WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic physics measurements

  1. Atomic physics precise measurements and ultracold matter

    CERN Document Server

    Inguscio, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atomic Physics provides an expert guide to two spectacular new landscapes in physics: precision measurements, which have been revolutionized by the advent of the optical frequency comb, and atomic physics, which has been revolutionized by laser cooling. These advances are not incremental but transformative: they have generated a consilience between atomic and many-body physics, precipitated an explosion of scientific and technological applications, opened new areas of research, and attracted a brilliant generation of younger scientists. The research is advancing so rapidly, the barrage of applications is so dazzling, that students can be bewildered. For both students and experienced scientists, this book provides an invaluable description of basic principles, experimental methods, and scientific applications.

  2. The impact of atomic precision measurements in high energy physics

    OpenAIRE

    Casalbuoni, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    In this talk I discuss the relevance of atomic physics in understanding some important questions about elementary particle physics. A particular attention is devoted to atomic parity violation measurements which seem to suggest new physics beyond the Standard Model. Atomic physics might also be relevant in discovering possible violations of the CPT symmetry.

  3. Ultracold atoms for precision measurement of fundamental physical quantities

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Cooling and trapping of neutral atoms has been one of the most active fields of research in physics in recent years. Several methods were demonstrated to reach temperatures as low as a few nanokelvin allowing, for example, the investigation of quantum degenerate gases. The ability to control the quantum degrees of freedom of atoms opens the way to applications for precision measurement of fundamental physical quantities. Experiments in progress, planned or being considered using new quantum devices based on ultracold atoms, namely atom interferometers and atomic clocks, will be discussed.

  4. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  5. Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  6. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  7. Influence of Halide Solutions on Collagen Networks: Measurements of Physical Properties by Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Birgit Spitzer-Sonnleitner; André Kempe; Maximilian Lackner

    2016-01-01

    The influence of aqueous halide solutions on collagen coatings was tested. The effects on resistance against indentation/penetration on adhesion forces were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the change of Young's modulus of the coating was derived. Comparative measurements over time were conducted with halide solutions of various concentrations. Physical properties of the mesh-like coating generally showed large variability. Starting with a compact set of physical properties, data...

  8. Modern atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of physics in the last 30-plus years has come from research on atoms, photons, and their interactions. Collecting information previously scattered throughout the literature, Modern Atomic Physics provides students with one unified guide to contemporary developments in the field. After reviewing metrology and preliminary material, the text explains core areas of atomic physics. Important topics discussed include the spontaneous emission of radiation, stimulated transitions and the properties of gas, the physics and applications of resonance fluorescence, coherence, cooling and trapping of charged and neutral particles, and atomic beam magnetic resonance experiments. Covering standards, a different way of looking at a photon, stimulated radiation, and frequency combs, the appendices avoid jargon and use historical notes and personal anecdotes to make the topics accessible to non-atomic physics students. Written by a leader in atomic and optical physics, this text gives a state-of-the...

  9. Physics of the atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wehr, Russell M; Adair, Thomas W

    1984-01-01

    The fourth edition of Physics of the Atom is designed to meet the modern need for a better understanding of the atomic age. It is an introduction suitable for students with a background in university physics and mathematical competence at the level of calculus. This book is designed to be an extension of the introductory university physics course into the realm of atomic physics. It should give students a proficiency in this field comparable to their proficiency in mechanics, heat, sound, light, and electricity.

  10. Influence of Halide Solutions on Collagen Networks: Measurements of Physical Properties by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Spitzer-Sonnleitner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of aqueous halide solutions on collagen coatings was tested. The effects on resistance against indentation/penetration on adhesion forces were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM and the change of Young’s modulus of the coating was derived. Comparative measurements over time were conducted with halide solutions of various concentrations. Physical properties of the mesh-like coating generally showed large variability. Starting with a compact set of physical properties, data disperse after minutes. A trend of increase in elasticity and permeability was found for all halide solutions. These changes were largest in NaI, displaying a logical trend with ion size. However a correlation with concentration was not measured. Adhesion properties were found to be independent of mechanical properties. The paper also presents practical experience for AFM measurements of soft tissue under liquids, particularly related to data evaluation. The weakening in physical strength found after exposure to halide solutions may be interpreted as widening of the network structure or change in the chemical properties in part of the collagen fibres (swelling. In order to design customized surface coatings at optimized conditions also for medical applications, halide solutions might be used as agents with little impact on the safety of patients.

  11. Influence of Halide Solutions on Collagen Networks: Measurements of Physical Properties by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer-Sonnleitner, Birgit; Kempe, André; Lackner, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    The influence of aqueous halide solutions on collagen coatings was tested. The effects on resistance against indentation/penetration on adhesion forces were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the change of Young's modulus of the coating was derived. Comparative measurements over time were conducted with halide solutions of various concentrations. Physical properties of the mesh-like coating generally showed large variability. Starting with a compact set of physical properties, data disperse after minutes. A trend of increase in elasticity and permeability was found for all halide solutions. These changes were largest in NaI, displaying a logical trend with ion size. However a correlation with concentration was not measured. Adhesion properties were found to be independent of mechanical properties. The paper also presents practical experience for AFM measurements of soft tissue under liquids, particularly related to data evaluation. The weakening in physical strength found after exposure to halide solutions may be interpreted as widening of the network structure or change in the chemical properties in part of the collagen fibres (swelling). In order to design customized surface coatings at optimized conditions also for medical applications, halide solutions might be used as agents with little impact on the safety of patients.

  12. Theoretical atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This expanded and updated well-established textbook contains an advanced presentation of quantum mechanics adapted to the requirements of modern atomic physics. It includes topics of current interest such as semiclassical theory, chaos, atom optics and Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic gases. In order to facilitate the consolidation of the material covered, various problems are included, together with complete solutions. The emphasis on theory enables the reader to appreciate the fundamental assumptions underlying standard theoretical constructs and to embark on independent research projects. The fourth edition of Theoretical Atomic Physics contains an updated treatment of the sections involving scattering theory and near-threshold phenomena manifest in the behaviour of cold atoms (and molecules). Special attention is given to the quantization of weakly bound states just below the continuum threshold and to low-energy scattering and quantum reflection just above. Particular emphasis is laid on the fundamen...

  13. Topics in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Charles E

    2006-01-01

    The study of atomic physics propelled us into the quantum age in the early twentieth century and carried us into the twenty-first century with a wealth of new and, in some cases, unexplained phenomena. Topics in Atomic Physics provides a foundation for students to begin research in modern atomic physics. It can also serve as a reference because it contains material that is not easily located in other sources. A distinguishing feature is the thorough exposition of the quantum mechanical hydrogen atom using both the traditional formulation and an alternative treatment not usually found in textbooks. The alternative treatment exploits the preeminent nature of the pure Coulomb potential and places the Lenz vector operator on an equal footing with other operators corresponding to classically conserved quantities. A number of difficult to find proofs and derivations are included as is development of operator formalism that permits facile solution of the Stark effect in hydrogen. Discussion of the classical hydrogen...

  14. Influence of Halide Solutions on Collagen Networks: Measurements of Physical Properties by Atomic Force Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer-Sonnleitner, Birgit; Kempe, André; Lackner, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

      The influence of aqueous halide solutions on collagen coatings was tested. The effects on resistance against indentation/penetration on adhesion forces were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM...

  15. Physics through the 1990s: Atomic, molecular and optical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The volume presents a program of research initiatives in atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The current state of atomic, molecular, and optical physics in the US is examined with respect to demographics, education patterns, applications, and the US economy. Recommendations are made for each field, with discussions of their histories and the relevance of the research to government agencies. The section on atomic physics includes atomic theory, structure, and dynamics; accelerator-based atomic physics; and large facilities. The section on molecular physics includes spectroscopy, scattering theory and experiment, and the dynamics of chemical reactions. The section on optical physics discusses lasers, laser spectroscopy, and quantum optics and coherence. A section elucidates interfaces between the three fields and astrophysics, condensed matter physics, surface science, plasma physics, atmospheric physics, and nuclear physics. Another section shows applications of the three fields in ultra-precise measurements, fusion, national security, materials, medicine, and other topics.

  16. Atoms, molecules and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hertel, Ingolf V

    2015-01-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginner...

  17. Exotic objects of atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletskii, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    There has been presented a short survey of physical properties, methods of production and exploration as well as directions of practical usage of the objects of atomic physics which are not yet described in detail in modern textbooks and manuals intended for students of technical universities. The family of these objects includes negative and multicharged ions, Rydberg atoms, excimer molecules, clusters. Besides of that, in recent decades this family was supplemented with new nanocarbon structures such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The textbook “Exotic objects of atomic physics” [1] edited recently contains some information on the above-listed objects of the atomic physics. This textbook can be considered as a supplement to classic courses of atomic physics teaching in technical universities.

  18. Atomic physics and reality

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    An account of the long standing debate between Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein regarding the validity of the quantum mechanical description of atomic phenomena.With physicts, John Wheeler (Texas), John Bell (CERN), David Rohm (London), Abner Shimony (Boston), Alain Aspect (Paris)

  19. Quantum Electronics for Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nagourney, Warren

    2010-01-01

    Quantum Electronics for Atomic Physics provides a course in quantum electronics for researchers in atomic physics. The book covers the usual topics, such as Gaussian beams, cavities, lasers, nonlinear optics and modulation techniques, but also includes a number of areas not usually found in a textbook on quantum electronics. It includes such practical matters as the enhancement of nonlinear processes in a build-up cavity, impedance matching into a cavity, laser frequencystabilization (including servomechanism theory), astigmatism in ring cavities, and atomic/molecular spectroscopic techniques

  20. Physics of atomic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    This advanced textbook presents an extensive and diverse study of low-energy nuclear physics considering the nucleus as a quantum system of strongly interacting constituents. The contents guide students from the basic facts and ideas to more modern topics including important developments over the last 20 years, resulting in a comprehensive collection of major modern-day nuclear models otherwise unavailable in the current literature. The book emphasizes the common features of the nucleus and other many-body mesoscopic systems currently in the center of interest in physics. The authors have also included full problem sets that can be selected by lecturers and adjusted to specific interests for more advanced students, with many chapters containing links to freely available computer code. As a result, readers are equipped for scientific work in mesoscopic physics.

  1. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  2. High-energy atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drukarev, Evgeny G

    2016-01-01

    This self-contained text introduces readers to the field of high-energy atomic physics - a new regime of photon-atom interactions in which the photon energies significantly exceed the atomic or molecular binding energies, and which opened up with the recent advent of new synchrotron sources. From a theoretical point of view, a small-parameter characteristic of the bound system emerged, making it possible to perform analytic perturbative calculations that can in turn serve as benchmarks for more powerful numerical computations. The first part of the book introduces readers to the foundations of this new regime and its theoretical treatment. In particular, the validity of the small-parameter perturbation expansion and of the lowest-order approximation is critically reviewed. The following chapters then apply these insights to various atomic processes, such as photoionization as a many-body problem, dominant mechanisms for the production of ions at higher energies, Compton scattering and ionization accompanied b...

  3. Robert Dicke and Atomic Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 4. Robert Dicke and Atomic Physics. Vasant Natarajan. General Article Volume 16 Issue 4 April 2011 pp 322-332. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/04/0322-0332. Keywords.

  4. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bederson, Benjamin

    1993-01-01

    Advances in Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics, established in 1965, continues its tradition of excellence with Volume 32, published in honor of Founding Editor Sir David Bates upon his retirement as editorof the series. This volume presents reviews of topics related to the applications of atomic and molecular physics to atmospheric physics and astrophysics.

  5. Atomic and Molecular Physics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    Atomic Quantum Memories in Nano-Scale Optical Circuits: Jeff Kimble, Oskar Painter (CalTech) • Demonstration of a nanofiber atom trap: A. Goban...et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 033603 (2012) • Cavity QED with atomic mirrors: D. Chang, et al, N. J. Phys. 14, 063003 (2012) • Fiber -coupled chip... PMMA -diamond hybrid cavities, coupling stable NV centers • Cavity Optomechanics with Cold Atoms: Dan Stamper-Kurn (UC Berkeley) • Squeezed light

  6. Relativistic atomic physics at the SSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses the following proposed work for relativistic atomic physics at the Superconducting Super Collider: Beam diagnostics; atomic physics research; staffing; education; budget information; statement concerning matching funds; description and justification of major items of equipment; statement of current and pending support; and assurance of compliance.

  7. Advances in atomic physics: Four decades of contribution of the Cairo University - Atomic Physics Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sherbini, Tharwat M

    2015-09-01

    In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University - Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s - when the author first engaged in research - an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics.

  8. New trends in atomic and molecular physics advanced technological applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The field of Atomic and Molecular Physics (AMP) has reached significant advances in high–precision experimental measurement techniques. The area covers a wide spectrum ranging from conventional to new emerging multi-disciplinary areas like physics of highly charged ions (HCI), molecular physics, optical science, ultrafast laser technology etc. This book includes the important topics of atomic structure, physics of atomic collision, photoexcitation, photoionization processes, Laser cooling and trapping, Bose Einstein condensation and advanced technology applications of AMP in the fields of astronomy , astrophysics , fusion, biology and nanotechnology. This book is useful for researchers, professors, graduate, post graduate and PhD students dealing with atomic and molecular physics. The book has a wide scope with applications in neighbouring fields like plasma physics, astrophysics, cold collisions, nanotechnology and future fusion energy sources like ITER (international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) To...

  9. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    1999-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered also include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics, and laser physics.

  10. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Paul R; Arimondo, Ennio

    2006-01-01

    Volume 54 of the Advances Series contains ten contributions, covering a diversity of subject areas in atomic, molecular and optical physics. The article by Regal and Jin reviews the properties of a Fermi degenerate gas of cold potassium atoms in the crossover regime between the Bose-Einstein condensation of molecules and the condensation of fermionic atom pairs. The transition between the two regions can be probed by varying an external magnetic field. Sherson, Julsgaard and Polzik explore the manner in which light and atoms can be entangled, with applications to quantum information processing

  11. Atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1986-01-01

    ... Survey Committee Board on Physics and Astronomy Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1986 i Copyrightthe cannot be not from book, paper however, version for formatting, original authoritative the typesetting-specific the as from created publication fi...

  12. The ALADDIN atomic physics database system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Russell A.

    1990-05-01

    ALADDIN is an atomic physics database system which has been developed in order to provide a broadly-based standard medium for the exchange and management of atomic data. ALADDIN consists of a data format definition together with supporting software for both interactive searches as well as for access to the data by plasma modeling and other codes. 8AB The ALADDIN system is designed to offer maximum flexibility in the choice of data representations and labeling schemes, so as to support a wide range of atomic physics data types and allow natural evolution and modification of the database as needs change. Associated dictionary files are included in the ALADDIN system for data documentation. The importance of supporting the widest possible user community was also central to be ALADDIN design, leading to the use of straightforward text files with concatentated data entries for the file structure, and the adoption of strict FORTRAN 77 code for the supporting software. This will allow ready access to the ALADDIN system on the widest range of scientific computers, and easy interfacing with FORTRAN modeling codes, user developed atomic physics codes and database, etc. This supporting software consists of the ALADDIN interactive searching and data display code, together with the ALPACK subroutine package which provides ALADDIN datafile searching and data retrieval capabilities to user's codes. ALADDIN has been adopted as the standard international atomic physics data exchange format for magnetic confinement fusion applications by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Entry of critically evaluated atomic data sets into ALADDIN format is to be coordinated by the IAEA atomic and Molecular Data Unit, which will also coordinate long-term development and distribution of updated software and documentation. The increasingly widespread adoption of the ALADDIN data format can be expected to greatly facilitate access to atomic data both within and outside of this original

  13. Advances in atomic physics an overview

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude

    2011-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive overview of the spectacular advances seen in atomic physics during the last 50 years. The authors explain how such progress was possible by highlighting connections between developments that occurred at different times. They discuss the new perspectives and the new research fields that look promising. The emphasis is placed, not on detailed calculations, but rather on physical ideas. Combining both theoretical and experimental considerations, the book will be of interest to a wide range of students, teachers and researchers in quantum and atomic physics.

  14. Plasmas applied atomic collision physics, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, C F

    1984-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 2: Plasmas covers topics on magnetically confined plasmas. The book starts by providing the history of fusion research and describing the various approaches in both magnetically and inertially confined plasmas. The text then gives a general discussion of the basic concepts and properties in confinement and heating of a plasma. The theory of atomic collisions that result in excited quantum states, particularly highly ionized impurity atoms; and diverse diagnostic topics such as emission spectra, laser scattering, electron cyclotron emission, particle bea

  15. Benchmarking Attosecond Physics with Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-25

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 12 Mar 12 – 11 Mar 15 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Benchmarking attosecond physics with atomic hydrogen 5a...AND SUBTITLE Benchmarking attosecond physics with atomic hydrogen 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-12-1-4025 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Final Report for AOARD Grant FA2386-12-1-4025 “ Benchmarking

  16. Precision measurements with atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Schlippert, Dennis; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.

    2017-04-01

    Interferometry with matter waves enables precise measurements of rotations, accelerations, and differential accelerations [1-5]. This is exploited for determining fundamental constants [2], in fundamental science as e.g. testing the universality of free fall [3], and is applied for gravimetry [4], and gravity gradiometry [2,5]. At the Institut für Quantenoptik in Hannover, different approaches are pursued. A large scale device is designed and currently being set up to investigate the gain in precision for gravimetry, gradiometry, and fundamental tests on large baselines [6]. For field applications, a compact and transportable device is being developed. Its key feature is an atom chip source providing a collimated high flux of atoms which is expected to mitigate systematic uncertainties [7,8]. The atom chip technology and miniaturization benefits from microgravity experiments in the drop tower in Bremen and sounding rocket experiments [8,9] which act as pathfinders for space borne operation [10]. This contribution will report about our recent results. The presented work is supported by the CRC 1227 DQ-mat, the CRC 1128 geo-Q, the RTG 1729, the QUEST-LFS, and by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under Grant No. DLR 50WM1552-1557. [1] P. Berg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 114, 063002, 2015; I. Dutta et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 116, 183003, 2016. [2] J. B. Fixler et al., Science 315, 74 (2007); G. Rosi et al., Nature 510, 518, 2014. [3] D. Schlippert et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 112, 203002, 2014. [4] A. Peters et al., Nature 400, 849, 1999; A. Louchet-Chauvet et al., New J. Phys. 13, 065026, 2011; C. Freier et al., J. of Phys.: Conf. Series 723, 012050, 2016. [5] J. M. McGuirk et al., Phys. Rev. A 65, 033608, 2002; P. Asenbaum et al., arXiv:1610.03832. [6] J. Hartwig et al., New J. Phys. 17, 035011, 2015. [7] H. Ahlers et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 173601

  17. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  18. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    2000-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered also include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics, and laser physics. Articles are written by distinguished experts who are active in their research fields. The articles contain both relevant review material and detailed descriptions of important recent developments.

  19. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    1998-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered also include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics, and laser physics. Articles are written by distinguished experts who are active in their research fields. The articles contain both relevant review material as well as detailed descriptions of important recent developments.

  20. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    2001-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered also include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics, and laser physics. Articles are written by distinguished experts who are active in their research fields. The articles contain both relevant review material and detailed descriptions of important recent developments.

  1. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    2002-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics and laser physics. Articles are written by distinguished experts who are active in their research fields. The articles contain both relevant review material and detailed descriptions of important recent developments.

  2. Atomic, molecular, and optical physics charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning, F B

    1995-01-01

    With this volume, Methods of Experimental Physics becomes Experimental Methods in the Physical Sciences, a name change which reflects the evolution of todays science. This volume is the first of three which will provide a comprehensive treatment of the key experimental methods of atomic, molecular, and optical physics; the three volumes as a set will form an excellent experimental handbook for the field. The wide availability of tunable lasers in the pastseveral years has revolutionized the field and lead to the introduction of many new experimental methods that are covered in these volumes. Traditional methods are also included to ensure that the volumes will be a complete reference source for the field.

  3. Applied atomic and collision physics special topics

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, H S W; Bederson, Benjamin

    1982-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 5: Special Topics deals with topics on applications of atomic collisions that were not covered in the first four volumes of the treatise. The book opens with a chapter on ultrasensitive chemical detectors. This is followed by separate chapters on lighting, magnetohydrodynamic electrical power generation, gas breakdown and high voltage insulating gases, thermionic energy converters, and charged particle detectors. Subsequent chapters deal with the operation of multiwire drift and proportional chambers and streamer chambers and their use in high energy p

  4. Atoms, Molecules and Photons An Introduction to Atomic-, Molecular- and Quantum Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This introduction to Atomic and Molecular Physics explains how our present model of atoms and molecules has been developed over the last two centuries both by many experimental discoveries and, from the theoretical side, by the introduction of quantum physics to the adequate description of micro-particles. It illustrates the wave model of particles by many examples and shows the limits of classical description. The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with atoms and molecules and its potential for spectroscopy is outlined in more detail and in particular lasers as modern spectroscopic tools are discussed more thoroughly. Many examples and problems with solutions are offered to encourage readers to actively engage in applying and adapting the fundamental physics presented in this textbook to specific situations. Completely revised new edition with new sections covering all actual developments, like x-ray optics, ion-cyclotron-resonance spectrometer, attosecond lasers, ultraprecission frequency measurement ...

  5. Atomic Physics 15: Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Atomic Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Linden van den Heuvell, H. B.; Walraven, J. T. M.; Reynolds, M. W.

    1997-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Generation of a "Schrödinger cat" of radiation and observation of its decoherence * Synthesis of entangled states and quantum computing * Entangled states of atomic ions for quantum metrology and computation * Entanglement and indistinguishability: Coherence experiments with photon pairs and triplets * Atom optics as a testing ground for quantum chaos * Coherent ultra-bright XUV lasers and harmonics * Hollow atoms * Interdisciplinary experiments with polarized noble gases * The creation and study of Bose-Einstein condensation in a cold alkali vapor * oscopic quantum phenomena in trapped Bose-condensed gases * Doppler-free spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen * QED and the ground state of helium * Towards coherent atomic samples using laser cooling * Bose-Einstein condensation of a weakly-interacting gas * Zeeman and his contemporaries: Dutch physics around 1900 * Zeeman's great discovery * The Zeeman effect: A tool for atom manipulation * The Zeeman effect a century later: New insights into classical physics * QED effects in few-electron high-Z systems * Lamb shift experiments on high-Z one- and two-electron systems * Fundamental constants of nature * Response of atoms in photonic lattices * Hydrogen-like systems and quantum electrodynamics * New experiments with atomic lattices bound by light * Bloch oscillations of atoms in an optical potential * Quantum decoherence and inertial sensing with atom interferometers * Quantum effects in He clusters * Atoms in super-intense radiation fields * Wave packet dynamics of excited atomic electrons in intense laser fields * Nonlinear laser-electron scattering * Comparing the antiproton and proton and progress toward cold antihydrogen * Author Index

  6. Handbook explaining the fundamentals of nuclear and atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlen, D. F.; Morse, W. J.

    1969-01-01

    Indoctrination document presents nuclear, reactor, and atomic physics in an easy, straightforward manner. The entire subject of nuclear physics including atomic structure ionization, isotopes, radioactivity, and reactor dynamics is discussed.

  7. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  8. Atomic, molecular, and optical physics electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning, F B; Lucatorto, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Combined with Volumes 29A and 29B, this volume is a comprehensive treatment of the key experimental methods of atomic, molecular, and optical physics, as well as an excellent experimental handbook for the field. Thewide availability of tunable lasers in the past several years has revolutionized the field and lead to the introduction of many new experimental methods that are covered in these volumes. Traditional methods are also included to ensure that the volumes will be a complete reference source for the field.

  9. Atomic and nuclear physics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Littlefield, T A

    1979-01-01

    After the death of Dr. Littlefield it was decided that I should undertake the revision ofthe whole of Atomic and Nuclear Physics: an Introduction for the third edition, and it was soon apparent that major changes were necessary. I am confident that these changes would have had Dr. Littlefield's approval. The prime consideration for the present edition has been to modernize at a minimum cost. As much as possible of the second edition has therefore been retained, but where changes have been made they have been fairly drastic. Thus the chapters on fine structure, wave mechanics, the vector model of the atom, Pauli's principle and the Zeeman effect have been completely restructured. The chapters on nuclear models, cosmic rays, fusion systems and fundamental particles have been brought up to date while a new chapter on charm and the latest ideas on quarks has been included. It is hoped that the presentation of the last named will give readers a feeling that physics research can be full of adventure and surprises.

  10. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Measuring ... About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File ...

  11. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity ... Windows Media Player, 4:48 More videos Here are some ways to understand and measure the intensity ...

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  14. Atomic physics checks of parity violation

    CERN Document Server

    Barkov, L M

    1979-01-01

    The results of the new run of measurements of the parity violation in atomic bismuth on /sup 4/S/sub 3/2/-/sup 2/D/sub 5/2/ MI-transition at lambda =648 nm are presented. The value R=Im(EI/MI) measured on F=6- F'=7 and F=6-F'=6 hyperfine structure components is found to be (-20.6+or-3.2).10/sup -8/. The average value for all the measurements (R)=(-20.2+or-2.7).10/sup -8/ is in agreement with the theoretical prediction obtained in the framework of the standard gauge model with sin/sup 2/ theta =0.25. (21 refs).

  15. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  16. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J Q; Nori, Franco

    2011-06-29

    Superconducting circuits based on Josephson junctions exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence and can behave like artificial atoms. Recent technological advances have made it possible to implement atomic-physics and quantum-optics experiments on a chip using these artificial atoms. This Review presents a brief overview of the progress achieved so far in this rapidly advancing field. We not only discuss phenomena analogous to those in atomic physics and quantum optics with natural atoms, but also highlight those not occurring in natural atoms. In addition, we summarize several prospective directions in this emerging interdisciplinary field.

  17. Two-terminal transport measurements with cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinner, Sebastian; Esslinger, Tilman; Brantut, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-01

    In recent years, the ability of cold atom experiments to explore condensed-matter-related questions has dramatically progressed. Transport experiments, in particular, have expanded to the point in which conductance and other transport coefficients can now be measured in a way that is directly analogous to solid-state physics, extending cold-atom-based quantum simulations into the domain of quantum electronic devices. In this topical review, we describe the transport experiments performed with cold gases in the two-terminal configuration, with an emphasis on the specific features of cold atomic gases compared to solid-state physics. We present the experimental techniques and the main experimental findings, focusing on—but not restricted to—the recent experiments performed by our group. We finally discuss the perspectives opened up by this approach, the main technical and conceptual challenges for future developments, and potential applications in quantum simulation for transport phenomena and mesoscopic physics problems.

  18. The quantum beat the physical principles of atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Major, F G

    1998-01-01

    One of the indicators of the level of technological development of a society has been, throughout history, the precision of clocks it was able to build. This book examines the physical principles underlying the workings of clocks--from the earliest mechanical clocks to the present-day sophisticated clocks based on the properties of individual atoms. Intended for non-specialists with some knowledge of physics or engineering,the book treats the material in a broad intuitive manner, with a minimum of mathematical formalism. The presentation covers a broad range of salient topics relevant to the measurement of frequency and time intervals. The main focus is on electronic time-keeping: clocks based on quartz crystal oscillators and, at greater length, atomic clocks based on quantum resonance in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen atoms, and, more recently, mercury ions. The book treats the revolutionary changes that the optical laser has wrought on atomic standards through laser cooling and optical pumping, and it disc...

  19. Project Physics Text 5, Models of the Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Basic atomic theories are presented in this fifth unit of the Project Physics text for use by senior high students. Chemical basis of atomic models in the early years of the 18th Century is discussed n connection with Dalton's theory, atomic properties, and periodic tables. The discovery of electrons is described by using cathode rays, Millikan's…

  20. Unparticle physics constraints from the hydrogen atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wondrak, Michael Florian; Nicolini, Piero; Bleicher, Marcus [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Unparticle stuff has been proposed as an extension of the Standard Model of particle physics by including scale invariant fields. In the framework of effective field theory, it describes the low-energy limit of a so-called Banks-Zaks sector which exhibits scale invariance below an energy scale Λ{sub U}. Unparticle fields are characterized by a non-integer canonical scaling dimension d{sub U}, which leads to unusual properties like resembling a fractional number of (un)particles. The existence of unparticle stuff may be detected experimentally through the interaction with conventional matter. After a review on the unparticle theory and the static potential due to virtual unparticle exchange, we focus on its impact on hydrogen atom energy levels. We obtain the energy shift of the ground state by using Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory and compare it with experimental data. In this way, bounds on the energy scale Λ{sub U} as a function of d{sub U} are derived. Finally, we offer a comparison with existing constraints in literature like the lepton magnetic anomaly. For some parameter regimes, the hydrogen bound provides competitive results.

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    Full Text Available ... activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test is a simple way to measure relative intensity. In general, if you're ...

  3. A Laser Stabilization System for Rydberg Atom Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-06

    A Laser Stabilization System for Rydberg Atom Physics We purchased 2 dual wavelength ultrastable ultralow expansion glass cavities along with optics...term locking could be achieved for 2 photon Rydberg atom excitation. Both systems were offset locked using a high bandwidth resonant electro-optic...Rydberg Atom Physics Report Title We purchased 2 dual wavelength ultrastable ultralow expansion glass cavities along with optics and electronics to

  4. Atomic Layer Thermopile Materials: Physics and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. X. Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New types of thermoelectric materials characterized by highly anisotropic Fermi surfaces and thus anisotropic Seebeck coefficients are reviewed. Early studies revealed that there is an induced voltage in high TC oxide superconductors when the surface of the films is exposed to short light pulses. Subsequent investigations proved that the effect is due to anisotropic components of the Seebeck tensor, and the type of materials is referred to atomic layer thermopile (ALT. Our recent studies indicate that multilayer thin films at the nanoscale demonstrate enhanced ALT properties. This is in agreement with the prediction in seeking the larger figure of merit (ZT thermoelectric materials in nanostructures. The study of ALT materials provides both deep insight of anisotropic transport property of these materials and at the same time potential materials for applications, such as light detector and microcooler. By measuring the ALT properties under various perturbations, it is found that the information on anisotropic transport properties can be provided. The information sometimes is not easily obtained by other tools due to the nanoscale phase coexistence in these materials. Also, some remained open questions and future development in this research direction have been well discussed.

  5. The quantum measurement effect of interaction without interaction for an atomic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Yi

    When an atomic beam collectively and harmonically vibrates perpendicular to the wave vector of the beam, the number of atoms reaching the atomic detector will have a vibrant factor Δt / T if the measurement time interval Δt is shorter than the period T. This new quantum mechanical measurement effect for an atomic beam is called interaction without interaction: though the translational motion of the atomic beam does not interact with its collective and transverse harmonic vibration, the latter will have an effect on the measured number of atoms associated with the former. From the new measurement effect the classical harmonic vibration's period is evaluated. We give a clear physical picture and a satisfactory physical interpretation for the measurement effect based on the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. We present an experimental proposal to verify this measurement effect for an ion beam instead of an atomic beam.

  6. Atomic physics: Cold gases venture into Flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Keith

    2007-09-01

    Vortex structures have revealed a lot about the nature of three-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates. They play an even bigger part in two-dimensional cold atomic gases and drive a fundamentally different phase transition.

  7. Quantum physics: Atomic envoy enables molecular control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Wes

    2017-05-01

    A technique for manipulating molecules uses an intermediary atom to query a nearby molecule's energy state and produces 'quantum superpositions' of these states, a prerequisite for extremely high-precision spectroscopy. See Letter p.203

  8. The infancy of atomic physics Hercules in his cradle

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Alex

    1983-01-01

    Atomic physics is a mighty Hercules that dominates modern civilization, promising immense reserves of power but threatening catastrophic war and radioactive pollution. The story of the atom's discovery and the development of techniques to harness its energy offers fascinating insights into the forces behind twenty-first-century technology. This compelling history portrays the human faces and lives behind the beginnings of atomic science.The Infancy of Atomic Physics ranges from experiments in the 1880s by William Crookes and others to the era just after the First World War, when Rutherford's f

  9. Atoms and molecules interacting with light atomic physics for the laser era

    CERN Document Server

    Straten, Peter van der

    2016-01-01

    This in-depth textbook with a focus on atom-light interactions prepares students for research in a fast-growing and dynamic field. Intended to accompany the laser-induced revolution in atomic physics, it is a comprehensive text for the emerging era in atomic, molecular and optical science. Utilising an intuitive and physical approach, the text describes two-level atom transitions, including appendices on Ramsey spectroscopy, adiabatic rapid passage and entanglement. With a unique focus on optical interactions, the authors present multi-level atomic transitions with dipole selection rules, and M1/E2 and multiphoton transitions. Conventional structure topics are discussed in some detail, beginning with the hydrogen atom and these are interspersed with material rarely found in textbooks such as intuitive descriptions of quantum defects. The final chapters examine modern applications and include many references to current research literature. The numerous exercises and multiple appendices throughout enable advanc...

  10. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  11. Division of Atomic Physics. Lund Institute of Technology. Progress Report 1993-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlstroem, C.G. [ed.

    1995-12-31

    The Division of Atomic Physics is responsible for basic physics teaching in all engineering disciplines and for specialized teaching in Optics, Atomic Physics, Spectroscopy, Laser Physics, and Non-Linear Optics. Research activities are mainly carried out in the fields of basic and applied spectroscopy, largely based on the use of lasers. Projects in the following areas are reported: Basic Atomic Physics - Atomic physics with high power laser radiation; Laser spectroscopic investigations of atomic and ionic excited states in the short-wavelength region; Laser spectroscopy in the visible; Theoretical Atomic Physics; Applied Optics and Quantum Electronics -High resolution spectroscopy; Photon echoes in Rare Earth Ion Doped Crystals; diode laser Spectroscopy; Environmental Remote Sensing -Tropospheric Ozone Lidar; Measurement of gases of geophysical origin; Industrial and Urban Pollution Measurements; Laser induced fluorescence of vegetation and water; Applications in Medicine and Biology - Tissue diagnostic using Laser-induced fluorescence; Photodynamic Therapy; Measurement of Optical Properties of Tissue with applications to Diagnostics; Two Photon Excited fluorescence Microscopy; Capillary Electrophoresis; New Techniques; Industrial Applications - Optical spectroscopy in Metallurgy; Physics of Electric Breakdown in Dielectric liquids; Optical Spectroscopy of Paper.

  12. Essen and the National Physical Laboratory's atomic clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Dale

    2005-06-01

    To commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the development of the first atomic frequency standard, we present some notes about the work of Louis Essen at the National Physical Laboratory. In addition, we publish below some personal recollections of Essen on his work, which have previously been available only on the Internet (http://www.btinternet.com/~time.lord/TheAtomicClock.htm).

  13. Project Physics Tests 5, Models of the Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Test items relating to Project Physics Unit 5 are presented in this booklet. Included are 70 multiple-choice and 23 problem-and-essay questions. Concepts of atomic model are examined on aspects of relativistic corrections, electron emission, photoelectric effects, Compton effect, quantum theories, electrolysis experiments, atomic number and mass,…

  14. NASA GSFC Science Symposium on Atomic and Molecular Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anand K. (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    This document is the proceedings of a conference on atomic and molecular physics in honor of the retirements of Dr. Aaron Temkin and Dr. Richard Drachman. The conference contained discussions on electron, positron, atomic, and positronium physics, as well as a discussion on muon catalyzed fusion. This proceedings document also contains photographs taken at the symposium, as well as speeches and a short biography made in tribute to the retirees.

  15. Research in Dense Plasma Atomic Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-19

    a strongly coupled neon plasma.3 However, ion correlations were neglected in these approaches. A self - consistent set of Schrodinger - Poisson ...attention on * the solution to the time-independent Schrodinger equation with a self - consistent charge density. For calculations of atomic properties the...a system of equations that must be solved self - consistently . The electrostatic potential is given by the Poisson equation, V(r) - Z 2 ford e r (2

  16. Springer Handbook of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Gordon W. F.

    This Springer Handbook of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics comprises a comprehensive reference source that unifies the entire fields of atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics, assembling the principal ideas, techniques and results of the field from atomic spectroscopy to applications in comets. Its 92 chapters are written by over 100 authors, all leaders in their respective disciplines. Carefully edited to ensure uniform coverage and style, with extensive cross references, and acting as a guide to the primary research literature, it is both a source of information and an inspiration for graduate students and other researchers new to the field.

  17. Condensed matter applied atomic collision physics, v.4

    CERN Document Server

    Datz, Sheldon

    1983-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 4: Condensed Matter deals with the fundamental knowledge of collision processes in condensed media.The book focuses on the range of applications of atomic collisions in condensed matter, extending from effects on biological systems to the characterization and modification of solids. This volume begins with the description of some aspects of the physics involved in the production of ion beams. The radiation effects in biological and chemical systems, ion scattering and atomic diffraction, x-ray fluorescence analysis, and photoelectron and Auger spectrosc

  18. Towards improved measurements of parity violation in atomic ytterbium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antypas, D.; Fabricant, A.; Bougas, L.; Tsigutkin, K.; Budker, D.

    2017-11-01

    We report on progress towards performing precision measurements of parity violation in Yb, in which the theoretical prediction for a strong weak-interaction-induced effect in the 6s2 1S0→ 5d6s3D1 optical transition at 408 nm has already been confirmed, with a measurement of the effect at the ≈10 % level of accuracy. With a new atomic-beam apparatus offering enhanced sensitivity, we are aiming at precisely determining the parity violation observable in Yb, which will allow us to probe the distributions of neutrons in different isotopes, investigate physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as to study intra-nucleus weak interactions, through an observation of the anapole moment of Yb nuclei with nonzero spin. We present the experimental principle employed to probe atomic parity violation, describe our new apparatus, and discuss the attained experimental sensitivity as well as the methods for characterizing systematics in these measurements.

  19. Non-destructive state measurement of individual neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Michael; Shih, Chung-Yu; Hamley, Chris; Chapman, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Non-destructive state detection of individual neutral atoms is essential for scalable neutral atom quantum information processing. We have demonstrated non-destructive fluorescent state detection of individual neutral atom qubits trapped in an optical lattice. The hyperfine state of the atom is measured with 95% accuracy and the atom loss rate of 1%. State detection is performed on individual atoms over 100 times before being lost from the trap, representing a significant increase in the data collection rates. Using this technique, we have observed microwave Rabi oscillations with measurements done on one-and-the-same atom.

  20. Atoms in Flight: The Remarkable Connections between Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-16

    Atomic physics and hadron physics are both based on Yang Mills gauge theory; in fact, quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics provide important insight into the theory of hadrons in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of light-front relativistic equations of motion which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The renormalization scale for the running coupling, which is unambiguously set in QED, leads to a method for setting the renormalization scale in QCD. The production of atoms in flight provides a method for computing the formation of hadrons at the amplitude level. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, and light-front quantization have equal utility for atomic physics, especially in the relativistic domain. I also present a new perspective for understanding the contributions to the cosmological constant from QED and QCD.

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  2. Estimation of atomic interaction parameters by quantum measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Alexander Holm; Mølmer, Klaus

    Quantum systems, ranging from atomic systems to field modes and mechanical devices are useful precision probes for a variety of physical properties and phenomena. Measurements by which we extract information about the evolution of single quantum systems yield random results and cause a back actio...... strategies, we address the Fisher information and the Cramér-Rao sensitivity bound. We investigate monitoring by photon counting, homodyne detection and frequent projective measurements respectively, and exemplify by Rabi frequency estimation in a driven two-level system....

  3. Difference-frequency combs in cold atom physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kliese, Russell; Puppe, Thomas; Rohde, Felix; Sell, Alexander; Zach, Armin; Leisching, Patrick; Kaenders, Wilhelm; Keegan, Niamh C; Bounds, Alistair D; Bridge, Elizabeth M; Leonard, Jack; Adams, Charles S; Cornish, Simon L; Jones, Matthew P A

    2016-01-01

    Optical frequency combs provide the clockwork to relate optical frequencies to radio frequencies. Hence, combs allow to measure optical frequencies with respect to a radio frequency where the accuracy is limited only by the reference signal. In order to provide a stable link between the radio and optical frequencies, the two parameters of the frequency comb must be fixed: the carrier envelope offset frequency $f_{\\rm ceo}$ and the pulse repetition-rate $f_{\\rm rep}$. We have developed the first optical frequency comb based on difference frequency generation (DFG) that eliminates $f_{\\rm ceo}$ by design - specifically tailored for applications in cold atom physics. An $f_{\\rm ceo}$-free spectrum at 1550 nm is generated from a super continuum spanning more than an optical octave. Established amplification and frequency conversion techniques based on reliable telecom fiber technology allow generation of multiple wavelength outputs. In this paper we discuss the frequency comb design, characterization, and optical...

  4. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bederson, Benjamin

    1997-01-01

    Praise for the Series""This volume maintains the authoritative standards of the series...The editors and publishers are to be congratulated.""--M.S. Child in Physics Bulletin""Maintains the high standards of earlier volumes in the series...All the articles are written by experts in the field, and their summaries are most timely...Strongly recommended.""--G. Herzberg in American Scientist

  5. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bederson, Benjamin

    1995-01-01

    Praise for Previous Volumes"This volume maintains the authoritative standards of the series...The editors and publishers are to be congratulated"- M.S. CHILD in PHYSICS BULLETIN"Maintains the high standards of earlier volumes in the series...All the series are written by experts in the field, and their summaries are most timely...Strongly recommended."- G. HERZBERG in AMERICAN SCIENTIST

  6. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  7. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  8. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 67 Data & Statistics Facts About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact ...

  9. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... 67 Data & Statistics Facts About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact ...

  10. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  11. Springer handbook of atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cassar, Mark M

    2006-01-01

    This Springer Handbook of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics comprises a comprehensive reference source that unifies the entire fields of atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics, assembling the principal ideas, techniques and results of the field from atomic spectroscopy to applications in comets. Its 92 chapters are written by over 100 authors, all leaders in their respective disciplines. Carefully edited to ensure uniform coverage and style, with extensive cross references, and acting as a guide to the primary research literature, it is both a source of information and an inspiration for graduate students and other researchers new to the field. Relevant diagrams, graphs, and tables of data are provided throughout the text. Substantially updated and expanded since the 1996 edition and published in conjunction with the 2005 World Year of Physics (commemorating Einstein’s 1905 "miracle year"), it contains several entirely new chapters covering current areas of great research interest, such as Bose �...

  12. The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-26

    Atomic physics and hadronic physics are both governed by the Yang Mills gauge theory Lagrangian; in fact, Abelian quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics can provide important insight into hadronic eigenstates in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of frame-independent light-front relativistic equations of motion consistent with light-front holography which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The production of antihydrogen in flight can provide important insight into the dynamics of hadron production in QCD at the amplitude level. The renormalization scale for the running coupling is unambiguously set in QED; an analogous procedure sets the renormalization scales in QCD, leading to scheme-independent scale-fixed predictions. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, the quark-interchange process and light-front quantization have important applicants for atomic physics and photon science, especially in the relativistic domain.

  13. Optically pumped semiconductor lasers for atomic and molecular physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, S.; Leibfried, D.; Wilson, A. C.; Wineland, D. J.

    2015-03-01

    Experiments in atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) physics rely on lasers at many different wavelengths and with varying requirements on spectral linewidth, power and intensity stability. Optically pumped semiconductor lasers (OPSLs), when combined with nonlinear frequency conversion, can potentially replace many of the laser systems currently in use. We are developing a source for laser cooling and spectroscopy of Mg+ ions at 280 nm, based on a frequency quadrupled OPSL with the gain chip fabricated at the ORC at Tampere Univ. of Technology, Finland. This OPSL system could serve as a prototype for many other sources used in atomic and molecular physics.

  14. Gas lasers applied atomic collision physics, v.3

    CERN Document Server

    McDaniel, E W

    1982-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 3: Gas Lasers describes the applications of atomic collision physics in the development of many types of gas lasers. Topics covered range from negative ion formation in gas lasers to high-pressure ion kinetics and relaxation of molecules exchanging vibrational energy. Ion-ion recombination in high-pressure plasmas is also discussed, along with electron-ion recombination in gas lasers and collision processes in chemical lasers.Comprised of 14 chapters, this volume begins with a historical summary of gas laser developments and an overview of the basic ope

  15. Application of atomic force microscopy measurements on cardiovascular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin; Sun, Zhe; Meininger, Gerald A; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2012-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a state-of-the-art tool that can analyze and characterize samples on a scale from angstroms to 100 μm by physical interaction between AFM cantilever tip and sample surface. AFM imaging has been used incrementally over last decade in living cells in cardiovascular research. Beyond its high resolution 3D imaging, AFM allows the quantitative assessments on the structure and function of the underlying cytoskeleton and cell organelles, binding probability, adhesion forces, and micromechanical properties of the cell by "sensing" the cell surface with mechanical sharp cantilever tip. AFM measurements have enhanced our understanding of cell mechanics in normal physiological and pathological states.

  16. Do atoms and anti-atoms obey the same laws of physics?

    CERN Multimedia

    Jeffrey Hangst

    2010-01-01

    ALPHA physicists have recently succeeded in trapping anti-atoms for the first time. Being able to hold on to the simplest atoms of antimatter is an important step towards the collaboration’s ultimate goal: precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen. The question they are seeking to answer: do atoms and anti-atoms obey the same laws of physics? The Standard Model says that they must.   The ALPHA Collaboration celebrates the successful results. The ALPHA collaboration has taken it up a gear and trapped 38 atoms of antihydrogen for the first time. Antihydrogen atoms have been mass-produced at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) since 2002, when ATHENA (ALPHA’s predecessor) and ATRAP learned how to mix clouds of antiprotons and positrons at cryogenic temperatures. However, these anti-atoms were not confined, and flew off in a few microseconds to meet their fate: annihilation with matter in the walls of the experiment. ALPHA uses antiprotons produced at...

