WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic physics measurements

  1. Atomic physics precise measurements and ultracold matter

    CERN Document Server

    Inguscio, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atomic Physics provides an expert guide to two spectacular new landscapes in physics: precision measurements, which have been revolutionized by the advent of the optical frequency comb, and atomic physics, which has been revolutionized by laser cooling. These advances are not incremental but transformative: they have generated a consilience between atomic and many-body physics, precipitated an explosion of scientific and technological applications, opened new areas of research, and attracted a brilliant generation of younger scientists. The research is advancing so rapidly, the barrage of applications is so dazzling, that students can be bewildered. For both students and experienced scientists, this book provides an invaluable description of basic principles, experimental methods, and scientific applications.

  2. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  3. Atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  4. Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  5. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1989-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  6. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in atomic physics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: experiments on stored ions; test for parity violation in neutral weak currents; energy conservation and astrophysics; atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and molecular detectors; theoretical studies of quantum electrodynamics and high-z ions; atomic beam magnetic resonance; radiative decay from the 23Po,2 levels of helium-like argon; quenching of the metastable 2S/sub 1/2/ state of hydrogen-like argon in an external electric field; and lifetime of the 23Po level of helium-like krypton

  7. Advances in atomic physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharwat M. El-Sherbini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University – Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s – when the author first engaged in research – an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics.

  8. Advances in atomic physics

    OpenAIRE

    Tharwat M. El-Sherbini

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University – Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s – when the author first engaged in research - an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics.

  9. Division of atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Atomic Physics, Lund Institute of Technology (LTH), is responsible for the basic physics teaching in all subjects at LTH and for specialized teaching in Optics, Atomic Physics, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy and Laser Physics. The Division has research activities in basic and applied optical spectroscopy, to a large extent based on lasers. It is also part of the Physics Department, Lund University, where it forms one of eight divisions. Since the beginning of 1980 the research activities of our division have been centred around the use of lasers. The activities during the period 1991-1992 is described in this progress reports

  10. The state of Atomic Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter presents the final lecture given at the Eighth International Conference on Atomic Physics held in Sweden in 1982. Discusses (in general terms) new tools, positron investigations, quantum electrodynamics, physical metaphors, Bell's inequalities, quantum mechanics, precision measurements, sensitivity, high-resolution laser spectroscopy, and the theoretical papers given at the conference. Concludes that there are gaps in atomic physics which need to be filled

  11. Influence of Halide Solutions on Collagen Networks: Measurements of Physical Properties by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, André; Lackner, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    The influence of aqueous halide solutions on collagen coatings was tested. The effects on resistance against indentation/penetration on adhesion forces were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the change of Young's modulus of the coating was derived. Comparative measurements over time were conducted with halide solutions of various concentrations. Physical properties of the mesh-like coating generally showed large variability. Starting with a compact set of physical properties, data disperse after minutes. A trend of increase in elasticity and permeability was found for all halide solutions. These changes were largest in NaI, displaying a logical trend with ion size. However a correlation with concentration was not measured. Adhesion properties were found to be independent of mechanical properties. The paper also presents practical experience for AFM measurements of soft tissue under liquids, particularly related to data evaluation. The weakening in physical strength found after exposure to halide solutions may be interpreted as widening of the network structure or change in the chemical properties in part of the collagen fibres (swelling). In order to design customized surface coatings at optimized conditions also for medical applications, halide solutions might be used as agents with little impact on the safety of patients.

  12. Atomic and Molecular Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude

    2015-01-01

    When physicists began to explore the world of atoms more precisely, as they endeavoured to understand its structure and the laws governing its behaviour, they soon encountered serious difficulties. Our intuitive concepts, based on our daily experience of the macroscopic world around us, proved to be completely erroneous on the atomic scale; the atom was incomprehensible within the framework of classical physics. In order to uncover these new mysteries, after a great deal of trial and error, e...

  13. Effect of cholesterol on the physical properties of pulmonary surfactant films: Atomic force measurements study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic force measurements were performed on supported pulmonary surfactant (PS) films to address the effect of cholesterol on the physical properties of lung surfactant films. We recently found that cholesterol in excess of a physiological proportion abolishes surfactant function, and is the reason that surfactant fails to lower the surface tension upon compression. In this study, we investigated how the loss of mechanical stability observed earlier is related to the local mechanical properties of the film by local force measurements. The presence of 20% of cholesterol in bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) resulted in a decrease of the observed adhesive interaction, and an increase in rigidity of the film. We discuss the implication the increased rigidity might have on the functional failure of PS

  14. Topics in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Charles E

    2006-01-01

    The study of atomic physics propelled us into the quantum age in the early twentieth century and carried us into the twenty-first century with a wealth of new and, in some cases, unexplained phenomena. Topics in Atomic Physics provides a foundation for students to begin research in modern atomic physics. It can also serve as a reference because it contains material that is not easily located in other sources. A distinguishing feature is the thorough exposition of the quantum mechanical hydrogen atom using both the traditional formulation and an alternative treatment not usually found in textbooks. The alternative treatment exploits the preeminent nature of the pure Coulomb potential and places the Lenz vector operator on an equal footing with other operators corresponding to classically conserved quantities. A number of difficult to find proofs and derivations are included as is development of operator formalism that permits facile solution of the Stark effect in hydrogen. Discussion of the classical hydrogen...

  15. Theoretical atomic collision physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, N.F. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA) Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Quantum Inst.)

    1990-01-01

    The theoretical atomic physics at Rice University focuses on obtaining a better understanding of the mechanisms that control inelastic collisions between excited atoms and atoms, molecules and ions. Particular attention is given to systems and processes that are of potential importance to advanced energy technologies. In the current year, significant progress has been made in quantitative studies of: quenching of low-Rydberg Na atoms in thermal energy collisions with He, Ne and Ar atoms; selective excitation resulting from charge transfer in collisions of highly stripped ions of He, Li, C, and with Li, Na and He atoms and H{sub 2} molecules at keV energies; differential elastic and single, and double electron transfer in He{sup ++} collisions with He at keV energies; inelastic electron-transfer in ultra-low-energy-energy (T=8 to 80K) collisions between {sup 3}He{sup +} and {sup 4}He and {sup 4}He{sup +} and {sup 3}He; a formalism for ionization by electron impact of ions in dense, high temperature plasmas.

  16. Experimental atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic structure and collision phenomena of highly stripped ions in the range Z = 6 to 35 were studied. Charge-transfer and multiple-electron-loss cross sections were determined. Absolute x-ray-production cross sections for incident heavy ions were measured. 10 figures, 1 table

  17. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion, 1980-1993. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1993. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (I) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  18. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1994. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (i) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  19. Physics through the 1990s: Atomic, molecular and optical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The volume presents a program of research initiatives in atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The current state of atomic, molecular, and optical physics in the US is examined with respect to demographics, education patterns, applications, and the US economy. Recommendations are made for each field, with discussions of their histories and the relevance of the research to government agencies. The section on atomic physics includes atomic theory, structure, and dynamics; accelerator-based atomic physics; and large facilities. The section on molecular physics includes spectroscopy, scattering theory and experiment, and the dynamics of chemical reactions. The section on optical physics discusses lasers, laser spectroscopy, and quantum optics and coherence. A section elucidates interfaces between the three fields and astrophysics, condensed matter physics, surface science, plasma physics, atmospheric physics, and nuclear physics. Another section shows applications of the three fields in ultra-precise measurements, fusion, national security, materials, medicine, and other topics.

  20. Atoms, molecules and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hertel, Ingolf V

    2015-01-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginner...

  1. Atomic physics and reality

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    An account of the long standing debate between Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein regarding the validity of the quantum mechanical description of atomic phenomena.With physicts, John Wheeler (Texas), John Bell (CERN), David Rohm (London), Abner Shimony (Boston), Alain Aspect (Paris)

  2. Physics of atomic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    This advanced textbook presents an extensive and diverse study of low-energy nuclear physics considering the nucleus as a quantum system of strongly interacting constituents. The contents guide students from the basic facts and ideas to more modern topics including important developments over the last 20 years, resulting in a comprehensive collection of major modern-day nuclear models otherwise unavailable in the current literature. The book emphasizes the common features of the nucleus and other many-body mesoscopic systems currently in the center of interest in physics. The authors have also included full problem sets that can be selected by lecturers and adjusted to specific interests for more advanced students, with many chapters containing links to freely available computer code. As a result, readers are equipped for scientific work in mesoscopic physics.

  3. Accurate measurement and physical insight: The X-ray extended range technique for fundamental atomic physics, condensed matter research and biological sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research in core physics or atomic and condensed matter science is increasingly relevant for diverse fields and are finding application in chemistry, engineering and biological sciences, linking to experimental research at synchrotrons, reactors and specialised facilities. Over recent synchrotron experiments and publications we have developed methods for measuring the absorption coefficient far from the edge and in the XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) region in neutral atoms, simple compounds and organometallics reaching accuracies of below 0.02%. This is 50-500 times more accurate than earlier methods, and 50-250 times more accurate than claimed uncertainties in theoretical computations for these systems. The data and methodology are useful for a wide range of applications, including major synchrotron and laboratory techniques relating to fine structure, near-edge analysis and standard crystallography. Experiments are sensitive to theoretical and computational issues, including correlation between convergence of electronic and atomic orbitals and wavefunctions. Hence, particularly in relation to the popular techniques of XAFS and XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure), this development calls for strong theoretical involvement but has great applications in solid state structural determination, catalysis and enzyme environments, active centres of biomolecules and organometallics, phase changes and fluorescence investigations and others. We discuss key features of the X-ray extended range technique (XERT) and illustrate applications.

  4. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  5. Atomic and molecular physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topics covered include: electron attachment to SO2 in high pressure gases; long-lived parent negative ions formed via nuclear-excited Feshbach resonances, part IV, a systematic study of NO2-containing benzene derivatives; threshold-electron excitation and compound-negative-ion states of aromatic hydrocarbons; linking of existing data on electron-molecule interactions in gases with those in the liquid phase; slowing down of subexcitation electrons in polyatomic gases; electron mobilities in high-pressure gases (''quasi-liquids''); measurement of the mobility of excess electrons in liquids; potential energy function of an excess electron in a nonpolar liquid; electron mobilities in gases and liquids; photophysics of aromatic hydrocarbons; synthesis of electron-molecule interactions with benzene and benzene derivatives; and spin-off of basic studies on electron attachment to, and elastic scattering from, polyatomic molecules. 14 figures, 2 tables

  6. Physics of Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bransden, B H

    2003-01-01

    New edition of a well-established second and third year textbook for Physics degree students, covering the physical structure and behaviour of atoms and molecules. The aim of this new edition is to provide a unified account of the subject within an undergraduate framework, taking the opportunity to make improvements based on the teaching experience of users of the first edition, and cover important new developments in the subject.

  7. High-energy atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drukarev, Evgeny G

    2016-01-01

    This self-contained text introduces readers to the field of high-energy atomic physics - a new regime of photon-atom interactions in which the photon energies significantly exceed the atomic or molecular binding energies, and which opened up with the recent advent of new synchrotron sources. From a theoretical point of view, a small-parameter characteristic of the bound system emerged, making it possible to perform analytic perturbative calculations that can in turn serve as benchmarks for more powerful numerical computations. The first part of the book introduces readers to the foundations of this new regime and its theoretical treatment. In particular, the validity of the small-parameter perturbation expansion and of the lowest-order approximation is critically reviewed. The following chapters then apply these insights to various atomic processes, such as photoionization as a many-body problem, dominant mechanisms for the production of ions at higher energies, Compton scattering and ionization accompanied b...

  8. Atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applications of synchrotron radiation to research in high-energy atomic physics are summarized. These lie in the areas of photoelectron spectrometry, photon scattering, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, time-resolved measurements, resonance spectroscopy and threshold excitation, and future, yet undefined studies

  9. Applications of Hubble Volume in Atomic Physics, Nuclear Physics, Particle Physics, Quantum Physics and Cosmic Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. V. S. Seshavatharam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an attempt is made to emphasize the major shortcomings of standard cosmology. It can be suggested that, the current cosmological changes can be understood by studying the atom and the atomic nucleus through ground based experiments. If light is coming from the atoms of the gigantic galaxy, then redshift can be interpreted as an index of the galactic atomic ‘light emission mechanism’. In no way it seems to be connected with ‘galaxy receding’. With ‘cosmological increasing (emitted photon energy’, observed cosmic redshift can be considered as a measure of the age difference between our galaxy and any observed galaxy. If it is possible to show that, (from the observer older galaxy’s distance increases with its ‘age’, then ‘galaxy receding’ and ‘accelerating universe’ concepts can be put for a revision at fundamental level. At any given cosmic time, the product of ‘critical density’ and ‘Hubble volume’ gives a characteristic cosmic mass and it can be called as the ‘Hubble mass’. Interesting thing is that, Schwarzschild radius of the ‘Hubble mass’ again matches with the ‘Hubble length’. Most of the cosmologists believe that this is merely a coincidence. At any given cosmic time,’Hubble length’ can be considered as the gravitational or electromagnetic interaction range. If one is willing to think in this direction, by increasing the number of applications of Hubble mass and Hubble volume in other areas of fundamental physics like quantum physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics and particle physics - slowly and gradually - in a progressive way, concepts of ‘Black hole Cosmology’ can be strengthened and can also be confirmed.

  10. Physics through the 1990s: Atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was prepared by the Panel on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics of the Physics Survey Committee in response to its charge to describe the field, to characterize the recent advances, and to identify the current frontiers of research. Some of the areas discussed are: atomic structure, atomic dynamics, accelerator-based atomic physics, molecular photoionization and electron-molecule scattering, astrophysics, laser spectroscopy, atmospheric physics, plasma physics, and applications

  11. Case studies in atomic collision physics

    CERN Document Server

    McDaniel, E W

    2013-01-01

    Case Studies in Atomic Collision Physics II focuses on studies on the role of atomic collision processes in astrophysical plasmas, including ionic recombination, electron transport, and position scattering. The book first discusses three-body recombination of positive and negative ions, as well as introduction to ionic recombination, calculation of the recombination coefficient, ions recombining in their parent gas, and three-body recombination at moderate and high gas-densities. The manuscript also takes a look at precision measurements of electron transport coefficients and differential cr

  12. Withdrawal of Chinese Physics Letters 28 (2011) 043401 “Measurement of Absolute Atomic Collision Cross Section with Helium Using 87Rb Atoms Confined in Magneto-Optic and Magnetic Traps” by WANG Ji-Cheng et al.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji-Cheng; ZHOU Ke-Ya; WANG Yue-Yuan; LIAO Qing-Hong; LIU Shu-Tian

    2011-01-01

    We announce the withdrawal of the article entitled “Measurement of Absolute Atomic Collision Cross Section with Helium Using 87Rb Atoms Confined in Magneto-Optic and Magnetic Traps”,which was published in Chinese Physics Letters [28(4)(2011)043401].The first author,Jicheng Wang,had participated in related research with Professor Kirk Madison's group at the Department of Physics & Astronomy at the University of British Columbia,Canada from September 2008 to February 2010.Even though consent had been granted for some of the experimental data to be used by Jicheng Wang in his own thesis,its publication had not been authorized.We apologize to Professor K.Madison for the misunderstanding,and to Chinese Physics Letters and the readers of Chinese Physics Letters for any inconvenience this mistake may have caused.%We announce the withdrawal of the article entitled "Measurement of Absolute Atomic Collision Cross Section with Helium Using 87Rb Atoms Confined in Magneto-Optic and Magnetic Traps", which was published in Chinese Physics Letters [28(4) (2011)043401]. The first author, Jicheng Wang, had participated in related research with Professor Kirk Madison's group at the Department of Physics & Astronomy at the University of British Columbia, Canada from September 2008 to February 2010. Even though consent had been granted for some of the experimental data to be used by Jicheng Wang in his own thesis, its publication had not been authorized. We apologize to Professor K. Madison for the misunderstanding, and to Chinese Physics Letters ad the readers of Chinese Physics Letters for any inconvenience this mistake may have caused.

  13. Measures that the Federal Atomic Energy Agency of the Russian Federation is taking to improve physical protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our view, this conference is a logical extension of international efforts to coordinate activities to prevent potential acts of nuclear terrorism. Terrorism, in all its manifestations and in scale, has become one of the most dangerous problems of the 21st century. Our experience tells us that the possibility now exists for nuclear material to be used for criminal purposes. This is the starting point for us in the Russian Federation. In the light of this and the rapid development of nuclear power for peaceful purposes, the physical security of nuclear sites is one, if not the most crucial, factor in determining the long term prospects for nuclear development and for international collaboration in this field. Against this background, the IAEA's role in strengthening the international physical protection regime for facilities involved in the peaceful use of atomic energy is steadily growing. Nowadays, this activity has a pronounced preventive dimension focused on potential acts of nuclear terrorism. Rosatom (which I represent) carries out its activities in the field of the physical protection of nuclear material and facilities in accordance with the fundamentals of the Russian Federation's national nuclear and radiation safety policy for the period up to 2010 and on the basis of the Rosatom sector based programme for improving the physical protection of nuclear material, nuclear facilities and nuclear material storage locations. The main focus of our efforts to strengthen the physical protection regime is directed at improving the security system for nuclear facilities and nuclear material. In the Russian Federation, all facilities that pose a nuclear threat are under the protection of the federal domestic security forces. Also, departmental security units have been set up to assist the domestic security forces in security and emergency response matters. A federal State enterprise, Rosatom Departmental Security, has been created, and its function is to direct the

  14. Dynamical processes in atomic and molecular physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ogurtsov, Gennadi

    2012-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics underlie a basis for our knowledge of fundamental processes in nature and technology and in such applications as solid state physics, chemistry and biology. In recent years, atomic and molecular physics has undergone a revolutionary change due to great achievements in computing and experimental techniques. As a result, it has become possible to obtain information both on atomic and molecular characteristics and on dynamics of atomic and molecular processes. This e-book highlights the present state of investigations in the field of atomic and molecular physics. Rece

  15. Experimental methods of ultracold atomic physics

    OpenAIRE

    Stamper-Kurn, D.M.; Thywissen, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Experiments on solid-state materials and atomic quantum gases are increasingly investigating similar concepts in many-body quantum physics. Yet, the flavor of experiments on the gaseous atomic materials is different from that of conventional materials research. Here, we summarize some aspects of atomic physics and some of the common technical elements of cold-atom experiments which underlie the investigations described in the remaining chapters of this volume.

  16. The Atomic Physics Center of Toulouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research program was concerned with the aerosol and atmospheric exchange physics and, in atomic physics essentially with: atomic collisions, postluminescence in gases, discharges in gases at medium and high pressure, the electric arc, dielectric physics, and radiation transport in matter

  17. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bederson, Benjamin

    1993-01-01

    Advances in Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics, established in 1965, continues its tradition of excellence with Volume 32, published in honor of Founding Editor Sir David Bates upon his retirement as editorof the series. This volume presents reviews of topics related to the applications of atomic and molecular physics to atmospheric physics and astrophysics.

  18. Atomic physics in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses: Microwave Driven Multiphoton Excitation Dynamics in Rydberg Atoms; Nonadiabatic Geometric Phases of Multiphoton Transitions in Dissipative Systems and Spin-j Systems; and Nonperturbative Treatments of Atomic and Molecular Processes in Intense Laser Fields

  19. Experimental atomic and molecular physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Physics research in the Physics Division consists of five ongoing experimental programs: dissociation and other interactions of energetic molecular ions in solid and gaseous targets; beam-foil research and collision dynamics of heavy ions; photoionization-photoelectron research; spectroscopy of free atoms and molecules, high precision laser-rf double-resonance spectroscopy with atomic and molecular beams; and Moessbauer effect research

  20. Classical approach in atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solov' ev, E.A. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    The application of a classical approach to various quantum problems - the secular perturbation approach to quantization of a hydrogen atom in external fields and a helium atom, the adiabatic switching method for calculation of a semiclassical spectrum of a hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields, a spontaneous decay of excited states of a hydrogen atom, Gutzwiller's approach to Stark problem, long-lived excited states of a helium atom discovered with the help of Poincare section, inelastic transitions in slow and fast electron-atom and ion-atom collisions - is reviewed. Further, a classical representation in quantum theory is discussed. In this representation the quantum states are treated as an ensemble of classical states. This approach opens the way to an accurate description of the initial and final states in classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and a purely classical explanation of tunneling phenomenon. The general aspects of the structure of the semiclassical series such as renormalization group symmetry, criterion of accuracy and so on are reviewed as well. (author)

  1. New trends in atomic and molecular physics advanced technological applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The field of Atomic and Molecular Physics (AMP) has reached significant advances in high–precision experimental measurement techniques. The area covers a wide spectrum ranging from conventional to new emerging multi-disciplinary areas like physics of highly charged ions (HCI), molecular physics, optical science, ultrafast laser technology etc. This book includes the important topics of atomic structure, physics of atomic collision, photoexcitation, photoionization processes, Laser cooling and trapping, Bose Einstein condensation and advanced technology applications of AMP in the fields of astronomy , astrophysics , fusion, biology and nanotechnology. This book is useful for researchers, professors, graduate, post graduate and PhD students dealing with atomic and molecular physics. The book has a wide scope with applications in neighbouring fields like plasma physics, astrophysics, cold collisions, nanotechnology and future fusion energy sources like ITER (international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) To...

  2. Atomic physics in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: nonadiabatic geometric phases of multiphoton transitions; nonperturbative treatments of level shifts of excited states in strong fields; multiple high-order harmonic generation in intense laser fields; quantum fractal character of quasi-energy states in multi-color fields; complex- scaling Fourier-grid Hamiltonian method for intense-field multiphoton resonances; and microwave driven multiphoton excitation dynamics in Rydberg atoms: Fast Fourier transformation propagation method

  3. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Paul R; Arimondo, Ennio

    2006-01-01

    Volume 54 of the Advances Series contains ten contributions, covering a diversity of subject areas in atomic, molecular and optical physics. The article by Regal and Jin reviews the properties of a Fermi degenerate gas of cold potassium atoms in the crossover regime between the Bose-Einstein condensation of molecules and the condensation of fermionic atom pairs. The transition between the two regions can be probed by varying an external magnetic field. Sherson, Julsgaard and Polzik explore the manner in which light and atoms can be entangled, with applications to quantum information processing

  4. Artificial Atoms: from Quantum Physics to Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this workshop is to survey the most recent advances of technologies enabling single atom- and artificial atom-based devices. These include the assembly of artificial molecular structures with magnetic dipole and optical interactions between engineered atoms embedded in solid-state lattices. The ability to control single atoms in diamond or similar solids under ambient operating conditions opens new perspectives for technologies based on nanoelectronics and nanophotonics. The scope of the workshop is extended towards the physics of strong coupling between atoms and radiation field modes. Beyond the traditional atom-cavity systems, artificial dipoles coupled to microwave radiation in circuit quantum electrodynamics is considered. All these technologies mutually influence each other in developing novel devices for sensing at the quantum level and for quantum information processing.

  5. Advances in atomic physics an overview

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude

    2011-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive overview of the spectacular advances seen in atomic physics during the last 50 years. The authors explain how such progress was possible by highlighting connections between developments that occurred at different times. They discuss the new perspectives and the new research fields that look promising. The emphasis is placed, not on detailed calculations, but rather on physical ideas. Combining both theoretical and experimental considerations, the book will be of interest to a wide range of students, teachers and researchers in quantum and atomic physics.

  6. Atomic physics at the advanced photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argonne's 7-GeV synchrotron light source (APS) is expected to commence operations for research early in FY 1996. The Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotron Research Center (BESSRC) is likewise expected to start its research programs at that time. As members of the BESSRC CAT (Collaborative Access Team), we are preparing, together with atomic physicists from the University of Western Michigan, the University of Tennessee, and University of Notre Dame, to initiate a series of atomic physics experiments that exploit the unique capabilities of the APS, especially its high brilliance for photon energies extending from about 3 keV to more than 50 keV. Most of our early work will be conducted on an undulator beam line and we are thus concentrating on various aspects of that beam line and its associated experimental areas. Our group has undertaken responsibilities in such areas as hutch design, evaluation of undulator performance, user policy, interfacing and instrumentation, etc. Initial experiments will probably utilize existing apparatus. We are, however, planning to move rapidly to more sophisticated measurements involving, for example, ion-beam targets, simultaneous laser excitation, and the spectroscopy of emitted photons

  7. Plasmas applied atomic collision physics, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, C F

    1984-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 2: Plasmas covers topics on magnetically confined plasmas. The book starts by providing the history of fusion research and describing the various approaches in both magnetically and inertially confined plasmas. The text then gives a general discussion of the basic concepts and properties in confinement and heating of a plasma. The theory of atomic collisions that result in excited quantum states, particularly highly ionized impurity atoms; and diverse diagnostic topics such as emission spectra, laser scattering, electron cyclotron emission, particle bea

  8. Atomic hydrogen and fundamental physical constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques are described which allow the study, in undergraduate laboratories, of the spectrum of atomic hydrogen. The Rydberg constant, the electron-proton mass ratio, and the fine-structure constant are evaluated from the measurements. The key to the series of experiments is a discharge tube in which atomic lines dominate over the molecular lines. (author)

  9. Accelerator based atomic physics experiments: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Physics research with beams from accelerators has continued to expand and the number of papers and articles at meetings and in journals reflects a steadily increasing interest and an increasing support from various funding agencies. An attempt will be made to point out where interdisciplinary benefits have occurred, and where applications of the new results to engineering problems are expected. Drawing from material which will be discussed in the conference, a list of the most active areas of research is presented. Accelerator based atomic physics brings together techniques from many areas, including chemistry, astronomy and astrophysics, nuclear physics, solid state physics and engineering. An example is the use of crystal channeling to sort some of the phenomena of ordinary heavy ion stopping powers. This tool has helped us to reach a better understanding of stopping mechanisms with the result that now we have established a better base for predicting energy losses of heavy ions in various materials

  10. Atomic physics at high brilliance synchrotron sources: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains papers on the following topics: present status of SPring-8 and the atomic physics undulator beamline; recent photoabsorption measurements in the rare gases and alkalis in the 3 to 15 keV proton energy region; atomic and molecular physics at LURE; experiments on atoms, ions and small molecules using the new generation of synchrotron radiation sources; soft x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy using tunable synchrotron radiation; soft x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy excited by synchrotron radiation: Inelastic and resonant scattering near threshold; outer-shell photoionization of ions; overview of the APS BESSRC beamline development; the advanced light source: Research opportunities in atomic and molecular physics; Photoionization of the Ba+ ion by 4d shell excitation; decay dynamics of inner-shell excited atoms and molecules; absorption of atomic Ca, Cr, Mn and Cu; High-resolution photoelectron studies of resonant molecular photoionization; radiative and radiationless resonant raman scattering by synchrotron radiation; auger spectrometry of atoms and molecules; some thoughts of future experiments with the new generation of storage rings; Electron spectroscopy studies of argon K-shell excitation and vacancy cascades; ionization of atoms by high energy photons; ion coincidence spectroscopy on rare gas atoms and small molecules after photoexcitation at energies of several keV; an EBIS for use with synchrotron radiation photoionization of multiply charged ions and PHOBIS; gamma-2e coincidence measurements the wave of the future in inner-shell electron spectroscopy; recoil momentum spectroscopy in ion-atom and photon-atom collisions; a study of compton ionization of helium; future perspectives of photoionization studies at high photon energies; and status report on the advanced photon source. These papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere

  11. Atomic physics in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamak discharges produce hydrogen-isotope plasmas in a quasi-steady state, with radial electron temperature, Tsub(e)(r), and density nsub(e)(r), distribution usually centrally peaked, with typical values Tsub(e)(0) approx.= 1 - 3 keV, nsub(e)(r) approx.= 1014 cm-3. Besides hydrogen, the plasma contains small quantities of carbon, oxygen, various construction or wall-conditioning materials such as Fe, Cr, Ni, Ti, Zr, Mo, and perhaps elements added for special diagnostic purposes, e.g., Si, Sc, Al, or noble gases. These elements are spatially fairly homogeneously distributed, with the different ionization states occurring near radial locations where Tsub(e)(r) approx.= Esub(i), the ionization potential. Thus, spectroscopic measurements of various plasma properties, such as ion temperatures, plasma motions or oscillations, radial transport rates, etc. are automatically endowed with spatial resolution. Furthermore the emitted spectra, even of heavier elements such as Fe or Ni, are fairly simple because only the ground levels are appreciably populated under the prevailing plasma conditions. Identification of near-ground transitions, including particularly magnetic dipole and intercombination transitions of ions with ionization potentials in the several keV range, and determination of their collisional and radiative transition probabilities will be required for development of appropriate diagnostics of tokamak-type plasma approaching the prospective fusion reactor conditions. (orig.)

  12. Scattering processes in atomic physics, nuclear physics, and cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchedrin, Gavriil

    The universal way to probe a physical system is to scatter a particle or radiation off the system. The results of the scattering are governed by the interaction Hamiltonian of the physical system and scattered probe. An object of the investigation can be a hydrogen atom immersed in a laser field, heavy nucleus exposed to a flux of neutrons, or space-time metric perturbed by the stress-energy tensor of neutrino flux in the early Universe. This universality of scattering process designates the Scattering Matrix, defined as the unitary matrix of the overlapping in and out collision states, as the central tool in theoretical physics. In this Thesis we present our results in atomic physics, nuclear physics, and cosmology. In these branches of theoretical physics the key element that unifies all of them is the scattering matrix. Additionally, within the scope of Thesis we present underlying ideas responsible for the unification of various physical systems. Within atomic physics problems, namely the axial anomaly contribution to parity nonconservation in atoms, and two-photon resonant transition in a hydrogen atom, it was the scattering matrix which led to the Landau-Yang theorem, playing the central role in these problems. In scattering problems of cosmology and quantum optics we developed and implemented mathematical tools that allowed us to get a new point of view on the subject. Finally, in nuclear physics we were able to take advantage of the target complexity in the process of neutron scattering which led to the formulation of a new resonance width distribution for an open quantum system.

  13. The fundamentals of atomic and molecular physics

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    The Fundamentals of Atomic and Molecular Physics is intended as an introduction to the field for advanced undergraduates who have taken quantum mechanics. Each chapter builds upon the previous, using the same tools and methods throughout. As the students progress through the book, their ability to use these tools will steadily increase, along with their confidence in their efficacy. The book treats the two-electron atom as the simplest example of the many-electron atom—as opposed to using techniques that are not applicable to many-electron atoms—so that it is unnecessary to develop additional equations when turning to multielectron atoms, such as carbon. External fields are treated using both perturbation theory and direct diagonalization and spontaneous emission is developed from first principles. Only diatomic molecules are considered with the hydrogen molecular ion and neutral molecule treated in some detail. This comprehensive coverage of the quantum mechanics of complex atoms and simple diatomic mole...

  14. Guide to Laboratory Practicum in Atomic Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbulea, N. F.; Golban, G. N.; Scurtul, V. V.; Oleynik, V. A.

    1980-12-01

    The broshure represents a collection of 11 Laboratory works in Quantum Optics, Semiconductor, Atomic and Nuclear Physics for students of 2-nd years from Technical High Schools. A minimum of theoretical knowledges is given as well as a description of experimental installation (setup),a number of control questions and a task to be carried out is presented for every of the Laboratory work.

  15. SSPALS for atomic physics with positronium

    CERN Document Server

    Deller, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (SSPALS) has proven an extremely useful tool for atomic physics experiments with positronium (Ps). Using a Monte-Carlo simulation, I examine methods employed to analyze lifetime spectra and explore the advantages and limitations these have in laser spectroscopy experiments, such as resonance-enhance multiphoton ionization (REMPI) or the production of Rydberg Ps.

  16. Atomic, molecular, and optical physics charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning, F B

    1995-01-01

    With this volume, Methods of Experimental Physics becomes Experimental Methods in the Physical Sciences, a name change which reflects the evolution of todays science. This volume is the first of three which will provide a comprehensive treatment of the key experimental methods of atomic, molecular, and optical physics; the three volumes as a set will form an excellent experimental handbook for the field. The wide availability of tunable lasers in the pastseveral years has revolutionized the field and lead to the introduction of many new experimental methods that are covered in these volumes. Traditional methods are also included to ensure that the volumes will be a complete reference source for the field.

  17. Atomic physics processes in radial transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These lectures were intended as preparation for detailed discussions of the role of atomic and molecular physics in confinement research at the 1982 NATO Advanced Study Institute. They begin with a description of the major approaches to magnetic confinement: tandem (ambipolar) mirrors with their associated auxiliary barriers, tokamaks, and stellarators. The leading alternatives, the ELMO Bumpy Torus and the reversed field pinch, are also treated. The evolution equations for particle, energy, and (where relevant) field diffusion are presented and discussed. This is the context for atomic and molecular processes relevant to confinement

  18. Applied atomic and collision physics special topics

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, H S W; Bederson, Benjamin

    1982-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 5: Special Topics deals with topics on applications of atomic collisions that were not covered in the first four volumes of the treatise. The book opens with a chapter on ultrasensitive chemical detectors. This is followed by separate chapters on lighting, magnetohydrodynamic electrical power generation, gas breakdown and high voltage insulating gases, thermionic energy converters, and charged particle detectors. Subsequent chapters deal with the operation of multiwire drift and proportional chambers and streamer chambers and their use in high energy p

  19. Safeguards and physics measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carchon, R

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's programme on safeguards and physics measurements involves gamma and neutron dosimetry, calibrations and irradiations, electronic support, metrology of various samples including internal contamination of human beings, of waste barrels and of fissile materials, neutron activation analysis, and radioisotope source preparation. The document reports on the main activities and achievements of the sections 'Instrumentation, Calibration and Dosimetry' and 'Safeguards and Nuclear Physics Measurements'.

  20. Atomic Physics 15: Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Atomic Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Linden van den Heuvell, H. B.; Walraven, J. T. M.; Reynolds, M. W.

    1997-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Generation of a "Schrödinger cat" of radiation and observation of its decoherence * Synthesis of entangled states and quantum computing * Entangled states of atomic ions for quantum metrology and computation * Entanglement and indistinguishability: Coherence experiments with photon pairs and triplets * Atom optics as a testing ground for quantum chaos * Coherent ultra-bright XUV lasers and harmonics * Hollow atoms * Interdisciplinary experiments with polarized noble gases * The creation and study of Bose-Einstein condensation in a cold alkali vapor * oscopic quantum phenomena in trapped Bose-condensed gases * Doppler-free spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen * QED and the ground state of helium * Towards coherent atomic samples using laser cooling * Bose-Einstein condensation of a weakly-interacting gas * Zeeman and his contemporaries: Dutch physics around 1900 * Zeeman's great discovery * The Zeeman effect: A tool for atom manipulation * The Zeeman effect a century later: New insights into classical physics * QED effects in few-electron high-Z systems * Lamb shift experiments on high-Z one- and two-electron systems * Fundamental constants of nature * Response of atoms in photonic lattices * Hydrogen-like systems and quantum electrodynamics * New experiments with atomic lattices bound by light * Bloch oscillations of atoms in an optical potential * Quantum decoherence and inertial sensing with atom interferometers * Quantum effects in He clusters * Atoms in super-intense radiation fields * Wave packet dynamics of excited atomic electrons in intense laser fields * Nonlinear laser-electron scattering * Comparing the antiproton and proton and progress toward cold antihydrogen * Author Index

  1. Precision position measurement of single atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziauddin; Rahmatullah; Almas Khan

    2012-01-01

    Atom localization in a five-level atomic system under the effect of three driving fields and one standing wave field is suggested.A spontaneously emitted photon from the proposed system is measured in a detector.Precision position measurement of an atom is controlled via phase and vacuum field detuning without considering the parity violation.

  2. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atomic physics and foundations of spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unique, unified presentation of these partial fields and by this exclusive. With the highly reputed co-author Prof. Dr. Ingolf Volker Hertel. Eminent presentation makes it possible, together also over set connections. For bachelor/master and diploma curricula. The book applies primarily to graduate students of physics and physical chemistry until promotion. It offers a detailed introduction to the most important theme complexes of atomic and molecular physics and the methods of modern optical physics connected with this. In many selected partial fields it leads until the actual status of research. Simultaneously it also appeals to the active scientist and wants to be a standard work of the field. By the clearly stuctured chapters the reader is - starting from the foundations of quantum physics - step-wise made familiar with the most important phenomena and models of atomic and molecular physics and led wherever it is offered, to their actual developments in modern research. In the first part here present the to a certain degree canonical knowledge with the main topic structure of atoms and molecules and the competent spectroscopy is summarized. In the second part still being in work deepening knowledge for this is mediated, and selected chapters of modern optics, lase physics, cluster research, and scattering physics is treated, as well a short excursus in the world of cold atoms and molecules is given. At the whole both volumes of this textbook want to show to the interested reader that atomic, molecular, and optical physics, are still as usual an alive field of modern physical research

  3. Atomic density functions: atomic physics calculations analyzed with methods from quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Borgoo, Alex; Geerlings, P

    2011-01-01

    This contribution reviews a selection of findings on atomic density functions and discusses ways for reading chemical information from them. First an expression for the density function for atoms in the multi-configuration Hartree--Fock scheme is established. The spherical harmonic content of the density function and ways to restore the spherical symmetry in a general open-shell case are treated. The evaluation of the density function is illustrated in a few examples. In the second part of the paper, atomic density functions are analyzed using quantum similarity measures. The comparison of atomic density functions is shown to be useful to obtain physical and chemical information. Finally, concepts from information theory are introduced and adopted for the comparison of density functions. In particular, based on the Kullback--Leibler form, a functional is constructed that reveals the periodicity in Mendeleev's table. Finally a quantum similarity measure is constructed, based on the integrand of the Kullback--L...

  4. Atomic, molecular, and optical physics electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning, F B; Lucatorto, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Combined with Volumes 29A and 29B, this volume is a comprehensive treatment of the key experimental methods of atomic, molecular, and optical physics, as well as an excellent experimental handbook for the field. Thewide availability of tunable lasers in the past several years has revolutionized the field and lead to the introduction of many new experimental methods that are covered in these volumes. Traditional methods are also included to ensure that the volumes will be a complete reference source for the field.

  5. Atomic-position Localization Via Dual Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Nha, H; Chang, J S; An, K; Nha, Hyunchul; Lee, Jai-Hyung; Chang, Joon-Sung; An, Kyungwon

    2002-01-01

    We study localization of atomic position when a three-level atom interacts with a quantized standing-wave field in the Ramsey interferometer setup. Both the field quadrature amplitude and the atomic internal state are measured to obtain the atomic position information. It is found that this dual measurement scheme produces an interference pattern superimposed on a diffraction-like pattern in the atomic position distribution, where the former pattern originates from the state-selective measurement and the latter from the field measurement. The present scheme results in a better resolution in the position localization than the field-alone measurement schemes. We also discuss the measurement-correlated mechanical action of the standing-wave field on the atom in the light of Popper's test.

  6. Atomic and nuclear physics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Littlefield, T A

    1979-01-01

    After the death of Dr. Littlefield it was decided that I should undertake the revision ofthe whole of Atomic and Nuclear Physics: an Introduction for the third edition, and it was soon apparent that major changes were necessary. I am confident that these changes would have had Dr. Littlefield's approval. The prime consideration for the present edition has been to modernize at a minimum cost. As much as possible of the second edition has therefore been retained, but where changes have been made they have been fairly drastic. Thus the chapters on fine structure, wave mechanics, the vector model of the atom, Pauli's principle and the Zeeman effect have been completely restructured. The chapters on nuclear models, cosmic rays, fusion systems and fundamental particles have been brought up to date while a new chapter on charm and the latest ideas on quarks has been included. It is hoped that the presentation of the last named will give readers a feeling that physics research can be full of adventure and surprises.

  7. Microtraps and Atom Chips: Toolboxes for Cold Atom Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Feenstra, L.; Andersson, L. M.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic microtraps and Atom Chips are safe, small-scale, reliable and flexible tools to prepare ultra-cold and degenerate atom clouds as sources for various atom-optical experiments. We present an overview of the possibilities of the devices and indicate how a microtrap can be used to prepare and launch a Bose-Einstein condensate for use in an atom clock or an interferometer.