  17. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  6. The physics of laser polarized muonic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, G. D.

    This past research period we carried out a successful experiment at LAMPF in collaboration with Syracuse University in which we used lasers to produce polarized muonic He-3. Samples of nuclear polarized He-3 were produced by spin-exchange with optically pumped rubidium vapor. Unpolarized muons were stopped in the gas, and became polarized due to their hyperfine interaction with the He-3 nucleus. We determined that a muon polarization of approximately 8 percent results with a He-3 target polarization of 100 percent. The high statistical accuracy of our result gives us a firm handle on a theoretical question of great importance to future work involving muons and polarized He-3. Currently, we are working toward a new experiment at LAMPF, for which we have just submitted a proposal requesting running time this coming summer. The experiment utilizes a new technique for producing polarized muonic He-3, a technique we believe has the potential for producing practical polarizations that in principle could be as high as 75 percent, and in practice may exceed 25 to 50 percent. We call this new technique direct spin-exchange (DSE) because it is based on spin-exchange collisions between neutral muonic helium and an optically pumped vapor of Rb. It is direct because, in contrast to the technique we used last summer, the He-3 nucleus is not involved in the spin-exchange process. We have proposed the use of DSE to study the induced pseudoscalar form factor of He-3. Finally, we describe an experiment to measure the spin dependent structure function of the neutron at SLAC. Princeton played an important role in the design and proposal of this experiment, including hosting a meeting to explore the technical feasibility of the polarized He-3 target.

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    Full Text Available ... What's this? Submit Button Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs ...

  8. Atomic physics with highly charged ions. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, P.

    1994-08-01

    The study of inelastic collision phenomena with highly charged projectile ions and the interpretation of spectral features resulting from these collisions remain as the major focal points in the atomic physics research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas. The title of the research project, ``Atomic Physics with Highly Charged Ions,`` speaks to these points. The experimental work in the past few years has divided into collisions at high velocity using the primary beams from the tandem and LINAC accelerators and collisions at low velocity using the CRYEBIS facility. Theoretical calculations have been performed to accurately describe inelastic scattering processes of the one-electron and many-electron type, and to accurately predict atomic transition energies and intensities for x rays and Auger electrons. Brief research summaries are given for the following: (1) electron production in ion-atom collisions; (2) role of electron-electron interactions in two-electron processes; (3) multi-electron processes; (4) collisions with excited, aligned, Rydberg targets; (5) ion-ion collisions; (6) ion-molecule collisions; (7) ion-atom collision theory; and (8) ion-surface interactions.

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  10. Measuring children's physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneller, Mikkel Bo; Bentsen, Peter; Nielsen, Glen

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Accelerometer-based physical activity monitoring has become the method of choice in many large-scale physical activity (PA) studies. However, there is an ongoing debate regarding the placement of the device, the determination of device wear time, and how to solve a lack of participant...

  11. Understanding Solar Coronal Heating through Atomic and Plasma Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Daniel Wolf; Arthanayaka, Thusitha; Bose, Sayak; Hahn, Michael; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Gekelman, Walter; Vincena, Steve

    2017-08-01

    Recent solar observations suggest that the Sun's corona is heated by Alfven waves that dissipate at unexpectedly low heights in the corona. These observations raise a number of questions. Among them are the problems of accurately quantifying the energy flux of the waves and that of describing the physical mechanism that leads to the wave damping. We are performing laboratory experiments to address both of these issues.The energy flux depends on the electron density, which can be measured spectroscopically. However, spectroscopic density diagnostics have large uncertainties, because they depend sensitively on atomic collisional excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transition rates for multiple atomic levels. Essentially all of these data come from theory and have not been experimentally validated. We are conducting laboratory experiments using the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that will provide accurate empirical calibrations for spectroscopic density diagnostics and which will also help to guide theoretical calculations.The observed rapid wave dissipation is likely due to inhomogeneities in the plasma that drive flows and currents at small length scales where energy can be more efficiently dissipated. This may take place through gradients in the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, which causes wave reflection and generates turbulence. Alternatively, gradients in the Alfvén speed across the field can lead to dissipation through phase-mixing. Using the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California Los Angeles, we are studying both of these dissipation mechanisms in the laboratory in order to understand their potential roles in coronal heating.

  12. Einstein's physics atoms, quanta, and relativity : derived, explained, and appraised

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Ta-Pei

    2013-01-01

    Many regard Albert Einstein as the greatest physicist since Newton. What exactly did he do that is so important in physics? We provide an introduction to his physics at a level accessible to an undergraduate physics student. All equations are worked out in detail from the beginning. Einstein's doctoral thesis and his Brownian motion paper were decisive contributions to our understanding of matter as composed of molecules and atoms. Einstein was one of the founding fathers of quantum theory: his photon proposal through the investigation of blackbody radiation, his quantum theory of photoelectri

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  15. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  7. Analysis of polarizability measurements made with atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gregoire, Maxwell D; Trubko, Raisa; Cronin, Alexander D

    2016-01-01

    We present revised measurements of the static electric dipole polarizabilities of K, Rb, and Cs based on atom interferometer experiments presented in [Phys. Rev. A 2015, 92, 052513] but now re-analyzed with new calibrations for the magnitude and geometry of the applied electric field gradient. The resulting polarizability values did not change, but the uncertainties were significantly reduced. Then we interpret several measurements of alkali metal atomic polarizabilities in terms of atomic oscillator strengths $f_{ik}$, Einstein coefficients $A_{ik}$, state lifetimes $\\tau_{k}$, transition dipole matrix elements $D_{ik}$, line strengths $S_{ik}$, and van der Waals $C_6$ coefficients. Finally, we combine atom interferometer measurements of polarizabilities with independent measurements of lifetimes and $C_6$ values in order to quantify the residual contribution to polarizability due to all atomic transitions other than the principal $ns$-$np_J$ transitions for alkali metal atoms.

  8. Towards improved measurements of parity violation in atomic ytterbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antypas, D., E-mail: dantypas@uni-mainz.de [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Fabricant, A.; Bougas, L. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany); Tsigutkin, K. [ASML (Netherlands); Budker, D. [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We report on progress towards performing precision measurements of parity violation in Yb, in which the theoretical prediction for a strong weak-interaction-induced effect in the 6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}→ 5d6s{sup 3}D{sub 1} optical transition at 408 nm has already been confirmed, with a measurement of the effect at the ≈10 % level of accuracy. With a new atomic-beam apparatus offering enhanced sensitivity, we are aiming at precisely determining the parity violation observable in Yb, which will allow us to probe the distributions of neutrons in different isotopes, investigate physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as to study intra-nucleus weak interactions, through an observation of the anapole moment of Yb nuclei with nonzero spin. We present the experimental principle employed to probe atomic parity violation, describe our new apparatus, and discuss the attained experimental sensitivity as well as the methods for characterizing systematics in these measurements.

  9. Physics measurements and health education

    OpenAIRE

    HAJDUCH, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The thesis "Physical measurements and health education" looks at physical quantities that are related to human health and can be measured in a elementary school environment. It focuses especially on the cross-curricular relationship between physics and health education and also on the use of relevant online measurement systems. As part of this thesis, we suggest a number of activities that exploit this relationship.

  10. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... CDC’s Example StairWELL Stairwell Appearance Motivational Signs Installing Music Other Ideas to Consider Tracking Stair Usage Project ... intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test ...

  11. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... 67 Data & Statistics Facts About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults ... Needs Assessment Evaluating Success CDC’s Example StairWELL Stairwell Appearance Motivational Signs Installing Music Other Ideas to Consider ...

  12. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... CDC’s Example StairWELL Stairwell Appearance Motivational Signs Installing Music Other Ideas to Consider Tracking Stair Usage Project ... an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate ...

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test is a simple ...

  14. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... of Perceived Exertion Scale) Videos Glossary of Terms Personal Stories Harold, Age 7 Maria, Age 16 Alex, Age 32 Demetrise, Age 42 Susan, Age 45 David, Age 65 Harold, Age 67 Data & Statistics Facts About Physical Activity Data, Trends and ...

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  16. Problems with Accurate Atomic Lfetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabert, E

    2009-02-19

    A number of recent atomic lifetime measurements on multiply charged ions have reported uncertainties lower than 1%. Such a level of accuracy challenges theory, which is a good thing. However, a few lessons learned from earlier precision lifetime measurements on atoms and singly charged ions suggest to remain cautious about the systematic errors of experimental techniques.

  17. Physical replicas and the Bose glass in cold atomic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, S; Kantian, A; Daley, A J; Zoller, P [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Katzgraber, H G [Theoretische Physik, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Lewenstein, M [ICAO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Parc Mediterrani de la Tecnologia, E-08860 Castelldefels, Barcelona (Spain); Buechler, H P [Institute for Theoretical Physics III, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)], E-mail: sarah.morrison@uibk.ac.at

    2008-07-15

    We study cold atomic gases in a disorder potential and analyse the correlations between different systems subjected to the same disorder landscape. Such independent copies with the same disorder landscape are known as replicas. While, in general, these are not accessible experimentally in condensed matter systems, they can be realized using standard tools for controlling cold atomic gases in an optical lattice. Of special interest is the overlap function which represents a natural order parameter for disordered systems and is a correlation function between the atoms of two independent replicas with the same disorder. We demonstrate an efficient measurement scheme for the determination of this disorder-induced correlation function. As an application, we focus on the disordered Bose-Hubbard model and determine the overlap function within the perturbation theory and a numerical analysis. We find that the measurement of the overlap function allows for the identification of the Bose-glass phase in certain parameter regimes.

  18. Measuring Children's Physical Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneller, Mikkel Bo; Bentsen, Peter; Nielsen, Glen

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Accelerometer-based physical activity monitoring has become the method of choice in many large-scale physical activity (PA) studies. However, there is an ongoing debate regarding the placement of the device, the determination of device wear time, and how to solve a lack of participant...... compliance. The aim of this study was to assess the compliance of Axivity AX3 accelerometers taped directly to the skin of 9-13-year-old children. METHODS: Children in 46 school classes (53.4% girls, age 11.0±1.0 years, BMI 17.7±2.8 kg*m) across Denmark wore two Axivity AX3 accelerometers, one taped...

  19. Theoretical femtosecond physics atoms and molecules in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of atoms and molecules interacting with pulsed or continuous wave lasers up to atomic field strengths on the order of 10^16 W/cm² are leading to an understanding of many challenging experimental discoveries. This book deals with the basics of femtosecond physics and goes up to the latest applications of new phenomena. The book presents an introduction to laser physics with mode-locking and pulsed laser operation. The solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is discussed both analytically and numerically. The basis for the non-perturbative treatment of laser-matter interaction in the book is the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The light field is treated classically, and different possible gauges are discussed. Physical phenonema, ranging from Rabi-oscillations in two-level systems to the ionization of atoms, the generation of high harmonics, the ionization and dissociation of molecules as well as the control of chemical reactions are pre...

  20. The quantum measurement effect of interaction without interaction for an atomic beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yi Huang

    Full Text Available When an atomic beam collectively and harmonically vibrates perpendicular to the wave vector of the beam, the number of atoms reaching the atomic detector will have a vibrant factor Δt/T if the measurement time interval Δt is shorter than the period T. This new quantum mechanical measurement effect for an atomic beam is called interaction without interaction: though the translational motion of the atomic beam does not interact with its collective and transverse harmonic vibration, the latter will have an effect on the measured number of atoms associated with the former. From the new measurement effect the classical harmonic vibration’s period is evaluated. We give a clear physical picture and a satisfactory physical interpretation for the measurement effect based on the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. We present an experimental proposal to verify this measurement effect for an ion beam instead of an atomic beam. Keywords: The quantum measurement effect of interaction without interaction, The Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  2. European scientists produce - and measure - atoms of antihydrogen

    CERN Multimedia

    Koppel, N

    2002-01-01

    "Scientists working on an experiment called ATRAP at the European Particle Physics Laboratory, or CERN, said Tuesday that they were able to register the creation of antihydrogen atoms at the moment when they were destroyed again. The results are to be published in the journal Physical Review Letters" (1 page).

  3. Prospects for Precise Measurements with Echo Atom Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Brynle; Carew, Adam; Beica, Hermina; Vorozcovs, Andrejs; Pouliot, Alexander; Kumarakrishnan, A.

    2016-06-01

    Echo atom interferometers have emerged as interesting alternatives to Raman interferometers for the realization of precise measurements of the gravitational acceleration $g$ and the determination of the atomic fine structure through measurements of the atomic recoil frequency $\\omega_q$. Here we review the development of different configurations of echo interferometers that are best suited to achieve these goals. We describe experiments that utilize near-resonant excitation of laser-cooled rubidium atoms by a sequence of standing wave pulses to measure $\\omega_q$ with a statistical uncertainty of 37 parts per billion (ppb) on a time scale of $\\sim 50$ ms and $g$ with a statistical precision of 75 ppb. Related coherent transient techniques that have achieved the most statistically precise measurements of atomic g-factor ratios are also outlined. We discuss the reduction of prominent systematic effects in these experiments using off-resonant excitation by low-cost, high-power lasers.

  4. Prospects for Precise Measurements with Echo Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brynle Barrett

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Echo atom interferometers have emerged as interesting alternatives to Raman interferometers for the realization of precise measurements of the gravitational acceleration g and the determination of the atomic fine structure through measurements of the atomic recoil frequency ω q . Here we review the development of different configurations of echo interferometers that are best suited to achieve these goals. We describe experiments that utilize near-resonant excitation of laser-cooled rubidium atoms by a sequence of standing wave pulses to measure ω q with a statistical uncertainty of 37 parts per billion (ppb on a time scale of ∼50 ms and g with a statistical precision of 75 ppb. Related coherent transient techniques that have achieved the most statistically precise measurements of atomic g-factor ratios are also outlined. We discuss the reduction of prominent systematic effects in these experiments using off-resonant excitation by low-cost, high-power lasers.

  5. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  8. Atomic Parity Violation and Related Physics in Ytterbium

    OpenAIRE

    Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri Robert

    2012-01-01

    Atomic parity violation has been observed in the 408 nm 1S0--3D1 forbidden transition of ytterbium. The parity violating amplitude is 8.7(1.4)e-10 ea0, two orders of magnitude larger than in cesium, where the most precise experiments to date have been performed. This is in accordance with theoretical predictions and constitutes the largest atomic parity violating amplitude yet observed. This also opens the way to future measurements of neutron skins and anapole moments by comparing parity-vio...

  9. Essay: Fifty years of atomic, molecular and optical physics in Physical Review Letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroche, Serge

    2008-10-17

    The fiftieth anniversary of Physical Review Letters is a good opportunity to review the extraordinary progress of atomic, molecular, and optical physics reported in this journal during the past half-century. As both a witness and an actor of this story, I recall personal experiences and reflect about the past, present, and possible future of my field of research.

  10. Measurements of electrostatic double layer potentials with atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamberardino, Jason

    The aim of this thesis is to provide a thorough description of the development of theory and experiment pertaining to the electrostatic double layer (EDL) in aqueous electrolytic systems. The EDL is an important physical element of many systems and its behavior has been of interest to scientists for many decades. Because many areas of science and engineering move to test, build, and understand systems at smaller and smaller scales, this work focuses on nanoscopic experimental investigations of the EDL. In that vein, atomic force microscopy (AFM) will be introduced and discussed as a tool for making high spatial resolution measurements of the solid-liquid interface, culminating in a description of the development of a method for completely characterizing the EDL. This thesis first explores, in a semi-historical fashion, the development of the various models and theories that are used to describe the electrostatic double layer. Later, various experimental techniques and ideas are addressed as ways to make measurements of interesting characteristics of the EDL. Finally, a newly developed approach to measuring the EDL system with AFM is introduced. This approach relies on both implementation of existing theoretical models with slight modifications as well as a unique experimental measurement scheme. The model proposed clears up previous ambiguities in definitions of various parameters pertaining to measurements of the EDL and also can be used to fully characterize the system in a way not yet demonstrated.

  11. Attosecond science in atomic, molecular, and condensed matter physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Stephen R; Neumark, Daniel M

    2016-12-16

    Attosecond science represents a new frontier in atomic, molecular, and condensed matter physics, enabling one to probe the exceedingly fast dynamics associated with purely electronic dynamics in a wide range of systems. This paper presents a brief discussion of the technology required to generate attosecond light pulses and gives representative examples of attosecond science carried out in several laboratories. Attosecond transient absorption, a very powerful method in attosecond science, is then reviewed and several examples of gas phase and condensed phase experiments that have been carried out in the Leone/Neumark laboratories are described.

  12. Roadmap of ultrafast x-ray atomic and molecular physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Linda; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Gühr, Markus; Bucksbaum, Philip H.; Simon, Marc; Mukamel, Shaul; Rohringer, Nina; Prince, Kevin C.; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Meyer, Michael; Rudenko, Artem; Rolles, Daniel; Bostedt, Christoph; Fuchs, Matthias; Reis, David A.; Santra, Robin; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François; Vrakking, Marc; Isinger, Marcus; Kroon, David; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; L’Huillier, Anne; Wörner, Hans Jakob; Leone, Stephen R.

    2018-02-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) and table-top sources of x-rays based upon high harmonic generation (HHG) have revolutionized the field of ultrafast x-ray atomic and molecular physics, largely due to an explosive growth in capabilities in the past decade. XFELs now provide unprecedented intensity (1020 W cm‑2) of x-rays at wavelengths down to ∼1 Ångstrom, and HHG provides unprecedented time resolution (∼50 attoseconds) and a correspondingly large coherent bandwidth at longer wavelengths. For context, timescales can be referenced to the Bohr orbital period in hydrogen atom of 150 attoseconds and the hydrogen-molecule vibrational period of 8 femtoseconds; wavelength scales can be referenced to the chemically significant carbon K-edge at a photon energy of ∼280 eV (44 Ångstroms) and the bond length in methane of ∼1 Ångstrom. With these modern x-ray sources one now has the ability to focus on individual atoms, even when embedded in a complex molecule, and view electronic and nuclear motion on their intrinsic scales (attoseconds and Ångstroms). These sources have enabled coherent diffractive imaging, where one can image non-crystalline objects in three dimensions on ultrafast timescales, potentially with atomic resolution. The unprecedented intensity available with XFELs has opened new fields of multiphoton and nonlinear x-ray physics where behavior of matter under extreme conditions can be explored. The unprecedented time resolution and pulse synchronization provided by HHG sources has kindled fundamental investigations of time delays in photoionization, charge migration in molecules, and dynamics near conical intersections that are foundational to AMO physics and chemistry. This roadmap coincides with the year when three new XFEL facilities, operating at Ångstrom wavelengths, opened for users (European XFEL, Swiss-FEL and PAL-FEL in Korea) almost doubling the present worldwide number of XFELs, and documents the remarkable progress in HHG capabilities

  13. Atomic Physics at Accelerators Laser Spectroscopy and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Letokhov, V

    2003-01-01

    From 19 to 24 September, 1999, the First European Conference Atomic physics at Accelerators: Laser Spectroscopy and Applications (APAC'99) was held at University of Mainz and Schloss Waldhausen (Budenheim, Germany) under the chairmanship of H. Backe and G. Huber. The idea of this up-to-date conference was associated with the 65th anniversary of Professor Ernst Otten (University of Mainz) who, together with H. Kluge, contributed much to the development of this work at CERN, University of Mainz, and Darmstadt. (17 refs).

  14. Inertial rotation measurement with atomic spins: From angular momentum conservation to quantum phase theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Yuan, H.; Tang, Z.; Quan, W.; Fang, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Rotation measurement in an inertial frame is an important technology for modern advanced navigation systems and fundamental physics research. Inertial rotation measurement with atomic spin has demonstrated potential in both high-precision applications and small-volume low-cost devices. After rapid development in the last few decades, atomic spin gyroscopes are considered a promising competitor to current conventional gyroscopes—from rate-grade to strategic-grade applications. Although it has been more than a century since the discovery of the relationship between atomic spin and mechanical rotation by Einstein [Naturwissenschaften, 3(19) (1915)], research on the coupling between spin and rotation is still a focus point. The semi-classical Larmor precession model is usually adopted to describe atomic spin gyroscope measurement principles. More recently, the geometric phase theory has provided a different view of the rotation measurement mechanism via atomic spin. The theory has been used to describe a gyroscope based on the nuclear spin ensembles in diamond. A comprehensive understanding of inertial rotation measurement principles based on atomic spin would be helpful for future applications. This work reviews different atomic spin gyroscopes and their rotation measurement principles with a historical overlook. In addition, the spin-rotation coupling mechanism in the context of the quantum phase theory is presented. The geometric phase is assumed to be the origin of the measurable rotation signal from atomic spins. In conclusion, with a complete understanding of inertial rotation measurements using atomic spin and advances in techniques, wide application of high-performance atomic spin gyroscopes is expected in the near future.

  15. Interaction of intense laser pulses with atomic clusters: Measurements of ion emission, simulations and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisch, J.W.G. E-mail: john.tisch@ic.ac.uk; Hay, N.; Mendham, K.J.; Springate, E.; Symes, D.R.; Comley, A.J.; Mason, M.B.; Gumbrell, E.T.; Ditmire, T.; Smith, R.A.; Marangos, J.P.; Hutchinson, M.H.R

    2003-05-01

    This review paper provides a general introduction to the interaction of intense (>10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}), femtosecond laser pulses with atomic clusters in the size range 500-10{sup 5} atoms. A nanoplasma model of the laser-cluster interaction is used to elucidate the underlying physics. Measurements of ion emission from the laser-cluster interaction are presented together with numerical simulations. Emerging applications are described.

  16. Optical Thin Film Thickness Measurement for the Single Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Courtney; Frisbie, Dustin; Singh, Jaideep; Spinlab Team

    2017-09-01

    The Single Atom Microscope Project proposes an efficient, selective, and sensitive method to measure the 1022Ne+24 He ->1225 Mg + n reaction. This rare nuclear reaction is a source of neutrons for heavy element development through the slow neutron capture process. This method embeds Magnesium atoms in a solid neon film. The Magnesium atoms exhibit a shifted fluorescence spectrum allowing for the detection of individual fluorescence photons against the excitation light background. Currently, Ytterbium is used in place of Magnesium-25 because it has been more thoroughly studied than Magnesium and we expect it to have a brighter signal. To identify the signal emitted from the Ytterbium atoms, we need to quantify the amount of signal and background per atom in the neon film. We need to know the film thickness to find the number of atoms in the film to determine the amount of light emitted per atom. In preparation for the neon film measurement, I constructed an experiment to advance the understanding of what is required to optically measure a thin film by using a cover glass slide in place of the thin film. This preliminary experiment has determined a measurement method for finding the thickness of a neon thin film on a sapphire substrate. This work is supported by Michigan State University, U.S. National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1654610, and U.S. NSF REU.

  17. Simultaneous current-, force- and work function measurement with atomic resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Herz, Markus; Schiller, Christian H.; Giessibl, Franz J.; Mannhart, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    The local work function of a surface determines the spatial decay of the charge density at the Fermi level normal to the surface. Here, we present a method that enables simultaneous measurements of local work function and tip-sample forces. A combined dynamic scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope is used to measure the tunneling current between an oscillating tip and the sample in real time as a function of the cantilever's deflection. Atomically resolved work function mea...

  18. Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics Workshop Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Jr., Lloyd [University of Southern California

    1997-09-21

    This document contains the final reports from the five panels that comprised a Workshop held to explore future directions, scientific impacts and technological connections of research in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics. This workshop was sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division and was held at the Westfields International Conference Center in Chantilly, Virginia on September 21-24, 1997. The workshop was chaired by Lloyd Armstrong, Jr., University of Southern California and the five panels focused on the following topics: Panel A: Interactions of Atoms and Molecules with Photons - Low Field Daniel Kleppner (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), chair Panel B: Interactions of Atoms and Molecules with Photons - High Field Phil Bucksbaum (University of Michigan), chair Panel C: Surface Interactions with Photons, Electrons, Ions, Atoms and Molecules J. Wayne Rabalais (University of Houston), chair Panel D: Theory of Structure and Dynamics Chris Greene (University of Colorado), chair Panel E: Nano- and Mesocopic Structures Paul Alivisatos (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory), chair The choice of focus areas reflects areas of significant interest to DOE/BES but is clearly not intended to span all fields encompassed by the designation of atomic, molecular and optical physics, nor even all areas that would be considered for review and funding under DOE’s AMOP program. In a similar vein, not all research that might be suggested under these topics in this report would be appropriate for consideration by DOE’s AMOP program. The workshop format included overview presentations from each of the panel chairs, followed by an intensive series of panel discussion sessions held over a two-day period. The panels were comprised of scientists from the U. S. and abroad, many of whom are not supported by DOE’s AMOP Program. This workshop was held in lieu of the customary “Contractors Meeting” held annually for

  19. Davisson-Germer Prize in Atomic or Surface Physics Lecture: Exploring Flatland with Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalibard, Jean

    2012-06-01

    A two-dimensional Bose fluid is a remarkably rich many-body system, which allows one to revisit several features of quantum statistical physics. Firstly, the role of thermal fluctuations is enhanced compared to the 3D case, which destroys the ordered state associated with Bose-Einstein condensation. However interactions between particles can still cause a superfluid transition, thanks to the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless mechanism. Secondly, a weakly interacting Bose fluid in 2D must be scale-invariant, a remarkable feature that manifests itself in the very simple form taken by the equation of state of the fluid. In this talk I will present recent experimental progress in the investigation of 2D atomic gases, which provide a nice illustration of the main features of low dimensional many-body physics.

  20. Measurement of the inherent strength of carbon atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailovskij, I. M.; Sadanov, E. V.; Kotrechko, S.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Mazilova, T. I.

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsic strength of freestanding carbon atomic chains was measured by in situ high-field mechanical testing of carbon atomic chains carried out inside a field-ion microscope. The determined breaking field strength corresponds to a tensile strength of carbon atomic chains at 5 K equal to 245 GPa. Carbon atomic chains also show exceptionally high-evaporation stability in electric fields up to 259 V/nm. The tensile strength of linear carbon chains significantly exceeds the tensile strength of known two-dimensional and three-dimensional carbon materials, including carbon nanotubes and graphene. Our results can be considered as direct experimental evidence for Pauling's prediction of bond stiffening with reduced atomic bond order.

  1. Particle physics brick by brick atomic and subatomic physics explained... in LEGO

    CERN Document Server

    Still, Ben

    2017-01-01

    Using LEGO (R) blocks to create a uniquely visual and clear depiction of the way our universe is put together. This is the perfect introduction to the enigmatic and fascinating world of Quantum Physics.Our story starts with the Big Bang, and along the way, the constructs and interactions within and among atoms and sub-atomic particles, and the forces that play upon them, are clearly explained, with each LEGO (R) block representing a different atomic or sub-atomic particle. The different colours and size denote what that particle is and its relationship with the other 'building blocks'.Each chapter is presented in digestible chunks, using toy building blocks to illustrate the ideas and experiments that have led to some of the biggest discoveries of the past 150 years.Soon you'll be able to construct every element in the Universe using a box of LEGO (R) and this book!

  2. Lifetime measurement of excited atomic and ionic states of some ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. High-frequency deflection (HFD) technique with a delayed coincidence single photon counting arrangement is an efficient technique for radiative lifetime measurement. An apparatus for measurement of the radiative lifetime of atoms and molecules has been developed in our laboratory and measurements have ...

  3. Lifetime measurement of excited atomic and ionic states of some ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-frequency deflection (HFD) technique with a delayed coincidence single photon counting arrangement is an efficient technique for radiative lifetime measurement. An apparatus for measurement of the radiative lifetime of atoms and molecules has been developed in our laboratory and measurements have been ...

  4. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan Wagner; Robert Moon; Jon Pratt; Gordon Shaw; Arvind Raman

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale...

  5. Atomic physics studies of highly charged ions on tokamaks using x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.

    1989-07-01

    An overview is given of atomic physics issues which have been studied on tokamaks with the help resolution x-ray spectroscopy. The issues include the testing of model calculations predicting the excitation of line radiation, the determination of rate coefficients, and accurate atomic structure measurements. Recent research has focussed primarily on highly charged heliumlike (22 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 28) and neonlike (34 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 63) ions, and results are presented from measurements on the PLT and TFTR tokamaks. Many of the measurements have been aided by improved instrumental design and new measuring techniques. Remarkable agreement has been found between measurements and theory in most cases. However, in this review those areas are stressed where agreement is worst and where further investigations are needed. 19 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Measurement of frequency sweep nonlinearity using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningfang; Lu, Xiangxiang; Xu, Xiaobin; Pan, Xiong; Li, Wei; Hu, Di; Liu, Jixun

    2018-01-01

    A novel scheme to determine frequency sweep nonlinearity using atomic saturated absorption spectroscopy is proposed and demonstrated. The frequency modulation rate is determined by directly measuring the interference fringe number and the frequency gap between two atomic transition peaks of rubidium atom. An experimental setup is established, and test results show that the frequency sweep nonlinearity is ∼10%, with an average frequency modulation rate of ∼1.12 THz/s. Moreover, the absolute optical frequency and optical path difference between two laser beams are simultaneously determined with this method. This low-cost technique can be used for optical frequency sweep nonlinearity correction and real-time frequency monitor.

  7. Construction and characterization of external cavity diode lasers for atomic physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Kyle S; Bennetts, Shayne; Debs, John E; Kuhn, Carlos C N; McDonald, Gordon D; Robins, Nick

    2014-04-24

    Since their development in the late 1980s, cheap, reliable external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) have replaced complex and expensive traditional dye and Titanium Sapphire lasers as the workhorse laser of atomic physics labs. Their versatility and prolific use throughout atomic physics in applications such as absorption spectroscopy and laser cooling makes it imperative for incoming students to gain a firm practical understanding of these lasers. This publication builds upon the seminal work by Wieman, updating components, and providing a video tutorial. The setup, frequency locking and performance characterization of an ECDL will be described. Discussion of component selection and proper mounting of both diodes and gratings, the factors affecting mode selection within the cavity, proper alignment for optimal external feedback, optics setup for coarse and fine frequency sensitive measurements, a brief overview of laser locking techniques, and laser linewidth measurements are included.

  8. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Abdallah, J., Jr.; Clark, R. E. H.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Cunningham, R. T.; Hakel, P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-07-01

    The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suite can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.

  9. Spectroscopic measurement of the softness of ultracold atomic collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coslovsky, Jonathan; Afek, Gadi; Mil, Alexander; Almog, Ido; Davidson, Nir

    2017-09-01

    The softness of elastic atomic collisions, defined as the average number of collisions each atom undergoes until its energy decorrelates significantly, can have a considerable effect on the decay dynamics of atomic coherence. In this paper we combine two spectroscopic methods to measure these dynamics and obtain the collisional softness of ultracold atoms in an optical trap: Ramsey spectroscopy to measure the energy decorrelation rate and echo spectroscopy to measure the collision rate. We obtain a value of 2.5(3) for the collisional softness, in good agreement with previously reported numerical molecular-dynamics simulations. This fundamental quantity is used to determine the s -wave scattering lengths of different atoms but has not been directly measured. We further show that the decay dynamics of the revival amplitudes in the echo experiment has a transition in its functional decay. The transition time is related to the softness of the collisions and provides yet another way to approximate it. These conclusions are supported by Monte Carlo simulations of the full echo dynamics. The methods presented here can allow measurement of a generalized softness parameter for other two-level quantum systems with discrete spectral fluctuations.

  10. Optical Measurements of Strong Radio-Frequency Fields Using Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stephanie Anne

    There has recently been an initiative toward establishing atomic measurement standards for field quantities, including radio-frequency, millimeter-wave, and micro-wave electric fields. Current measurement standards are obtained using dipole antennas, which are fundamentally limited in frequency bandwidth (set by the physical size of the antenna) and accuracy (due to the metal perturbing the field during the measurement). Establishing an atomic standard rectifies these problems. My thesis work contributes to an ongoing effort towards establishing the viability of using Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) to perform atom-based measurements of radio-frequency (RF) fields over a wide range of frequencies and field strengths, focusing on strong-field measurements. Rydberg atoms are atoms with an electron excited to a high principal quantum number, resulting in a high sensitivity to an applied field. A model based on Floquet theory is implemented to accurately describe the observed atomic energy level shifts from which information about the field is extracted. Additionally, the effects due to the different electric field domains within the measurement volume are accurately modeled. Absolute atomic measurements of fields up to 296 V/m within a +/-0.35% relative uncertainty are demonstrated. This is the strongest field measured at the time of data publication. Moreover, the uncertainty is over an order of magnitude better than that of current standards. A vacuum chamber setup that I implemented during my graduate studies is presented and its unique components are detailed. In this chamber, cold-atom samples are generated and Rydberg atoms are optically excited within the ground-state sample. The Rydberg ion detection and imaging procedure are discussed, particularly the high magnification that the system provides. By analyzing the position of the ions, the spatial correlation g(2) (r) of Rydberg-atom distributions can be extracted. Aside from ion

  11. Top quark physics: Future measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, R. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Physics; Vejcik, S. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Berger, E.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-04

    The authors discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top`s large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. They emphasize measurements of the top quark`s mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  12. Measurement noise 100 times lower than the quantum-projection limit using entangled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosten, Onur; Engelsen, Nils J.; Krishnakumar, Rajiv; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum metrology uses quantum entanglement—correlations in the properties of microscopic systems—to improve the statistical precision of physical measurements. When measuring a signal, such as the phase shift of a light beam or an atomic state, a prominent limitation to achievable precision arises from the noise associated with the counting of uncorrelated probe particles. This noise, commonly referred to as shot noise or projection noise, gives rise to the standard quantum limit (SQL) to phase resolution. However, it can be mitigated down to the fundamental Heisenberg limit by entangling the probe particles. Despite considerable experimental progress in a variety of physical systems, a question that persists is whether these methods can achieve performance levels that compare favourably with optimized conventional (non-entangled) systems. Here we demonstrate an approach that achieves unprecedented levels of metrological improvement using half a million 87Rb atoms in their ‘clock’ states. The ensemble is 20.1 ± 0.3 decibels (100-fold) spin-squeezed via an optical-cavity-based measurement. We directly resolve small microwave-induced rotations 18.5 ± 0.3 decibels (70-fold) beyond the SQL. The single-shot phase resolution of 147 microradians achieved by the apparatus is better than that achieved by the best engineered cold atom sensors despite lower atom numbers. We infer entanglement of more than 680 ± 35 particles in the atomic ensemble. Applications include atomic clocks, inertial sensors, and fundamental physics experiments such as tests of general relativity or searches for electron electric dipole moment. To this end, we demonstrate an atomic clock measurement with a quantum enhancement of 10.5 ± 0.3 decibels (11-fold), limited by the phase noise of our microwave source.

  13. Physics of Polarized Scattering at Multi-level Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    2015-03-01

    The symmetric peak observed in linear polarization in the core of the solar sodium D1 line at 5896 Å has remained enigmatic since its discovery nearly two decades ago. One reason is that the theory of polarized scattering has not been experimentally tested for multi-level atomic systems in the relevant parameter domains, although the theory is continually being used for the interpretation of astrophysical observations. A laboratory experiment that was set up a decade ago to find out whether the D1 enigma is a problem of solar physics or quantum physics revealed that the D1 system has a rich polarization structure in situations where standard scattering theory predicts zero polarization, even when optical pumping of the m state populations of the hyperfine-split ground state is accounted for. Here we show that the laboratory results can be modeled in great quantitative detail if the theory is extended to include the coherences in both the initial and final states of the scattering process. Radiative couplings between the allowed dipole transitions generate coherences in the initial state. Corresponding coherences in the final state are then demanded by a phase closure selection rule. The experimental results for the well understood D2 line are used to constrain the two free parameters of the experiment, collision rate and optical depth, to suppress the need for free parameters when fitting the D1 results.

  14. Atomic force microscopy probing in the measurement of cell mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Kirmizis, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    Dimitrios Kirmizis, Stergios LogothetidisDepartment of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, GreeceAbstract: Atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used incrementally over the last decade in cell biology. Beyond its usefulness in high resolution imaging, AFM also has unique capabilities for probing the viscoelastic properties of living cells in culture and, even more, mapping the spatial distribution of cell mechanical properties...

  15. Les Houches Summer School of Theoretical Physics : Session 72, Coherent Atomic Matter Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Westbrook, C; David, F; Coherent Atomic Matter Waves

    2001-01-01

    Progress in atomic physics has been so vigorous during the past decade that one is hard pressed to follow all the new developments. In the early 1990s the first atom interferometers opened a new field in which we have been able to use the wave nature of atoms to probe fundamental quantum me chanics questions as well as to make precision measurements. Coming fast on the heels of this development was the demonstration of Bose Einstein condensation in dilute atomic vapors which intensified research interest in studying the wave nature of matter, especially in a domain in which "macro scopic" quantum effects (vortices, stimulated scattering of atomic beams) are visible. At the same time there has been much progress in our understanding of the behavior of waves (notably electromagnetic) in complex media, both periodic and disordered. An obvious topic of speculation and probably of future research is whether any new insight or applications will develop if one examines the behavior of de Broglie waves in ana...

  16. Correlating Atom Probe Crystallographic Measurements with Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Andrew J; Babinsky, Katharina; Day, Alec C; Eder, K; Oakman, Connor J; Trimby, Patrick W; Primig, Sophie; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2017-04-01

    Correlative microscopy approaches offer synergistic solutions to many research problems. One such combination, that has been studied in limited detail, is the use of atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) on the same tip specimen. By combining these two powerful microscopy techniques, the microstructure of important engineering alloys can be studied in greater detail. For the first time, the accuracy of crystallographic measurements made using APT will be independently verified using TKD. Experimental data from two atom probe tips, one a nanocrystalline Al-0.5Ag alloy specimen collected on a straight flight-path atom probe and the other a high purity Mo specimen collected on a reflectron-fitted instrument, will be compared. We find that the average minimum misorientation angle, calculated from calibrated atom probe reconstructions with two different pole combinations, deviate 0.7° and 1.4°, respectively, from the TKD results. The type of atom probe and experimental conditions appear to have some impact on this accuracy and the reconstruction and measurement procedures are likely to contribute further to degradation in angular resolution. The challenges and implications of this correlative approach will also be discussed.

  17. Measuring Forces between Oxide Surfaces Using the Atomic Force Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Høj, Jakob Weiland

    1996-01-01

    The interactions between colloidal particles play a major role in processing of ceramics, especially in casting processes. With the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) it is possible to measure the inter-action force between a small oxide particle (a few micron) and a surface as function of surface...

  18. Lyapunov convexity type theorems for non-atomic vector measures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    atomic, and σ-additive X-valued measure has a convex closure. We give a survey of Lyapunov convexity type theorems pertaining to this problem. We also give a necessary and sufficient condition that will insure the convexity of the closure of the ...

  19. Measurement of "optical" transition probabilities in the silver atom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, J.; Smit, J.A.

    1958-01-01

    For 22 spectral lines of the silver atom the probability of spontaneous transition has been derived from measurements of the emission intensity of the line and the population of the corresponding upper level. The medium of excitation was the column of a vertical arc discharge in air of atmospheric

  20. Experimental measurement of effective atomic number of composite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we report a new method to determine the effective atomic number, eff, of composite materials for Compton effect in the γ -ray region 280–1115 keV based on the theoretically obtained Klein–Nishina scattering cross-sections in the angular range 50°–100° as well as a method to experimentally measure ...

  1. Top Quark Physics: Future Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaros, John A

    2003-05-09

    We discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top's large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. We emphasize measurements of the top quark's mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  2. Top quark physics: Future Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, Raymond; Gerdes, David; Jaros, John; Vejcik, Steve; Berger, Edmond L.; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Cuypers, Frank; Drell, Persis S.; Fero, Michael; Hadley, Nicholas; Han, Tao; Heinson, Ann P.; Knuteson, Bruce; Larios, Francisco; Miettinen, Hannu; Orr, Lynne H.; Peskin, Michael E.; Rizzo, Thomas; Sarid, Uri; Schmidt, Carl; Stelzer, Tim; Sullivan, Zack

    1996-12-31

    We discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top's large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. We emphasize measurements of the top quark's mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  3. Measurement theory in local quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Kazuya, E-mail: okamura@math.cm.is.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Ozawa, Masanao, E-mail: ozawa@is.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we aim to establish foundations of measurement theory in local quantum physics. For this purpose, we discuss a representation theory of completely positive (CP) instruments on arbitrary von Neumann algebras. We introduce a condition called the normal extension property (NEP) and establish a one-to-one correspondence between CP instruments with the NEP and statistical equivalence classes of measuring processes. We show that every CP instrument on an atomic von Neumann algebra has the NEP, extending the well-known result for type I factors. Moreover, we show that every CP instrument on an injective von Neumann algebra is approximated by CP instruments with the NEP. The concept of posterior states is also discussed to show that the NEP is equivalent to the existence of a strongly measurable family of posterior states for every normal state. Two examples of CP instruments without the NEP are obtained from this result. It is thus concluded that in local quantum physics not every CP instrument represents a measuring process, but in most of physically relevant cases every CP instrument can be realized by a measuring process within arbitrary error limits, as every approximately finite dimensional von Neumann algebra on a separable Hilbert space is injective. To conclude the paper, the concept of local measurement in algebraic quantum field theory is examined in our framework. In the setting of the Doplicher-Haag-Roberts and Doplicher-Roberts theory describing local excitations, we show that an instrument on a local algebra can be extended to a local instrument on the global algebra if and only if it is a CP instrument with the NEP, provided that the split property holds for the net of local algebras.

  4. FEATURES OF MEASURING IN LIQUID MEDIA BY ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V. Zhukov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The paper presents results of experimental study of measurement features in liquids by atomic force microscope to identify the best modes and buffered media as well as to find possible image artifacts and ways of their elimination. Method. The atomic force microscope Ntegra Aura (NT-MDT, Russia with standard prism probe holder and liquid cell was used to carry out measurements in liquids. The calibration lattice TGQ1 (NT-MDT, Russia was chosen as investigated structure with a fixed shape and height. Main Results. The research of probe functioning in specific pH liquids (distilled water, PBS - sodium phosphate buffer, Na2HPO4 - borate buffer, NaOH 0.1 M, NaOH 0.5 M was carried out in contact and semi-contact modes. The optimal operating conditions and the best media for the liquid measurements were found. Comparison of atomic force microscopy data with the results of lattice study by scanning electron microscopy was performed. The features of the feedback system response in the «probe-surface» interaction were considered by the approach/retraction curves in the different environments. An artifact of image inversion was analyzed and recommendation for its elimination was provided. Practical Relevance. These studies reveal the possibility of fine alignment of research method for objects of organic and inorganic nature by atomic force microscopy in liquid media.

  5. Lifetime measurement of the 9s level of atomic francium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, S; Gomez, E; Orozco, L A; Sprouse, G D

    2003-11-01

    We use two-photon resonant excitation and time-correlated single-photon counting techniques on a sample of 210Fr atoms confined and cooled in a magneto-optical trap to measure the lifetime of the 9s excited level. Direct measurement of the decay through the 7P(3/2) level at 851 nm yields a lifetime of 107.53 +/- 0.80 ns.

  6. STIR-Physics: Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber and High-Q Resonator Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-02

    STIR-Physics: Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber and High-Q Resonator Potentials We worked on a tapered fiber in cold atomic cloud...setup. At the end of this program, we had built the vacuum system, specialized cold atom chamber and were working on the fiber epoxy mount for the...Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Tapered Fibers, Cold atoms , Nonlinear Optics REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR

  7. Precision measurement of the Newtonian gravitational constant using cold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, G; Sorrentino, F; Cacciapuoti, L; Prevedelli, M; Tino, G M

    2014-06-26

    About 300 experiments have tried to determine the value of the Newtonian gravitational constant, G, so far, but large discrepancies in the results have made it impossible to know its value precisely. The weakness of the gravitational interaction and the impossibility of shielding the effects of gravity make it very difficult to measure G while keeping systematic effects under control. Most previous experiments performed were based on the torsion pendulum or torsion balance scheme as in the experiment by Cavendish in 1798, and in all cases macroscopic masses were used. Here we report the precise determination of G using laser-cooled atoms and quantum interferometry. We obtain the value G = 6.67191(99) × 10(-11) m(3) kg(-1) s(-2) with a relative uncertainty of 150 parts per million (the combined standard uncertainty is given in parentheses). Our value differs by 1.5 combined standard deviations from the current recommended value of the Committee on Data for Science and Technology. A conceptually different experiment such as ours helps to identify the systematic errors that have proved elusive in previous experiments, thus improving the confidence in the value of G. There is no definitive relationship between G and the other fundamental constants, and there is no theoretical prediction for its value, against which to test experimental results. Improving the precision with which we know G has not only a pure metrological interest, but is also important because of the key role that G has in theories of gravitation, cosmology, particle physics and astrophysics and in geophysical models.

  8. Status and perspectives of atomic physics research at GSI : The new GSI accelerator project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, T; Backe, H; Beyer, HF; Brauning-Demian, A; Hagmann, S; Ionescu, DC; Jungmann, K; Kluge, HJ; Kozhuharov, C; Kuhl, T; Liesen, D; Mann, R; Mokler, PH; Quint, W; Bosch, F.M.

    A short overview on the results of atomic physics research at the storage ring ESR is given followed by a presentation of the envisioned atomic physics program at the planned new GSI facility. The proposed new GSI facility will provide highest intensities of relativistic beams of both stable and

  9. Certified quantum non-demolition measurement of atomic spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Robert; Napolitano, Mario; Behbood, Naeimeh; Colangelo, Giorgio; Martin Ciurana, Ferran; Mitchell, Morgan

    2014-05-01

    We report certified quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement of atomic spins via paramagnetic Faraday rotation, recently used to demonstrate spin squeezing in an optical magnetometer [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 253605 (2012)]. We apply rigorous criteria, originally developed for continuous variable experiments in optics [Nature 396, 537 (1998)] and which we have extended to describe measurements of material systems [New J. Phys. 14, 085021 (2012)], to distinguish QND from similar non-classical measurements. We observe quantum state preparation (QSP) and information-damage trade-off (IDT) beyond their classical limits by seven and twelve standard deviations, respectively [Nat. Phot. 7, 517 (2013)].

  10. Measurements of scattering processes in negative ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvale, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    This Technical Progress Report describes the progress made on the research objectives during the past twelve months. This research project is designed to provide measurements of various scattering processes which occur in H{sup {minus}} collisions with atomic (specifically, noble gas and atomic hydrogen) targets at intermediate energies. These processes include: elastic scattering,single- and double-electron detachment, and target excitation/ionization. For the elastic and target inelastic processes where H{sup {minus}} is scattered intact, the experimental technique of Ion Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (IELS) will be employed to identify the final target state(s). In most of the above processes, cross sections are unknown both experimentally and theoretically. The measurements in progress will provide either experimentally-determined cross sections or set upper limits to those cross sections. In either case, these measurements will be stringent tests of our understanding in energetic negative ion-atom collisions. This series of experiments required the construction of a new facility and the initial ion beam was accelerated through the apparatus in April 1991.

  11. Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayano, Ryugo S.

    2010-01-01

    Antiprotonic helium atom, a metastable neutral system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus, was serendipitously discovered, and has been studied at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility. Its transition frequencies have recently been measured to nine digits of precision by laser spectroscopy. By comparing these experimental results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron massratio was determined as 1836.152674(5). This result contributed to the CODATA recommended values of the fundamental physical constants. PMID:20075605

  12. Theoretical atomic physics for fusion. 1995 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pindzola, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The understanding of electron-ion collision processes in plasmas remains a key factor in the ultimate development of nuclear fusion as a viable energy source for the nation. The 1993--1995 research proposal delineated several areas of research in electron-ion scattering theory. In this report the author summarizes his efforts in 1995. The main areas of research are: (1) electron-impact excitation of atomic ions; (2) electron-impact ionization of atomic ions; and (3) electron-impact recombination of atomic ions.

  13. Atomic Spectral Line Broadening Bibliographic Database Physical Reference Data

    CERN Document Server

    Fuhr, J; National Institute of Standards and Technology. Gaithersburg

    This database contains approximately 800 recent references. These papers contain numerical data, general information, comments, and review articles and are part of the collection of the Data Center on Atomic Line Shapes and Shifts at NIST.

  14. [Measurement of atomic number of alkali vapor and pressure of buffer gas based on atomic absorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui-jie; Quan, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivitymagnetic measurementscanbe achieved by utilizing atomic spinmanipulation in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) regime, which uses an alkali cell as a sensing element. The atomic number density of the alkali vapor and the pressure of the buffer gasare among the most important parameters of the cell andrequire accurate measurement. A method has been proposed and developedto measure the atomic number density and the pressure based on absorption spectroscopy, by sweeping the absorption line and fittingthe experiment data with a Lorentzian profile to obtainboth parameters. Due to Doppler broadening and pressure broadening, which is mainly dominated by the temperature of the cell and the pressure of buffer gas respectively, this work demonstrates a simulation of the errorbetween the peaks of the Lorentzian profile and the Voigt profile caused by bothfactors. The results indicates that the Doppler broadening contribution is insignificant with an error less than 0.015% at 313-513 K for a 4He density of 2 amg, and an error of 0.1% in the presence of 0.6-5 amg at 393 K. We conclude that the Doppler broadening could be ignored under above conditions, and that the Lorentzianprofile is suitably applied to fit the absorption spectrumobtainingboth parameters simultaneously. In addition we discuss the resolution and the instability due to thelight source, wavelength and the temperature of the cell. We find that the cell temperature, whose uncertainty is two orders of magnitude larger than the instability of the light source and the wavelength, is one of the main factors which contributes to the error.

  15. Ultimate Statistical Physics: fluorescence of a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Pomeau, Yves; Ginibre, Jean

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the statistics of emission of photons by a single atom or ion illuminated by a laser beam at the frequency of quasi-resonance between two energy levels, a situation that corresponds to real experiments. We extend this to the case of two laser beams resonant with the energy differences between two excited levels and the ground state (three level atom in V-configuration). We use a novel approach of this type of problem by considering Kolmogorov equation for the probability distribution of the atomic state which takes into account first the deterministic evolution of this state under the effect of the incoming laser beam and the random emission of photons during the spontaneous decay of the excited state(s) to the ground state. This approach yields solvable equations in the two level atom case. For the three level atom case we set the problem and define clearly its frame. The results obtained are valid both in the opposite limits of rare and of frequent spontaneous decay, compared to the period of the...

  16. Interlaboratory comparison of traceable atomic force microscope pitch measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixson, Ronald; Chernoff, Donald A.; Wang, Shihua; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Tan, Siew Leng; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Advanced Surface Microscopy (ASM), and the National Metrology Centre (NMC) of the Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR) in Singapore have completed a three-way interlaboratory comparison of traceable pitch measurements using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The specimen being used for this comparison is provided by ASM and consists of SiO2 lines having a 70 nm pitch patterned on a silicon substrate. NIST has a multifaceted program in atomic force microscope (AFM) dimensional metrology. One component of this effort is a custom in-house metrology AFM, called the calibrated AFM (C-AFM). The NIST C-AFM has displacement metrology for all three axes traceable to the 633 nm wavelength of the iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser - a recommended wavelength for realization of the SI (Système International d'Unités, or International System of Units) meter. NIST used the C-AFM to participate in this comparison. ASM used a commercially available AFM with an open-loop scanner, calibrated by a 144 nm pitch transfer standard. In a prior collaboration with Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German national metrology institute, ASM's transfer standard was calibrated using PTB's traceable optical diffractometry instrument. Thus, ASM's measurements are also traceable to the SI meter. NMC/A*STAR used a large scanning range metrological atomic force microscope (LRM-AFM). The LRM-AFM integrates an AFM scanning head into a nano-stage equipped with three built-in He-Ne laser interferometers so that its measurement related to the motion on all three axes is directly traceable to the SI meter. The measurements for this interlaboratory comparison have been completed and the results are in agreement within their expanded uncertainties and at the level of a few parts in 104.

  17. Microwave field measurement via Rabi resonances in Cs atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Fuyu; Bai, Qingsong; Huang, Xianhe; Ma, Jie; Li, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    We present a technique for measuring microwave (MW) field based on Rabi resonances induced by the interaction of atoms with a phase-modulated MW field. A theoretical model of field measurement is used to calculate Rabi frequency. Single-peak feature of the measurement model makes the technique a valuable tool for simple and fast field measurement. As an example, we use the technique to determine the MW field strength inside a Cs vapor cell in the X-band rectangular cavity for applied power in the range of -21 dBm to 20 dBm. The results show that this proposed technique is capable for detecting the field over a broad dynamical range.

  18. Correlation of experimentally measured atomic scale properties of EUV photoresist to modeling performance: an exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Yudhishthir; Chandonait, Jonathan; Melvin, Lawrence S.; Marokkey, Sajan; Yan, Qiliang; Grzeskowiak, Steven; Painter, Benjamin; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography at 13.5 nm stands at the crossroads of next generation patterning technology for high volume manufacturing of integrated circuits. Photo resist models that form the part of overall pattern transform model for lithography play a vital role in supporting this effort. The physics and chemistry of these resists must be understood to enable the construction of accurate models for EUV Optical Proximity Correction (OPC). In this study, we explore the possibility of improving EUV photo-resist models by directly correlating the parameters obtained from experimentally measured atomic scale physical properties; namely, the effect of interaction of EUV photons with photo acid generators in standard chemically amplified EUV photoresist, and associated electron energy loss events. Atomic scale physical properties will be inferred from the measurements carried out in Electron Resist Interaction Chamber (ERIC). This study will use measured physical parameters to establish a relationship with lithographically important properties, such as line edge roughness and CD variation. The data gathered from these measurements is used to construct OPC models of the resist.

  19. The Physics of Spin-Polarized Atomic Vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    angular momen- 5 512 turn, while an atom with spin greater than -L is like a "• capacitor with dielectric material between its plates. This...laminated plastic circular- (F,)PUMP TF _L- ize material . Thus the pmnp-phase signal is + I (FF) I + q(K K ) no 2 )AF(F)p,.p (49) (57) $ np-j~a.. 2In...spin-relaxation data described in this paper. In- cause the 769.9-nm DI absorption line of K atoms is n- dependent magnectic -decoupling experiments 3

  20. Progress on accurate measurement of the Planck constant: watt balance and counting atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shisong; Zhang, Zhonghua; Zhao, Wei; Li, Zhengkun; Huang, Songling

    2014-01-01

    The Planck constant $h$ is one of the most significant constants in quantum physics. Recently, the precision measurement of the numeral value of $h$ has been a hot issue due to its important role in establishment for both a new SI and a revised fundamental physical constant system. Up to date, two approaches, the watt balance and counting atoms, have been employed to determine the Planck constant at a level of several parts in $10^8$. In this paper, the principle and progress on precision mea...

  1. Physical measures of sound and noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The physical measurement of sound is examined through basic definitions and measuring techniques. The terminology of acoustics is presented with noise characterization, graphs, and mathematical formulas included.

  2. Pre-Service Physics Teachers' Ideas on Size, Visibility and Structure of the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, Pervin

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the atom gives the opportunity to both understand and conceptually unify the various domains of science, such as physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy and geology. Among these disciplines, physics teachers are expected to be particularly well educated in this topic. It is important that pre-service physics teachers know what sort of…

  3. Upper Secondary Students' Understanding of the Basic Physical Interactions in Analogous Atomic and Solar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Keith S.

    2013-01-01

    Comparing the atom to a "tiny solar system" is a common teaching analogy, and the extent to which learners saw the systems as analogous was investigated. English upper secondary students were asked parallel questions about the physical interactions between the components of a simple atomic system and a simple solar system to investigate…

  4. Sensitivity of MSE measurements on the beam atomic level population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, C; Kumar, S T A; Anderson, F S B; Anderson, D T

    2016-11-01

    The effect of variation in atomic level population of a neutral beam on the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) measurements is investigated in the low density plasmas of HSX stellarator. A 30 KeV, 4 A, 3 ms hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam is injected into HSX plasmas of line averaged electron density ranging from 2 to 4 ⋅ 1018 m-3 at a magnetic field of 1 T. For this density range, the excited level population of the hydrogen neutral beam is expected to undergo variations. Doppler shifted and Stark split Hα and Hβ emissions from the beam are simultaneously measured using two cross-calibrated spectrometers. The emission spectrum is simulated and fit to the experimental measurements and the deviation from a statistically populated beam is investigated.

  5. Sensitivity of MSE measurements on the beam atomic level population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, C., E-mail: carlos.ruiz@wisc.edu; Kumar, S. T. A.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Anderson, D. T. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The effect of variation in atomic level population of a neutral beam on the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) measurements is investigated in the low density plasmas of HSX stellarator. A 30 KeV, 4 A, 3 ms hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam is injected into HSX plasmas of line averaged electron density ranging from 2 to 4 ⋅ 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} at a magnetic field of 1 T. For this density range, the excited level population of the hydrogen neutral beam is expected to undergo variations. Doppler shifted and Stark split H{sub α} and H{sub β} emissions from the beam are simultaneously measured using two cross-calibrated spectrometers. The emission spectrum is simulated and fit to the experimental measurements and the deviation from a statistically populated beam is investigated.

  6. Summary of informal workshop on state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.W.; Cocke, C.L.; Datz, S.; Kostroun, V.

    1984-11-13

    The present state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research in the United States is assessed by means of a questionnaire and informal workshop. Recommendations for future facilities are given. 3 refs.

  7. Introduction to the physics of matter basic atomic, molecular, and solid-state physics

    CERN Document Server

    Manini, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    This book offers an up-to-date, compact presentation of basic topics in the physics of matter, from atoms to molecules to solids, including elements of statistical mechanics. The adiabatic separation of the motion of electrons and nuclei in matter and its spectroscopic implications are outlined for molecules and recalled regularly in the study of the dynamics of gases and solids. Numerous experiments are described and more than 160 figures give a clear visual impression of the main concepts. Sufficient detail of mathematical derivations is provided to enable students to follow easily. The focus is on present-day understanding and especially on phenomena fitting various independent-particle models. The historical development of this understanding, and phenomena such as magnetism and superconductivity, where interparticle interactions and nonadiabatic effects play a crucial role, are mostly omitted. A final outlook section stimulates the curiosity of the reader to pursue the study of such advanced topics in gra...

  8. Measuring student responsibility in Physical Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measuring student responsibility in Physical Education: Examinantion of CSR and PSR Models. ... South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation ... It is, therefore, necessary to develop a new instrument for measuring student responsibility within the field of physical education. Key words: ...

  9. Thermoelectric measurements using different tips in atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushvaha, S. S.; Hofbauer, W.; Loke, Y. C.; Singh, Samarendra P.; O'Shea, S. J.

    2011-04-01

    We use conducting atomic force microscopy (AFM) in ultra high vacuum to measure the thermoelectric power of Au, Pt, and 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) films. Tips coated with thick (1200 nm) Pt films or highly doped diamond film give reproducible data. The thermoelectric power of metal junctions formed with diamond tips is high but dominated by the diamond material thus making diamond tips of limited applicability in thermovoltage AFM. Pt coated tips on Au or Pt films gives small thermovoltage signal, making quantitative analysis of the thermopower on metal sample problematic. The thermovoltage AFM technique appears best suited to study organic thin films and the thermoelectric power of 1.5 nm and 2 nm thick PTCDA deposited on Au measured with Pt tips is -342 and -372 μV/K, respectively. The negative sign indicates that the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital level dominates electrical transport.

  10. Towards a precise measurement of atomic parity violation in a single Ra{sup +} ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez Portela, M., E-mail: nunez@kvi.nl; Berg, J. E. van den; Bekker, H.; Boell, O.; Dijck, E. A.; Giri, G. S.; Hoekstra, S.; Jungmann, K.; Mohanty, A.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Santra, B.; Schlesser, S.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; Versolato, O. O.; Wansbeek, L. W.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) (Netherlands)

    2013-03-15

    A single trapped Ra{sup + } (Z = 88) ion provides a very promising route towards a most precise measurement of Atomic Parity Violation (APV), since APV effects grow faster than Z{sup 3}. This experiment promises the best determination of the electroweak coupling constant at the lowest accessible energies. Such a measurement provides a sensitive test of the Standard Model in particle physics. At the present stage of the experiment, we focus on trapping and laser cooling stable Ba{sup + } ions as a precursor for radioactive Ra{sup + }. Online laser spectroscopy of the isotopes {sup 209 - 214}Ra{sup + } in a linear Paul trap has provided information on transition wavelengths, fine and hyperfine structures and excited state lifetimes as test of atomic structure calculations. Additionaly, a single trapped Ra{sup + } ion could function as a very stable clock.

  11. Towards the measurement of the electron EDM with laser cooled francium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Sakamoto, K.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Yoshida, H. P.; Wakasa, T.; Sakemi, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle is a probe into new physics beyond the standard model. The electron EDM might be observed with an enhancement in heavier paramagnetic atoms. Francium (Fr), whose electron structure is useful for laser-cooling and trapping, has a large enhancement factor. Fr produced at high temperature via a fusion reaction will be laser-cooled and trapped in an optical lattice where the EDM is measured. The magneto-optical trapping of Fr is required in advance of the lattice trapping. The technique observing a small number of atoms makes it easy to search for the resonant frequency of Fr. The improvement of the beam purity should lead to a more efficient trap. The techniques towards Fr trapping and EDM measurement have been developed. The electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle is a probe into new physics beyond the standard model. The electron EDM might be observed with an enhancement in heavier paramagnetic atoms. Francium (Fr), whose electron structure is useful for laser-cooling and trapping, has a large enhancement factor. Fr produced at high temperature via a fusion reaction will be laser-cooled and trapped in an optical lattice where the EDM is measured. The magneto-optical trapping of Fr is required in advance of the lattice trapping. The technique observing a small number of atoms makes it easy to search for the resonant frequency of Fr. The improvement of the beam purity should lead to a more efficient trap. The techniques towards Fr trapping and EDM measurement have been developed. Supported by MEXT/JSPS KAKENHI Grants (21104005, 25610112 and 26220705) and Tohoku University's Focused Research Project.

  12. Systematic measurements of opacity dependence on temperature, density, and atomic number at stellar interior conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Taisuke

    2017-10-01

    Model predictions for iron opacity are notably different from measurements performed at matter conditions similar to the boundary between the solar radiation and convection zones. The calculated iron opacities have narrower spectral lines, weaker quasi-continuum at short wavelength, and deeper opacity windows than the measurements. If correct, these measurements help resolve a decade old problem in solar physics. A key question is therefore: What is responsible for the model-data discrepancy? The answer is complex because the experiments are challenging and opacity theories depend on multiple entangled physical processes such as the influence of completeness and accuracy of atomic states, line broadening, contributions from myriad transitions from excited states, and multi-photon absorption processes. To help determine the cause of this discrepancy, a systematic study of opacity variation with temperature, density, and atomic number is underway. Measurements of chromium, iron, and nickel opacities have been performed at two different temperatures and densities. The collection of measured opacities provides constraints on hypotheses to explain the discrepancy. We will discuss implications of measured opacities, experimental errors, and possible opacity model refinements. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525.

  13. Extracting dark matter signatures from atomic clock stability measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran; Yu, Nan

    2017-10-01

    We analyze possible effects of the dark matter environment on the atomic clock stability measurements. The dark matter is assumed to exist in the form of waves of ultralight scalar fields or in the form of topological defects (monopoles and strings). We identify dark matter signal signatures in clock Allan deviation plots that can be used to constrain the dark matter coupling to the Standard Model fields. The existing data on the Al+/Hg+ clock comparison are used to put new limits on the dilaton dark matter in the region of masses mϕ>10-15 eV . We also estimate the sensitivities of future atomic clock experiments in space, including the cesium microwave and strontium optical clocks aboard the International Space Station, as well as a potential nuclear clock. These experiments are expected to put new limits on the topological dark matter in the range of masses 10-10 eV

  14. Elasticity measurement of breast cancer cells by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chaoxian; Wang, Yuhua; Jiang, Ningcheng; Yang, Hongqin; Lin, Juqiang; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical properties of living cells play an important role in understanding various cells' function and state. Therefore cell biomechanics is expected to become a useful tool for cancer diagnosis. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a square pyramid probe was performed to investigate cancerous (MCF-7) and benign (MCF-10A) human breast epithelial cells. The new QITM mode was used to acquire high-resolution topographic images and elasticity of living cells. Furthermore, individual force curves were recorded at maximum loads of 0.2, 0.5 and 1 nN, and the dependence of cell's elasticity with loading force was discussed. It was showed that the cancerous cells exhibited smaller elasticity modulus in comparison to non-cancerous counterparts. The elasticity modulus increased as the loading force increased from 0.2 nN to 1 nN. This observation indicates that loading force affects the cell's apparent elasticity and it is important to choose the appropriate force applied to cells in order to distinguish normal and cancer cells. The results reveal that the mechanical properties of living cells measured by atomic force microscopy may be a useful indicator of cell type and disease.

  15. Towards an Atomic Parity Violation Measurement with Laser Trapped Francium at ISAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collister, R.; Tandecki, M.; Gwinner, G.; Zhang, J.; Orozco, L.; Behr, J. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Gomez-Garcia, E.; Aubin, S.

    2012-10-01

    The neutral atom trap for parity violation measurements at TRIUMF has recently accepted its first radioactive beam. The longest lived francium isotopes have half-lives of minutes, requiring us to produce them with the online mass separator of the ISAC facility. The ion beam is embedded into a catcher made of yttrium foil where it is neutralized. Subsequently, the foil is rotated and heated to release a pulse of atomic francium into the laser trap cell. Francium isotopes 207, 209 and 221 have successfully been cooled and confined in a magneto-optical trap, a crucial first step for later experiments. The next online measurements are planned for November 2012 where two physics goals will be pursued. Firstly, the hyperfine anomaly will be probed via high precision spectroscopy on the atomic D1 transition in order to investigate the nuclear magnetization distribution. This will be followed by ionization cross-section measurements from the 7p3/2 state to evaluate this as a potential problematic trap loss mechanism for future parity violation measurements.

  16. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ryan; Moon, Robert; Pratt, Jon; Shaw, Gordon; Raman, Arvind

    2011-11-01

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale resolution of both inorganic and biological surfaces and nanomaterials. We present a framework to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. We demonstrate the framework by quantifying uncertainty in AFM-based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), an abundant, plant-derived nanomaterial whose mechanical properties are comparable to Kevlar fibers. For a single, isolated CNC the transverse elastic modulus was found to have a mean of 8.1 GPa and a 95% confidence interval of 2.7-20 GPa. A key result is that multiple replicates of force-distance curves do not sample the important sources of uncertainty, which are systematic in nature. The dominant source of uncertainty is the nondimensional photodiode sensitivity calibration rather than the cantilever stiffness or Z-piezo calibrations. The results underscore the great need for, and open a path towards, quantifying and minimizing uncertainty in AFM-based material property measurements of nanoparticles, nanostructured surfaces, thin films, polymers and biomaterials. This work is a partial contribution of the USDA Forest Service and NIST, agencies of the US government, and is not subject to copyright.

  17. Atomic Oscillator Strengths by Emission Spectroscopy and Lifetime Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, W. L.; Griesmann, U.; Kling, R.; Musielok, J.

    2002-11-01

    Over the last seven years, we have carried out numerous oscillator strength measurements for some light and medium heavy elements (Musielok et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000; Veres & Wiese 1996; Griesmann et al. 1997; Bridges & Wiese 1998; Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Gries- mann 2000; Bridges & Wiese to be published). Most recently we have determined numerous transitions of Mu II (Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Griesmann 2000) and are now working on Cl I (Bridges & Wiese to be published). See the summary statement at the end of the text. For the emission measurements, we have applied either a high-current wall-stabilized arc (described for example, in Musielok et al. (1999)), or a high-current hollow cathode, or a Penning discharge. The latter two sources were used for branching ratio measurements from common upper 1ev- els, while the wall-stabilized arc was operated at atmospheric pressure under the condition of partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, which allows the measurement of relative transition probabilities. Absolute data were obtained by combining the emission results with lifetime data measured by other research groups, especially the University of Hannover, with which we have closely collaborated. This group uses the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Our emission spectra were recorded for the light elements with a 2 m grating spectrometer, or, for Mu II, with an FT 700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. The radiometric calibration was carried out with a tungsten strip lamp for the visible part of the spectrum and with a deuterium lamp for the ultraviolet. All measurements were made under optically thin conditions, which was checked by doubling the path length with a focusing mirror setup. Typical uncertainties of the measured oscillator strengths are estimated to be in the range 15%-20% (one-standard deviation). However, discrepancies with advanced atomic structure theories are sometimes much larger. In Tables 1-3 and Fig. 1, we

  18. Atomic physics with highly-charged ions at the future FAIR facility. A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehlker, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Beyer, H.F.; Braeuning, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (DE)] (and others)

    2006-11-15

    The key features of the future international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) offer a range of new and challenging opportunities for atomic physics research in the realm of highly-charged heavy ions and exotic nuclei. Centred on use of FAIR, the Stored Particle Atomic Physics Research Collaboration (SPARC), organized in working groups, has been formed. A short report on the tasks and activities of the various SPARC working groups, devoted to the realization of experimental equipments and setups required to reach the physics goals is given. (orig.)

  19. Atomic physics with highly-charged ions at the future FAIR facility: A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehlker, Th. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany) and Institut fuer Kernphysik, University of Frankfurt (Germany)]. E-mail: t.stoehlker@gsi.de; Beyer, H.F. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Brandau, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Kozhuharov, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Kluge, H.J. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Th. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Mann, R. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Noertershaeuser, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Quint, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Schramm, U. [LMU, Munich (Germany); Schuch, R. [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-08-15

    Key features of the future international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) offer a range of new and challenging opportunities for atomic physics research in the realm of highly-charged heavy ions and exotic nuclei. Centred on use of FAIR, the Stored Particle Atomic Physics Research Collaboration (SPARC), organized in working groups, has been formed. A short report on the tasks and activities of the various SPARC working groups, devoted to the realization of experimental equipments and set-ups required to reach the physics goals is given.

  20. PREFACE: 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jim F.; Buckman, Steve; Bieske, Evan J.

    2009-09-01

    These proceedings arose from the 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP) which was held at the University of Western Australia 24-28 November 2008. The history of AISAMP (Takayanagi and Matsuzawa 2002) recognizes its origin from the Japan-China meeting of 1985, and the first use of the name 'The First Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)' in 1992. The initial attendees, Japan and China, were joined subsequently by scientists from Korea, Taiwan, India, Australia and recently by Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Turkey Iran, UK and USA. The main purpose of the biennial AISAMP series is to create a wide forum for exchanging ideas and information among atomic and molecular scientists and to promote international collaboration. The scope of the AISAMP8 meeting included pure, strategic and applied research involving atomic and molecular structure and processes in all forms of matter and antimatter. For 2008 the AISAMP conference incorporated the Australian Atomic and Molecular Physics and Quantum Chemistry meeting. The topics for AISAMP8 embraced themes from earlier AISAMP meetings and reflected new interests, in atomic and molecular structures, spectroscopy and collisions; atomic and molecular physics with laser or synchrotron radiation; quantum information processing using atoms and molecules; atoms and molecules in surface physics, nanotechnology, biophysics, atmospheric physics and other interdisciplinary studies. The implementation of the AISAMP themes, as well as the international representation of research interests, is indicated both in the contents list of these published manuscripts as well as in the program for the meeting. Altogether, 184 presentations were made at the 8th AISAMP, including Invited Talks and Contributed Poster Presentations, of which 60 appear in the present Proceedings after review by expert referees in accordance with the usual practice of Journal of Physics: Conference Series of

  1. Atomic physics with highly-charged heavy ions at the GSI future facility: The scientific program of the SPARC collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehlker, Th. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: t.stoehlker@gsi.de; Beier, T. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Beyer, H.F. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Bosch, F. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Gumberidze, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Kozhuharov, C. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Th. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Mann, R. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Mokler, P.H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Quint, W. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Schuch, R. [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Warczak, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland)

    2005-07-01

    In the current report a short overview about the envisioned program of the atomic physics research collaboration SPARC (Stored Particle Atomic Research Collaboration, at the new international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI is given. In addition, a condensed description of the planned experimental areas devoted to atomic physics research at the new facility is presented.

  2. Heterodyne non-demolition measurements on cold atomic samples: towards the preparation of non-classical states for atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernon, S.; Vanderbruggen, T.; Kohlhaas, R.; Bertoldi, A.; Landragin, A.; Bouyer, P.

    2011-06-01

    We report on a novel experiment to generate non-classical atomic states via quantum non-demolition (QND) measurements on cold atomic samples prepared in a high-finesse ring cavity. The heterodyne technique developed for QND detection exhibits an optical shot-noise limited behavior for local oscillator optical power of a few hundred μW, and a detection bandwidth of several GHz. This detection tool is used in a single pass to follow non-destructively the internal state evolution of an atomic sample when subjected to Rabi oscillations or a spin-echo interferometric sequence.

  3. Heterodyne non-demolition measurements on cold atomic samples: towards the preparation of non-classical states for atom interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernon, S; Vanderbruggen, T; Kohlhaas, R; Bertoldi, A; Bouyer, P [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, F-91127 Palaiseau cedex (France); Landragin, A, E-mail: simon.bernon@institutoptique.fr [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS and UPMC 61 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2011-06-15

    We report on a novel experiment to generate non-classical atomic states via quantum non-demolition (QND) measurements on cold atomic samples prepared in a high-finesse ring cavity. The heterodyne technique developed for QND detection exhibits an optical shot-noise limited behavior for local oscillator optical power of a few hundred {mu}W, and a detection bandwidth of several GHz. This detection tool is used in a single pass to follow non-destructively the internal state evolution of an atomic sample when subjected to Rabi oscillations or a spin-echo interferometric sequence.

  4. The physics of atoms and quanta introduction to experiments and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Haken, Hermann; Brewer, William D

    2000-01-01

    The Physics of Atoms and Quanta is a thorough introduction to experiments and theory in this field. Every classical and modern aspect is included and discussed in detail. The new edition is completely revised, new sections on atoms in strong electric fields and high magnetic fields complete the comprehensive coverage of all topics related to atoms and quanta. All new developments, such as new experiments on quantum entanglement, the quantum computer, quantum information, the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradoxon, Bell's inequality, Schrödinger's cat, decoherence, Bose-Einstein-Condensation and the atom laser are discussed. Over 170 problems and their solutions help deepen the insight in this subject area and make this book a real study text. The second and more advanced book by the same authors entitled "Molecular Physics and Elements of Quantum Chemistry" is the completion of this unique textbook.

  5. Handbook of theoretical atomic physics data for photon absorption, electron scattering, and vacancies decay

    CERN Document Server

    Amusia, Miron Ya; Yarzhemsky, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present highly accurate and extensive theoretical Atomic data and to give a survey of selected calculational methods for atomic physics, used to obtain these data. The book presents the results of calculations of cross sections and probabilities of a broad variety of atomic processes with participation of photons and electrons, namely on photoabsorption, electron scattering and accompanying effects. Included are data for photoabsorption and electron scattering cross-sections and probabilities of vacancy decay formed for a large number of atoms and ions. Attention is also given to photoionization and vacancy decay in endohedrals and to positron-atom scattering. The book is richly illustrated. The methods used are one-electron Hartree-Fock and the technique of Feynman diagrams that permits to include many-electron correlations. This is done in the frames of the Random Phase approximation with exchange and the many-body perturbation theory. Newly obtained and previously collected atomi...

  6. Theoretical Models for Surface Forces and Adhesion and Their Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Fabio L.; Bueno, Carolina C.; Da Róz, Alessandra L.; Ziemath, Ervino C.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of AFS, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution. PMID:23202925

  7. Theoretical models for surface forces and adhesion and their measurement using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Fabio L; Bueno, Carolina C; Da Róz, Alessandra L; Ziemath, Ervino C; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2012-10-08

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of afs, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution.

  8. Otto Stern (1888-1969): The founding father of experimental atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Toennies, J Peter; Friedrich, Bretislav; Lower, Julian C A

    2011-01-01

    We review the work and life of Otto Stern who developed the molecular beam technique and with its aid laid the foundations of experimental atomic physics. Among the key results of his research are: the experimental determination of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of molecular velocities (1920), experimental demonstration of space quantization of angular momentum (1922), diffraction of matter waves comprised of atoms and molecules by crystals (1931) and the determination of the magnetic dipole moments of the proton and deuteron (1933).

  9. Clock Technology Development for the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, W. M.; Thompson, R. J.; Seidel, D. J.; Kohel, J.; Maleki, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Time and Frequency Sciences and Technology Group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has developed a laser cooling capability for flight and has been selected by NASA to support the Laser-Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program. Current work in the group includes design and development for tee two laser-cooled atomic clock experiments which have been selected for flight on the International Space Station.

  10. I.I. Rabi in Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics Prize Talk: Strongly Interacting Fermi Gases of Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierlein, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Strongly interacting fermions govern physics at all length scales, from nuclear matter to modern electronic materials and neutron stars. The interplay of the Pauli principle with strong interactions can give rise to exotic properties that we do not understand even at a qualitative level. In recent years, ultracold Fermi gases of atoms have emerged as a new type of strongly interacting fermionic matter that can be created and studied in the laboratory with exquisite control. Feshbach resonances allow for unitarity limited interactions, leading to scale invariance, universal thermodynamics and a superfluid phase transition already at 17 Trapped in optical lattices, fermionic atoms realize the Fermi-Hubbard model, believed to capture the essence of cuprate high-temperature superconductors. Here, a microscope allows for single-atom, single-site resolved detection of density and spin correlations, revealing the Pauli hole as well as anti-ferromagnetic and doublon-hole correlations. Novel states of matter are predicted for fermions interacting via long-range dipolar interactions. As an intriguing candidate we created stable fermionic molecules of NaK at ultralow temperatures featuring large dipole moments and second-long spin coherence times. In some of the above examples the experiment outperformed the most advanced computer simulations of many-fermion systems, giving hope for a new level of understanding of strongly interacting fermions.

  11. Nondestructive light-shift measurements of single atoms in optical dipole traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chung-Yu; Chapman, Michael S.

    2013-06-01

    We measure the ac Stark shifts of the 5S1/2,F=2→5P3/2,F'=3 transitions of individual optically trapped 87Rb atoms using a nondestructive detection technique that allows us to measure the fluorescent signal of one and the same atom for over 60 s. These measurements allow the efficient and rapid characterization of single-atom traps that is required for many coherent quantum information protocols. Although this method is demonstrated using a single-atom trap, the concept is readily extended to resolvable atomic arrays.

  12. Atomic force microscopy and direct surface force measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ralston, J.; Larson, I.; Rutland, M.; Feiler, A.; Kleijn, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is designed to provide high-resolution (in the ideal case, atomic) topographical analysis, applicable to both conducting and nonconducting surfaces. The basic imaging principle is very simple: a sample attached to a piezoelectric positioner is rastered beneath a

  13. Measurement of atomic number and mass attenuation coefficient in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The linear attenuation coefficient (), mass attenuation coefficient (/ρ), total atomic cross-section (tot), total electronic cross-section (ele) and the effective atomic number (eff) were calculated for pure magnesium ferrite (MgFe2O4). The values of -ray mass attenuation coefficient were obtained using a NaI energy ...

  14. Light-shift measurement and suppression in atomic spin gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wan, Shuangai; Chen, Yao; Li, Rujie

    2012-11-01

    We present a method to determine and suppress the light shift in an atomic spin gyroscope. This method doesn't require additional drive source or frequency modulation, and it is based on the dynamics of an atomic spin gyroscope to determine a clean curve as a function of the frequency of the pump beam that predicts the zero light shift. We experimentally validate the method in a Cs-(129)Xe atomic spin gyroscope and verify the results through numerical simulations. This method can also be applied to an atomic spin magnetometer based on the spin-exchange relaxation-free exchange that experiences light shift. The method is useful for atomic spin devices because it can improve long-term performance and reduce the influence of the laser.

  15. Proceedings of the workshop on opportunities for atomic physics using slow, highly-charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    The study of atomic physics with highly-charged ions is an area of intense activity at the present time because of a convergence of theoretical interest and advances in experimental techniques. The purpose of the Argonne ''Workshop on Opportunities for Atomic Physics Using Slow, Highly-Charged Ions'' was to bring together atomic, nuclear, and accelerator physicists in order to identify what new facilities would be most useful for the atomic physics community. The program included discussion of existing once-through machines, advanced ion sources, recoil ion techniques, ion traps, and cooler rings. One of the topics of the Workshop was to discuss possible improvement to the ANL Tandem-Linac facility (ATLAS) to enhance the capability for slowing down ions after they are stripped to a high-charge state (the Accel/Decel technique). Another topic was the opportunity for atomic physics provided by the ECR ion source which is being built for the Uranium Upgrade of ATLAS. 18 analytics were prepared for the individual papers in this volume.

  16. New Strategies for Atomic Scale Measurements at Interfaces using Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, David A.

    1997-03-01

    The local electronic structure of a material can be measured directly from the energy loss spectrum of a swift electron scattered through it. When the electron beam is focussed down to the width of an atomic column, the electronic density of states at an interface, grain boundary or impurity site can be decomposed by site, chemical species and angular momentum. Here, we discuss the use of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) fine structure to provide insight into the origin of grain boundary and interfacial properties. EELS can reveal the physics underlying why a particular local bonding arrangement develops. Even a qualitative understanding of local bonding can help indentify possible sites for chemical reactions and potentially weak points at a grain boundary. More can be done however: an EELS sum rule allows quantitative estimates of grain boundary energies. This is particularly useful at general, large angle grain boundaries where no other atomic scale information can be obtained. As an example, we show how atomic-scale EELS measurements of grain boundaries in Ni_3Al (D.A. Muller, S. Subramanian, P.E. Batson, S.L. Sass, J. Silcox, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 75 4744 (1995). lead not only to rules-of-thumb for segregation and bond strength, but also to quantitative estimates of the boundary cohesion. Application to magnetic multilayers and Al:Cu interconnects will also be touched on. (Work at Cornell supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER45322 and NSF grant DMR-9121654.)

  17. Measuring physical activity environments: a brief history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallis, James F

    2009-04-01

    Physical activity is usually done in specific types of places, referred to as physical activity environments. These often include parks, trails, fitness centers, schools, and streets. In recent years, scientific interest has increased notably in measuring physical activity environments. The present paper provides an historical overview of the contributions of the health, planning, and leisure studies fields to the development of contemporary measures. The emphasis is on attributes of the built environment that can be affected by policies to contribute to the promotion of physical activity. Researchers from health fields assessed a wide variety of built environment variables expected to be related to recreational physical activity. Settings of interest were schools, workplaces, and recreation facilities, and most early measures used direct observation methods with demonstrated inter-observer reliability. Investigators from the city planning field evaluated aspects of community design expected to be related to people's ability to walk from homes to destinations. GIS was used to assess walkability defined by the 3Ds of residential density, land-use diversity, and pedestrian-oriented designs. Evaluating measures for reliability or validity was rarely done in the planning-related fields. Researchers in the leisure studies and recreation fields studied mainly people's use of leisure time rather than physical characteristics of parks and other recreation facilities. Although few measures of physical activity environments were developed, measures of aesthetic qualities are available. Each of these fields made unique contributions to the contemporary methods used to assess physical activity environments.

  18. Directly measuring the concurrence of two-atom state via detecting coherent lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Li-Hua; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2017-11-01

    Concurrence is an important parameter for quantifying quantum entanglement, but usually the state tomography must be determined before quantification. In this paper we propose a scheme, based on cavity-assisted atom–light interaction, to measure the concurrence of two-atom pure states and the Collins–Gisin state directly, without tomography. The concurrence of atomic states is encoded in the output coherent optical beams after interacting with cavities and the atoms therein, so the results of detection applied to the output coherent optical beams provide the concurrence data of the atomic states. This scheme provides an alternative method for directly measuring atomic entanglement by detecting coherent light, rather than measuring the atomic systems, which thus greatly simplifies the realization complexity of the direct measurement of atomic entanglement. In addition, as the cavity-assisted atom–light interaction used here is robust and scalable in realistic applications, the current scheme may be realized in the near future.

  19. Nuclear physics (of the cell, not the atom).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Thoru; Marko, John F

    2014-11-05

    The nucleus is physically distinct from the cytoplasm in ways that suggest new ideas and approaches for interrogating the operation of this organelle. Chemical bond formation and breakage underlie the lives of cells, but as this special issue of Molecular Biology of the Cell attests, the nonchemical aspects of cell nuclei present a new frontier to biologists and biophysicists. © 2014 Pederson and Marko. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  20. IMPACT OF PLANETARY GRAVITATION ON HIGH-PRECISION NEUTRAL ATOM MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucharek, H.; Möbius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Park, J.; Schwadron, N. A [University of New Hampshire, 8 College Road, Durham, NH, 03824 (United States); Galli, A.; Wurz, P. [Physikalisches Institut der Universität Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Bzowski, M. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-10-15

    Measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) have been extremely successful in providing very important information on the physical processes inside and outside of our heliosphere. For instance, recent Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observations have provided new insights into the local interstellar environment and improved measurements of the interstellar He temperature, velocity, and direction of the interstellar flow vector. Since particle collisions are rare, and radiation pressure is negligible for these neutrals, gravitational forces mainly determine the trajectories of neutral He atoms. Depending on the distance of an ENA to the source of a gravitational field and its relative speed and direction, this can result in significant deflection and acceleration. In this paper, we investigate the impact of the gravitational effects of Earth, the Moon, and Jupiter on ENA measurements performed in Earth’s orbit. The results show that current analysis of the interstellar neutral parameters by IBEX is not significantly affected by planetary gravitational effects. We further studied the possibility of whether or not the Helium focusing cone of the Sun and Jupiter could be measured by IBEX and whether or not these cones could be used as an independent measure of the temperature of interstellar Helium.

  1. Impact of Planetary Gravitation on High-precision Neutral Atom Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharek, H.; Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Möbius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Park, J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Bzowski, M.; Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D.

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) have been extremely successful in providing very important information on the physical processes inside and outside of our heliosphere. For instance, recent Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observations have provided new insights into the local interstellar environment and improved measurements of the interstellar He temperature, velocity, and direction of the interstellar flow vector. Since particle collisions are rare, and radiation pressure is negligible for these neutrals, gravitational forces mainly determine the trajectories of neutral He atoms. Depending on the distance of an ENA to the source of a gravitational field and its relative speed and direction, this can result in significant deflection and acceleration. In this paper, we investigate the impact of the gravitational effects of Earth, the Moon, and Jupiter on ENA measurements performed in Earth’s orbit. The results show that current analysis of the interstellar neutral parameters by IBEX is not significantly affected by planetary gravitational effects. We further studied the possibility of whether or not the Helium focusing cone of the Sun and Jupiter could be measured by IBEX and whether or not these cones could be used as an independent measure of the temperature of interstellar Helium.

  2. An improved $\\pi$K atom lifetime measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Yazkov, V

    2016-01-01

    This note describes details of analysis of data samples collected by DIRAC experiment on a Pt target in 2007 and Ni targets in 2008–2010 in order to estimate the lifetime of πK atoms. Experimental results consist of eight distinct data samples: both charge combinations ( π + K − and K + π − atoms) obtained in different experimental conditions corresponding to each year of data taking. Estimations of systematic errors are presented. Taking into account both statistical and systematic uncertainties, the lifetime of πK atoms is estimated by the maximum likelihood method. The above sample comprises the total statistics, available for the analysis, thus the improvement over the previous estimation [1,3] of the πK atom lifetime is achieved.

  3. Understanding the physics and chemistry of reaction mechanisms from atomic contributions: a reaction force perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2012-07-12

    Studying chemical reactions involves the knowledge of the reaction mechanism. Despite activation barriers describing the kinetics or reaction energies reflecting thermodynamic aspects, identifying the underlying physics and chemistry along the reaction path contributes essentially to the overall understanding of reaction mechanisms, especially for catalysis. In the past years the reaction force has evolved as a valuable tool to discern between structural changes and electrons' rearrangement in chemical reactions. It provides a framework to analyze chemical reactions and additionally a rational partition of activation and reaction energies. Here, we propose to separate these energies further in atomic contributions, which will shed new insights in the underlying reaction mechanism. As first case studies we analyze two intramolecular proton transfer reactions. Despite the atom based separation of activation barriers and reaction energies, we also assign the participation of each atom in structural changes or electrons' rearrangement along the intrinsic reaction coordinate. These participations allow us to identify the role of each atom in the two reactions and therfore the underlying chemistry. The knowledge of the reaction chemistry immediately leads us to suggest replacements with other atom types that would facilitate certain processes in the reaction. The characterization of the contribution of each atom to the reaction energetics, additionally, identifies the reactive center of a molecular system that unites the main atoms contributing to the potential energy change along the reaction path.

  4. Cracking quantum physics you, this book and 200 years of sub-atomic science

    CERN Document Server

    Clegg, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Enter the invisible world of sub-atomic physics and discover the very core of existence. Cracking Quantum Physics takes you through every area of particle physics to clearly explain how our world was, and is, created, and breaks down the most complex theories into easily understandable elements. Subjects covered include:-Time travel-The Higgs field-Dark Matter-The anatomy of the elements-Enter the atom-Quantum reality-Quantum tunnelling-Electrodynamics-Accelerators and colliders-The Zeno effectAn easy-to-understand guide to some of the most complex and intriguing topics: Cracking Quantum Physics is a must-read for anyone who has ever wondered about the underlying forces and materials that make up the world as we know it.

  5. Ultra-precise single-ion atomic mass measurements on deuterium and helium-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafonte, S. L.; Van Dyck, R. S., Jr.

    2015-04-01

    The former University of Washington Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer (UW-PTMS), now located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany, was used in the decade before the move to determine new values for the deuteron atomic mass, M (2H+) = 2.013 553 212 745(40) u, and the deuterium atomic mass, M (2H) = 2.014 101 778 052(40) u, both of which are now more than an order-of-magnitude more accurate than the previous best 1994-MIT measurements of these quantities. The new value for the deuteron’s mass can then be used with the accepted 2010-CODATA proton mass and the most recent 1999-measurement of the 2.2 MeV gamma-ray binding energy of the deuteron to refine the neutron’s mass to mn = 1.008 664 916 018(435) u which has about half the uncertainty relative to the value computed using that previous 1994-MIT deuterium measurement. As a result, further improvements of mn must now come from a more accurate determination of the wavelength of this gamma ray. In this same period of time, this spectrometer has also been used to determine new values for the helion atomic mass, M (3He2+) = 3.014 932 246 668(43) u, and the neutral helium-3 atomic mass, M (3He) = 3.016 029 321 675(43) u, which are both about 60 times more accurate than the 2006-SMILETRAP measurements, but disagree with the 4.4-times less-accurate 2015-Florida-State measurements by 0.76 nu. It is expected that these helium-3 results will be used in the future 3H/3He mass ratio (to be determined by the Heidelberg, Germany version of the old UW-PTMS) in order to generate a more accurate value for the tritium atomic mass.