  8. Atom interferometers and optical atomic clocks: New quantum sensors for fundamental physics experiments in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present projects for future space missions using new quantum devices based on ultracold atoms. They will enable fundamental physics experiments testing quantum physics, physics beyond the standard model of fundamental particles and interactions, special relativity, gravitation and general relativity

  9. High Rydberg atoms: newcomers to the atomic physics scene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of high Rydberg atoms which have a greatly increased size due to their having been perturbed in certain ways. The production, detection, and research on these atoms are considered. The motivation for such studies, apart from their intrinsic interest, includes laser development, laser isotope separation, energy deposition in gases, plasma diagnostics, and radio astronomy

  10. Production of heavy ion beams for atomic physics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory for research in atomic physics of ions has been set up around a 2 MV tandem Van de Graaff accelerator designed and built indegenously. Mass analysed negatively charged heavy ion beams from a directly extracted duoplasmatron ion source are injected through various ion-optical elements into the accelerating tube. A gas stripper at the high voltage dome changes the negative ions into positive ions which are subsequently accelerated. The high energy end of the accelerator consists of quadrupole focussing magnets and an analysing magnet. A pair of insulated tantalum slits provide corona feedback and stabilize the energy of the accelerator. A beam resolution of 5 keV at 1 MeV proton energy has been measured. A number of experiments are presently being planned to utilize the accelerator in the field of basic research in atomic physics. These include beam-foil spectroscopic measurements involving detection of decay photon/electrons, ion-induced X-ray emission, analytical applications and radiation damage studies. Electron spectrometers which are in the stage of testing include cylindrical mirror analyser and parallel plate analyser. On the accelerator front, efforts are underway to develop a new sputter ion source and computer automation for improving stability and reliability. The salient features of the accelerator and the instrumentation developed for carrying out experiments in atomic physics are reported. (author). 14 refs., 17 figs

  11. Atomic physics and non-equilibrium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisheit, J.C.

    1986-04-25

    Three lectures comprise the report. The lecture, Atomic Structure, is primarily theoretical and covers four topics: (1) Non-relativistic one-electron atom, (2) Relativistic one-electron atom, (3) Non-relativistic many-electron atom, and (4) Relativistic many-electron atom. The lecture, Radiative and Collisional Transitions, considers the problem of transitions between atomic states caused by interactions with radiation or other particles. The lecture, Ionization Balance: Spectral Line Shapes, discusses collisional and radiative transitions when ionization and recombination processes are included. 24 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Experiments in atomic and applied physics using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diverse program in atomic and applied physics using x rays produced at the X-26 beam line at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source is in progress. The atomic physics program studies the properties of multiply-ionized atoms using the x rays for photo-excitation and ionization of neutral atoms and ion beams. The applied physics program builds on the techniques and results of the atomic physics work to develop new analytical techniques for elemental and chemical characterization of materials. The results are then used for a general experimental program in biomedical sciences, geo- and cosmochemistry, and materials sciences. The present status of the program is illustrated by describing selected experiments. Prospects for development of new experimental capabilities are discussed in terms of a heavy ion storage ring for atomic physics experiments and the feasibility of photoelectron microscopy for high spatial resolution analytical work. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Atomic clocks based on adaptive phase measurements with entangled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Axel; Sorensen, Anders; Lukin, Mikhail

    2005-05-01

    We show that the frequency stability of atomic clocks limited by local oscillator frequency fluctuations [1] can be greatly improved by using an adaptive measurement strategy with entangled atoms. Our method uses multiple atomic sub-ensembles with various degrees of spin-squeezing and sequential adaptive measurements of the Ramsey phase. With properly optimized degree of squeezing, this method reaches the Heisenberg limit for phase measurements δφ˜1/N, where N is the number of atoms. In addition, we show that multiple interrogation times for these sub-ensembles can be used to improve the long-term stability of the clock. This method allows one to use a very long interrogation time, limited only by environmental fluctuations. The combination of the above two methods leads to an ultimate long-term frequency stability of the clock scaling as σy(τ)=A. Andr'e, A. S. Sørensen, and M. D. Lukin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 230801 (2004).

  14. The Structure of Light Nuclei and Its Effect on Precise Atomic Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Friar, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    My talk will consist of three parts: (a) what every atomic physicist needs to know about the physics of light nuclei [and no more]; (b) what nuclear physicists can do for atomic physics; (c) what atomic physicists can do for nuclear physics. A brief qualitative overview of the nuclear force and calculational techniques for light nuclei will be presented, with an emphasis on debunking myths and on recent progress in the field. Nuclear quantities that affect precise atomic measurements will be ...

  15. The Structure of Light Nuclei and Its Effect on Precise Atomic Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Friar, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    This review consists of three parts: (a) what every atomic physicist needs to know about the physics of light nuclei; (b) what nuclear physicists can do for atomic physics; (c) what atomic physicists can do for nuclear physics. A brief qualitative overview of the nuclear force and calculational techniques for light nuclei will be presented, with an emphasis on debunking myths and on recent progress in the field. Nuclear quantities that affect precise atomic measurements will be discussed, tog...

  16. On the utility and ubiquity of atomic collision physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is divided into three parts. In the introduction, we discuss the history and makeup of ICPEAC. In the second part, we discuss the extent of applicability of atomic collision physics. In the third part, we chose one subject (dielectronic excitation) to show the interrelationship of various sub-branches of atomic collision physics. 28 refs., 14 figs

  17. Atomic Layer Thermopile Materials: Physics and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. X. Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New types of thermoelectric materials characterized by highly anisotropic Fermi surfaces and thus anisotropic Seebeck coefficients are reviewed. Early studies revealed that there is an induced voltage in high TC oxide superconductors when the surface of the films is exposed to short light pulses. Subsequent investigations proved that the effect is due to anisotropic components of the Seebeck tensor, and the type of materials is referred to atomic layer thermopile (ALT. Our recent studies indicate that multilayer thin films at the nanoscale demonstrate enhanced ALT properties. This is in agreement with the prediction in seeking the larger figure of merit (ZT thermoelectric materials in nanostructures. The study of ALT materials provides both deep insight of anisotropic transport property of these materials and at the same time potential materials for applications, such as light detector and microcooler. By measuring the ALT properties under various perturbations, it is found that the information on anisotropic transport properties can be provided. The information sometimes is not easily obtained by other tools due to the nanoscale phase coexistence in these materials. Also, some remained open questions and future development in this research direction have been well discussed.

  18. Weisskopf--Wigner approximation in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several approximations involved in the usual Weisskopf-Wigner treatment of the emission of light by an atom are investigated. The system considered is a recoilless, nonrelativistic hydrogen atom interacting with a quantized electromagnetic field, in dipole approximation (with a nonrelativistic cutoff in momentum space). Since only electric dipole waves interact with the atom, the Hamiltonian can be expressed in a simple one-dimensional form. The time evolution of the system is determined by resolvent operator techniques. The method goes beyond the analysis by Van Hove and Hugenholtz, allowing one to treat also fields of finite intensity in the infinite-volume limit. A comparison between this and other techniques is made

  19. Probing the Planck Scale in Low-Energy Atomic Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Bluhm, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Experiments in atomic physics have exceptional sensitivity to small shifts in energy in an atom, ion, or bound particle. They are particularly well suited to search for unique low-energy signatures of new physics, including effects that could originate from the Planck scale. A number of recent experiments have used CPT and Lorentz violation as a candidate signal of new physics originating from the Planck scale. A discussion of these experiments and their theoretical implications is presented.

  20. Combined ion and atom trap for low temperature ion-atom physics

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi, K.; LEE, Seunghyun; Sharma, Arijit; Werth, G.; Rangwala, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    We report an experimental apparatus and technique which simultaneously traps ions and cold atoms with spatial overlap. Such an apparatus is motivated by the study of ion-atom processes at temperatures ranging from hot to ultra-cold. This area is a largely unexplored domain of physics with cold trapped atoms. In this article we discuss the general design considerations for combining these two traps and present our experimental setup. The ion trap and atom traps are characterized independently ...

  1. Atomic physics: computer calculations and theoretical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Drukarev, E. G.

    2004-01-01

    It is demonstrated, how the theoretical analysis preceding the numerical calculations helps to calculate the energy of the ground state of helium atom, and enables to avoid qualitative errors in the calculations of the characteristics of the double photoionization.

  2. Atomic physics: A milestone in quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers require many quantum bits to perform complex calculations, but devices with more than a few bits are difficult to program. A device based on five atomic quantum bits shows a way forward. See Letter p.63

  3. Atomic physics and radiation processes in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is pointed out that atomic and molecular (A/M) processes play important roles in divertor plasmas but the problems related to these processes are not yet studied quantitatively. Recently new subjects related to A/M processes such as plasma- vapor interaction during plasma disruption are presented. This is a brief summary of our discussions. Our recent results of the calculations for the line emissions of carbon atoms in edge plasmas are also included. (J.P.N.)

  4. Tight Binding Models in Cold Atoms Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, J.

    2007-05-01

    Cold atomic gases placed in optical lattice potentials offer a unique tool to study simple tight binding models. Both the standard cases known from the condensed matter theory as well as novel situations may be addressed. Cold atoms setting allows for a precise control of parameters of the systems discussed, stimulating new questions and problems. The attempts to treat disorder in a controlled fashion are addressed in detail.

  5. The infancy of atomic physics Hercules in his cradle

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Alex

    2006-01-01

    Atomic physics is a mighty Hercules that dominates modern civilization, promising immense reserves of power but threatening catastrophic war and radioactive pollution. The story of the atom's discovery and the development of techniques to harness its energy offers fascinating insights into the forces behind twenty-first-century technology. This compelling history portrays the human faces and lives behind the beginnings of atomic science.The Infancy of Atomic Physics ranges from experiments in the 1880s by William Crookes and others to the era just after the First World War, when Rutherford's f

  6. Fundamentals of Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of the structure of the atom, elementary nuclear physics, the nature of electromagnetic radiation and the production of X rays is fundamental to the understanding of the physics of medical imaging and radiation protection. This, the first chapter of the handbook, summarizes those aspects of these areas which, being part of the foundation of modern physics, underpin the remainder of the book

  7. Division of Atomic Physics. Lund Institute of Technology. Progress Report 1993-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Atomic Physics is responsible for basic physics teaching in all engineering disciplines and for specialized teaching in Optics, Atomic Physics, Spectroscopy, Laser Physics, and Non-Linear Optics. Research activities are mainly carried out in the fields of basic and applied spectroscopy, largely based on the use of lasers. Projects in the following areas are reported: Basic Atomic Physics - Atomic physics with high power laser radiation; Laser spectroscopic investigations of atomic and ionic excited states in the short-wavelength region; Laser spectroscopy in the visible; Theoretical Atomic Physics; Applied Optics and Quantum Electronics -High resolution spectroscopy; Photon echoes in Rare Earth Ion Doped Crystals; diode laser Spectroscopy; Environmental Remote Sensing -Tropospheric Ozone Lidar; Measurement of gases of geophysical origin; Industrial and Urban Pollution Measurements; Laser induced fluorescence of vegetation and water; Applications in Medicine and Biology - Tissue diagnostic using Laser-induced fluorescence; Photodynamic Therapy; Measurement of Optical Properties of Tissue with applications to Diagnostics; Two Photon Excited fluorescence Microscopy; Capillary Electrophoresis; New Techniques; Industrial Applications - Optical spectroscopy in Metallurgy; Physics of Electric Breakdown in Dielectric liquids; Optical Spectroscopy of Paper

  8. Division of Atomic Physics. Lund Institute of Technology. Progress Report 1993-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlstroem, C.G. [ed.

    1995-12-31

    The Division of Atomic Physics is responsible for basic physics teaching in all engineering disciplines and for specialized teaching in Optics, Atomic Physics, Spectroscopy, Laser Physics, and Non-Linear Optics. Research activities are mainly carried out in the fields of basic and applied spectroscopy, largely based on the use of lasers. Projects in the following areas are reported: Basic Atomic Physics - Atomic physics with high power laser radiation; Laser spectroscopic investigations of atomic and ionic excited states in the short-wavelength region; Laser spectroscopy in the visible; Theoretical Atomic Physics; Applied Optics and Quantum Electronics -High resolution spectroscopy; Photon echoes in Rare Earth Ion Doped Crystals; diode laser Spectroscopy; Environmental Remote Sensing -Tropospheric Ozone Lidar; Measurement of gases of geophysical origin; Industrial and Urban Pollution Measurements; Laser induced fluorescence of vegetation and water; Applications in Medicine and Biology - Tissue diagnostic using Laser-induced fluorescence; Photodynamic Therapy; Measurement of Optical Properties of Tissue with applications to Diagnostics; Two Photon Excited fluorescence Microscopy; Capillary Electrophoresis; New Techniques; Industrial Applications - Optical spectroscopy in Metallurgy; Physics of Electric Breakdown in Dielectric liquids; Optical Spectroscopy of Paper.

  9. Investigations in atomic physics by heavy ion projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations in atomic physics by high-energy heavy ions are discussed. The main attention is paid to collision mechanisms (direct Coulomb interaction, quasi-molecular collision mechanism and other models) and the structure of highly ionized and excited atoms. Some problems of fundamental issues (Lamb shift of H-like heavy ions, the superheavy quasi-atoms and the position production in supercritical fields) are conside-- red in detail

  10. Francis M. Pipkin Award Talk - Precision Measurement with Atom Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Holger

    2015-05-01

    Atom interferometers are relatives of Young's double-slit experiment that use matter waves. They leverage light-atom interactions to masure fundamental constants, test fundamental symmetries, sense weak fields such as gravity and the gravity gradient, search for elusive ``fifth forces,'' and potentially test properties of antimatter and detect gravitational waves. We will discuss large (multiphoton-) momentum transfer that can enhance sensitivity and accuracy of atom interferometers several thousand fold. We will discuss measuring the fine structure constant to sub-part per billion precision and how it tests the standard model of particle physics. Finally, there has been interest in light bosons as candidates for dark matter and dark energy; atom interferometers have favorable sensitivity in searching for those fields. As a first step, we present our experiment ruling out chameleon fields and a broad class of other theories that would reproduce the observed dark energy density.

  11. Atomic physics with highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses: One electron outer shell processes in fast ion-atom collisions; role of electron-electron interaction in two-electron processes; multi-electron processes at low energy; multi-electron processes at high energy; inner shell processes; molecular fragmentation studies; theory; and, JRM laboratory operations

  12. Atomic physics with highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, P.

    1991-08-01

    This report discusses: One electron outer shell processes in fast ion-atom collisions; role of electron-electron interaction in two-electron processes; multi-electron processes at low energy; multi-electron processes at high energy; inner shell processes; molecular fragmentation studies; theory; and, JRM laboratory operations.

  13. Highly charged atomic physics at HIRFL-CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIRFL-CSR is a proposed electron cooling storage ring optimized to accelerate and store beams of highly charged heavy ions. Several possibilities for advanced atomic physics studies are discussed, such as studies of electron-ion, ion-atoms, photon-ion-electron interactions and high resolution spectroscopy

  14. Biomolecular Interactions Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Oscar H.; Snel, Margot M.E.; Cambi, Alessandra; Greve, Jan; Grooth, de Bart G.; Figdor, Carl G.

    2000-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is nowadays frequently applied to determine interaction forces between biological molecules. Starting with the detection of the first discrete unbinding forces between ligands and receptors by AFM only several years ago, measurements have become more and more quantitati

  15. Atomic References for Measuring Small Accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan

    2009-01-01

    Accelerometer systems that would combine the best features of both conventional (e.g., mechanical) accelerometers and atom interferometer accelerometers (AIAs) have been proposed. These systems are intended mainly for use in scientific research aboard spacecraft but may also be useful on Earth in special military, geological, and civil-engineering applications. Conventional accelerometers can be sensitive, can have high dynamic range, and can have high frequency response, but they lack accuracy and long-term stability. AIAs have low frequency response, but they offer high sensitivity, and high accuracy for measuring small accelerations. In a system according to the proposal, a conventional accelerometer would be used to perform short-term measurements of higher-frequency components of acceleration, while an AIA would be used to provide consistent calibration of, and correction of errors in, the measurements of the conventional accelerometer in the lower-frequency range over the long term. A brief description of an AIA is prerequisite to a meaningful description of a system according to the proposal. An AIA includes a retroreflector next to one end of a cell that contains a cold cloud of atoms in an ultrahigh vacuum. The atoms in the cloud are in free fall. The retroreflector is mounted on the object, the acceleration of which is to be measured. Raman laser beams are directed through the cell from the end opposite the retroreflector, then pass back through the cell after striking the retroreflector. The Raman laser beams together with the cold atoms measure the relative acceleration, through the readout of the AIA, between the cold atoms and the retroreflector.

  16. Two centre problems in relativistic atomic physics

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, Sean R.

    2012-01-01

    The work contained within this thesis is concerned with the explanation and usage of a set of theoretical procedures for the study of static and dynamic two–centre problems in the relativistic framework of Dirac’s equation. Two distinctly different theories for handling time–dependent atomic interactions are reviewed, namely semi–classical perturbation theory and a non–perturbative numerical technique based on the coupled channel equation to directly solve the time–dependent, two–centre Dirac...

  17. Atoms and molecules interacting with light atomic physics for the laser era

    CERN Document Server

    Straten, Peter van der

    2016-01-01

    This in-depth textbook with a focus on atom-light interactions prepares students for research in a fast-growing and dynamic field. Intended to accompany the laser-induced revolution in atomic physics, it is a comprehensive text for the emerging era in atomic, molecular and optical science. Utilising an intuitive and physical approach, the text describes two-level atom transitions, including appendices on Ramsey spectroscopy, adiabatic rapid passage and entanglement. With a unique focus on optical interactions, the authors present multi-level atomic transitions with dipole selection rules, and M1/E2 and multiphoton transitions. Conventional structure topics are discussed in some detail, beginning with the hydrogen atom and these are interspersed with material rarely found in textbooks such as intuitive descriptions of quantum defects. The final chapters examine modern applications and include many references to current research literature. The numerous exercises and multiple appendices throughout enable advanc...

  18. Condensed matter applied atomic collision physics, v.4

    CERN Document Server

    Datz, Sheldon

    1983-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 4: Condensed Matter deals with the fundamental knowledge of collision processes in condensed media.The book focuses on the range of applications of atomic collisions in condensed matter, extending from effects on biological systems to the characterization and modification of solids. This volume begins with the description of some aspects of the physics involved in the production of ion beams. The radiation effects in biological and chemical systems, ion scattering and atomic diffraction, x-ray fluorescence analysis, and photoelectron and Auger spectrosc

  19. Supercomputers and the future of computational atomic scattering physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advent of the supercomputer has opened new vistas for the computational atomic physicist. Problems of hitherto unparalleled complexity are now being examined using these new machines, and important connections with other fields of physics are being established. This talk briefly reviews some of the most important trends in computational scattering physics and suggests some exciting possibilities for the future. 7 refs., 2 figs

  20. Difference-frequency combs in cold atom physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kliese, Russell; Puppe, Thomas; Rohde, Felix; Sell, Alexander; Zach, Armin; Leisching, Patrick; Kaenders, Wilhelm; Keegan, Niamh C; Bounds, Alistair D; Bridge, Elizabeth M; Leonard, Jack; Adams, Charles S; Cornish, Simon L; Jones, Matthew P A

    2016-01-01

    Optical frequency combs provide the clockwork to relate optical frequencies to radio frequencies. Hence, combs allow to measure optical frequencies with respect to a radio frequency where the accuracy is limited only by the reference signal. In order to provide a stable link between the radio and optical frequencies, the two parameters of the frequency comb must be fixed: the carrier envelope offset frequency $f_{\\rm ceo}$ and the pulse repetition-rate $f_{\\rm rep}$. We have developed the first optical frequency comb based on difference frequency generation (DFG) that eliminates $f_{\\rm ceo}$ by design - specifically tailored for applications in cold atom physics. An $f_{\\rm ceo}$-free spectrum at 1550 nm is generated from a super continuum spanning more than an optical octave. Established amplification and frequency conversion techniques based on reliable telecom fiber technology allow generation of multiple wavelength outputs. In this paper we discuss the frequency comb design, characterization, and optical...

  1. The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Brodsky, Stanley J

    2015-01-01

    Atomic physics and hadronic physics are both governed by the Yang Mills gauge theory Lagrangian; in fact, Abelian quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics can provide important insight into hadronic eigenstates in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of frame-independent light-front relativistic equations of motion consistent with light-front holography which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The production of antihydrogen in flight can provide important insight into the dynamics of hadron production in QCD at the amplitude level. The renormalization scale for the running coupling is unambiguously set in QED; an analogous procedure sets the renormalization scales in QCD, leading to scheme-independent scale-fixed...

  2. Fisher-like atomic divergences: Mathematical grounds and physical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, A. L.; Angulo, J. C.; Antolín, J.

    2013-11-01

    Two different local divergence measures, the Fisher (FD) and the Jensen-Fisher (JFD) ones, are compared in this work by applying them to atomic one-particle densities in position and momentum spaces. They are defined in terms of the absolute and the relative Fisher information functionals. The analysis here afforded includes not only neutral atoms, but also singly-charged cations. The results are interpreted and justified according to (i) shell-filling patterns, (ii) short- and long-range behaviors of the atomic densities, and (iii) the value of the atomic ionization potential. The strengths of the FD measure, as compared to the JFD one, are emphasized.

  3. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bederson, Benjamin

    1995-01-01

    Praise for Previous Volumes"This volume maintains the authoritative standards of the series...The editors and publishers are to be congratulated"- M.S. CHILD in PHYSICS BULLETIN"Maintains the high standards of earlier volumes in the series...All the series are written by experts in the field, and their summaries are most timely...Strongly recommended."- G. HERZBERG in AMERICAN SCIENTIST

  4. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bederson, Benjamin

    1997-01-01

    Praise for the Series""This volume maintains the authoritative standards of the series...The editors and publishers are to be congratulated.""--M.S. Child in Physics Bulletin""Maintains the high standards of earlier volumes in the series...All the articles are written by experts in the field, and their summaries are most timely...Strongly recommended.""--G. Herzberg in American Scientist

  5. Benchmarking atomic physics models for magnetically confined fusion plasma physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In present magnetically confined fusion devices, high and intermediate Z impurities are either puffed into the plasma for divertor radiative cooling experiments or are sputtered from the high Z plasma facing armor. The beneficial cooling of the edge as well as the detrimental radiative losses from the core of these impurities can be properly understood only if the atomic physics used in the modeling of the cooling curves is very accurate. To this end, a comprehensive experimental and theoretical analysis of some relevant impurities is undertaken. Gases (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are puffed and nongases are introduced through laser ablation into the FTU tokamak plasma. The charge state distributions and total density of these impurities are determined from spatial scans of several photometrically calibrated vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectrographs (3 - 1600 Angstrom), the multiple ionization state transport code transport code (MIST) and a collisional radiative model. The radiative power losses are measured with bolometery, and the emissivity profiles were measured by a visible bremsstrahlung array. The ionization balance, excitation physics, and the radiative cooling curves are computed from the Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore atomic code (HULLAC) and are benchmarked by these experiments. (Supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER53214 at JHU and Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 at LLNL.) copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  6. Estimation of atomic interaction parameters by quantum measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Alexander Holm; Mølmer, Klaus

    Quantum systems, ranging from atomic systems to field modes and mechanical devices are useful precision probes for a variety of physical properties and phenomena. Measurements by which we extract information about the evolution of single quantum systems yield random results and cause a back action...... on the system. This back action may be favourable as it randomly quenches the system and triggers a transient evolution with temporal signal correlations which may depend more strongly than the steady state on the desired physical properties. To identify the quantitative performance of quantum...

  7. Atoms in Flight: The Remarkable Connections between Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-16

    Atomic physics and hadron physics are both based on Yang Mills gauge theory; in fact, quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics provide important insight into the theory of hadrons in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of light-front relativistic equations of motion which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The renormalization scale for the running coupling, which is unambiguously set in QED, leads to a method for setting the renormalization scale in QCD. The production of atoms in flight provides a method for computing the formation of hadrons at the amplitude level. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, and light-front quantization have equal utility for atomic physics, especially in the relativistic domain. I also present a new perspective for understanding the contributions to the cosmological constant from QED and QCD.

  8. The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-26

    Atomic physics and hadronic physics are both governed by the Yang Mills gauge theory Lagrangian; in fact, Abelian quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics can provide important insight into hadronic eigenstates in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of frame-independent light-front relativistic equations of motion consistent with light-front holography which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The production of antihydrogen in flight can provide important insight into the dynamics of hadron production in QCD at the amplitude level. The renormalization scale for the running coupling is unambiguously set in QED; an analogous procedure sets the renormalization scales in QCD, leading to scheme-independent scale-fixed predictions. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, the quark-interchange process and light-front quantization have important applicants for atomic physics and photon science, especially in the relativistic domain.

  9. An exacting transition probability measurement - a direct test of atomic many-body theories

    OpenAIRE

    Tarun Dutta; Debashis De Munshi; Dahyun Yum; Riadh Rebhi; Manas Mukherjee

    2016-01-01

    A new protocol for measuring the branching fraction of hydrogenic atoms with only statistically limited uncertainty is proposed and demonstrated for the decay of the P$_{3/2}$ level of the barium ion, with precision below $0.5\\%$. Heavy hydrogenic atoms like the barium ion are test beds for fundamental physics such as atomic parity violation and they also hold the key to understanding nucleo-synthesis in stars. To draw definitive conclusion about possible physics beyond the standard model by ...

  10. Opportunities for atomic physics with hard synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of third-generation synchrotron radiation facilities places atomic and molecular scientists at the threshold of extraordinary opportunities. Areas of potential interest for the APS in atomic physics are: (1) exploration of relativistic and QED effects which become prominent in inner shells and at high Z; (2) total photon interaction cross sections; (3) scattering; (4) fluorescence; (5) photo- and Auger-electron spectrometries; and (6) ion spectrometry. A special regime in which the APS will lend access to unprecedented exploration is atomic inner-shell phenomena

  11. Atomic physics with highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The past year has been a busy one for all three accelerators, the LINAC, EBIS and the tandem. The EBIS continues to deliver beams of highly charged ions around the clock for the study of low energy collisions with gases and surfaces. The electron beam energy has been upgraded to 10 keV, and intensities of highly charged species such as Xe44+ have been greatly increased. The tandem, the traditional source of highly charged Binary encounter electron production at zero degrees were studied for medium Z (Si,Cl,Cu) projectiles. Recoil momentum spectroscopy has been used to separate the contributions to collisional ionization of one-electron ions (C5+, O7+, F8+) from the nucleus and the electrons of a He target. Marked structure in the binary encounter electron spectra for Cuq+ on H2 targets has been measured for moderate velocity projectiles. Electron capture by slow multiply charged (EBIS) projectiles from laser excited targets has been carried out. Cross sections for capture from Na(3s) and Na*(3p) have been measured for velocities between 0.1 and 1 au. The extension of these experiments to laser excited Rydberg targets is proceeding. Electron capture cross sections and average Q values for Ar16+ on He at velocities between 0.23 and 1.67 au have been measured. The charge state distribution of the He recoils following large angle scattering of C4+ and C6+ ions at 7.5 keV/u has been measured. Cross sections have been measured for up to sextuple capture from C60 (buckminsterfullerene) by highly charged slow projectiles. Coupled channel calculations for double capture from He by slow multicharge ions have been carried out

  12. Gas lasers applied atomic collision physics, v.3

    CERN Document Server

    McDaniel, E W

    1982-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 3: Gas Lasers describes the applications of atomic collision physics in the development of many types of gas lasers. Topics covered range from negative ion formation in gas lasers to high-pressure ion kinetics and relaxation of molecules exchanging vibrational energy. Ion-ion recombination in high-pressure plasmas is also discussed, along with electron-ion recombination in gas lasers and collision processes in chemical lasers.Comprised of 14 chapters, this volume begins with a historical summary of gas laser developments and an overview of the basic ope

  13. Accurate abundance analysis of late-type stars: advances in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Barklem, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of stellar properties such as chemical compositions, masses and ages, through stellar spectra, is a fundamental problem in astrophysics. Progress in the understanding, calculation and measurement of atomic properties and processes relevant to the high-accuracy analysis of F-, G-, and K-type stellar spectra is reviewed, with particular emphasis on abundance analysis. This includes fundamental atomic data such as energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities, as well as processes of photoionisation, collisional broadening and inelastic collisions. A recurring theme throughout the review is the interplay between theoretical atomic physics, laboratory measurements, and astrophysical modelling, all of which contribute to our understanding of atoms and atomic processes, as well as to modelling stellar spectra.

  14. Studying Atomic Physics Using the Nighttime Atmosphere as a Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpee, B. D.; Slanger, T. G.; Huestis, D. L.; Cosby, P. C.

    2006-01-01

    A summary of our recent work using terrestrial nightglow spectra, obtained from astronomical instrumentation, to directly measure, or evaluate theoretical values for fundamental parameters of astrophysically important atomic lines.

  15. Benchmarking atomic physics models for magnetically confined fusion plasma physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Finkenthal, M.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stutman, D.; Moos, H. W.; Pacella, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Fournier, K.; Goldstein, W.; Gregory, B.

    1999-01-01

    In present magnetically confined fusion devices, high and intermediate Z impurities are either puffed into the plasma for divertor radiative cooling experiments or are sputtered from the high Z plasma facing armor. The beneficial cooling of the edge as well as the detrimental radiative losses from the core of these impurities can be properly understood only if the atomic physics used in the modeling of the cooling curves is very accurate. To this end, a comprehensive experimental and theoretical analysis of some relevant impurities is undertaken. Gases (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are puffed and nongases are introduced through laser ablation into the FTU tokamak plasma. The charge state distributions and total density of these impurities are determined from spatial scans of several photometrically calibrated vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectrographs (3-1600 Å), the multiple ionization state transport code transport code (MIST) and a collisional radiative model. The radiative power losses are measured with bolometery, and the emissivity profiles were measured by a visible bremsstrahlung array. The ionization balance, excitation physics, and the radiative cooling curves are computed from the Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore atomic code (HULLAC) and are benchmarked by these experiments. (Supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER53214 at JHU and Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 at LLNL.)

  16. Measurement of near neighbor separations of surface atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two techniques are being developed to measure the nearest neighbor distances of atoms at the surfaces of solids. Both measures extended fine structure in the excitation probability of core level electrons which are excited by an incident electron beam. This is an important problem because the structures of most surface systems are as yet unknown, even though the location of surface atoms is the basis for any quantitative understanding of the chemistry and physics of surfaces and interfaces. These methods would allow any laboratory to make in situ determinations of surface structure in conjunction with most other laboratory probes of surfaces. Each of these two techniques has different advantages; further, the combination of the two will increase confidence in the results by reducing systematic error in the data analysis

  17. [The physics of laser polarized muonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This past research period we carried out a successful experiment at LAMPF in collaboration with Syracuse University in which we used lasers to produce polarized muonic 3He. Samples of nuclear polarized 3He were produced by spin-exchange with optically pumped rubidium vapor. Unpolarized muons were stopped in the gas, and became polarized due to their hyperfine interaction with the 3He nucleus. We determined that a muon polarization of ∼8% results with a 3He target polarization of 100%. The high statistical accuracy of our result gives us a firm handle on a theoretical question of great importance to future work involving muons and polarized 3He. Currently, we are working toward a new experiment at LAMPF, for which we have just submitted a proposal requesting running time this coming summer. The experiment utilizes a new technique for producing polarized muonic 3He, a technique we believe has the potential for producing practical polarizations that in principle could be as high as 75%, and in practice may exceed 25--50%. We call this new technique direct spin-exchange (DSE) because it is based on spin-exchange collisions between neutral muonic helium and an optically pumped vapor of Rb. It is direct because, in contrast to the technique we used last summer, the 3He nucleus is not involved in the spin-exchange process. We have proposed the use of DSE to study the induced pseudoscalar form factor of 3He. Finally, we describe an experiment to measure the spin dependent structure function of the neutron at SLAC. Princeton played an important role in the design and proposal of this experiment, including hosting a meeting to explore the technical feasibility of the polarized 3He target

  18. Theoretical Femtosecond Physics Atoms and Molecules in Strong Laser Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical femtosecond physics is a new field of research. Theoretical investigations of atoms and molecules interacting with pulsed or continuous wave lasers of up to atomic field strengths are leading to an understanding of many challenging experimental discoveries. Laser-matter interaction is treated on a nonperturbative level in the book using approximate and numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The light field is treated classically. Physical phenomena, ranging from ionization of atoms to the ionization and dissociation of molecules and the control of chemical reactions are presented and discussed. Theoretical background for experiments with strong and short laser pulses is given. Several exercises are included in the main text. Some detailed calculations are performed in the appendices.

  19. ATOMIC PHYSICS, AN AUTOINSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM, VOLUME 4, SUPPLEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DETERLINE, WILLIAM A.; KLAUS, DAVID J.

    THE AUTOINSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS IN THIS TEXT WERE PREPARED FOR USE IN AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY, OFFERING SELF-TUTORING MATERIAL FOR LEARNING ATOMIC PHYSICS. THE TOPICS COVERED ARE (1) RADIATION USES AND NUCLEAR FISSION, (2) NUCLEAR REACTORS, (3) ENERGY FROM NUCLEAR REACTORS, (4) NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND FUSION, (5) A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW, AND (6) A…

  20. Atomic Quadrupole Moment Measurement Using Dynamic Decoupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaniv, R; Akerman, N; Ozeri, R

    2016-04-01

    We present a method that uses dynamic decoupling of a multilevel quantum probe to distinguish small frequency shifts that depend on m_{j}^{2}, where m_{j}^{2} is the angular momentum of level |j⟩ along the quantization axis, from large noisy shifts that are linear in m_{j}, such as those due to magnetic field noise. Using this method we measured the electric-quadrupole moment of the 4D_{5/2} level in ^{88}Sr^{+} to be 2.973_{-0.033}^{+0.026}ea_{0}^{2}. Our measurement improves the uncertainty of this value by an order of magnitude and thus helps mitigate an important systematic uncertainty in ^{88}Sr^{+} based optical atomic clocks and verifies complicated many-body quantum calculations.

  1. Future atomic physics researches at HIRFL-CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new storage ring system, HIRFL-CSR, is now in construction in the National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Research Facility of Lanzhou, China. The new facility consists of a main ring (CSRm) and an experimental ring (CSRe). With the flexibility of the production and the investigation of highly charged ions and radioactive ion beams the new HIRFL-CSR facility will make many frontier atomic physics researches possible in near future. The future physics researches at the HIRFL-CSR are now under consideration. In this paper an overview of the HIRFL-CSR project is given, and the main atomic physics programs to be carried at the HIRFL-CSR are presented. (orig.)

  2. Do atoms and anti-atoms obey the same laws of physics?

    CERN Multimedia

    Jeffrey Hangst

    2010-01-01

    ALPHA physicists have recently succeeded in trapping anti-atoms for the first time. Being able to hold on to the simplest atoms of antimatter is an important step towards the collaboration’s ultimate goal: precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen. The question they are seeking to answer: do atoms and anti-atoms obey the same laws of physics? The Standard Model says that they must.   The ALPHA Collaboration celebrates the successful results. The ALPHA collaboration has taken it up a gear and trapped 38 atoms of antihydrogen for the first time. Antihydrogen atoms have been mass-produced at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) since 2002, when ATHENA (ALPHA’s predecessor) and ATRAP learned how to mix clouds of antiprotons and positrons at cryogenic temperatures. However, these anti-atoms were not confined, and flew off in a few microseconds to meet their fate: annihilation with matter in the walls of the experiment. ALPHA uses antiprotons produced at...

  3. Atoms, molecules, and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons, spectroscopy and scattering physics; Atome, Molekuele und optische Physik 2. Molekuele und Photonen, Spektroskopie und Streuphysik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, C.P. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    These textbooks apply first of all to graduate students of physics and physical chemistry until the promotion. They want to a certain degree mediate the canonical knowledge of atomic and molecular physics and introduce to foundations of modern optica and quantum optics. In many selected partial fields they lead (together with a planned third volume) up to the actual status of research. So also the active scientist is addressed. By clearly structurated chapters the reader is - starting from the foundations of quantum physics, stepwise made familiar with the most important phenomena, models, and measuring methods. Thereby the focus lies on the experiment and its interpretation - the necessary theory is introduced from this point of view compactly and occasionally also something laxly. The first part is concentrated to the structure of the atoms and an introduction in modern methods of spectroscopy. In the present second part it deals with the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy as well as with scattering physics, which treats - complementarly to the bound molecular states - the continuum. Finally selected chapters of laser physics, modern optics, and quantum optics are treated. Thereby atomic, molecular, and optical physics is proved as a undiminishedly alive, highly productive branch of modern physics. It provides simultaneously for many further partial fields of physics and other natural-scientific disciplines indispensable foundations. [German] Diese Lehrbuecher wenden sich in erster Linie an fortgeschrittene Studierende der Physik und der Physikalischen Chemie bis hin zur Promotion. Sie wollen gewissermassen das kanonische Wissen der Atom- und Molekuelphysik vermitteln und in Grundlagen der modernen Optik und Quantenoptik einfuehren. In vielen ausgewaehlten Teilgebieten fuehren sie (zusammen mit einem geplanten dritten Band) bis hin zum aktuellen Stand der Forschung. So wird auch der aktive Wissenschaftler angesprochen. Durch klar strukturierte Kapitel

  4. Introducing many-body physics using atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Krebs, Dietrich; Santra, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Atoms constitute relatively simple many-body systems, making them suitable objects for developing an understanding of basic aspects of many-body physics. Photoabsorption spectroscopy is a prominent method to study the electronic structure of atoms and the inherent many-body interactions. In this article the impact of many-body effects on well-known spectroscopic features such as Rydberg series, Fano resonances, Cooper minima, and giant resonances is studied, and related many-body phenomena in other fields are outlined. To calculate photoabsorption cross sections the time-dependent configuration interaction singles (TDCIS) model is employed. The conceptual clearness of TDCIS in combination with the compactness of atomic systems allows for a pedagogical introduction to many-body phenomena.

  5. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  6. Theoretical atomic physics code development I: CATS: Cowan Atomic Structure Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adaptation of R.D. Cowan's Atomic Structure program, CATS, has been developed as part of the Theoretical Atomic Physics (TAPS) code development effort at Los Alamos. CATS has been designed to be easy to run and to produce data files that can interface with other programs easily. The CATS produced data files currently include wave functions, energy levels, oscillator strengths, plane-wave-Born electron-ion collision strengths, photoionization cross sections, and a variety of other quantities. This paper describes the use of CATS. 10 refs

  7. Atomic and molecular physics at INDUS-1: plans and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will give a brief description of the INDUS-1 source, details of the proposed beam lines, the present status of the beam lines and atomic and molecular physics experiments planned to be carried out on these beam lines. It will also include some of the future plans for utilisation of INDUS-1 and INDUS-2, a higher energy (2 GeV) machine

  8. Atomic physics experiments with trapped and cooled highly charged ions

    OpenAIRE

    Kluge, H.-J.; Quint, W; Winters, D. F. A

    2007-01-01

    Trapping and cooling techniques have become very important for many fundamental experiments in atomic physics. When applied to highly charged ions confined in Penning traps, these procedures are very effective for testing quantum electrodynamics in extreme electromagnetic fields produced by heavy highly charged ions such as uranium U$^{91+}$. In addition, fundamental constants or nuclear ground state properties can be determined with high accuracy in these simple systems. Finally, by studying...

  9. Physical, Atomic and Thermal Properties of Biofield Treated Lithium Powder

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Lithium has gained extensive attention in medical science due to mood stabilizing activity. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of biofield treatment on physical, atomic, and thermal properties of lithium powder. The lithium powder was divided into two parts i.e., control and treatment. Control part was remained as untreated and treatment part received Mr. Trivedi’s biofield treatment. Subsequently, control and treated lithium powder samples were characterized ...

  10. Theoretical femtosecond physics atoms and molecules in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of atoms and molecules interacting with pulsed or continuous wave lasers up to atomic field strengths on the order of 10^16 W/cm² are leading to an understanding of many challenging experimental discoveries. This book deals with the basics of femtosecond physics and goes up to the latest applications of new phenomena. The book presents an introduction to laser physics with mode-locking and pulsed laser operation. The solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is discussed both analytically and numerically. The basis for the non-perturbative treatment of laser-matter interaction in the book is the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The light field is treated classically, and different possible gauges are discussed. Physical phenonema, ranging from Rabi-oscillations in two-level systems to the ionization of atoms, the generation of high harmonics, the ionization and dissociation of molecules as well as the control of chemical reactions are pre...