  6. Clock Technology Development in the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Dave; Thompson, R. J.; Klipstein, W. M.; Kohel, J.; Maleki, L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program. It focuses on clock technology development. The topics include: 1) Overview of LCAP Flight Projects; 2) Space Clock 101; 3) Physics with Clocks in microgravity; 4) Space Clock Challenges; 5) LCAP Timeline; 6) International Space Station (ISS) Science Platforms; 7) ISS Express Rack; 8) Space Qualification of Components; 9) Laser Configuration; 10) Clock Rate Comparisons: GPS Carrier Phase Frequency Transfer; and 11) ISS Model Views. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  7. Associations of objectively and subjectively measured physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PBSSs) calculated from physical activity (PA) questionnaires and accelerometry measures of PA with trabecular and cortical bone properties in prepubertal children. Methods. We compared PBSSs calculated from the bone-specific component of PA ...

  8. Physical and chemical nature of the scaling relations between adsorption energies of atoms on metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calle-Vallejo, F.; Martínez, J. I.; García Lastra, Juan Maria

    2012-01-01

    Despite their importance in physics and chemistry, the origin and extent of the scaling relations between the energetics of adsorbed species on surfaces remain elusive. We demonstrate here that scalability is not exclusive to adsorbed atoms and their hydrogenated species but rather a general phen...

  9. Atomic Physics of Shocked Plasma in Winds of Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution diffraction grating spectra of X-ray emission from massive stars obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revolutionized our understanding of their powerful, radiation-driven winds. Emission line shapes and line ratios provide diagnostics on a number of key wind parameters. Modeling of resolved emission line velocity profiles allows us to derive independent constraints on stellar mass-loss rates, leading to downward revisions of a factor of a few from previous measurements. Line ratios in He-like ions strongly constrain the spatial distribution of Xray emitting plasma, confirming the expectations of radiation hydrodynamic simulations that X-ray emission begins moderately close to the stellar surface and extends throughout the wind. Some outstanding questions remain, including the possibility of large optical depths in resonance lines, which is hinted at by differences in line shapes of resonance and intercombination lines from the same ion. Resonance scattering leads to nontrivial radiative transfer effects, and modeling it allows us to place constraints on shock size, density, and velocity structure

  10. Seventh Semiannual Report of the Commission to the Congress: Atomic Energy and the Physical Sciences, January 1950

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilienthal, David E.

    1950-01-01

    The document represents the seventh semiannual Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) report to Congress. The report sums up briefly the major activities and developments in the national atomic energy program in Part I. Part II focuses on research in the physical sciences and progress in atomic energy.

  11. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE HEAVY NEUTRAL ATOMS MEASURED BY IBEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeewoo; Kucharek, Harald; Möbius, Eberhard [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, 8 College Road, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Galli, André [Pysics Institute, University of Bern, Bern 3012 (Switzerland); Livadiotis, George; Fuselier, Steve A.; McComas, David J., E-mail: jtl29@wildcats.unh.edu [Southwest Research Institute, P.O. Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We investigate the directional distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the heliosphere by using heavy neutral maps generated with the IBEX-Lo instrument over three years from 2009 to 2011. The interstellar neutral (ISN) O and Ne gas flow was found in the first-year heavy neutral map at 601 keV and its flow direction and temperature were studied. However, due to the low counting statistics, researchers have not treated the full sky maps in detail. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the statistical significance of each pixel in the heavy neutral maps to get a better understanding of the directional distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the heliosphere. Here, we examine three statistical analysis methods: the signal-to-noise filter, the confidence limit method, and the cluster analysis method. These methods allow us to exclude background from areas where the heavy neutral signal is statistically significant. These methods also allow the consistent detection of heavy neutral atom structures. The main emission feature expands toward lower longitude and higher latitude from the observational peak of the ISN O and Ne gas flow. We call this emission the extended tail. It may be an imprint of the secondary oxygen atoms generated by charge exchange between ISN hydrogen atoms and oxygen ions in the outer heliosheath.

  12. First Measurement of the Atomic Electric Dipole Moment of $^{225}$Ra

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, R H; Kalita, M R; Lemke, N D; Bailey, K G; Bishof, M N; Greene, J P; Holt, R J; Korsch, W; Lu, Z -T; Mueller, P; O'Connor, T P; Singh, J T

    2015-01-01

    The radioactive radium-225 ($^{225}$Ra) atom is a favorable case to search for a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM). Due to its strong nuclear octupole deformation and large atomic mass, $^{225}$Ra is particularly sensitive to interactions in the nuclear medium that violate both time-reversal symmetry and parity. We have developed a cold-atom technique to study the spin precession of $^{225}$Ra atoms held in an optical dipole trap, and demonstrated the principle of this method by completing the first measurement of its atomic EDM, reaching an upper limit of $|$$d$($^{225}$Ra)$|$ $<$ $5.0\\!\\times\\!10^{-22}$ $e \\cdot$cm (95$\\%$ confidence).

  13. Measurement of the Temperature of Rubidium Atoms in a Magneto-Optical Trap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. F. Liwag

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We have performed measurements that can be used to determine the temperature of rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap.The expansion of the atomic cloud after switching off the current through the anti-Helmholtz coils was recorded with a CCDcamera. Analysis of the measurements revealed that the cloud of atoms in optical molasses expands at a velocity of 4 cm/s.

  14. PREFACE: Atomically controlled fabrication technology: new physics and functional device realization Atomically controlled fabrication technology: new physics and functional device realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Yuji; Kasai, Hideaki

    2011-10-01

    To realize next generation functional devices, atomic level controllability of the application and fabrication techniques is necessary. The conventional route to advance solid state devices, which involves improvement of 'instrumental accuracy', is now facing a major paradigm shift towards 'phenomenal accuracy'. Therefore, to keep up with this critical turn in the development of devices, pioneering research (both theoretical and experimental) on relevant materials, focusing on new physics at the atomic scale, is inevitable. This special section contains articles on the advancements in fabrication of functional devices with an emphasis on the exploration, clarification and understanding of atomistic phenomena. Research articles reporting theoretical and experimental findings on various materials such as semiconductors, metals, magnetic and organic systems, collectively present and 'capture' the appropriate processes and mechanisms of this rapidly developing field. The theoretical investigations employ first-principles quantum-mechanical simulations to clarify and bring about design principles and guidelines, or to develop more reliable computational methods. Experimental studies, on the other hand, introduce novel capabilities to build, view and manipulate materials at the atomic scale by employing pioneering techniques. Thus, the section pays significant attention to novel structures and properties and the accompanying fabrication techniques and design arising from the understanding of properties and structures at the atomic scale. We hope that researchers in the area of physics, materials science and engineering, interested in the development of functional devices via atomic level control, will find valuable information in this collaborative work. We are grateful to all of the authors for their contributions. Atomically controlled fabrication contents On the mechanism of carbon nanotube formation: the role of the catalyst G N Ayre, T Uchino, B Mazumder, A L Hector

  15. Physics and Its Multiple Roles in the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Charles D.

    2017-01-01

    The IAEA is the world's centre for cooperation in the nuclear field. It was set up as the world's ``Atoms for Peace'' organization in 1957 within the United Nations family. The Agency works with its Member States and multiple partners worldwide to promote the safe, secure and peaceful use of nuclear technologies. Three main areas of work underpin the IAEA's mission: Safety and Security, Science and Technology, and Safeguards and Verification. To carry out its mission, the Agency is authorized to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful uses throughout the world; foster the exchange of scientific and technical information on peaceful uses of atomic energy; and encourage the exchange of training of scientists and experts in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. Nowadays, nuclear physics and nuclear technology are applied in a great variety of social areas, such as power production, medical diagnosis and therapies, environmental protection, security control, material tests, food processing, waste treatments, agriculture and artifacts analysis. This presentation will cover the role and practical application of physics at the IAEA, and, in particular, focus on the role physics has, and will play, in nuclear security.

  16. Measurements of non-physical quantities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkin, Igor F.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the paper is to suggest an approach to development of a theory of measurements for non-physical quantities. For these measurements it is not possible to ensure traceability because of their exclusive nature as substantiated by the author. This theory is presented as particularly important one for social and human sciences.

  17. Energetic Neutral Atoms Measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX): Evidence for Multiple Heliosheath Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F. A.; Bzowski, M.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Kubiak, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Schwadron, N. A.; Sokół, J. M.; Zank, G. P.; Zirnstein, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) provide powerful diagnostics about the origin of the progenitor ion populations and the physical mechanisms responsible for their production. In this paper, we extend the work of Desai et al. and Fuselier et al. and combine and compare ENA spectra from the first 3 yr of observations by the IBEX-Hi and -Lo ENA imagers along the lines-of-sight (LOSs) from the inner heliosphere through to the locations of Voyager 1 and 2 with results from an updated physics-based model of the three-dimensional heliosphere and its constituent ion populations. Our results show that (1) IBEX ENA fluxes and spectra above ~0.7 keV measured along the LOSs of the Voyagers are consistent with several models in which the parent pickup ion (PUI) populations originate in the inner heliosheath, and (2) a significant fraction of lower energy ENAs between ~0.1-0.5 keV may originate from interstellar neutral gas charge-exchanging with a non-thermalized (hot) population of PUIs in the outer heliosheath beyond the heliopause. We discuss the implications of ENAs observed by IBEX originating from distinct parent populations as well as from two distinct locations in the heliospheric interface. These results indicate that ENA spectral measurements at various energies can be used to remotely probe distinct physical processes operating in vastly different regions of the distant heliosphere.

  18. Energetic Neutral Atoms Measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX): Evidence for Multiple Heliosheath Ion Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F.; Bzowski, M.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S.; Kubiak, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Schwadron, N.; Sokol, J. M.; Zank, G. P.; Zirnstein, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) provide powerful diagnostics about the origin of the progenitor ion populations and the physical mechanisms responsible for their production. In this paper, we extend the work of Desai et al. (2012) and Fuselier et al. (2012) and combine and compare ENA spectra from the first three years of observations by the IBEX-Hi and -Lo ENA imagers along the lines-of-sights (LOS) from the inner heliosphere through to the locations of Voyager 1 and 2 with results from an updated physics-based model of the 3D heliosphere and its constituent ion populations. Our results show that (1) IBEX ENA fluxes and spectra above ~0.7 keV measured along the LOS of the Voyagers are consistent with several models in which the parent pickup (PUI) populations originate in the inner heliosheath, and (2) a significant fraction of lower-energy ENAs between ~0.1-0.5 keV may originate from interstellar neutral gas charge-exchanging with a non-thermalized (hot) population of PUIs in the outer heliosheath beyond the heliopause. We discuss the implications of ENAs observed by IBEX originating from distinct parent populations as well as from two distinct locations in the heliospheric interface. These results indicate that ENA spectral measurements at various energies can be used to remotely probe distinct physical processes operating in vastly different regions of the distant heliosphere.

  19. Atomic Physics Effects on Convergent, Child-Langmuir Ion Flow between Nearly Transparent Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarius, John F. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Emmert, Gilbert A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2013-11-07

    Research during this project at the University of Wisconsin Fusion Technology Institute (UW FTI) on ion and neutral flow through an arbitrary, monotonic potential difference created by nearly transparent electrodes accomplished the following: (1) developed and implemented an integral equation approach for atomic physics effects in helium plasmas; (2) extended the analysis to coupled integral equations that treat atomic and molecular deuterium ions and neutrals; (3) implemented the key deuterium and helium atomic and molecular cross sections; (4) added negative ion production and related cross sections; and (5) benchmarked the code against experimental results. The analysis and codes treat the species D0, D20, D+, D2+, D3+, D and, separately at present, He0 and He+. Extensions enhanced the analysis and related computer codes to include He++ ions plus planar and cylindrical geometries.

  20. Nonlinear optical and atomic systems at the interface of physics and mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Garreau, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the interface between mathematics and physics, this book offers an introduction to the physics, the mathematics, and the numerical simulation of nonlinear systems in optics and atomic physics. The text covers a wide spectrum of current research on the subject, which is  an extremely active field in physics and mathematical physics, with a very broad range of implications, both for fundamental science and technological applications: light propagation in microstructured optical fibers, Bose-Einstein condensates, disordered systems, and the newly emerging field of nonlinear quantum mechanics.   Accessible to PhD students, this book will also be of interest to post-doctoral researchers and seasoned academics.

  1. Enhanced synthesis of Sn nanowires with aid of Se atom via physical vapor transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huacheng; Wang, Wendong; Liu, Peiwen; Wang, Guangming; Liu, Ankang; He, Zhe; Cheng, Zhaofang; Zhang, Shengli; Xia, Minggang

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate tin (Sn) nanowires growth enhanced by Selenium (Se) atoms via physical vapor transport (PVT) method. The Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy show that Sn nanowires are synthesized with a large quantity, good quality and high purity of Sn. The growth of Sn nanowires is attributed to Solid-Vapor-Liquid mechanism. The effects of gold nanoparticles catalyst, Si substrate, and Se atoms on Sn nanowires growth are discussed in detail. We find that Se atom plays a key role in the growth of Sn nanowires. The gaseous Sn atoms are absorbed by the eutectic alloy droplets of Se-Au at first. Then Sn atoms precipitate at the liquid-solid phase interface due to a supersaturated solution and form a one-dimensional nanostructure. In all, this PVT method could provide a simple and quick way to synthesize monocrystalline Sn nanowires with an advantage in both quality and quantity. The optical transmittance of Sn nanowires thin film with 2 μm2 density approaches 85-90% in visible wavelength. Therefore, the Sn nanowires thin film can be applied to transparent electrode along with their metallic property.

  2. Informal proposal for an Atomic Physics Facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Meron, M.

    1986-01-01

    An Atomic Physics Facility (APF) for experiments that will use radiation from a superconducting wiggler on the NSLS X-13 port is described. The scientific justification for the APF is given and the elements of the facility are discussed. It is shown that it will be possible to conduct a uniquely varied set of experiments that can probe most aspects of atomic physics. A major component of the proposal is a heavy-ion storage ring capable of containing ions with energies of about 10 MeV/nucleon. The ring can be filled with heavy ions produced at the BNL MP Tandem Laboratory or from independent ion-source systems. A preliminary cost estimate for the facility is presented.

  3. Status and perspectives of atomic physics research at GSI: The new GSI accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehlker, Th. E-mail: t.stoehlker@gsi.de; Backe, H.; Beyer, H.F.; Bosch, F.; Braeuning-Demian, A.; Hagmann, S.; Ionescu, D.C.; Jungmann, K.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kuehl, Th.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.; Quint, W

    2003-05-01

    A short overview on the results of atomic physics research at the storage ring ESR is given followed by a presentation of the envisioned atomic physics program at the planned new GSI facility. The proposed new GSI facility will provide highest intensities of relativistic beams of both stable and unstable heavy nuclei - up to a Lorentz factor of 24. At those relativistic velocities, the energies of optical transitions, such as for lasers, are boosted into the X-ray region and the high-charge state ions generate electric and magnetic fields of exceptional strength. Together with high beam intensities a range of important experiments can be anticipated, for example electronic transitions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions such as dynamically induced e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs, test of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in strong fields, and ions and electrons in ultra-high intensity femtosecond laser fields.

  4. From the Dawn of Nuclear Physics to the First Atomic Bombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolbright, Stephen; Schumacher, Jacob; Michonova-Alexova, Ekaterina

    2014-03-01

    This work gives a fresh look at the major discoveries leading to nuclear fission within the historical perspective. The focus is on the main contributors to the discoveries in nuclear physics, leading to the idea of fission and its application to the creation of the atomic bombs used at the end of the World War II. The present work is a more complete review on the history of the nuclear physics discoveries and their application to the atomic bomb. In addition to the traditional approach to the topic, focusing mainly on the fundamental physics discoveries in Europe and on the Manhattan Project in the United States, the nuclear research in Japan is also emphasized. Along with that, a review of the existing credible scholar publications, providing evidence for possible atomic bomb research in Japan, is provided. Proper credit is given to the women physicists, whose contributions had not always been recognized. Considering the historical and political situation at the time of the scientific discoveries, thought-provoking questions about decision-making, morality, and responsibility are also addressed. The work refers to the contributions of over 20 Nobel Prize winners. EM-A is grateful to Prof. Walter Grunden and to Prof. Emeritus Shadahiko Kano, Prof. Emeritus Monitori Hoshi for sharing their own notes, documents, and references, and to CCCU for sponsoring her participation in the 2013 Nuclear Weapons Seminar in Japan.

  5. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons - Spectroscopy and collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    This is the second volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 2 introduces lasers and quantum optics, while the main focus is on the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy, as well as on collision physics as the continuum counterpart to bound molecular states. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of gravity acceleration and gravity gradient with an atom interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrentino, F.; Lien, Y.-H.; Rosi, G.; Tino, G. M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, Universita di Firenze, INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bertoldi, A. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, F-91127 Palaiseau cedex (France); Bodart, Q. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, Universita di Firenze, INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); European Space Agency, Research and Scientific Support Department, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Cacciapuoti, L. [European Space Agency, Research and Scientific Support Department, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Angelis, M. de [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' CNR, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Prevedelli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126, Bologna (Italy)

    2012-09-10

    We demonstrate a method to measure the gravitational acceleration with a dual cloud atom interferometer; the use of simultaneous atom interferometers reduces the effect of seismic noise on the gravity measurement. At the same time, the apparatus is capable of accurate measurements of the vertical gravity gradient. The ability to determine the gravity acceleration and gravity gradient simultaneously and with the same instrument opens interesting perspectives in geophysical applications.

  7. Study on laser-irradiated Au plasmas by detailed configuration accounting atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ke; Qiao, Xiumei; Song, Peng; Zheng, Wudi; Qing, Bo; Zhang, Jiyan

    2017-10-01

    We coupled the one-dimensional multi-group radiation hydrodynamic code RDMG with the MBDCA atomic physics package, which uses the Matrix-Block Method to solve the coupled rate equations of the Detailed Configuration Accounting (DCA) non-LTE model, and applied the coupled code RDMG-MBDCA with different flux limiters fe to simulate a laser-irradiated CH-tamped Au disk experiment at the SGII laser facility. From our simulations, we found that a higher fe leads to faster laser ablation, earlier x-ray breakout time with a higher maximum x-ray flux, and an x-ray spectrum with a higher intensity. However, for the same fe, the simulation from RDMG with the DCA model shows a slower electron thermal conduction between the laser absorption region and the electron thermal conduction than that with the average-atom model. From our investigation, we can say that it is the lower ionization from DCA in the electron thermal conduction region which causes the slower electron thermal conduction between the two regions. The electron thermal conduction from DCA can be increased remarkably when the atomic processes of dielectronic capture and auto-ionization are turned off in simulation. This indicates that the atomic transition rate coefficients are important in determining the heat conduction and the plasma status for laser generated plasmas.

  8. Optical and magnetic properties of a transparent garnet film for atomic physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Saito

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the optical and magnetic properties of a transparent magnetic garnet with a particular focus on its applications to atomic physics experiments. The garnet film used in this study was a magnetically soft material that was originally designed for a Faraday rotator at optical communication wavelengths in the near infrared region. The film had a thickness of 2.1 μm and a small optical loss at a wavelength of λ=780 nm resonant with Rb atoms. The Faraday effect was also small and, thus, barely affected the polarization of light at λ=780 nm. In contrast, large Faraday rotation angles at shorter wavelengths enabled us to visualize magnetic domains, which were perpendicularly magnetized in alternate directions with a period of 3.6 μm. We confirmed the generation of an evanescent wave on the garnet film, which can be used for the optical observation and manipulation of atoms on the surface of the film. Finally, we demonstrated a magnetic mirror for laser-cooled Rb atoms using the garnet film.

  9. Physical properties of quantum field theory measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, J. M.; Thiemann, T.; Velhinho, J. M.

    1999-05-01

    Well known methods of measure theory on infinite dimensional spaces are used to study physical properties of measures relevant to quantum field theory. The difference of typical configurations of free massive scalar field theories with different masses is studied. We apply the same methods to study the Ashtekar-Lewandowski (AL) measure on spaces of connections. In particular we prove that the diffeomorphism group acts ergodically, with respect to the AL measure, on the Ashtekar-Isham space of quantum connections modulo gauge transformations. We also prove that a typical, with respect to the AL measure, quantum connection restricted to a (piecewise analytic) curve leads to a parallel transport discontinuous at every point of the curve.

  10. 2nd International School of Physics of Exotic Atoms "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Duclos, J; Fiorentini, Giovanni; Torelli, Gabriele; Exotic atoms : fundamental interactions and structure of matter

    1980-01-01

    The second course of the International School on the Physics of Exotic Atoms took place at the "Ettore Majorana" Center for Scien­ tific Culture, Erice, Sicily, during the period from March 25 to April 5, 1979. It was attended by 40 participants from 23 insti­ tutes in 8 countries. The purpose of the course was to review the various aspects of the physics of exotic atoms, with particular emphasis on the re­ sults obtained in the last two years, i.e., after the first course of the School (Erice, April 24-30, 1977). The course dealt with two main topics, A) Exotic atoms and fundamental interactions and B) Applications to the study of the structure of matter. One of the aims of the course was to offer an opportunity for the exchange of experiences between scientists working in the two fields. In view of this, the lectures in the morning discussed the more general arguments in a common session, whereas the more specialized topics were treated in the afternoon, in two parallel sections. Section A was or...

  11. Medical physics in Europe following recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Maria do Carmo; Drljević, Advan; Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Pesznyak, Csilla

    2016-01-01

    Background Medical physics is a health profession where principles of applied physics are mostly directed towards the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. The key role of the medical physics expert in safe and effective use of ionizing radiation in medicine was widely recognized in recent European reference documents like the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (2014), and European Commission Radiation Protection No. 174, European Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert (2014). Also the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been outspoken in supporting and fostering the status of medical physics in radiation medicine through multiple initiatives as technical and cooperation projects and important documents like IAEA Human Health Series No. 25, Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (2013) and the International Basic Safety Standards, General Safety Requirements Part 3 (2014). The significance of these documents and the recognition of the present insufficient fulfilment of the requirements and recommendations in many European countries have led the IAEA to organize in 2015 the Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe, where major issues in medical physics in Europe were discussed. Most important outcomes of the meeting were the recommendations addressed to European member states and the survey on medical physics status in Europe conducted by the IAEA and European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. Conclusions Published recommendations of IAEA Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe shall be followed and enforced in all European states. Appropriate qualification framework including education, clinical specialization, certification and registration of medical physicists shall be established and international recommendation regarding staffing levels in the field of medical physics shall be fulfilled in particular. European states have clear

  12. Medical physics in Europe following recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casar, Bozidar; Lopes, Maria do Carmo; Drljević, Advan; Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Pesznyak, Csilla

    2016-03-01

    Medical physics is a health profession where principles of applied physics are mostly directed towards the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. The key role of the medical physics expert in safe and effective use of ionizing radiation in medicine was widely recognized in recent European reference documents like the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (2014), and European Commission Radiation Protection No. 174, European Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert (2014). Also the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been outspoken in supporting and fostering the status of medical physics in radiation medicine through multiple initiatives as technical and cooperation projects and important documents like IAEA Human Health Series No. 25, Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (2013) and the International Basic Safety Standards, General Safety Requirements Part 3 (2014). The significance of these documents and the recognition of the present insufficient fulfilment of the requirements and recommendations in many European countries have led the IAEA to organize in 2015 the Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe, where major issues in medical physics in Europe were discussed. Most important outcomes of the meeting were the recommendations addressed to European member states and the survey on medical physics status in Europe conducted by the IAEA and European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. Published recommendations of IAEA Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe shall be followed and enforced in all European states. Appropriate qualification framework including education, clinical specialization, certification and registration of medical physicists shall be established and international recommendation regarding staffing levels in the field of medical physics shall be fulfilled in particular. European states have clear legal and moral

  13. A Fiber Optic Catalytic Sensor for Neutral Atom Measurements in Oxygen Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Vesel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The presented sensor for neutral oxygen atom measurement in oxygen plasma is a catalytic probe which uses fiber optics and infrared detection system to measure the gray body radiation of the catalyst. The density of neutral atoms can be determined from the temperature curve of the probe, because the catalyst is heated predominantly by the dissipation of energy caused by the heterogeneous surface recombination of neutral atoms. The advantages of this sensor are that it is simple, reliable, easy to use, noninvasive, quantitative and can be used in plasma discharge regions. By using different catalyst materials the sensor can also be applied for detection of neutral atoms in other plasmas. Sensor design, operation, example measurements and new measurement procedure for systematic characterization are presented.

  14. Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten P.

    Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope......Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope...

  15. Apparatus for measurement of electronic-ionization cross sections of metal atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovach, D.G.; Rakhovskii, V.I.; Shustryakov, V.M.

    1987-06-01

    Automated apparatus is described for measurement of the absolute cross section of multiple and total electronic of metal atoms. Intersecting electron and modulated atomic beams with time separation of the processes of ionization and ion extraction are used. The results of measurements of the dependences of ..gamma../sub +/, ..gamma../sup +/, and ..gamma../sup + +/ of Pb and Ba on electron energy are given and compared with the data in the literature.

  16. Measurement of nanomechanical properties of biomolecules using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Nicholas E; Drira, Zouheir; Yadavalli, Vamsi K

    2012-02-01

    The capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been rapidly expanding beyond topographical imaging to now allow for the analysis of a wide range of properties of diverse materials. The technique of nanoindentation, traditionally performed via dedicated indenters can now be reliably achieved using AFM instrumentation, enabling mechanical property determination at the nanoscale using the high spatial and force resolutions of the AFM. In the study of biological systems, from biomolecules to complexes, this technique provides insight into how mesoscale properties and functions may arise from a myriad of single biomolecules. In vivo and in situ analyses of native structures under physiological conditions as well as the rapid analysis of molecular species under a variety of experimental treatments are made possible with this technique. As a result, AFM nanoindentation has emerged as a critical tool for the study of biological systems in their natural state, further contributing to both biomaterial design and pharmacological research. In this review, we detail the theory and progression of AFM-based nanoindentation, and present several applications of this technique as it has been used to probe biomolecules and biological nanostructures from single proteins to complex assemblies. We further detail the many challenges associated with mechanical models and required assumptions for model validity. AFM nanoindentation capabilities have provided an excellent improvement over conventional nanomechanical tools and by integration of topographical data from imaging, enabled the rapid extraction and presentation of mechanical data for biological samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Using an Advanced Computational Laboratory Experiment to Extend and Deepen Physical Chemistry Students' Understanding of Atomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Gary G.

    2015-01-01

    A computational laboratory experiment is described, which involves the advanced study of an atomic system. The students use concepts and techniques typically covered in a physical chemistry course but extend those concepts and techniques to more complex situations. The students get a chance to explore the study of atomic states and perform…

  18. Challenges and opportunities for atomic physics at FAIR: The new GSI accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagmann, S. [Institut f. Kernphysik, University of Frankfurt (Germany) and GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: s.hagmann@gsi.de; Beyer, H.F. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Bosch, F. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Kluge, H.-J. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Kozhuharov, Ch. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Th. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Stoehlker, Th. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Ullrich, J. [Max Planck Inst. f. Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Moshammer, R. [Max Planck Inst. f. Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Mann, R. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Mokler, P. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Quint, W. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Schuch, R. [Department of Physics, University of Stockholm (Sweden); Warczak, A. [Department of Physics, University of Cracow (Poland)

    2005-12-15

    We present a short overview of the current status of the new accelerator project FAIR at GSI with the new double synchrotron rings and the multi-storage rings. The key features of the new facility, which provides intense relativistic beams of stable and unstable nuclei, are introduced and their relation to the anticipated experimental programs in nuclear structure physics and antiproton physics is shown. The main emphasis in this overview is given to the atomic physics program with unique opportunities which will be provided e.g. by bare U{sup 92+} ions with kinetic energies continuously variable between relativistic energies corresponding to {gamma} up to {approx_equal}35 down to kinetic energies of such ions in traps corresponding to fractions of a Kelvin.

  19. Quantum physics of light and matter photons, atoms, and strongly correlated systems

    CERN Document Server

    Salasnich, Luca

    2017-01-01

    This compact but exhaustive textbook, now in its significantly revised and expanded second edition, provides an essential introduction to the field quantization of light and matter with applications to atomic physics and strongly correlated systems. Following an initial review of the origins of special relativity and quantum mechanics, individual chapters are devoted to the second quantization of the electromagnetic field and the consequences of light field quantization for the description of electromagnetic transitions. The spin of the electron is then analyzed, with particular attention to its derivation from the Dirac equation. Subsequent topics include the effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the atomic spectra and the properties of systems composed of many interacting identical particles. The book also provides a detailed explanation of the second quantization of the non-relativistic matter field, i.e., the Schrödinger field, which offers a powerful tool for the investigation of many-body...

  20. Spectroscopy and atomic physics of highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni for tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Cheng, C.-C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers the spectroscopy and atomic physics for some highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni ions produced in tokamak plasmas. Forbidden and intersystem wavelengths for Cr and Ni ions are extrapolated and interpolated using the known wavelengths for Fe lines identified in solar-flare plasmas. Tables of transition probabilities for the B I, C I, N I, O I, and F I isoelectronic sequences are presented, and collision strengths and transition probabilities for Cr, Fe, and Ni ions of the Be I sequence are given. Similarities of tokamak and solar spectra are discussed, and it is shown how the atomic data presented may be used to determine ion abundances and electron densities in low-density plasmas.

  1. Testing for a cosmological influence on local physics using atomic and gravitational clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P. J.; Hellings, R. W.; Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.

    1983-01-01

    The existence of a possible influence of the large-scale structure of the universe on local physics is discussed. A particular realization of such an influence is discussed in terms of the behavior in time of atomic and gravitational clocks. Two natural categories of metric theories embodying a cosmic infuence exist. The first category has geodesic equations of motion in atomic units, while the second category has geodesic equations of motion in gravitational units. Equations of motion for test bodies are derived for both categories of theories in the appropriate parametrized post-Newtonian limit and are applied to the Solar System. Ranging data to the Viking lander on Mars are of sufficient precision to reveal (1) if such a cosmological influence exists at the level of Hubble's constant, and (2) which category of theories is appropriate for a descripton of the phenomenon.

  2. Physical properties of the HIV-1 capsid from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilla, Juan R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly dependent on its capsid. The capsid is a large container, made of ~1,300 proteins with altogether 4 million atoms. Although the capsid proteins are all identical, they nevertheless arrange themselves into a largely asymmetric structure made of hexamers and pentamers. The large number of degrees of freedom and lack of symmetry pose a challenge to studying the chemical details of the HIV capsid. Simulations of over 64 million atoms for over 1 μs allow us to conduct a comprehensive study of the chemical-physical properties of an empty HIV-1 capsid, including its electrostatics, vibrational and acoustic properties, and the effects of solvent (ions and water) on the capsid. The simulations reveal critical details about the capsid with implications to biological function.

  3. Atom interferometry experiments with lithium. Accurate measurement of the electric polarizability; Experiences d'interferometrie atomique avec le lithium. Mesure de precision de la polarisabilite electrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miffre, A

    2005-06-15

    Atom interferometers are very sensitive tools to make precise measurements of physical quantities. This study presents a measurement of the static electric polarizability of lithium by atom interferometry. Our result, {alpha} = (24.33 {+-} 0.16)*10{sup -30} m{sup 3}, improves by a factor 3 the most accurate measurements of this quantity. This work describes the tuning and the operation of a Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer in detail. The two interfering arms are separated by the elastic diffraction of the atomic wave by a laser standing wave, almost resonant with the first resonance transition of lithium atom. A set of experimental techniques, often complicated to implement, is necessary to build the experimental set-up. After a detailed study of the atom source (a supersonic beam of lithium seeded in argon), we present our experimental atom signals which exhibit a very high fringe visibility, up to 84.5 % for first order diffraction. A wide variety of signals has been observed by diffraction of the bosonic isotope at higher diffraction orders and by diffraction of the fermionic less abundant isotope. The quality of these signals is then used to do very accurate phase measurements. A first experiment investigates how the atom interferometer signals are modified by a magnetic field gradient. An absolute measurement of lithium atom electric polarizability is then achieved by applying a static electric field on one of the two interfering arms, separated by only 90 micrometers. The construction of such a capacitor, its alignment in the experimental set-up and its operation are fully detailed.We obtain a very accurate phase measurement of the induced Lo Surdo - Stark phase shift (0.07 % precision). For this first measurement, the final uncertainty on the electric polarizability of lithium is only 0.66 %, and is dominated by the uncertainty on the atom beam mean velocity, so that a further reduction of the uncertainty can be expected. (author)

  4. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B. (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  5. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Radiation forces on a three-level atom in the high-order Bessel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng-Ling; Yin, Jian-Ping

    2008-07-01

    The general expressions of the average dissipative and dipole forces acting on a Λ-configuration three-level atom in an arbitrary light field are derived by means of the optical Bloch equations based on the atomic density matrix elements, and the general properties of the average dissipative and dipole forces on a three-level atom in the linearly-polarized high-order Bessel beams (HBBs) are analysed. We find a resonant property (with two resonant peaks) of the dissipative force and a non-resonant property (with two pairs of non-resonant peaks) of the dipole force on the three-level atom, which are completely different from those on the two-level atom. Meanwhile we find a saturation effect of the average dissipative force in the HBB, which comes from the saturation of the upper-level population. Our study shows that the general expressions of the average dissipative and dipole forces on the three-level atom will be simplified to those of the two-level atom under the approximation of large detuning. Finally, we study the axial and azimuthal Doppler cooling of atoms in 1D optical molasses composed of two counter-propagating HBBs and discuss the azimuthal influence of the HBB on the Doppler cooling limit. We also find that the Doppler limit of atoms in the molasses HBB is slightly below the conventional Doppler limit of ħΓ(2κB) due to the orbital angular momentum lħ of the HBB.

  6. Quantum non-demolition measurement of photon number with atom-light interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S Y; Chen, L Q; Ou, Z Y; Hang, Weipingz

    2017-12-11

    When atoms are illuminated by an off-resonant field, the AC Stark effect will lead to phase shifts in atomic states. The phase shifts are proportional to the photon number of the off-resonant illuminating field. By measuring the atomic phase with newly developed atom-light hybrid interferometers, we can achieve quantum non-demolition measurement of the photon number of the optical field. In this paper, we analyze theoretically the performance of this QND measurement scheme by using the QND measurement criteria established by Holland et al [Phys. Rev. A 42, 2995 (1990)]. We find the quality of the QND measurement depends on the phase resolution of the atom-light hybrid interferometers. We apply this QND measurement scheme to a twin-photon state from parametric amplifier to verify the photon correlation in the twin beams. Furthermore, a sequential QND measurement procedure is analyzed for verifying the projection property of quantum measurement and for the quantum information tapping. Finally, we discuss the possibility for single-photon-number-resolving detection via QND measurement.

  7. A new technique for ultrafast velocity distribution measurements of atomic species by post-ionization laser induced fluorescent (PILIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F.L.

    1992-07-01

    A new method for single shot velocity distribution measurement of metallic impurities of relevance for studies involving continuous sources, such as limiter experiments in fusion devices or sputtering experiments, based in the combination of Resonant Enhanced Multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is proposed. High ionization yield and good time resolution are expected according to the numerical simulation of the experiment that has been run for several atomic species. Other possible applications of REMPI to plasma edge physics and to conventional techniques for velocity distribution measurements are briefly addressed. (Author) 8 refs.

  8. Towards a gravity measurement on cold antimatter atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Caravita, R; Amsler, C; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Bonomi, G; Bräunig, P; Bremer, J; Brusa, R S; Cabaret, L; Caccia, M; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Chlouba, K; Cialdi, S; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Demetrio, A; Di Noto, L; Doser, M; Dudarev, A; Ereditato, A; Evans, C; Ferragut, R; Fesel, J; Fontana, A; Forslund, O K; Gerber, S; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Gninenko, S; Guatieri, F; Haider, S; Holmestad, H; Huse, T; Jernelv, I L; Jordan, E; Kaltenbacher, T; Kellerbauer, A; Kimura, M; Koetting, T; Krasnicky, D; Lagomarsino, V; Lansonneur, P; Lebrun, P; Lehner, S; Liberadzka, J; Malbrunot, C; Mariazzi, S; Marx, L; Matveev, V; Mazzotta, Z; Nebbia, G; Nedelec, P; Oberthaler, M; Pacifico, N; Pagano, D; Penasa, L; Petracek, V; Pistillo, C; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Ravelli, L; Resch, L; Rienäcker, B; Røhne, O M; Rosenberger, S; Rotondi, A; Sacerdoti, M; Sandaker, H; Santoro, R; Scampoli, P; Sorrentino, F; Spacek, M; Storey, J; Strojek, I M; Testera, G; Tietje, I; Vamosi, S; Widmann, E; Yzombard, P; Zavatarelli, S; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    The present status of the AEGIS experiment at CERN (AD-06), on the way of forming anti-hydrogen for a first gravity measurement, is reviewed. Recent results in trapping and cooling positrons and antiprotons in the main electromagnetic traps are presented, including the storage time measurement obtained during the 2014 run with antiprotons, the observation of centrifugal separation of a mixed antiproton/electron plasma and positron accumulation and transfer results obtained during 2015.

  9. Physical Measurements of Sea Bed Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, V. B.; Pawlak, G.

    2004-12-01

    Physical measurements of sea bed roughness were obtained using a boat-mounted acoustic altimetry system combined with diver-based observations with the goal of resolving scales between 10 and 100cm. The surveyed area extends from the wave breaking zone to a depth of 20 m and is characterized by a highly inhomogeneous sea bed. Theory suggests that these roughness scales play an important role in wave energy dissipation, despite the lack of established parameterizations for these high roughness regimes. This study attempts to address this issue by investigating methods for quantifying roughness and examining the relationships between physical and hydrodynamic roughness. Results show a significant variation of roughness over the study area indicating limitations in defining a single scale for the shallow water region. Various statistical estimators are examined as potential candidates for roughness parameterization schemes, including rms, standard deviation and consecutive angle difference in order to characterize bed morphologies. Wave number spectral analysis is used to highlight the dominant roughness scales. The analysis is directed towards merging the various roughness parameters with wave field observations and numerical wave model output, to produce a roughness map that establishes a link between the physical roughness measurements and hydrodynamic wave friction at the study area.

  10. Direct Measurements of Terahertz Meta-atoms with Near-Field Emission of Terahertz Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serita, Kazunori; Darmo, Juraj; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2017-09-01

    We present the direct measurements of terahertz meta-atoms, an elementary unit of metamaterials, by using locally generated terahertz waves in the near-field region. In contrast to a conventional far-field terahertz spectroscopy or imaging, our technique features the localized emission of coherent terahertz pulses on a sub-wavelength scale, which has a potential for visualizing details of dynamics of each meta-atom. The obtained data show the near-field coupling among the meta-atoms and the impact of the electric field distribution from the excited meta-atom to neighbor meta-atoms. The observable LC resonance response is enhanced with an increase of numbers of meta-atoms. Furthermore, our approach also has a potential for visualizing the individual mode of meta-atom at different terahertz irradiation spots. These data can help us to understand the important role of the meta-atom in metamaterials and develop the novel terahertz components and devices such as active terahertz metamaterial and compact, high-sensitive bio-sensor devices.

  11. Application of the Finite Element Method in Atomic and Molecular Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shertzer, Janine

    2007-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a numerical algorithm for solving second order differential equations. It has been successfully used to solve many problems in atomic and molecular physics, including bound state and scattering calculations. To illustrate the diversity of the method, we present here details of two applications. First, we calculate the non-adiabatic dipole polarizability of Hi by directly solving the first and second order equations of perturbation theory with FEM. In the second application, we calculate the scattering amplitude for e-H scattering (without partial wave analysis) by reducing the Schrodinger equation to set of integro-differential equations, which are then solved with FEM.

  12. Nuclear-spin-independent short-range three-body physics in ultracold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Noam; Shotan, Zav; Kokkelmans, Servaas; Khaykovich, Lev

    2010-09-03

    We investigate three-body recombination loss across a Feshbach resonance in a gas of ultracold 7Li atoms prepared in the absolute ground state and perform a comparison with previously reported results of a different nuclear-spin state [N. Gross, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 163202 (2009)]. We extend the previously reported universality in three-body recombination loss across a Feshbach resonance to the absolute ground state. We show that the positions and widths of recombination minima and Efimov resonances are identical for both states which indicates that the short-range physics is nuclear-spin independent.

  13. Physics for computer science students with emphasis on atomic and semiconductor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, Narciso

    1991-01-01

    This text is the product of several years' effort to develop a course to fill a specific educational gap. It is our belief that computer science students should know how a computer works, particularly in light of rapidly changing tech­ nologies. The text was designed for computer science students who have a calculus background but have not necessarily taken prior physics courses. However, it is clearly not limited to these students. Anyone who has had first-year physics can start with Chapter 17. This includes all science and engineering students who would like a survey course of the ideas, theories, and experiments that made our modern electronics age possible. This textbook is meant to be used in a two-semester sequence. Chapters 1 through 16 can be covered during the first semester, and Chapters 17 through 28 in the second semester. At Queens College, where preliminary drafts have been used, the material is presented in three lecture periods (50 minutes each) and one recitation period per week, 15 weeks p...

  14. Measurement of radiative lifetime in atomic samarium using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-08

    Feb 8, 2014 ... In this paper, we report the investigations of lifetime measurement of odd-parity energy level 19009.52 cm. −1 .... introduced by an electronic delay generator between the two Q-switch pulses of Nd-YAG laser. The slope of the .... Our values of the lifetimes are free from the common systematic errors. Thus ...

  15. Atomic recombination rate determination through heat-transfer measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C.; Anderson, L. A.; Sheldahl, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental demonstration is presented which shows that under suitable conditions the volume recombination coefficient can be determined by measuring the heat transfer rate into the wall of a cylinder through which a dissociated stream is passing. The experimental results obtained are in agreement with those of other investigators.

  16. Experimental measurement of effective atomic number of composite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-02

    Aug 2, 2011 ... sample containers. They differed only in their heights. Therefore, the angle of acceptance was almost the same in each measurement. It may be argued that the multiple scattering of photons occurs whenever thick samples are used because such samples offer a larger mean free path for the incident ...

  17. Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms and measurement of the fine structure constant; Oscillations de Bloch d'atomes ultrafroids et mesure de la constante de structure fine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clade, P

    2005-10-15

    From a measurement of the recoil velocity of an atom absorbing a photon, it is possible to deduce a determination of the ratio h/m between the Planck constant and the mass of the atoms and then to deduce a value of the fine structure constant alpha. To do this measurement, we use the technique of Bloch oscillations, which allows us to transfer a large number of recoils to atoms. A velocity sensor, based on velocity selective Raman transition, enables us to measure the momentum transferred to the atoms. A measurement with a statistical uncertainty of 4.4 10{sup -9}, in conjunction with a careful study of systematic effects (5 10{sup -9}), has led us to a determination of alpha with an uncertainty of 6.7 10{sup -9}: {alpha}{sup -1}(Rb) = 137.03599878 (91). This uncertainty is similar to the uncertainty of the best determinations of alpha based on atom interferometry. (author)

  18. Atom land guided tour through the strange (and impossibly small) world of particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Butterworth, Jon

    2018-01-01

    For fans of Seven Brief Lessons on Physics and Astrophysics for People in a Hurry: a richly conjured world, in map and metaphor, of particle physics. Atom Land brings the impossibly small world of particle physics to life, taking readers on a guided journey through the subatomic world. Readers will sail the subatomic seas in search of electron ports, boson continents, and hadron islands. The sea itself is the quantum field, complete with quantum waves. Beware dark energy and extra dimensions, embodied by fantastical sea creatures prowling the far edges of the known world. Your tour guide through this whimsical—and highly instructive— world is Jon Butterworth, leading physicist at CERN (the epicenter of today’s greatest findings in physics). Over a series of journeys, he shows how everything fits together, and how a grasp of particle physics is key to unlocking a deeper understanding of many of the most profound mysteries—and science’s possible answers—in the known universe.

  19. Development of an electric field application system with transparent electrodes towards the electron EDM measurement with laser-cooled Fr atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Taisuke; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Inoue, Takeshi; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Kato, Ko; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Aiko; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of elementary particles is a good probe for new physics beyond the standard model. Since the francium (Fr) atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and laser-cooled atoms can have long coherence times, we plan to utilize laser-cooled Fr atoms for the electron EDM search experiment. Besides, a strong electric field is one of key issues for the EDM experiment. Recently, we have embarked on a development of the electric field application system with transparent electrodes coated by tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). The ITO electrodes break the difficulty in the coexistence of electrodes with several cooling laser lights. The actual electric field applied to the atom is evaluated by measuring the dc Stark shift for the laser-cooled rubidium atoms. In this presentation, the present status of the electric field application system will be reported. The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of elementary particles is a good probe for new physics beyond the standard model. Since the francium (Fr) atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and laser-cooled atoms can have long coherence times, we plan to utilize laser-cooled Fr atoms for the electron EDM search experiment. Besides, a strong electric field is one of key issues for the EDM experiment. Recently, we have embarked on a development of the electric field application system with transparent electrodes coated by tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). The ITO electrodes break the difficulty in the coexistence of electrodes with several cooling laser lights. The actual electric field applied to the atom is evaluated by measuring the dc Stark shift for the laser-cooled rubidium atoms. In this presentation, the present status of the electric field application system will be reported. This work is supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 26220705) and Tohoku University's Focused Research Project.

  20. Common Physical Framework Explains Phase Behavior and Dynamics of Atomic, Molecular, and Polymeric Network Formers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Whitelam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that the self-assembly of a diverse collection of building blocks can be understood within a common physical framework. These building blocks, which form periodic honeycomb networks and nonperiodic variants thereof, range in size from atoms to micron-scale polymers and interact through mechanisms as different as hydrogen bonds and covalent forces. A combination of statistical mechanics and quantum mechanics shows that one can capture the physics that governs the assembly of these networks by resolving only the geometry and strength of building-block interactions. The resulting framework reproduces a broad range of phenomena seen experimentally, including periodic and nonperiodic networks in thermal equilibrium, and nonperiodic supercooled and glassy networks away from equilibrium. Our results show how simple “design criteria” control the assembly of a wide variety of networks and suggest that kinetic trapping can be a useful way of making functional assemblies.

  1. Atomic layer deposition of metal oxide patterns on nonwoven fiber mats using localized physical compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, William J; Oldham, Christopher J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2014-06-25

    Patterning is an essential part of many industrial processes from printing to semiconductor manufacturing. In this work, we demonstrate a new method to pattern and selectively coat nonwoven textiles by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using compressive mask patterning. A physical mask combined with mechanical compression allows lateral definition and fidelity of the ALD coating to be controlled. We produce features of several sizes on different nonwoven fiber materials and demonstrate the ability to limit diffusion effects to within nonwoven mats is investigated by plan-view and cross-sectional imaging. Vertical growth is also analyzed by imaging coating depth into fiber mat stacks. We develop a fully quantitative transport model that describes well the effect of fiber structure and mechanical compression on the extent of coating under the physical mask. This method could be implemented for high-volume patterning for applications including flexible electronics.

  2. Preparation of spin squeezed atomic states by optical phase shift measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchoule, Isabelle; Moelmer, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a state vector analysis of the generation of atomic spin squeezing by measurement of an optical phase shift. The frequency resolution is improved when a spin squeezed sample is used for spectroscopy in place of an uncorrelated sample. When light is transmitted through an atomic sample some photons will be scattered out of the incident beam, and this has a destructive effect on the squeezing. We present quantitative studies for three limiting cases: the case of a sampl...

  3. Information and backaction due to phase contrast imaging measurements of cold atomic gases: beyond Gaussian states

    CERN Document Server

    Ilo-Okeke, Ebubechukwu O

    2016-01-01

    We further examine a theory of phase contrast imaging (PCI) of cold atomic gases, first introduced by us in Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 112}, 233602 (2014). We model the PCI measurement by directly calculating the entangled state between the light and the atoms due to the ac Stark shift, which induces a conditional phase shift on the light depending upon the atomic state. By interfering the light that passes through the BEC with the original light, one can obtain information of the atomic state at a single shot level. We derive an exact expression for a measurement operator that embodies the information obtained from PCI, as well as the back-action on the atomic state. By the use of exact expressions for the measurement process, we go beyond the continuous variables approximation such that the non-Gaussian regime can be accessed for both the measured state and the post-measurement state. Features such as the photon probability density, signal, signal variance, Fisher information, error of the measurement, and the b...

  4. Potential physics measurement with ALICE electromagnetic calorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, D.C., E-mail: dczhou@mail.ccnu.edu.c [Institute of Particle Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics, Ministry of Education, Wuhan (China); Mao, Y.X.; Wan, R.Z. [Institute of Particle Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics, Ministry of Education, Wuhan (China); Schutz, Y. [CERN, Geneva CH-1211, Switzerland and SUBATECH, IN2P3, Nantes (France); Yin, Z.-B.; Wang, Y.P.; Ma, K. [Institute of Particle Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics, Ministry of Education, Wuhan (China); Conesa, G. [Laboratori Nazionale Di Frascati, INFN, Via Enrico Fermi, 40, P.O box 13, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Kharlov, Y. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino, 142281 (Russian Federation); Wang, M.L.; Zhu, X.R.; Yin, X.; Cai, X. [Institute of Particle Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics, Ministry of Education, Wuhan (China)

    2010-03-01

    We present the two electromagnetic calorimeters of the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) experiment at LHC (Large Hadron Collider). One is the high-resolution PHOton Spectrometer (PHOS) made of lead tungsten crystals and the other is the ElectroMagnetic Calorimeter (EMCal), a Lead-Scintillator sampling calorimeter. They are dedicated to the measurement and identification of direct photons, light neutral mesons such as pi{sup 0}, eta and omega(782), and jets emitted in proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at the LHC energies. The PHOS is capable of precisely detecting photons with momentum range between 0.1 GeV/c and 100 GeV/c and the EMCal can extend the prompt photon and light neutral meson momentum measurement beyond 200 GeV/c. The objective of the study is to explore the physics of strongly interacting QCD matter under extreme conditions of energy density.

  5. Improving Sensitivity and Bandwidth of an Atomic Magnetometer using Quantum Non-Demolition Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vishal; Vasilakis, Georgios; Romalis, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The fundamental sensitivity of an atomic magnetometer is limited by spin projection noise. In the case of uniform spin relaxation, it is well understood that it is not possible to improve the sensitivity using spin squeezing induced by quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement for measurement time scales longer than spin relaxation time [1, 2]. It is however possible to increase the bandwidth of the magnetometer using QND measurement. Here we experimentally demonstrate, in excellent agreement with the theory, an improvement in the bandwidth of our scalar alkali vapor atomic magnetometer using continuous QND measurement. We also investigate the possibility of improving sensitivity of our magnetometer in the special case in which the spin relaxation is time dependent. The case of time dependent spin relaxation naturally arises in high polarization regime in an alkali-alkali spin-exchange relaxation dominated atomic sample. [1] S. F. Huelga, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3865 -- 3868, 1997. [2] M. Auzinsh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 173002, 2004.

  6. Measuring exchange interactions between atomic spins using electron spin resonance STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian; Choi, Taeyoung; Heinrich, Andreas; Lutz, Christopher

    Exchange interactions between neighboring atoms give rise to magnetic order in magnetic materials. As the size of the electronic device is miniaturized toward the limit of single atoms, magnetic nanostructures such as coupled atomic dimers and clusters are explored more as prototypes for possible data storage, spintronics as well as quantum computing applications. Characterizing inter-atom exchange interactions calls for increasing spatial resolution and higher energy sensitivity to better understand this fundamental interaction. Here, using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we studied a magnetically coupled atomic dimer consisting of two 3d transition metal atoms, with one adsorbed on an insulating layer (MgO) and the other attached to the STM tip. We demonstrate the ability to measure the short-range exchange interaction between the two atomic spins with orders-of-magnitude variation ranging from milli-eV all the way to micro-eV. This is realized by the successful combination of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) and electron spin resonance (ESR) techniques in STM implemented at different energy scales. We unambiguously confirm the exponential decay behavior of the direct exchange interaction.

  7. Concurrence Measurement for the Two-Qubit Optical and Atomic States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Concurrence provides us an effective approach to quantify entanglement, which is quite important in quantum information processing applications. In the paper, we mainly review some direct concurrence measurement protocols of the two-qubit optical or atomic system. We first introduce the concept of concurrence for a two-qubit system. Second, we explain the approaches of the concurrence measurement in both a linear and a nonlinear optical system. Third, we introduce some protocols for measuring the concurrence of the atomic entanglement system.

  8. Atom-Resonant Heralded Single Photons by Interaction-Free Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgramm, Florian; Astiz, Yannick A. de Icaza; Beduini, Federica A.; Cere, Alessandro; Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the generation of rubidium-resonant heralded single photons for quantum memories. Photon pairs are created by cavity-enhanced down-conversion and narrowed in bandwidth to 7 MHz with a novel atom-based filter operating by "interaction-free measurement" principles. At least 94% of the heralded photons are atom-resonant as demonstrated by a direct absorption measurement with rubidium vapor. A heralded auto-correlation measurement shows $g_c^{(2)}(0)=0.040 \\pm 0.012$, i.e., suppres...

  9. The influence of physical and physiological cues on atomic force microscopy-based cell stiffness assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chiou

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All of these cues show a significant influence on the cell elasticity assessment. Sharp AFM tips create a two-fold increase in the value of the effective Young's modulus (E(eff relative to that of the blunt tips. Higher indenting force at the same loading rate generates higher estimated cell elasticity. Increasing the operation temperature of the AFM leads to decreases in the cell stiffness because the structure of actin filaments becomes disorganized. The physiological cues include the presence of fetal bovine serum or extracellular matrix-coated surfaces, the culture passage number, and the culture density. Both fetal bovine serum and the extracellular matrix are critical for cells to maintain the integrity of actin filaments and consequently exhibit higher elasticity. Unlike primary cells, mouse kidney progenitor cells can be passaged and maintain their morphology and elasticity for a very long period without a senescence phenotype. Finally, cell elasticity increases with increasing culture density only in MDCK epithelial cells. In summary, for researchers who use AFM to assess cell elasticity, our results provide basic and significant information about the suitable selection of physical and physiological cues.

  10. Atomic-resolution measurements with a new tunable diode laser-based interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, R.M.; Zou, H.; Gonda, S.

    2004-01-01

    We develop a new implementation of a Michelson interferometer designed to make measurements with an uncertainty of less than 20 pm. This new method uses a tunable diode laser as the light source, with the diode laser wavelength continuously tuned to fix the number of fringes in the measured optical...... path. The diode laser frequency is measured by beating against a reference laser. High-speed, accurate frequency measurements of the beat frequency signal enables the diode laser wavelength to be measured with nominally 20-pm accuracy for the measurements described. The new interferometer design...... is lightweight and is mounted directly on an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope capable of atomic resolution. We report the simultaneous acquisition of an atomic resolution image, while the relative lateral displacement of the tip along the sample distance is measured with the new tunable diode...

  11. Use of O2 airglow for calibrating direct atomic oxygen measurements from sounding rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Witt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge about the distribution of atomic oxygen is crucial for many studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Direct measurements of atomic oxygen by the resonance fluorescence technique at 130 nm have been made from many sounding rocket payloads in the past. This measurement technique yields atomic oxygen profiles with good sensitivity and altitude resolution. However, accuracy is a problem as calibration and aerodynamics make the quantitative analysis challenging. Most often, accuracies better than a factor 2 are not to be expected from direct atomic oxygen measurements. As an example, we present results from the NLTE (Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium sounding rocket campaign at Esrange, Sweden, in 1998, with simultaneous O2 airglow and O resonance fluorescence measurements. O number densities are found to be consistent with the nightglow analysis, but only within the uncertainty limits of the resonance fluorescence technique. Based on these results, we here describe how better atomic oxygen number densities can be obtained by calibrating direct techniques with complementary airglow photometer measurements and detailed aerodynamic analysis. Night-time direct O measurements can be complemented by photometric detection of the O2 (b1∑g+−X3∑g- Atmospheric Band at 762 nm, while during daytime the O2 (a1Δg−X3∑g- Infrared Atmospheric Band at 1.27 μm can be used. The combination of a photometer and a rather simple resonance fluorescence probe can provide atomic oxygen profiles with both good accuracy and good height resolution.

  12. Atomic physics with highly-charged heavy ions at the GSI future facility: The scientific program of the SPARC collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumberidze, A. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: a.gumberidze@gsi.de; Bosch, F. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Th. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Schuch, R. [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Stoehlker, Th. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    The proposed new international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will open up exciting and far-reaching perspectives for atomic physics research in the realm of highly-charged heavy ions: it will provide the highest intensities of relativistic beams of both stable and unstable heavy nuclei. In combination with the strongest possible electromagnetic fields produced by the nuclear charge of the heaviest nuclei, this will allow to extend atomic spectroscopy up to the virtual limits of atomic matter. Based on the experience and results already achieved at the experimental storage ring (ESR), a substantial progress in atomic physics research has to be expected in this domain, due to a tremendous improvement of intensity, energy and production yield of both stable and unstable nuclei.

  13. pedometer-measured physical activity, self-reported physical activity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    physical activity and sedentary behaviour in older adults? Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:62. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1479-5868-8-62]. 17. World Health Organization. Global Recommendations on Physical Activity for. Health. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2010. 18. Tudor-Locke C, Sisson SB, Collova T, Lee SM, ...

  14. Intense electron beams from GaAs photocathodes as a tool for molecular and atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, Claude

    2009-10-28

    We present cesium-coated GaAs photocathodes as reliable sources of intense, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams in atomic and molecular physics experiments. In long-time operation of the Electron Target of the ion storage ring TSR in Heidelberg, cold electron beams could be realised at steadily improving intensity and reliability. Minimisation of processes degrading the quantum efficiency allowed to increase the extractable current to more than 1mA at usable cathode lifetimes of 24 h or more. The benefits of the cold electron beam with respect to its application to electron cooling and electron-ion recombination experiments are discussed. Benchmark experiments demonstrate the superior cooling force and energy resolution of the photoelectron beam compared to its thermionic counterparts. The long period of operation allowed to study the long-time behaviour of the GaAs samples during multiple usage cycles at the Electron Target and repeated in-vacuum surface cleaning by atomic hydrogen exposure. An electron emission spectroscopy setup has been implemented at the photocathode preparation chamber of the Electron Target. Among others, this new facility opened the way to a novel application of GaAs (Cs) photocathodes as robust, ultraviolet-driven electron emitters. Based on this principle, a prototype of an electron gun, designed for implementation at the HITRAP setup at GSI, has been built and taken into operation successfully. (orig.)

  15. Optical Atomic Clock for Fundamental Physics and Precision Metrology in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jason; Le, Thanh; Kulas, Sascha; Yu, Nan

    2017-04-01

    The maturity of optical atomic clocks (OC), which operate at optical frequencies for higher quality-factor as compared to their microwave counterparts, has rapidly progressed to the point where lab-based systems now outperform the record cesium clocks by orders of magnitude in both accuracy and stability. We will present our efforts to develop a strontium optical clock testbed at JPL, aimed towards extending the exceptional performance demonstrated by OCs from state-of-the-art laboratory designs to a transportable instrument that can fit within the space and power constraints of e.g. a single express rack onboard the International Space Station. The overall technology will find applications for future fundamental physics research, both on ground and in space, precision time keeping, and NASA/JPL time and frequency test capabilities. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. The pope of physics Enrico Fermi and the birth of the atomic age

    CERN Document Server

    Segre, Gino

    2016-01-01

    Enrico Fermi is unquestionably among the greats of the world's physicists, the most famous Italian scientist since Galileo. Called the Pope by his peers, he was regarded as infallible in his instincts and research. His discoveries changed our world; they led to weapons of mass destruction and conversely to life-saving medical interventions. This unassuming man struggled with issues relevant today, such as the threat of nuclear annihilation and the relationship of science to politics. Fleeing Fascism and anti-Semitism, Fermi became a leading figure in America's most secret project: building the atomic bomb. The last physicist who mastered all branches of the discipline, Fermi was a rare mixture of theorist and experimentalist. His rich legacy encompasses key advances in fields as diverse as comic rays, nuclear technology, and early computers. In their revealing book, The Pope of Physics, Gino Segré and Bettina Hoerlin bring this scientific visionary to life. An examination of the human dramas that touched F...

  17. Measurement of the Magnetic Moment of the Negative Muon Bound in Different Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Mamedov, T N; Gritsaj, K I; Kormann, O; Major, J V; Stoikov, A V; Zimmermann, U

    2001-01-01

    Theoretical calculations show that the magnetic moment of the electron and the negative muon in a bound state in an atom should be different from the magnetic moment of the free particle due to their relativistic motion. There are also additional radiative corrections to the magnetic moment of a bound electron (muon) due to the presence of the strong Coulomb field of the atomic nucleus. The results of the measurements of the magnetic moment of the negative muon in carbon, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, and zinc are presented. The accuracy of the measurements makes it possible to prove the dependence of the relativistic correction to the magnetic moment of a bound muon on Z of the atom.

  18. Improving the physical realism and structural accuracy of protein models by a two-step atomic-level energy minimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Zhang, Yang

    2011-11-16

    Most protein structural prediction algorithms assemble structures as reduced models that represent amino acids by a reduced number of atoms to speed up the conformational search. Building accurate full-atom models from these reduced models is a necessary step toward a detailed function analysis. However, it is difficult to ensure that the atomic models retain the desired global topology while maintaining a sound local atomic geometry because the reduced models often have unphysical local distortions. To address this issue, we developed a new program, called ModRefiner, to construct and refine protein structures from Cα traces based on a two-step, atomic-level energy minimization. The main-chain structures are first constructed from initial Cα traces and the side-chain rotamers are then refined together with the backbone atoms with the use of a composite physics- and knowledge-based force field. We tested the method by performing an atomic structure refinement of 261 proteins with the initial models constructed from both ab initio and template-based structure assemblies. Compared with other state-of-art programs, ModRefiner shows improvements in both global and local structures, which have more accurate side-chain positions, better hydrogen-bonding networks, and fewer atomic overlaps. ModRefiner is freely available at http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/ModRefiner. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Measurements of amplitude and frequencies of subwavelength oscillations of atoms using resonance fluorescence of three levels atom in two standing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enaki, Nicolae; Bazgan, Sergiu; Mihailescu, Ion

    2015-02-01

    The resonance fluorescence of an atomic (or ion) system implanted in the materials driving two standing waves of the optical cavity is studied taking into consideration the delocalization of the atom. It is demonstrated that the resonance fluorescence depends on the position of atoms (or ions) relative the nodes or antinodes of standing waves. This situation gives us the possibility to measure the amplitude of mechanical oscillations of these radiators implanted in organic or inorganic materials. It is proposed to measure the amplitude of the mechanical oscillations relative to the equilibrium position using the time changes in the positions of the five peaks of the resonance fluorescence spectrum. In this case, the small oscillation amplitude relative to the standing wave length can drastically change the spectrum of resonance fluorescence of such atoms. The proposed method can be used in the measurements of the nanostructure temperature (or bio-molecule temperature deformation).

  20. A New Computerised Advanced Theory of Mind Measure for Children with Asperger Syndrome: The ATOMIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Renae B.; Sofronoff, Kate

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the ability of children with Asperger Syndrome (AS) to attribute mental states to characters in a new computerised, advanced theory of mind measure: The Animated Theory of Mind Inventory for Children (ATOMIC). Results showed that children with AS matched on IQ, verbal comprehension, age and gender performed equivalently on…

  1. Influence of biosurfactant on interactive forces between mutans streptococci and enamel measured by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoogmoed, CG; Dijkstra, RJB; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    Although interactive forces, influenced by environmental conditions, between oral bacteria and tooth surfaces are important for the development of plaque, they have never been estimated. It is hypothesized that interactive forces, as measured by atomic force microscopy, between enamel with or

  2. Laboratory Measurements of Charge Transfer on Atomic Hydrogen at Thermal Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havener, C. C.; Vane, C. R.; Krause, H. F.; Stancil, P. C.; Mroczkowski, T.; Savin, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    We describe our ongoing program to measure velocity dependent charge transfer (CT) cross sections for selected ions on atomic hydrogen using the ion-aloin merged-beams apparatus at Oak Ridge Natioiial Laboralory. Our focus is on those ions for which CT plays an important role in determining the ionization structure, line emis sion, and thermal structure of observed cosmic photoionized plasmas.

  3. Youth physical activity resource use and activity measured by accelerometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andréa L; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    To examine whether use of physical activity resources (eg, parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. One hundred eleven adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported use of a physical activity resource (none /1+ resources). The main outcomes were total minutes spent in daily (1) moderate-vigorous physical activity and (2) vigorous physical activity. Using a physical activity resource was significantly associated with total minutes in moderate-vigorous physical activity. African Americans and males had significantly greater moderate-vigorous physical activity. Results from this study support the development and use of physical activity resources.

  4. Youth Physical Activity Resources Use and Activity Measured by Accelerometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andréa L.; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether utilization of physical activity resources (eg, parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. Methods 111 adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported utilization of a physical activity resource (none/1+ resources). The main outcomes were total minutes spent in daily 1) moderate-vigorous physical activity and 2) vigorous physical activity. Results Utilizing a physical activity resource was significantly associated with total minutes in moderate-vigorous physical activity. African-Americans and males had significantly greater moderate-vigorous physical activity. Conclusions Results from this study support the development and use of physical activity resources. PMID:21204684

  5. Derivation of Inter-Atomic Force Constants of Cu2O from Diffuse Neutron Scattering Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Makhsun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Neutron scattering intensity from Cu2O compound has been measured at 10 K and 295 K with High Resolution Powder Diffractometer at JRR-3 JAEA. The oscillatory diffuse scattering related to correlations among thermal displacements of atoms was observed at 295 K. The correlation parameters were determined from the observed diffuse scattering intensity at 10 and 295 K. The force constants between the neighboring atoms in Cu2O were estimated from the correlation parameters and compared to those of Ag2O

  6. Midinfrared absorption measured at a lambda/400 resolution with an atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houel, Julien; Homeyer, Estelle; Sauvage, Sébastien; Boucaud, Philippe; Dazzi, Alexandre; Prazeres, Rui; Ortéga, Jean-Michel

    2009-06-22

    Midinfrared absorption can be locally measured using a detection combining an atomic force microscope and a pulsed excitation. This is illustrated for the midinfrared bulk GaAs phonon absorption and for the midinfrared absorption of thin SiO(2) microdisks. We show that the signal given by the cantilever oscillation amplitude of the atomic force microscope follows the spectral dependence of the bulk material absorption. The absorption spatial resolution achieved with microdisks is around 50 nanometer for an optical excitation around 22 micrometer wavelength.

  7. Measurement of the $\\pi K$ atom lifetime and the $\\pi K$ scattering length

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva, B.; The PS212 collaboration; Allkofer, Y.; Amsler, C.; Anania, A.; Aogaki, S.; Benelli, A.; Brekhovskikh, V.; Cechak, T.; Chiba, M.; Chliapnikov, P.; Drijard, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dumitriu, D.; Federicova, P.; Fluerasu, D.; Gorin, A.; Gorchakov, O.; Gritsay, K.; Guaraldo, C.; Gugiu, M.; Hansroul, M.; Hons, Z.; Horikawa, S.; Iwashita, Y.; Karpukhin, V.; Kluson, J.; Kobayashi, M.; Kruglov, V.; Kruglova, L.; Kulikov, A.; Kulish, E.; Kuptsov, A.; Lamberto, A.; Lanaro, A.; Lednicky, R.; Marinas, C.; Martincik, J.; Nemenov, L.; Nikitin, M.; Okada, K.; Olchevskii, V.; Pentia, M.; Penzo, A.; Plo, M.; Prusa, P.; Rappazzo, G.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ryazantsev, A.; Rykalin, V.; Saborido, J.; Schacher, J.; Sidorov, A.; Smolik, J.; Takeutchi, F.; Tauscher, L.; Trojek, T.; Trusov, S.; Urban, T.; Vrba, T.; Yazkov, V.; Yoshimura, Y.; Zhabitsky, M.; Zrelov, P.

    2017-09-19

    After having announced the statistically significant observation (5.6~$\\sigma$) of the new exotic $\\pi K$ atom, the DIRAC experiment at the CERN proton synchrotron presents the measurement of the corresponding atom lifetime, based on the full $\\pi K$ data sample: $\\tau = (5.5^{+5.0}_{-2.8}) \\cdot 10^{-15}s$. By means of a precise relation ($<1\\%$) between atom lifetime and scattering length, the following value for the S-wave isospin-odd $\\pi K$ scattering length $a_0^{-}~=~\\frac{1}{3}(a_{1/2}-a_{3/2})$ has been derived: $\\left|a_0^-\\right| = (0.072^{+0.031}_{-0.020}) M_{\\pi}^{-1}$.

  8. First $\\pi K$ atom lifetime and $\\pi K$ scattering length measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva, B; Allkofer, Y; Amsler, C; Anania, A; Aogaki, S; Benelli, A; Brekhovskikh, V; Cechak, T; Chiba, M; Chliapnikov, P; Ciocarlan, C; Constantinescu, S; Doskarova, P; Drijard, D; Dudarev, A; Duma, M; Dumitriu, D; Fluerasu, D; Gorin, A; Gorchakov, O; Gritsay, K; Guaraldo, C; Gugiu, M; Hansroul, M; Hons, Z; Horikawa, S; Iwashita, Y; Karpukhin, V; Kluson, J; Kobayashi, M; Kruglov, V; Kruglova, L; Kulikov, A; Kulish, E; Kuptsov, A; Lamberto, A; Lanaro, A; Lednicky, R; Marinas, C; Martincik, J; Nemenov, L; Nikitin, M; Okada, K; Olchevskii, V; Pentia, M; Penzo, A; Plo, M; Ponta, T; Prusa, P; Rappazzo, G; Romero Vidal, A; Ryazantsev, A; Rykalin, V; Schacher, J; Sidorov, A; Smolik, J; Sugimoto, S; Takeutchi, F; Tauscher, L; Trojek, T; Trusov, S; Urban, T; Vrba, T; Yazkov, V; Yoshimura, Y; Zhabitsky, M; Zrelov, P

    2014-01-01

    The results of a search for hydrogen-like atoms consisting of $\\pi^{\\mp}K^{\\pm}$ mesons are presented. Evidence for $\\pi K$ atom production by 24 GeV/c protons from CERN PS interacting with a nickel target has been seen in terms of characteristic $\\pi K$ pairs from their breakup in the same target ($178 \\pm 49$) and from Coulomb final state interaction ($653 \\pm 42$). Using these results the analysis yields a first value for the $\\pi K$ atom lifetime of $\\tau=(2.5_{-1.8}^{+3.0})$ fs and a first model-independent measurement of the S-wave isospin-odd $\\pi K$ scattering length $\\left|a_0^-\\right|=\\frac{1}{3}\\left|a_{1/2}-a_{3/2}\\right|= \\left( 0.11_{-0.04}^{+0.09} \\right)M_{\\pi}^{-1}$ ($a_I$ for isospin $I$).

  9. Error sources in atomic force microscopy for dimensional measurements: Taxonomy and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinello, F.; Voltan, A.; Savio, E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aimed at identifying the error sources that occur in dimensional measurements performed using atomic force microscopy. In particular, a set of characterization techniques for errors quantification is presented. The discussion on error sources is organized in four main categories......: scanning system, tip-surface interaction, environment, and data processing. The discussed errors include scaling effects, squareness errors, hysteresis, creep, tip convolution, and thermal drift. A mathematical model of the measurement system is eventually described, as a reference basis for errors...

  10. Methods to Measure Physical Activity Behaviors in Health Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzhugh, Eugene C.

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) is an important concept to measure in health education research. The health education researcher might need to measure physical activity because it is the primary measure of interest, or PA might be a confounding measure that needs to be controlled for in statistical analysis. The purpose of this commentary is to…

  11. Cold Atom Interferometers Used In Space (CAIUS) for Measuring the Earth's Gravity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraz, O.; Luca, M.; Siemes, C.; Haagmans, R.; Silvestrin, P.

    2016-12-01

    In the past decades, it has been shown that atomic quantum sensors are a newly emerging technology that can be used for measuring the Earth's gravity field. There are two ways of making use of that technology: One is a gravity gradiometer concept and the other is in a low-low satellite-to-satellite ranging concept. Whereas classical accelerometers typically suffer from high noise at low frequencies, Cold Atom Interferometers are highly accurate over the entire frequency range. We recently proposed a concept using cold atom interferometers for measuring all diagonal elements of the gravity gradient tensor and the full spacecraft angular velocity in order to achieve better performance than the GOCE gradiometer over a larger part of the spectrum, with the ultimate goals of determining the fine structures in the gravity field better than today. This concept relies on a high common mode rejection, which relaxes the drag free control compare to GOCE mission, and benefits from a long interaction time with the free falling clouds of atoms due to the micro gravity environment in space as opposed to the 1-g environment on-ground. Other concept is also being studied in the frame of NGGM, which relies on the hybridization between quantum and classical techniques to improve the performance of accelerometers. This could be achieved as it is realized in frequency measurements where quartz oscillators are phase locked on atomic or optical clocks. This technique could correct the spectrally colored noise of the electrostatic accelerometers in the lower frequencies. In both cases, estimation of the Earth gravity field model from the instruments has to be evaluated taking into account different system parameters such as attitude control, altitude of the satellite, time duration of the mission, etc. Miniaturization, lower consumptions and upgrading Technical Readiness Level are the key engineering challenges that have to be faced for these space quantum technologie.

  12. Davisson-Germer Prize in Atomic or Surface Physics Talk: Few-body processes in the quantum limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Chris

    2010-03-01

    Recent theoretical studies of low energy collisions and resonant processes will be reviewed. These include the process of molecular dissociation induced by electron collision, and the role of universal Efimov physics in collisions of three or four atoms in an ultracold gas. The role of experiment in testing and advancing our understanding of these few-body studies will also be discussed.

  13. The Development of Open University New Generation Learning Model Using Research and Development for Atomic Physics Course PEFI4421

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayekti

    2017-01-01

    This research was aimed at developing printed teaching materials of Atomic Physics PEFI4421 Course using Research and Development (R & D) model; which consisted of three major set of activities. The first set consisted of seven stages, the second set consisted of one stage, and the third set consisted of seven stages. This research study was…

  14. Davisson-Germer Prize Talk: Many-Body Physics with Atomic Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold atomic gases confined to optical lattices have proven to be highly versatile and tunable systems for realizing novel quantum states of matter. We are using Fermi gases of 6 Li atoms in our laboratory to explore several goals related to the strong correlations that arise in these systems. We have realized the Hubbard model, which has long been suspected of containing the essential ingredients of high temperature superconductivity. We measured the compressibility of the Mott insulating phase that occurs near half filling (1 atom/site), thus demonstrating the excitation gap of the Mott insulator. Progress in this field, however, has been hampered by an inability to cool to low enough temperatures to achieve the most ambitious goals. To address this problem, we have developed the compensated optical lattice method to enable evaporative cooling in the lattice. With this method, we have cooled the Mott insulator sufficiently far to observe short-range antiferromagnetic correlations using Bragg scattering of light. We are currently exploring new methods for entropy storage and redistribution to achieve even lower entropy in the antiferromagnetic phase. Motivated by the enhancement of quantum correlations in low dimensions, we are also exploring Fermi gases in quasi-one-dimension (1D). A deep 2D optical lattice produces an array of 1D tubes which can be weakly coupled by reducing the lattice depth, thus increasing the lattice hopping t between them. We observe a crossover from 1D-like to 3D-like behavior in the phase separation of a spin-imbalanced Fermi gas with increasing t. While this crossover occurs at a value of t that depends on interaction, we find that the crossover location is universally dependent upon the scaled hopping t /ɛb , where ɛb is the pair binding energy. Finally, I will also report progress on measuring the speed of sound of the charge and spin modes in a 1D Fermi gas. Work supported by an ARO MURI, NSF, and the Robert A Welch Foundation.

  15. A three-axis atomic magnetometer for temperature-dependence measurements of fields in a magnetically shielded environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenfeng; Liu, Gang; Li, Rujie; Quan, Wei; Jiang, Liwei; Duan, Lihong

    2017-09-01

    High performance spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) gyroscopes require stable and homogeneous magnetic fields. These fields are usually sensitive to temperature. In this paper, a three-axis atomic magnetometer to measure the temperature dependence of fields inside the magnetic shields for a SERF gyroscope prototype is constructed and tested. Based on a three-beam configuration, three-axis vector capability is obtained by a cross-modulation scheme of the magnetic field components along orthogonal axes and subsequent demodulation of the relevant probe signals. The relative temperature dependence of magnetic fields inside the prototype shields is measured to be 0.03 -0.12~K-1 . The results are useful for estimating the necessary precision of temperature control in both a SERF gyroscope and its fundamental physics applications.

  16. Measuring teacher effectiveness in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Judith E

    2013-12-01

    This article summarizes the research base on teacher effectiveness in physical education from a historical perspective and explores the implications of the recent emphasis on student performance and teacher observation systems to evaluate teachers for physical education. The problems and the potential positive effects of using student performance scores as well as establishing a comprehensive evaluation program are explored with supportive evidence that some level of accountability is necessary in our field to make significant change.

  17. Local, atomic-level elastic strain measurements of metallic glass thin films by electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebner, C. [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sarkar, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Rajagopalan, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Rentenberger, C., E-mail: christian.rentenberger@univie.ac.at [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    A novel technique is used to measure the atomic-level elastic strain tensor of amorphous materials by tracking geometric changes of the first diffuse ring of selected area electron diffraction patterns (SAD). An automatic procedure, which includes locating the centre and fitting an ellipse to the diffuse ring with sub-pixel precision is developed for extracting the 2-dimensional strain tensor from the SAD patterns. Using this technique, atomic-level principal strains from micrometre-sized regions of freestanding amorphous Ti{sub 0.45}Al{sub 0.55} thin films were measured during in-situ TEM tensile deformation. The thin films were deformed using MEMS based testing stages that allow simultaneous measurement of the macroscopic stress and strain. The calculated atomic-level principal strains show a linear dependence on the applied stress, and good correspondence with the measured macroscopic strains. The calculated Poisson’s ratio of 0.23 is reasonable for brittle metallic glasses. The technique yields a strain accuracy of about 1×10{sup −4} and shows the potential to obtain localized strain profiles/maps of amorphous thin film samples. - Highlights: • A TEM method to measure elastic strain in metallic glass films is proposed. • Method is based on tracking geometric changes in TEM diffraction patterns. • An automatic procedure is developed for extracting the local strain tensor. • Atomic-level strain in amorphous TiAl film was analysed during in-situ deformation. • Capability of the method to obtain micrometer scale strain profiles/maps is shown.

  18. Physics-based all-atom modeling of RNA energetics and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Louis G; Zhao, Jianbo; Mathews, David H; Turner, Douglas H

    2017-09-01

    The database of RNA sequences is exploding, but knowledge of energetics, structures, and dynamics lags behind. All-atom computational methods, such as molecular dynamics, hold promise for closing this gap. New algorithms and faster computers have accelerated progress in improving the reliability and accuracy of predictions. Currently, the methods can facilitate refinement of experimentally determined nuclear magnetic resonance and x-ray structures, but are 'unreliable' for predictions based only on sequence. Much remains to be discovered, however, about the many molecular interactions driving RNA folding and the best way to approximate them quantitatively. The large number of parameters required means that a wide variety of experimental results will be required to benchmark force fields and different approaches. As computational methods become more reliable and accessible, they will be used by an increasing number of biologists, much as x-ray crystallography has expanded. Thus, many fundamental physical principles underlying the computational methods are described. This review presents a summary of the current state of molecular dynamics as applied to RNA. It is designed to be helpful to students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty who are considering or starting computational studies of RNA. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1422. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1422. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Measuring the Newtonian constant of gravitation G with an atomic interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevedelli, M; Cacciapuoti, L; Rosi, G; Sorrentino, F; Tino, G M

    2014-10-13

    We have recently completed a measurement of the Newtonian constant of gravitation G using atomic interferometry. Our result is G=6.67191(77)(62)×10(-11) m(3) kg(-1) s(-2) where the numbers in parenthesis are the type A and type B standard uncertainties, respectively. An evaluation of the measurement uncertainty is presented and the perspectives for improvement are discussed. Our result is approaching the precision of experiments based on macroscopic sensing masses showing that the next generation of atomic gradiometers could reach a total relative uncertainty in the 10 parts per million range. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. RAPID COMMUNICATION: A TALIF calibration method for quantitative oxygen atom density measurement in plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilecce, G.; Vigliotti, M.; DeBenedictis, S.

    2000-03-01

    In this communication we propose a calibration method for two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). It can be carried out without any addition or modification to the O atom TALIF set-up. It is based on the measurement of the collision quenching of the laser-excited state (3p3 P2 ) in a pure O2 system in which a high dissociation degree can be achieved. Since the collision rate constant by O is largely lower than that by O2 , the quenching rate can be correlated to the O density. The incertitude in this procedure is comparable to other calibration techniques. We have applied this method to the spatially resolved measurement of O atom density in an O2 rf plasma jet.

  1. Integrating atomic layer deposition and ultra-high vacuum physical vapor deposition for in situ fabrication of tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Alan J; Malek, Gary A; Lu, Rongtao; Han, Siyuan; Yu, Haifeng; Zhao, Shiping; Wu, Judy Z

    2014-07-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a promising technique for growing ultrathin, pristine dielectrics on metal substrates, which is essential to many electronic devices. Tunnel junctions are an excellent example which require a leak-free, ultrathin dielectric tunnel barrier of typical thickness around 1 nm between two metal electrodes. A challenge in the development of ultrathin dielectric tunnel barriers using ALD is controlling the nucleation of dielectrics on metals with minimal formation of native oxides at the metal surface for high-quality interfaces between the tunnel barrier and metal electrodes. This poses a critical need for integrating ALD with ultra-high vacuum (UHV) physical vapor deposition. In order to address these challenges, a viscous-flow ALD chamber was designed and interfaced to an UHV magnetron sputtering chamber via a load lock. A sample transportation system was implemented for in situ sample transfer between the ALD, load lock, and sputtering chambers. Using this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system, superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Nb-Al/Al2O2/Nb Josephson tunnel junctions were fabricated with tunnel barriers of thickness varied from sub-nm to ~1 nm. The suitability of using an Al wetting layer for initiation of the ALD Al2O3 tunnel barrier was investigated with ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and electrical transport measurements. With optimized processing conditions, leak-free SIS tunnel junctions were obtained, demonstrating the viability of this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system for the fabrication of tunnel junctions and devices comprised of metal-dielectric-metal multilayers.

  2. Integrating atomic layer deposition and ultra-high vacuum physical vapor deposition for in situ fabrication of tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Alan J.; Malek, Gary A.; Lu, Rongtao; Han, Siyuan; Yu, Haifeng; Zhao, Shiping; Wu, Judy Z.

    2014-07-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a promising technique for growing ultrathin, pristine dielectrics on metal substrates, which is essential to many electronic devices. Tunnel junctions are an excellent example which require a leak-free, ultrathin dielectric tunnel barrier of typical thickness around 1 nm between two metal electrodes. A challenge in the development of ultrathin dielectric tunnel barriers using ALD is controlling the nucleation of dielectrics on metals with minimal formation of native oxides at the metal surface for high-quality interfaces between the tunnel barrier and metal electrodes. This poses a critical need for integrating ALD with ultra-high vacuum (UHV) physical vapor deposition. In order to address these challenges, a viscous-flow ALD chamber was designed and interfaced to an UHV magnetron sputtering chamber via a load lock. A sample transportation system was implemented for in situ sample transfer between the ALD, load lock, and sputtering chambers. Using this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system, superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Nb-Al/Al2O2/Nb Josephson tunnel junctions were fabricated with tunnel barriers of thickness varied from sub-nm to ˜1 nm. The suitability of using an Al wetting layer for initiation of the ALD Al2O3 tunnel barrier was investigated with ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and electrical transport measurements. With optimized processing conditions, leak-free SIS tunnel junctions were obtained, demonstrating the viability of this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system for the fabrication of tunnel junctions and devices comprised of metal-dielectric-metal multilayers.

  3. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements for Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzuchowski, Kristen; Singh, Jaideep; Wenzl, Jennifer; Frisbie, Dustin; Johnson, Maegan

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new highly selective detector to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. Our primary interest is the 22Ne(α , n) 25Mg reaction, which is a primary source of neutrons for the s-process. Our proposed detector, in conjunction with a recoil separator, captures the recoil products resulting from the reaction in a cryogenically frozen thin film of solid neon. The fluorescence spectra of the captured atoms is shifted from the absorption spectra by hundreds of nanometers. This allows for the optical detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light. We will describe our initial studies of laser-induced fluorescence of Yb and Mg in solid Ne. Neon is an attractive medium because it is optically transparent and provides efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Yb is used as a test atom because of its similar atomic structure to Mg and much brighter fluorescence signal. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  4. Measurement of the Local Tension of Red Blood Cell Membranes by Atomic Force Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sergunova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the average local tension of a membrane upon exposure to its modifiers. Materials and methods. Blood from 3 healthy donors was sampled into ethylene diamine tetraacetate-containing microvettes (Sarstedt AG and Co., Germany during prophylactic examinations. In this series of experiments, the red blood cells were exposed to the membrane nanosurface modifier hemin (muriatic hematin. Hemin disrupts the conformation of spectrin, a band 4.1 protein, and weakens their bond [19]. Hemin was added to blood in vitro. Its blood concentration was 1.8 mM. The images of cells and their membranes were obtained on a NTEGRA Prima atomic force microscope (NT-MDT, Russia [16]. The membrane tension was estimated by atomic force spectroscopy. Results. After exposure to hemin, 68% of cases showed a 2.1-fold increase in the average tension as compared to the mean control value (p<0.05, which could reduce ID by «30 %. Subsequent exposure to perftoran returned the membrane tension to the baseline values in 85% of cases. The membrane tension of other 15% of the areas on the cells remained high — 2.3 times higher than the control values (p<0.05 even despite the action of perftoran. Conclusion. Thus, atomic force spectroscopy was used to measure the average local tension of the membrane, which depended on exposure to its modifiers, such as hemin. Key words: red blood cell, membrane tension, atomic force spectroscopy, hemin.

  5. Precision measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthey, Christian G.; Matveev, Arthur; Alnis, Janis; Beyer, Axel; Kolachevsky, Nikolai; Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Haensch, Theodor W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, 80799 Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Precision spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen has been used to test quantum electrodynamics (QED), determine the Rydberg constant and the proton charge radius. It can also be used to set limits on possible Lorentz-boost invariance violations. Here we report on a new measurement of the 1S-2S transition pushing the uncertainty to the 10{sup -15} level.

  6. Functionalization of atomic force microscopy Akiyama tips for magnetic force microscopy measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Stiller, Markus; Barzola-Quiquia, Jose; Esquinazi, Pablo D.; Sangiao, Soraya; De Teresa, Jose M.; Meijer, Jan; Abel, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    In this work we have used focused electron beam induced deposition of cobalt to functionalize atomic force microscopy Akiyama tips for application in magnetic force microscopy. The grown tips have a content of 90% Co after exposure to ambient air. The magnetic tips were characterized using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In order to investigate the magnetic properties, current loops were prepared by electron beam lithography. Measurements at room tempera...

  7. Scheme for teleportation of entangled states without Bell-state measurement by using one atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang Wenchao; Zhang Lei; Zhang Aiping [Faculty of Science, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an 710055 (China); Dong Shihai, E-mail: qwcqj@163.com [Departamento de Fisica, Esc. Sup de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edificio 9, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico, DF 07738 (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    We propose a scheme for approximately and conditionally teleporting an entanglement of zero- and one-photon states from a cavity with left- and right-polarized modes to another similar one, with a fidelity exceeding 99%. Instead of using the Bell-state measurement, only one atom is used in our scheme. The time spent, the success probability and the feasibility of the proposed scheme are also discussed.

  8. Single Ra{sup +} ion spectroscopy - towards a measurement of atomic parity violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez Portela, Mayerlin; Mohanti, A.; Dijck, E.A.; Bekker, H.; Boell, O.; Berg, J. van den; Giri, G.S.; Jungmann, K.; Onderwater, C.J.G.; Santra, B.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Versolato, O.O.; Wansbeek, L.W.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H.W. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    The sensitivity of the Atomic Parity Violation (APV) signal grows faster than the third power of the atomic number Z. Ra{sup +} (Z=88) is heaviest alkaline earth ion available. A single trapped Ra{sup +} ion opens a very promising path for a measurement atomic parity violation. One of the experimental challenges is the localization of the ion within a fraction of an optical wavelength. For this the current experiments are focused on trapping and laser cooling of Ba{sup +} ions as a precursor for Ra{sup +}. Ba{sup +} ions are trapped and laser cooled in a precision hyperbolic Paul trap. Work towards single Ba{sup +} ion localization and detection is in progress. Recently the hyperfine structure of the 6d{sub 2}D{sub 3/2} states and the isotope shift of the 6d{sub 2}D{sub 3/2}-7p{sub 2}P{sub 1/2} transition in the isotopes {sup 209-214}Ra{sup +} has been measured in online laser spectroscopy experiments at the KVI AGOR/TRIμP facility. These results are essential for the interpretation of an APV measurement in Ra{sup +}.

  9. Laser induced fluorescence measurements on W- and Ba atoms eroded from fluorescent lamp electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlbeck, J.; Rackow, K.; Sigeneger, F.; Uhrlandt, D.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Hadrath, S.; Lieder, G.

    2010-05-01

    The method of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is applied to fluorescent lamps (FL) in order to investigate processes of electrode erosion in the vicinity of the electrodes. The life time of FLs which are ignited by instant start is mainly limited by sputtering of the coil electrodes and in final breaking. This sputtering of tungsten mainly occurs during the ignition in the glow discharge phase. Therefore, the density of W atoms is measured in the electrode region during ignition. Temporal and spatial resolved profiles were measured by LIF which has been combined with fast imaging. The life time of FLs which are started with preheated coils is also caused mainly by electrode failures. But the reason differs from the instant start case because here the loss is caused mainly by evaporation. End-of-lamp life is reached if the emitter material which is deposited at the coil to reduce the work function of the coil is lost completely. LIF is used to measure the density of the eroded emitter material, namely Barium atoms. First result of phase resolved absolute Ba atoms densities are presented.

  10. Ancient atomism and modern physics: the search for the unified theory in the context of (in determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romulo Siqueira Batista

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Research Group “Physics and Humanities”, based in the Brazilian Center of Physics Research (BCPR, has worked on building dialogues between Physics and Humanities, particularly regarding philosophical questions applied to quantum mechanics (QM. The present article intends to establish the relationship between questions concerning the discussion on chance versus necessity — in the context of ancient atomism — and the most recent theories on the nature of matter and the general state of the universe, notably the implications that the proposition of a unified theory of the world presents for the debate on determinism versus indetermination.    

  11. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research an Oxford Instruments Company, Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States)

    2015-06-22

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  12. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-01

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  13. Novel dual-probes atomic force microscope for line width measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hequn; Gao, Sitian; Li, Wei; Shi, Yushu; Li, Qi; Li, Shi

    2017-11-01

    Dual-probe Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) can effectively eliminate the influence of the probe size on measurement of the line width, and realize true three-dimensional measurement. Novel dual-probe AFM consists of probe system, scanning system, alignment system and displacement measurement system. As displacement measurement system, the interferometers are added to the novel dual-probes AFM. In order to simplify the dual-probe AFM structure, self-sensing tuning fork probe is used. Measurement method has two steps: the first step is to align two probes and obtain the reference point; the second step is to scan two sides of measured line by two probes separately, and calculate the line width value according to the reference point. In the alignment of two probes, the alignment method is improved by using the edge alignment and the feedback scanning alignment.