  11. Moscow State University physics alumni and the Soviet Atomic Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, two closely related themes are addressed: (1) the role that M V Lomonosov Moscow State University (MSU) played in training specialists in physics for the Soviet Atomic Project, and (2) what its alumni contributed to the development of thermonuclear weapons. In its earlier stages, the Soviet Atomic Project was in acute need of qualified personnel, without whom building nuclear and thermonuclear weapons would be an impossible task, and MSU became a key higher educational institution grappled with the training problem. The first part of the paper discusses the efforts of the leading Soviet scientists and leaders of FMD (First Main Directorate) to organize the training of specialists in nuclear physics at the MSU Physics Department and, on the other hand, to create a new Physics and Technology Department at the university. As a result, a number of Soviet Government's resolutions were prepared and issued, part of which are presented in the paper and give an idea of the large-scale challenges this sphere of education was facing at the time. Information is presented for the first time on the early MSU Physics Department graduates in the structure of matter, being employed in the FMD organizations and enterprises from 1948 to 1951. The second part discusses the contribution to the development of thermonuclear weapons by the teams of scientists led by Academicians I E Tamm, A N Tikhonov, and I M Frank, and including MSU physics alumni. The paper will be useful to anyone interested in the history of Russian physics. (from the history of physics)

  12. Impact of Planetary Gravitation on High Precision Neutral Atom Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharek, H.; Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Moebius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Park, J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Bzowski, M.; Schwadron, N.; McComas, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) have been extremely successful in providing very important information on physical processes inside and outside our heliosphere. For instance, recent IBEX observations provided new insights into the local interstellar environment and improved measurements of the interstellar He temperature, velocity, and direction of the interstellar flow vector. Since particle collisions are rare and radiation pressure is negligible for these neutrals, gravitational forces mainly determine the trajectories of neutral He atoms. Depending on the distance of an ENA to the source of a gravitational field and its relative speed and direction this can result in a significant deflection and acceleration. In this presentation we study the impact of the gravitational effects of the Earth, Moon, and Jupiter on ENA measurements performed in Earth orbit. We show that planetary gravitational effects do not significantly affect the interstellar neutral gas parameters obtained from IBEX observations. We further study the possibility whether the He focusing cone of the Sun or Jupiter could be measured by IBEX, and whether these cones could be used as an independent measure of the interstellar He temperature. These topics are of particular importance for future missions such as IMAP, which will provide ENA images for a broader energy range and with better sensitivity and resolution.

  13. Initial physics measurements on FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial criticality of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was achieved on February 9, 1980 at 3:45 p.m. During the period November 27, 1979 to March 8, 1980, fuel was loaded into the FFTF core, initial criticality was achieved, and several subcritical physics measurements were performed. The data obtained from initial FFTF nuclear operation are presented. Specifically, the absolute and relative neutron count rates were predicted for the bulk of the seventy-three fuel loadings of FFTF. Agreement between predicted and observed values is illustrated. Severe variations of fission chamber detection efficiency in the reactor shield is contrasted with that near the core center. Control rod worths, measured by the rod drop inverse kinetics method, are compared with predictions based upon Engineering Mockup Critical (EMC) evaluations. Control rod reactivity worth curves measured by rod run-in inverse kinetics are given

  14. Interaction-Free Measurements, Atom Localisation and Complementarity

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Anders; Bjork, Gunnar; Forsberg, Erik

    1997-01-01

    We analyse interaction-free measurements on classical and quantum objects. We show the transition from a classical interaction free measurement to a quantum non-demolition measurement of atom number, and discuss the mechanism of the enforcement of complementarity in atom interferometric interaction-free measurements.

  15. Influence of selective atomic measurement on the entanglement properties of a two-atom outside cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Dao-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Considering three two-level atoms initially in the W or Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state, one of the three atoms is put into an initially coherent light cavity and made to resonantly interact with the cavity. The two-atom entanglement evolution outside the cavity is investigated. The influences of state-selective measurement of the atom inside the cavity and strength of the light field on the two-atom entanglement evolution outside the cavity are discussed. The results obtained from the numerical method show that the two-atom entanglement outside the cavity is strengthened through state-selective measurement of the atom inside the cavity. In addition, the strength of the light field also influences the two-atom entanglement properties.

  16. Measurement theory in local quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Kazuya, E-mail: okamura@math.cm.is.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Ozawa, Masanao, E-mail: ozawa@is.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we aim to establish foundations of measurement theory in local quantum physics. For this purpose, we discuss a representation theory of completely positive (CP) instruments on arbitrary von Neumann algebras. We introduce a condition called the normal extension property (NEP) and establish a one-to-one correspondence between CP instruments with the NEP and statistical equivalence classes of measuring processes. We show that every CP instrument on an atomic von Neumann algebra has the NEP, extending the well-known result for type I factors. Moreover, we show that every CP instrument on an injective von Neumann algebra is approximated by CP instruments with the NEP. The concept of posterior states is also discussed to show that the NEP is equivalent to the existence of a strongly measurable family of posterior states for every normal state. Two examples of CP instruments without the NEP are obtained from this result. It is thus concluded that in local quantum physics not every CP instrument represents a measuring process, but in most of physically relevant cases every CP instrument can be realized by a measuring process within arbitrary error limits, as every approximately finite dimensional von Neumann algebra on a separable Hilbert space is injective. To conclude the paper, the concept of local measurement in algebraic quantum field theory is examined in our framework. In the setting of the Doplicher-Haag-Roberts and Doplicher-Roberts theory describing local excitations, we show that an instrument on a local algebra can be extended to a local instrument on the global algebra if and only if it is a CP instrument with the NEP, provided that the split property holds for the net of local algebras.

  17. Possible future experiments in atomic physics utilizing synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survey is limited to processes in which a single photon is absorbed and either photon attenuation is measured or the end products following absorption are detected. Furthermore, only interactions with free atoms (or positive ions) in their ground states are considered

  18. Cold atom interferometers and their applications in precision measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin WANG; Lin ZHO; Run-bing LI; Min LIU; Ming-sheng ZHAN

    2009-01-01

    Experimental realization of cold 85Rb atom interferometers and their applications in precision meademonstrated: Detailed descriptions of the interferometers are given including manipulation of cold atoms, Rabi oscillation, stimulated Raman transitions, and optical pumping. As an example of using atom interferometers in precision measurements, the quadratic Zeeman shift of hyperfine sublevels of 85Rb was determined.

  19. Atomic physics at the Advanced Photon Source: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first Workshop on Atomic Physics at the Advanced Photon Source was held at Argonne National Laboratory on March 29--30, 1990. The unprecedented brightness of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the hard X-ray region is expected to make possible a vast array of new research opportunities for the atomic-physics community. Starting with discussions of the history and current status of the field, presentations were made on various future directions for research with hard X-rays interacting with atoms, ions, clusters, and solids. Also important were the discussions on the design and status of the four next-generation rings coming on line during the 1990's: the ALS 1.6 GeV ring at Berkeley; the ESRF 6.0-GeV ring at Grenoble (1993); the APS 7.0-GeV ring at Argonne (1995); and the SPring-8 8.0-GeV ring in Japan (1998). The participation of more than one hundred scientists from domestic as well as foreign institutions demonstrated a strong interest in this field. We plan to organize follow-up workshops in the future emphasizing specific research topics

  20. Remote atomic information concentration without Bell-state measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Zhen-Zhen; Fang Mao-Fa

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme for information concentration of two remote two-level atoms in cavity QED. This scheme does not involve the Bell-state measurement. During the interaction between atom and cavity, the cavity frequency is large-detuned from the atomic transition frequency, thus the scheme is insensitive to both the cavity decay and the thermal field. This idea can directly be generalized in the case of multi-atom information concentration.

  1. Magnetic measurements with atomic-plane resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusz, Ján; Muto, Shunsuke; Spiegelberg, Jakob; Adam, Roman; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Bürgler, Daniel E.; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of magnetic nanotechnologies calls for experimental techniques capable of providing magnetic information with subnanometre spatial resolution. Available probes of magnetism either detect only surface properties, such as spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy, magnetic force microscopy or spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, or they are bulk probes with limited spatial resolution or quantitativeness, such as X-ray magnetic circular dichroism or classical electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD). Atomic resolution EMCD methods have been proposed, although not yet experimentally realized. Here, we demonstrate an EMCD technique with an atomic size electron probe utilizing a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope in its standard operation mode. The crucial element of the method is a ramp in the phase of the electron beam wavefunction, introduced by a controlled beam displacement. We detect EMCD signals with atomic-plane resolution, thereby bringing near-atomic resolution magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy to hundreds of laboratories worldwide. PMID:27578421

  2. Magnetic measurements with atomic-plane resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusz, Ján; Muto, Shunsuke; Spiegelberg, Jakob; Adam, Roman; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Bürgler, Daniel E; Oppeneer, Peter M; Schneider, Claus M

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of magnetic nanotechnologies calls for experimental techniques capable of providing magnetic information with subnanometre spatial resolution. Available probes of magnetism either detect only surface properties, such as spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy, magnetic force microscopy or spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, or they are bulk probes with limited spatial resolution or quantitativeness, such as X-ray magnetic circular dichroism or classical electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD). Atomic resolution EMCD methods have been proposed, although not yet experimentally realized. Here, we demonstrate an EMCD technique with an atomic size electron probe utilizing a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope in its standard operation mode. The crucial element of the method is a ramp in the phase of the electron beam wavefunction, introduced by a controlled beam displacement. We detect EMCD signals with atomic-plane resolution, thereby bringing near-atomic resolution magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy to hundreds of laboratories worldwide. PMID:27578421

  3. Analysis of polarizability measurements made with atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gregoire, Maxwell D; Trubko, Raisa; Cronin, Alexander D

    2016-01-01

    We present revised measurements of the static electric dipole polarizabilities of K, Rb, and Cs based on atom interferometer experiments presented in [Phys. Rev. A 2015, 92, 052513] but now re-analyzed with new calibrations for the magnitude and geometry of the applied electric field gradient. The resulting polarizability values did not change, but the uncertainties were significantly reduced. Then we interpret several measurements of alkali metal atomic polarizabilities in terms of atomic oscillator strengths $f_{ik}$, Einstein coefficients $A_{ik}$, state lifetimes $\\tau_{k}$, transition dipole matrix elements $D_{ik}$, line strengths $S_{ik}$, and van der Waals $C_6$ coefficients. Finally, we combine atom interferometer measurements of polarizabilities with independent measurements of lifetimes and $C_6$ values in order to quantify the residual contribution to polarizability due to all atomic transitions other than the principal $ns$-$np_J$ transitions for alkali metal atoms.

  4. Analysis of Polarizability Measurements Made with Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell D. Gregoire

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present revised measurements of the static electric dipole polarizabilities of K, Rb, and Cs based on atom interferometer experiments presented in [Phys. Rev. A 2015, 92, 052513] but now re-analyzed with new calibrations for the magnitude and geometry of the applied electric field gradient. The resulting polarizability values did not change, but the uncertainties were significantly reduced. Then, we interpret several measurements of alkali metal atomic polarizabilities in terms of atomic oscillator strengths fik, Einstein coefficients Aik, state lifetimes τk, transition dipole matrix elements Dik, line strengths Sik, and van der Waals C6 coefficients. Finally, we combine atom interferometer measurements of polarizabilities with independent measurements of lifetimes and C6 values in order to quantify the residual contribution to polarizability due to all atomic transitions other than the principal ns-npJ transitions for alkali metal atoms.

  5. Analysis of polarizability measurements made with atom interferometry

    OpenAIRE

    Gregoire, Maxwell D.; Brooks, Nathan; Trubko, Raisa; Cronin, Alexander D

    2016-01-01

    We present revised measurements of the static electric dipole polarizabilities of K, Rb, and Cs based on atom interferometer experiments presented in [Phys. Rev. A 2015, 92, 052513] but now re-analyzed with new calibrations for the magnitude and geometry of the applied electric field gradient. The resulting polarizability values did not change, but the uncertainties were significantly reduced. Then we interpret several measurements of alkali metal atomic polarizabilities in terms of atomic os...

  6. Recent advances in Rydberg physics using alkaline-earth atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, F. B.; Killian, T. C.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this brief review, the opportunities that the alkaline-earth elements offer for studying new aspects of Rydberg physics are discussed. For example, the bosonic alkaline-earth isotopes have zero nuclear spin which eliminates many of the complexities present in alkali Rydberg atoms, permitting simpler and more direct comparison between theory and experiment. The presence of two valence electrons allows the production of singlet and triplet Rydberg states that can exhibit a variety of attractive or repulsive interactions. The availability of weak intercombination lines is advantageous for laser cooling and for applications such as Rydberg dressing. Excitation of one electron to a Rydberg state leaves behind an optically active core ion allowing, for high-L states, the optical imaging of Rydberg atoms and their (spatial) manipulation using light scattering. The second valence electron offers the possibility of engineering long-lived doubly excited states such as planetary atoms. Recent advances in both theory and experiment are highlighted together with a number of possible directions for the future.

  7. Problems with Accurate Atomic Lfetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabert, E

    2009-02-19

    A number of recent atomic lifetime measurements on multiply charged ions have reported uncertainties lower than 1%. Such a level of accuracy challenges theory, which is a good thing. However, a few lessons learned from earlier precision lifetime measurements on atoms and singly charged ions suggest to remain cautious about the systematic errors of experimental techniques.

  8. Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics Workshop Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Jr., Lloyd [University of Southern California

    1997-09-21

    This document contains the final reports from the five panels that comprised a Workshop held to explore future directions, scientific impacts and technological connections of research in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics. This workshop was sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division and was held at the Westfields International Conference Center in Chantilly, Virginia on September 21-24, 1997. The workshop was chaired by Lloyd Armstrong, Jr., University of Southern California and the five panels focused on the following topics: Panel A: Interactions of Atoms and Molecules with Photons - Low Field Daniel Kleppner (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), chair Panel B: Interactions of Atoms and Molecules with Photons - High Field Phil Bucksbaum (University of Michigan), chair Panel C: Surface Interactions with Photons, Electrons, Ions, Atoms and Molecules J. Wayne Rabalais (University of Houston), chair Panel D: Theory of Structure and Dynamics Chris Greene (University of Colorado), chair Panel E: Nano- and Mesocopic Structures Paul Alivisatos (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory), chair The choice of focus areas reflects areas of significant interest to DOE/BES but is clearly not intended to span all fields encompassed by the designation of atomic, molecular and optical physics, nor even all areas that would be considered for review and funding under DOE’s AMOP program. In a similar vein, not all research that might be suggested under these topics in this report would be appropriate for consideration by DOE’s AMOP program. The workshop format included overview presentations from each of the panel chairs, followed by an intensive series of panel discussion sessions held over a two-day period. The panels were comprised of scientists from the U. S. and abroad, many of whom are not supported by DOE’s AMOP Program. This workshop was held in lieu of the customary “Contractors Meeting” held annually for

  9. Atomic physics studies of highly charged ions on tokamaks using x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is given of atomic physics issues which have been studied on tokamaks with the help resolution x-ray spectroscopy. The issues include the testing of model calculations predicting the excitation of line radiation, the determination of rate coefficients, and accurate atomic structure measurements. Recent research has focussed primarily on highly charged heliumlike (22 ≤ Z ≤ 28) and neonlike (34 ≤ Z ≤ 63) ions, and results are presented from measurements on the PLT and TFTR tokamaks. Many of the measurements have been aided by improved instrumental design and new measuring techniques. Remarkable agreement has been found between measurements and theory in most cases. However, in this review those areas are stressed where agreement is worst and where further investigations are needed. 19 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Davisson-Germer Prize in Atomic or Surface Physics Lecture: Exploring Flatland with Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalibard, Jean

    2012-06-01

    A two-dimensional Bose fluid is a remarkably rich many-body system, which allows one to revisit several features of quantum statistical physics. Firstly, the role of thermal fluctuations is enhanced compared to the 3D case, which destroys the ordered state associated with Bose-Einstein condensation. However interactions between particles can still cause a superfluid transition, thanks to the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless mechanism. Secondly, a weakly interacting Bose fluid in 2D must be scale-invariant, a remarkable feature that manifests itself in the very simple form taken by the equation of state of the fluid. In this talk I will present recent experimental progress in the investigation of 2D atomic gases, which provide a nice illustration of the main features of low dimensional many-body physics.

  11. Prospects for Precise Measurements with Echo Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brynle Barrett

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Echo atom interferometers have emerged as interesting alternatives to Raman interferometers for the realization of precise measurements of the gravitational acceleration g and the determination of the atomic fine structure through measurements of the atomic recoil frequency ω q . Here we review the development of different configurations of echo interferometers that are best suited to achieve these goals. We describe experiments that utilize near-resonant excitation of laser-cooled rubidium atoms by a sequence of standing wave pulses to measure ω q with a statistical uncertainty of 37 parts per billion (ppb on a time scale of ∼50 ms and g with a statistical precision of 75 ppb. Related coherent transient techniques that have achieved the most statistically precise measurements of atomic g-factor ratios are also outlined. We discuss the reduction of prominent systematic effects in these experiments using off-resonant excitation by low-cost, high-power lasers.

  12. Prospects for Precise Measurements with Echo Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Brynle; Beica, Hermina C; Vorozcovs, Andrejs; Pouliot, Alexander; Kumarakrishnan, A

    2016-01-01

    Echo atom interferometers have emerged as interesting alternatives to Raman interferometers for the realization of precise measurements of the gravitational acceleration $g$ and the determination of the atomic fine structure through measurements of the atomic recoil frequency $\\omega_q$. Here we review the development of different configurations of echo interferometers that are best suited to achieve these goals. We describe experiments that utilize near-resonant excitation of laser-cooled rubidium atoms by a sequence of standing wave pulses to measure $\\omega_q$ with a statistical uncertainty of 37 parts per billion (ppb) on a time scale of $\\sim 50$ ms and $g$ with a statistical precision of 75 ppb. Related coherent transient techniques that have achieved the most statistically precise measurements of atomic g-factor ratios are also outlined. We discuss the reduction of prominent systematic effects in these experiments using off-resonant excitation by low-cost, high-power lasers.

  13. Construction and characterization of external cavity diode lasers for atomic physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Kyle S; Bennetts, Shayne; Debs, John E; Kuhn, Carlos C N; McDonald, Gordon D; Robins, Nick

    2014-04-24

    Since their development in the late 1980s, cheap, reliable external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) have replaced complex and expensive traditional dye and Titanium Sapphire lasers as the workhorse laser of atomic physics labs. Their versatility and prolific use throughout atomic physics in applications such as absorption spectroscopy and laser cooling makes it imperative for incoming students to gain a firm practical understanding of these lasers. This publication builds upon the seminal work by Wieman, updating components, and providing a video tutorial. The setup, frequency locking and performance characterization of an ECDL will be described. Discussion of component selection and proper mounting of both diodes and gratings, the factors affecting mode selection within the cavity, proper alignment for optimal external feedback, optics setup for coarse and fine frequency sensitive measurements, a brief overview of laser locking techniques, and laser linewidth measurements are included.

  14. High-performance laser power feedback control system for cold atom physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Lu; Thibault Vogt; Xinxing Liu; Xiaoji Zhou; Xuzong Chen

    2011-01-01

    @@ A laser power feedback control system that features fast response,large-scale performance,low noise,and excellent stability is presented.Some essential points used for optimization are described.Primary optical lattice experiments are given as examples to show the performance of this system.With these performance characteristics,the power control system is useful for applications in cold atom physics and precision measurements.%A laser power feedback control system that features fast response, large-scale performance, low noise, and excellent stability is presented. Some essential points used for optimization are described. Primary optical lattice experiments are given as examples to show the performance of this system. With these performance characteristics, the power control system is useful for applications in cold atom physics and precision measurements.

  15. In Pursuit of Highly Accurate Atomic Lifetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabert, E

    2009-06-01

    Accurate atomic lifetime data are useful for terrestrial and astrophysical plasma diagnostics. At accuracies higher than those required for these applications, lifetime measurements test atomic structure theory in ways complementary to spectroscopic energy determinations. At the highest level of accuracy, the question arises whether such tests reach the limits of modern theory, a combination of quantum mechanics and QED, adn possibly point to physics beyond the Standard Model. If high-precision atomic lifetime measurements, especially on multiply charged ions, have not quite reached this high accuracy yet, then what is necessary to attain this goal?

  16. Measuring the quantum statistics of an atom laser beam

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, A. S.; Olsen, M. K.; Haine, S. A.; Hope, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    We propose and analyse a scheme for measuring the quadrature statistics of an atom laser beam using extant optical homodyning and Raman atom laser techniques. Reversal of the normal Raman atom laser outcoupling scheme is used to map the quantum statistics of an incoupled beam to an optical probe beam. A multimode model of the spatial propagation dynamics shows that the Raman incoupler gives a clear signal of de Broglie wave quadrature squeezing for both pulsed and continuous inputs. Finally, ...

  17. Atomic and molecular physics in the gas phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toburen, L.H.

    1990-09-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of energy deposition by high-linear-energy-transfer radiation play an important role in the subsequent chemical and biological processes leading to radiation damage. Because the spatial structures of energy deposition events are of the same dimensions as molecular structures in the mammalian cell, direct measurements of energy deposition distributions appropriate to radiation biology are infeasible. This has led to the development of models of energy transport based on a knowledge of atomic and molecular interactions process that enable one to simulate energy transfer on an atomic scale. Such models require a detailed understanding of the interactions of ions and electrons with biologically relevant material. During the past 20 years there has been a great deal of progress in our understanding of these interactions; much of it coming from studies in the gas phase. These studies provide information on the systematics of interaction cross sections leading to a knowledge of the regions of energy deposition where molecular and phase effects are important and that guide developments in appropriate theory. In this report studies of the doubly differential cross sections, crucial to the development of stochastic energy deposition calculations and track structure simulation, will be reviewed. Areas of understanding are discussed and directions for future work addressed. Particular attention is given to experimental and theoretical findings that have changed the traditional view of secondary electron production for charged particle interactions with atomic and molecular targets.

  18. I.I. Rabi Prize in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics Talk: Novel Quantum Physics in Few- and Many-body Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Cheng

    2011-05-01

    Recent cold atom researches are reaching out far beyond the realm that was conventionally viewed as atomic physics. Many long standing issues in other physics disciplines or in Gedanken-experiments are nowadays common targets of cold atom physicists. Two prominent examples will be discussed in this talk: BEC-BCS crossover and Efimov physics. Here, cold atoms are employed to emulate electrons in superconductors, and nucleons in nuclear reactions, respectively. The ability to emulate exotic or thought systems using cold atoms stems from the precisely determined, simple, and tunable interaction properties of cold atoms. New experimental tools have also been devised toward an ultimate goal: a complete control and a complete characterization of a few- or many-body quantum system. We are tantalizingly close to this major milestone, and will soon open new venues to explore new quantum phenomena that may (or may not!) exist in scientists' dreams.

  19. Atomic Physics in the Quest for Fusion Energy and ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles H. Skinner

    2008-02-27

    The urgent quest for new energy sources has led developed countries, representing over half of the world population, to collaborate on demonstrating the scientific and technological feasibility of magnetic fusion through the construction and operation of ITER. Data on high-Z ions will be important in this quest. Tungsten plasma facing components have the necessary low erosion rates and low tritium retention but the high radiative efficiency of tungsten ions leads to stringent restrictions on the concentration of tungsten ions in the burning plasma. The influx of tungsten to the burning plasma will need to be diagnosed, understood and stringently controlled. Expanded knowledge of the atomic physics of neutral and ionized tungsten will be important to monitor impurity influxes and derive tungsten concentrations. Also, inert gases such as argon and xenon will be used to dissipate the heat flux flowing to the divertor. This article will summarize the spectroscopic diagnostics planned for ITER and outline areas where additional data is needed.

  20. Atomic physics experiments with trapped and cooled highly charged ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, H -J; Winters, D F A

    2007-01-01

    Trapping and cooling techniques have become very important for many fundamental experiments in atomic physics. When applied to highly charged ions confined in Penning traps, these procedures are very effective for testing quantum electrodynamics in extreme electromagnetic fields produced by heavy highly charged ions such as uranium U$^{91+}$. In addition, fundamental constants or nuclear ground state properties can be determined with high accuracy in these simple systems. Finally, by studying a single trapped radioactive ion, its nuclear decay can be studied in detail by observing the disappearance of the signal of the mother and the appearance of that of the daughter isotope. Such experiments on highly charged ions at extremely low energy will become possible by the HITRAP facility which is currently being built up at GSI. Also the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will be briefly described which is expected to be operational by 2014.

  1. Probing non-Hermitian physics with flying atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jianming; Xiao, Yanhong; Peng, Peng; Cao, Wanxia; Shen, Ce; Qu, Weizhi; Jiang, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Non-Hermtian optical systems with parity-time (PT) symmetry provide new means for light manipulation and control. To date, most of experimental demonstrations on PT symmetry rely on advanced nanotechnologies and sophisticated fabrication techniques to manmade solid-state materials. Here, we report the first experimental realization of optical anti-PT symmetry, a counterpart of conventional PT symmetry, in a warm atomic-vapor cell. By exploiting rapid coherence transport via flying atoms, we observe essential features of anti-PT symmetry with an unprecedented precision on phase-transition threshold. Moreover, our system allows nonlocal interference of two spatially-separated fields as well as anti-PT assisted four-wave mixing. Besides, another intriguing feature offered by the system is refractionless (or unit-refraction) light propagation. Our results thus represent a significant advance in non-Hermitian physics by bridging a firm connection with the AMO field, where novel phenomena and applications in quantum and nonlinear optics aided by (anti-)PT symmetry can be anticipated.

  2. Nuclear effects in atomic and solid state physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, Nikolay

    2015-04-15

    Various nuclear effects in atomic systems and in a particular type of solids, namely, in unconventional superconductors, are investigated. The first process considered, internal pair conversion in heavy ions, can play an important role in numerous scattering processes to be examined at existing or upcoming high-energy heavy-ion-accelerator facilities. The rate of nuclear excitation and thus the number of created pairs is found here to be strongly increased by ion planar channeling through a crystal. The time-reversed process of pair conversion, nuclear excitation by resonant positron annihilation, provides an alternative mechanism of positron-matter interaction and constitutes a state-selective way to excite nuclei which is complementary to photo- and Coulomb excitation. Furthermore, weak-interaction effects are examined in the context of parity violation in unconventional p-wave superconductors. We suggest schemes to efficiently enhance the effect and to enable its future experimental study. The considered effects represent new phenomena at the interface of atomic and nuclear physics and quantum electrodynamics, and provide effective ways to investigate fundamental interactions.

  3. Measurement of the Gravity-Field Curvature by Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rosi, G; Sorrentino, F; Menchetti, M; Prevedelli, M; Tino, G M

    2015-01-01

    We present the first direct measurement of the gravity-field curvature based on three conjugated atom interferometers. Three atomic clouds launched in the vertical direction are simultaneously interrogated by the same atom interferometry sequence and used to probe the gravity field at three equally spaced positions. The vertical component of the gravity-field curvature generated by nearby source masses is measured from the difference between adjacent gravity gradient values. Curvature measurements are of interest in geodesy studies and for the validation of gravitational models of the surrounding environment. The possibility of using such a scheme for a new determination of the Newtonian constant of gravity is also discussed.

  4. Lifetime Measurement of Cold Atoms in an Integrating Sphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Zhuo; WANG Xu-Cheng; CHENG Hua-Dong; XIAO Ling; LIU Liang; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental measurement of the lifetime of the cold 87Rb atoms in an integrating sphere.The atoms are cooled by the diffuse light which is generated by the diffuse reflection of laser beams in the integrating sphere.Our result shows that the lifetime is primarily determined by the free fall of the cold 87Rb atoms,and its half-life can reach 40 ms,which is suitable for many experiments,especially for a cold atom clock.

  5. ATTITUDES TOWARD PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND ITS MEASUREMENT

    OpenAIRE

    VISHNU PETHKAR; SHRADDHA NAIK; SANJEEV SONAWANE

    2010-01-01

    This paper is based on the fact, experience and concerns of many physical educators & teachers about the severe decline in levels of physical activity and the ways in which, incorporation & teaching of physical activity is carried out. This paper deals with the theoretical psychological basis of physical activity andinterventions carried out in measurement of this dimension. This paper tries to bring out the relevance of psychological determinants of physical activity and how these need to su...

  6. Physics of polarized scattering at multi-level atomic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Stenflo, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The symmetric peak observed in linear polarization in the core of the solar sodium D$_1$ line at 5896 \\AA\\ has remained enigmatic since its discovery nearly two decades ago. One reason is that the theory of polarized scattering has not been experimentally tested for multi-level atomic systems in the relevant parameter domains, although the theory is continually being used for the interpretation of astrophysical observations. A laboratory experiment that was set up a decade ago to find out whether the D$_1$ enigma is a problem of solar physics or quantum physics revealed that the D$_1$ system has a rich polarization structure in situations where standard scattering theory predicts zero polarization, even when optical pumping of the $m$ state populations of the hyperfine-split ground state is accounted for. Here we show that the laboratory results can be modeled in great quantitative detail if the theory is extended to include the coherences in both the initial and final states of the scattering process. Radiat...

  7. Atomic multiwave interferometer for Aharonov-Casher-phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min-Kang; Zhang, Ke; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Ke, Yi; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2016-02-01

    We present an atomic multiwave interferometer with magnetic sublevels to precisely determine the Aharonov-Casher (AC) geometric phase. Simulations show that this interferometer has sharper fringes than a normal two-wave interferometer, which means a higher phase resolution can be achieved. Moreover, atoms evolving in a single hyperfine structure state make the interferometer insensitive to the dc Stark phase shift. This dc Stark shift is one of the main noise sources in AC phase measurements. The constraint of the photon rest mass is also discussed when using this atomic interferometer to measure the Aharonov-Casher phase.

  8. Measuring the quantum statistics of an atom laser beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bradley, A S; Hope, J J; Olsen, M K

    2006-01-01

    We propose and analyse a scheme for measuring the quadrature statistics of an atom laser beam using extant optical homodyning and Raman atom laser techniques. Reversal of the normal Raman atom laser outcoupling scheme is used to map the quantum statistics of an incoupled beam to an optical probe beam. A multimode model of the spatial propagation dynamics shows that the Raman incoupler gives a clear signal of de Broglie wave quadrature squeezing for both pulsed and continuous inputs. Finally, we show that experimental realisations of the scheme may be tested with existing methods via measurements of Glauber's intensity correlation function.

  9. A review on recent upper atmosphere atomic oxygen measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Martin; Ern, Manfred; Riese, Martin; Zhu, Yajun

    2016-07-01

    Atomic oxygen is a key player in the upper mesosphere lower and thermosphere chemistry, energy balance, and dynamics. In recent years, a few new global datasets of this species have been presented. They are based on airglow measurements from low earth satellites. Surprisingly, the atomic oxygen abundance differs by 30-50% for similar atmospheric conditions. This paper gives an overview on the various atomic oxygen datasets available so far and presents most recent results obtained from measurements of the SCIAMACHY instrument on Envisat. Differences between the datasets are discussed.

  10. Emissivity measurements with an Atomic Force Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    van Zwol, Pieter Jan; Ranno, Laurent; Chevrier, Joel

    2011-01-01

    We show that functionalized micromechanical bilayer levers can be used as sensitive probes to accurately measure radiative heat flux in vacuum between two materials at the micro scale. By means of calibration to one material these measurements can be made quantitative for radiative heat flux or for either temperature or material emissivity. We discuss issues and opportunities for our method and provide ample technical details regarding its implementation and demonstrate good correspondence wi...

  11. Atomic physics with new synchrotron radiation: Report from the Japanese working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of a new photon facility, SPring-8, is being started this year in Harima, Japan, and the first photon beam is to be supplied to users in 1998. As a next generation photon source, this facility will rely mainly upon insertion devices like the APS. The source has two characteristic features. One is that the photon flux is very powerful. In atomic physics target density is often very dilute, and, in many cases, coincidence measurement is desirable to get more definite conclusions. Only with the advent of an intense photon source such studies become tractable and will compensate a thin target density. Another feature is that it can yield photons as high as one hundred or two hundred keV. Since the K-edge of uranium is about 120 keV, the new source can be used to ionize even the innermost shell of the heaviest element. In order to discuss the possible projects in the field of atomic physics with these new photon sources, a group was organized in December 1988. The following themes have been discussed (multiply charged ion is abbreviated to MCI): (1) spectroscopy of atoms and molecules; (2) photoionization of ions (inclusive of MCI); (3) MCI-trap (spectroscopy of MCI, cold MCI plasma); (4) collisions of very slow MCI; (5) electronic and atomic structures of microclusters; and (6) plasma

  12. Atom-interferometric measurement of Stark level splittings

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Limei; Zhang, Linjie; Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2015-01-01

    Multiple adiabatic/diabatic passages through avoided crossings in the Stark map of cesium Rydberg atoms are employed as beam splitters and recombiners in an atom-interferometric measurement of energy-level splittings. We subject cold cesium atoms to laser-excitation, electric-field and detection sequences that constitute an (internal-state) atom interferometer. For the read-out of the interferometer we utilize state-dependent collisions, which selectively remove atoms of one kind from the detected signal. We investigate the dependence of the interferometric signal on timing and field parameters, and find good agreement with time-dependent quantum simulations of the interferometer. Fourier analysis of the interferometric signals yield coherence frequencies that agree with corresponding energy-level differences in calculated Stark maps. The method enables spectroscopy of states that are inaccessible to direct laser-spectroscopic observation, due to selection rules, and has applications in field metrology.

  13. Atom-interferometric measurement of Stark level splittings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianming; Raithel, Georg

    2016-05-01

    Rydberg atoms are highly sensitive to external electric fields due to their large polarizability, scaling as n7 (n is the principal quantum number). In cesium, nS Rydberg levels mix with nearby (n-4) high- l states, forming sequences of avoided crossings. Mixed adiabatic/diabatic passages through these crossings are employed as beam splitters and recombiners in an atom-interferometric measurement of energy level splittings. We subject cold cesium atoms to laser-excitation, electric-field and detection sequences that constitute an (internal-state) atom interferometer. For the read-out of the interferometer we utilize state-dependent collisions, which selectively remove atoms of one kind from the detected signal. We investigate the dependence of the interferometric signal on timing and field parameters, and find good agreement with quantum simulations of the interferometer. Fourier analysis of the interferometric signals yield coherence frequencies that agree with corresponding energy-level differences in calculated Stark maps.

  14. An exacting transition probability measurement - a direct test of atomic many-body theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Tarun; De Munshi, Debashis; Yum, Dahyun; Rebhi, Riadh; Mukherjee, Manas

    2016-01-01

    A new protocol for measuring the branching fraction of hydrogenic atoms with only statistically limited uncertainty is proposed and demonstrated for the decay of the P3/2 level of the barium ion, with precision below 0.5%. Heavy hydrogenic atoms like the barium ion are test beds for fundamental physics such as atomic parity violation and they also hold the key to understanding nucleo-synthesis in stars. To draw definitive conclusion about possible physics beyond the standard model by measuring atomic parity violation in the barium ion it is necessary to measure the dipole transition probabilities of low-lying excited states with a precision better than 1%. Furthermore, enhancing our understanding of the barium puzzle in barium stars requires branching fraction data for proper modelling of nucleo-synthesis. Our measurements are the first to provide a direct test of quantum many-body calculations on the barium ion with a precision below one percent and more importantly with no known systematic uncertainties. The unique measurement protocol proposed here can be easily extended to any decay with more than two channels and hence paves the way for measuring the branching fractions of other hydrogenic atoms with no significant systematic uncertainties. PMID:27432734

  15. Les Houches Summer School of Theoretical Physics : Session 72, Coherent Atomic Matter Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Westbrook, C; David, F; Coherent Atomic Matter Waves

    2001-01-01

    Progress in atomic physics has been so vigorous during the past decade that one is hard pressed to follow all the new developments. In the early 1990s the first atom interferometers opened a new field in which we have been able to use the wave nature of atoms to probe fundamental quantum me chanics questions as well as to make precision measurements. Coming fast on the heels of this development was the demonstration of Bose Einstein condensation in dilute atomic vapors which intensified research interest in studying the wave nature of matter, especially in a domain in which "macro scopic" quantum effects (vortices, stimulated scattering of atomic beams) are visible. At the same time there has been much progress in our understanding of the behavior of waves (notably electromagnetic) in complex media, both periodic and disordered. An obvious topic of speculation and probably of future research is whether any new insight or applications will develop if one examines the behavior of de Broglie waves in ana...

  16. Direct measurement of desorption and diffusion energies of O and N atoms physisorbed on amorphous surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Minissale, Marco; Dulieu, François

    2016-01-01

    Physisorbed atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains play a central role in solid state astrochemistry. Their surface reactivity is one source of the observed molecular complexity in space. In experimental astrophysics, the high reactivity of atoms also constitutes an obstacle to measuring two of the fundamental properties in surface physics, namely desorption and diffusion energies, and so far direct measurements are non-existent for O and N atoms. We investigated the diffusion and desorption processes of O and N atoms on cold surfaces in order to give boundary conditions to astrochemical models. Here we propose a new technique for directly measuring the N- and O-atom mass signals. Including the experimental results in a simple model allows us to almost directly derive the desorption and diffusion barriers of N atoms on amorphous solid water ice (ASW) and O atoms on ASW and oxidized graphite. We find a strong constraint on the values of desorption and thermal diffusion energy barriers. The measured b...

  17. Kinetic theory and atomic physics corrections for determination of ion velocities from charge-exchange spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Burgos, J. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Solomon, W. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.; Chrystal, C.

    2013-09-01

    Charge-exchange spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for determining ion temperatures, densities and rotational velocities in tokamak plasmas. This technique depends on detailed understanding of the atomic physics processes that affect the measured apparent velocities with respect to the true ion rotational velocities. These atomic effects are mainly due to energy dependence of the charge-exchange cross-sections, and in the case of poloidal velocities, due to gyro-motion of the ion during the finite lifetime of the excited states. Accurate lifetimes are necessary for correct interpretation of measured poloidal velocities, specially for high density plasma regimes on machines such as ITER, where l-mixing effects must be taken into account. In this work, a full nl-resolved atomic collisional radiative model coupled with a full kinetic calculation that includes the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the ion gyro-motion is presented for the first time. The model directly calculates from atomic physics first principles the excited state lifetimes that are necessary to evaluate the gyro-orbit effects. It is shown that even for low density plasmas where l-mixing effects are unimportant and coronal conditions can be assumed, the nl-resolved model is necessary for an accurate description of the gyro-motion effects to determine poloidal velocities. This solution shows good agreement when compared to three QH-mode shots on DIII-D, which contain a wide range of toroidal velocities and high ion temperatures where greater atomic corrections are needed. The velocities obtained from the model are compared to experimental velocities determined from co- and counter-injection of neutral beams on DIII-D.

  18. High temperature facility for atomic physics studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a program designed to develop a laser heated plasma sample for atomic physics studies in the 30 to 100 eV range of electron temperature and the 3 x 1017 to 1018 cm-3 range in electron density are presented. The approach used was discussed in detail in Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc., (MSNW) Proposal 1660, that is, the laser breakdown mode of heating in a slow solenoid. An extensive rework of the plasma sample facility was done in order to use this mode of heating. Specifically, a new solenoid magnet was constructed to allow higher field operation and the plasma chamber was modified to allow the use of puff filling orifices and small bore tube liners. The vacuum system and focussing optics were changed to allow the use of an on-axis Cassagranian system capable of focussing the laser radiation to a nearly diffraction limited spot as is necessary when heating through a small aperture. The 10 liter CO2 laser optics were charged to an unstable oscillator configuration and additional windows were provided into the optical cavity for alignment purposes

  19. The fission time scale measured with an atomic clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kravchuk, VL; Wilschut, HW; Hunyadi, M; Kopecky, S; Lohner, H; Rogachevskiy, A; Siemssen, RH; Krasznahorkay, A; Hamilton, JH; Ramayya, AV; Carter, HK

    2003-01-01

    We present a new direct method of measuring the fission absolute time scale using an atomic clock based on the lifetime of a vacancy in the atomic K-shell. We studied the reaction Ne-20 + Th-232 -> O-16 + U-236* at 30 MeV/u. The excitation energy of about 115 MeV in such a reaction is in the range w

  20. Atomic hydrogen on Mars - Measurements at solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Anderson, D. E., Jr.; Barker, E. S.

    1978-01-01

    The Copernicus Orbiting Astronomical Observatory was used to obtain measurements of Mars Lyman-alpha (1215.671-angstrom) emission at the solar minimum, which has resulted in the first information on atomic hydrogen concentrations in the upper atmosphere of Mars at the solar minimum. The Copernicus measurements, coupled with the Viking in situ measurements of the temperature (170 plus or minus 30 K) of the upper atmosphere of Mars, indicate that the atomic hydrogen number density at the exobase of Mars (250 kilometers) is about 60 times greater than that deduced from Mariner 6 and 7 Lyman-alpha measurements obtained during a period of high solar activity. The Copernicus results are consistent with Hunten's hypothesis of the diffusion-limited escape of atomic hydrogen from Mars.

  1. Quantum Control nd Measurement of Spins in Cold Atomic Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    Spins are natural carriers of quantum information given their long coherence time and our ability to precisely control and measure them with magneto-optical fields. Spins in cold atomic gases provide a pristine environment for such quantum control and measurement, and thus this system can act as a test-bed for the development of quantum simulators. I will discuss the progress my group has made in collaboration with Prof. Jessen, University of Arizona, to develop the toolbox for this test-bed. Through its interactions with rf and microwave magnetic fields, whose waveforms are designed through optimal control techniques, we can implement arbitrary unitary control on the internal hyperfine spins of cesium atoms, a 16 dimensional Hilbert space (isomorphic to 4 qubits). Control of the collective spin of the ensemble of many atoms is performed via the mutual coupling of the atomic ensemble to a mode of the electromagnetic field that acts as a quantum data bus for entangling atoms with one another. Internal spin control can be used to enhance the entangling power of the atom-photon interface. Finally, both projective and weak-continuous measurements can be performed to tomograhically reconstruct quantum states and processes.

  2. Measurement noise 100 times lower than the quantum-projection limit using entangled atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosten, Onur; Engelsen, Nils J; Krishnakumar, Rajiv; Kasevich, Mark A

    2016-01-28

    Quantum metrology uses quantum entanglement--correlations in the properties of microscopic systems--to improve the statistical precision of physical measurements. When measuring a signal, such as the phase shift of a light beam or an atomic state, a prominent limitation to achievable precision arises from the noise associated with the counting of uncorrelated probe particles. This noise, commonly referred to as shot noise or projection noise, gives rise to the standard quantum limit (SQL) to phase resolution. However, it can be mitigated down to the fundamental Heisenberg limit by entangling the probe particles. Despite considerable experimental progress in a variety of physical systems, a question that persists is whether these methods can achieve performance levels that compare favourably with optimized conventional (non-entangled) systems. Here we demonstrate an approach that achieves unprecedented levels of metrological improvement using half a million (87)Rb atoms in their 'clock' states. The ensemble is 20.1 ± 0.3 decibels (100-fold) spin-squeezed via an optical-cavity-based measurement. We directly resolve small microwave-induced rotations 18.5 ± 0.3 decibels (70-fold) beyond the SQL. The single-shot phase resolution of 147 microradians achieved by the apparatus is better than that achieved by the best engineered cold atom sensors despite lower atom numbers. We infer entanglement of more than 680 ± 35 particles in the atomic ensemble. Applications include atomic clocks, inertial sensors, and fundamental physics experiments such as tests of general relativity or searches for electron electric dipole moment. To this end, we demonstrate an atomic clock measurement with a quantum enhancement of 10.5 ± 0.3 decibels (11-fold), limited by the phase noise of our microwave source. PMID:26751056

  3. Blood Pressure Measurement Guidelines for Physical Therapists

    OpenAIRE

    Frese, Ethel M; Fick, Ann; Sadowsky, H. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Vital sign measurement and assessment are important components of the review of systems in a physical therapy examination for individuals with and without documented cardiopulmonary disease. The measurement of blood pressure gives the therapist information regarding the patient's baseline cardiovascular status, response to exercise/activity, and guides exercise prescription. Accurate measurement of blood pressure is critical for making appropriate clinical decisions especially if physical the...

  4. Design, fabrication and characterization of tunable external cavity diode laser and atom trapping chips for atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao

    External cavity diode laser systems (ECDLs) have been well documented for their suitability in the fields of laser cooling and atom trapping, and are now widely used in optical and atomic physics. A particularly simple implementation of this idea uses feedback from a diffraction grating mounted in the Littrow configuration and the typical size of this laser is quite large (120mmx90mmx90mm). For atom optics, the current atom trapping chips are not in a feedthrough configuration, which makes the chips to glass cell assembly process complicated and the wires and solder areas vulnerable, resulting in an unreliable vacuum seal. Recent experimental realizations of atom optical devices such as atomic waveguides, beam splitters, and on-chip Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) sources have opened a new field for the development of more complex devices such as, e.g., BEC-based atom transistor. This work focuses on micro/nano fabrication techniques to build three different devices for the miniature BEC system. The research work focuses on the development of new ECDLs, a novel fabrication process of feedthrough atom trapping chips for atomic optics and a fabrication process for atom transistor chips. In the ECDLs part, we describe a new method for constructing a smaller external-cavity diode laser by use of a micromachined silicon flexure and a VHG (Volume Holographic Grating). It is much smaller, inexpensive and easy to build because it is based on simple modifications of a few commercial optical and mechanical components but with a specific silicon flexure design enabled by micro-fabrication technology for the laser frequency tuning. In the feedthrough chips part, we present a novel fabrication process for feedthrough atom trapping chips in atomic condensate optics cells using the copper electroplating to seal the vias. The advantages of using feedthrough atom trapping chips are the simple microfabrication process and reduction of the overall chip area bonded on the glass atom

  5. Status and perspectives of atomic physics research at GSI : The new GSI accelerator project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, T; Backe, H; Beyer, HF; Brauning-Demian, A; Hagmann, S; Ionescu, DC; Jungmann, K; Kluge, HJ; Kozhuharov, C; Kuhl, T; Liesen, D; Mann, R; Mokler, PH; Quint, W; Bosch, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    A short overview on the results of atomic physics research at the storage ring ESR is given followed by a presentation of the envisioned atomic physics program at the planned new GSI facility. The proposed new GSI facility will provide highest intensities of relativistic beams of both stable and uns

  6. Pre-service physics teachers' ideas on size, visibility and structure of the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the atom gives the opportunity to both understand and conceptually unify the various domains of science, such as physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy and geology. Among these disciplines, physics teachers are expected to be particularly well educated in this topic. It is important that pre-service physics teachers know what sort of theories regarding the atom they will bring into their own classrooms. Six tasks were developed, comprising size, visibility and structure of the atom. These tasks carried out by pre-service physics teachers were examined by content analysis and six categories were determined. These are size, visibility, subatomic particles, atom models, electron orbit and electron features. Pre-service physics teachers' ideas about the atom were clarified under these categories.

  7. An open source digital servo for atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a general purpose digital servo optimized for feedback control of lasers in atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments. The servo is capable of feedback bandwidths up to roughly 1 MHz (limited by the 320 ns total latency); loop filter shapes up to fifth order; multiple-input, multiple-output control; and automatic lock acquisition. The configuration of the servo is controlled via a graphical user interface, which also provides a rudimentary software oscilloscope and tools for measurement of system transfer functions. We illustrate the functionality of the digital servo by describing its use in two example scenarios: frequency control of the laser used to probe the narrow clock transition of 27Al+ in an optical atomic clock, and length control of a cavity used for resonant frequency doubling of a laser

  8. Many-body processes in atomic and molecular physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: Dynamics of Multiphoton Excitation in Rydberg Atoms; Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation and Dissipative Quantum Dynamics in Periodic Fields; Density Matrix Formulation of Complex Geometric Phases in Dissipative Systems; and A. C. Stark Shifts of Excited States of Atoms in Strong Fields

  9. ANALYSIS OF UNCERTAINTY MEASUREMENT IN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEHA S.MAHAJAN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A spectrophotometer is a photometer that can measure intensity as a function of the light source wavelength. The important features of spectrophotometers are spectral bandwidth and linear range of absorption or reflectance measurement. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS is a very common technique for detecting chemical composition of elements in metal and its alloy. It is very reliable and simple to use. Quality of result (accuracy depends on the uncertainty of measurement value of the test. If uncertainty of measurement is more there may be doubt of about the final result. The final result of Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer gets affected by the number of parameters; we should take in to account will calculating the final result. This paper deal with the methodology of evaluating the uncertainty of measurement of chemical composition using AAS. The study is useful for quality of measurement equipment and testing process.

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on atomic physics with fast heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Workshop on Atomic Physics with Fast Heavy-Ion Beams was held in the Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory on January 20 and 21, 1983. The meeting brought together approx. 50 practitioners in the field of accelerator-based atomic physics. The workshop was held to focus attention on possible areas of atomic physics research which would benefit from use of the newest generation of accelerators designed to produce intense high-quality beams of fast heavy ions. Abstracts of individual paper were prepared separately for the data base

  11. Precise measurements of optical Feshbach resonances of $^{174}$Yb atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min-Seok; Lee, Jeongwon; Lee, Jae Hoon; Shin, Y.; Mun, Jongchul

    2016-01-01

    We present precise measurements of the optical Feshbach resonances (OFRs) of $^{174}$Yb atoms for the intercombination transition. We measure the photoassociation (PA) spectra of a pure $^{174}$Yb Bose-Einstein condensate, and determine the dependence of OFRs to PA laser intensities and frequencies for four least bound vibrational levels near the intercombination transition. We confirm that our measurements are consistent with the temporal decay of a BEC subjected to a PA beam in the vicinity...

  12. Measuring Forces between Oxide Surfaces Using the Atomic Force Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Høj, Jakob Weiland

    1996-01-01

    The interactions between colloidal particles play a major role in processing of ceramics, especially in casting processes. With the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) it is possible to measure the inter-action force between a small oxide particle (a few micron) and a surface as function of surface...

  13. Current Topics in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Chandana; Bhattacharyya, Shib Shankar

    Preface -- Ultrafast dynamics of nano and mesoscopic systems driven by asymmetric electromagnetic pulses / A. Matos-Abiague, A. S. Moskalenko and J. Berakdar -- One-dimensional non-linear oscillators as models for atoms and molecules under intense laser fields / A. Wadehra and B. M. Deb -- Experimenting with topological states of Bose-Einstein condensates / C. Raman -- Laser cooling and trapping of Rb atoms / S. Chakraborty ... [et al.] -- Pair-correlation in Bose-Einstein condensate and fermi superfluid of atomic gases / B. Deb -- Properties of trapped Bose gas in the large-gas-parameter regime / A. Banerjee -- A Feynman-Kac path integral study of Rb gas / S. Datta -- Mean field theory for interacting spin-1 bosons on a lattice / R. V. Pai, K. Sheshadri and R. Pandit -- Mixed internal-external state approach for quantum computation with neutral atoms on atom chips / E. Charron ... [et al.] -- Ultrafast pulse shaping developments for quantum computation / S. K. Karthick Kumar and D. Goswami -- Quantum information transfer in atom-photon interactions in a cavity / A. S. Majumdar, N. Nayak and B. Ghosh -- Liouville density evolution in billiards and the quantum connection / D. Biswas -- MRCPA: theory and application to highly correlating system / K. Tanaka -- Calculation of negative ion shape resonances using coupled cluster theory / Y. Sajeev and S. Pal -- Optical frequency standard with Sr+: a theoretical many-body approach / C. Sur ... [et al.] -- Fast heavy ion collisions with H[symbol] molecules and young type interference / L. C. Tribedi and D. Misra -- Estimation of ion kinetic energies from time-of-flight and momentum spectra / B. Bapat -- Third-order optical susceptibility of metal nanocluster-glass 28 composites / B. Ghosh and P. Chakraborty -- Study of atom-surface interaction using magnetic atom mirror / A. K. Mohapatra.

  14. Casimir effects in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Babb, James F

    2010-01-01

    The long-range interaction between two atoms and the long-range interaction between an ion and an electron are compared at small and large intersystem separations. The vacuum dressed atom formalism is applied and found to provide a framework for interpretation of the similarities between the two cases. The van der Waals forces or Casimir-Polder potentials are used to obtain insight into relativistic and higher multipolar terms.

  15. Theoretical Atomic Physics code development II: ACE: Another collisional excitation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new computer code for calculating collisional excitation data (collision strengths or cross sections) using a variety of models is described. The code uses data generated by the Cowan Atomic Structure code or CATS for the atomic structure. Collisional data are placed on a random access file and can be displayed in a variety of formats using the Theoretical Atomic Physics Code or TAPS. All of these codes are part of the Theoretical Atomic Physics code development effort at Los Alamos. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  16. Measurements of relative photoemission time delays in noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We determine relative photoemission time delays between valence electrons in different noble gas atoms (Ar, Ne and He) in an energy range between 31 and 37 eV. The atoms are ionized by an attosecond pulse train synchronized with an infrared laser field and the delays are measured using an interferometric technique. We compare our results with calculations using the random phase approximation with exchange and multi-configurational Hartree–Fock. We also investigate the influence of the different ionization angular channels. (paper)

  17. Demonstration of Weak Measurement Based on Atomic Spontaneous Emission

    OpenAIRE

    Shomroni, Itay; Bechler, Orel; Rosenblum, Serge; Dayan, Barak

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new type of weak measurement based on the dynamics of spontaneous emission. The pointer in our scheme is given by the Lorentzian distribution characterizing atomic exponential decay via emission of a single photon. We thus introduce weak measurement, so far demonstrated nearly exclusively with laser beams and Gaussian statistics, into the quantum regime of single emitters and single quanta, enabling the exploitation of a wide class of sources that are abundant in nature. We d...

  18. Introduction to the physics of matter basic atomic, molecular, and solid-state physics

    CERN Document Server

    Manini, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    This book offers an up-to-date, compact presentation of basic topics in the physics of matter, from atoms to molecules to solids, including elements of statistical mechanics. The adiabatic separation of the motion of electrons and nuclei in matter and its spectroscopic implications are outlined for molecules and recalled regularly in the study of the dynamics of gases and solids. Numerous experiments are described and more than 160 figures give a clear visual impression of the main concepts. Sufficient detail of mathematical derivations is provided to enable students to follow easily. The focus is on present-day understanding and especially on phenomena fitting various independent-particle models. The historical development of this understanding, and phenomena such as magnetism and superconductivity, where interparticle interactions and nonadiabatic effects play a crucial role, are mostly omitted. A final outlook section stimulates the curiosity of the reader to pursue the study of such advanced topics in gra...

  19. Atom probe trajectory mapping using experimental tip shape measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, D; Petersen, T; Ringer, S P; Smith, G D W

    2011-11-01

    Atom probe tomography is an accurate analytical and imaging technique which can reconstruct the complex structure and composition of a specimen in three dimensions. Despite providing locally high spatial resolution, atom probe tomography suffers from global distortions due to a complex projection function between the specimen and detector which is different for each experiment and can change during a single run. To aid characterization of this projection function, this work demonstrates a method for the reverse projection of ions from an arbitrary projection surface in 3D space back to an atom probe tomography specimen surface. Experimental data from transmission electron microscopy tilt tomography are combined with point cloud surface reconstruction algorithms and finite element modelling to generate a mapping back to the original tip surface in a physically and experimentally motivated manner. As a case study, aluminium tips are imaged using transmission electron microscopy before and after atom probe tomography, and the specimen profiles used as input in surface reconstruction methods. This reconstruction method is a general procedure that can be used to generate mappings between a selected surface and a known tip shape using numerical solutions to the electrostatic equation, with quantitative solutions to the projection problem readily achievable in tens of minutes on a contemporary workstation. PMID:22004277

  20. An exacting transition probability measurement - a direct test of atomic many-body theories

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, T; Yum, D; Rebhi, R; Mukherjee, M

    2016-01-01

    A new protocol for measuring the branching fraction of hydrogenic atoms with only statistically limited uncertainty is proposed and demonstrated for the decay of the P$_{3/2}$ level of the barium ion, with precision below $0.5\\%$. Heavy hydrogenic atoms like the barium ion are test beds for fundamental physics such as atomic parity violation and they also hold the key to understanding nucleo-synthesis in stars. To draw definitive conclusion about possible physics beyond the standard model by measuring atomic parity violation in the barium ion it is necessary to measure the dipole transition probabilities of low-lying excited states with precision better than $1\\%$. Furthermore, enhancing our understanding of the $\\it{barium-puzzle}$ in barium stars requires branching fraction data for proper modelling of nucleo-synthesis. Our measurements are the first to provide a direct test of quantum many-body calculations on the barium ion with precision below one percent and more importantly with no known systematic unc...

  1. Ultimate Statistical Physics: fluorescence of a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Pomeau, Yves; Ginibre, Jean

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the statistics of emission of photons by a single atom or ion illuminated by a laser beam at the frequency of quasi-resonance between two energy levels, a situation that corresponds to real experiments. We extend this to the case of two laser beams resonant with the energy differences between two excited levels and the ground state (three level atom in V-configuration). We use a novel approach of this type of problem by considering Kolmogorov equation for the probability distribution of the atomic state which takes into account first the deterministic evolution of this state under the effect of the incoming laser beam and the random emission of photons during the spontaneous decay of the excited state(s) to the ground state. This approach yields solvable equations in the two level atom case. For the three level atom case we set the problem and define clearly its frame. The results obtained are valid both in the opposite limits of rare and of frequent spontaneous decay, compared to the period of the...

  2. Pre-Service Physics Teachers' Ideas on Size, Visibility and Structure of the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, Pervin

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the atom gives the opportunity to both understand and conceptually unify the various domains of science, such as physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy and geology. Among these disciplines, physics teachers are expected to be particularly well educated in this topic. It is important that pre-service physics teachers know what sort of…

  3. Measuring Physical Neighborhood Quality Related to Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Rollings

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although sociodemographic factors are one aspect of understanding the effects of neighborhood environments on health, equating neighborhood quality with socioeconomic status ignores the important role of physical neighborhood attributes. Prior work on neighborhood environments and health has relied primarily on level of socioeconomic disadvantage as the indicator of neighborhood quality without attention to physical neighborhood quality. A small but increasing number of studies have assessed neighborhood physical characteristics. Findings generally indicate that there is an association between living in deprived neighborhoods and poor health outcomes, but rigorous evidence linking specific physical neighborhood attributes to particular health outcomes is lacking. This paper discusses the methodological challenges and limitations of measuring physical neighborhood environments relevant to health and concludes with proposed directions for future work.

  4. Measuring Physical Neighborhood Quality Related to Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollings, Kimberly A.; Wells, Nancy M.; Evans, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Although sociodemographic factors are one aspect of understanding the effects of neighborhood environments on health, equating neighborhood quality with socioeconomic status ignores the important role of physical neighborhood attributes. Prior work on neighborhood environments and health has relied primarily on level of socioeconomic disadvantage as the indicator of neighborhood quality without attention to physical neighborhood quality. A small but increasing number of studies have assessed neighborhood physical characteristics. Findings generally indicate that there is an association between living in deprived neighborhoods and poor health outcomes, but rigorous evidence linking specific physical neighborhood attributes to particular health outcomes is lacking. This paper discusses the methodological challenges and limitations of measuring physical neighborhood environments relevant to health and concludes with proposed directions for future work. PMID:25938692

  5. Quantum yield measurement in the chemical reactions of laser-excited Zn and Rb atoms with molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: A new method of determining the rate constants of chemical reactions proceeding with participant of Zn(4p 3P1) and Rb(11P3/2) atoms has been introduced. The method is based on the investigation of the spatial and temporary behavior of the atoms and their interaction with reagent-gas molecules in a carrier gas flow. For the excitation of the atom pulsed monochromatic resonance laser radiation was used. The interaction of electronically excited atoms with reagent-gas molecules causes a decrease in the concentration of atoms owing to chemical and physical quenching processes. Registering the change in the atom concentration at the end of the flow, one can evaluate the rate a constants of the reaction in which of stable chemical compounds forms. These investigations are necessary for the laser isotope separation. - Abstract: In the present paper, we introduce a method for measuring the apparent quantum yield θap and the rate-constant values of the physical kp and chemical kc quenching of electronically excited Zn and Rb atoms by gas molecules. The method is based on measuring the concentration of the atoms at the end of their flow in a mixture with a reagent-gas and a carrier gas, in the region where all quenching and secondary processes are already over. The concentration of the atoms was determined from measured absorbed energy of resonance laser radiation. The rate constants and the cross-sections of the chemical and physical quenching of Zn(3P10) and Rb(11P3/2) atoms with several molecules have been determined. For some collisions the quantum yield was found to be close to unity. The method may find applications in laser photochemical isotope separation and in measuring the rate constants of reactions proceeding with participation of ground state atoms.

  6. The 'atom-splitting' moment of synthetic biology: Nuclear physics and synthetic biology share common features

    OpenAIRE

    Valentine, Alex J; Kleinert, Aleysia; Verdier, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology and nuclear physics share many commonalities in terms of public perception and funding. Synthetic biologists could learn valuable lessons from the history of the atomic bomb and nuclear power.

  7. Precise measurements of optical Feshbach resonances of $^{174}$Yb atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Min-Seok; Lee, Jae Hoon; Shin, Y; Mun, Jongchul

    2016-01-01

    We present precise measurements of the optical Feshbach resonances (OFRs) of $^{174}$Yb atoms for the intercombination transition. We measure the photoassociation (PA) spectra of a pure $^{174}$Yb Bose-Einstein condensate, and determine the dependence of OFRs to PA laser intensities and frequencies for four least bound vibrational levels near the intercombination transition. We confirm that our measurements are consistent with the temporal decay of a BEC subjected to a PA beam in the vicinity of the fourth vibrational level from the dissociation limit.

  8. Two measured completely different electron affinities for atomic Eu?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Felfli, Z.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the electron affinity (EA) of atomic Eu was measured to be 0.116?eV. This value is in outstanding agreement with the theoretically calculated values using the Regge pole and MCDF-RCI methods. Previously, the EA of Eu was measured to be 1.053 eV. In an attempt to resolve the discrepancy between the two measured values, we have adopted the complex angular momentum (CAM) method and investigated in the electron energy range 0.11 eV methane to methanol without CO2 emission. These new results call for immediate experimental and theoretical verification.

  9. Theoretical atomic and molecular physics: Progress report, July 1, 1988 through June 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theoretical atomic and molecular physics program at Rice University emphasizes fundamental questions regarding the structure and collision dynamics of various atomic and molecular systems with some attention given to atomic processes at surfaces. Our activities have been centered on continuing the projects initiated last year as well as beginning some new studies. These include: differential elastic and charge-transfer scattering and alignment and orientation of the excited electron cloud in ion-atom, atom-atom and ion-molecule collisions, using a molecular-orbital representation and both semiclassical and quantal methods; quenching of low-lying Rydberg states of a sodium atom in a collision with a rare-gas atom, using a semiclassical representation; so far, target atoms He, Ne and Ar have been studied; chemiionization and ion-pair formation in a collision of a Li atom with a metastable He atom at intermediate collision energies, using a combination of quantal and semi-classical methods; Penning ionization of alkali atoms Na and K, using advanced Cl and Stieltjes imaging methods; radiative and nonradiative charge-transfer in He+ + H collisions at ultra-low collision energies, using quantal methods; elastic and inelastic processes in electron-molecule collisions, using the continuum-multiple-scattering method; and inelastic collision processes in dense, high-temperature plasmas. Selected highlights of our research progress are briefly summarized in this paper

  10. SASP '86: Symposium on atomic and surface physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    71 papers are presented on subject matters indicated in the section headings: 1) Ion-neutral and neutral-neutral interactions in the gas phase; 2) Laser physics and photonics; 3) Electron collisions and electronic capture; 4) Ion-surface interaction and plasma-related effects; 5) Cluster physics. 70 thereof are of INIS interested and are treated separately. (G.Q.)

  11. The Influence of Physical and Physiological Cues on Atomic Force Microscopy-Based Cell Stiffness Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Wei Chiou; Hsiu-Kuan Lin; Ming-Jer Tang; Hsi-Hui Lin; Ming-Long Yeh

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All...

  12. Research in atomic and applied physics using a 6-GeV synchrotron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Atomic and Applied Physics in the Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts a broad program of research using ion beams and synchrotron radiation for experiments in atomic physics and nuclear analytical techniques and applications. Many of the experiments would benefit greatly from the use of high energy, high intensity photon beams from a 6-GeV synchrotron source. A survey of some of the specific scientific possibilities is presented

  13. Impact of Precision Mass Measurements on Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kreim, Susanne; Dilling, Jens; Litvinov, Yuri A

    2013-01-01

    Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of neutron and proton number, N and Z, respectively. The data obtained through mass measurements provide details of the nuclear interaction and thus apply to a variety of physics topics. Some of the most crucial questions to be addressed by mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides are, on the one hand, nuclear forces and structure, describing phenomena such as the so-called neutron-halos or the evolution of magic numbers when moving towards the borders of nuclear existence. On the other hand, the understanding of the processes of element formation in the Universe poses a challenge and requires an accurate knowledge of nuclear astrophysics. Here, precision atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis processes are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations.

  14. Ultra-sensitive atomic spin measurements with a nonlinear interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Sewell, R J; Behbood, N; Colangelo, G; Ciurana, F Martin; Mitchell, M W

    2013-01-01

    Quantum metrology studies and improves quantum-limited ultra-sensitive measurements. Both linear interferometers, e.g. gravitational wave observatories, and nonlinear interferometers, e.g. optical magnetometers, have been enhanced by quantum metrology. The sensitivities of nonlinear interferometers scale better with system size than even quantum-enhanced linear interferometers, so-called `super-Heisenberg scaling', but it is actively debated whether this scaling can lead to better absolute sensitivity. Here we demonstrate a nonlinear measurement that surpasses, through super-Heisenberg scaling, the best possible linear measurement of the same quantity. We use alignment-to-orientation conversion, a practical magnetometry technique, to make a quantum non-demolition measurement of the spin alignment of a sample of $^{87}$Rb atoms. We observe absolute sensitivity 9 dB beyond the best comparable linear measurement and measurement-induced spin squeezing. The results provide insight into ultra-sensitive magnetometer...

  15. Computational challenges in atomic, molecular and optical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kenneth T

    2002-06-15

    Six challenges are discussed. These are the laser-driven helium atom; the laser-driven hydrogen molecule and hydrogen molecular ion; electron scattering (with ionization) from one-electron atoms; the vibrational and rotational structure of molecules such as H(3)(+) and water at their dissociation limits; laser-heated clusters; and quantum degeneracy and Bose-Einstein condensation. The first four concern fundamental few-body systems where use of high-performance computing (HPC) is currently making possible accurate modelling from first principles. This leads to reliable predictions and support for laboratory experiment as well as true understanding of the dynamics. Important aspects of these challenges addressable only via a terascale facility are set out. Such a facility makes the last two challenges in the above list meaningfully accessible for the first time, and the scientific interest together with the prospective role for HPC in these is emphasized.

  16. Measurements of scattering processes in negative ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvale, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    This Technical Progress Report describes the progress made on the research objectives during the past twelve months. This research project is designed to provide measurements of various scattering processes which occur in H{sup {minus}} collisions with atomic (specifically, noble gas and atomic hydrogen) targets at intermediate energies. These processes include: elastic scattering,single- and double-electron detachment, and target excitation/ionization. For the elastic and target inelastic processes where H{sup {minus}} is scattered intact, the experimental technique of Ion Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (IELS) will be employed to identify the final target state(s). In most of the above processes, cross sections are unknown both experimentally and theoretically. The measurements in progress will provide either experimentally-determined cross sections or set upper limits to those cross sections. In either case, these measurements will be stringent tests of our understanding in energetic negative ion-atom collisions. This series of experiments required the construction of a new facility and the initial ion beam was accelerated through the apparatus in April 1991.

  17. Atomic spectroscopy and highly accurate measurement: determination of fundamental constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author concerning highly accurate atomic spectroscopy applied for the determination of fundamental constants. A pure optical frequency measurement of the 2S-12D 2-photon transitions in atomic hydrogen and deuterium has been performed. The experimental setting-up is described as well as the data analysis. Optimized values for the Rydberg constant and Lamb shifts have been deduced (R = 109737.31568516 (84) cm-1). An experiment devoted to the determination of the fine structure constant with an aimed relative uncertainty of 10-9 began in 1999. This experiment is based on the fact that Bloch oscillations in a frequency chirped optical lattice are a powerful tool to transfer coherently many photon momenta to the atoms. We have used this method to measure accurately the ratio h/m(Rb). The measured value of the fine structure constant is α-1 = 137.03599884 (91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.7*10-9. The future and perspectives of this experiment are presented. This document presented before an academic board will allow his author to manage research work and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  18. Python GUI Scripting Interface for Running Atomic Physics Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Tahat, Amani; Tahat, Mofleh

    2011-01-01

    We create a Python GUI scripting interface working under Windows in addition to (UNIX/Linux). The GUI has been built around the Python open-source programming language. We use the Python's GUI library that so called Python Mega Widgets (PMW) and based on Tkinter Python module (http://www.freenetpages.co.uk/hp/alan.gauld/tutgui.htm). The new GUI was motivated primarily by the desire of more updated operations, more flexibility incorporating future and current improvements in producing atomic d...

  19. Towards Relativistic Atomic Physics and Post-Minkowskian Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Luca LusannaINFN

    2009-01-01

    A review is given of the formulation of relativistic atomic theory, in which there is an explicit realization of the Poincare' generators, both in the inertial and in the non-inertial rest-frame instant form of dynamics in Minkowski space-time. This implies the need to solve the problem of the relativistic center of mass of an isolated system and to describe the transitions from different conventions for clock synchronization, namely for the identifications of instantaneous ...

  20. Errors and Uncertainty in Physics Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasiak, Wladyslaw

    1983-01-01

    Classifies errors as either systematic or blunder and uncertainties as either systematic or random. Discusses use of error/uncertainty analysis in direct/indirect measurement, describing the process of planning experiments to ensure lowest possible uncertainty. Also considers appropriate level of error analysis for high school physics students'…

  1. Vital physical signals measurements using a webcam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jianfei; Yan, Yonggang; Yao, Lifeng

    2013-10-01

    Non-contact and remote measurements of vital physical signals are important for reliable and comfortable physiological self-assessment. In this paper, we provide a new video-based methodology for remote and fast measurements of vital physical signals such as cardiac pulse and breathing rate. A webcam is used to track color video of a human face or wrist, and a Photoplethysmography (PPG) technique is applied to perform the measurements of the vital signals. A novel sequential blind signal extraction methodology is applied to the color video under normal lighting conditions, based on correlation analysis between the green trace and the source signals. The approach is successfully applied in the measurement of vital signals under the condition of different illuminating in which the target signal can also be found out accurately. To assess the advantages, the measuring time of a large number of cases is recorded correctly. The experimental results show that it only takes less than 30 seconds to measure the vital physical signals using presented technique. The study indicates the proposed approach is feasible for PPG technique, which provides a way to study the relationship of the signal for different ROI in future research.

  2. Atomic-scale nanowires: physical and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology to build and study nanowires with sizes ranging from individual atoms to tens of nanometres has been developing rapidly over the last few years. We survey the motivation behind these developments, and summarize the basics behind quantized conduction. Several of the different experimental techniques and materials systems used in the creation of nanowires are examined, and the range of theoretical methods developed both for examining open systems (especially their conduction properties) and for modelling large systems are considered. We present various noteworthy example results from the field, before concluding with a look at future directions. (topical review)

  3. Measurement and analysis of MOX physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A programme of physical properties measurements has been carried out on MOX fuel manufactured using the Short Binderless Route (SBR) by BNFL and on MOX fuel manufactured using the MIMAS process by Belgonucleaire. The programme includes the following work: Determination of the meeting point of MOX fuel; the measurement of the thermal expansion of MOX fuel; determination of the thermal diffusivity of MOX fuel. This paper will describe the programme of measurements and summarize the results obtained as well as analyzing the results in comparison with previous published work, where applicable. (author). 12 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  4. Handbook of theoretical atomic physics. Data for photon absorption, electron scattering, and vacancies decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, Miron [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Racah Inst. of Physics; Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Chernysheva, Larissa [Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Yarzhemsky, Victor [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this book is to present highly accurate and extensive theoretical Atomic data and to give a survey of selected calculational methods for atomic physics, used to obtain these data. The book presents the results of calculations of cross sections and probabilities of a broad variety of atomic processes with participation of photons and electrons, namely on photoabsorption, electron scattering and accompanying effects. Included are data for photoabsorption and electron scattering cross-sections and probabilities of vacancy decay formed for a large number of atoms and ions. Attention is also given to photoionization and vacancy decay in endohedrals and to positron-atom scattering. The book is richly illustrated. The methods used are one-electron Hartree-Fock and the technique of Feynman diagrams that permits to include many-electron correlations. This is done in the frames of the Random Phase approximation with exchange and the many-body perturbation theory. Newly obtained and previously collected atomic data are presented. The atomic data are useful for investigating the electronic structure and physical processes in solids and liquids, molecules and clusters, astronomical objects, solar and planet atmospheres and atomic nucleus. Deep understanding of chemical reactions and processes is reached by deep and accurate knowledge of atomic structure and processes with participation of atoms. This book is useful for theorists performing research in different domains of contemporary physics, chemistry and biology, technologists working on production of new materials and for experimentalists performing research in the field of photon and electron interaction with atoms, molecules, solid bodies and liquids.

  5. Physical behaviors of impure atoms during relaxation of impure NiAl-based alloy grain boundary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation with the energetics described by the embedded atom method has been employed to mainly study physical behaviors of boron atoms during relaxation of the Ni3Al-x at.% B grain boundary. During relaxation of impure Ni3Al grain boundaries, we suggest that for different types of impure atoms(Mg, B, Cr and Zr atoms etc.), as the segregating species, they have the different behaviors, but as the inducing species, they have the same behaviors, i.e. they all induce Ni atoms to substitute Al atoms. Calculations show that at the equilibrium, when x(the B bulk concentration) increases from 0.1 to 0.9 , the peak concentration of B increases, correspondently, the peak concentration of Ni maximizes but the valley concentration of Al minimizes, at x = 0.5. The calculations also show the approximate saturation of Ni at the grain boundary at x = 0.5.

  6. International Conference 'Current Problems in Nuclear Physics and Atomic Energy'. May 29 - Jun 03 2006. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collective processes in atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions and processes with exotic nuclei, rare nuclear processes, relativistic nuclear physics, neutron physics, physics of nuclear reactors, problems of atomic energy and reactors of the future, applied nuclear physics and technique of experiments was discussed in this conference

  7. Interlaboratory comparison of traceable atomic force microscope pitch measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixson, Ronald; Chernoff, Donald A.; Wang, Shihua; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Tan, Siew Leng; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Advanced Surface Microscopy (ASM), and the National Metrology Centre (NMC) of the Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR) in Singapore have completed a three-way interlaboratory comparison of traceable pitch measurements using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The specimen being used for this comparison is provided by ASM and consists of SiO2 lines having a 70 nm pitch patterned on a silicon substrate. NIST has a multifaceted program in atomic force microscope (AFM) dimensional metrology. One component of this effort is a custom in-house metrology AFM, called the calibrated AFM (C-AFM). The NIST C-AFM has displacement metrology for all three axes traceable to the 633 nm wavelength of the iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser - a recommended wavelength for realization of the SI (Système International d'Unités, or International System of Units) meter. NIST used the C-AFM to participate in this comparison. ASM used a commercially available AFM with an open-loop scanner, calibrated by a 144 nm pitch transfer standard. In a prior collaboration with Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German national metrology institute, ASM's transfer standard was calibrated using PTB's traceable optical diffractometry instrument. Thus, ASM's measurements are also traceable to the SI meter. NMC/A*STAR used a large scanning range metrological atomic force microscope (LRM-AFM). The LRM-AFM integrates an AFM scanning head into a nano-stage equipped with three built-in He-Ne laser interferometers so that its measurement related to the motion on all three axes is directly traceable to the SI meter. The measurements for this interlaboratory comparison have been completed and the results are in agreement within their expanded uncertainties and at the level of a few parts in 104.

  8. Atomic physics with highly-charged ions at the future FAIR facility: A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehlker, Th. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany) and Institut fuer Kernphysik, University of Frankfurt (Germany)]. E-mail: t.stoehlker@gsi.de; Beyer, H.F. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Brandau, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Kozhuharov, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Kluge, H.J. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Th. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Mann, R. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Noertershaeuser, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Quint, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Schramm, U. [LMU, Munich (Germany); Schuch, R. [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-08-15

    Key features of the future international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) offer a range of new and challenging opportunities for atomic physics research in the realm of highly-charged heavy ions and exotic nuclei. Centred on use of FAIR, the Stored Particle Atomic Physics Research Collaboration (SPARC), organized in working groups, has been formed. A short report on the tasks and activities of the various SPARC working groups, devoted to the realization of experimental equipments and set-ups required to reach the physics goals is given.

  9. Atomic physics with highly-charged ions at the future FAIR facility. A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehlker, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Beyer, H.F.; Braeuning, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (DE)] (and others)

    2006-11-15

    The key features of the future international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) offer a range of new and challenging opportunities for atomic physics research in the realm of highly-charged heavy ions and exotic nuclei. Centred on use of FAIR, the Stored Particle Atomic Physics Research Collaboration (SPARC), organized in working groups, has been formed. A short report on the tasks and activities of the various SPARC working groups, devoted to the realization of experimental equipments and setups required to reach the physics goals is given. (orig.)

  10. An all-optical vector atomic magnetometer for fundamental physics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, David; Mateos, Ignacio; Zhivun, Elena; Patton, Brian; Fierlinger, Peter; Beck, Douglas; Budker, Dmitry

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a laboratory prototype of a compact all-optical vector magnetometer. Due to their high precision and absolute accuracy, atomic magnetometers are crucial sensors in fundamental physics experiments which require extremely stable magnetic fields (e.g., neutron EDM searches). This all-optical sensor will allow high-resolution measurements of the magnitude and direction of a magnetic field without perturbing the magnetic environment. Moreover, its absolute accuracy makes it calibration-free, an advantage in space applications (e.g., space-based gravitational-wave detection). Magnetometry in precision experiments or space applications also demands long-term stability and well-understood noise characteristics at frequencies below 10-4 Hz. We have characterized the low-frequency noise floor of this sensor and will discuss methods to improve its long-time performance.

  11. PREFACE: 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jim F.; Buckman, Steve; Bieske, Evan J.

    2009-09-01

    These proceedings arose from the 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP) which was held at the University of Western Australia 24-28 November 2008. The history of AISAMP (Takayanagi and Matsuzawa 2002) recognizes its origin from the Japan-China meeting of 1985, and the first use of the name 'The First Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)' in 1992. The initial attendees, Japan and China, were joined subsequently by scientists from Korea, Taiwan, India, Australia and recently by Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Turkey Iran, UK and USA. The main purpose of the biennial AISAMP series is to create a wide forum for exchanging ideas and information among atomic and molecular scientists and to promote international collaboration. The scope of the AISAMP8 meeting included pure, strategic and applied research involving atomic and molecular structure and processes in all forms of matter and antimatter. For 2008 the AISAMP conference incorporated the Australian Atomic and Molecular Physics and Quantum Chemistry meeting. The topics for AISAMP8 embraced themes from earlier AISAMP meetings and reflected new interests, in atomic and molecular structures, spectroscopy and collisions; atomic and molecular physics with laser or synchrotron radiation; quantum information processing using atoms and molecules; atoms and molecules in surface physics, nanotechnology, biophysics, atmospheric physics and other interdisciplinary studies. The implementation of the AISAMP themes, as well as the international representation of research interests, is indicated both in the contents list of these published manuscripts as well as in the program for the meeting. Altogether, 184 presentations were made at the 8th AISAMP, including Invited Talks and Contributed Poster Presentations, of which 60 appear in the present Proceedings after review by expert referees in accordance with the usual practice of Journal of Physics: Conference Series of

  12. Measurement properties of patient-specific instruments measuring physical function.

    OpenAIRE

    Barten, J.A.; Pisters, M.F.; Huisman, P.A.; Takken, T; Veenhof, C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify patient-specific self-assessment instruments, which measure physical function in patients with musculoskeletal disorders and to evaluate the descriptive properties and the psychometric qualities of these instruments. Study Design and Setting: After a systematic search, included instruments were evaluated psychometrically by the checklist “quality criteria for measurement properties of health status instruments.” Results: Twenty-three studies were included, referring to ...

  13. Towards Relativistic Atomic Physics and Post-Minkowskian Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lusanna, Luca

    2009-01-01

    A review is given of the formulation of relativistic atomic theory, in which there is an explicit realization of the Poincare' generators, both in the inertial and in the non-inertial rest-frame instant form of dynamics in Minkowski space-time. This implies the need to solve the problem of the relativistic center of mass of an isolated system and to describe the transitions from different conventions for clock synchronization, namely for the identifications of instantaneous 3-spaces, as gauge transformations. These problems, stemming from the Lorentz signature of space-time, are a source of non-locality, which induces a spatial non-separability in relativistic quantum mechanics, with implications for relativistic entanglement. Then the classical system of charged particles plus the electro-magnetic field is studied in the framework of ADM canonical tetrad gravity in asymptotically Minkowskian space-times admitting the ADM Poincare' group at spatial infinity, which allows to get the general relativistic extens...

  14. Measurement properties of patient-specific instruments measuring physical function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barten, J.A.; Pisters, M.F.; Huisman, P.A.; Takken, T.; Veenhof, C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify patient-specific self-assessment instruments, which measure physical function in patients with musculoskeletal disorders and to evaluate the descriptive properties and the psychometric qualities of these instruments. Study Design and Setting: After a systematic search, include

  15. Measuring covariation in RNA alignments: Physical realism improves information measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgreen, Stinus; Gardner, Paul Phillip; Krogh, Anders

    2006-01-01

    part of such an analysis is to measure covariation between two positions in an alignment. Here, we rank various measures ranging from simple mutual information to more advanced covariation measures. Results: Mutual information is still used for secondary structure prediction, but the results...... of this study indicate which measures are useful. Incorporating more structural information by considering e.g. indels and stacking improves accuracy, suggesting that physically realistic measures yield improved predictions. This can be used to improve both current and future programs for secondary structure...... prediction. The best measure tested is the RNAalifold covariation measure modified to include stacking. Availability: Scripts, data and supplementary material can be found at http://www.binf.ku.dk/Stinus_covariation Contact: stinus@binf.ku.dk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available...