  14. Spatial Distributions of Metal Atoms During Carbon SWNTs Formation: Measurements and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, M.; Dorval, N.; Attal-Tretout, B.; Cochon, J. L.; Loiseau, A.; Farhat, S.; Hinkov, I.; Scott, C. D.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and modelling have been undertaken to clarify the role of metal catalysts during single-wall carbon nanotube formation. For instance, we wonder whether the metal catalyst is active as an atom, a cluster, a liquid or solid nanoparticle [1]. A reactor has been developed for synthesis by continuous CO2-laser vaporisation of a carbon-nickel-cobalt target in laminar helium flow. The laser induced fluorescence technique [2] is applied for local probing of gaseous Ni, Co and CZ species throughout the hot carbon flow of the target heated up to 3500 K. A rapid depletion of C2 in contrast to the spatial extent of metal atoms is observed in the plume (Fig. 1). This asserts that C2 condenses earlier than Ni and Co atoms.[3, 4]. The depletion is even faster when catalysts are present. It may indicate that an interaction between metal atoms and carbon dimers takes place in the gas as soon as they are expelled from the target surface. Two methods of modelling are used: a spatially I-D calculation developed originally for the arc process [5], and a zero-D time dependent calculation, solving the chemical kinetics along the streamlines [6]. The latter includes Ni cluster formation. The peak of C2 density is calculated close to the target surface where the temperature is the highest. In the hot region, C; is dominant. As the carbon products move away from the target and mix with the ambient helium, they recombine into larger clusters, as demonstrated by the peak of C5 density around 1 mm. The profile of Ni-atom density compares fairly well with the measured one (Fig. 2). The early increase is due to the drop of temperature, and the final decrease beyond 6 mm results from Ni cluster formation at the eutectic temperature (approx.1600 K).

  15. Performing the Millikan experiment at the molecular scale: Determination of atomic Millikan-Thomson charges by computationally measuring atomic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, T. Ryan; Wang, Feng

    2017-10-01

    An atomic version of the Millikan oil drop experiment is performed computationally. It is shown that for planar molecules, the atomic version of the Millikan experiment can be used to define an atomic partial charge that is free from charge flow contributions. We refer to this charge as the Millikan-Thomson (MT) charge. Since the MT charge is directly proportional to the atomic forces under a uniform electric field, it is the most relevant charge for force field developments. The MT charge shows good stability with respect to different choices of the basis set. In addition, the MT charge can be easily calculated even at post-Hartree-Fock levels of theory. With the MT charge, it is shown that for a planar water dimer, the charge transfer from the proton acceptor to the proton donor is about -0.052 e. While both planar hydrated cations and anions show signs of charge transfer, anions show a much more significant charge transfer to the hydration water than the corresponding cations. It might be important to explicitly model the ion charge transfer to water in a force field at least for the anions.

  16. Performing the Millikan experiment at the molecular scale: Determination of atomic Millikan-Thomson charges by computationally measuring atomic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng

    2017-01-01

    An atomic version of the Millikan oil drop experiment is performed computationally. It is shown that for planar molecules, the atomic version of the Millikan experiment can be used to define an atomic partial charge that is free from charge flow contributions. We refer to this charge as the Millikan-Thomson (MT) charge. Since the MT charge is directly proportional to the atomic forces under a uniform electric field, it is the most relevant charge for force field developments. The MT charge shows good stability with respect to different choices of the basis set. In addition, the MT charge can be easily calculated even at post-Hartree-Fock levels of theory. With the MT charge, it is shown that for a planar water dimer, the charge transfer from the proton acceptor to the proton donor is about −0.052 e. While both planar hydrated cations and anions show signs of charge transfer, anions show a much more significant charge transfer to the hydration water than the corresponding cations. It might be important to explicitly model the ion charge transfer to water in a force field at least for the anions. PMID:29096447

  17. Steps that count: Pedometer-measured physical activity, self ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To examine the association between self-perceived and actual physical activity in relation to physical activity guidelines, with reference to volume, intensity and duration of steps/day, and to establish the level of agreement between pedometer-measured and selfreported ambulatory physical activity, in relation to current ...

  18. Measurement of Workload: Physics, Psychophysics, and Metaphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopher, D.

    1984-01-01

    The present paper reviews the results of two experiments in which workload analysis was conducted based upon performance measures, brain evoked potentials and magnitude estimations of subjective load. The three types of measures were jointly applied to the description of the behavior of subjects in a wide battery of experimental tasks. Data analysis shows both instances of association and dissociation between types of measures. A general conceptual framework and methodological guidelines are proposed to account for these findings.

  19. The generation and detection of high flux atomic oxygen for physical vapor deposition thin film growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingle, N.J.C.; Hammond, R.H.; Beasley, M.R.; Blank, David H.A.

    1999-01-01

    The growth of many epitaxial thin-film oxides is significantly enhanced with the use of an oxidizing agent such as atomic oxygen, ozone, or NO2. We developed a flow-through microwave plasma source to generate large atomic oxygen fluxes while maintaining vacuum pressures of less that 1×10¿4 Torr.

  20. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms.

  1. A quantitative comparison of dura mater tissue structures measured with atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Andrzej; Kedzia, Alicja

    2012-01-01

    The growth of a human embryo is a very sophisticated process. Understanding the way it proceeds is a key factor in pathology preventing and treating diseases. Therefore one needs to use advanced to tools and methods to investigate various aspects of the anatomy and physiology of humans during the first months of growth. This work is focused on the structure of dura mater tissue, one of the membranes protecting the brain, which can be responsible for a number of health issues if it develops abnormally. The aim of the work was to observe dura mater tissue structure with atomic force microscopy and to provide a quantitative method of discrimination of both the periosteal and meningeal layers in a 6-month-old human embryo. The measurements were performed with atomic force microscopy, in air, using tapping mode. The sample was stored in formaldehyde and dried prior to the measurements. The results obtained permitted observation of the structure of the tissue, in particular the presence of collagen fibers. By applying various image analysis tools, quantitative descriptions of both layers were created in order to distinguish them. The experiment proved that atomic force microscopy can be a useful tool in the investigation of the development process of the dura mater tissue in terms of the appearance of differences related to various functions of the periosteal and meningeal layers.

  2. Reliable measurement of elastic modulus of cells by nanoindentation in an atomic force microscope

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Zhoulong

    2012-04-01

    The elastic modulus of an oral cancer cell line UM1 is investigated by nanoindentation in an atomic force microscope with a flat-ended tip. The commonly used Hertzian method gives apparent elastic modulus which increases with the loading rate, indicating strong effects of viscoelasticity. On the contrary, a rate-jump method developed for viscoelastic materials gives elastic modulus values which are independent of the rate-jump magnitude. The results show that the rate-jump method can be used as a standard protocol for measuring elastic stiffness of living cells, since the measured values are intrinsic properties of the cells. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Development of a 2D temperature measurement technique for combustion diagnostics using 2-line atomic fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstroem, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the development and application of a novel planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique for temperature measurements in a variety of combusting flows. Accurate measurement of temperature is an essential task in combustion diagnostics, since temperature is one of the most fundamental quantities for the characterization of combustion processes. The technique is based on two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) from small quantities of atomic indium (In) seeded into the fuel. It has been developed from small-scale experiments in laboratory flames to the point where practical combustion systems can be studied. The technique is conceptually simple and reveals temperature information in the post-flame regions. The viability of the technique has been tested in three extreme measurement situations: in spark ignition engine combustion, in ultra-lean combustion situations such as lean burning aero-engine concepts and, finally, in fuel-rich combustion. TLAF was successfully applied in an optical Sl engine using isooctane as fuel. The wide temperature sensitivity, 700 - 3000 K, of the technique using indium atoms allowed measurements over the entire combustion cycle in the engine to be performed. In applications in lean combustion a potential problem caused by the strong oxidation processes of indium atoms was encountered. This limits measurement times due to deposits of absorbing indium oxide on measurement windows. The seeding requirement is a disadvantage of the technique and can be a limitation in some applications. The results from experiments performed in sooting flames are very promising for thermometry measurements in such environments. Absorption by hydrocarbons and other native species was found to be negligible. Since low laser energies and low seeding concentrations could be used, the technique did not, unlike most other incoherent optical thermometry techniques, suffer interferences from LII of soot particles or LIF from PAH

  4. Surface topography characterization using an atomic force microscope mounted on a coordinate measuring machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Hansen, H.N; Kofod, N

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes the construction, testing and use of an integrated system for topographic characterization of fine surfaces on parts having relatively big dimensions. An atomic force microscope (AFM) was mounted on a manual three-coordinate measuring machine (CMM) achieving free positioning...... of the AFM probe in space. This means that the limited measuring range of the AFM (40 mu m x 40 mu m x 2.7 um) can be extended by positioning the AFM probe using the movements of the CMM axes (400 mm x 100 mm x 75 mm). Evaluation of the background noise by determining the Sa value of an optical fiat gave...

  5. Comparing Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry Approaches to Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Thorpe, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Thoroughly studied classic space-based gravitational-wave missions concepts such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) are based on laser-interferometry techniques. Ongoing developments in atom-interferometry techniques have spurred recently proposed alternative mission concepts. These different approaches can be understood on a common footing. We present an comparative analysis of how each type of instrument responds to some of the noise sources which may limiting gravitational-wave mission concepts. Sensitivity to laser frequency instability is essentially the same for either approach. Spacecraft acceleration reference stability sensitivities are different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but acceleration noise requirements are nonetheless similar. Each approach has distinct additional measurement noise issues.

  6. EDM measurement in {sup 129}Xe atom using dual active feedback nuclear spin maser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, T., E-mail: sato@yap.nucl.ap.titech.ac.jp [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Ichikawa, Y. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Ohtomo, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kojima, S.; Funayama, C.; Suzuki, T.; Chikamori, M.; Hikota, E.; Tsuchiya, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Yoshimi, A. [Okayama University, Research Core for Extreme Quantum World (Japan); Bidinosti, C. P. [University of Winnipeg, Department Physics (Canada); Ino, T. [Institute of Material Structure Science, KEK (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan); Fukuyama, T. [Osaka University, RCNP (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    The technique of an active nuclear spin maser is adopted in the search for electric dipole moment in a diamagnetic atom {sup 129}Xe. In order to reduce systematic uncertainties arising from long-term drifts of the external magnetic field and from the contact interaction between longitudinal polarized Rb atoms and {sup 129}Xe spin, a {sup 3}He comagnetometer with a double-cell geometry was employed. The remaining shift, which turned out to show some correlation with the cell temperature, was mitigated by stabilizing the cell temperature. As a result, the frequency drift of the {sup 129}Xe maser was reduced from 12 mHz to 700 μHz, and the determination precision of frequency of 8.7 nHz was obtained for a 2×10{sup 4} s measurement time using the double-cell geometry cell.

  7. The potential of continuous, local atomic clock measurements for earthquake prediction and volcanology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarescu Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern optical atomic clocks along with the optical fiber technology currently being developed can measure the geoid, which is the equipotential surface that extends the mean sea level on continents, to a precision that competes with existing technology. In this proceeding, we point out that atomic clocks have the potential to not only map the sea level surface on continents, but also look at variations of the geoid as a function of time with unprecedented timing resolution. The local time series of the geoid has a plethora of applications. These include potential improvement in the predictions of earthquakes and volcanoes, and closer monitoring of ground uplift in areas where hydraulic fracturing is performed.

  8. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  9. Manual for soil physical measurements; Version 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolte, J.

    1997-01-01

    Manuals are given for several laboratory methods for determining hydraulic conductivity, water retention and shrinkage characteristics of soil. Measurement techniques described are: the constant-head and falling-head methods for saturated conductivitythe drip infiltrometer for unsaturated

  10. Implementation of measurement instruments in physical therapist practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anita Stevens

    2010-01-01

    The use of measurement instruments has become a major issue in physical therapy, but their use in daily practice is infrequent. The aims of this case report were to develop and evaluate a plan for the systematic implementation of two measurement instruments frequently recommended in Dutch physical

  11. Calorimetry energy measurement in particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wigmans, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Particle physics is the science that pursues the age-old quest for the innermost structure of matter and the fundamental interactions between its constituents. Modern experiments in this field rely increasingly on calorimetry, a detection technique in which the particles of interest are absorbed in the detector. Calorimeters are very intricate instruments. Their performance characteristics depend on subtle, sometimes counter-intuitive design details. This book, written by one of the world's foremost experts, is the first comprehensive text on this topic. It provides a fundamental and systematic introduction to calorimetry. It describes the state of the art in terms of both the fundamental understanding of calorimetric particle detection, and the actual detectors that have been or are being built and operated in experiments. The last chapter discusses landmark scientific discoveries in which calorimetry has played an important role. This book summarizes and puts into perspective the work described in some 900...

  12. Early twentieth century atomic models: from classical physics to the introduction of quantum theory

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Cesar Valmor Machado; PUC/SP

    2010-01-01

    The present research examines the history of atomic models in the early twentieth century approaching the contributions of Joseph John Thomson, Hantaro Nagaoka, Ernest Rutherford, John William Nicholson and Niels Bohr and his contemporaries.

  13. Atomic physics of strongly correlated systems. Progress report, 1 August 1980-31 July 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C.D.

    1981-03-01

    Studies of electron correlations of doubly-excited electrons in hyperspherical coordinates, and differential and total cross sections for charge transfer and ionization in fast ion-atom collisions are reported. (GHT)

  14. Nobel Prize in Physics 1997 "for development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light" : Steven Chu, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and William D. Phillips

    CERN Multimedia

    Audiovideo service

    1998-01-01

    Prof. C. Cohen-Tannoudji presents "manipulating atoms with light" . By using quasi-resonant exchanges of energy, linear and angular momentum between atoms and photons, it is possible to polarize atoms, to displace their energy levels and to control their position and their velocity. A few physical mechanisms allowing one to trap atoms and to cool them in the microKelvin, and even in the nanoKelvin range, will be described. Various possible applications of such ultracold atoms will be also reviewed.

  15. The Morphology of Chromium and LIF Measurement of Atomic Arsenic in Laminar Diffusion Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Young Bin [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-26

    The morphology and size distribution of chromium oxides and the concentration measurement of atomic arsenic have been studied in laminar diffusion flames. Nitrogen was added to vary flame temperatures in hydrogen flames. Ethene flames were used in order to investigate the potential for interaction between the soot aerosol that is formed in these flames and the chromium aerosol. Two sources of chromium compounds were introduced:chromium nitrate and chromium hexacarbonyl. A detailed investigation of the morphology was carried out by scanning electron microscopy(SEM). The amounts of Cr(VI) and total Cr were determined by a spectrophotometric method and by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, respectively. Also, LIF was used for the measurement of atomic arsenic, which was excited at 197.2 nm and was detected at 249.6 nm. Results showed that the morphology of the particles varied with the flame temperature and with the chromium source. The particles were characterized by porous structures, cenospheres and agglomerated dense particles when chromium nitrate solution was added to the flames. At low to moderate temperature, porous sintered cenospheric structures were formed, in some cases with a blow hole. At higher temperatures, an agglomerated cluster which was composed Cr(VI) from the undiluted H{sub 2} flame was more than 10 times larger than in the 50%H{sub 2}/50%N{sub 2} flame on a mass basis. Single point LIF measurement of atomic arsenic indicated that arsenic exist only in the low temperature, fuel rich region. (author). 14 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  16. Nondestructive fluorescent state detection of single neutral atom qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Michael J; Hamley, Christopher D; Shih, Chung-Yu; Chapman, Michael S

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate nondestructive (lossless) fluorescent state detection of individual neutral atom qubits trapped in an optical lattice. The hyperfine state of the atom is measured with a 95% accuracy and an atom loss rate of 1%. Individual atoms are initialized and detected over 100 times before being lost from the trap, representing a 100-fold improvement in data collection rates over previous experiments. Microwave Rabi oscillations are observed with repeated measurements of one and the same single atom. © 2011 American Physical Society

  17. Frequency, amplitude, and phase measurements in contact resonance atomic force microscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Stan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The resonance frequency, amplitude, and phase response of the first two eigenmodes of two contact-resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM configurations, which differ in the method used to excite the system (cantilever base vs sample excitation, are analyzed in this work. Similarities and differences in the observables of the cantilever dynamics, as well as the different effect of the tip–sample contact properties on those observables in each configuration are discussed. Finally, the expected accuracy of CR-AFM using phase-locked loop detection is investigated and quantification of the typical errors incurred during measurements is provided.

  18. 3D mechanical measurements with an atomic force microscope on 1D structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Christian; Larsen, Martin Benjamin Barbour Spanget; Bøggild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a simple method to characterize the mechanical properties of three dimensional nanostructures, such as nanorods standing up from a substrate. With an atomic force microscope the cantilever probe is used to deflect a horizontally aligned nanorod at different positions along...... the nanorod, using the apex of the cantilever itself rather than the tip normally used for probing surfaces. This enables accurate determination of nanostructures' spring constant. From these measurements, Young's modulus is found on many individual nanorods with different geometrical and material structures...... in a short time. Based on this method Young's modulus of carbon nanofibers and epitaxial grown III-V nanowires has been determined....

  19. Are conductance plateaus independent events in atomic point contact measurements? A statistical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leoni, Thomas; Zoubkoff, Remi; Homri, Sabrina; Candoni, Nadine; Vidakovic, Petar; Ranguis, Alain; Klein, Hubert; Saul, Andres; Dumas, Philippe [CINaM-CNRS 3118, Aix-Marseille Universite, Faculte de Luminy, Case 913, 13288, Marseille Cedex (France)], E-mail: dumas@cinam.univ-mrs.fr

    2008-09-03

    Conductance-elongation curves of gold atomic wires are measured using a scanning tunneling microscope break junction technique at room temperature. Landauer's conductance plateaus are individually identified and statistically analyzed. Both the probabilities to observe and the lengths of the two last plateaus (at conductance values close to 2e{sup 2}/h and 4e{sup 2}/h) are studied. All results converge to show that the occurrences of these two conductance plateaus on a conductance-elongation curve are statistically independent events.

  20. Hadron Production Measurements for Neutrino Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Panman, Jaap

    2008-01-01

    One of the limiting factors for the precision of neutrino oscillation experiments is the uncertainty in the composition and spectrum of the neutrino flux. Recently, dedicated hadron production experiments have been taking data and are being planned to supply measurements which can significantly reduce these uncertainties. The HARP experiment has presented results on the measurements of the double‐differential production cross‐section of charged pions in proton interactions with beryllium, carbon, aluminium, copper, tin, tantalum and lead targets. These results are relevant for a detailed understanding of neutrino flux in accelerator neutrino experiments K2K (p–Al data) and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE (p–Be data), for a better prediction of atmospheric neutrino fluxes (p–C, π + – C and π − – C data) as well as for a systematic improvement of hadron production models. The E910 experiment at BNL has recently published their p–Be data. NA49 has measured pion production spectra in p–C interactions and...

  1. Optically-detected spin-echo method for relaxation times measurements in a Rb atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Radojičić, I. S.; Krmpot, A. J.; Jelenković, B. M.; Mileti, G.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce and demonstrate an experimental method, optically-detected spin-echo (ODSE), to measure ground-state relaxation times of a rubidium (Rb) atomic vapor held in a glass cell with buffer-gas. The work is motivated by our studies on high-performance Rb atomic clocks, where both population and coherence relaxation times (T 1 and T 2, respectively) of the ‘clock transition’ (52S1/2 | {F}g = 1,{m}F=0> ≤ftrightarrow | {F}g=2,{m}F=0> ) are relevant. Our ODSE method is inspired by classical nuclear magnetic resonance spin-echo method, combined with optical detection. In contrast to other existing methods, like continuous-wave double-resonance (CW-DR) and Ramsey-DR, principles of the ODSE method allow suppression of decoherence arising from the inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field across the vapor cell, thus enabling measurements of intrinsic relaxation rates, as properties of the cell alone. Our experimental result for the coherence relaxation time, specific for the clock transition, measured with the ODSE method is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction, and the ODSE results are validated by comparison to those obtained with Franzen, CW-DR and Ramsey-DR methods. The method is of interest for a wide variety of quantum optics experiments with optical signal readout.

  2. Shock-tube measurements of excited oxygen atoms using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nations, Marcel; Wang, Shengkai; Goldenstein, Christopher S; Sun, Kai; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2015-10-10

    We report the use of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using two distributed feedback diode lasers near 777.2 and 844.6 nm for sensitive, time-resolved, in situ measurements of excited-state populations of atomic oxygen in a shock tube. Here, a 1% O2/Ar mixture was shock-heated to 5400-8000 K behind reflected shock waves. The combined use of a low-finesse cavity, fast wavelength scanning of the lasers, and an off-axis alignment enabled measurements with 10 μs time response and low cavity noise. The CEAS absorption gain factors of 104 and 142 for the P35←S520 (777.2 nm) and P0,1,23←S310 (844.6 nm) atomic oxygen transitions, respectively, significantly improved the detection sensitivity over conventional single-pass measurements. This work demonstrates the potential of using CEAS to improve shock-tube studies of nonequilibrium electronic-excitation processes at high temperatures.

  3. In situ friction measurement on murine cartilage by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Jeffrey M; Blum, Jason J; Jay, Gregory D; Darling, Eric M; Guilak, Farshid; Zauscher, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Articular cartilage provides a low-friction, wear-resistant surface for the motion of diarthrodial joints. The objective of this study was to develop a method for in situ friction measurement of murine cartilage using a colloidal probe attached to the cantilever of an atomic force microscope. Sliding friction was measured between a chemically functionalized microsphere and the cartilage of the murine femoral head. Friction was measured at normal loads ranging incrementally from 20 to 100 nN with a sliding speed of 40 microm/s and sliding distance of 64 microm. Under these test conditions, hydrostatic pressurization and biphasic load support in the cartilage were minimized, providing frictional measurements that predominantly reflect boundary lubrication properties. Friction coefficients measured on murine tissue (0.25+/-0.11) were similar to those measured on porcine tissue (0.23+/-0.09) and were in general agreement with measurements of boundary friction on cartilage by other researchers. Using the colloidal probe as an indenter, the elastic mechanical properties and surface roughness were measured in the same configuration. Interfacial shear was found to be the principal mechanism of friction generation, with little to no friction resulting from plowing forces, collision forces, or energy losses due to normal deformation. This measurement technique can be applied to future studies of cartilage friction and mechanical properties on genetically altered mice or other small animals.

  4. A Novel Graphene Oxide-Based Protein Interaction Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung-Woong; Morita, Kyohei; Adachi, Taiji

    2015-02-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising material for biological applications because of its excellent physical/chemical properties such as aqueous processability, amphiphilicity, and surface functionalizability. Here we introduce a new biological application of GO, a novel GO-based technique for probing protein interactions using atomic force microscopy (AFM). GO sheets were intercalated between the protein-modified AFM probe and the polymer substrate in order to reduce the non-specific adhesion force observed during single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). In this study, we used SMFS to probe the interaction of the actin filament and actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3), an actin-binding protein. Our results confirm that the GO sheet reduces nonspecific adhesion of the probe to the substrate. Using the GO-based technique, we succeeded in estimating the dissociation constant of the actin filament-binding protein interaction.

  5. Lifetime Measurements of $ \\pi ^+ \\pi ^- $ and $\\pi^{+-} K^{-+}$ Atoms to Test Low-Energy QCD Predictions

    CERN Multimedia

    Iliescu, M A; Ponta, T C; Dumitriu, D E; Afanasyev, L; Zhabitskiy, M; Rykalin, V; Hons, Z; Schacher, J; Yazkov, V; Gerndt, J; Detraz, C C; Guaraldo, C; Dreossi, D; Smolik, J; Gorchakov, O; Nikitin, M; Dudarev, A; Kluson, J; Hansroul, M; Okada, K; Constantinescu, S; Kruglov, V; Komarov, V; Takeutchi, F; Tarta, P D; Kuptsov, A; Nemenov, L; Karpukhin, V; Shliapnikov, P; Brekhovskikh, V; Saborido silva, J J; Drijard, D; Rappazzo, G F; Pentia, M C; Gugiu, M M; Kruglova, L; Pustylnik, Z; Trojek, T; Vrba, T; Duma, M; Ciocarlan, C; Kulikov, A; Ol'shevskiy, V; Ryazantsev, A; Chiba, M; Anania, A; Tarasov, A; Gritsay, K; Lapchine, V; Cechak, T; Lopez aguera, A

    2002-01-01

    %PS212 \\\\ \\\\ The proposed experiment aims to measure the lifetime of $ \\pi ^+ \\pi ^- $ atoms in the ground state with 10\\% precision, using the 24~GeV/c proton beam of the CERN Proton Synchrotron. As the value of the above lifetime of order 10$ ^- ^{1} ^{5} $s is dictated by a strong interaction at low energy, the precise measurement of this quantity enables to determine a combination of S-wave pion scattering lengths to 5\\%. Pion scattering lengths have been calculated in the framework of chiral perturbation theory and values predicted at the same level of accuracy have, up to now, never been confronted with accurate experimental data. Such a measurement would submit the understanding of chiral symmetry breaking of QCD to a crucial test.

  6. Adhesion measurement of micropatterned surfaces using three-dimensional-printed atomic force microscopy tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chih-Yi; Yeh, Yun-Peng; Sung, Cheng-Kuo; Liao, Wei-Chien; Chuang, Tzu-Han; Fu, Chien-Chung

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to fabricate three-dimensional-printed (3D-printed) atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips for the measurement of the adhesion force on micropatterned surfaces. The shape of the microstructure strongly affects the peeling-off process in the fabrication of flexible electronic devices, and we demonstrate the fabrication of a micropatterned structure for the peeling-off process from soft materials. Furthermore, the 3D-printed AFM tips not only have an optimized design but also increase the sensitivity of adhesion force measurement. We have demonstrated the conical 3D-printed AFM tips with the radii of the spherical end from 2 to 10 µm with various sensitivities of adhesive force measurement.

  7. Probing exotic phenomena at the interface of nuclear and particle physics with the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms: A unique window to hadronic and semi-leptonic CP violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, N. [RIKEN, Wako, iTHES Research Group, Saitama (Japan); Far Eastern Federal University, Complex Simulation Group, School of Biomedicine, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Sahoo, B.K. [Physical Research Laboratory, Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics Division, Ahmedabad (India); Yoshinaga, N. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama (Japan); Sato, T. [RIKEN, Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Asahi, K. [RIKEN, Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics and International Education and Research Center of Science, Tokyo (Japan); Das, B.P. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics and International Education and Research Center of Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    The current status of electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms which involves the synergy between atomic experiments and three different theoretical areas, i.e. particle, nuclear and atomic, is reviewed. Various models of particle physics that predict CP violation, which is necessary for the existence of such electric dipole moments, are presented. These include the standard model of particle physics and various extensions of it. Effective hadron level combined charge conjugation (C) and parity (P) symmetry violating interactions are derived taking into consideration different ways in which a nucleon interacts with other nucleons as well as with electrons. Nuclear structure calculations of the CP-odd nuclear Schiff moment are discussed using the shell model and other theoretical approaches. Results of the calculations of atomic electric dipole moments due to the interaction of the nuclear Schiff moment with the electrons and the P and time-reversal (T) symmetry violating tensor-pseudotensor electron-nucleus are elucidated using different relativistic many-body theories. The principles of the measurement of the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms are outlined. Upper limits for the nuclear Schiff moment and tensor-pseudotensor coupling constant are obtained combining the results of atomic experiments and relativistic many-body theories. The coefficients for the different sources of CP violation have been estimated at the elementary particle level for all the diamagnetic atoms of current experimental interest and their implications for physics beyond the standard model is discussed. Possible improvements of the current results of the measurements as well as quantum chromodynamics, nuclear and atomic calculations are suggested. (orig.)

  8. Measuring Physical Activity in Youth Settings: Considerations for Instrument Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D. Hickerson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing physical activity participation has become one of the primary strategies for prevention of early-onset health conditions including obesity and Type II diabetes. Youth programs including summer camps and after-school programs are premium providers of physical activity opportunities, but researchers and administrators of these programs must be able to effectively collect and interpret physical activity data to make program adjustments and communicate results. This article reviews existing methods for physical activity measurement including self-reports and objective instruments and makes suggestions for their applicability. Pedometers are covered in-depth as they may be the method of choice in many youth settings. These devices are unobtrusive, have a relatively low cost, and provide excellent data quality. Proper physical activity measurement in youth settings can provide information about effective intervention strategies and may also encourage on-site participants to increase their physical activity frequency.

  9. Resilience, physical performance measures, and self-perceived physical and mental health in older Catholic nuns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Margaret; Avers, Dale; Brooks, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The importance of physical performance measures and their influence on predicting future disability has been suggested; however, the association between resilience and physical performance measures in older women needs further study. The purpose of this research study was to investigate the resilience level in a convenience sample of older women who happened to be Roman Catholic nuns. The relationships of resilience with specific physical performance measures, self-perceived physical and mental health status, and depressive symptoms were also explored. Descriptive correlational cross-sectional design was used. Data from 54 volunteer Roman Catholic nuns, aged 55-94 were collected beginning with self report questionnaires followed by physical performance tests. Self-report measures included the Resilience Scale, Short-Form revised (SF-12v2) Health Survey, and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). The 12-point Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and fast gait speed were the physical performance tests measured. This sample of nuns had moderate levels of resilience. Those with fewer depressive symptoms and better health had higher resilience levels. Fast gait speed was positively associated with resilience. The positive relationship between resilience and gait speed is an important finding of this study because it reinforces the connection between physical and emotional health. Future studies should examine if resilience and gait speed can serve as predictors of disability in a broader sample of older adults or if resilience can be targeted as a means of improving physical performance. Maintaining functional ability and recovering when physical injury is experienced is of great importance in older adults. It is reasonable for physical therapists to consider both resilience and physical performance measures when attempting to identify older women at risk for poor outcomes. Resilience may play a role in helping older adults recover from a physical injury.

  10. Atomic and molecular physics and data activities for astrophysics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffery, D.J.; Kristic, P.S.; Liu, W.; Schultz, D.R.; Stancil, P.C.

    1998-04-01

    The atomic astrophysics group at ORNL produces, collects, evaluates, and disseminates atomic and molecular data relevant to astrophysics and actively models various astrophysical environments utilizing this information. With the advent of the World Wide Web, these data are also being placed on-line to facilitate their use by end-users. In this brief report, the group`s recent activities in data production and in modeling are highlighted. For example, the authors describe recent calculations of elastic and transport cross sections relevant to ionospheric and heliospheric studies, charge transfer between metal ions and metal atoms and novel supernova nebular spectra modeling, ion-molecule collision data relevant to planetary atmospheres and comets, and data for early universe modeling.

  11. Measurements and kinetic modeling of atomic species in fuel-oxidizer mixtures excited by a repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, C.; Eckert, Z.; Yin, Z.; Frederickson, K.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2018-01-01

    This work presents the results of number density measurements of metastable Ar atoms and ground state H atoms in diluted mixtures of H2 and O2 with Ar, as well as ground state O atoms in diluted H2–O2–Ar, CH4–O2–Ar, C3H8–O2–Ar, and C2H4–O2–Ar mixtures excited by a repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge. The measurements have been made in a nanosecond pulse, double dielectric barrier discharge plasma sustained in a flow reactor between two plane electrodes encapsulated within dielectric material, at an initial temperature of 500 K and pressures ranging from 300 Torr to 700 Torr. Metastable Ar atom number density distribution in the afterglow is measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, and used to characterize plasma uniformity. Temperature rise in the reacting flow is measured by Rayleigh scattering. H atom and O atom number densities are measured by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence. The results are compared with kinetic model predictions, showing good agreement, with the exception of extremely lean mixtures. O atoms and H atoms in the plasma are produced mainly during quenching of electronically excited Ar atoms generated by electron impact. In H2–Ar and O2–Ar mixtures, the atoms decay by three-body recombination. In H2–O2–Ar, CH4–O2–Ar, and C3H8–O2–Ar mixtures, O atoms decay in a reaction with OH, generated during H atom reaction with HO2, with the latter produced by three-body H atom recombination with O2. The net process of O atom decay is O  +  H  →  OH, such that the decay rate is controlled by the amount of H atoms produced in the discharge. In extra lean mixtures of propane and ethylene with O2–Ar the model underpredicts the O atom decay rate. At these conditions, when fuel is completely oxidized by the end of the discharge burst, the net process of O atom decay, O  +  O  →  O2, becomes nearly independent of H atom number density. Lack of agreement with the

  12. EDITORIAL: The 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases The 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Marić, Dragana; Malović, Gordana

    2011-03-01

    This special issue consists of papers that are associated with invited lectures, workshop papers and hot topic papers presented at the 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases (ESCAMPIG XX). This conference was organized in Novi Sad (Serbia) from 13 to 17 July 2010 by the Institute of Physics of the University of Belgrade. It is important to note that this is not a conference 'proceedings'. Following the initial selection process by the International Scientific Committee, all papers were submitted to the journal by the authors and have been fully peer reviewed to the standard required for publication in Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST). The papers are based on presentations given at the conference but are intended to be specialized technical papers covering all or part of the topic presented by the author during the meeting. The ESCAMPIG conference is a regular biennial Europhysics Conference of the European Physical Society focusing on collisional and radiative aspects of atomic and molecular physics in partially ionized gases as well as on plasma-surface interaction. The conference focuses on low-temperature plasma sciences in general and includes the following topics: Atomic and molecular processes in plasmas Transport phenomena, particle velocity distribution function Physical basis of plasma chemistry Plasma surface interaction (boundary layers, sheath, surface processes) Plasma diagnostics Plasma and discharges theory and simulation Self-organization in plasmas, dusty plasmas Upper atmospheric plasmas and space plasmas Low-pressure plasma sources High-pressure plasma sources Plasmas and gas flows Laser-produced plasmas During ESCAMPIG XX special sessions were dedicated to workshops on: Atomic and molecular collision data for plasma modeling, organized by Professors Z Lj Petrovic and N Mason Plasmas in medicine, organized by Dr N Puac and Professor G Fridman. The conference topics were represented in the

  13. Minimising the effect of nanoparticle deformation in intermittent contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babic, Bakir, E-mail: bakir.babic@measurement.gov.au; Lawn, Malcolm A.; Coleman, Victoria A.; Jämting, Åsa K.; Herrmann, Jan [National Measurement Institute, 36 Bradfield Road, West Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia)

    2016-06-07

    The results of systematic height measurements of polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles using intermittent contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (IC-AM-AFM) are presented. The experimental findings demonstrate that PS nanoparticles deform during AFM imaging, as indicated by a reduction in the measured particle height. This deformation depends on the IC-AM-AFM imaging parameters, material composition, and dimensional properties of the nanoparticles. A model for nanoparticle deformation occurring during IC-AM-AFM imaging is developed as a function of the peak force which can be calculated for a particular set of experimental conditions. The undeformed nanoparticle height can be estimated from the model by extrapolation to zero peak force. A procedure is proposed to quantify and minimise nanoparticle deformation during IC-AM-AFM imaging, based on appropriate adjustments of the experimental control parameters.

  14. Laser pumping Cs atom magnetometer of theory research based on gradient tensor measuring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Zhang; Chong Kang; Wang Qingtao; Lei Cheng; Zheng Caiping, E-mail: zhangyang@hrbeu.edu.cn [College of Science, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2011-02-01

    At present, due to space exploration, military technology, geological exploration, magnetic navigation, medical diagnosis and biological magnetic fields study of the needs of research and development, the magnetometer is given strong driving force. In this paper, it will discuss the theoretical analysis and system design of laser pumping cesium magnetometer, cesium atomic energy level formed hyperfine structure with the I-J coupling, the hyperfine structure has been further split into Zeeman sublevels for the effects of magnetic field. To use laser pump and RF magnetic field make electrons transition in the hyperfine structure to produce the results of magneto-optical double resonance, and ultimately through the resonant frequency will be able to achieve accurate value of the external magnetic field. On this basis, we further have a discussion about magnetic gradient tensor measuring method. To a large extent, it increases the magnetic field measurement of information.

  15. Global Properties of the Heliospheric Termination Shock as inferred from Energetic Neutral Atoms measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mihir; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; McComas, David; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Zank, Gary; Dayeh, Maher; Schwadron, Nathan; Allegrini, Frederic; Zirnstein, Eric

    Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) provide powerful diagnostics about the origin of the progenitor ion populations and the physical mechanisms responsible for their production. Desai et al. (2012; 2013) combined and compared ENA spectra from the first three years of observations by the IBEX-Hi and -Lo ENA imagers along the lines-of-sights (LOS) from the inner heliosphere through to the locations of Voyager 1 and 2 with results from an updated physics-based model of the 3D heliosphere and its constituent ion populations. These results showed that (1) IBEX ENA fluxes and spectra above ˜0.7 keV measured along the LOS of the Voyagers are consistent with several models in which the parent pickup (PUI) populations originate in the inner heliosheath, and (2) a significant fraction of lower-energy ENAs between ˜0.1-0.5 keV may originate from interstellar neutral gas charge-exchanging with a non-thermalized (hot) population of PUIs in the outer heliosheath beyond the heliopause. We use these results and model the full sky IBEX-Hi energy spectra to probe the microphysical processes occurring in the inner heliospheath near the termination shock and then infer the global properties (e.g., latitudinal and longitudinal variations of the shock compression ratio) of the termination shock.

  16. High time resolution measurements of the thermosphere from Fabry-Perot Interferometer measurements of atomic oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. K. Ford

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the performance of CCD detectors have enabled a high time resolution study of the high latitude upper thermosphere with Fabry-Perot Interferometers (FPIs to be performed. 10-s integration times were used during a campaign in April 2004 on an FPI located in northern Sweden in the auroral oval. The FPI is used to study the thermosphere by measuring the oxygen red line emission at 630.0 nm, which emits at an altitude of approximately 240 km. Previous time resolutions have been 4 min at best, due to the cycle of look directions normally observed. By using 10 s rather than 40 s integration times, and by limiting the number of full cycles in a night, high resolution measurements down to 15 s were achievable. This has allowed the maximum variability of the thermospheric winds and temperatures, and 630.0 nm emission intensities, at approximately 240 km, to be determined as a few minutes. This is a significantly greater variability than the often assumed value of 1 h or more. A Lomb-Scargle analysis of this data has shown evidence of gravity wave activity with waves with short periods. Gravity waves are an important feature of mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT dynamics, observed using many techniques and providing an important mechanism for energy transfer between atmospheric regions. At high latitudes gravity waves may be generated in-situ by localised auroral activity. Short period waves were detected in all four clear nights when this experiment was performed, in 630.0 nm intensities and thermospheric winds and temperatures. Waves with many periodicities were observed, from periods of several hours, down to 14 min. These waves were seen in all parameters over several nights, implying that this variability is a typical property of the thermosphere.

  17. The Scales of Time, Length, Mass, Energy, and Other Fundamental Physical Quantities in the Atomic World and the Use of Atomic Units in Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Boon K.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2011-01-01

    This article is divided into two parts. In the first part, the atomic unit (au) system is introduced and the scales of time, space (length), and speed, as well as those of mass and energy, in the atomic world are discussed. In the second part, the utility of atomic units in quantum mechanical and spectroscopic calculations is illustrated with…

  18. Quantum physics of light and matter a modern introduction to photons, atoms and many-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Salasnich, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The book gives an introduction to the field quantization (second quantization) of light and matter with applications to atomic physics. The first chapter briefly reviews the origins of special relativity and quantum mechanics and the basic notions of quantum information theory and quantum statistical mechanics. The second chapter is devoted to the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, while the third chapter shows the consequences of the light field quantization in the description of electromagnetic transitions.In the fourth chapter it is analyzed the spin of the electron, and in particular its derivation from the Dirac equation, while the fifth chapter investigates the effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the atomic spectra (Stark and Zeeman effects). The sixth chapter describes the properties of systems composed by many interacting identical particles by introducing the Hartree-Fock variational method, the density functional theory, and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Finally,...

  19. Enhancing Laos Students' Understanding of Nature of Science in Physics Learning about Atom for Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengdala, Phoxay; Yuenyong, Chokchai

    2014-01-01

    This paper aimed to study of Grade 12 students' understanding of nature of science in learning about atom for peace through science technology and society (STS) approach. Participants were 51 Grade 12 who study in Thongphong high school Vientiane Capital City Lao PDR, 1st semester of 2012 academic year. This research regarded interpretive…

  20. Simultaneous Use of Cs and Rb Rydberg Atoms for Independent RF Electric Field Measurements via Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Simons, Matt T; Holloway, Christopher L

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) with cesium (Cs) and rubidium (Rb) Rydberg atoms in the same vapor cell with coincident (overlapping) optical fields. Each atomic system can detect radio frequency (RF) electric (E) field strengths through modification of the EIT signal (Autler-Townes (AT) splitting), which leads to a direct SI traceable RF E-field measurement. We show that these two systems can detect the same the RF E-field strength simultaneously, which provides a direct in situ comparison of Rb and Cs RF measurements in Rydberg atoms. In effect, this allows us to perform two independent measurements of the same quantity in the same laboratory, providing two different immediate and independent measurements. This gives two measurements that helps rule out systematic effects and uncertainties in this E-field metrology approach, which are important when establishing an international measurement standard for an E-field strength and is a necessary step for this method to...

  1. Robust high-resolution imaging and quantitative force measurement with tuned-oscillator atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Götzen, Jan; Hölscher, Hendrik; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy are based on locally detecting the interactions between a surface and a sharp probe tip. For highest resolution imaging, noncontact modes that avoid tip-sample contact are used; control of the tip’s vertical position is accomplished by oscillating the tip and detecting perturbations induced by its interaction with the surface potential. Due to this potential’s nonlinear nature, however, achieving reliable control of the tip-sample distance is challenging, so much so that despite its power vacuum-based noncontact AFM has remained a niche technique. Here we introduce a new pathway to distance control that prevents instabilities by externally tuning the oscillator’s response characteristics. A major advantage of this operational scheme is that it delivers robust position control in both the attractive and repulsive regimes with only one feedback loop, thereby providing an easy-to-implement route to atomic resolution imaging and quantitative tip-sample interaction force measurement.

  2. Measuring the charge state of an adatom with noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gross, L.; Mohn, F.; Liljeroth, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314007423; Repp, J.; Meyer, G.; Giessibl, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Charge states of atoms can be investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy, but this method requires a conducting substrate. We investigated the charge-switching of individual adsorbed gold and silver atoms (adatoms) on ultrathin NaCl films on Cu(111) using a qPlus tuning fork atomic force

  3. Associations of objectively measured physical activity and abdominal fat distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Annelotte; Hansen, Anne-Louise Smidt; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2015-01-01

    Introduction/Purpose: Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and physical activity are both independent predictors of Type 2 diabetes. Physical activity and overall obesity are inversely associated with each other. Yet the nature of the association between objectively measured dimensions of physical...... activity and abdominal fat distribution has not been well characterized. We aimed to do so in a middle-age to elderly population at high risk of diabetes. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of 1134 participants of the ADDITION-PRO study. VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) were assessed one......-dimensionally by ultrasonography and physical activity with combined accelerometry and HR monitoring. Linear regression of physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) and time spent in different physical activity intensity levels on VAT and SAT was performed. Results: Median body mass index (BMI) was 26.6 kg.m(-2) and PAEE was 28...

  4. Simultaneous volume-velocity measurements in the near field of atomizing sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Phuong X.; Kourmatzis, Agisilaos; Masri, Assaad R.

    2017-11-01

    Direct visualization of atomizing sprays using backlight imaging is commonly used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative information on spray morphology. Recently, the standard backlight technique was extended to ‘dual-angle’ imaging by the authors (Kourmatzis et al 2017 Meas. Sci. Technol. 28 035302), to enable quantification of the volume of arbitrarily shaped fragments to accuracies of the order of 10% . In this contribution, dual-angle particle-tracking velocimetry (PTV) has been developed, hence extending our capability to measure volume, velocity, and flow rate of atomizing fragments simultaneously, regardless of their shapes. The experimental layout consists of two time-shifted lasers, where each beam is split in two, two long-distance microscope lenses and two cameras oriented 90 degrees towards each other, operating in particle image velocimetry mode. The accuracy of the joint volume-velocity measurements has been carefully assessed using mono-dispersed droplets and microspheres of known size. The technique has also been examined for different air-assisted sprays covering regimes from Rayleigh to multi-mode breakup. By introducing terminologies such as ‘fragment residence time’ and ‘fragment-specific volume flow rate’, the overall volume flow rate of both the mono-dispersed drops as well as low Weber number air-assisted sprays may be recovered. This PTV method is a powerful diagnostic tool to simultaneously track and size arbitrarily shaped liquid fragments. It also provides a viable technique to measure liquid mass flux in the near field of sprays.

  5. Brownian Motion as a Limit to Physical Measuring Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, Martin

    2016-01-01

    formulated a general conclusion concerning the nature of physical measurements, namely that there is a definite limit to the ultimate sensitivity of measuring instruments beyond which we cannot advance, and that this limit is determined by Brownian motion. Ising’s conclusion agreed with experiments......In this paper, we examine the history of the idea that noise presents a fundamental limit to physical measuring processes. This idea had its origins in research aimed at improving the accuracy of instruments for electrical measurements. Out of these endeavors, the Swedish physicist Gustaf A. Ising...... and received widespread recognition, but his way of modeling the system was contested by his contemporaries. With the more embracing notion of noise that developed during and after World War II, Ising’s conclusion was reinterpreted as showing that noise puts a limit on physical measurement processes. Hence...