  16. Atomic physics with highly-charged heavy ions at the GSI future facility: The scientific program of the SPARC collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehlker, Th. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: t.stoehlker@gsi.de; Beier, T. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Beyer, H.F. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Bosch, F. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Gumberidze, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Kozhuharov, C. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Th. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Mann, R. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Mokler, P.H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Quint, W. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Schuch, R. [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Warczak, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland)

    2005-07-01

    In the current report a short overview about the envisioned program of the atomic physics research collaboration SPARC (Stored Particle Atomic Research Collaboration, at the new international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI is given. In addition, a condensed description of the planned experimental areas devoted to atomic physics research at the new facility is presented.

  17. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  18. Measuring the Earth's gravity field with cold atom interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Carraz, Olivier; Massotti, Luca; Haagmans, Roger; Silvestrin, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    The scope of the paper is to propose different concepts for future space gravity missions using Cold Atom Interferometers (CAI) for measuring the diagonal elements of the gravity gradient tensor, the spacecraft angular velocity and the spacecraft acceleration. The aim is to achieve better performance than previous space gravity missions due to a very low white noise spectral behaviour of the CAI instrument and a very high common mode rejection, with the ultimate goals of determining the fine structures of the gravity field with higher accuracy than GOCE and detecting time-variable signals in the gravity field.

  19. Analog to Digital Conversion in Physical Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Kapitaniak, T; Feudel, U; Grebogi, C

    1999-01-01

    There exist measuring devices where an analog input is converted into a digital output. Such converters can have a nonlinear internal dynamics. We show how measurements with such converting devices can be understood using concepts from symbolic dynamics. Our approach is based on a nonlinear one-to-one mapping between the analog input and the digital output of the device. We analyze the Bernoulli shift and the tent map which are realized in specific analog/digital converters. Furthermore, we discuss the sources of errors that are inevitable in physical realizations of such systems and suggest methods for error reduction.

  20. Progress towards precision measurements of beta-decay correlation parameters using atom and ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Melconian, D; Fenker, B; Mehlman, M; Shidling, P D; Anholm, M; Ashery, D; Behr, J A; Gorelov, A; Gwinner, G; Olchankski, K; Smale, S

    2014-01-01

    The correlations of the decay products following the beta decay of nuclei have a long history of providing a low-energy probe of the fundamental symmetries of our universe. Over half a century ago, the correlation of the electrons following the decay of polarized 60Co demonstrated that parity is not conserved in weak interactions. Today, the same basic idea continues to be applied to search for physics beyond the standard model: make precision measurements of correlation parameters and look for deviations compared to their standard model predictions. Efforts to measure these parameters to the 0.1% level utilizing atom and ion trapping techniques are described.

  1. Unravelling CSH atomic structure via computational and experimental physical chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Abdolhosseini Qomi, Mohammad Javad; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Calcium Silicate Hydrate (CSH) is the main binding phase for the cement paste, which is responsible for its strength and creep behavior. This is a nonstoichiometric hydration phase with calcium to silicon ratio (C/S) ranging from 1 to 2.2. At low C/S ratios, the molecular structure of CSH resembles to that of Tobermorite minerals, whereas in high C/S ratios it mostly looks like disordered glasses. By taking advantage of tools of statistical physics, it is shown that CSH at a given C/S can be ...

  2. Lasers as a Bridge between Atomic and Nuclear Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Matinyan, Sergei G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of optical and UV laser radiation to several topics in low-energy nuclear physics. We consider the laser-induced nuclear anti-Stokes transitions, the laser-assisted and the laser-induced internal conversion, and the Electron Bridge and Inverse Electron Bridge mechanisms as tools for deexciting and exciting of low-lying nuclear isomeric states. A study of the anomalous, by low-lying, nuclear isomeric states (on an example of the $^{229}$Th nucleus) is present...

  3. Measurement of the absolute separation for atomic force microscopy measurements in the presence of adsorbed polymer

    OpenAIRE

    McKee, C. T.; Mosse, W. K. J.; Ducker, W. A.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate that the absolute separation between an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and a solid substrate can be measured in the presence of an irreversibly adsorbed polymer film. The separation is obtained from the analysis of a scattered evanescent wave that is generated at the surface of the solid. By comparing our scattering measurements to conventional AFM measurements, we also show an example where a conventional AFM measurement gives the incorrect force-distance profile. We valida...

  4. Proceedings of the workshop on fundamental muon physics: atoms, nuclei, and particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the proceedings of a workshop held at Los Alamos, January 20-22, 1986, to discuss present and future experiments with muons in particle, nuclear, and atomic physics. Special attention was paid to new developments in muon beams and detection devices. The workshop sessions were Muon Decay, Muon Capture, QED and Electroweak Interactions, Laser Spectroscopy of Muonic Atoms, High-Energy Muon-Nucleon and Muon-Nucleus Scattering, Muon Beams - New Developments, and Muon Catalysis

  5. Field-matter interaction in atomic and plasma physics, from fluctuations to the strongly nonlinear regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manuscript provides a theoretical description, sometimes illustrated by experimental results, of several examples of field-matter interaction in various domains of physics, showing how the same basic concepts and theoretical methods may be used in very different physics situations. The issues addressed here are nonlinear field-matter interaction in plasma physics within the framework of classical mechanics (with a particular emphasis on wave-particle interaction), the linear analysis of beam-plasma instabilities in the relativistic regime, and the quantum description of laser-atom interaction, including quantum electrodynamics. Novel methods are systematically introduced in order to solve some very old problems, like the nonlinear counterpart of the Landau damping rate in plasma physics, for example. Moreover, our results directly apply to inertial confinement fusion, laser propagation in an atomic vapor, ion acceleration in a magnetized plasma and the physics of the Reversed Field Pinch for magnetic fusion. (author)

  6. Educational, research and implementation activities in the Department of Atomic Physics at Plovdiv University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Atomic Physics at Plovdiv University has 40 year long experience in educating students in Atomic and Subatomic Physics. We aim at making the knowledge gained in nuclear physics part of the culture of our students. At the core of our educational activities lies our long and successful experience in studying the characteristics of atomic nuclei. In cooperation with JINR-Dubna we have studied the nuclei of approximately 40 percent of the periodic table elements. These studies also serve as a basis for the diverse implementation activities of the Department, which have an impressive geographical spread. In recent years our research has been focusing more specifically on radio-ecological issues with the valuable support of the Nuclear Regulatory Agency (NRA). Future more intense support on behalf of NRA's together with more dynamic links with other specialized units, such as the Kozloduy NPP in the first place, would considerably contribute to optimizing the effect of our overall activity. (authors)

  7. Long-lived BLOCH oscillations with bosonic sr atoms and application to gravity measurement at the micrometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, G; Poli, N; Sorrentino, F; Tino, G M

    2006-08-11

    We report on the observation of Bloch oscillations on the unprecedented time scale of several seconds. The experiment is carried out with ultracold bosonic 88Sr atoms loaded into a vertical optical standing wave. The negligible atom-atom elastic cross section and zero angular momentum in the ground state makes 88Sr an almost ideal Bose gas, insensitive to typical mechanisms of decoherence due to thermalization and external stray fields. The small size of the system enables precision measurements of forces at micrometer scale. This is a challenge in physics for studies of surfaces, Casimir effects, and searches for deviations from Newtonian gravity predicted by theories beyond the standard model.

  8. Precision spatial measurement of the hot rubidium atom in the three-dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Ullah, Rahmat; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of hot atoms with laser fields experiences a Doppler shift which can severely affect the precise spatial measurement of an atom. We suggest an experimentally realizable scheme to address this issue in three-dimension position measurement of a single atom in vapors of rubidium atoms. Three-level lambda type atom-field configuration is considered where a moving atom interacts with three orthogonal standing-wave laser fields and spatial information of the atom in 3D space is obtained via upper-level population using a weak probe laser field. The atom moves with a velocity along the probe laser field and due to the Doppler broadening the precision in the spatial information deteriorates significantly. It is reported that via a microwave field the precision in the position measurement of the single atom can be obtained in the hot rubidium atom overcoming the limitation posed by the Doppler shift.

  9. Proceedings of the workshop on opportunities for atomic physics using slow, highly-charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    The study of atomic physics with highly-charged ions is an area of intense activity at the present time because of a convergence of theoretical interest and advances in experimental techniques. The purpose of the Argonne ''Workshop on Opportunities for Atomic Physics Using Slow, Highly-Charged Ions'' was to bring together atomic, nuclear, and accelerator physicists in order to identify what new facilities would be most useful for the atomic physics community. The program included discussion of existing once-through machines, advanced ion sources, recoil ion techniques, ion traps, and cooler rings. One of the topics of the Workshop was to discuss possible improvement to the ANL Tandem-Linac facility (ATLAS) to enhance the capability for slowing down ions after they are stripped to a high-charge state (the Accel/Decel technique). Another topic was the opportunity for atomic physics provided by the ECR ion source which is being built for the Uranium Upgrade of ATLAS. 18 analytics were prepared for the individual papers in this volume.

  10. Interfacial forces between silica surfaces measured by atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal particle stability and some other interfacial phenomena are governed by interfacial force interactions. The two well known forces are van der Waals force and electrostatic force, as documented by the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Moreover, advances in modern instrumentation and colloid science suggested that some short-ranged forces or structure forces are important for relevant colloidal systems. The interfacial and/or molecular forces can be measured as a resultant force as function of separation distance by atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloid probe. This article presents a discussion on AFM colloid probe measurement of silica particle and silica wafer surfaces in solutions with some technical notifications in measurement and data convolution mechanisms. The measured forces are then analyzed and discussed based on the 'constant charge' and 'constant potential' models of DLVO theory. The difference between the prediction of DLVO theory and the measured results indicates that there is a strong short-range structure force between the two hydrophilic surfaces, even at extremely low ionic concentration, such as Milli-Q water purity solution.

  11. Preparation and measurement in quantum physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, James L.; Band, William

    1992-05-01

    To honor Henry Margenau on the occasion of his 90th birthday, we attempt in this essay to integrate certain aspects of the physics, philosophy, and pedagogy of quantum mechanics in a manner very much inspired by Margenau's idealist scientific epistemology. Over half a century ago, Margenau was perhaps the first philosopher of science to recognize and elaborate upon the essential distinction between the preparation of a quantum state and the measurement of an observable associated with a system in that state; yet in contemporary quantum texts that distinction rarely receives adequate emphasis even though, as we demonstrate, it may be explicated through a series of simple illustrations.

  12. Measurement Theory, Nomological Machine And Measurement Uncertainties (In Classical Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ave Mets

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Measurement is said to be the basis of exact sciences as the process of assigning numbers to matter (things or their attributes, thus making it possible to apply the mathematically formulated laws of nature to the empirical world. Mathematics and empiria are best accorded to each other in laboratory experiments which function as what Nancy Cartwright calls nomological machine: an arrangement generating (mathematical regularities. On the basis of accounts of measurement errors and uncertainties, I will argue for two claims: 1 Both fundamental laws of physics, corresponding to ideal nomological machine, and phenomenological laws, corresponding to material nomological machine, lie, being highly idealised relative to the empirical reality; and also laboratory measurement data do not describe properties inherent to the world independently of human understanding of it. 2 Therefore the naive, representational view of measurement and experimentation should be replaced with a more pragmatic or practice-based view.

  13. Applications of resonance ionization spectroscopy in atomic and molecular physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine topics of current interest in which we feel the use of RIS can yield significant contributions. To this end we discuss several previous studies as examples of the methods involved and then suggest a variety of specific experiments, the performance of which, we endeavor to show, should be possible with present-day technology. The areas of consideration are: (1) laser excitation with relatively broad bandwidth lasers; (2) measurements of photoionization cross sections; and (3) studies of collision and transport processes. Particular attention is given to the inert gases and to diatomic molecules

  14. Classical stochastic measurement trajectories: Bosonic atomic gases in an optical cavity and quantum measurement backaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark D.; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2014-08-01

    We formulate computationally efficient classical stochastic measurement trajectories for a multimode quantum system under continuous observation. Specifically, we consider the nonlinear dynamics of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate contained within an optical cavity subject to continuous monitoring of the light leaking out of the cavity. The classical trajectories encode within a classical phase-space representation a continuous quantum measurement process conditioned on a given detection record. We derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the quasiprobability distribution of the combined condensate-cavity system. We unravel the dynamics into stochastic classical trajectories that are conditioned on the quantum measurement process of the continuously monitored system. Since the dynamics of a continuously measured observable in a many-atom system can be closely approximated by classical dynamics, the method provides a numerically efficient and accurate approach to calculate the measurement record of a large multimode quantum system. Numerical simulations of the continuously monitored dynamics of a large atom cloud reveal considerably fluctuating phase profiles between different measurement trajectories, while ensemble averages exhibit local spatially varying phase decoherence. Individual measurement trajectories lead to spatial pattern formation and optomechanical motion that solely result from the measurement backaction. The backaction of the continuous quantum measurement process, conditioned on the detection record of the photons, spontaneously breaks the symmetry of the spatial profile of the condensate and can be tailored to selectively excite collective modes.

  15. Atomic Oscillator Strengths by Emission Spectroscopy and Lifetime Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, W. L.; Griesmann, U.; Kling, R.; Musielok, J.

    2002-11-01

    Over the last seven years, we have carried out numerous oscillator strength measurements for some light and medium heavy elements (Musielok et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000; Veres & Wiese 1996; Griesmann et al. 1997; Bridges & Wiese 1998; Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Gries- mann 2000; Bridges & Wiese to be published). Most recently we have determined numerous transitions of Mu II (Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Griesmann 2000) and are now working on Cl I (Bridges & Wiese to be published). See the summary statement at the end of the text. For the emission measurements, we have applied either a high-current wall-stabilized arc (described for example, in Musielok et al. (1999)), or a high-current hollow cathode, or a Penning discharge. The latter two sources were used for branching ratio measurements from common upper 1ev- els, while the wall-stabilized arc was operated at atmospheric pressure under the condition of partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, which allows the measurement of relative transition probabilities. Absolute data were obtained by combining the emission results with lifetime data measured by other research groups, especially the University of Hannover, with which we have closely collaborated. This group uses the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Our emission spectra were recorded for the light elements with a 2 m grating spectrometer, or, for Mu II, with an FT 700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. The radiometric calibration was carried out with a tungsten strip lamp for the visible part of the spectrum and with a deuterium lamp for the ultraviolet. All measurements were made under optically thin conditions, which was checked by doubling the path length with a focusing mirror setup. Typical uncertainties of the measured oscillator strengths are estimated to be in the range 15%-20% (one-standard deviation). However, discrepancies with advanced atomic structure theories are sometimes much larger. In Tables 1-3 and Fig. 1, we

  16. A New ECR Ion Source for Atomic Physics Research at IMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source (LECR3-Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No.3) was constructed this year. The main purpose of this source is to provide highly charged ion beams for atomic physics and surface physics research. The design of this ion source is based on the IMP 14.5 GHz ECR ion source (LECR2-Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No.2) with double RF heating

  17. Theoretical Models for Surface Forces and Adhesion and Their Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo N. Oliveira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS, it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of afs, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution.

  18. Atomic physics of shocked plasma in winds of massive stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Owocki, Stanley P. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); CRESST/UMBC (United States); Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA 19081 (United States); Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2012-05-25

    High resolution diffraction grating spectra of X-ray emission from massive stars obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revolutionized our understanding of their powerful, radiation-driven winds. Emission line shapes and line ratios provide diagnostics on a number of key wind parameters. Modeling of resolved emission line velocity profiles allows us to derive independent constraints on stellar mass-loss rates, leading to downward revisions of a factor of a few from previous measurements. Line ratios in He-like ions strongly constrain the spatial distribution of Xray emitting plasma, confirming the expectations of radiation hydrodynamic simulations that X-ray emission begins moderately close to the stellar surface and extends throughout the wind. Some outstanding questions remain, including the possibility of large optical depths in resonance lines, which is hinted at by differences in line shapes of resonance and intercombination lines from the same ion. Resonance scattering leads to nontrivial radiative transfer effects, and modeling it allows us to place constraints on shock size, density, and velocity structure.

  19. Atomic Physics of Shocked Plasma in Winds of Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution diffraction grating spectra of X-ray emission from massive stars obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revolutionized our understanding of their powerful, radiation-driven winds. Emission line shapes and line ratios provide diagnostics on a number of key wind parameters. Modeling of resolved emission line velocity profiles allows us to derive independent constraints on stellar mass-loss rates, leading to downward revisions of a factor of a few from previous measurements. Line ratios in He-like ions strongly constrain the spatial distribution of Xray emitting plasma, confirming the expectations of radiation hydrodynamic simulations that X-ray emission begins moderately close to the stellar surface and extends throughout the wind. Some outstanding questions remain, including the possibility of large optical depths in resonance lines, which is hinted at by differences in line shapes of resonance and intercombination lines from the same ion. Resonance scattering leads to nontrivial radiative transfer effects, and modeling it allows us to place constraints on shock size, density, and velocity structure

  20. Physics. Experimental and theoretical foundations. Pt. 3. Atomic, molecular, and quantum physics. 2. ed.; Physik. Experimentelle und theoretische Grundlagen. T. 3. Atom-, Molekuel- und Quantenphysik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Reinhart [Konstanz Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich Physik

    2012-07-01

    This textbook mediates in three volumes the matter of the first four semester of the bachelor respectively master course. The otherwise generally usual separate presentation of experimental and theoretical physics is canceled in favor of an integrated treatment. The advances are obvious: The studying is enabled to learn to understand knowledge gotten by means of experiments also immediately in a quantitative formulation. The can equally be used as textbook to an integrated course and to separated courses. Because the relevant theoretical concepts are developed without gap a special book of theoretical physics is unnecessary. Numerous exercise problems deepen the understanding and help directly in the preparation for examinations. The illustrations are mostly presented in two colours. Volume III treats atomic and molecular physics. After a semiclassical presentation the quantum-mechanical foundations are developed and in the following chapters applied to atomic systems and processes. An introduction in the foundations and application of the laser. The closure is formed by a chapter about entangled systems.

  1. Measurement of an atomic quadrupole moment using dynamic decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Shaniv, Ravid; Ozeri, Roee

    2016-05-01

    Some of the best clocks today are ion-based optical clocks. These clocks are referenced to a narrow optical transition in a trapped ion. An example for such a narrow transition is the electric quadrupole E 2 transition between states with identical parity. An important systematic shift of such a transition is the quadrupole shift resulting from the electric field gradient inherent to the ion trap. We present a new dynamic decoupling method that rejects magnetic field noise while measuring the small quadrupole shift of the optical clock transition. Using our sequence we measured the quadrupole moment of the 4D5/2 level in a trapped 88 Sr+ ion to be 2 .973-0 . 033 + 0 . 026 ea02 , where e is the electron charge and a0 is the Bohr radius. Our measurement improves the uncertainty of this value by an order of magnitude and thus helps mitigate an important systematic uncertainty in 88 Sr+ based optical atomic clocks and verifies complicated many-body quantum calculations.

  2. Physical and chemical nature of the scaling relations between adsorption energies of atoms on metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calle-Vallejo, F.; Martínez, J. I.; García Lastra, Juan Maria;

    2012-01-01

    Despite their importance in physics and chemistry, the origin and extent of the scaling relations between the energetics of adsorbed species on surfaces remain elusive. We demonstrate here that scalability is not exclusive to adsorbed atoms and their hydrogenated species but rather a general...

  3. Do General Physics Textbooks Discuss Scientists' Ideas about Atomic Structure? A Case in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, Mansoor; Kwon, Sangwoon; Kim, Nahyun; Lee, Gyoungho

    2013-01-01

    Research in science education has recognized the importance of teaching atomic structure within a history and philosophy of science perspective. The objective of this study is to evaluate general physics textbooks published in Korea based on the eight criteria developed in previous research. The result of this study shows that Korean general…

  4. Atomic and molecular physics, physicochemical properties of biologically important structure, and high-voltage research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research in atomic and molecular physics is reported. Studies included: experimental evidence for the existence of a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in liquid methane and liquid argon; discovery of a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in gaseous ethane and propane; motion of thermal electrons in n-alkane vapors; electron mobilities in high pressure gases; electron capture and drift in liquid media; electron attachment to molecules in dense gases; attachment of slow electrons to hexafluorobenzene; fragmentation of atmospheric halocarbons under electron impact; negative ion resonances and threshold electron excitation spectra of organic molecules; theoretical studies of negative-ion resonance states of organic molecules; kinetics of electron capture by sulfur hexafluoride in solution; interactions of slow electrons with benzene and benzene derivatives; Stokes and anti-Stokes fluorescence of 1 : 12-benzoperylene in solution; photoionization of molecules in liquid media; construction of high-voltage breakdown apparatus for gaseous insulation studies; measurements of the breakdown strengths of gaseous insulators and their relation to basic electron-collision processes; accuracy of the breakdown voltage measurements; and assembling basic data on electronegative gases of significance to breakdown

  5. A high density target of ultracold atoms and momentum resolved measurements of ion-atom collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Götz, Simone Andrea

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis an ultracold high density target with high loading flux in combination with a recoil ion momentum spectrometer (RIMS) is presented. Trapped rubidium atoms serve as a high density target (up to 10¹¹ atoms/cm³) at a temperature of only 200 µK. The target is loaded from a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap (2D MOT), which delivers an atom beam with a brilliance of 8 x 10¹² atoms/(s*rad) and a longitudinal momentum spread of 0.25 a.u.. The great advantage of this source is that t...

  6. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T., E-mail: tomomi.fujita@riken.jp [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Shimoda, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan); Collaboration: OROCHI Collaboration

    2015-11-15

    A new laser spectroscopic method named “OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)” has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with {sup 84−87}Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  7. Direct measurement of the van der Waals interaction between two single atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Béguin, Lucas; Chicireanu, Radu; Lahaye, Thierry; Browaeys, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    We report on the direct measurement of the van der Waals interaction between two isolated, single Rydberg atoms separated by a controlled distance of a few micrometers. By working in a regime where the single-atom Rabi frequency of the laser used for excitation to the Rydberg state is comparable to the interaction energy, we observe a \\emph{partial} Rydberg blockade, whereby the time-dependent populations of the various two-atom states exhibit coherent oscillations with several frequencies. A quantitative comparison of the data with a simple model based on the optical Bloch equations allows us to extract the van der Waals energy, and to observe its characteristic $C_6/R^6$ dependence. The magnitude of the measured $C_6$ coefficient agrees well with an \\emph{ab-initio} theoretical calculation, and we observe its dramatic increase with the principal quantum number $n$ of the Rydberg state. Our results not only allow to test an important physical law, but also demonstrate a degree of experimental control which o...

  8. IMPACT OF PLANETARY GRAVITATION ON HIGH-PRECISION NEUTRAL ATOM MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucharek, H.; Möbius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Park, J.; Schwadron, N. A [University of New Hampshire, 8 College Road, Durham, NH, 03824 (United States); Galli, A.; Wurz, P. [Physikalisches Institut der Universität Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Bzowski, M. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-10-15

    Measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) have been extremely successful in providing very important information on the physical processes inside and outside of our heliosphere. For instance, recent Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observations have provided new insights into the local interstellar environment and improved measurements of the interstellar He temperature, velocity, and direction of the interstellar flow vector. Since particle collisions are rare, and radiation pressure is negligible for these neutrals, gravitational forces mainly determine the trajectories of neutral He atoms. Depending on the distance of an ENA to the source of a gravitational field and its relative speed and direction, this can result in significant deflection and acceleration. In this paper, we investigate the impact of the gravitational effects of Earth, the Moon, and Jupiter on ENA measurements performed in Earth’s orbit. The results show that current analysis of the interstellar neutral parameters by IBEX is not significantly affected by planetary gravitational effects. We further studied the possibility of whether or not the Helium focusing cone of the Sun and Jupiter could be measured by IBEX and whether or not these cones could be used as an independent measure of the temperature of interstellar Helium.

  9. Measurement of the temperature of atomic ensembles via \\emph{which-way} information

    CERN Document Server

    León-Montiel, R de J

    2011-01-01

    We unveil the relationship existing between the temperature of an atomic ensemble of three-level atoms in a $\\Lambda$-configuration, and the width of the emission cone of Stokes photons that are spontaneously emitted when atoms are excited by an optical beam. This relationship, which is based on the amount of \\emph{which-way} information available about where the Stokes photon originated during the interaction, allow us to put forward a new scheme to determine the temperature of atomic clouds by measuring the width of the emission cone. Unlike the commonly used time-of-flight measurements, with this new technique, the atomic cloud is not destroyed during each measurement.

  10. SASP. Contributions to the 13. Symposium on atomic and surface physics and related topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The XIII symposium on Atomic and Surface Physics and related Topics (SASP) is devoted to cover the research of interactions between ions, electrons, photons, atoms, molecules and clusters and their interaction with surfaces. This year there was a special session dedicated to proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry covering its applications in different fields and a mini symposium on the radiation action on bio-molecules such as uracil. The contributions included in the proceeding correspond to invited lectures and poster sessions, consisting of short and extended abstracts as well as short articles. (nevyjel)

  11. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Atomic Physics" by E. Uggerhoj

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  12. Nonlinear optical and atomic systems at the interface of physics and mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Garreau, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the interface between mathematics and physics, this book offers an introduction to the physics, the mathematics, and the numerical simulation of nonlinear systems in optics and atomic physics. The text covers a wide spectrum of current research on the subject, which is  an extremely active field in physics and mathematical physics, with a very broad range of implications, both for fundamental science and technological applications: light propagation in microstructured optical fibers, Bose-Einstein condensates, disordered systems, and the newly emerging field of nonlinear quantum mechanics.   Accessible to PhD students, this book will also be of interest to post-doctoral researchers and seasoned academics.

  13. Atomic force microscopy and direct surface force measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ralston, J.; Larson, I.; Rutland, M.; Feiler, A.; Kleijn, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is designed to provide high-resolution (in the ideal case, atomic) topographical analysis, applicable to both conducting and nonconducting surfaces. The basic imaging principle is very simple: a sample attached to a piezoelectric positioner is rastered beneath a sha

  14. Measurements of Scattering Processes in Negative Ion- Atom Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvale, T. J.

    2000-12-22

    The main research activity is to study various scattering processes which occur in H{sup -} collisions with atomic (specifically, noble gas and atomic hydrogen) targets in the intermediate energy region. These processes include: elastic scattering, single- and double-electron detachment, and target excitation/ionization.

  15. Light-shift measurement and suppression in atomic spin gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wan, Shuangai; Chen, Yao; Li, Rujie

    2012-11-01

    We present a method to determine and suppress the light shift in an atomic spin gyroscope. This method doesn't require additional drive source or frequency modulation, and it is based on the dynamics of an atomic spin gyroscope to determine a clean curve as a function of the frequency of the pump beam that predicts the zero light shift. We experimentally validate the method in a Cs-(129)Xe atomic spin gyroscope and verify the results through numerical simulations. This method can also be applied to an atomic spin magnetometer based on the spin-exchange relaxation-free exchange that experiences light shift. The method is useful for atomic spin devices because it can improve long-term performance and reduce the influence of the laser.

  16. Precision Measurement of the Newtonian Gravitational Constant Using Cold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Rosi, G; Cacciapuoti, L; Prevedelli, M; Tino, G M

    2014-01-01

    About 300 experiments have tried to determine the value of the Newtonian gravitational constant, G, so far, but large discrepancies in the results have made it impossible to know its value precisely. The weakness of the gravitational interaction and the impossibility of shielding the effects of gravity make it very difficult to measure G while keeping systematic effects under control. Most previous experiments performed were based on the torsion pendulum or torsion balance scheme as in the experiment by Cavendish in 1798, and in all cases macroscopic masses were used. Here we report the precise determination of G using laser-cooled atoms and quantum interferometry. We obtain the value G=6.67191(99) x 10^(-11) m^3 kg^(-1) s^(-2) with a relative uncertainty of 150 parts per million (the combined standard uncertainty is given in parentheses). Our value differs by 1.5 combined standard deviations from the current recommended value of the Committee on Data for Science and Technology. A conceptually different exper...

  17. Youth Physical Activity Resources Use and Activity Measured by Accelerometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andréa L.; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether utilization of physical activity resources (eg, parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. Methods 111 adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported utilization of a physical activity resource (none/1+ resources). The main outcomes were total minutes spent in daily 1) moderate-vigorous physical activity and 2) vigorous physical activity. Results Utilizing a physical activity resource was significantly associated with total minutes in moderate-vigorous physical activity. African-Americans and males had significantly greater moderate-vigorous physical activity. Conclusions Results from this study support the development and use of physical activity resources. PMID:21204684

  18. Measuring the weak value of momentum in a double slit atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, J.; Edmunds, P. D.; Barker, P. F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the development of an experiment to measure the weak value of the transverse momentum operator (local momentum [1]) of cold atoms passing through a matter- wave interferometer. The results will be used to reconstruct the atom's average trajectories. We describe our progress towards this goal using laser cooled argon atoms.

  19. Atomic Physics Effects on Convergent, Child-Langmuir Ion Flow between Nearly Transparent Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarius, John F. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Emmert, Gilbert A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2013-11-07

    Research during this project at the University of Wisconsin Fusion Technology Institute (UW FTI) on ion and neutral flow through an arbitrary, monotonic potential difference created by nearly transparent electrodes accomplished the following: (1) developed and implemented an integral equation approach for atomic physics effects in helium plasmas; (2) extended the analysis to coupled integral equations that treat atomic and molecular deuterium ions and neutrals; (3) implemented the key deuterium and helium atomic and molecular cross sections; (4) added negative ion production and related cross sections; and (5) benchmarked the code against experimental results. The analysis and codes treat the species D0, D20, D+, D2+, D3+, D and, separately at present, He0 and He+. Extensions enhanced the analysis and related computer codes to include He++ ions plus planar and cylindrical geometries.

  20. ELENA MCP detector: absolute efficiency measurement for low energy neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispoli, R.; De Angelis, E.; Colasanti, L.; Vertolli, N.; Orsini, S.; Scheer, J.; Mura, A.; Milillo, A.; Wurz, P.; Selci, S.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Leoni, R.; D'Alessandro, M.; Mattioli, F.; Cibella, S.

    2012-04-01

    MicroChannel plates (MCP) detectors are frequently used in space instrumentation for detecting a wide range of radiation and particles. In particular, the capability to detect non-thermal low energy neutral species is crucial for the sensor ELENA (Emitted Low-Energy Neutral Atoms), part of the package SERENA (Search for Exospheric Refilling and Emitted Natural Abundances) on board the BepiColombo mission to Mercury to be launched in 2014. ELENA is a TOF sensor, based on a novel concept ultra-sonic oscillating shutter (Start section)which is operated at frequencies up to 50 kHz; a MCP detector is used as a Stop section. It is aimed to detect neutral atoms in the range 10 eV - 5 keV, within 70° FOV, perpendicular to the S/C orbital plane. ELENA will monitor the emission of neutral atoms from the whole surface of Mercury thanks to the spacecraft motion. The major scientific objectives are the interaction between the environment and the planet, the global particle loss-rate and the remote sensing of the surface properties. In particular, surface release processes are investigated by identifying particles release from the surface, via solar wind-induced ion sputtering (100 eV) as well as Hydrogen back-scattered at hundreds eV. MCP absolute detection efficiency for very low energy neutral atoms (EMEFISTO facility of the Physical Institute of University of Bern (CH), measurements on three different type of MCPs coating have been performed providing the behaviors of MCP detection efficiency in the range 10eV-1keV. Outcomes from such measurements are here discussed.

  1. Medical physics in Europe following recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casar Bozidar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Medical physics is a health profession where principles of applied physics are mostly directed towards the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. The key role of the medical physics expert in safe and effective use of ionizing radiation in medicine was widely recognized in recent European reference documents like the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (2014, and European Commission Radiation Protection No. 174, European Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert (2014. Also the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA has been outspoken in supporting and fostering the status of medical physics in radiation medicine through multiple initiatives as technical and cooperation projects and important documents like IAEA Human Health Series No. 25, Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (2013 and the International Basic Safety Standards, General Safety Requirements Part 3 (2014. The significance of these documents and the recognition of the present insufficient fulfilment of the requirements and recommendations in many European countries have led the IAEA to organize in 2015 the Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe, where major issues in medical physics in Europe were discussed. Most important outcomes of the meeting were the recommendations addressed to European member states and the survey on medical physics status in Europe conducted by the IAEA and European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics.

  2. Measurement of Velocity Distribution in Atomic Beam by Diode Laser with Narrow Line width

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jingbiao; WANG Fengzhi; YANG Donghai; WANG YiQiu

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, by using the detecting laser beam interacts with the atomic beam at a sharp angle and the Doppler frequency shift effect, the velocity distribution in cesium atomic beam is measured with a diode laser of narrow linewidth of 1 MHz. The effects of the atomic natural line width and cycling transition detecting factor on the measured results have been analyzed. Finally, the measured results have been compared with the theoretical calculation.

  3. Photon-correlation measurements of atomic-cloud temperature using an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Grover, J A; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L

    2015-01-01

    We develop a temperature measurement of an atomic cloud based on the temporal correlations of fluorescence photons evanescently coupled into an optical nanofiber. We measure the temporal width of the intensity-intensity correlation function due to atomic transit time and use it to determine the most probable atomic velocity, hence the temperature. This technique agrees well with standard time-of-flight temperature measurements. We confirm our results with trajectory simulations.

  4. Status and perspectives of atomic physics research at GSI: The new GSI accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehlker, Th. E-mail: t.stoehlker@gsi.de; Backe, H.; Beyer, H.F.; Bosch, F.; Braeuning-Demian, A.; Hagmann, S.; Ionescu, D.C.; Jungmann, K.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kuehl, Th.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.; Quint, W

    2003-05-01

    A short overview on the results of atomic physics research at the storage ring ESR is given followed by a presentation of the envisioned atomic physics program at the planned new GSI facility. The proposed new GSI facility will provide highest intensities of relativistic beams of both stable and unstable heavy nuclei - up to a Lorentz factor of 24. At those relativistic velocities, the energies of optical transitions, such as for lasers, are boosted into the X-ray region and the high-charge state ions generate electric and magnetic fields of exceptional strength. Together with high beam intensities a range of important experiments can be anticipated, for example electronic transitions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions such as dynamically induced e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs, test of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in strong fields, and ions and electrons in ultra-high intensity femtosecond laser fields.

  5. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: The development of the first Soviet atomic bomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, German A.; Ryabev, Lev D.

    2001-01-01

    In the late 1930s and early 1940s, two remarkable physical phenomena — the fission of heavy nuclei and the chain fission reaction — were discovered, implying that a new powerful source of energy (nuclear fission energy) might become a practical possibility for mankind. At that time, however, the political situation in the world made the development of the atomic bomb the main objective of nuclear energy research in the countries involved. The first atomic bombs, notoriously used in the war against Japan, were produced by the United States of America only six and a half years after the discovery of fission. Four years later, the first Soviet atomic bomb was tested. This was a major step toward the establishment of nuclear parity which led to stability and global peace and thus greatly influenced the destiny of human kind. Based on documentary materials covering the period from 1939 to 1949, this paper traces the origin and evolution of the physical ideas behind the first Soviet atomic bomb and discusses the most important events associated with the project.

  6. Depletion interaction measured by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijting, W.K.; Knoben, W.; Besseling, N.A.M.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the depletion interaction between stearylated silica surfaces in cyclohexane in the presence of dissolved polydimethylsiloxane by means of colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. We found that the range of the depletion interaction decreases with increasing concentration. Furthermor

  7. Potential Impact of Biofield Energy Treatment on the Atomic, Physical and Thermal Properties Indium Powder

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Indium has gained significant attention in the semiconductor industries due to its unique thermal and optical properties. The objective of this research was to investigate the influence of the biofield energy treatment on the atomic, physical and thermal properties of the indium. The study was performed in two groups (control and treated). The control group remained as untreated, and treated group received Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment. Subsequently, the control and treated in...

  8. Evaluation of Atomic, Physical and Thermal Properties of Tellurium Powder: Impact of Biofield Energy Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Tellurium has gained significant attention due to its photoconductivity, piezoelectricity, and thermo conductivity properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of biofield energy treatment on thermal, physical and atomic properties of tellurium powder. The tellurium powder was equally divided in two parts: control and treated (T). The treated part was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment, whereas the control part was remained untreated. Subsequently, the ...

  9. Evaluation of Biofield Treatment on Physical, Atomic and Structural Characteristics of Manganese (II, III) Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    In Mn3O4, the crystal structure, dislocation density, particle size and spin of the electrons plays crucial role in modulating its magnetic properties. Present study investigates impact of Biofield treatment on physical and atomic properties of Mn3O4. X-ray diffraction revealed the significant effect of biofield on lattice parameter, unit cell volume, molecular weight, crystallite sizes and densities of treated Mn3O4. XRD analysis confirmed that crystallinity was enhanced and dislocation dens...

  10. Potential Impact of BioField Treatment on Atomic and Physical Characteristics of Magnesium

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra; Branton, Alice; Trivedi, Dahryn; Nayak, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg), present in every cell of all living organisms, is an essential nutrient and primarily responsible for catalytic reaction of over 300 enzymes. The aim of present study was to evaluate the effect of biofield treatment on atomic and physical properties of magnesium powder. Magnesium powder was divided into two parts denoted as control and treatment. Control part was remained as untreated and treatment part received biofield treatment. Both control and treated magnesium samples we...

  11. Potential Impact of BioField Treatment on Atomic and Physical Characteristics of Magnesium

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg), present in every cell of all living organisms, is an essential nutrient and primarily responsible for catalytic reaction of over 300 enzymes. The aim of present study was to evaluate the effect of biofield treatment on atomic and physical properties of magnesium powder. Magnesium powder was divided into two parts denoted as control and treatment. Control part was remained as untreated and treatment part received biofield treatment. Both control and treated ...

  12. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons - Spectroscopy and collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    This is the second volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 2 introduces lasers and quantum optics, while the main focus is on the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy, as well as on collision physics as the continuum counterpart to bound molecular states. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  13. Focus on topological physics: from condensed matter to cold atoms and optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Hui; Rechtsman, Mikael; Lu, Yuan-Ming; Yang, Kun

    2016-08-01

    The notions of a topological phase and topological order were first introduced in the studies of integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, and further developed in the study of topological insulators and topological superconductors in the past decade. Topological concepts are now widely used in many branches of physics, not only limited to condensed matter systems but also in ultracold atomic systems, photonic materials and trapped ions. Papers published in this focus issue are direct testaments of that, and readers will gain a global view of how topology impacts different branches of contemporary physics. We hope that these pages will inspire new ideas through communication between different fields.

  14. Status of Charge Exchange Cross Section Measurements for Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganic, I. N.; Havener, C. C.; Schultz, D. R.; Seely, D. G.; Schultz, P. C.

    2011-05-01

    Total cross sections of charge exchange (CX) for C5+, N6+, and O7+ ions on ground state atomic hydrogen are measured in an extended collision energy range of 1 - 20,000 eV/u. Absolute CX measurements are performed using an improved merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source mounted on a high voltage platform. In order to improve the problematic H+ signal collection for these exoergic CX collisions at low relative energies, a new double focusing electrostatic analyzer was installed. Experimental CX data are in good agreement with all previous H-oven relative measurements at higher collision energies. We compare our results with the most recent molecular orbital close-coupling (MOCC) and atomic orbital close-coupling (AOCC) theoretical calculations. Work supported by the NASA Solar & Heliospheric Physics Program NNH07ZDA001N, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences and the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. DoE.

  15. Measuring Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the research base on teacher effectiveness in physical education from a historical perspective and explores the implications of the recent emphasis on student performance and teacher observation systems to evaluate teachers for physical education. The problems and the potential positive effects of using student performance…

  16. Prospects for Forbidden-Transition Spectroscopy and Parity Violation Measurements using a Beam of Cold Stable or Radioactive Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sanguinetti, S; Lintz, M; Jacquier, P; Wasan, A; Bouchiat, M A; Jacquier, Ph.

    2003-01-01

    Laser cooling and trapping offers the possibility of confining a sample of radioactive atoms in free space. Here, we address the question of how best to take advantage of cold atom properties to perform the observation of as highly forbidden a line as the 6S-7S Cs transition for achieving, in the longer term, Atomic Parity Violation measurements in radioactive alkali isotopes. Another point at issue is whether one might do better with stable, cold atoms than with thermal atoms. To compensate for the large drawback of the small number of atoms available in a trap, one must take advantage of their low velocity. To lengthen the time of interaction with the excitation laser, we suggest choosing a geometry where the laser beam exciting the transition is colinear to a slow, cold atomic beam, either extracted from a trap or prepared by Zeeman slowing. We also suggest a new observable physical quantity manifesting APV, which presents several advantages:specificity, efficiency of detection, possibility of direct calib...