  6. Reviews Equipment: Vibration detector Equipment: SPARK Science Learning System PS-2008 Equipment: Pelton wheel water turbine Book: Atomic: The First War of Physics and the Secret History of the Atom Bomb 1939-49 Book: Outliers: The Story of Success Book: T-Minus: The Race to the Moon Equipment: Fridge Rover Equipment: Red Tide School Spectrophotometer Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    WE RECOMMEND Vibration detector SEP equipment measures minor tremors in the classroom SPARK Science Learning System PS-2008 Datalogger is easy to use and has lots of added possibilities Atomic: The First War of Physics and the Secret History of the Atom Bomb 1939-49 Book is crammed with the latest on the atom bomb T-Minus: The Race to the Moon Graphic novel depicts the politics as well as the science Fridge Rover Toy car can teach magnetics and energy, and is great fun Red Tide School Spectrophotometer Professional standard equipment for the classroom WORTH A LOOK Pelton wheel water turbine Classroom-sized version of the classic has advantages Outliers: The Story of Success Study of why maths is unpopular is relevant to physics teaching WEB WATCH IOP webcasts are improving but are still not as impressive as Jodrell Bank's Chromoscope website

  7. Realization of quantum non-demolition measurement of nuclear spin 1/2 of cold ytterbium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, T.; Namiki, R.; Takahashi, Y.

    2009-04-01

    We have demonstrated a quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement with a collective spin of cold ytterbium atoms (171Yb) via Faraday rotation interaction, and have observed 1.8-1.5+2.4 dB spin squeezing. Since 171Yb atoms have only a nuclear spin of one-half in the ground state, the system constitutes the simplest spin ensemble and is thus robust against decoherence. Furthermore, we have considered the atomic quantum swapping gate as a quantum information device using multiple Faraday rotation interactions, and have found that we can realize the quantum-domain performance for a realistic experimental condition.

  8. Measurement of a strong atomic hyperfine field allowing the determination of nuclear g-factors in (sub)nanosecond states

    CERN Document Server

    Vyvey, K; Cottenier, S; Balabanski, D L; Coulier, N; Coussement, R; Georgiev, G; Lépine-Szily, A; Ternier, S; Teughels, S

    2001-01-01

    An extension of the time-integrated atomic decoupling technique to measure g-factors of (sub)nanosecond isomers and/or the magnetic hyperfine field induced by highly excited atomic electrons on nuclei recoiling into vacuum is discussed. A high average field B sub h sub f =1080 sub - sub 1 sub 7 sub 5 sup + sup 2 sup 7 sup 0 T and an average atomic spin J=2.7(2) is deduced using the known magnetic moment of a 4.05(7) mu s isomer in sup 6 sup 9 Ge. Such high magnetic fields allow g-factor measurements of (sub)nanosecond states. Ab initio calculations show that the combination of a high average magnetic hyperfine field and a high average atomic spin is only possible if a considerable fraction of the ions is in a metastable excited state.

  9. Improving fundamental abilities of atomic force microscopy for investigating quantitative nanoscale physical properties of complex biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X.

    Measurements of local material properties of complex biological systems (e.g. live cells and viruses) in their respective physiological conditions are extremely important in the fields of biophysics, nanotechnology, material science, and nanomedicine. Yet, little is known about the structure-function-property relationship of live cells and viruses. In the case of live cells, the measurements of progressive variations in viscoelastic properties in vitro can provide insight to the mechanistic processes underpinning morphogenesis, mechano-transduction, motility, metastasis, and many more fundamental cellular processes. In the case of living viruses, the relationship between capsid structural framework and the role of the DNA molecule interaction within viruses influencing their stiffness, damping and electrostatic properties can shed light in virological processes like protein subunits assembly/dissassembly, maturation, and infection. The study of mechanics of live cells and viruses has been limited in part due to the lack of technology capable of acquiring high-resolution (nanoscale, subcellular) images of its heterogeneous material properties which vary widely depending on origin and physical interaction. The capabilities of the atomic force microscope (AFM) for measuring forces and topography with sub-nm precision have greatly contributed to research related to biophysics and biomechanics during the past two decades. AFM based biomechanical studies have the unique advantage of resolving/mapping spatially the local material properties over living cells and viruses. However, conventional AFM techniques such as force-volume and quasi-static force-distance curves are too low resolution and low speed to resolve interesting biophysical processes such as cytoskeletal dynamics for cells or assembly/dissasembly of viruses. To overcome this bottleneck, a novel atomic force microscopy mode is developed, that leads to sub-10-nm resolution and sub-15-minutes mapping of local

  10. Divisible Atoms or None at All? Facing the European Contributions to Developments of Chemistry and Physics in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Južnič, Stanislav

    2016-12-01

    atoms is discussed as possible new paradigm which could rename the destructible divisible entities of future physics, and with more difficulties also of chemistry. The word atom meaning indivisible not compound entity is basically in contradiction with the characteristics of item it is supposed to describe. The suffix "a" provides a negation in Ancient Greek language. The suffix should be omitted to use tom (τομος) to manage the actual situation of a-toms (=Toms) as compound of elementary particles. In late 19th century after the European Spring of Nations actually two basically different concepts of atoms of chemists and physicists accomplished a kind of symbioses. The suggestion is put forward that while indivisible atoms soon became contradictions in physics, they still retain some value in chemistry which should be taken into account in the attempt to hange the name of atom. The research of human genome as the atom of genetics is similar in broader sense, while there is no basic problem with the nomenclature of genome. The genome manipulations are far less obstructed with Chinese traditions compared to Christian beliefs.

  11. Biophysical Measurements of Cells, Microtubules, and DNA with an Atomic Force Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Devenica, Luka M; Cabrejo, Raysa; Kurek, Matthew; Deveney, Edward F; Carter, Ashley R

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are ubiquitous in research laboratories and have recently been priced for use in teaching laboratories. Here we review several AFM platforms (Dimension 3000 by Digital Instruments, EasyScan2 by Nanosurf, ezAFM by Nanomagnetics, and TKAFM by Thorlabs) and describe various biophysical experiments that could be done in the teaching laboratory using these instruments. In particular, we focus on experiments that image biological materials and quantify biophysical parameters: 1) imaging cells to determine membrane tension, 2) imaging microtubules to determine their persistence length, 3) imaging the random walk of DNA molecules to determine their contour length, and 4) imaging stretched DNA molecules to measure the tensional force.

  12. A standard format for reporting atomic positions in measured or calculated surface structures: The CIF file

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Laurence D.

    2010-06-01

    In his editorial in this issue, the editor-in-chief emphasizes the editorial policy that any paper which involves a crystallographic structure (whether experimentally measured or theoretically calculated) must also include a complete listing of all the atomic positions within the crystal structure, either as supporting information or directly within the paper itself. He also strongly recommends that the complete crystallographic data set be included as supporting information. At the request of the editor-in-chief, I outline here the reasons why this is scientifically desirable. Furthermore, I propose here that the Surface Science community adopt the same standard format for reporting these as is already widely used in bulk crystallography publications, namely the inclusion of a Crystallographic Information Format file (or CIF file) as supporting information. Finally, I describe the details of this specific file format, with illustrative examples.

  13. Low Energy (Anti)atoms for Precision Tests of Basic Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, D M; Pereira, O.; Veloso, M; Cesar, Claudio L.

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in techniques to manipulate and study, with high precision, atomic hydrogen, from one hand, and successful trapping schemes for positrons and antiprotons, from the other hand, have encouraged the pursuit of experiments to test CPT violation and the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP) through the comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen. A description of the hydrogen trap and laser system being built in Rio, to trap and perform high resolution spectroscopy on cold hydrogen, is pres...

  14. Physical activity in the United States measured by accelerometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Richard P; Berrigan, David; Dodd, Kevin W; Mâsse, Louise C; Tilert, Timothy; McDowell, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    To describe physical activity levels of children (6-11 yr), adolescents (12-19 yr), and adults (20+ yr), using objective data obtained with accelerometers from a representative sample of the U.S. population. These results were obtained from the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES), a cross-sectional study of a complex, multistage probability sample of the civilian, noninstitutionalized U.S. population in the United States. Data are described from 6329 participants who provided at least 1 d of accelerometer data and from 4867 participants who provided four or more days of accelerometer data. Males are more physically active than females. Physical activity declines dramatically across age groups between childhood and adolescence and continues to decline with age. For example, 42% of children ages 6-11 yr obtain the recommended 60 min x d(-1) of physical activity, whereas only 8% of adolescents achieve this goal. Among adults, adherence to the recommendation to obtain 30 min x d(-1) of physical activity is less than 5%. Objective and subjective measures of physical activity give qualitatively similar results regarding gender and age patterns of activity. However, adherence to physical activity recommendations according to accelerometer-measured activity is substantially lower than according to self-report. Great care must be taken when interpreting self-reported physical activity in clinical practice, public health program design and evaluation, and epidemiological research.

  15. Direct Surface Tension Measurements of Individual Sub-Micrometer Particles Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hansol D; Estillore, Armando D; Morris, Holly S; Ray, Kamal K; Alejandro, Aldair; Grassian, Vicki H; Tivanski, Alexei V

    2017-11-02

    Understanding the role of sea spray aerosol (SSA) on climate and the environment is of great interest due to their high number concentration throughout the Earth's atmosphere. Despite being of fundamental importance, direct surface tension measurements of SSA relevant sub-micrometer particles are rare, largely due to their extremely small volumes. Herein, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to directly measure the surface tension of individual sub-micrometer SSA particle mimics at ambient temperature and varying relative humidity (RH). Specifically, we probed both atmospherically relevant and fundamentally important model systems including electrolyte salts, dicarboxylic acids, and saccharides as single components and mixtures. Our results show that the single particle surface tension depends on RH or solute mole percentage and chemical composition. Moreover, for liquid droplets at and below 100 Pa s in viscosity, or at corresponding RH, we show good agreement between the AFM single particle and the bulk solution surface tension measurements at overlapping concentration ranges. Thus, direct surface tension measurements of individual particles using AFM is shown over a wide range of chemical systems as a function of RH, solute mole percentage, and viscosity than previously reported.

  16. Elastic-properties measurement at high temperatures through contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinello, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.marinello@unipd.it; Pezzuolo, Andrea; Sartori, Luigi; Cavalli, Raffaele [University of Padova, Department of Land, Environment, Agriculture and Forestry, Viale dell’Università 16, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Carmignato, Simone [University of Padova, Department of Management and Engineering, Stradella San Nicola 3, 36100 Vicenza (Italy); Savio, Enrico [University of Padova, Department of Industrial Engineering, Via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova (Italy); De Chiffre, Leonardo [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Produktionstorvet 425, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-06-23

    Miniaturization of products and need for further improvement of machines performance introduce new serious challenges in materials characterization. In particular non-destructive mechanical testing in the sub-micrometer scale is needed to better understand and improve micro-manufacturing operations. To this regard, some open issues are of particular interest: low depth of penetration, high lateral resolution and measurements at elevated temperatures. An interesting solution is given by acoustic microscopy techniques, which can be successfully implemented for advanced research in surface elasticity, allowing fast direct and non-destructive measurement of Young’s modulus and related surface parameters. In this work an instrument set up for Contact Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy is proposed, where the sample with is coupled to a heating stage and a piezoelectric transducer directly vibrate the cantilever during scanning, in order to allow exploitation of high resolution measurements at relatively high temperatures. Such instrument set up was undergone a set of calibration experiments in order to allow not only qualitative but also quantitative characterization of surfaces. The work was completed with a feasibility study with mechanical and topography measurements at temperatures as high as 150°C, with lateral resolution lower than 100 nm.

  17. Measuring Force-Induced Dissociation Kinetics of Protein Complexes Using Single-Molecule Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manibog, K; Yen, C F; Sivasankar, S

    2017-01-01

    Proteins respond to mechanical force by undergoing conformational changes and altering the kinetics of their interactions. However, the biophysical relationship between mechanical force and the lifetime of protein complexes is not completely understood. In this chapter, we provide a step-by-step tutorial on characterizing the force-dependent regulation of protein interactions using in vitro and in vivo single-molecule force clamp measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM). While we focus on the force-induced dissociation of E-cadherins, a critical cell-cell adhesion protein, the approaches described here can be readily adapted to study other protein complexes. We begin this chapter by providing a brief overview of theoretical models that describe force-dependent kinetics of biomolecular interactions. Next, we present step-by-step methods for measuring the response of single receptor-ligand bonds to tensile force in vitro. Finally, we describe methods for quantifying the mechanical response of single protein complexes on the surface of living cells. We describe general protocols for conducting such measurements, including sample preparation, AFM force clamp measurements, and data analysis. We also highlight critical limitations in current technologies and discuss solutions to these challenges. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Standardized Nanomechanical Atomic Force Microscopy Procedure (SNAP) for Measuring Soft and Biological Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillers, Hermann; Rianna, Carmela; Schäpe, Jens; Luque, Tomas; Doschke, Holger; Wälte, Mike; Uriarte, Juan José; Campillo, Noelia; Michanetzis, Georgios P A; Bobrowska, Justyna; Dumitru, Andra; Herruzo, Elena T; Bovio, Simone; Parot, Pierre; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Podestà, Alessandro; Puricelli, Luca; Scheuring, Simon; Missirlis, Yannis; Garcia, Ricardo; Odorico, Michael; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Lafont, Frank; Lekka, Malgorzata; Rico, Felix; Rigato, Annafrancesca; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Oberleithner, Hans; Navajas, Daniel; Radmacher, Manfred

    2017-07-11

    We present a procedure that allows a reliable determination of the elastic (Young's) modulus of soft samples, including living cells, by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The standardized nanomechanical AFM procedure (SNAP) ensures the precise adjustment of the AFM optical lever system, a prerequisite for all kinds of force spectroscopy methods, to obtain reliable values independent of the instrument, laboratory and operator. Measurements of soft hydrogel samples with a well-defined elastic modulus using different AFMs revealed that the uncertainties in the determination of the deflection sensitivity and subsequently cantilever's spring constant were the main sources of error. SNAP eliminates those errors by calculating the correct deflection sensitivity based on spring constants determined with a vibrometer. The procedure was validated within a large network of European laboratories by measuring the elastic properties of gels and living cells, showing that its application reduces the variability in elastic moduli of hydrogels down to 1%, and increased the consistency of living cells elasticity measurements by a factor of two. The high reproducibility of elasticity measurements provided by SNAP could improve significantly the applicability of cell mechanics as a quantitative marker to discriminate between cell types and conditions.

  19. Elastic-properties measurement at high temperatures through contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinello, Francesco; Pezzuolo, Andrea; Carmignato, Simone; Savio, Enrico; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Sartori, Luigi; Cavalli, Raffaele

    2015-06-01

    Miniaturization of products and need for further improvement of machines performance introduce new serious challenges in materials characterization. In particular non-destructive mechanical testing in the sub-micrometer scale is needed to better understand and improve micro-manufacturing operations. To this regard, some open issues are of particular interest: low depth of penetration, high lateral resolution and measurements at elevated temperatures. An interesting solution is given by acoustic microscopy techniques, which can be successfully implemented for advanced research in surface elasticity, allowing fast direct and non-destructive measurement of Young's modulus and related surface parameters. In this work an instrument set up for Contact Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy is proposed, where the sample with is coupled to a heating stage and a piezoelectric transducer directly vibrate the cantilever during scanning, in order to allow exploitation of high resolution measurements at relatively high temperatures. Such instrument set up was undergone a set of calibration experiments in order to allow not only qualitative but also quantitative characterization of surfaces. The work was completed with a feasibility study with mechanical and topography measurements at temperatures as high as 150°C, with lateral resolution lower than 100 nm.

  20. In Situ Roughness Measurements for the Solar Cell Industry Using an Atomic Force Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higinio González-Jorge

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Areal roughness parameters always need to be under control in the thin film solar cell industry because of their close relationship with the electrical efficiency of the cells. In this work, these parameters are evaluated for measurements carried out in a typical fabrication area for this industry. Measurements are made using a portable atomic force microscope on the CNC diamond cutting machine where an initial sample of transparent conductive oxide is cut into four pieces. The method is validated by making a comparison between the parameters obtained in this process and in the laboratory under optimal conditions. Areal roughness parameters and Fourier Spectral Analysis of the data show good compatibility and open the possibility to use this type of measurement instrument to perform in situ quality control. This procedure gives a sample for evaluation without destroying any of the transparent conductive oxide; in this way 100% of the production can be tested, so improving the measurement time and rate of production.

  1. Imaging and measuring the molecular force of lymphoma pathological cells using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili; Zhang, Weijing

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a new technology to visualize the cellular topography and quantify the molecular interactions at nanometer spatial resolution. In this work, AFM was used to image the cellular topography and measure the molecular force of pathological cells from B-cell lymphoma patients. After the fluorescence staining, cancer cells were recognized by their special morphological features and then the detailed topography was visualized by AFM imaging. The AFM images showed that cancer cells were much rougher than healthy cells. CD20 is a surface marker of B cells and rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. To measure the CD20-rituximab interaction forces, the polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker was used to link rituximab onto the AFM tip and the verification experiments of the functionalized probe indicated that rituximab molecules were successfully linked onto the AFM tip. The CD20-rituximab interaction forces were measured on about 20 pathological cells and the force measurement results indicated the CD20-rituximab binding forces were mainly in the range of 110-120 pN and 130-140 pN. These results can improve our understanding of the topography and molecular force of lymphoma pathological cells. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Spectral analysis of irregular roughness artifacts measured by atomic force microscopy and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhang; Luo, Tingting; Ma, Chengfu; Huang, Wenhao; Gao, Sitian

    2014-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laser scanning microscopy (LSM) measurements on a series of specially designed roughness artifacts were performed and the results characterized by spectral analysis. As demonstrated by comparisons, both AFM and LSM can image the complex structures with high resolution and fidelity. When the surface autocorrelation length increases from 200 to 500 nm, the cumulative power spectral density spectra of the design, AFM and LSM data reach a better agreement with each other. The critical wavelength of AFM characterization is smaller than that of LSM, and the gap between the measured and designed critical wavelengths is reduced with an increase in the surface autocorrelation length. Topography measurements of surfaces with a near zero or negatively skewed height distribution were determined to be accurate. However, obvious discrepancies were found for surfaces with a positive skewness owing to more severe dilations of either the solid tip of the AFM or the laser tip of the LSM. Further surface parameter evaluation and template matching analysis verified that the main distortions in AFM measurements are tip dilations while those in LSM are generally larger and more complex.

  3. Measurements of atomic state distribution functions of the Philips QL-lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonkers, J.; Bakker, M.; Mullen, J.A.M. van der [Eindhoven Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Dept. of Applied Physics

    1996-12-31

    In 1992 Philips Lighting introduced the QL-lamp, an inductively coupled low pressure RF discharge containing a mixture of argon and mercury. Its main advantage is the absence of electrodes, which benefits the life-time. In order to improve the knowledge of this kind of plasmas a model has been developed and measurements have been performed. In every plasma the free electrons are an important species: they control the energy transfer from the electromagnetic field to the heavy particles. Therefore, it is important to know the spatial distribution of the electron temperature and of the electron density. These parameters can be obtained from the Atomic State Distribution Function (ASDF), since the levels close the ionization limit are in partial Local Saha Equilibrium (pLSE). The densities of the excited states are obtained from absolute line intensity measurements. However, it appears that the highly excited, measurable, states are not in pLSE, indicating that the QL plasma is far from Saha equilibrium. In order to obtain the electron densities and temperatures the ASDF has to be combined with either measurements of continuum radiation or a Collisional Radiative Model (CRM). The results of both methods will be presented and compared with a third technique to obtain the electron density and temperature: Thomson scattering.

  4. The role of quantum measurements in physical processes and protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Benjamin; Jacobs, Kurt

    2017-09-01

    In this mainly pedagogical article, we discuss under what circumstances measurements play a special role in quantum processes. In particular, we discuss the following facts that appear to be a common area of confusion. (i) From a fundamental point of view, measurements play no special role whatsoever: all dynamics that can be generated by measurements can be generated by unitary processes (for which post-selection is no exception). (ii) From a purely physical point of view, measurements are not ‘outside’ of quantum mechanics. (iii) The only difference between the abilities of measurement-based protocols and unitary circuits for quantum computing comes from practical (technology dependent) constraints. We emphasise the importance of distinguishing between differences that are (i) fundamental but without physical import; (ii) fundamental and possess physical import; and (iii) are not fundamental but have practical import. We also emphasise the importance of separating theoretical and experimental elements of measurement, primarily projection and amplification, which are physically very different. Note that since we are concerned with facts regarding physical processes, this article has little if anything to do with interpretations of quantum mechanics.

  5. Physics of quantum fluids. New trends and hot topics in atomic and polariton condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramati, Alberto [Paris Univ. (France). Laboratoire Kastler Brossel; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Modugno, Michele (eds.) [IKERBASQUE, Bilbao (Spain); Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica e Historia de la Ciencia

    2013-10-01

    Provides an overview of the field of quantum fluids. Presents analogies and differences between polariton and atomic quantum fluids. With contributions from the major actors in the field. Explains a new type of quantum fluid with specific characteristics. The study of quantum fluids, stimulated by the discovery of superfluidity in liquid helium, has experienced renewed interest after the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in ultra-cold atomic gases and the observation a new type of quantum fluid with specific characteristics derived from its intrinsic out-of-equilibrium nature. The main objective of this book is to take a snapshot of the state-of-the-art of this fast moving field with a special emphasis on the hot topics and new trends. Bringing together the most active specialists of the two areas (atomic and polaritonic quantum fluids), we expect that this book will facilitate the exchange and the collaboration between these two communities working on subjects with very strong analogies.

  6. Nanogeochronology of discordant zircon measured by atom probe microscopy of Pb-enriched dislocation loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Emily M.; Reddy, Steven M.; Saxey, David W.; Snoeyenbos, David R.; Rickard, William D. A.; Fougerouse, Denis; Kylander-Clark, Andrew R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic discordance is a common feature in zircon that can lead to an erroneous age determination, and it is attributed to the mobilization and escape of radiogenic Pb during its post-crystallization geological evolution. The degree of isotopic discordance measured at analytical scales of ~10 μm often differs among adjacent analysis locations, indicating heterogeneous distributions of Pb at shorter length scales. We use atom probe microscopy to establish the nature of these sites and the mechanisms by which they form. We show that the nanoscale distribution of Pb in a ~2.1 billion year old discordant zircon that was metamorphosed c. 150 million years ago is defined by two distinct Pb reservoirs. Despite overall Pb loss during peak metamorphic conditions, the atom probe data indicate that a component of radiogenic Pb was trapped in 10-nm dislocation loops that formed during the annealing of radiation damage associated with the metamorphic event. A second Pb component, found outside the dislocation loops, represents homogeneous accumulation of radiogenic Pb in the zircon matrix after metamorphism. The 207Pb/206Pb ratios measured from eight dislocation loops are equivalent within uncertainty and yield an age consistent with the original crystallization age of the zircon, as determined by laser ablation spot analysis. Our results provide a specific mechanism for the trapping and retention of radiogenic Pb during metamorphism and confirm that isotopic discordance in this zircon is characterized by discrete nanoscale reservoirs of Pb that record different isotopic compositions and yield age data consistent with distinct geological events. These data may provide a framework for interpreting discordance in zircon as the heterogeneous distribution of discrete radiogenic Pb populations, each yielding geologically meaningful ages. PMID:27617295

  7. Diabetes increases stiffness of live cardiomyocytes measured by atomic force microscopy nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benech, Juan C; Benech, Nicolás; Zambrana, Ana I; Rauschert, Inés; Bervejillo, Verónica; Oddone, Natalia; Damián, Juan P

    2014-11-15

    Stiffness of live cardiomyocytes isolated from control and diabetic mice was measured using the atomic force microscopy nanoindentation method. Type 1 diabetes was induced in mice by streptozotocin administration. Histological images of myocardium from mice that were diabetic for 3 mo showed disorderly lineup of myocardial cells, irregularly sized cell nuclei, and fragmented and disordered myocardial fibers with interstitial collagen accumulation. Phalloidin-stained cardiomyocytes isolated from diabetic mice showed altered (i.e., more irregular and diffuse) actin filament organization compared with cardiomyocytes from control mice. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a) pump expression was reduced in homogenates obtained from the left ventricle of diabetic animals compared with age-matched controls. The apparent elastic modulus (AEM) for live control or diabetic isolated cardiomyocytes was measured using the atomic force microscopy nanoindentation method in Tyrode buffer solution containing 1.8 mM Ca(2+) and 5.4 mM KCl (physiological condition), 100 nM Ca(2+) and 5.4 mM KCl (low extracellular Ca(2+) condition), or 1.8 mM Ca(2+) and 140 mM KCl (contraction condition). In the physiological condition, the mean AEM was 112% higher for live diabetic than control isolated cardiomyocytes (91 ± 14 vs. 43 ± 7 kPa). The AEM was also significantly higher in diabetic than control cardiomyocytes in the low extracellular Ca(2+) and contraction conditions. These findings suggest that the material properties of live cardiomyocytes were affected by diabetes, resulting in stiffer cells, which very likely contribute to high diastolic LV stiffness, which has been observed in vivo in some diabetes mellitus patients. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Measuring Physical Activity in the Elderly: Some Implications for Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Roy J.

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of physical activity patterns is discussed in terms of data obtained by attitude assessment, activity questionnaires, personal monitoring devices, and fitness assessment. Problems of each technique are described. Application of activity measures to the estimation of total dietary needs is discussed. (SK)

  9. Capillary force on a tilted cylinder: Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sébastien; Laurent, Justine; Steinberger, Audrey

    2017-11-01

    The capillary force in situations where the liquid meniscus is asymmetric, such as the one around a tilted object, has been hitherto barely investigated even though these situations are very common in practice. In particular, the capillary force exerted on a tilted object may depend on the dipping angle i. We investigate experimentally the capillary force that applies on a tilted cylinder as a function of its dipping angle i, using a home-built tilting Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) with custom made probes. A micrometric-size rod is glued at the end of an AFM cantilever of known stiffness, whose deflection is measured when the cylindrical probe is dipped in and retracted from reference liquids. We show that a torque correction is necessary to understand the measured deflection. We give the explicit expression of this correction as a function of the probes' geometrical parameters, so that its magnitude can be readily evaluated. The results are compatible with a vertical capillary force varying as 1/cosi, in agreement with a recent theoretical prediction. Finally, we discuss the accuracy of the method for measuring the surface tension times the cosine of the contact angle of the liquid on the probe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Technique for measurement of magnetostriction in an individual nanowire using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Park, Jung, E-mail: jjpark74@gmail.com; Flatau, Alison B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Estrine, Eliot C.; Madhukar Reddy, Sai; Stadler, Bethanie J. H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    We have investigated a method for measuring the dimensions of an individual multilayered Fe-Ga/Cu nanowire (NW) as it changes with induced magnetization. In this study, we demonstrate the proposed approach and establish this as a viable method for measuring the magnetostrictive behavior of an individual Fe-Ga/Cu NW using atomic force microscopy (AFM). When an external magnetic field (∼300 Oe) was applied perpendicular to the NW axis, the NW length appeared minimized. When a field (∼1000 Oe) was applied parallel to the NW axis, the height profile of the NW was found to be higher than in the case with no parallel external field. Since both ends of the NW were welded to the substrate, the magnetic field induced dimensional change of the NW caused deflection of the NW in the upward direction, which was significant enough to be detected by AFM. An average height difference of 15 nm was measured with and without an applied field which was then used to calculate the magnetostriction of the multilayered NW.

  11. Application of triangular atomic force microscopy cantilevers to friction measurement with the improved parallel scan method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Liang; Zhao, Xue-Zeng

    2009-02-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) can provide tribological information in micro/nanoscale. However, the general measurement techniques require rigorous value of stiffness and relationship between AFM cantilever deformation and corresponding photodetector response. In this study, triangular AFM cantilevers with different dimensions are applied to quantitatively measure the coefficient of friction with the improved parallel scan method [Y. L. Wang, X. Z. Zhao, and F. Q. Zhou, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 036107 (2007)]. An analytical model is first presented with the plan-view geometrical dimensions of cantilevers. Finite element analysis (FEA) models are set up to validate the analytical model. The results show good agreement between analytical calculation and FEA simulation. More importantly, the coefficient of friction obtained with different cantilevers on silicon surface shows a good consistency. At last, the factors which may affect measurement are discussed. The advantage of the model presented here is that the general uncertainties of thickness and Young's modulus are not necessary to be known for the friction force calibration in AFM application.

  12. Spatially resolved modeling and measurements of metastable argon atoms in argon-helium microplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.; Gregório, José; Hopwood, Jeffrey; Galbally-Kinney, Kristin L.; Davis, Steven J.; Rawlins, Wilson T.

    2017-04-01

    Microwave-driven plasmas operating near atmospheric pressure have been shown to be a promising technique for producing the high density of argon metastable atoms required for optically pumped rare gas laser systems. Stable microwave-driven plasmas can be generated at high pressures using microstrip-based resonator circuits. We present results from computational modeling and laser absorption measurements of argon metastable densities in such plasmas operating in argon-helium gas mixtures at pressures up to 300 Torr. The model and measurements resolve the plasma characteristics both perpendicular to the substrate surface and along the resonator length. The measurements qualitatively and in many aspects quantitatively confirm the accuracy of the model. The plasmas exhibit distinct behaviors depending on whether the operating gas is mostly argon or mostly helium. In high-argon plasmas, the metastable density has a large peak value but is confined very closely to the electrode surfaces as well as being reduced near the discharge gap itself. In contrast, metastable densities in high helium-fraction mixtures extend through most of the plasma. In all systems, increasing the power extends the region of metastable along the resonator length, while the extent away from the substrate surface remains approximately constant.

  13. Measurement of partial pressures in vacuum technology and vacuum physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, W. K.

    1986-01-01

    It is pointed out that the measurement of gaseous pressures of less than 0.0001 torr is based on the ionization of gas atoms and molecules due to collisions with electrons. The particle density is determined in place of the pressure. The ionization cross sections for molecules of various gases are discussed. It is found that the true pressure in a vacuum system cannot be determined with certainty if it is unknown which gas is present. Effects of partial pressure determination on the condition of the vacuum system are discussed together with ion sources, systems of separation, and ion detection.

  14. Measurement of the diffusion coefficient of oriented Na atoms in different buffer gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bicchi, P. (Siena Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica); Moi, L.; Savino, P.; Zambon, B. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa (Italy). Lab. di Fisica Atomica e Moleculare)

    1980-01-11

    The authors report the measurements of the diffusion coefficients of Na in different buffer gases obtained through the study of the optical activity of Na vapour oriented by laser light. The reliability of this method is analyzed in the different physical situations to which the different buffer gases give rise. The accuracy of the method, in all cases in which extremely short relaxation processes are absent, is confirmed either by the comparison among the diffusion coefficient values here measured and those present in the literature obtained with different techniques, or by the analysis of the polarization distribution in steady conditions, which results to be in good agreement with the theoretical forecasts.

  15. Exciting interdisciplinary physics quarks and gluons, atomic nuclei, relativity and cosmology, biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear physics is an exciting, broadly faceted field. It spans a wide range of topics, reaching from nuclear structure physics to high-energy physics, astrophysics and medical physics (heavy ion tumor therapy).  New developments are presented in this volume and the status of research is reviewed. A major focus is put on nuclear structure physics, dealing with superheavy elements and with various forms of exotic nuclei: strange nuclei, very neutron rich nuclei, nuclei of antimatter. Also quantum electrodynamics of strong fields is addressed, which is linked to the occurrence of giant nuclear systems in, e.g., U+U collisions. At high energies nuclear physics joins with elementary particle physics. Various chapters address the theory of elementary matter at high densities and temperature, in particular the quark gluon plasma which is predicted by quantum chromodynamics (QCD) to occur in high-energy heavy ion collisions. In the field of nuclear astrophysics, the properties of neutron stars and quark stars are d...

  16. Low energy (anti)atoms for precision tests of basic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Silveira, D M; Veloso, M; Cesar, C L

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in techniques to manipulate and study, with high precision, atomic hydrogen, from one hand, and successful trapping schemes for positrons and antiprotons, from the other hand, have encouraged the pursuit of experiments to test CPT violation and the weak equivalence principle (WEP) through the comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen. A description of the hydrogen trap and laser system being built in Rio, to trap and perform high resolution spectroscopy on cold hydrogen, is presented along with a discussion on the techniques and experimental system being implemented by the ATHENA collaboration at CERN to produce cold antihydrogen. A new technique to make a cold antihydrogen beam is proposed. (25 refs).

  17. Measurements on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces using a porous gamma alumina nanoparticle aggregate mounted on Atomic Force Microscopy cantilevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Theerthankar; Becker, Thomas; Nair, Balagopal N.

    2010-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements are extensively used for a detailed understanding of molecular and surface forces. In this study, we present a technique for measuring such forces, using an AFM cantilever attached with a porous gamma alumina nanoparticle aggregate. The modified cantilever

  18. The uncertainty in physical measurements an introduction to data analysis in the physics laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Fornasini, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    All measurements of physical quantities are affected by uncertainty. Understanding the origin of uncertainty, evaluating its extent and suitably taking it into account in data analysis is essential for assessing the degree of accuracy of phenomenological relationships and physical laws in both scientific research and technological applications. The Uncertainty in Physical Measurements: An Introduction to Data Analysis in the Physics Laboratory presents an introduction to uncertainty and to some of the most common procedures of data analysis. This book will serve the reader well by filling the gap between tutorial textbooks and highly specialized monographs. The book is divided into three parts. The first part is a phenomenological introduction to measurement and uncertainty: properties of instruments, different causes and corresponding expressions of uncertainty, histograms and distributions, and unified expression of uncertainty. The second part contains an introduction to probability theory, random variable...

  19. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics: "Light Antiprotonic Atoms" by R. Hayano

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  20. The Physics of Metrology All About Instruments - from Trundle Wheels to Atomic Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Hebra, Alexius J

    2008-01-01

    Suitable for practicing engineers, instrument designers, service technicians and engineering students, this reference manual incorporates the related fields of physics, mechanics and mathematics to enhance the understanding of the subject matter

  1. Long-Term Stability of NIST Chip-Scale Atomic Clock Physics Packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    L. Moi, and G. Orriols, 1976, “ Experimental -Method for Observation of Rf Transitions and Laser Beat Resonances in Oriented Na Vapor,” Nuovo Cimento...della Societa Italiana di Fisica B-General Physics, Relativity, Astronomy, and Mathematical Physics and Methods, 36, 5-20. [16] N. Cyr, M. Têtu...2000, “Theoretical and experimental study of light shift in a CPT-based Rb vapor cell frequency standard,” in Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Precise

  2. Stark spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen balmer-alpha line for electric field measurement in plasmas by saturation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, S.; Katayama, K.; Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Sasaki, K.

    2016-09-01

    Detailed structures of electric fields in sheath and pre-sheath regions of various plasmas are interested from the viewpoint of basic plasma physics. Several researchers observed Stark spectra of Doppler-broadened Rydberg states to evaluate electric fields in plasmas; however, these measurements needed high-power, expensive tunable lasers. In this study, we carried out another Stark spectroscopy with a low-cost diode laser system. We applied saturation spectroscopy, which achieves a Doppler-free wavelength resolution, to observe the Stark spectrum of the Balmer-alpha line of atomic hydrogen in the sheath region of a low-pressure hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma was generated in an ICP source which was driven by on-off modulated rf power at 20 kHz. A planar electrode was inserted into the plasma. Weak probe and intense pump laser beams were injected into the plasma from the counter directions in parallel to the electrode surface. The laser beams crossed with a small angle above the electrode. The observed fine-structure spectra showed shifts, deformations, and/or splits when varying the distance between the observation position and the electrode surface. The detection limit for the electric field was estimated to be several tens of V/cm.

  3. Elasticity maps of living neurons measured by combined fluorescence and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spedden, Elise; White, James D; Naumova, Elena N; Kaplan, David L; Staii, Cristian

    2012-09-05

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here, we combine atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy with fluorescence microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglion, and P-19 (mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells) neurons. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon disruption of microtubules of the cell. We find reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules. We also report that cortical and P-19 neurons have similar elasticity maps, with elastic moduli in the range 0.1-2 kPa, with typical average values of 0.4 kPa (P-19) and 0.2 kPa (cortical). In contrast, dorsal root ganglion neurons are stiffer than P-19 and cortical cells, yielding elastic moduli in the range 0.1-8 kPa, with typical average values of 0.9 kPa. Finally, we report no measurable influence of substrate protein coating on cell body elasticity for the three types of neurons. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative measurements of dielectrophoresis in a nanoscale electrode array with an atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froberg, James; Jayasooriya, Vidura; You, Seungyong; Nawarathna, Dharmakeerthi; Choi, Yongki

    2017-05-01

    Nanoelectronic devices integrated with dielectrophoresis (DEP) have been promoted as promising platforms for trapping, separating, and concentrating target biomarkers and cancer cells from a complex medium. Here, we visualized DEP and DEP gradients in conventional nanoelectronic devices by using multi-pass atomic force microcopy techniques. Our measurements directly demonstrated a short range DEP only at sharp step edges of electrodes, frequency dependent DEP polarity, and separation distance dependent DEP strength. Additionally, non-uniform DEP along the edges of the electrodes due to a large variation in electric field strength was observed. The strength and apparent working distance of DEP were measured to be an order of a few nN and 80 nm within the limited scale of particles and other parameters such as an ionic strength of the medium. This method provides a powerful tool to quantify the strength and polarity of DEP and allows optimizing and calibrating the device's operating parameters including the driving field strength for the effective control and manipulation of target biomolecules.

  5. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  6. Time-of-flight atom probe measurements on Ni3Al and Co3W

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soer, W.A.; Bronsveld, P.M.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a VG FIM100 was taken into operation, consisting of a field-ion microscope (FIM), a time-of-flight atom probe (TOFAP) and an imaging atom probe. A tungsten specimen was used to calibrate the conversion of flight times to m/n values. The resulting relative mass resolution of the TOFAP

  7. Atomic physics modeling of transmission spectra of Sc-doped aerogel foams to support OMEGA experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, H. M., E-mail: hjohns@lanl.gov; Lanier, N. E.; Kline, J. L.; Fontes, C. J.; Perry, T. S.; Fryer, C. L.; Sherrill, M. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Brown, C. R. D.; Morton, J. W. [AWE Aldermaston, Berkshire, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Hager, J. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Lockheed-Martin, 497 Electronics Parkway, Syracuse, New York 13221 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We present synthetic transmission spectra generated with PrismSPECT utilizing both the ATBASE model and the Los Alamos opacity library (OPLIB) to evaluate whether an alternative choice in atomic data will impact modeling of experimental data from radiation transport experiments using Sc-doped aerogel foams (ScSi{sub 6}O{sub 12} at 75 mg/cm{sup 3} density). We have determined that in the 50-200 eV T{sub e} range there is a significant difference in the 1s-3p spectra, especially below 100 eV, and for T{sub e} = 200 eV above 5000 eV in photon energy. Examining synthetic spectra generated using OPLIB with 300 resolving power reveals spectral sensitivity to T{sub e} changes of ∼3 eV.

  8. Atomic physics for cave-men and other beginners. The universe from within. Molecules, atoms, and elementary particles; Atomphysik fuer Hoehlenmenschen und andere Anfaenger. Das Universum von innen. Molekuele, Atome und Elementarteilchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beetz, Juergen

    2016-07-01

    In this essential can be found the structure and the general properties of atoms, the precise interior of atoms and the special behaviour resulting from it, and the mysterious world of ''quanta'' and their behaviour.

  9. Measurements of sub photon cavity fields by atom interferometry; Mesures de champs au niveau du photon par interferometrie atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussenzveig, P

    1994-07-15

    Two neighbouring levels of a Rydberg atom coupled to a high quality-factor microwave cavity are an excellent tool for the study of matter-wave interactions at the most basic level. The system is so simple (a two-level atom coupled to a single mode of the field) that most phenomena can be described analytically. In this work we study dispersive effects of the non-resonant atom-cavity interaction. We have measured the linear dependence of the atomic energy level-shifts on the average photon number in the cavity. Light shifts induced by an average microwave field intensity weaker than a single photon have been observed. It has also been possible to measure the residual shift of one of the two levels of the atomic transition in the absence of an injected field: a Lamb shift due to a single mode of the field. A sensitive measurement of these energy shifts is performed by an interferometric method: the Ramsey separated oscillatory fields technique. Future experiments, in a situation of very weak field relaxation, are proposed. The quantum behavior of the field will then be dominant and it shall be possible to perform a Quantum Non-Demolition measurement of the photon number: since the interaction is non-resonant, the atoms can neither absorb nor emit photons in the cavity. The performed experiments demonstrate the sensitivity of the apparatus and set the stage for future non-demolition measurements and for the study of 'mesoscopic' Schroedinger cat states of the field, on the boundary between classical and quantum worlds. (author)

  10. Comparative Validity of Physical Activity Measures in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    COLBERT, LISA H.; MATTHEWS, CHARLES E.; HAVIGHURST, THOMAS C.; KIM, KYUNGMANN; SCHOELLER, DALE A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare the validity of various physical activity measures with doubly labeled water (DLW)–measured physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in free-living older adults. Methods Fifty-six adults aged ≥65 yr wore three activity monitors (New Lifestyles pedometer, ActiGraph accelerometer, and a SenseWear (SW) armband) during a 10-d free-living period and completed three different surveys (Yale Physical Activity Survey (YPAS), Community Health Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS), and a modified Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (modPASE)). Total energy expenditure was measured using DLW, resting metabolic rate was measured with indirect calorimetry, the thermic effect of food was estimated, and from these, estimates of PAEE were calculated. The degree of linear association between the various measures and PAEE was assessed, as were differences in group PAEE, when estimable by a given measure. Results All three monitors were significantly correlated with PAEE (r = 0.48–0.60, P < 0.001). Of the questionnaires, only CHAMPS was significantly correlated with PAEE (r = 0.28, P = 0.04). Statistical comparison of the correlations suggested that the monitors were superior to YPAS and modPASE. Mean squared errors for all correlations were high, and the median PAEE from the different tools was significantly different from DLW for all but the YPAS and regression-estimated PAEE from the ActiGraph. Conclusions Objective devices more appropriately rank PAEE than self-reported instruments in older adults, but absolute estimates of PAEE are not accurate. Given the cost differential and ease of use, pedometers seem most useful in this population when ranking by physical activity level is adequate. PMID:20881882

  11. Measurements of new physics in B→ππ decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seungwon; Botella, F. J.; London, David; Silva, João P.

    2005-12-01

    If new physics (NP) is present in B→ππ decays, it can affect the isospin I=2 or I=0 channels. In this paper, we discuss various methods for detecting and measuring this NP. The techniques have increasing amounts of theoretical hadronic input. If NP is eventually detected in B→ππ—there is no evidence for it at present—one will be able to distinguish I=2 and I=0, and measure its parameters, using these methods.

  12. Probing viscoelastic surfaces with bimodal tapping-mode atomic force microscopy: Underlying physics and observables for a standard linear solid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares, Santiago D

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents computational simulations of single-mode and bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) with particular focus on the viscoelastic interactions occurring during tip-sample impact. The surface is modeled by using a standard linear solid model, which is the simplest system that can reproduce creep compliance and stress relaxation, which are fundamental behaviors exhibited by viscoelastic surfaces. The relaxation of the surface in combination with the complexities of bimodal tip-sample impacts gives rise to unique dynamic behaviors that have important consequences with regards to the acquisition of quantitative relationships between the sample properties and the AFM observables. The physics of the tip-sample interactions and its effect on the observables are illustrated and discussed, and a brief research outlook on viscoelasticity measurement with intermittent-contact AFM is provided.

  13. Digital image technology and a measurement tool in physical models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phelp, David

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Advances in digital image technology has allowed us to use accurate, but relatively cost effective technology to measure a number of varied activities in physical models. The capturing and manipulation of high resolution digital images can be used...

  14. Measurement of the parity nonconserving neutral weak interaction in atomic thallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucksbaum, P.H.

    1980-11-01

    This thesis describes an experiment to measure parity nonconservation in atomic thallium. A frequency doubled, flashlamp pumped tunable dye laser is used to excite the 6P/sub 1/2/(F = 0) ..-->.. 7P/sub 1/2/(F = 1) transition at 292.7 nm, with circularly polarized light. An electrostatic field E of 100 to 300 V/cm causes this transition to occur via Stark induced electric dipole. Two field free transitions may also occur: a highly forbidden magnetic dipole M, and a parity nonconserving electric dipole epsilon/sub P/. The latter is presumed to be due to the presence of a weak neutral current interaction between the 6p valence electron and the nucleus, as predicted by gauge theories which unite the electromagnetic and weak interactions. Both M and epsilon/sub P/ interfere with the Stark amplitude ..beta..E to produce a polarization of the 7P/sub 1/2/ state. This is measured with a circularly polarized infrared laser beam probe, tuned to the 7P/sub 1/2/ ..-->.. 8S/sub 1/2/ transition. This selectively excites m/sub F/ = +1 or -1 components of the 7P/sub 1/2/ state, and the polarization is seen as an asymmetry in 8S ..-->.. 6P/sub 3/2/ fluorescence when the probe helicity is reversed. The polarization due to M is ..delta../sub M/ = -2M/(BETAE). It is used to calibrate the analyzing efficiency. The polarization due to epsilon/sub P/ is ..delta../sub P/ = 2i epsilon/sub P//(..beta..E), and can be distinguished from ..delta../sub M/ by its properties under reversal of the 292.7 nm photon helicity and reversal of the laser direction. A preliminary measurement yielded a parity violation in agreement with the gauge theory of Weinberg and Salam.

  15. Direct Measurement of Interparticle Forces of Titan Aerosol Analogs ("Tholin") Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinting; Hörst, Sarah M.; He, Chao; McGuiggan, Patricia; Bridges, Nathan T.