  17. From the Dawn of Nuclear Physics to the First Atomic Bombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolbright, Stephen; Schumacher, Jacob; Michonova-Alexova, Ekaterina

    2014-03-01

    This work gives a fresh look at the major discoveries leading to nuclear fission within the historical perspective. The focus is on the main contributors to the discoveries in nuclear physics, leading to the idea of fission and its application to the creation of the atomic bombs used at the end of the World War II. The present work is a more complete review on the history of the nuclear physics discoveries and their application to the atomic bomb. In addition to the traditional approach to the topic, focusing mainly on the fundamental physics discoveries in Europe and on the Manhattan Project in the United States, the nuclear research in Japan is also emphasized. Along with that, a review of the existing credible scholar publications, providing evidence for possible atomic bomb research in Japan, is provided. Proper credit is given to the women physicists, whose contributions had not always been recognized. Considering the historical and political situation at the time of the scientific discoveries, thought-provoking questions about decision-making, morality, and responsibility are also addressed. The work refers to the contributions of over 20 Nobel Prize winners. EM-A is grateful to Prof. Walter Grunden and to Prof. Emeritus Shadahiko Kano, Prof. Emeritus Monitori Hoshi for sharing their own notes, documents, and references, and to CCCU for sponsoring her participation in the 2013 Nuclear Weapons Seminar in Japan.

  18. Methods to Measure Physical Activity Behaviors in Health Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzhugh, Eugene C.

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) is an important concept to measure in health education research. The health education researcher might need to measure physical activity because it is the primary measure of interest, or PA might be a confounding measure that needs to be controlled for in statistical analysis. The purpose of this commentary is to…

  19. Measurements of scattering processes in negative ion - atom collisions. Technical progress report - year 1, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvale, T.J.

    1995-12-01

    This Technical Progress Report describes the progress made on the research objectives during the past twelve months. The objective of this research project is to provide absolute cross section measurements of various scattering processes which occur in negative ion collisions with atomic (specifically, noble gas and atomic hydrogen) targets at intermediate energies. These processes include: elastic scattering, single- and double-electron detachment, and target-inelastic processes of excitation and ionization. Total cross sections for single- and double-electron detachment were recently published in Physical Review A from this research project. The researchers were successful this past year in acquiring the first cross section measurements of target excitation for H{sup -} impact on helium target atoms.

  20. Atomic physics for cave-men and other beginners. The universe from within. Molecules, atoms, and elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this essential can be found the structure and the general properties of atoms, the precise interior of atoms and the special behaviour resulting from it, and the mysterious world of ''quanta'' and their behaviour.

  1. Velocity distribution measurements in atomic beams generated using laser induced back-ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Denning, A; Lee, S; Ammonson, M; Bergeson, S D

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of calcium atoms in an atomic beam generated using a dual-stage laser back-ablation apparatus. Distributions are measured using a velocity selective Doppler time-of-flight technique. They are Boltzmann-like with rms velocities corresponding to temperatures above the melting point for calcium. Contrary to a recent report in the literature, this method does not generate a sub-thermal atomic beam.

  2. Physics for computer science students with emphasis on atomic and semiconductor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, Narciso

    1991-01-01

    This text is the product of several years' effort to develop a course to fill a specific educational gap. It is our belief that computer science students should know how a computer works, particularly in light of rapidly changing tech­ nologies. The text was designed for computer science students who have a calculus background but have not necessarily taken prior physics courses. However, it is clearly not limited to these students. Anyone who has had first-year physics can start with Chapter 17. This includes all science and engineering students who would like a survey course of the ideas, theories, and experiments that made our modern electronics age possible. This textbook is meant to be used in a two-semester sequence. Chapters 1 through 16 can be covered during the first semester, and Chapters 17 through 28 in the second semester. At Queens College, where preliminary drafts have been used, the material is presented in three lecture periods (50 minutes each) and one recitation period per week, 15 weeks p...

  3. Phases and Interfaces from Real Space Atomically Resolved Data: Physics-Based Deep Data Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Ziatdinov, Maxim; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2016-09-14

    Advances in electron and scanning probe microscopies have led to a wealth of atomically resolved structural and electronic data, often with ∼1-10 pm precision. However, knowledge generation from such data requires the development of a physics-based robust framework to link the observed structures to macroscopic chemical and physical descriptors, including single phase regions, order parameter fields, interfaces, and structural and topological defects. Here, we develop an approach based on a synergy of sliding window Fourier transform to capture the local analog of traditional structure factors combined with blind linear unmixing of the resultant 4D data set. This deep data analysis is ideally matched to the underlying physics of the problem and allows reconstruction of the a priori unknown structure factors of individual components and their spatial localization. We demonstrate the principles of this approach using a synthetic data set and further apply it for extracting chemical and physically relevant information from electron and scanning tunneling microscopy data. This method promises to dramatically speed up crystallographic analysis in atomically resolved data, paving the road toward automatic local structure-property determinations in crystalline and quasi-ordered systems, as well as systems with competing structural and electronic order parameters. PMID:27517608

  4. Phases and Interfaces from Real Space Atomically Resolved Data: Physics-Based Deep Data Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Ziatdinov, Maxim; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2016-09-14

    Advances in electron and scanning probe microscopies have led to a wealth of atomically resolved structural and electronic data, often with ∼1-10 pm precision. However, knowledge generation from such data requires the development of a physics-based robust framework to link the observed structures to macroscopic chemical and physical descriptors, including single phase regions, order parameter fields, interfaces, and structural and topological defects. Here, we develop an approach based on a synergy of sliding window Fourier transform to capture the local analog of traditional structure factors combined with blind linear unmixing of the resultant 4D data set. This deep data analysis is ideally matched to the underlying physics of the problem and allows reconstruction of the a priori unknown structure factors of individual components and their spatial localization. We demonstrate the principles of this approach using a synthetic data set and further apply it for extracting chemical and physically relevant information from electron and scanning tunneling microscopy data. This method promises to dramatically speed up crystallographic analysis in atomically resolved data, paving the road toward automatic local structure-property determinations in crystalline and quasi-ordered systems, as well as systems with competing structural and electronic order parameters.

  5. Teleportation of a Superposition of Three Orthogonal States of an Atom without Bell-State Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Zhi-Rong

    2008-01-01

    A scheme to teleport a superposition of three orthogonal states of an atom without Bell-state measurement in cavity QED is proposed. The scheme based on the resonant interaction of two A-type three-level atoms with a bimodal cavity. The detection of atom a collapses atom b to the initial state of atom a with cavity mode left in two-mode vacuum state.The probability of success and the fidelity of this scheme are 0.112 and 0.999,respectively.

  6. First Measurement of the Atomic Electric Dipole Moment of $^{225}$Ra

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, R H; Kalita, M R; Lemke, N D; Bailey, K G; Bishof, M N; Greene, J P; Holt, R J; Korsch, W; Lu, Z -T; Mueller, P; O'Connor, T P; Singh, J T

    2015-01-01

    The radioactive radium-225 ($^{225}$Ra) atom is a favorable case to search for a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM). Due to its strong nuclear octupole deformation and large atomic mass, $^{225}$Ra is particularly sensitive to interactions in the nuclear medium that violate both time-reversal symmetry and parity. We have developed a cold-atom technique to study the spin precession of $^{225}$Ra atoms held in an optical dipole trap, and demonstrated the principle of this method by completing the first measurement of its atomic EDM, reaching an upper limit of $|$$d$($^{225}$Ra)$|$ $<$ $5.0\\!\\times\\!10^{-22}$ $e \\cdot$cm (95$\\%$ confidence).

  7. Stalking the Anti-Racist Atom: Engaging Educational Equity and Diversity in Physics Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodari, Apriel K.

    2006-12-01

    One of the first articles I ever read on diversity in physics education stated, “There’s no such thing as an anti-racist atom.” This perspective, that the science of physics is itself inherently unbiased, illustrates the difficulty of engaging our intellectual community on this topic. We genuinely believe that our science is devoid of the complications of the human condition, and therefore we need not worry about these things. It is clear however, as people competing for scarce resources in a non-equitable society, we engage in all of the same behaviors everyone else does, include those that work against equity and diversity. Over the last several years, my colleagues and I have held workshops aimed at addressing educational equity and diversity in physics teaching. In this discussion, I will present some of the questions we have posed, along with lessons learned and ideas about what we can do next.

  8. Challenges and opportunities for atomic physics at FAIR: The new GSI accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagmann, S. [Institut f. Kernphysik, University of Frankfurt (Germany) and GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: s.hagmann@gsi.de; Beyer, H.F. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Bosch, F. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Kluge, H.-J. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Kozhuharov, Ch. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Th. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Stoehlker, Th. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Ullrich, J. [Max Planck Inst. f. Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Moshammer, R. [Max Planck Inst. f. Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Mann, R. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Mokler, P. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Quint, W. [GSI, Max Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany); Schuch, R. [Department of Physics, University of Stockholm (Sweden); Warczak, A. [Department of Physics, University of Cracow (Poland)

    2005-12-15

    We present a short overview of the current status of the new accelerator project FAIR at GSI with the new double synchrotron rings and the multi-storage rings. The key features of the new facility, which provides intense relativistic beams of stable and unstable nuclei, are introduced and their relation to the anticipated experimental programs in nuclear structure physics and antiproton physics is shown. The main emphasis in this overview is given to the atomic physics program with unique opportunities which will be provided e.g. by bare U{sup 92+} ions with kinetic energies continuously variable between relativistic energies corresponding to {gamma} up to {approx_equal}35 down to kinetic energies of such ions in traps corresponding to fractions of a Kelvin.

  9. Upper Secondary Students' Understanding of the Basic Physical Interactions in Analogous Atomic and Solar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Keith S.

    2013-08-01

    Comparing the atom to a `tiny solar system' is a common teaching analogy, and the extent to which learners saw the systems as analogous was investigated. English upper secondary students were asked parallel questions about the physical interactions between the components of a simple atomic system and a simple solar system to investigate how they understood the forces acting within the two systems. A sample of just over 100 across the 15-18 age range responded to a pencil-and-paper instrument that asked about four aspects of the two systems. It was found that for both systems, about four fifths of students expected forces to decrease with increasing distance; but that only a little over half expected there to be interactions between the minor constituents (electrons and planets). Most students failed to apply Newton's third law to either system. There was a considerable difference in the extent to which respondents were able to identify the type of force acting in the systems (nearly all for the solar system, but only a small proportion in the case of the atom). The findings are considered in terms of both the limitations of students' understanding of the basic physics and possible implications for the use of the teaching analogy.

  10. 2nd International School of Physics of Exotic Atoms "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Duclos, J; Fiorentini, Giovanni; Torelli, Gabriele; Exotic atoms : fundamental interactions and structure of matter

    1980-01-01

    The second course of the International School on the Physics of Exotic Atoms took place at the "Ettore Majorana" Center for Scien­ tific Culture, Erice, Sicily, during the period from March 25 to April 5, 1979. It was attended by 40 participants from 23 insti­ tutes in 8 countries. The purpose of the course was to review the various aspects of the physics of exotic atoms, with particular emphasis on the re­ sults obtained in the last two years, i.e., after the first course of the School (Erice, April 24-30, 1977). The course dealt with two main topics, A) Exotic atoms and fundamental interactions and B) Applications to the study of the structure of matter. One of the aims of the course was to offer an opportunity for the exchange of experiences between scientists working in the two fields. In view of this, the lectures in the morning discussed the more general arguments in a common session, whereas the more specialized topics were treated in the afternoon, in two parallel sections. Section A was or...

  11. Isotopic shift of atom-dimer Efimov resonances in K-Rb mixtures: Critical effect of multichannel Feshbach physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, K; Kobayashi, J; Julienne, P S; Inouye, S

    2016-01-01

    The multichannel Efimov physics is investigated in ultracold heteronuclear admixtures of K and Rb atoms. We observe a shift in the scattering length where the first atom-dimer resonance appears in the $^{41}$K-$^{87}$Rb system relative to the position of the previously observed atom-dimer resonance in the $^{40}$K-$^{87}$Rb system. This shift is well explained by our calculations with a three-body model including the van der Waals interactions, and, more importantly, the multichannel spinor physics. With only minor difference in the atomic masses of the admixtures, the shift in the atom-dimer resonance positions can be cleanly ascribed to the isolated and overlapping Feshbach resonances in the $^{40}$K-$^{87}$Rb and $^{41}$K-$^{87}$Rb systems, respectively. Our study demonstrates the role of the multichannel Feshbach physics in determining Efimov resonances in heteronuclear three-body systems.

  12. Resistance of single polyaniline fibers and their junctions measured by double-probe atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Rintaro; Shingaya, Yoshitaka; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2016-08-01

    Electrical properties of polyaniline (PANI) fibers are of our interest as a component of network materials. Using a multiple-probe atomic force microscope with tuning fork probes, we investigated the resistance of single PANI fibers and their cross-point junction where the fibers contact each other. The resistivity of single PANI fibers was measured to be on the order of 10 Ω cm, and the contact resistance between PANI fibers was on the order of GΩ. The resistances through single cross-point junctions between two PANI fibers were very much dependent on the experimental condition, that is, the cross-point junction is stabilized or destabilized by physically placing the probes onto the two fibers. This suggests the nanomechanical instability of the cross-point junctions and a possibility to construct strain-responsive PANI fiber networks.

  13. A Thin Liquid Film and Its Effects in an Atomic Force Microscopy Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, it has been observed that a liquid film spreading on a sample surface will significantly distort atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. In order to elaborate on the effect, we establish an equation governing the deformation of liquid film under its interaction with the AFM tip and substrate. A key issue is the critical liquid bump height y0c, at which the liquid film jumps to contact the AFM tip. It is found that there are three distinct regimes in the variation of y0c with film thickness H, depending on Hamaker constants of tip, sample and liquid. Noticeably, there is a characteristic thickness H* physically defining what a thin film is; namely, once the film thickness H is the same order as H*, the effect of film thickness should be taken into account. The value of H* is dependent on Hamaker constants and liquid surface tension as well as tip radius. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  14. A Thin Liquid Film and Its Effects in an Atomic Force Microscopy Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Jing; ZHENG Zhi-Jun; YU Ji-Lin; BAI Yi-Long

    2009-01-01

    Recently,it has been observed that a liquid film spreading on a sample surface will significantly distort atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements.In order to elaborate on the effect,we establish an equation governing the deformation of liquid film under its interaction with the AFM tip and substrate.A key issue is the critical liquid bump height yoc,at which the liquid film jumps to contact the AFM tip.It is found that there are three distinct regimes in the variation of yoc with film thickness H,depending on Hamaker constants of tip,sample and liquid.Noticeably,there is a characteristic thickness H* physically defining what a thin fihn is;namely,once the film thickness H is the same order as H*,the effect of film thickness should be taken into account.The value of H* is dependent on Hamaker constants and liquid surface tension as well as tip radius.

  15. Measuring physical strain during ambulation with accelerometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussmann, J B; Hartgerink, I; van der Woude, L H; Stam, H J

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the feasibility of ambulatory accelerometry in the evaluation of physical strain in walking at different speeds and different levels of economy. METHODS: Twelve able-bodied subjects performed a walking test on a treadmill with increasing walking speed. After a 6-wk period, these me

  16. Enhancement of physical protection measures and observation on future JAEA's measures reflecting INFCIRC/225/Rev.5 (Draft) under consideration at IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The revised Nuclear Reactor Regulation Law is aimed at strengthening of the physical protection taking into account of INFCIRC/225/Rev.4 (Corrected) requirements by focusing on introducing confidentiality of secret information concerning the protection of the specific nuclear fuel material, physical protection inspection, and Design Basis Threat (DBT) following latest recommendations by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), enforced in December, 2005. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) possesses many facilities using Plutonium that fulfill the requirements of Category I and applicable DBT. In order to respond to the revised law, JAEA has conducted (a) development of information management manual for the reinforcement of the physical protection information control, (b) evaluation of the implementation of physical protection measures based on the DBT presented by the competent authority, and (c) enhancement of physical protection measures based on the evaluation result. Moreover, the inspection of physical protection measures and the verification of compliance with the physical protection regulation by competent authority were conducted for each JAEA facility, and the additional corresponding measures to reflect an inspection result were conducted. In this paper,we brief the requirements for the facility using Plutonium, an overview of the instruction by competent authority, an overview of corresponding measures by JAEA. Furthermore, we describe an image of a future physical protection system of JAEA's plutonium facilities influenced by the enhancement of physical protection measures following the recommendation document for the physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities (INFCIRC/225/Rev.5 (Draft)) currently under consideration by IAEA. (author)

  17. Enhancement of Physical Protection Measures and Observation on Future JAEA's Measures Reflecting INFCIRC/225/Rev.5 (Draft) under Consideration at IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The revised Nuclear Reactor Regulation Act was aimed at strengthening of the physical protection taking into account of INFCIRC/225/Rev.4 (Corrected) requirements by focusing on introducing confidentiality of secret information concerning the protection of the specific nuclear material, physical protection inspection, and Design Basis Threat (DBT) following latest recommendations by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), enforced in December, 2005. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) possesses many facilities using Plutonium that fulfill the requirements of Category I and applicable DBT. In order to respond to the revised law, JAEA has conducted (a) development of information management manual for the reinforcement of the physical protection information control, (b) evaluation of the implementation of physical protection measures based on the DBT presented by the competent authority, and (c) enhancement of physical protection measures based on the evaluation result. Moreover, the inspection of physical protection measures and the verification of compliance with the physical protection regulation by competent authority were conducted for each JAEA facility, and the additional corresponding measures to reflect an inspection result were conducted. In this paper, we brief the requirements for the facility using Plutonium, an overview of the instruction by competent authority, an overview of corresponding measures by JAEA. Furthermore, we describe an image of a future physical protection system of JAEA's plutonium facilities influenced by the enhancement of physical protection measures following the recommendation document for the physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities (INFCIRC/225/Rev.5 (Draft)) currently under consideration by IAEA. (author)

  18. Physical measurements of inertial-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of inertial-fusion targets has stimulated the development of many new techniques and instruments. This paper reviews the basis for selected target measurement requirements and the development of optical interferometry, optical scattering, microradiography and scanning electron microscopy as applied to target measurement. We summarize the resolution and speed which have been achieved to date, and describe several systems in which these are traded off to fill specific measurement applications. We point out the extent to which present capabilities meet the requirements for target measurement and the key problems which remain to be solved

  19. Whispering gallery states of neutrons and anti-hydrogen atoms and their applications to fundamental and surface physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvizhevsky, Valery

    2013-03-01

    The `whispering gallery' effect has been known since ancient times for sound waves in air, later in water and more recently for a broad range of electromagnetic waves: radio, optics, Roentgen and so on. It is intensively used and explored due to its numerous crucial applications. It consists of wave localization near a curved reflecting surface and is expected for waves of various natures, for instance, for neutrons and (anti)atoms. For (anti)matter waves, it includes a new feature: a massive particle is settled in quantum states, with parameters depending on its mass. In this talk, we present the first observation of the quantum whispering-gallery effect for matter particles (cold neutrons) 1-2. This phenomenon provides an example of an exactly solvable problem analogous to the `quantum bouncer'; it is complementary to recently discovered gravitational quantum states of neutrons3. These two phenomena provide a direct demonstration of the weak equivalence principle for a massive particle in a quantum state. Deeply bound long-living states are weakly sensitive to surface potential; highly excited short-living states are very sensitive to the wall nuclear potential shape. Therefore, they are a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects. Analogous phenomena could be measured with atoms and anti-atoms 4-5.

  20. Physical reason for quantum behaviour of the electron and stability of the main state of the hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electron model is proposed explaining the physical reasons for its nonrelativistic quantum-mechanical behaviour, the origin of its own mechanical and magnetic momentum and field energy. As an example the main electron state in hydrogen atom is obtained

  1. Upper Secondary Students' Understanding of the Basic Physical Interactions in Analogous Atomic and Solar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Keith S.

    2013-01-01

    Comparing the atom to a "tiny solar system" is a common teaching analogy, and the extent to which learners saw the systems as analogous was investigated. English upper secondary students were asked parallel questions about the physical interactions between the components of a simple atomic system and a simple solar system to investigate…

  2. Using an Advanced Computational Laboratory Experiment to Extend and Deepen Physical Chemistry Students' Understanding of Atomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Gary G.

    2015-01-01

    A computational laboratory experiment is described, which involves the advanced study of an atomic system. The students use concepts and techniques typically covered in a physical chemistry course but extend those concepts and techniques to more complex situations. The students get a chance to explore the study of atomic states and perform…

  3. Youth Physical Activity Resource Use and Activity Measured by Accelerometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andra L.; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether use of physical activity resources (e.g., parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. Methods: One hundred eleven adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported use of a physical activity resource (none /1 resources). The main…

  4. Measurement of Spatial Distribution of Cold Atoms in an Integrating Sphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xu-Cheng; CHENG Hua-Dong; XIAO Ling; ZHENG Ben-Chang; MENG Yan-Ling; LIU Liang; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    We present an experiment on the measurement of the spatial distribution of cold atoms in a ceramic cell. The atoms are first cooled by diffusing light produced by multiple scattering of laser light at the inner surface of the cell. An inhomogeneous magnetic field is applied after the atoms are cooled by using a pair of anti-Helmholtz coils, and thus the shift of atomic magnetic sub-levels is position-dependent. We move the anti-Helmholtz coils point by point while keeping the probe laser beam resonant with the cold atoms at zero magnetic field. The number of cold atoms at different positions can be extracted by detecting the absorption to the probe beam. The density of the cold atoms in the cell is measured in two dimensions perpendicular and parallel to the tube connecting to the vacuum system, respectively. The results show that at the center of the cell, fewer atoms exist due to the leakage of diffuse light into the hole connecting to the vacuum pump. The method we developed is used to detect cold atoms in a region where imaging is impossible.%We present an experiment on the measurement of the spatial distribution of cold atoms in a ceramic cell.The atoms are first cooled by diffusing light produced by multiple scattering of laser light at the inner surface of the cell.An inhomogeneous magnetic field is applied after the atoms are cooled by using a pair of anti-Helmholtz coils,and thus the shift of atomic magnetic sub-levels is position-dependent.We move the anti-Helmholtz coils point by point while keeping the probe laser beam resonant with the cold atoms at zero magnetic field.The number of cold atoms at different positions can be extracted by detecting the absorption to the probe beam.The density of the cold atoms in the cell is measured in two dimensions perpendicular and parallel to the tube connecting to the vacuum system,respectively.The results show that at the center of the cell,fewer atoms exist due to the leakage of diffuse light into the hole

  5. Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms and measurement of the fine structure constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a measurement of the recoil velocity of an atom absorbing a photon, it is possible to deduce a determination of the ratio h/m between the Planck constant and the mass of the atoms and then to deduce a value of the fine structure constant alpha. To do this measurement, we use the technique of Bloch oscillations, which allows us to transfer a large number of recoils to atoms. A velocity sensor, based on velocity selective Raman transition, enables us to measure the momentum transferred to the atoms. A measurement with a statistical uncertainty of 4.4 10-9, in conjunction with a careful study of systematic effects (5 10-9), has led us to a determination of alpha with an uncertainty of 6.7 10-9: α-1(Rb) = 137.03599878 (91). This uncertainty is similar to the uncertainty of the best determinations of alpha based on atom interferometry. (author)

  6. A new data acquisition system for Schottky signals in atomic physics experiments at GSI's and FAIR's storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trageser, C.; Brandau, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Müller, A.; Nolden, F.; Sanjari, S.; Stöhlker, T.

    2015-11-01

    A new continuous and broadband data acquisition system for measurements of Schottky-signals of ions revolving in a storage ring has been implemented. This set-up is capable of recording the radio frequency (RF) signal of the ions that circulate in the storage ring with a sustained acquisition rate of more than 3.5× {10}7 IQ-samples per second. This allows several harmonics of the full momentum acceptance of a storage ring to be measured at the same time. The RF signal analyzer modules are complemented by further electronic modules such as counters, precision clocks and synchronization modules that facilitate a seamless integration with main experimental data acquisitions for atomic and nuclear physics. In this contribution, the setup and first results from a test run at the experimental storage ring at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, are presented.

  7. Lifetime measurements and tau physics at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent updates on the measurements of the tau and D0 lifetimes by the Mark II Collaboration and on measurements of the tau and B-hadron lifetimes by the MAC Collaboration are presented. A new determination of an upper limit for the tau neutrino mass by the Mark II Collaboration and a recent measurement of Cabibbo-suppressed tau decay branching ratios from the DELCO Collaboration are also presented. 18 references

  8. Report to the evaluation committee on Swedish atomic and molecular physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scientific evaluation is planned to be performed by an international group of prominent physicists. Groups being evaluated have been requested to present background material on their research. The atomic physics program discussed in this report form the basis for a large applied laser spectroscopy program. Projects on atmospheric remote sensing, combustion diagnostics, industrial laser applications and medical diagnostic spectroscopy have emerged from this program. Accomplishments and publications 1980-1985 are presented and the planned research 1985-1988 is described. Project financing and cooperation with other groups is discussed. The list of references contains 80 papers. (G.B.)

  9. Analytical estimation of the gravitational constant with atomic and nuclear physical constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If NA represents the Avogadro's number, gravitational constant associated with atomic electromagnetic interaction can be expressed as GE ≅ N2AG. With GE and with the assumed two new pseudo numbers x ≈ 38.725 and y ≈ 47.415, value of G can be fixed for 10 digits in a verifiable approach. (x, y) can be called as the back ground analytical numbers using by which micro-macro physical constants can be interlinked qualitatively and quantitatively

  10. Application of the Finite Element Method in Atomic and Molecular Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shertzer, Janine

    2007-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a numerical algorithm for solving second order differential equations. It has been successfully used to solve many problems in atomic and molecular physics, including bound state and scattering calculations. To illustrate the diversity of the method, we present here details of two applications. First, we calculate the non-adiabatic dipole polarizability of Hi by directly solving the first and second order equations of perturbation theory with FEM. In the second application, we calculate the scattering amplitude for e-H scattering (without partial wave analysis) by reducing the Schrodinger equation to set of integro-differential equations, which are then solved with FEM.

  11. Laser irradiated enhancement of the atomic electron capture rate in search of new physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron capture processes are important for new physics searches and therefore a high capture rate is inevitably desired. We investigate a possibility of enhancement of an atomic electron capture rate by irradiating laser beam to “an atom”. The possibility of the enhancement is shown as a consequence of an enhanced electron wave function at origin Ψ(0) through an effectively increased mass of the electron. We find that order of magnitude enhancement can be achieved using the laser with intensity 1010 W/mm2, and energy of photon, of O(10-3) eV. (author)

  12. Characterization of Atomic and Physical Properties of Biofield Energy Treated Manganese Sulfide Powder

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Manganese sulfide (MnS) is known for its wide applications in solar cell, opto-electronic devices, and photochemical industries. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of biofield energy treatment on the atomic and physical properties of MnS. The MnS powder sample was equally divided into two parts, referred as to be control and to be treated. The treated part was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment. After that, both control and treated samples were inves...

  13. Atomic physics with high-brightness synchrotron x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description of atomic physics experiments that we intend to carry out at the National Synchrotron Light Source is given. Emphasis is given to work that investigates the properties of multiply charged ions. The use of a synchrotron storage ring for highly charged heavy ions is proposed as a way to produce high current beams which will make possible experiments to study the photoexcitation and ionization of multiply charged ions for the first time. Experiments along the same lines which are feasible at the proposed Advanced Light Source are considered briefly. 7 refs., 2 figs

  14. Remote Three-Atom Information Concentration without Bell-State Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhen-Zhen; FANG Mao-Fa

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose a scheme for information concentration of three remote two-level atoms in cavity QED. Our scheme does not involve the Bell-state measurement. During the interaction between atom and cavity, the cavity frequency is largely detuned from the atomic transition frequency, thus the scheme is insensitive to both the cavity decay and the thermal field. The idea can also be used to realize the remote information concentration of trapped ions.

  15. Accelerator physics measurements at the damping ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkin, L.; Delahaye, J. P.; Wille, K.; Allen, M. A.; Bane, K.; Fieguth, T.; Hofmann, A.; Button, A.; Lee, M.; Linebarger, W.

    1985-05-01

    Besides the optics measurements described elsewhere, machine experiments were done at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping ring to determine some of its parameters. The synchrotron radiation energy loss which gives the damping rates was measured by observing the RF-voltage dependence of the synchronous phase angle. The emittance was obtained from the synchrotron light monitor, scraper measurements and by extracting the beam through a doublet and measuring its size for different quadrupole settings. Current dependent effects such as parasitic mode losses, head tail instabilities, synchrotron and betatron frequency shifts were measured to estimate the impedance. RF-cavity beam loading and its compensation were also studied and ion collection was investigated. All results agree reasonably well with expectations and indicate no limitations to the design performance.

  16. Cryogenic microcalorimeter energy resolution measurements for multi-keV atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have experimentally investigated the kinetic energy resolution of an ∝ 10 mK magnetic microcalorimeter (MMC) detector for 12-150 keV atomic and molecular ion beams. The ion masses were varied from 1 amu (H+) to 58 amu (C3H6O+). The resulting FWHM energy resolutions were atomic ions and measured energy resolutions were similar for the neutral particles of the corresponding ions. The high resolving power in energy, the charge independence, and the optional position sensitivity all demonstrate the expected versatility of the MMC detectors for use in various mass spectrometry techniques. As a next step we implement the MMC detector for mass and position resolved fragment counting in the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. The storage energies of ∝ 300 keV will allow 1 amu mass resolution for stored ions of up to ∝ 150 amu (assuming a separation of 2 FWHMs between peaks).

  17. Cryogenic microcalorimeter energy resolution measurements for multi-keV atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, Oldrich; Savin, Daniel W. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, New York (United States); Allgeier, Steffen; Gamer, Lisa; Hengstler, Daniel; Kempf, Sebastian; Pabinger, Andreas; Pies, Christian; Enss, Christian; Fleischmann, Andreas [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Krantz, Claude; Wolf, Andreas [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Schwalm, Dirk [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2014-07-01

    We have experimentally investigated the kinetic energy resolution of an ∝ 10 mK magnetic microcalorimeter (MMC) detector for 12-150 keV atomic and molecular ion beams. The ion masses were varied from 1 amu (H{sup +}) to 58 amu (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O{sup +}). The resulting FWHM energy resolutions were atomic ions and measured energy resolutions were similar for the neutral particles of the corresponding ions. The high resolving power in energy, the charge independence, and the optional position sensitivity all demonstrate the expected versatility of the MMC detectors for use in various mass spectrometry techniques. As a next step we implement the MMC detector for mass and position resolved fragment counting in the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. The storage energies of ∝ 300 keV will allow 1 amu mass resolution for stored ions of up to ∝ 150 amu (assuming a separation of 2 FWHMs between peaks).

  18. The promise of exergames as tools to measure physical health

    OpenAIRE

    Staiano, Amanda E.; Calvert, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Exergames are popular video games that combine physical activity with digital gaming. To measure effects of exergame play on physical outcomes and health behaviors, most studies use external measures including accelerometry, indirect calorimetry, heart rate monitors, and written surveys. These measures may reduce external validity by burdening participants during gameplay. Many exergames have the capability to measure activity levels unobtrusively through monitors built into game equipment, a...

  19. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter

  20. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B. (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  1. Integral correlation measures for multiparticle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, H C; Carruthers, Peter A; Buschbeck, Brigitte

    1993-01-01

    We report on a considerable improvement in the technique of measuring multiparticle correlations via integrals over correlation functions. A modification of measures used in the characterization of chaotic dynamical sytems permits fast and flexible calculation of factorial moments and cumulants as well as their differential versions. Higher order correlation integral measurements even of large multiplicity events such as encountered in heavy ion collisons are now feasible. The change from ``ordinary'' to ``factorial'' powers may have important consequences in other fields such as the study of galaxy correlations and Bose-Einstein interferometry.

  2. Manual for soil physical measurements; Version 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolte, J.

    1997-01-01

    Manuals are given for several laboratory methods for determining hydraulic conductivity, water retention and shrinkage characteristics of soil. Measurement techniques described are: the constant-head and falling-head methods for saturated conductivitythe drip infiltrometer for unsaturated conductivi

  3. In situ measurement of fixed charge evolution at silicon surfaces during atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Ling; Watt, Morgan R.; Strandwitz, Nicholas C., E-mail: strand@lehigh.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Center for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States)

    2015-02-09

    Interfacial fixed charge or interfacial dipoles are present at many semiconductor-dielectric interfaces and have important effects upon device behavior, yet the chemical origins of these electrostatic phenomena are not fully understood. We report the measurement of changes in Si channel conduction in situ during atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide using trimethylaluminum and water to probe changes in surface electrostatics. Current-voltage data were acquired continually before, during, and after the self-limiting chemical reactions that result in film growth. Our measurements indicated an increase in conductance on p-type samples with p{sup +} ohmic contacts and a decrease in conductance on analogous n-type samples. Further, p{sup +} contacted samples with n-type channels exhibited an increase in measured current and n{sup +} contacted p-type samples exhibited a decrease in current under applied voltage. Device physics simulations, where a fixed surface charge was parameterized on the channel surface, connect the surface charge to changes in current-voltage behavior. The simulations and analogous analytical relationships for near-surface conductance were used to explain the experimental results. Specifically, the changes in current-voltage behavior can be attributed to the formation of a fixed negative charge or the modification of a surface dipole upon chemisorption of trimethylaluminum. These measurements allow for the observation of fixed charge or dipole formation during ALD and provide further insight into the electrostatic behavior at semiconductor-dielectric interfaces during film nucleation.

  4. Analog to Digital Conversion in Physical Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Kapitaniak, T.; Zyczkowski, K.; Feudel, U.; Grebogi, C.

    1999-01-01

    There exist measuring devices where an analog input is converted into a digital output. Such converters can have a nonlinear internal dynamics. We show how measurements with such converting devices can be understood using concepts from symbolic dynamics. Our approach is based on a nonlinear one-to-one mapping between the analog input and the digital output of the device. We analyze the Bernoulli shift and the tent map which are realized in specific analog/digital converters. Furthermore, we d...

  5. Precise measurement of millisecond atomic lifetimes with heavy-ion storage ring and EBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traebert, E. [I.P.N.E., Univ. de Liege, Liege (Belgium)]|[Bochum Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Atomic lifetime measurements in the millisecond range have provided transition rates of intercombination and forbidden transitions in a number of ions. However, at the often claimed high level of precision, discrepancies appear between the results from different devices (Kingdon-type electrostatic ion trap, radiofrequency ion trap, electron beam ion trap and heavy-ion storage ring) measuring the same or comparable atomic systems. This calls for an assessment of the quality of typical measurements. (orig.)

  6. Simultaneous measurement of gravity acceleration and gravity gradient with an atom interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrentino, F.; Lien, Y.-H.; Rosi, G.; Tino, G. M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, Universita di Firenze, INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bertoldi, A. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, F-91127 Palaiseau cedex (France); Bodart, Q. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, Universita di Firenze, INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); European Space Agency, Research and Scientific Support Department, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Cacciapuoti, L. [European Space Agency, Research and Scientific Support Department, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Angelis, M. de [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' CNR, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Prevedelli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126, Bologna (Italy)

    2012-09-10

    We demonstrate a method to measure the gravitational acceleration with a dual cloud atom interferometer; the use of simultaneous atom interferometers reduces the effect of seismic noise on the gravity measurement. At the same time, the apparatus is capable of accurate measurements of the vertical gravity gradient. The ability to determine the gravity acceleration and gravity gradient simultaneously and with the same instrument opens interesting perspectives in geophysical applications.

  7. Research on atomic states, physical properties and catalytic performance of Ru metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using the one-atom theory (OA) of pure metals, the atomic states of Ru metal with hcp structure, fcc structure, bcc structure and liquid state were determined as fol- lows: [Kr](4dn)3.78(4dc)2.22(5sc)1.77(5sf)0.23,Ψa(fcc-Ru)=[Kr](4dn)3.70(4dc)2.44 (5sc)1.42(5sf)0.44, Ψ a(bcc-Ru)=[Kr](4dn)4.00(4dc)2.22(5sc)1.56(5sf)0.22, Ψ a(L-Ru)=[Kr](4dn)4.00(4dc)2.00(5sc)1.52 (5sf)0.48. The potential curve and physical properties as a function of temperature for hcp-Ru such as lattice constant, cohesive energy, linear thermal expansion coeffi- cient, specific heat and Gibbs energy and so on were calculated quantitatively. The theoretical results are in excellent agreement with experimental value. The rela- tionship between the atomic states and catalytic performance was explained qualitatively and these supplied the designation of Ru metal and relative materials with theoretical instruction and complete data.

  8. Human MCG measurements with a high-sensitivity potassium atomic magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measuring biomagnetic fields, such as magnetocardiograms (MCGs), is important for investigating biological functions. To address to this need, we developed an optically pumped atomic magnetometer. In this study, human MCGs were acquired using a potassium atomic magnetometer without any modulating systems. The sensitivity of the magnetometer is comparable to that of high-Tc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) and is sufficient for acquiring human MCGs. The activity of a human heart estimated from the MCG maps agrees well with that measured with SQUID magnetometers. Thus, our magnetometer produces reliable results, which demonstrate the potential of our atomic magnetometer for biomagnetic measurements. (paper)

  9. Exploration of Cold Atom Physics in Space and Its Applications%空间冷原子物理及应用探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕宝龙; 刘亮; 刘伍明; 陈徐宗

    2011-01-01

    The current development of cold atomic physics in space is introduced, with its characteristics and advantage in the microgravity environment discussed. Cold atom samples in space provide unprecedented and powerful tools for atomic physics and precision measurements. Important scientific experiments in the field of cold atomic physics, such as quantum simulation, new matter states, and test of fundamental physical laws, as well as high-tech application exploration in space, are briefly discussed.%介绍空间冷原子物理领域现状,论述微重力环境下冷原子物理特色与优势的基础上,指出空间冷原子体系为原子分子物理的前沿领域,为精密物理测量提供了不可取代的强大工具,讨论了空间冷原子物理在量子仿真、新物态、基本物理规律的验证以及高技术开发等方面的应用。

  10. Faithfully probabilistic teleportation of an unknown atomic state and cavity field state with a single measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhen-Biao; Wu Huai-Zhi; Su Wan-Jun; Zhong Zhi-Rong; Zheng Shi-Biao

    2007-01-01

    This paper shows that, based on the single-photon JC model depicting the resonant interaction of a two-level atom with a single cavity mode, an unknown atomic state and cavity photon superposition state can be faithfully teleported with only a single measurement. The scheme is probabilistic, its success lies on the event that the sender atom (or the medi-atom, for teleportation of cavity field state) is detected in the higher state. The scheme is in contrast to the previous ones of using a maximally two-particle entangled state as quantum channel.

  11. Stability enhancement by joint phase measurements in a single cold atomic fountain

    CERN Document Server

    Meunier, M; Geiger, R; Guerlin, C; Alzar, C L Garrido; Landragin, A

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of joint interrogation in a single atom interferometer which overcomes the dead time between consecutive measurements in standard cold atomic fountains. The joint operation enables for a faster averaging of the Dick effect associated with the local oscillator noise in clocks and with vibration noise in cold atom inertial sensors. Such an operation allows achieving the lowest stability limit due to atom shot noise. We demonstrate a multiple joint operation in which up to five clouds of atoms are interrogated simultaneously in a single setup. The essential feature of multiple joint operation, demonstrated here for a micro-wave Ramsey interrogation, can be generalized to go beyond the current stability limit associated with dead times in present-day cold atom interferometer inertial sensors.

  12. Relating the physical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharides to virulence by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ivan E; Kintz, Erica N; Porter, Laura A; Goldberg, Joanna B; Burnham, Nancy A; Camesano, Terri A

    2011-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are an important class of macromolecules that are components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa contains two different sugar chains, the homopolymer common antigen (A band) and the heteropolymer O antigen (B band), which impart serospecificity. The characteristics of LPS are generally assessed after isolation rather than in the context of whole bacteria. Here we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the physical properties of the LPS of P. aeruginosa strain PA103 (serogroup O11) in situ. This strain contains a mixture of long and very long polymers of O antigen, regulated by two different genes. For this analysis, we studied the wild-type strain and four mutants, ΔWzz1 (producing only very long LPS), ΔWzz2 (producing only long LPS), DΔM (with both the wzz1 and wzz2 genes deleted), and Wzy::GM (producing an LPS core oligosaccharide plus one unit of O antigen). Forces of adhesion between the LPS on these strains and the silicon nitride AFM tip were measured, and the Alexander and de Gennes model of steric repulsion between a flat surface and a polymer brush was used to calculate the LPS layer thickness (which we refer to as length), compressibility, and spacing between the individual molecules. LPS chains were longest for the wild-type strain and ΔWzz1, at 170.6 and 212.4 nm, respectively, and these values were not statistically significantly different from one another. Wzy::GM and DΔM have reduced LPS lengths, at 34.6 and 37.7 nm, respectively. Adhesion forces were not correlated with LPS length, but a relationship between adhesion force and bacterial pathogenicity was found in a mouse acute pneumonia model of infection. The adhesion forces with the AFM probe were lower for strains with LPS mutations, suggesting that the wild-type strain is optimized for maximal adhesion. Our research contributes to further understanding of the role of LPS in the adhesion and virulence of

  13. The influence of physical and physiological cues on atomic force microscopy-based cell stiffness assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chiou

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All of these cues show a significant influence on the cell elasticity assessment. Sharp AFM tips create a two-fold increase in the value of the effective Young's modulus (E(eff relative to that of the blunt tips. Higher indenting force at the same loading rate generates higher estimated cell elasticity. Increasing the operation temperature of the AFM leads to decreases in the cell stiffness because the structure of actin filaments becomes disorganized. The physiological cues include the presence of fetal bovine serum or extracellular matrix-coated surfaces, the culture passage number, and the culture density. Both fetal bovine serum and the extracellular matrix are critical for cells to maintain the integrity of actin filaments and consequently exhibit higher elasticity. Unlike primary cells, mouse kidney progenitor cells can be passaged and maintain their morphology and elasticity for a very long period without a senescence phenotype. Finally, cell elasticity increases with increasing culture density only in MDCK epithelial cells. In summary, for researchers who use AFM to assess cell elasticity, our results provide basic and significant information about the suitable selection of physical and physiological cues.