    2017-12-01

    To understand the origin of the dunes on Titan, it is important to investigate the material properties of Titan's organic sand particles on Titan. The organic sand may behave distinctively compared to the quartz/basaltic sand on terrestrial planets (Earth, Venus, and Mars) due to differences in interparticle forces. We measured the surface energy (through contact angle measurements) and elastic modulus (through Atomic Force Microscopy) of the Titan aerosol analog (tholin). We find that the surface energy of a tholin thin film is about 70.9 mN/m, and its elastic modulus is about 3.0 GPa (similar to hard polymers like PMMA and polystyrene). For two 20 μm diameter particles, the theoretical cohesion force is therefore 3.3 μN. We directly measured interparticle forces for relevant materials: tholin particles are 0.8 ± 0.6 μN, while the interparticle cohesion between walnut shell particles (a typical model materials for the Titan Wind Tunnel, TWT) is only 0.4 ± 0.1 μN. The interparticle cohesion forces are much larger for tholins and presumably Titan sand particles than materials used in the TWT. This suggests that we should increase the interparticle force in both analog experiments (TWT) and threshold models to correctly translate the results to real Titan conditions. The strong cohesion of tholins may also inform us how the small aerosol particles (˜1 μm) in Titan's atmosphere are transformed into large sand particles (˜200 μm). It may also support the cohesive sand formation mechanism suggested by Rubin and Hesp (2009), where only unidirectional wind is needed to form linear dunes on Titan.

  16. Elasticity Maps of Living Neurons Measured by Combined Fluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spedden, Elise; Naumova, Elena N; Kaplan, David L; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here we combine Atomic Force Microscopy based force spectroscopy with Fluorescence Microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglion, and P-19 (mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells) neurons. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon disruption of microtubules of the cell. We find reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules. We also report that cortical and P-19 neurons have similar elasticity maps, with elastic moduli in the range 0.1-2 kPa, with typical average values of 0.4 kPa (P-19) and 0.2 k...

  17. Novel parallel plate condenser for single particle electrostatic force measurements in atomic force microscope

    KAUST Repository

    Kwek, Jin Wang

    2011-07-01

    A combination of small parallel plate condenser with Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) glass slides as electrodes and an atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to characterize the electrostatic behavior of single glass bead microparticles (105-150 μm) glued to the AFM cantilever. This novel setup allows measurements of the electrostatic forces acting on a particle in an applied electrical field to be performed in ambient air conditions. By varying the position of the microparticle between the electrodes and the strength of the applied electric field, the relative contributions of the particle net charge, induced and image charges were investigated. When the microparticle is positioned in the middle of the electrodes, the force acting on the microparticle was linear with the applied electric field and proportional to the microparticle net charge. At distances close to the bottom electrode, the force follows a parabolic relationship with the applied electric field reflecting the contributions of induced and image charges. The method can be used for the rapid evaluation of the charging and polarizability properties of the microparticle as well as an alternative to the conventional Faraday\\'s pail technique. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Direct Measurements of Half-Cycle Reaction Heats during Atomic Layer Deposition by Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lownsbury, James M. [Department; Gladden, James A. [Department; Campbell, Charles T. [Department; Department; Kim, In Soo [Materials; Martinson, Alex B. F. [Materials

    2017-10-05

    We introduce a new high-temperature adsorption calorimeter that approaches the ideal limit of a heat detector whereby the signal at any time is proportional to the heat power being delivered to the sample and prove its sensitivity for measuring pulse-to-pulse heats of half-reactions during atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 400 K. The heat dynamics of amorphous Al2O3 growth via sequential self-limiting surface reaction of trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O is clearly resolved. Calibration enables quantitation of the exothermic TMA and H2O half-reactions with high precision, -343 kJ/mol TMA and -251 kJ/mol H2O, respectively. A time resolution better than 1 ms is demonstrated, allowing for the deconvolution of at least two distinct surface reactions during TMA microdosing. It is further demonstrated that this method can provide the heat of reaction versus extent of reaction during each precursors half-reaction, thus providing even richer mechanistic information on the surface processes involved. The broad applicability of this novel calorimeter is demonstrated through excellent signal-to-noise ratios of less exothermic ALD half-reactions to produce TiO2 and MnO.

  19. Phase measurement of atomic resolution image using transport of intensity equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Kazuo; Allman, Brendan

    2005-06-01

    Since the Transport Intensity Equation (TIE) has been applied to electron microscopy only recently, there are controversial discussions in the literature regarding the theoretical concepts underlying the equation and the practical techniques to solve the equation. In this report we explored some of the issues regarding the TIE, especially bearing electron microscopy in mind, and clarified that: (i) the TIE for electrons exactly corresponds to the Schrödinger equation for high-energy electrons in free space, and thus the TIE does not assume weak scattering; (ii) the TIE can give phase information at any distance from the specimen, not limited to a new field; (iii) information transfer in the TIE for each spatial frequency g will be multiplied by g2 and thus low frequency components will be dumped more with respect to high frequency components; (vi) the intensity derivative with respect to the direction of wave propagation is well approximated by using a set of three symmetric images; and (v) a substantially larger defocus distance than expected before can be used for high-resolution electron microscopy. In the second part of this report we applied the TIE down to atomic resolution images to obtain phase information and verified the following points experimentally: (i) although low frequency components are attenuated in the TIE, all frequencies will be recovered satisfactorily except the very low frequencies; and (ii) using a reconstructed phase and the measured image intensity we can correct effectively the defects of imaging, such as spherical aberrations as well as partial coherence.

  20. Low-energy measurements of electron capture by multicharged ions from excited hydrogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havener, C.C. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennesse 37831-6372 (United States)); Haque, M.A. (Alcorn State University, Lorman, Mississippi 39096 (United States)); Smith, A.C.H. (University College London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)); Urbain, X. (Universite Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)); Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6372 (United States) Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6374 (United States))

    1993-06-05

    For very low collision energies electron capture from excited hydrogen by multicharged ions is characterized by enormous cross sections, the predicted maximum being comparable to the geometric size of the Rydberg atom. The ion-atom merged-beams technique is being used to study these collisions for the variety of charge states and the wide range of energies (0.1 to 1000 eV/amu) accessible to the apparatus. A neutral D beam containing a Rydberg atom population proportional to 1/n[sup 3] is produced by collisional electron detachment of 8 keV D[sup [minus

  1. Atoms, metaphors and paradoxes Niels Bohr and the construction of a new physics

    CERN Document Server

    Petruccioli, Sandro

    2006-01-01

    This book gives a detailed study of the development and the interpretation given to Niels Bohr's Principle of Correspondence. It also describes the role that this principle played in guiding Bohr's research over the critical period from 1920 to 1927. Quantum mechanics, developed in the 1920s and 1930s by Bohr, Heisenberg, Born, Schrödinger and Dirac, represents one of the most profound turning points in science. This theory required a wholly new kind of physics in which many of the principles, concepts and models representing reality, that had formed the basis of classical physics since Galileo and Newton, had to be abandoned. This book re-examines the birth of quantum mechanics, in particular examining the development of crucial and original insights of Niels Bohr.

  2. An undergraduate course in experimental atomic and molecular physics using an accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Magalhães, S. D.; de Castro Faria, N. V.

    2007-08-01

    We describe experiments, performed as a part of a one-semester experimental course, using the NEC 1.7 MV Pelletron electrostatic accelerator, offered to undergraduate students of physics in Rio de Janeiro. Besides the accelerator, the laboratory includes a source of negative ions by cesium sputtering, a Wien filter and a switching magnet. Experiments include principles of PIXE, time-of-flight mass spectrometry and beam attenuation in the accelerator tube.

  3. Cavity QED with hybrid nanocircuits: from atomic-like physics to condensed matter phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottet, Audrey; Dartiailh, Matthieu C; Desjardins, Matthieu M; Cubaynes, Tino; Contamin, Lauriane C; Delbecq, Matthieu; Viennot, Jérémie J; Bruhat, Laure E; Douçot, Benoit; Kontos, Takis

    2017-11-01

    Circuit QED techniques have been instrumental in manipulating and probing with exquisite sensitivity the quantum state of superconducting quantum bits coupled to microwave cavities. Recently, it has become possible to fabricate new devices in which the superconducting quantum bits are replaced by hybrid mesoscopic circuits combining nanoconductors and metallic reservoirs. This mesoscopic QED provides a new experimental playground to study the light-matter interaction in electronic circuits. Here, we present the experimental state of the art of mesoscopic QED and its theoretical description. A first class of experiments focuses on the artificial atom limit, where some quasiparticles are trapped in nanocircuit bound states. In this limit, the circuit QED techniques can be used to manipulate and probe electronic degrees of freedom such as confined charges, spins, or Andreev pairs. A second class of experiments uses cavity photons to reveal the dynamics of electron tunneling between a nanoconductor and fermionic reservoirs. For instance, the Kondo effect, the charge relaxation caused by grounded metallic contacts, and the photo-emission caused by voltage-biased reservoirs have been studied. The tunnel coupling between nanoconductors and fermionic reservoirs also enable one to obtain split Cooper pairs, or Majorana bound states. Cavity photons represent a qualitatively new tool to study these exotic condensed matter states.

  4. Cavity QED with hybrid nanocircuits: from atomic-like physics to condensed matter phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottet, Audrey; Dartiailh, Matthieu C.; Desjardins, Matthieu M.; Cubaynes, Tino; Contamin, Lauriane C.; Delbecq, Matthieu; Viennot, Jérémie J.; Bruhat, Laure E.; Douçot, Benoit; Kontos, Takis

    2017-11-01

    Circuit QED techniques have been instrumental in manipulating and probing with exquisite sensitivity the quantum state of superconducting quantum bits coupled to microwave cavities. Recently, it has become possible to fabricate new devices in which the superconducting quantum bits are replaced by hybrid mesoscopic circuits combining nanoconductors and metallic reservoirs. This mesoscopic QED provides a new experimental playground to study the light–matter interaction in electronic circuits. Here, we present the experimental state of the art of mesoscopic QED and its theoretical description. A first class of experiments focuses on the artificial atom limit, where some quasiparticles are trapped in nanocircuit bound states. In this limit, the circuit QED techniques can be used to manipulate and probe electronic degrees of freedom such as confined charges, spins, or Andreev pairs. A second class of experiments uses cavity photons to reveal the dynamics of electron tunneling between a nanoconductor and fermionic reservoirs. For instance, the Kondo effect, the charge relaxation caused by grounded metallic contacts, and the photo-emission caused by voltage-biased reservoirs have been studied. The tunnel coupling between nanoconductors and fermionic reservoirs also enable one to obtain split Cooper pairs, or Majorana bound states. Cavity photons represent a qualitatively new tool to study these exotic condensed matter states.

  5. Quantitative measurement of the nanoparticle size and number concentration from liquid suspensions by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalousha, M; Prasad, A; Lead, J R

    2014-05-01

    Microscopy techniques are indispensable to the nanoanalytical toolbox and can provide accurate information on the number size distribution and number concentration of nanoparticles (NPs) at low concentrations (ca. ppt to ppb range) and small sizes (ca. microscopy techniques are limited by the traditional sample preparation based on drying a small volume of suspension of NPs on a microscopy substrate. This method is limited by low recovery of NPs (ca. atomic force microscopy (AFM) that overcomes the above-mentioned shortcomings and allows full recovery and representativeness of the NPs under consideration by forcing the NPs into the substrate via ultracentrifugation and strongly attaches the NPs to the substrate by surface functionalization of the substrate or by adding cations to the NP suspension. The high efficiency of the analysis is demonstrated by the uniformity of the NP distribution on the substrate (that is low variability between the number of NPs counted on different images on different areas of the substrate), the high recovery of the NPs up to 71%) and the good correlation (R > 0.95) between the mass and number concentrations. Therefore, for the first time, we developed a validated quantitative sampling technique that enables the use of the full capabilities of microscopy tools to quantitatively and accurately determine the number size distribution and number concentration of NPs at environmentally relevant low concentrations (i.e. 0.34-100 ppb). This approach is of high environmental relevance and can be applied widely in environmental nanoscience and nanotoxicology for (i) measuring the number concentration dose in nanotoxicological studies and (ii) accurately measuring the number size distribution of NPs; both are key requirements for the implementation of the European Commission recommendation for definition of nanomaterials.

  6. HISTRAP: Proposal for a Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the physics capabilities of HISTRAP together with a brief description of the facility and a sampling of the beams which will be available for experimentation, and surveys some of the lines of investigation in the physics of multicharged ions, molecular ion spectroscopy, condensed beams, and nuclear physics that will become possible with the advent of HISTRAP. Details of the accelerator design are discussed, including computer studies of beam tracking in the HISTRAP lattice, a discussion of the HHIRF tandem and ECR/RFQ injectors, and a description of the electron beam cooling system. In the past three years, HISTRAP has received substantial support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory management and staff. The project has used discretionary funds to develop hardware prototypes and carry out design studies. Construction has been completed on a vacuum test stand which models 1/16 of the storage ring and has attained a pressure of 4 x 10/sup -12/ Torr; a prototype rf cavity capable of accelerating beams up to 90 MeV/nucleon and decelerating to 20 keV/nucleon; and a prototype dipole magnet, one of the eight required for the HISTRAP lattice. This paper also contains a summary of the work on electron cooling carried out by one of our staff members at CERN. Building structures and services are described. Details of cost and schedule are also discussed. 77 refs.

  7. Total cross-section measurements progress in nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, G; Mulvey, J H

    2013-01-01

    Total Cross-Section Measurements discusses the cross-sectional dimensions of elementary hadron collisions. The main coverage of the book is the resonance and high energy area of the given collision. A section of the book explains in detail the characteristic of a resonance region. Another section is focused on the location of the high energy region of collision. Parts of the book define the meaning of resonance in nuclear physics. Also explained are the measurement of resonance and the identification of the area where the resonance originates. Different experimental methods to measure the tota

  8. Acquire an Bruker Dimension FastScanTM Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) for Materials, Physical and Biological Science Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-14

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The DOD HBCU/MI instrumentation award provided us a rare opportunity to acquire a Bruker Dimension FastScanTM Atomic ...UU 14-04-2016 1-Jan-2015 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Acquire an Bruker Dimension FastScanTM Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) for Materials, Physical and...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Atomic Force Microscope, self-assembly

  9. Accelerometry-measured physical activity and inflammation after gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, Véronique; Vigneault, Jessica; Weisnagel, S John; Tchernof, André; Robitaille, Julie

    2013-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with adverse metabolic outcomes after delivery. Physical activity practice improves the inflammatory profile; however, whether this association exists in women with prior GDM remains unknown. Our objective was to examine the cardiometabolic and inflammatory risk factors associated with accelerometer-based measures of physical activity in women with prior GDM. Ninety-six women who had GDM between 2003 and 2010 were tested 2.9 ± 2.2 yr after delivery. The physical activity practice was measured with ActiGraph GT3X (ActiGraph™, Pensacola, FL) accelerometers worn ≥ 5 d, and the time spent weekly in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was derived. The waist circumference was measured and the inflammatory marker or cytokine concentrations were measured in fasting plasma by the xMAP technology using the Bio-Plex 200 system. The lipid profile was also measured from fasting blood samples. Only 31% of women accumulated at least 150 min of MVPA per week. No association was observed between the MVPA practice and any of the metabolic measurements in the whole group of women. The MVPA did not differ in groups stratified by waist circumference activator inhibitor-1 (r = -0.32, P = 0.04), and triglycerides (r = -0.44, P = 0.003). No association was seen with plasma interleukin-6; tumor necrosis factor-α; and total, LDL, or HDL cholesterol concentrations. These analyses suggest that in the years after delivery, longer time spent in MVPA practice is associated with a lower cardiometabolic risk only in women with prior GDM who do not have abdominal obesity.

  10. Elf measurements in Greece conducted by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabetsos, E.; Filippopoulos, G.; Koutounidis, D.; Govari, Ch.; Skamnakis, N. [Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Non Ionizing Radiation Office, (Greece)

    2006-07-01

    The Greek Atomic Energy Commission (E.E.A.E.) is the competent national authority for the protection of the general public and the environment from artificially produced non-ionizing radiation. To this end, E.E.A.E. carries out measurements in the vicinity of all kinds of facilities emitting E.L.F. electric and magnetic fields (e.g. power lines, high voltage substations) and RF electromagnetic fields (e.g. audio, radio and television antennas, mobile phone base stations, radar and satellite earth stations and other microwave communication systems), in order to monitor whether the general public exposure limits are being adhered to. Regarding the electromagnetic fields emitted by antenna stations, the safety limits in Greek legislation were recently set to 70% of the I.C.N.I.R.P. values and to 60% of them if the antenna station is closer than 300 m from the perimeter of day nurseries, schools, hospitals or elder-care facilities, while in the case of extremely low frequency fields, the limit values are set exactly the same as the reference levels in I.C.N.I.R.P. guidelines. Regarding the levels of E.L.F. electric and magnetic fields in Greece E.E.A.E. has conducted many measurements around the elements of the electric grid where the main interest of the public is focused. Theoretical estimations and typical values based on actual measurements of the fields in the vicinity of the power lines used in Greece are presented. Measurement results in the vicinity of substations are also presented. In general, the levels of the magnetic field in the vicinity of the power grid elements are well below the established safety limits; whereas the levels of the electric field may reach values comparable to the safety limits very close to extremely high voltage lines. However, there is no case where the measured values of elf electric or magnetic fields were higher than the safety limits. There are a few exceptional cases where measurements of RF fields conducted by E.E.A.E. in the

  11. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  12. Measurement of effective atomic number of gunshot residues using scattering of gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Demet; Turşucu, Ahmet; Uzunoğlu, Zeynep; Korucu, Demet

    2014-09-01

    Better understanding of gunshot residues and the major elemental composition would be valuable to forensic scientists for their analysis work and interpretation of results. In the present work, the effective atomic numbers of gunshot residues (cartridge case, bullet core, bullet jacket and gunpowder) were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The scattering of 59.54 keV gamma rays is studied using a high-resolution HPGe detector. The experiment is performed on various elements with atomic number in the 4≤Z≤82. The intensity ratio of coherent to Compton scattered peaks, corrected for photo-peak efficiency of gamma detector and absorption of photons in the sample and air, is plotted as a function of atomic number and constituted a best-fit-curve. From this fit-curve, the respective effective atomic numbers of gunshot residues are determined.

  13. Measurement of the physical properties of the snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinar, N. J.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2015-06-01

    This paper reviews measurement techniques and corresponding devices used to determine the physical properties of the seasonal snowpack from distances close to the ground surface. The review is placed in the context of the need for scientific observations of snowpack variables that provide inputs for predictive hydrological models that help to advance scientific understanding of geophysical processes related to snow in the near-surface cryosphere. Many of these devices used to measure snow are invasive and require the snowpack to be disrupted, thereby precluding the possibility for multiple measurements to be made at the same sampling location. Moreover, many devices rely on the use of empirical calibration equations that may not be valid at all geographic locations. The spatial density of observations with most snow measurement devices is often inadequate. There is a need for improved automation of snowpack measurement instrumentation with an emphasis on field-based feedback of measurement validity in lieu of postprocessing of samples or data at a lab or office location. The scientific future of snow measurement instrumentation thereby requires a synthesis between science and engineering principles that takes into consideration geophysics and the physics of device operation.

  14. Measurement properties of performance-based measures to assess physical function in hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobson, F; Hinman, R S; Hall, M

    2012-01-01

    reviewers independently rated measurement properties using the consensus-based standards for the selection of health status measurement instrument (COSMIN). "Best evidence synthesis" was made using COSMIN outcomes and the quality of findings. RESULTS: Twenty-four out of 1792 publications were eligible......OBJECTIVES: To systematically review the measurement properties of performance-based measures to assess physical function in people with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Electronic searches were performed in MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, and PsycINFO up to the end of June 2012. Two...... for inclusion. Twenty-one performance-based measures were evaluated including 15 single-activity measures and six multi-activity measures. Measurement properties evaluated included internal consistency (three measures), reliability (16 measures), measurement error (14 measures), validity (nine measures...

  15. Lilith: a tool for constraining new physics from Higgs measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernon, Jérémy; Dumont, Béranger

    2015-09-01

    The properties of the observed Higgs boson with mass around 125 GeV can be affected in a variety of ways by new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). The wealth of experimental results, targeting the different combinations for the production and decay of a Higgs boson, makes it a non-trivial task to assess the patibility of a non-SM-like Higgs boson with all available results. In this paper we present Lilith, a new public tool for constraining new physics from signal strength measurements performed at the LHC and the Tevatron. Lilith is a Python library that can also be used in C and C++/ ROOT programs. The Higgs likelihood is based on experimental results stored in an easily extensible XML database, and is evaluated from the user input, given in XML format in terms of reduced couplings or signal strengths.The results of Lilith can be used to constrain a wide class of new physics scenarios.

  16. Objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in youth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Ashley R; Goodman, Anna; Page, Angie S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity and sedentary behaviour in youth have been reported to vary by sex, age, weight status and country. However, supporting data are often self-reported and/or do not encompass a wide range of ages or geographical locations. This study aimed to describe objectively......-measured physical activity and sedentary time patterns in youth. METHODS: The International Children's Accelerometry Database (ICAD) consists of ActiGraph accelerometer data from 20 studies in ten countries, processed using common data reduction procedures. Analyses were conducted on 27,637 participants (2.......8-18.4 years) who provided at least three days of valid accelerometer data. Linear regression was used to examine associations between age, sex, weight status, country and physical activity outcomes. RESULTS: Boys were less sedentary and more active than girls at all ages. After 5 years of age...

  17. From atoms to galaxies a conceptual physics approach to scientific awareness

    CERN Document Server

    Hassani, Sadri

    2010-01-01

    … present[s] some of the most striking ideas behind physics but also give[s] students and the general public the opportunity of reflecting on the implications of these ideas and provide them with the tools to draw a distinction between scientific fact and nonsense. The book does indeed do what it says on the cover; it presents topics ranging from early Greek astronomy and Newtonian dynamics, passing by electromagnetism and thermodynamics and culminating with quantum theory, relativity and cosmology. … the CD included with the book has lengthier mathematical and numerical examples that suppleme

  18. Detailed assessment of diesel spray atomization models using visible and X-ray extinction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnotti, G.M.; Genzale, C.L. (GIT)

    2017-12-01

    The physical mechanisms characterizing the breakup of a diesel spray into droplets are still unknown. This gap in knowledge has largely been due to the challenges of directly imaging this process or quantitatively measuring the outcomes of spray breakup, such as droplet size. Recent x-ray measurements by Argonne National Laboratory, utilized in this work, provide needed information about the spatial evolution of droplet sizes in selected regions of the spray under a range of injection pressures (50–150 MPa) and ambient densities (7.6–22.8 kg/m3) relevant for diesel operating conditions. Ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS) measurements performed at the Advanced Photon Source are presented, which quantify Sauter mean diameters (SMD) within optically thick regions of the spray that are inaccessible by conventional droplet sizing measurement techniques, namely in the near-nozzle region, along the spray centerline, and within the core of the spray. To quantify droplet sizes along the periphery of the spray, a complementary technique is proposed and introduced, which leverages the ratio of path-integrated x-ray and visible laser extinction (SAMR) measurements to quantify SMD. The SAMR and USAXS measurements are then utilized to evaluate current spray models used for engine computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations. We explore the ability of a carefully calibrated spray model, premised on aerodynamic wave growth theory, to capture the experimentally observed trends of SMD throughout the spray. The spray structure is best predicted with an aerodynamic primary and secondary breakup process that is represented with a slower time constant and larger formed droplet size than conventionally recommended for diesel spray models. Additionally, spray model predictions suggest that droplet collisions may not influence the resultant droplet size distribution along the spray centerline in downstream regions of the spray.

  19. Measurement issues in the assessment of physical activity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welk, G J; Corbin, C B; Dale, D

    2000-06-01

    This paper reviewed the nature of children's physical activity patterns and how the unique nature of children can impact the assessment of physical activity. To accurately assess children's activity patterns, an instrument must be sensitive enough to detect, code, or record sporadic and intermittent activity. Care also must be used to select criterion measures that reflect appropriate physical activity guidelines for children. A number of different measurement approaches have been described for assessing children's activity, but no specific method can be identified as the best option for all studies. Selection of an appropriate instrument depends on the specific research question being addressed as well as the relative importance of accuracy and practicality (Baranowski & Simons-Morton, 1991). For example, accurate measures of energy expenditure using doubly-labeled water, indirect calorimetry, or heart rate calibration equations may be needed for certain clinical studies, but the cost and inconvenience would make them impractical for field-based assessments on larger samples. The "accuracy-practicality" trade-off presents a more challenging predicament with children than for adults. In adults, a number of self-report instruments have been found useful for large epidemiological studies or interventions where less precision is needed. Because of developmental differences, especially in ability to think abstractly and perform detailed recall (Going et al., 1999; Sallis, 1991), children are less likely to make accurate self-report assessment than adults. Though self-report methods are still likely to be a principal source of information for many studies, other approaches (or the use of combined measures) may be needed to better characterize children's activity levels. While objective instruments (e.g., direct observation or activity monitoring) require more time and resources than self-report, there are options available to simplify data collection. One approach may

  20. Comparison of cone beam computed tomography imaging with physical measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratemann, S A; Huang, J C; Maki, K; Miller, A J; Hatcher, D C

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the accuracy of measuring linear distances between landmarks commonly used in orthodontic analysis on a human skull using two cone beam CT (CBCT) systems. Measurements of length were taken using volumetric data from two CBCT systems and were compared with physical measures using a calliper applied to one human adult skull. Landmarks were identified with chromium steel balls embedded at 32 cranial and 33 mandibular landmarks and the linear measures were taken with a digital calliper. The skull was then scanned with two different CBCT systems: the NewTom QR DVT 9000 (Aperio Inc, Sarasota, FL) and the Hitachi MercuRay (Hitachi Medico Technology, Tokyo, Japan). CT data including the landmark point data were threshold segmented using CyberMed's CB Works software (CB Works 1.0, CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). The resulting segmentations were exported from CB Works as VRML (WRL) files to Amira software (Amira 3.1, Mercury Computer Systems GmbH, Berlin, Germany). The error was small compared with the gold standard of the physical calliper measures for both the NewTom (0.07+/-0.41 mm) and CB MercuRay (0.00+/-0.22 mm) generated data. Absolute error to the gold standard was slightly positive, indicating minor compression relative to the calliper measurement. The error was slightly smaller in the CB MercuRay than in the NewTom, probably related to a broader greyscale range for describing beam attenuation in 12-bit vs 8-bit data. The volumetric data rendered with both CBCT systems provided highly accurate data compared with the gold standard of physical measures directly from the skulls, with less than 1% relative error.

  1. A course in mathematical physics 3 quantum mechanics of atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Thirring, Walter

    1981-01-01

    In this third volume of A Course in Mathematical Physics I have attempted not simply to introduce axioms and derive quantum mechanics from them, but also to progress to relevant applications. Reading the axiomatic litera­ ture often gives one the impression that it largely consists of making refined axioms, thereby freeing physics from any trace of down-to-earth residue and cutting it off from simpler ways of thinking. The goal pursued here, however, is to come up with concrete results that can be compared with experimental facts. Everything else should be regarded only as a side issue, and has been chosen for pragmatic reasons. It is precisely with this in mind that I feel it appropriate to draw upon the most modern mathematical methods. Only by their means can the logical fabric of quantum theory be woven with a smooth structure; in their absence, rough spots would . inevitably appear, especially in the theory of unbounded operators, where the details are too intricate to be comprehended easily. Great care...

  2. Learning in a Physics Classroom Community: Physics Learning Identity Construct Development, Measurement and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sissi L.

    At the university level, introductory science courses usually have high student to teacher ratios which increases the challenge to meaningfully connect with students. Various curricula have been developed in physics education to actively engage students in learning through social interactions with peers and instructors in class. This learning environment demands not only conceptual understanding but also learning to be a scientist. However, the success of student learning is typically measured in test performance and course grades while assessment of student development as science learners is largely ignored. This dissertation addresses this issue with the development of an instrument towards a measure of physics learning identity (PLI) which is used to guide and complement case studies through student interviews and in class observations. Using the conceptual framework based on Etienne Wenger's communities of practice (1998), I examine the relationship between science learning and learning identity from a situated perspective in the context of a large enrollment science class as a community of practice. This conceptual framework emphasizes the central role of identity in the practices negotiated in the classroom community and in the way students figure out their trajectory as members. Using this framework, I seek to understand how the changes in student learning identity are supported by active engagement based instruction. In turn, this understanding can better facilitate the building of a productive learning community and provide a measure for achievement of the curricular learning goals in active engagement strategies. Based on the conceptual framework, I developed and validated an instrument for measuring physics learning identity in terms of student learning preferences, self-efficacy for learning physics, and self-image as a physics learner. The instrument was pilot tested with a population of Oregon State University students taking calculus based

  3. VUV absorption spectroscopy measurements of the role of fast neutral atoms in a high-power gap breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filuk; Bailey; Cuneo; Lake; Nash; Noack; Maron

    2000-12-01

    The maximum power achieved in a wide variety of high-power devices, including electron and ion diodes, z pinches, and microwave generators, is presently limited by anode-cathode gap breakdown. A frequently discussed hypothesis for this effect is ionization of fast neutral atoms injected throughout the anode-cathode gap during the power pulse. We describe a newly developed diagnostic tool that provides a direct test of this hypothesis. Time-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy is used to directly probe fast neutral atoms with 1-mm spatial resolution in the 10-mm anode-cathode gap of the SABRE 5 MV, 1 TW applied-B ion diode. Absorption spectra collected during Ar RF glow discharges and with CO2 gas fills confirm the reliability of the diagnostic technique. Throughout the 50-100 ns ion diode pulses no measurable neutral absorption was seen, setting upper limits of (0.12-1.5)x10(14) cm(-3) for ground-state fast neutral atom densities of H, C, N, O, and F. The absence of molecular absorption bands also sets upper limits of (0.16-1.2)x10(15) cm(-3) for common simple molecules. These limits are low enough to rule out ionization of fast neutral atoms as a breakdown mechanism. Breakdown due to ionization of molecules is also found to be unlikely. This technique can now be applied to quantify the role of neutral atoms in other high-power devices.

  4. Power-Law Stress and Creep Relaxations of Single Cells Measured by Colloidal Probe Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hiratsuka, Shinichiro; Mizutani, Yusuke; Toda, Akitoshi; Fukushima, Norichika; Kawahara, Koichi; Tokumoto, Hiroshi; Okajima, Takaharu

    2009-01-01

    We measured stress and creep relaxations of mouse fibroblast cells arranged and cultured on a microarray, by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM). A hydrophobic monolayer coating of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS) on the surface of colloidal silica beads significantly reduced the adhesion force of live cells, compared with untreated beads. The rheological behaviors of cells were estimated by averaging several relaxation curves of cells measured by the AFM. Longer-time tailing of...

  5. Measurement of the elastic modulus of spider mite silk fibers using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Stephen D.; Zhurov, Vladimir; Grbić, Vojislava; Grbić, Miodrag; Hutter, Jeffrey L.

    2013-04-01

    Bio-nanomaterials are one of the fastest developing sectors of industry and technology. Spider silk, a highly attractive light-weight biomaterial, has high tensile strength and elasticity and is compatible with human tissues, allowing for many areas of application. In comparison to spider silk fibers with diameters of several micrometers, spider mite silk fibers have much smaller diameters of tens of nanometers, making conventional tensile testing methods impractical. To determine the mechanical properties of adult and larval Tetranychus urticae silk fibers, we have performed three-point bending tests with an atomic force microscope. We found that because of the small diameters of these fibers, axial tension—due to both the applied force and a pre-existing strain—has a significant effect on the fiber response, even in the small-deformation limit. As a result, the typical Euler-Bernoulli-Timoshenko theory cannot be applied. We therefore follow the approach of Heidelberg et al. to develop a mechanical model of the fiber response that accounts for bending, an initial tension in the fibers, and a tension due to elongation during testing. This model provides self-consistent results, allowing us to determine that adult and larval fibers have Young's moduli of 24±3 GPa and 15±3 GPa, respectively. Both adult and larval fibers have an estimated ultimate strength of 200-300 MPa and a toughness of order 9 MJ/m3. We note that with increasing interest in the mechanical properties of very high aspect ratio nanomaterials, the influence of pre-existing tension must be considered in any measurements involving a bending test.

  6. Neighborhood Environments and Objectively Measured Physical Activity in 11 Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerin, Ester; Cain, Kelli L; Conway, Terry L

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Environmental changes are potentially effective population-level physical activity (PA) promotion strategies. However, robust multi-site evidence to guide international action for developing activity-supportive environments is lacking. We estimated pooled associations of perceived...... outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Residents' perceptions of neighborhood attributes that facilitate walking were positively associated with objectively-measured MVPA and meeting the guidelines for cancer/weight gain prevention at the within- and between-site levels. Associations were similar across study sites...

  7. Summary of ORSphere Critical and Reactor Physics Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Margaret A.; Bess, John D.

    2016-09-01

    In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J. J. Lynn, and J. R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s. The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. This critical configuration has been evaluated. Preliminary results were presented at ND2013. Since then, the evaluation was finalized and judged to be an acceptable benchmark experiment for the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Project (ICSBEP). Additionally, reactor physics measurements were performed to determine surface button worths, central void worth, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron decay constant, fission density and neutron importance. These measurements have been evaluated and found to be acceptable experiments and are discussed in full detail in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments. The purpose of this paper is summary summarize all the critical and reactor physics measurements evaluations and, when possible, to compare them to GODIVA experiment results.

  8. Teaching environmental physics with a field measurement campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boman, Johan; Dynefors, Bertil; Kühlmann-Berenzon, Sharon

    2003-09-01

    With 15 years of experience of teaching environmental physics, we still need to develop our curriculum. In this paper we present our findings from teaching environmental physics in close association with mathematical statistics in an applied field measurement campaign. Here not only environmental physics is taught, but also the concept of experimental planning, design, implementation, and evaluation of a field measurement campaign. The field measurement gives the students the opportunity to follow the whole process starting from experimental planning, including formulating the questions to answer, through design of the experiment, sample collection, analysis, and evaluation, together with the writing of a final report. All possible aspects of the problem that the students are working on can be carefully investigated, but the emphasis has been on understanding the whole process of carrying out a field campaign. This holistic view gives the students more interest in and better motivation for exploring the subject. This course gave the students insight into the field of interdisciplinary environmental research, promoted their creativity, and also gave the teachers a feeling of satisfaction.

  9. Comparing laser interferometry and atom interferometry approaches to space-based gravitational-wave measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ira Thorpe, James; Jennrich, Oliver; McNamara, Paul; Baker, John G.

    2012-07-01

    The science enabled by a space-based low-frequency gravitational-wave instrument is a high-priority objective of the international astronomy community. Mission concepts based on laser interferometry, such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), have been thoroughly studied and determined to be capable of delivering significant science returns. Ongoing developments in laboratory atom interferometry techniques have inspired new gravitational-wave mission concepts. We present a comparative analysis of LISA-like light interferometer systems and atom interferometer systems for gravitational-wave detection. Specific attention is paid to the sources of instrumental noise that are most important for light interferometer systems. We find that the response to laser frequency noise is identical in light interferometer and atom interferometer systems and that similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple-arm interferometers) must be employed to reach interesting gravitational wave sensitivities. Response to acceleration of the optical platforms is slightly different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but the acceleration noise requirements are similar. Based on this analysis, we find no clear advantage of the atom interferometry approach over traditional laser interferometry.

  10. Gaining insight into the physics of dynamic atomic force microscopy in complex environments using the VEDA simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiracofe, Daniel; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM) continues to grow in popularity among scientists in many different fields, and research on new methods and operating modes continues to expand the resolution, capabilities, and types of samples that can be studied. But many promising increases in capability are accompanied by increases in complexity. Indeed, interpreting modern dAFM data can be challenging, especially on complicated material systems, or in liquid environments where the behavior is often contrary to what is known in air or vacuum environments. Mathematical simulations have proven to be an effective tool in providing physical insight into these non-intuitive systems. In this article we describe recent developments in the VEDA (virtual environment for dynamic AFM) simulator, which is a suite of freely available, open-source simulation tools that are delivered through the cloud computing cyber-infrastructure of nanoHUB (www.nanohub.org). Here we describe three major developments. First, simulations in liquid environments are improved by enhancements in the modeling of cantilever dynamics, excitation methods, and solvation shell forces. Second, VEDA is now able to simulate many new advanced modes of operation (bimodal, phase-modulation, frequency-modulation, etc.). Finally, nineteen different tip-sample models are available to simulate the surface physics of a wide variety different material systems including capillary, specific adhesion, van der Waals, electrostatic, viscoelasticity, and hydration forces. These features are demonstrated through example simulations and validated against experimental data, in order to provide insight into practical problems in dynamic AFM.

  11. Impact of measurable physical phenomena on contact thermal comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fojtlín Miloš

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cabin HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air-conditioning systems have become an essential part of personal vehicles as demands for comfortable transport are still rising. In fact, 85 % of the car trips in Europe are shorter than 18 km and last only up to 30 minutes. Under such conditions, the HVAC unit cannot often ensure desired cabin environment and passengers are prone to experience thermal stress. For this reason, additional comfort systems, such as heated or ventilated seats, are available on the market. However, there is no straightforward method to evaluate thermal comfort at the contact surfaces nowadays. The aim of this work is to summarise information about heated and ventilated seats. These technologies use electrical heating and fan driven air to contact area in order to achieve enhanced comfort. It is also expected, that such measures may contribute to lower energy consumption. Yet, in real conditions it is almost impossible to measure the airflow through the ventilated seat directly. Therefore, there is a need for an approach that would correlate measurable physical phenomena with thermal comfort. For this reason, a method that exploits a measurement of temperatures and humidity at the contact area is proposed. Preliminary results that correlate comfort with measurable physical phenomena are demonstrated.

  12. Impact of measurable physical phenomena on contact thermal comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojtlín, Miloš; Pokorný, Jan; Fišer, Jan; Toma, Róbert; Tuhovčák, Ján

    Cabin HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air-conditioning) systems have become an essential part of personal vehicles as demands for comfortable transport are still rising. In fact, 85 % of the car trips in Europe are shorter than 18 km and last only up to 30 minutes. Under such conditions, the HVAC unit cannot often ensure desired cabin environment and passengers are prone to experience thermal stress. For this reason, additional comfort systems, such as heated or ventilated seats, are available on the market. However, there is no straightforward method to evaluate thermal comfort at the contact surfaces nowadays. The aim of this work is to summarise information about heated and ventilated seats. These technologies use electrical heating and fan driven air to contact area in order to achieve enhanced comfort. It is also expected, that such measures may contribute to lower energy consumption. Yet, in real conditions it is almost impossible to measure the airflow through the ventilated seat directly. Therefore, there is a need for an approach that would correlate measurable physical phenomena with thermal comfort. For this reason, a method that exploits a measurement of temperatures and humidity at the contact area is proposed. Preliminary results that correlate comfort with measurable physical phenomena are demonstrated.

  13. Carl E. Wieman received the Davisson-Germer Prize of the American Physical Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    C. E. Wieman was cited for his pioneering contributions to atomic physics, including the development of both ultraprecise measurements of atomic parity nonconservation as critical tests of the standard model, and remarkable new techniques for trapping neutral atoms.

  14. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of 87Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the 87Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the 87Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  15. Enhancing the quantum state transfer between two atoms in separate cavities via weak measurement and its reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Ling; Huang, Jinsong; Xu, Zhonghui; Xiao, Xing

    2017-10-01

    Taking the advantage of weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal, we propose a scheme to enhance the fidelity of transferring quantum state from one atom trapped in cavity to another distant one trapped in another cavity which is coupled by an optical fiber. It is turned out that the fidelity can be greatly improved even when the system is under serious dissipation. Moreover, the scheme works in both the strong-coupling and weak-coupling regimes. It is also robust to the ratio of the coupling constant between the atoms and the cavity modes to the coupling constant between the fiber and cavity modes. The underlying mechanism can be attributed to the probabilistic nature of weak measurements.

  16. Quantum Dynamics in Atomic-Fountain Experiments for Measuring the Electric Dipole Moment of the Electron with Improved Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Wundt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An improved measurement of the electron electric dipole moment (EDM appears feasible using ground-state alkali atoms in an atomic fountain in which a strong electric field, which couples to a conceivable EDM, is applied perpendicular to the fountain axis. In a practical fountain, the ratio of the atomic tensor Stark shift to the Zeeman shift is a factor μ∼100. We expand the complete time-evolution operator in inverse powers of this ratio; complete results are presented for atoms of total spin F=3, 4, and 5. For a specific set of entangled hyperfine sublevels (coherent states, potential systematic errors enter only as even powers of 1/μ, making the expansion rapidly convergent. The remaining EDM-mimicking effects are further suppressed in a proposed double-differential setup, where the final state is interrogated in a differential laser configuration, and the direction of the strong electric field also is inverted. Estimates of the signal available at existing accelerator facilities indicate that the proposed apparatus offers the potential for a drastic improvement in EDM limits over existing measurements, and for constraining the parameter space of supersymmetric (SUSY extensions of the Standard Model.

  17. Principles of Technology Student Achievement in Advanced Physics Measured by a Normed Physics Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, James Alan

    1991-02-01

    The Principles of Technology (PT) curriculum, now in approximately 1,200 schools, has produced a profound change in the delivery of applied physics. If high school PT programs and traditional physics courses deliver comparable student outcomes, as some research suggests, the PT curriculum may find wider acceptance in vocational programs and postsecondary schools may have rationale for accepting PT as physics. This study measured PT student performance on an advanced physics test, after they have had one year (7 units) of PT. The 1988R version of the National Association of Physics Teachers and National Science Teachers Association physics test, with more than 7500 copies sold, was selected as the research instrument. This test covers advanced aspects of traditional high school physics. A secondary enquiry included an attempt to link PT teacher preparation and credentialing and/or PT site demographics to variation in PT student scores on the 1988R test. The 10 PT sites in this study were self-selected from the 29 PT field study schools, the most mature PT sites. The researcher determined, that the 1988R physics test lacked content validity for the PT students tested. The PT students tested had a composite mean score of 17.67 questions correct out of 80, (below the second percentile), not statistically different than a chance score. No differences were found between site mean scores. Interpretation of the results regarding the effect of teachers, or demographics was not justified. The value of PT to the vocational-technical programs that it was designed for was not measured, nor was the awarding of general science credit for PT completion. One year of the PT curriculum, at the sampled schools, has not prepared students in the advanced scientific aspects of traditional physics found on the 1988R examination. The primary implication is that educators should not expect year one PT to prepare students for classes or curricula that include traditional physics as a

  18. Measurement of OH, NO, O and N atoms in helium plasma jet for ROS/RNS controlled biomedical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemori, Seiya; Kamakura, Taku; Ono, Ryo

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasmas are of emerging interest for new plasma applications such as cancer treatment, cell activation and sterilization. In those biomedical processes, reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) are said that they play significant role. It is though that active species give oxidative stress and induce biomedical reactions. In this study, we measured OH, NO, O and N atoms using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurement and found that voltage polarity affect particular ROS. When negative high voltage was applied to the plasma jet, O atom density was tripled compared to the case of positive applied voltage. In that case, O atom density was around 3 × 1015 [cm-3] at maximum. In contrast, OH and NO density did not change their density depending on the polarity of applied voltage, measured as in order of 1013 and 1014 [cm-3] at maximum, respectively. From ICCD imaging measurement, it could be seen that negative high voltage enhanced secondary emission in plasma bullet propagation and it can affect the effective production of particular ROS. Since ROS/RNS dose can be a quantitative criterion to control plasma biomedical application, those measurement results is able to be applied for in vivo and in vitro plasma biomedical experiments. This study is supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Science Research by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology.

  19. Measuring verbal communication in initial physical therapy encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lisa C; Whittle, Christopher T; Cleland, Jennifer; Wald, Mike

    2013-04-01

    Communication in clinical encounters is vital in ensuring a positive experience and outcome for both patient and clinician. The purpose of this study was to measure verbal communication between physical therapists and patients with back pain during their initial consultation and trial management of the data using a novel, Web-based application. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Nine musculoskeletal physical therapists and 27 patients with back pain participated in this study. Twenty-five initial consultations were observed, audio recorded, and categorized using the Medical Communications Behavior System. Data were managed using Synote, a freely available application enabling synchronization of audio recordings with transcripts and coded notes. In this sample, physical therapists spoke for 49.5% of the encounter and patients for 33.1%. Providers and patients spent little time overtly discussing emotions (1.4% and 0.9%, respectively). More-experienced clinicians used more "history/background probes," more "advice/suggestion," and less "restatement" than less-experienced staff, although they demonstrated a greater prevalence of talking concurrently and interrupting patients (7.6% compared with 2.6%). Although studies measuring actual behavior are considered to be the gold standard, audio recordings do not enable nonverbal behaviors to be recorded. This study investigated a method for measuring the verbal content of clinical encounters in a physical therapy outpatient setting. The study has directly contributed to developing a research-friendly version of the application (i.e., Synote Researcher). Given the pivotal role of communication in ensuring a positive experience and outcome for both patient and provider, investing time in further developing communication skills should be an on-going priority for providers. Further work is needed to explore affective behaviors and the prevalence of interrupting patients, considering differences in sex and provider

  20. Recent trends in precision measurements of atomic and nuclear properties with lasers and ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michael

    2017-11-01

    The X. international workshop on "Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research" took place in Poznan in May 2016. It addressed the latest experimental and theoretical achievements in laser and ion trap-based investigations of radionuclides, highly charged ions and antiprotons. The precise determination of atomic and nuclear properties provides a stringent benchmark for theoretical models and eventually leads to a better understanding of the underlying fundamental interactions and symmetries. This article addresses some general trends in this field and highlights select recent achievements presented at the workshop. Many of these are covered in more detail within the individual contributions to this special issue of Hyperfine Interactions.