  14. Atom interferometry experiments with lithium. Accurate measurement of the electric polarizability; Experiences d'interferometrie atomique avec le lithium. Mesure de precision de la polarisabilite electrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miffre, A

    2005-06-15

    Atom interferometers are very sensitive tools to make precise measurements of physical quantities. This study presents a measurement of the static electric polarizability of lithium by atom interferometry. Our result, {alpha} = (24.33 {+-} 0.16)*10{sup -30} m{sup 3}, improves by a factor 3 the most accurate measurements of this quantity. This work describes the tuning and the operation of a Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer in detail. The two interfering arms are separated by the elastic diffraction of the atomic wave by a laser standing wave, almost resonant with the first resonance transition of lithium atom. A set of experimental techniques, often complicated to implement, is necessary to build the experimental set-up. After a detailed study of the atom source (a supersonic beam of lithium seeded in argon), we present our experimental atom signals which exhibit a very high fringe visibility, up to 84.5 % for first order diffraction. A wide variety of signals has been observed by diffraction of the bosonic isotope at higher diffraction orders and by diffraction of the fermionic less abundant isotope. The quality of these signals is then used to do very accurate phase measurements. A first experiment investigates how the atom interferometer signals are modified by a magnetic field gradient. An absolute measurement of lithium atom electric polarizability is then achieved by applying a static electric field on one of the two interfering arms, separated by only 90 micrometers. The construction of such a capacitor, its alignment in the experimental set-up and its operation are fully detailed.We obtain a very accurate phase measurement of the induced Lo Surdo - Stark phase shift (0.07 % precision). For this first measurement, the final uncertainty on the electric polarizability of lithium is only 0.66 %, and is dominated by the uncertainty on the atom beam mean velocity, so that a further reduction of the uncertainty can be expected. (author)

  15. Measurement of the Aharonov-Casher geometric phase with a separated-arm atom interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Gillot, Jonathan; Gauguet, Alexandre; Vigué, Jacques; Büchner, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, we report a measurement of the Aharonov-Casher (AC) geometric phase with our lithium atom interferometer. The AC phase appears when a particle carrying a magnetic dipole propagates in a transverse electric field. The first measurement of the AC phase was done with a neutron interferometer in 1989 by A. Cimmino \\textit{et al.} (Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{63}, 380, 1989) and all the following experiments were done with Ramsey or Ramsey-Bord\\'e interferometers with molecules or atoms. In our experiment, we use lithium atoms pumped in a single hyperfine-Zeeman sublevel and we measure the AC-phase by applying opposite electric fields on the two interferometer arms. Our measurements are in good agreement with the expected theoretical values and they prove that this phase is independent of the atom velocity.

  16. Measurement of the Aharonov-Casher geometric phase with a separated-arm atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillot, Jonathan; Lepoutre, Steven; Gauguet, Alexandre; Vigué, Jacques; Büchner, Matthias

    2014-06-01

    In this letter, we report a measurement of the Aharonov-Casher (AC) geometric phase with our lithium atom interferometer. The AC phase appears when a particle carrying a magnetic dipole propagates in a transverse electric field. The first measurement of the AC phase was done with a neutron interferometer in 1989 by Cimmino et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 380 (1989)] and all the following experiments were done with Ramsey or Ramsey-Bordé interferometers with molecules or atoms. In our experiment, we use lithium atoms pumped in a single hyperfine-Zeeman sublevel and we measure the AC-phase by applying opposite electric fields on the two interferometer arms. Our measurements are in good agreement with the expected theoretical values and they also provide a further test of the independence of the AC phase with the atom velocity.

  17. A Fiber Optic Catalytic Sensor for Neutral Atom Measurements in Oxygen Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Vesel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The presented sensor for neutral oxygen atom measurement in oxygen plasma is a catalytic probe which uses fiber optics and infrared detection system to measure the gray body radiation of the catalyst. The density of neutral atoms can be determined from the temperature curve of the probe, because the catalyst is heated predominantly by the dissipation of energy caused by the heterogeneous surface recombination of neutral atoms. The advantages of this sensor are that it is simple, reliable, easy to use, noninvasive, quantitative and can be used in plasma discharge regions. By using different catalyst materials the sensor can also be applied for detection of neutral atoms in other plasmas. Sensor design, operation, example measurements and new measurement procedure for systematic characterization are presented.

  18. A Fiber Optic Catalytic Sensor for Neutral Atom Measurements in Oxygen Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaplotnik, Rok; Vesel, Alenka; Mozetic, Miran

    2012-01-01

    The presented sensor for neutral oxygen atom measurement in oxygen plasma is a catalytic probe which uses fiber optics and infrared detection system to measure the gray body radiation of the catalyst. The density of neutral atoms can be determined from the temperature curve of the probe, because the catalyst is heated predominantly by the dissipation of energy caused by the heterogeneous surface recombination of neutral atoms. The advantages of this sensor are that it is simple, reliable, easy to use, noninvasive, quantitative and can be used in plasma discharge regions. By using different catalyst materials the sensor can also be applied for detection of neutral atoms in other plasmas. Sensor design, operation, example measurements and new measurement procedure for systematic characterization are presented. PMID:22666005

  19. On-line data processing apparatus for spectroscopic measurements of atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer-based apparatus for on-line spectroscopic measurements of atomic uranium is described. The system is capable of enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio by averaging, and performing calculations. Computation flow charts and programs are included

  20. Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten P.

    Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope......Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope...

  1. Developing an "atomic clock" for fission lifetime measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilschut, H.W.E.M.; Kravchuk, V.

    2004-01-01

    The relevance of measuring fission lifetimes of hot nuclei is briefly discussed. It is shown that K X-ray emission prior to fission can be used to measure fission lifetimes. The preparation of the K-shell hole, the simultaneous nuclear excitation, and the analysis of the X-ray spectra is described.

  2. Measurement adhesion force between fine particle and effect of humidity: An study with Atomic Force Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhesion force is interaction between particle- particle and particle surface. First Hertz in 1882 calculated adhesion force between spherical particle and planar surface. Adhesion force in interested for scientist and different industries such as paint, foot, pharmaceutical, etc. In this study we measured adhesion force between fine particle such as silica and silicon and mica surface, with Atomic Force Microscopy. The adhesion force measured between particle-planar surfaces with Atomic Force Microscopy on different humidity and simulated results.

  3. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    OpenAIRE

    F. Gao; Liu, H.; P. Xu; Tian, X.; Y Wang; Ren, J; Haibin Wu; Hong Chang

    2014-01-01

    We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90$\\mu K$ in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques use...

  4. Production and measurement of Bose-Einstein condensate of 87Rb atomic gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The research platform for Bose-Einstein condensate in 87 Rb atomic gas,which is composed of a double MOT configuration and a QUIC trap,was reported.The properties of the condensate were measured both in time-of-flight and in tight confinement by the absorption imaging method.The measurements agreed with the criterions of Bose-Einstein condensation phase transition.About 2×10 5 atoms were pure condensed.

  5. Continuous Measurement Quantum State Tomography of Atomic Ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Riofrío, Carlos A

    2011-01-01

    Quantum state tomography is a fundamental tool in quantum information processing. It allows us to estimate the state of a quantum system by measuring different observables on many identically prepared copies of the system. This is, in general, a very time-consuming task that requires a large number of measurements. There are, however, systems in which the data acquisition can be done more efficiently. In fact, an ensemble of quantum systems can be prepared and manipulated by external fields while being continuously and collectively probed, producing enough information to estimate its state. This provides a basis for continuous measurement quantum tomography. In this protocol, an ensemble of identically prepared systems is collectively probed and controlled in a time-dependent manner to create an informationally complete continuous measurement record. The measurement history is then inverted to determine the state at the initial time. We use two different estimation methods: maximum likelihood and compressed s...

  6. High sensitivity probe absorption technique for time-of-flight measurements on cold atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mohapatra; C S Unnikrishnan

    2006-06-01

    We report on a phase-sensitive probe absorption technique with high sensitivity, capable of detecting a few hundred ultra-cold atoms in flight in an observation time of a few milliseconds. The large signal-to-noise ratio achieved is sufficient for reliable measurements on low intensity beams of cold atoms. We demonstrate the high sensitivity and figure of merit of the simple method by measuring the time-of-flight of atoms moving upwards from a magneto-optical trap released in the gravitational field.

  7. Measurement of Wigner function via atomic beam deflection in Raman- Nath regime

    CERN Document Server

    Khosa, A H; Khosa, Ashfaq Hussain

    2002-01-01

    We propose a method for the reconstruction of photon statistics and hence the Wigner function of a quantized cavity field. The method is based on the measurement of momentum distribution of two level atoms after atom- field interaction in Raman-Nath regime. We reconstruct the photon statistics of the cavity field both the cases of resonant and off- resonant atom field interaction.. For the measurement of Wigner function we propose to displace the photon statistics of the cavity field. We successfully reconstruct the Wigner function of the Schrodinger-cat state in a straightforward manner by employing the proposed method without much mathematical manipulation of the experimental data.

  8. Electroweak Physics (diboson production) measurements with ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachas, K.; Atlas Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    This paper is intended to give an overview of the ATLAS results on the production cross sections of gauge boson pairs using data from pp collisions at √{{s}} = 7 TeV for W γ, Z γ, W± W±, ZZ, W± Z and WV , where V = W± or Z decaying hadronically and √{{s}} = 8 TeV for ZZ, W± W±, W± Z and W± W± at the LHC at CERN. The cross sections are found to be in agreement with the expectations from the Standard Model within the estimated uncertainties. The production cross section measurements also allow for studies of anomalous triple and quartic gauge couplings for which 95% confidence limits are set.

  9. Non-local physics: Applications from the universe evolution to the atom structure in the frame of the unified theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, B. V.

    2013-10-01

    The main principles of the non-local physics are delivered. The unified theory of transport processes is applicable to the physical systems in tremendous diapason of scales - from atom structures to the Universe evolution. The origin of difficulties connected with the hypothetical dark matter and dark energy consists in the total Oversimplification following from the principles of local physics and reflects the general shortcomings of the local kinetic transport theory.

  10. Cold Matter Assembled Atom-by-Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Manuel; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Anschuetz, Eric R; Krajenbrink, Alexandre; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-01-01

    The realization of large-scale fully controllable quantum systems is an exciting frontier in modern physical science. We use atom-by-atom assembly to implement a novel platform for the deterministic preparation of regular arrays of individually controlled cold atoms. In our approach, a measurement and feedback procedure eliminates the entropy associated with probabilistic trap occupation and results in defect-free arrays of over 50 atoms in less than 400 ms. The technique is based on fast, real-time control of 100 optical tweezers, which we use to arrange atoms in desired geometric patterns and to maintain these configurations by replacing lost atoms with surplus atoms from a reservoir. This bottom-up approach enables controlled engineering of scalable many-body systems for quantum information processing, quantum simulations, and precision measurements.

  11. Physical theory of measuring process : a critical review

    OpenAIRE

    榛葉, 豊; 福地, 充; 坂田, 亮

    1980-01-01

    After a survey of the orthodox interpretation of quantum mechanics and von Neumann's approach to a measurement theory, the measurement theory of Daneri, Loinger and Prosperi is critically reviewed in regard in particular to their aims and assumptions. The review will lead us to see what is still desirable of a physical theory of measurement on quantum mechanical systems.

  12. Reliability and Validity Testing of the Physical Resilience Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara; Galik, Elizabeth; Dorsey, Susan; Scheve, Ann; Gutkin, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to test reliability and validity of the Physical Resilience Scale. Methods: A single-group repeated measure design was used and 130 older adults from three different housing sites participated. Participants completed the Physical Resilience Scale, Hardy-Gill Resilience Scale, 14-item Resilience Scale,…

  13. Polarimetric measurement of the motion of trapped atoms around a nanofiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, F. K.; Solano, P.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.

    2016-05-01

    Polarimetry is an important tool for probing the classical and quantum dynamics of a collection of trapped atoms. We observe the birefringence induced by trapped Rb atoms around an optical nanofiber by measuring the polarization change of an off-resonant probe. The signal from the weak, non-destructive probe is amplified using heterodyne detection. We observe the dynamical response of the trapped atoms to a transient modification of the trapping potential. This provides a direct measurement of the trapping frequencies associated with the axial and transverse potentials. The presence of large longitudinal fields in the evanescent field of the fiber complicates polarimetry, presenting significant challenges for the observation of atomic spin dynamics through Faraday rotation measurements. Work supported by NSF.

  14. Probabilistic naturalness measure for dipole moments due to new physics

    OpenAIRE

    アカマ, ケイイチ; ハットリ, タカシ; カツウラ, カズオ /; Keiichi, Akama; Takashi, Hattori; Kazuo, KATSUURA

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a probabilistic measure of naturalness (naturalness level) to fix naturalness bounds quantitatively. It is applied to the anomalous magnetic moments and the electric dipole moments due to new physics.

  15. Probabilistic Naturalness Measure for Dipole Moments due to New Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Akama, Keiichi; Hattori, Takashi; Katsuura, Kazuo

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a probabilistic measure of naturalness (naturalness level) to fix naturalness bounds quantitatively. It is applied to the anomalous magnetic moments and the electric dipole moments due to new physics.

  16. Progress on health physics monitoring systems at the French Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for health physics protection on nuclear plants or laboratory (nuclear power plant, fuel processing plant, etc) leads to data measurement and monitoring centralisation. This paper reviews the systems used for that purpose: old monobloc electronic systems, mini computer system, recent microprocessor-based system, it shows the impact of new methods on the system performances : standardization of measurements and alarms level for irradiation and contamination, reliability, peripherals devices (typewriters, CRT) availability for easy and efficient monitoring, and hardware compactness

  17. Measurements of the Ground-State Polarizabilities of Cs, Rb, and K using Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gregoire, Maxwell D; Holmgren, William F; Trubko, Raisa; Cronin, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    We measured the ground-state static electric-dipole polarizabilities of Cs, Rb, and K atoms using a three-nanograting Mach-Zehnder atom beam interferometer. Our measurements provide benchmark tests for atomic structure calculations and thus test the underlying theory used to interpret atomic parity non-conservation experiments. We measured $\\alpha_{\\mathrm{Cs}} = 4\\pi\\epsilon_0 \\times 59.45(11) \\AA^3$, $\\alpha_{\\mathrm{Rb}} = 4\\pi\\epsilon_0 \\times 47.44(9) \\AA^3$, and $\\alpha_{\\mathrm{K}} = 4\\pi\\epsilon_0 \\times 42.97(8) \\AA^3$. In atomic units, these measurements are $\\alpha_{\\mathrm{Cs}} = 401.2(7)$, $\\alpha_{\\mathrm{Rb}} = 320.1(6)$, and $\\alpha_{\\mathrm{K}} = 290.0(5)$. We report ratios of polarizabilities $\\alpha_{\\mathrm{Cs}}/\\alpha_{\\mathrm{Rb}} = 1.2532(10)$, $\\alpha_{\\mathrm{Cs}}/\\alpha_{\\mathrm{K}} = 1.3835(9)$, and $\\alpha_{\\mathrm{Rb}}/\\alpha_{\\mathrm{K}} = 1.1040(9)$ with smaller fractional uncertainty because the systematic errors for individual measurements are largely correlated. Since Cs atom...

  18. Atomic physics with highly-charged heavy ions at the GSI future facility: The scientific program of the SPARC collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumberidze, A. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: a.gumberidze@gsi.de; Bosch, F. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Th. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Schuch, R. [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Stoehlker, Th. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    The proposed new international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will open up exciting and far-reaching perspectives for atomic physics research in the realm of highly-charged heavy ions: it will provide the highest intensities of relativistic beams of both stable and unstable heavy nuclei. In combination with the strongest possible electromagnetic fields produced by the nuclear charge of the heaviest nuclei, this will allow to extend atomic spectroscopy up to the virtual limits of atomic matter. Based on the experience and results already achieved at the experimental storage ring (ESR), a substantial progress in atomic physics research has to be expected in this domain, due to a tremendous improvement of intensity, energy and production yield of both stable and unstable nuclei.

  19. Nuclear and Atomic Physics Invited Nuclear medium effects iu' K and R interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medium effects in the interaction of K and K' mesons with nucleons are reviewed. Recent K+ nuclear data confirm that conventional multiple scattering models fail to describe the interaction of K mesons for incoming momenta ρL = 400 - 800 MeV/c, suggesting a particular form of density dependence for the K nuclear optical potential. K+- atom strong-interaction data, fitted using a density dependent nuclear optical potential which respects the low-density theorem, require an appreciably stronger attraction than that obtained using a Vopt = tρ form, of order 180 +- 20 MeV at nuclear-matter density. The relationship of this result to the physics of theΛ(1405) KN unstable bound state is clarified, and the prospects of meeting the conditions for K- condensation in high-density matter are discussed

  20. Making custom fiber lasers for use in an atomic physics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademian, Ali; Cameron, Garnet; Nault, Kyla; Shiner, David

    2016-05-01

    Fiber lasers can be a reasonable choice for a laser source in atomic physics. Our particular applications involve the optical pumping and in some applications cooling of various transitions in atomic helium. Doped fiber with emission at the required wavelengths is necessary. Readily available fiber and approximate wavelength emission ranges include Yb (990 - 1150 nm), Er/Yb (1530 - 1625 nm) and Th (1900 -2100 nm). High efficiency conversion of pump photons into stable single frequency laser emission at the required wavelength is the function of the fiber laser. A simple fiber laser cavity uses a short (~ few mm) fiber grating high reflector mirror, a doped fiber section for the laser cavity, and a long (~ few cm) fiber grating output coupler. To ensure reliable single frequency operation, the laser cavity length should be within 2-3 times the output grating length. However the cavity length must be long enough for round trip gains to compensate for the output mirror transmission loss. Efficiency can be maximized by avoiding fiber splices in the fiber laser cavity. This requires that the gratings be written into the doped fiber directly. In our previous designs, back coupling of the fiber laser into the pump laser contributes to instability and sometimes caused catastrophic pump failure. Current designs use a fiber based wavelength splitter (WDM) to study and circumvent this problem. Data will be presented on the fiber lasers at 1083 nm. Work on a Thulium 2057 nm fiber laser will also be discussed. This work is supported by NSF Grant # 1404498.

  1. Intense electron beams from GaAs photocathodes as a tool for molecular and atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, Claude

    2009-10-28

    We present cesium-coated GaAs photocathodes as reliable sources of intense, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams in atomic and molecular physics experiments. In long-time operation of the Electron Target of the ion storage ring TSR in Heidelberg, cold electron beams could be realised at steadily improving intensity and reliability. Minimisation of processes degrading the quantum efficiency allowed to increase the extractable current to more than 1mA at usable cathode lifetimes of 24 h or more. The benefits of the cold electron beam with respect to its application to electron cooling and electron-ion recombination experiments are discussed. Benchmark experiments demonstrate the superior cooling force and energy resolution of the photoelectron beam compared to its thermionic counterparts. The long period of operation allowed to study the long-time behaviour of the GaAs samples during multiple usage cycles at the Electron Target and repeated in-vacuum surface cleaning by atomic hydrogen exposure. An electron emission spectroscopy setup has been implemented at the photocathode preparation chamber of the Electron Target. Among others, this new facility opened the way to a novel application of GaAs (Cs) photocathodes as robust, ultraviolet-driven electron emitters. Based on this principle, a prototype of an electron gun, designed for implementation at the HITRAP setup at GSI, has been built and taken into operation successfully. (orig.)

  2. On Measurements, Numbers and p-Adic Mathematical Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Dragovich, Branko

    2012-01-01

    In this short paper I consider relation between measurements, numbers and p-adic mathematical physics. p-Adic numbers are not result of measurements, but nevertheless they play significant role in description of some systems and phenomena. We illustrate their ability for applications referring to some sectors of p-adic mathematical physics and related topics, in particular, to string theory and the genetic code.

  3. Validating MOSPA questionnaire for measuring physical activity in Pakistani women

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi Rahat; Badruddin Salma; Rafique Ghazala; Iqbal Romaina; Gray-Donald Katherine

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Precise measurements of activity at a population level are important for monitoring trends and evaluating health promotion strategies. Few studies have assessed the measurement of physical activity in developing countries. The aim of this study was to validate the MOSPA (Monica Optional Study of Physical Activity) questionnaire which was developed for the WHO-Monitoring trends and determinants of cardiovasculr disease (MONICA) study sites. Methods The MOSPA questionnaire a...

  4. On curriculum of 'Atom and Radiation' in high school physics 1B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Nobuo [Tachibana Gakuen Senior High School, Matsuda, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    The 30% of electric power consumed in general home of Japan is supplied by nuclear power plants nowadays. High school students should have a right knowledge of nuclear energy. A curriculum of 'Atom and Radiation' is carried on about 10 school hours. The curriculum contains 10 items as follows: (1) history of discovery and development of nuclear energy, (2) radiation and radiation generation mechanism, (3) radiation measurement 1; natural radiation and familiar radiation source, (4) radiation measurement 2; relations of a distance and intensity (or dose), (5) radiation measurement 3; shielding effect experiment of radiation, (6) radiation observation by cloud chamber; assembling cloud chamber, (7) nuclear fission; chain reaction and atomic bomb, (8) principle of nuclear energy; principle and structure of nuclear reactor, (9) nuclear fuel and radioactive waste, (10) nuclear power as a energy source; discussion. Video-tapes fitted for these items are used in teaching. High school students after teaching have been able to consider nuclear energy and environmental issues by themselves. (M. Suetake)

  5. ATOMIC PHYSICS PROCESSES IMPORTANT TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE SCRAPE-OFF LAYER OF TOKAMAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEST, W.P.; GOLDSMITH,; B. EVANS,T.E.; OLSON, R.J.

    2002-05-01

    The region between the well-confined plasma and the vessel walls of a magnetic confinement fusion research device, the scrape-off layer (SOL), is typically rich in atomic and molecular physics processes. The most advanced magnetic confinement device, the magnetically diverted tokamak, uses a magnetic separatrix to isolate the confinement zone (closed flux surfaces) from the edge plasma (open field lines). Over most of their length the open field lines run parallel to the separatrix, forming a thin magnetic barrier with the nearby vessel walls. In a poloidally-localized region, the open field lines are directed away from the separatrix and into the divertor, a region spatially separated from the separatrix where intense plasma wall interaction can occur relatively safely. Recent data from several tokamaks indicate that particle transport across the field lines of the SOL can be somewhat faster than previously thought. In these cases, the rate at which particles reach the vessel wall is comparable to the rate to the divertor from parallel transport. The SOL can be thin enough that the recycling neutrals and sputtered impurities from the wall may refuel or contaminate the confinement zone more efficiently than divertor plasma wall interaction. Just inside the SOL is a confinement barrier that produces a sharp pedestal in plasma density and temperature. Understanding neutral transport through the SOL and into the pedestal is key to understanding particle balance and particle and impurity exhaust. The SOL plasma is sufficiently hot and dense to excite and ionize neutrals. Ion and neutral temperatures are high enough that charge exchange between the neutrals and fuel and impurity ions is fast. Excitation of neutrals can be fast enough to lead to nonlinear behavior in charge exchange and ionization processes. In this paper the detailed atomic physics important to the understanding of the neutral transport through the SOL will be discussed.

  6. The influence of atomizer internal design and liquid physical properties on effervescent atomizing of coal-water slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Meng; Duan, Yufeng [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). Inst. of Thermal Engineering

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated the dependence of effervescent atomizing of coal-water slurry (CWS) on atomizer internal design and fluid properties. Results demonstrate that internal design of atomizer and fluid properties directly affect the two-phase flow pattern inside the atomizer which consequently affects the spray quality. The influence of mixing chamber length on spray quality is not significant at the ALR of 0.15 except for spray 0.75 glycerol/0.248 water/0.002 xanthan mixture. The same trend also found in the effect of angle of aeration holes at ALR of 0.15. Large diameter of the inclined aeration holes shows small SMD for water. The consistency index of fluids has no effect on the spray quality and Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) increases when polymer additions were added to the glycerin-water mixture. The radial profile of SMD for spray water are almost flat, however, the largest SMD can be obtained at the edge of spray for three other fluids.

  7. Radium ion: A possible candidate for measuring atomic parity violation

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, P; Mukherjee, M

    2009-01-01

    Single trapped and laser cooled Radium ion as a possible candidate for measuring the parity violation induced frequency shift has been discussed here. Even though the technique to be used is similar to that proposed by Fortson [1], Radium has its own advantages and disadvantages. The most attractive part of Radium ion as compared to that of Barium ion is its mass which comes along with added complexity of instability as well as other issues which are discussed here

  8. Local gravity measurement with the combination of atom interferometry and Bloch oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Charrière, Renée; Zahzam, Nassim; Bidel, Yannick; Bresson, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    We present a local measurement of gravity combining Bloch oscillations and atom interferometry. With a falling distance of 0.8 mm, we achieve a sensitivity of 2x10-7 g with an integration time of 300 s. No bias associated with the Bloch oscillations has been measured. A contrast decay with Bloch oscillations has been observed and attributed to the spatial quality of the laser beams. A simple experimental configuration has been adopted where a single retro-reflected laser beam is performing atoms launch, stimulated Raman transitions and Bloch oscillations. The combination of Bloch oscillations and atom interferometry can thus be realized with an apparatus no more complex than a standard atomic gravimeter.

  9. Measuring the van der Waals forces between a Rydberg atom and a metallic surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed the deflection of Rydberg atoms towards a metallic surface by the van der Waals force. Cs and Na atoms in states of principal quantum number n were sent between two parallel gold-coated mirrors, spaced by a gap w (2.1 μm≤w≤8.5 μm). We measured the value n/sub m/ at which the transmission cuts off and from the variation of n/sub m/ versus w, we obtained a measure of the atom-surface interaction. For 12< n<30 this interaction is 3--4 orders of magnitude larger than for ground-state atoms, and it obeys the scaling laws of the Lennard-Jones model

  10. Information and backaction due to phase contrast imaging measurements of cold atomic gases: beyond Gaussian states

    CERN Document Server

    Ilo-Okeke, Ebubechukwu O

    2016-01-01

    We further examine a theory of phase contrast imaging (PCI) of cold atomic gases, first introduced by us in Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 112}, 233602 (2014). We model the PCI measurement by directly calculating the entangled state between the light and the atoms due to the ac Stark shift, which induces a conditional phase shift on the light depending upon the atomic state. By interfering the light that passes through the BEC with the original light, one can obtain information of the atomic state at a single shot level. We derive an exact expression for a measurement operator that embodies the information obtained from PCI, as well as the back-action on the atomic state. By the use of exact expressions for the measurement process, we go beyond the continuous variables approximation such that the non-Gaussian regime can be accessed for both the measured state and the post-measurement state. Features such as the photon probability density, signal, signal variance, Fisher information, error of the measurement, and the b...

  11. Quantum nondemolition measurement of photon-number distribution for a weak cavity field with resonant atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑仕标

    2003-01-01

    We propose a quantum nondemolition measurement of the photon-number distribution for a weak cavity field with no more than two photons. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of atoms with the cavity field, and thus the required interaction time is much shorter than that using dispersive interaction. This is important in view of decoherence. Our scheme can also be used to generate even and odd coherent states for a weak cavity field with resonant atoms.

  12. Conference on atomic processes in high temperature plasmas: a topical conference of the American Physical Society Division of Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts are included for approximately 100 of the papers presented at the meeting. The following sessions were held at the conference: (1) electron ionization and excitation rates, (2) radiation from low density plasmas, (3) electron-ion cross sections and rates, (4) oscillator strengths and atomic structure, (5) spectroscopy and atomic structure, (6) astrophysical plasmas, (7) particle transport, (8) ion-atom cross sections and rates, (9) wall effects in laboratory plasmas, (10) spectroscopy and photoionization, and (11) radiation from high density plasmas

  13. Spectroscopic approach for an electron EDM measurement using neutral cesium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kunyan; Solmeyer, Neal; Weiss, David S.

    2012-06-01

    Observation of a permanent electric dipole moment of the electron (eEDM) would imply CP violating effects not contained in the Standard Model. We describe the state preparation and spectroscopy that will be used to measure the eEDM. Cesium atoms are guided into a measurement chamber, where they are laser-cooled and trapped in a pair of parallel one-dimensional optical lattices. The lattices thread three specially coated glass electric field plates. The measurement chamber is surrounded by a four layer magnetic shield inside of which eight magnetic field coils control the bias and gradient magnetic fields. A series of microwave and low frequency magnetic field pulses transfer the atoms into a superposition state that is sensitive to the eEDM signal. A measurement of the eEDM using neutral cesium atoms can obtain an ultimate shot noise limit of 3x10-30 e-cm.

  14. Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms and measurement of the fine structure constant; Oscillations de Bloch d'atomes ultrafroids et mesure de la constante de structure fine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clade, P

    2005-10-15

    From a measurement of the recoil velocity of an atom absorbing a photon, it is possible to deduce a determination of the ratio h/m between the Planck constant and the mass of the atoms and then to deduce a value of the fine structure constant alpha. To do this measurement, we use the technique of Bloch oscillations, which allows us to transfer a large number of recoils to atoms. A velocity sensor, based on velocity selective Raman transition, enables us to measure the momentum transferred to the atoms. A measurement with a statistical uncertainty of 4.4 10{sup -9}, in conjunction with a careful study of systematic effects (5 10{sup -9}), has led us to a determination of alpha with an uncertainty of 6.7 10{sup -9}: {alpha}{sup -1}(Rb) = 137.03599878 (91). This uncertainty is similar to the uncertainty of the best determinations of alpha based on atom interferometry. (author)

  15. Fluorescence (TALIF) measurement of atomic hydrogen concentration in a coplanar surface dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrkvičková, M.; Ráheľ, J.; Dvořák, P.; Trunec, D.; Morávek, T.

    2016-10-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved measurements of atomic hydrogen concentration above the dielectric of coplanar barrier discharge are presented for atmospheric pressure in 2.2% H2/Ar. The measurements were carried out in the afterglow phase by means of two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). The difficulties of employing the TALIF technique in close proximity to the dielectric surface wall were successfully addressed by taking measurements on a suitable convexly curved dielectric barrier, and by proper mathematical treatment of parasitic signals from laser-surface interactions. It was found that the maximum atomic hydrogen concentration is situated closest to the dielectric wall from which it gradually decays. The maximum absolute concentration was more than 1022 m-3. In the afterglow phase, the concentration of atomic hydrogen above the dielectric surface stays constant for a considerable time (10 μs-1 ms), with longer times for areas situated farther from the dielectric surface. The existence of such a temporal plateau was explained by the presented 1D model: the recombination losses of atomic hydrogen farther from the dielectric surface are compensated by the diffusion of atomic hydrogen from regions close to the dielectric surface. The fact that a temporal plateau exists even closest to the dielectric surface suggests that the dielectric surface acts as a source of atomic hydrogen in the afterglow phase.

  16. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a Strontium atomic beam

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, F; Xu, P; Tian, X; Wang, Y; Ren, J; Wu, Haibin; Chang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    We measure precisely the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam with a velocity selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. By using the ultrastable laser system and narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms, the resolution of the velocity measured can be reached 0.13m/s, corresponding to 90$\\mu K$ in energy unit. The experimental results are agreement very well with a theoretical calculation. With the spectroscopic techniques, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of $^{88}$Sr is measured by an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, which is given by 434 829 121 318(10)kHz.

  17. Concurrence Measurement for the Two-Qubit Optical and Atomic States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Concurrence provides us an effective approach to quantify entanglement, which is quite important in quantum information processing applications. In the paper, we mainly review some direct concurrence measurement protocols of the two-qubit optical or atomic system. We first introduce the concept of concurrence for a two-qubit system. Second, we explain the approaches of the concurrence measurement in both a linear and a nonlinear optical system. Third, we introduce some protocols for measuring the concurrence of the atomic entanglement system.

  18. Atom-Resonant Heralded Single Photons by Interaction-Free Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgramm, Florian; Astiz, Yannick A. de Icaza; Beduini, Federica A.; Cere, Alessandro; Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the generation of rubidium-resonant heralded single photons for quantum memories. Photon pairs are created by cavity-enhanced down-conversion and narrowed in bandwidth to 7 MHz with a novel atom-based filter operating by "interaction-free measurement" principles. At least 94% of the heralded photons are atom-resonant as demonstrated by a direct absorption measurement with rubidium vapor. A heralded auto-correlation measurement shows $g_c^{(2)}(0)=0.040 \\pm 0.012$, i.e., suppres...

  19. Measuring Physical Activity in the Elderly: Some Implications for Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Roy J.

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of physical activity patterns is discussed in terms of data obtained by attitude assessment, activity questionnaires, personal monitoring devices, and fitness assessment. Problems of each technique are described. Application of activity measures to the estimation of total dietary needs is discussed. (SK)

  20. Cross-section measurements for electron-impact ionization of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Robert S.; Wetzel, Robert C.; Shul, Randy J.; Hayes, Todd R.

    1990-04-01

    Absolute electron-impact cross sections have been measured from 0 to 200 eV for single ionization of 16 atoms (Mg, Fe, Cu, Ag, Al, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, P, As, Sb, Bi, S, Se, and Te) with an estimated accuracy of +/-10%. Combined with our recent measurements of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, F, Cl, Br, I, Ga, and In [Wetzel et al., Phys. Rev. A 35, 559 (1987); Hayes et al., ibid. 35, 578 (1987); Shul, Wetzel, and Freund, ibid. 39, 5588 (1989)], a set of 27 atomic single-ionization cross sections has now been measured with the same apparatus. In addition, cross sections are reported for double ionization of ten atoms and triple ionization of eight atoms. The measurements are made by crossing an electron beam with a 3-keV beam of neutral atoms, prepared by charge-transfer neutralization of a mass-selected ion beam. The critical measurement of absolute neutral beam flux is made with a calibrated pyroelectric crystal. The magnitudes of the single-ionization-peak cross sections decrease monotonically across rows of the periodic table from group IIIA (Al,Ga,In) to group VIIIA (Ar,Kr,Xe), varying much more than predicted by various empirical formulas and classical and quantum-mechanical theories.

  1. Spring constants and adhesive properties of native bacterial biofilm cells measured by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volle, C B; Ferguson, M A; Aidala, K E; Spain, E M; Núñez, M E

    2008-11-15

    Bacterial biofilms were imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and their elasticity and adhesion to the AFM tip were determined from a series of tip extension and retraction cycles. Though the five bacterial strains studied included both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria and both environmental and laboratory strains, all formed simple biofilms on glass surfaces. Cellular spring constants, determined from the extension portion of the force cycle, varied between 0.16+/-0.01 and 0.41+/-0.01 N/m, where larger spring constants were measured for Gram-positive cells than for Gram-negative cells. The nonlinear regime in the extension curve depended upon the biomolecules on the cell surface: the extension curves for the smooth Gram-negative bacterial strains with the longest lipopolysaccharides on their surface had a larger nonlinear region than the rough bacterial strain with shorter lipopolysaccharides on the surface. Adhesive forces between the retracting silicon nitride tip and the cells varied between cell types in terms of the force components, the distance components, and the number of adhesion events. The Gram-negative cells' adhesion to the tip showed the longest distance components, sometimes more than 1 microm, whereas the shortest distance adhesion events were measured between the two Gram-positive cell types and the tip. Fixation of free-swimming planktonic cells by NHS and EDC perturbed both the elasticity and the adhesive properties of the cells. Here we consider the biochemical meaning of the measured physical properties of simple biofilms and implications to the colonization of surfaces in the first stages of biofilm formation. PMID:18815013

  2. Measuring Students' Beliefs about Physics in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadlaq, H.; Alshaya, F.; Alabdulkareem, S.; Perkins, K. K.; Adams, W. K.; Wieman, C. E.

    2009-11-01

    Over the last decade, science education researchers in the US have studied students' beliefs about science and learning science and measured how these beliefs change in response to classroom instruction in science. In this paper, we present an Arabic version of the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) which was developed to measure students' beliefs about physics at King Saud University (KSU) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We describe the translation process, which included review by four experts in physics and science education and ten student interviews to ensure that the statements remained valid after translation. We have administered the Arabic CLASS to over 300 students in introductory physics courses at KSU's men's and women's campuses. We present a summary of students' beliefs about physics at KSU and compare these results to similar students in the US.

  3. Atomic-resolution measurements with a new tunable diode laser-based interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, R.M.; Zou, H.; Gonda, S.;

    2004-01-01

    We develop a new implementation of a Michelson interferometer designed to make measurements with an uncertainty of less than 20 pm. This new method uses a tunable diode laser as the light source, with the diode laser wavelength continuously tuned to fix the number of fringes in the measured optical...... path. The diode laser frequency is measured by beating against a reference laser. High-speed, accurate frequency measurements of the beat frequency signal enables the diode laser wavelength to be measured with nominally 20-pm accuracy for the measurements described. The new interferometer design...... is lightweight and is mounted directly on an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope capable of atomic resolution. We report the simultaneous acquisition of an atomic resolution image, while the relative lateral displacement of the tip along the sample distance is measured with the new tunable diode...

  4. The uncertainty in physical measurements an introduction to data analysis in the physics laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Fornasini, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    All measurements of physical quantities are affected by uncertainty. Understanding the origin of uncertainty, evaluating its extent and suitably taking it into account in data analysis is essential for assessing the degree of accuracy of phenomenological relationships and physical laws in both scientific research and technological applications. The Uncertainty in Physical Measurements: An Introduction to Data Analysis in the Physics Laboratory presents an introduction to uncertainty and to some of the most common procedures of data analysis. This book will serve the reader well by filling the gap between tutorial textbooks and highly specialized monographs. The book is divided into three parts. The first part is a phenomenological introduction to measurement and uncertainty: properties of instruments, different causes and corresponding expressions of uncertainty, histograms and distributions, and unified expression of uncertainty. The second part contains an introduction to probability theory, random variable...

  5. Differences in physical aging measured by walking speed

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physical functioning and mobility of older populations are of increasing interest when populations are aging. Lower body functioning such as walking is a fundamental part of many actions in daily life. Limitations in mobility threaten independent living as well as quality of life in old age. In this study we examine differences in physical aging and convert those differences into the everyday measure of single years of age. Methods: We use the English Longitudinal Study ...

  6. Measurement of the hyperfine splitting of {sup 133}Cs atoms in superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, K., E-mail: kimamura@riken.jp [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Yang, X. F. [Peking University, School of Physics (China); Mitsuya, Y. [Meiji University, Department of Physics (Japan); Fujita, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Hayasaka, M. [Tokyo Gakugei University, Department of Physics (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Odashima, H. [Meiji University, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    We have been developing a new nuclear laser spectroscopy method named “OROCHI” (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher). OROCHI utilizes superfluid helium (He II) not only as an efficient stopping medium of highly energetic ions but also as a host matrix of in-situ atomic laser spectroscopy. Using these characteristic of He II, we produce atomic spin polarization and measure Zeeman and hyperfine structure (HFS) splitting using laser-RF (radio frequency) / MW (microwave) double resonance method. From the measured energy splittings, we can deduce nuclear spins and moments. So far, we have conducted a series of experiments using both stable ({sup 85,87}Rb, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 197}Au, {sup 107,109}Ag) and unstable isotopes ({sup 84,86}Rb) to confirm the feasibility of OROCHI method, especially observing Zeeman resonance and determining nuclear spins. The measurement of HFS splitting of atoms introduced into He II is indispensable to clarify the nuclear properties by deducing nuclear moments as well as the study of nuclear spins. For this purpose, we perform a precision measurement of HFS of {sup 133}Cs atoms immersed in He II using laser ablation technique. In this paper, we describe the result of the experiment.

  7. Measurement of the hyperfine splitting of 133Cs atoms in superfluid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been developing a new nuclear laser spectroscopy method named “OROCHI” (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher). OROCHI utilizes superfluid helium (He II) not only as an efficient stopping medium of highly energetic ions but also as a host matrix of in-situ atomic laser spectroscopy. Using these characteristic of He II, we produce atomic spin polarization and measure Zeeman and hyperfine structure (HFS) splitting using laser-RF (radio frequency) / MW (microwave) double resonance method. From the measured energy splittings, we can deduce nuclear spins and moments. So far, we have conducted a series of experiments using both stable (85,87Rb, 133Cs, 197Au, 107,109Ag) and unstable isotopes (84,86Rb) to confirm the feasibility of OROCHI method, especially observing Zeeman resonance and determining nuclear spins. The measurement of HFS splitting of atoms introduced into He II is indispensable to clarify the nuclear properties by deducing nuclear moments as well as the study of nuclear spins. For this purpose, we perform a precision measurement of HFS of 133Cs atoms immersed in He II using laser ablation technique. In this paper, we describe the result of the experiment

  8. Approximate and Conditional Teleportation of an Unknown Atomic-Entangled State Without Bell-State Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme for approximately and conditionally teleporting an unknown atomic-entangled state in cavity QED is proposed. It is the novel extension of the scheme of [Phys. Rev. A 69 (2004) 064302], where the state to be teleported is an unknown atomic state and where only a time point of system evolution and the corresponding fidelity implementing the teleportation are given. In fact, there exists multi-time points and the corresponding fidelities, which are shown in this paper and then are used to realize the approximate and conditional teleportation of the unknown atomic-entangled state. Naturally, our scheme does not involve the Bell-state measurement or an additional atom, which is required in the Bell-state measurement, only requiring one single-mode cavity. The scheme may be generalized to not only the teleportation of the cavity-mode-entangled-state by means of a single atom but also the teleportation of the unknown trapped-ion-entangled-state in a linear ion trap and the teleportation of the multi-atomic entangled states included in generalized GHZ states.

  9. Approximate and Conditional Teleportation of an Unknown Atomic-Entangled State Without Bell-State Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chang-Yong; LI Shao-Hua

    2007-01-01

    A scheme for approximately and conditionally teleporting an unknown atomic-entangled state in cavity QED is proposed.It is the novel extension of the scheme of [Phys.Rev.A 69 (2004) 064302],where the state to be teleported is an unknown atomic state and where only a time point of system evolution and the corresponding fidelity implementing the teleportation are given.In fact,there exists multi-time points and the corresponding fidclities,which are shown in this paper and then are used to realize the approximate and conditional teleportation of the unknown atomic-entangled state.Naturally,our scheme does not involve the Bell-state measurement or an additional atom,which is required in the Bell-state measurement,only requiring one single-mode cavity.The scheme may be generalized to not only the teleportation of the cavity-mode-entangled-state by means of a single atom but also the teleportation of the unknown trapped-ion-entangled-state in a linear ion trap and the teleportation of the multi-atomic entangled states included in generalized GHZ states.

  10. Atomic beam magnetic resonance apparatus for systematic measurement of hyperfine structure anomalies (Bohr-Weisskopf effect)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atomic beam magnetic resonance (ABMR) apparatus has been constructed at Orsay, and has been installed at the CERN PS Booster ISOLDE mass separator facility for 'on-line' work with radioactive isotopes in a program to measure hyperfine structure anomalies (the Bohr-Weisskopf effect) over long isotopic chains. The hfs anomalies result from the effect of the spatial distribution of the nuclear magnetization on the atomic hfs interaction. Constructional details of the system are described: Emphasis is placed on the measurement of nuclear g-factors by a triple resonance, laser state selected, ABMR method. A precision better than 10-4 for gI values has been obtained in stable atomic beam tests, leading to hfs anomaly measurements better than 10%. Two types of detection systems are described: Laser fluorescence and surface ionization coupled with mass spectrometry. (orig.)

  11. Use of O2 airglow for calibrating direct atomic oxygen measurements from sounding rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Witt

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge about the distribution of atomic oxygen is crucial for many studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Direct measurements of atomic oxygen by the resonance fluorescence technique at 130 nm have been made from many sounding rocket payloads in the past. This measurement technique yields atomic oxygen profiles with good sensitivity and altitude resolution. However, accuracy is a problem as calibration and aerodynamics make the quantitative analysis challenging. In general, accuracies better than a factor 2 are not to be expected from direct atomic oxygen measurements. As an example, we present results from the NLTE (non local thermodynamic equilibrium sounding rocket campaign at Esrange, Sweden, in 1998, with simultaneous O2 airglow and O resonance fluorescence measurements. O number densities are found to be consistent with the nightglow analysis, but only within the uncertainty limits of the resonance fluorescence technique. Based on these results, we here describe how better atomic oxygen number densities can be obtained by calibrating direct techniques with complementary airglow photometer measurements and detailed aerodynamic analysis. Night-time direct O measurements can be complemented by photometric detection of the O2 (b1Σg+−X3Σg− atmospheric band at 762 nm, while during daytime the O2 (a1Δg−X3Σg− infrared atmospheric band at 1.27 μm can be used. The combination of a photometer and a rather simple resonance fluorescence probe can provide atomic oxygen profiles with both good accuracy and good height resolution.

  12. Use of O2 airglow for calibrating direct atomic oxygen measurements from sounding rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Witt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge about the distribution of atomic oxygen is crucial for many studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Direct measurements of atomic oxygen by the resonance fluorescence technique at 130 nm have been made from many sounding rocket payloads in the past. This measurement technique yields atomic oxygen profiles with good sensitivity and altitude resolution. However, accuracy is a problem as calibration and aerodynamics make the quantitative analysis challenging. Most often, accuracies better than a factor 2 are not to be expected from direct atomic oxygen measurements. As an example, we present results from the NLTE (Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium sounding rocket campaign at Esrange, Sweden, in 1998, with simultaneous O2 airglow and O resonance fluorescence measurements. O number densities are found to be consistent with the nightglow analysis, but only within the uncertainty limits of the resonance fluorescence technique. Based on these results, we here describe how better atomic oxygen number densities can be obtained by calibrating direct techniques with complementary airglow photometer measurements and detailed aerodynamic analysis. Night-time direct O measurements can be complemented by photometric detection of the O2 (b1∑g+−X3∑g- Atmospheric Band at 762 nm, while during daytime the O2 (a1Δg−X3∑g- Infrared Atmospheric Band at 1.27 μm can be used. The combination of a photometer and a rather simple resonance fluorescence probe can provide atomic oxygen profiles with both good accuracy and good height resolution.

  13. Davisson-Germer Prize Talk: Many-Body Physics with Atomic Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold atomic gases confined to optical lattices have proven to be highly versatile and tunable systems for realizing novel quantum states of matter. We are using Fermi gases of 6 Li atoms in our laboratory to explore several goals related to the strong correlations that arise in these systems. We have realized the Hubbard model, which has long been suspected of containing the essential ingredients of high temperature superconductivity. We measured the compressibility of the Mott insulating phase that occurs near half filling (1 atom/site), thus demonstrating the excitation gap of the Mott insulator. Progress in this field, however, has been hampered by an inability to cool to low enough temperatures to achieve the most ambitious goals. To address this problem, we have developed the compensated optical lattice method to enable evaporative cooling in the lattice. With this method, we have cooled the Mott insulator sufficiently far to observe short-range antiferromagnetic correlations using Bragg scattering of light. We are currently exploring new methods for entropy storage and redistribution to achieve even lower entropy in the antiferromagnetic phase. Motivated by the enhancement of quantum correlations in low dimensions, we are also exploring Fermi gases in quasi-one-dimension (1D). A deep 2D optical lattice produces an array of 1D tubes which can be weakly coupled by reducing the lattice depth, thus increasing the lattice hopping t between them. We observe a crossover from 1D-like to 3D-like behavior in the phase separation of a spin-imbalanced Fermi gas with increasing t. While this crossover occurs at a value of t that depends on interaction, we find that the crossover location is universally dependent upon the scaled hopping t /ɛb , where ɛb is the pair binding energy. Finally, I will also report progress on measuring the speed of sound of the charge and spin modes in a 1D Fermi gas. Work supported by an ARO MURI, NSF, and the Robert A Welch Foundation.

  14. Atom Chips

    CERN Document Server

    Folman, R; Cassettari, D; Hessmo, B; Maier, T; Schmiedmayer, J; Folman, Ron; Krüger, Peter; Cassettari, Donatella; Hessmo, Björn; Maier, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Atoms can be trapped and guided using nano-fabricated wires on surfaces, achieving the scales required by quantum information proposals. These Atom Chips form the basis for robust and widespread applications of cold atoms ranging from atom optics to fundamental questions in mesoscopic physics, and possibly quantum information systems.

  15. ATOMIC BEAM POLARIZATION MEASUREMENT OF THE RHIC POLARIZED H-JET TARGET.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAKDISI,Y.; NASS,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KPONOU,A.; MAHLER,G.; MENG,W.; RITTER,J.; ET AL.

    2005-01-28

    The RHIC polarized H-Jet measures the polarization of the RHIC proton beam via elastic scattering off a nuclear polarized atomic hydrogen beam. The atomic beam is produced by a dissociator, a beam forming system and sextupole magnets. Nuclear polarization is achieved by exchanging occupation numbers of hyperfine states using high frequency transitions. The polarization was measured using a modified form of a Breit-Rabi polarimeter including focusing magnets and another set of high frequency transitions. The sampling of a large part of the beam and low noise electronics made it possible to measure the polarization to a high degree of accuracy in a very short time period (1 min). Using this system, we measured no depolarization of the atomic beam due to the RF fields of the bunched proton beam. Time-of-Flight measurements were done using a fast chopper and a QMA at the position of the RHIC interaction point to determine the areal density of the atomic beam seen by the RHIC beam.

  16. Tracking of objectively measured physical activity from childhood to adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Peter Lund; Møller, N C; Korsholm, L;

    2007-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated tracking of physical activity from childhood to adolescence and, in general, these studies have been based on methods with some degree of subjectivity (e.g., questionnaires). The aim of the present study was to evaluate tracking of physical activity from...... childhood to adolescence using accelerometry, taking into account major sources of variation in physical activity. Both a crude and an adjusted model was fitted, and, in the adjusted model, analyses were corrected for seasonal variation, within-week variation, activity registration during night time sleep......, within instrumental measurement error, and day-to-day variation in physical activity. In all, 208 subjects were included in the crude analyses. Stability coefficients estimated from the crude model were low (i.e., 0.18 and 0.19 for boys and girls, respectively) and only borderline significant. However...

  17. Brownian Motion as a Limit to Physical Measuring Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, Martin

    2016-01-01

    and received widespread recognition, but his way of modeling the system was contested by his contemporaries. With the more embracing notion of noise that developed during and after World War II, Ising’s conclusion was reinterpreted as showing that noise puts a limit on physical measurement processes. Hence...

  18. Angular correlation measurements for the 32Dsub(j) states of atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angular correlation measurements have been made of the Lyman-α radiation arising from the cascade of the 32Dsub(j) states of atomic hydrogen detected in coincidence with electron scattered with n=3 energy loss. Data are presented at incident energies of 54.4 and 100 eV and electron scattering angles thetasub(e)=20 and 250. (author)

  19. Electric-field gradients used to measure atomic short range order: as a case-study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottenier, S.; Meersschaut, J.; Vermeire, L.; Demuynck, S.; Swinnen, B.; Rots, M.

    1999-02-01

    A scheme is presented in order to obtain complete information on atomic short range order in crystalline materials based on measuring the electric-field gradient on a probe nucleus. Limitations and possible improvements of the method are discussed. When applied to U(In0.5Sn0.5)3, short range order with In-Sn attraction is found.

  20. Towards a precise measurement of atomic parity violation in a single Ra+ ion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunez Portela, M.; van den Berg, J. E.; Bekker, H.; Giri, G.S.; Hoekstra, S.; Jungmann, K.; Mohanty, A.; Onderwater, G.J.C.; Santra, B.; Schlesser, S.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Versolato, O.O.; Wansbeek, L.W.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H.W.

    2013-01-01

    A single trapped Ra+(Z= 88) ion provides a very promising route towards a most precise measurement of Atomic Parity Violation (APV), since APV effects grow faster than Z 3. This experiment promises the best determination of the electroweak coupling constant at the lowest accessible energies. Such a

  1. Complex decay patterns in atomic core photoionization disentangled by ion-recoil measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemin, Renaud; Bomme, Cedric; Marin, Thierry; Journel, Loic; Marchenko, Tatiana; Kushawaha, Rajesh K.; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris 06, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, FR-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonement (UMR7614), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, FR-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Trcera, Nicolas [Synchrotron SOLEIL, l' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, FR-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-12-15

    Following core 1s ionization and resonant excitation of argon atoms, we measure the recoil energy of the ions due to momentum conservation during the emission of Auger electrons. We show that such ion momentum spectroscopy can be used to disentangle to some degree complex decay patterns, involving both radiative and nonradiative decays.

  2. A New Computerised Advanced Theory of Mind Measure for Children with Asperger Syndrome: The ATOMIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Renae B.; Sofronoff, Kate

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the ability of children with Asperger Syndrome (AS) to attribute mental states to characters in a new computerised, advanced theory of mind measure: The Animated Theory of Mind Inventory for Children (ATOMIC). Results showed that children with AS matched on IQ, verbal comprehension, age and gender performed equivalently on…

  3. Emulating solid-state physics with a hybrid system of ultracold ions and atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Bissbort U.; Cocks D.; Negretti A.; Idziaszek Z.; Calarco T.; Schmidt-Kaler F.; Hofstetter W.; Gerritsma R.

    2013-01-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate a hybrid system composed of a crystal of trapped ions coupled to a cloud of ultracold fermions. The ions form a periodic lattice and induce a band structure in the atoms. This system combines the advantages of scalability and tunability of ultracold atomic systems with the high fidelity operations and detection offered by trapped ion systems. It also features close analogies to natural solid-state systems, as the atomic degrees of freedom couple to pho...

  4. Atomic physics with highly charged ions. Progress report, 15 February 1985-14 February 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental program has three directions: the study of collisions of very low velocity, highly-charged secondary recoil ions with stationary gas atoms, the study of collisions of high velocity, highly-charged ions with stationary targets, and the study of the theoretical descriptions of atomic collisions and atomic structure properties of highly-charged ions. Brief reports of the progress in these areas are given

  5. Note: Directly measuring the direct digital synthesizer frequency chirp-rate for an atom interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Juan-Juan; Zhou, Min-Kang, E-mail: zkhu@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: zmk@hust.edu.cn; Zhang, Qiao-Zhen; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun, E-mail: zkhu@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: zmk@hust.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luo Yu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-09-15

    During gravity measurements with Raman type atom interferometry, the frequency of the laser used to drive Raman transition is scanned by chirping the frequency of a direct digital synthesizer (DDS), and the local gravity is determined by precisely measuring the chip rate α of DDS. We present an effective method that can directly evaluate the frequency chirp rate stability of our DDS. By mixing a pair of synchronous linear sweeping signals, the chirp rate fluctuation is precisely measured with a frequency counter. The measurement result shows that the relative α instability can reach 5.7 × 10{sup −11} in 1 s, which is neglectable in a 10{sup −9} g level atom interferometry gravimeter.

  6. Physics of non-steady state diffusion of lightweight atoms in a heavy atom matrix. Introducing an open-source tool for simulated-experiments in fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Serrano-López, Roberto; Tapia-Júdez, Oscar; Fradera, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The practice-based learning methodologies offer to undergraduate professors different ways to illustrate certain general physic principles. Traditional experimental workbenches have been extensively used during decades for academic lessons in order to complete theoretical dissertations or lectures, aiming at assuring an adequate understanding. The high cost of materials and laboratory equipment, the excessive preparation time, and the difficulty for carrying out offsite-campus replications by students, are disadvantages that can discourage of trying new kinds of experimental tasks. This paper gives insight of simulated experiment possibilities through an open-source-based computational suite in teaching fluid mechanics. Physics underlying diffusion of a light specie in a heavier atom matrix, as function of time and position, were explained to students as an example to teach them the Fick's Second Law expression. We present a docent step-by-step programme, scheduled in three sessions. The expected solution is ...

  7. Inter-atomic force constants of BaF{sub 2} by diffuse neutron scattering measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Takashi, E-mail: sakuma@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp; Makhsun,; Sakai, Ryutaro [Institute of Applied Beam Science, Ibaraki University, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Xianglian [College of Physics and Electronics Information, Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities, Tongliao 028043 (China); Takahashi, Haruyuki [Institute of Applied Beam Science, Ibaraki University, Hitachi 316-8511 (Japan); Basar, Khairul [Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Igawa, Naoki [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan); Danilkin, Sergey A. [Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Kirrawee DC NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2015-04-16

    Diffuse neutron scattering measurement on BaF{sub 2} crystals was performed at 10 K and 295 K. Oscillatory form in the diffuse scattering intensity of BaF{sub 2} was observed at 295 K. The correlation effects among thermal displacements of F-F atoms were obtained from the analysis of oscillatory diffuse scattering intensity. The force constants among neighboring atoms in BaF{sub 2} were determined and compared to those in ionic crystals and semiconductors.

  8. Derivation of Inter-Atomic Force Constants of Cu2O from Diffuse Neutron Scattering Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron scattering intensity from Cu2O compound has been measured at 10 K and 295 K with High Resolution Powder Diffractometer at JRR-3 JAEA. The oscillatory diffuse scattering related to correlations among thermal displacements of atoms was observed at 295 K. The correlation parameters were determined from the observed diffuse scattering intensity at 10 and 295 K. The force constants between the neighboring atoms in Cu2O were estimated from the correlation parameters and compared to those of Ag2O (author)

  9. Derivation of Inter-Atomic Force Constants of Cu2O from Diffuse Neutron Scattering Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Makhsun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Neutron scattering intensity from Cu2O compound has been measured at 10 K and 295 K with High Resolution Powder Diffractometer at JRR-3 JAEA. The oscillatory diffuse scattering related to correlations among thermal displacements of atoms was observed at 295 K. The correlation parameters were determined from the observed diffuse scattering intensity at 10 and 295 K. The force constants between the neighboring atoms in Cu2O were estimated from the correlation parameters and compared to those of Ag2O

  10. The Potential of Continuous, Local Atomic Clock Measurements for Earthquake Prediction and Volcanology

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarescu, Mihai; Jetzer, Philippe; Lundgren, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Modern optical atomic clocks along with the optical fiber technology currently being developed can measure the geoid, which is the equipotential surface that extends the mean sea level on continents, to a precision that competes with existing technology. In this proceeding, we point out that atomic clocks have the potential to not only map the sea level surface on continents, but also look at variations of the geoid as a function of time with unprecedented timing resolution. The local time series of the geoid has a plethora of applications. These include potential improvement in the predictions of earthquakes and volcanoes, and closer monitoring of ground uplift in areas where hydraulic fracturing is performed.

  11. Investigations on atomic-vapor-filter high-spectral-resolution lidar for temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, E.; Weitkamp, C.

    1992-01-01

    The temperature measurement by the analysis of Rayleigh scattered laser radiation with atomic vapor filters is investigated in both theory and laboratory experiments. Synthetic air is irradiated with a cw dye laser at 283 nano-meters, and the backscattered spectrum is analyzed with two lead vapor cells in one oven. Temperature measurements are carried out, and the effect of different parameters on the accuracy is investigated. Important aspects for the realization of a lidar are given.

  12. Experimental determination of conduction channels in atomic scale conductors based on shot noise measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Vardimon, Ran; Klionsky, Marina; Tal, Oren

    2013-01-01

    We present an experimental procedure for obtaining the conduction channels of low-dimensional conductors based on shot noise measurements. The transmission coefficient for each channel is determined numerically from the measured conductance and Fano factor. The channel analysis is demonstrated for atomic contacts of Ag, Au, Al and Pt, showing their channel evolution as a function of conductance and mechanical elongation. This approach can be readily applied to map the conduction channels in a...

  13. Sensitive measurement of forces at the micron scale using Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carusotto, I; Pitaevskii, L; Stringari, S; Modugno, G; Inguscio, M

    2005-08-26

    We show that Bloch oscillations of ultracold fermionic atoms in the periodic potential of an optical lattice can be used for a sensitive measurement of forces at the micrometer length scale, e.g., in the vicinity of a dielectric surface. In particular, the proposed approach allows us to perform a local and direct measurement of the Casimir-Polder force which is, for realistic experimental parameters, as large as 10(-4) gravity.

  14. Measurement of 5-eV atomic oxygen using carbon-based films: preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    White, C de B; Roberts, G. T.; Chambers, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon-based sensors have been developed to measure the atmospheric neutral atomic oxygen (AO) flux experienced by spacecraft in low Earth orbit. Thin- and thick-film carbon sensor elements were deposited onto an alumina substrate between thick-film gold tracks and silver palladium solder pads. AO flux is deduced by measuring resistance changes as the carbon film erodes and applying a simple theory. A wide range of responses were observed that are dependent on the deposition process and post ...

  15. Total cross-section measurements progress in nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, G; Mulvey, J H

    2013-01-01

    Total Cross-Section Measurements discusses the cross-sectional dimensions of elementary hadron collisions. The main coverage of the book is the resonance and high energy area of the given collision. A section of the book explains in detail the characteristic of a resonance region. Another section is focused on the location of the high energy region of collision. Parts of the book define the meaning of resonance in nuclear physics. Also explained are the measurement of resonance and the identification of the area where the resonance originates. Different experimental methods to measure the tota

  16. ATLAS QCD measurements for Higgs studies and New Physics searches

    CERN Document Server

    Proissl, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the modelling of Standard Model processes plays an important role for Higgs physics and searches beyond the Standard Model. Measurements such as vector boson plus jet production are essential for the understanding of backgrounds, modelling of double parton interactions, heavy flavour production from gluon splitting and modelling of the underlying event. Precision QCD measurements can also be used to constrain parton density functions, which are important for the understanding of the Higgs boson production cross section and the Standard Model backgrounds at the LHC kinematic limits. A review of recent ATLAS measurements is presented.

  17. Scholar-activating teaching materials on quantum physics. Pt. 3. Foundations of atomic physics; Schueleraktivierende Unterrichtsmaterialien zur Quantenphysik. T. 3. Grundlagen der Atomphysik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebel, Horst

    2010-07-01

    Traditionally in the center of the interest on quantum physics referring to schools the question lies, whether electrons or photons are now particles or waves, a question, which is often characterized by the phrase ''wave-particle dualism'', which notoriously not exists in its original meaning. Against that by the author - on the base of important preparatory works of Kueblbeck and Mueller - a new concept of quantum physics for the school was proposed, which puts ''basic facts'' in the foreground, comparable with the Kueblbeck-Mueller ''characteristic features''. The ''basic facts'' are similar to axioms of quantum physics, by means of them a large number of experiments and phenomena can be ''explained'' at least qualitatively - in a heuristic way -. Instead of the so-called ''wave-particle dualism'' uncertainty and complementarity are put in the foreground. The new concept is in the Internet under http://www.forphys.de extensively presented with many further materials. In the partial volumes of this publication manifold and carefully elaborated teaching materials are presented, by which scholars can get themselves the partial set of quantum physics referring to schools by different methods like learning at stations, short referates, Internet-research, group puzzle, the query-sheet or the card-index method etc. In the present 3. part materials are prepared, by which scholars can get foundations of atomic physics and interpret in the sense of the ''basic facts or quantum physics''. Here deals it thus with discrete energy levels, the linear potential box, with atomic models, the atomic structure, the tunnel effect, and - because curricula it often require - also with the Schroedinger equation. The materials can also be usefully applied in other concepts.

  18. Algorithmic randomness, physical entropy, measurements, and the second law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algorithmic information content is equal to the size -- in the number of bits -- of the shortest program for a universal Turing machine which can reproduce a state of a physical system. In contrast to the statistical Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon entropy, which measures ignorance, the algorithmic information content is a measure of the available information. It is defined without a recourse to probabilities and can be regarded as a measure of randomness of a definite microstate. I suggest that the physical entropy S -- that is, the quantity which determines the amount of the work ΔW which can be extracted in the cyclic isothermal expansion process through the equation ΔW = kBTΔS -- is a sum of two contributions: the mission information measured by the usual statistical entropy and the known randomness measured by the algorithmic information content. The sum of these two contributions is a ''constant of motion'' in the process of a dissipation less measurement on an equilibrium ensemble. This conservation under a measurement, which can be traced back to the noiseless coding theorem of Shannon, is necessary to rule out existence of a successful Maxwell's demon. 17 refs., 3 figs

  19. Faithful Teleportation of an Unknown Atomic-Entangled State Without Bell-State Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alternative scheme is proposed for teleportation of an unknown atomic-entangled state. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of a two-mode cavity field with a Λ-type three-level atom. In contrast with the previously proposed scheme of [Commun. Theor. Phys. 47 (2007) 253], the present scheme is ascendant, since the fidelity is 1.0 in principle similarly without the Bell-state measurement. The scheme may be generalized to not only the teleportation of the cavity-mode-entangled-state but also the teleportation of the multi-atomic entangled states included in generalized GHZ states. And the scheme is experimentally feasible based on the current cavity QED technique.

  20. Learning in a Physics Classroom Community: Physics Learning Identity Construct Development, Measurement and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sissi L.

    At the university level, introductory science courses usually have high student to teacher ratios which increases the challenge to meaningfully connect with students. Various curricula have been developed in physics education to actively engage students in learning through social interactions with peers and instructors in class. This learning environment demands not only conceptual understanding but also learning to be a scientist. However, the success of student learning is typically measured in test performance and course grades while assessment of student development as science learners is largely ignored. This dissertation addresses this issue with the development of an instrument towards a measure of physics learning identity (PLI) which is used to guide and complement case studies through student interviews and in class observations. Using the conceptual framework based on Etienne Wenger's communities of practice (1998), I examine the relationship between science learning and learning identity from a situated perspective in the context of a large enrollment science class as a community of practice. This conceptual framework emphasizes the central role of identity in the practices negotiated in the classroom community and in the way students figure out their trajectory as members. Using this framework, I seek to understand how the changes in student learning identity are supported by active engagement based instruction. In turn, this understanding can better facilitate the building of a productive learning community and provide a measure for achievement of the curricular learning goals in active engagement strategies. Based on the conceptual framework, I developed and validated an instrument for measuring physics learning identity in terms of student learning preferences, self-efficacy for learning physics, and self-image as a physics learner. The instrument was pilot tested with a population of Oregon State University students taking calculus based

  1. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms.

  2. Physical Construction of the Chemical Atom: Is It Convenient to Go All the Way Back?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Aymerich, Merce; Aduriz-Bravo, Agustin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of chemistry texts (mainly textbooks) published during the first half of the 20th century. We show the evolution of the explanations therein in terms of atoms and of atomic structure, when scientists were interpreting phenomena as evidence of the discontinuous, corpuscular structure of matter. In this process…

  3. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms

  4. Measurement of effective atomic number of gunshot residues using scattering of gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Better understanding of gunshot residues and the major elemental composition would be valuable to forensic scientists for their analysis work and interpretation of results. In the present work, the effective atomic numbers of gunshot residues (cartridge case, bullet core, bullet jacket and gunpowder) were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The scattering of 59.54 keV gamma rays is studied using a high-resolution HPGe detector. The experiment is performed on various elements with atomic number in the 4≤Z≤82. The intensity ratio of coherent to Compton scattered peaks, corrected for photo-peak efficiency of gamma detector and absorption of photons in the sample and air, is plotted as a function of atomic number and constituted a best-fit-curve. From this fit-curve, the respective effective atomic numbers of gunshot residues are determined. - Highlights: • Values of Zeff depend on the chemical content of the investigated gunshot residues. • The agreement of measured values of effective atomic numbers with theoretical calculations is quite satisfactory. • The present calculations of Zeff have thrown new light on forensic science

  5. Emulating solid-state physics with a hybrid system of ultracold ions and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissbort, U; Cocks, D; Negretti, A; Idziaszek, Z; Calarco, T; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Hofstetter, W; Gerritsma, R

    2013-08-23

    We propose and theoretically investigate a hybrid system composed of a crystal of trapped ions coupled to a cloud of ultracold fermions. The ions form a periodic lattice and induce a band structure in the atoms. This system combines the advantages of high fidelity operations and detection offered by trapped ion systems with ultracold atomic systems. It also features close analogies to natural solid-state systems, as the atomic degrees of freedom couple to phonons of the ion lattice, thereby emulating a solid-state system. Starting from the microscopic many-body Hamiltonian, we derive the low energy Hamiltonian, including the atomic band structure, and give an expression for the atom-phonon coupling. We discuss possible experimental implementations such as a Peierls-like transition into a period-doubled dimerized state. PMID:24010420

  6. Emulating solid-state physics with a hybrid system of ultracold ions and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissbort, U; Cocks, D; Negretti, A; Idziaszek, Z; Calarco, T; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Hofstetter, W; Gerritsma, R

    2013-08-23

    We propose and theoretically investigate a hybrid system composed of a crystal of trapped ions coupled to a cloud of ultracold fermions. The ions form a periodic lattice and induce a band structure in the atoms. This system combines the advantages of high fidelity operations and detection offered by trapped ion systems with ultracold atomic systems. It also features close analogies to natural solid-state systems, as the atomic degrees of freedom couple to phonons of the ion lattice, thereby emulating a solid-state system. Starting from the microscopic many-body Hamiltonian, we derive the low energy Hamiltonian, including the atomic band structure, and give an expression for the atom-phonon coupling. We discuss possible experimental implementations such as a Peierls-like transition into a period-doubled dimerized state.

  7. The application of nonintrusive optical methods for physical measurements in combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerer, J. E.; Oeding, R. G.; Poon, C. C.; Hess, C. F.

    1982-01-01

    Laser optical diagnostic techniques have proven to be effective for making physical measurements in hostile combustion environments. Two major and complementary approaches have been applied; namely, single event imaging and multi-signal detection methods. Single event imaging methods (e.g., pulsed laser holography) can provide the essentially instantaneous observation of physical events, e.g., fuel atomization, droplet breakup, particle and surface combustion, condensed phase formation, and flow field visualization. Multi-signal detection methods, which involve the processing of signals produced by the light scattered from the interaction of particles and/or droplets with an incident coherent ray, can provide information on flow velocity, turbulence, fluid shear stresses, and particle/droplet size and velocity. Recent results using both approaches are presented.

  8. Measures of nonclassicality for a two-level atom interacting with power-law potential field under decoherence effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Khalek, S.; Berrada, K.; Alkhateeb, Sadah A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a useful quantum system to perform different tasks of quantum information and computational technologies. We explore the required optimal conditions for this system that are feasible with real experimental realization. We present an active way to control the variation of some measures of nonclassicality considering the time-dependent coupling and photon transition effects under a model that closely describes a realistic experimental scenario. We investigate qualitatively the quantum measures for a two-level atom system interacting with a quantum field initially defined in a coherent state in the framework of power-law potentials (PLPCSs). We study the nonlocal correlation in the whole system state using the negativity as a measure of entanglement in terms of the exponent parameter, number of photon transition, and phase damping effect. The influences of the different physical parameters on the statistical properties and purity of the field are also demonstrated during the time evolution. The results indicate that the preservation and enhancement of entanglement greatly benefit from the combination of the choice of the physical parameters. Finally, we explore an interesting relationship between the different quantum measures of non-classicality during the time evolution in the absence and presence of time-dependent coupling effect.

  9. Constraining new physics with collider measurements of Standard Model signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Butterworth, Jonathan M; Krämer, Michael; Yallup, David

    2016-01-01

    A new method providing general consistency constraints for Beyond-the-Standard-Model (BSM) theories, using measurements at particle colliders, is presented. The method, `Constraints On New Theories Using Rivet', Contur, exploits the fact that particle-level differential measurements made in fiducial regions of phase-space have a high degree of model-independence. These measurements can therefore be compared to BSM physics implemented in Monte Carlo generators in a very generic way, allowing a wider array of final states to be considered than is typically the case. The Contur approach should be seen as complementary to the discovery potential of direct searches, being designed to eliminate inconsistent BSM proposals in a context where many (but perhaps not all) measurements are consistent with the Standard Model. We demonstrate, using a competitive simplified dark matter model, the power of this approach. The Contur method is highly scaleable to other models and future measurements.

  10. Cavity-assisted measurement and coherent control of collective atomic spin oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Kohler, Jonathan; Schreppler, Sydney; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate continuous measurement and coherent control of the collective spin of an atomic ensemble undergoing Larmor precession in a high-finesse optical cavity. The coupling of the precessing spin oscillator to the cavity field yields phenomena similar to those observed in cavity optomechanics, including cavity amplification, damping, and optical spring shifts. These effects arise from autonomous optical feedback onto the atomic spin dynamics, conditioned by the cavity spectrum. We use this feedback to stabilize the spin in either its high- or low-energy state, where it achieves a steady-state temperature in equilibrium with measurement back-action. We measure the effective spin temperature from the asymmetry between the Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands and show that, for sufficiently large Larmor frequency, such a feedback-stabilized spin ensemble remains in a nearly pure quantum state, in spite of continuous interaction with the probe field.

  11. In-situ measurement of vacuum window birefringence by atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Andreas; Genske, Maximilian; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Alberti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    We present an in-situ method to measure the birefringence of a single vacuum window by means of microwave spectroscopy on an ensemble of cold atoms. Stress-induced birefringence can cause an ellipticity in the polarization of an initially linearly-polarized laser beam. The amount of ellipticity can be reconstructed by measuring the differential vector light shift of an atomic hyperfine transition. Measuring the ellipticity as a function of the linear polarization angle allows us to infer the amount of birefringence $\\Delta n$ at the level of $10^{-8}$ and identify the orientation of the optical axes. The key benefit of this method is the ability to separately characterize each vacuum window, allowing the birefringence to be precisely compensated in existing vacuum apparatuses.

  12. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90 μK in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques used here, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of 88Sr is measured using an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, and is given as 434 829 121 318(10 kHz.

  13. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, F.; Liu, H.; Tian, X. [CAS Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Xi' an 710600 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, P.; Wang, Y.; Ren, J. [CAS Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Xi' an 710600 (China); Wu, Haibin, E-mail: hbwu@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Chang, Hong, E-mail: changhong@ntsc.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Xi' an 710600 (China); State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2014-02-15

    We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90 μK in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques used here, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of {sup 88}Sr is measured using an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, and is given as 434 829 121 318(10) kHz.

  14. Atom-Resonant Heralded Single Photons by Interaction-Free Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfgramm, Florian; Beduini, Federica A; Cere, Alessandro; Mitchell, Morgan W; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.053602

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the generation of rubidium-resonant heralded single photons for quantum memories. Photon pairs are created by cavity-enhanced down-conversion and narrowed in bandwidth to 7 MHz with a novel atom-based filter operating by "interaction-free measurement" principles. At least 94% of the heralded photons are atom-resonant as demonstrated by a direct absorption measurement with rubidium vapor. A heralded auto-correlation measurement shows $g_c^{(2)}(0)=0.040 \\pm 0.012$, i.e., suppression of multi-photon contributions by a factor of 25 relative to a coherent state. The generated heralded photons can readily be used in quantum memories and quantum networks.

  15. Validating MOSPA questionnaire for measuring physical activity in Pakistani women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Rahat

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise measurements of activity at a population level are important for monitoring trends and evaluating health promotion strategies. Few studies have assessed the measurement of physical activity in developing countries. The aim of this study was to validate the MOSPA (Monica Optional Study of Physical Activity questionnaire which was developed for the WHO-Monitoring trends and determinants of cardiovasculr disease (MONICA study sites. Methods The MOSPA questionnaire assesses energy expendtiture (EE related to physical activity (employment, household work, transportation, and leisure time over a one year period. This questionnaire has been described in the manuscript as the long term (LT questionnaire. An adapted short term (ST 5 day questionnaire was developed to assess convergent validity. Questionnaire data were compared with physical activity EE estimates from a Caltrac accelerometer and with body composition measures (height, weight and bioelectrical impedance in 50 women from the Aga Khan University (AKU hospital antenatal clinics, Pakistan. Other forms of EE i.e. resting EE and thermic effect of food were not assessd in this study. Results Subjects were aged 26 ± 3.8 years and were 16.1 ± 6.7 weeks pregnant. Their average weight was 58.8 ± 10.7 Kg. The average EE/day assessed by the Caltrac accelerometer, was 224 kcal and by MOSPA LT questionnaire it was 404 kcal. The questionnaires and Caltrac data were reasonably well correlated: r = 0.51 and r = 0.60 (P Conclusion The MOSPA questionnaire is useful in assessing physical activity levels in a sedentary population over a one year period.

  16. Parent-child relationship of directly measured physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mâsse Louise C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on parent-child correlations of physical activity have been mixed. Few studies have examined concurrent temporal patterns of physical activity and sedentary behaviors in parents and children using direct measures. The purpose of this study was to examine parent-child activity correlations by gender, day of week, and time of day, using accelerometers - a method for direct assessment of physical activity. Methods Accelerometers were used to assess physical activity and sedentary time in 45 fathers, 45 mothers and their children (23 boys, 22 girls, mean age 9.9 years over the course of 4 days (Thursday - Sunday. Participants were instructed to wear accelerometers for 24 hours per day. Data from accelerometers were aggregated into waking hours on weekdays and weekends (6:00 am to midnight and weekday after-school hours (3:00 - 7:00 pm. Results Across the 4 days, the mean minutes per day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA for fathers was 30.0 (s.d. = 17.3, for mothers was 30.1 (s.d. = 20.1 and for children was 145.47 (s.d. = 51.64. Mothers' and fathers' minutes of MVPA and minutes of sedentary time were positively correlated with child physical activity and sedentary time (all ps Conclusions Greater parental MVPA was associated with increased child MVPA. In addition, having two parents with higher levels of MVPA was associated with greater levels of activity in children. Sedentary time in children was not as strongly correlated with that of their parents. Findings lend support to the notion that to increase childhood activity levels it may be fruitful to improve physical activity among parents.

  17. Development, installation and adjustment of gas filter system of atomic and molecular physics beamline at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A differentially pumped rare gas absorption cell has been developed to suppress high order harmonic radiation on the atomic and molecule physics beamline at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. The gas filter system contained a gas absorption cell and two differential pumping systems considering the present status of atomic and molecule physics beamline. The adjustment results indicated that the pressure of Ar in the gas cell should be lower than 1.333 x 103 Pa while preserving the beamline vacuum to -7 Pa. When the pressure of Ar in the gas absorption cell was set to 1.241 x 103 Pa, the filter factor of gas filter system was better than 99.975%. Generally speaking, the adjustment results of the gas filter system were in agreement with the design parameters and could meet the experimental requirement very well. (authors)

  18. Ground-state atomic polarization relaxation-time measurement of Rb filled hypocycloidal core-shaped Kagome HC-PCF

    CERN Document Server

    Bradley, T D; McFerran, J J; Jouin, J; Debord, B; Alharbi, M; Thomas, P; Gerome, F; Benabid, F

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of ground state atomic polarization relaxation tile of Rb vapor confined in five different hypocycloidal core shape Kagome hollow core photonic crystal fibers made with uncoated silica glass. We are able to distinguish between wall-collision and transit-time effects in optical waveguide and deduce the contribution of the atom's dwell time at the core wall surface. In contrast with convetional macroscopic atomic cell configuration, and in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, the measured relaxation times were found to be at least one order of magnitude longer than the limit set by the atom-wall collisional relaxation from thermal atoms. This extended relaxation time is explained by the combination of a stronger contribution of the slow atoms in the atomic polarization build-up, and of the relatively significant contribution of dwell time to the relaxation process of the ground state polarization.

  19. The Potential Impact of Biofield Energy Treatment on the Atomic and Physical Properties of Antimony Tin Oxide Nanopowder

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Antimony tin oxide (ATO) is known for its high thermal conductivity, optical transmittance, and wide energy band gap, which makes it a promising material for the display devices, solar cells, and chemical sensor industries. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of biofield energy treatment on the atomic and physical properties of ATO nanopowder. The ATO nanopowder was divided into two parts: control and treated. The treated part was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield ...

  20. Observation and Measurement of Interaction-Induced Dispersive Optical Nonlinearities in an Ensemble of Cold Rydberg Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Parigi, Valentina; Bimbard, Erwan; Stanojevic, Jovica; Hilliard, Andrew; Nogrette, Florence; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Grangier, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    International audience We observe and measure dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold Rydberg atoms placed inside an optical cavity. The experimental results are in agreement with a simple model where the optical nonlinearities are due to the progressive appearance of a Rydberg blockaded volume within the medium. The measurements allow a direct estimation of the ''blockaded fraction'' of atoms within the atomic ensemble.

  1. The relation of the measurement physical quantities to radioactive logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the statistic error theory, the author discusses the vertical resolution because of the moving survey in the radioactive logging, and analyses its relation with the other measurement physical quantities, as the GR (Natural gamma-rays logging) being given. And the fitting process principle is described, especially Kalman fitting technology in modern control theory and adaptive Kalman fitting in the practical application. The examples of simulation are shown

  2. Empirical Validation of Daylight Simulation Tool with Physical Model Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Yaik-Wah Lim; Mohd H. Ahmad; Dilshan R. Ossen

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: In recent years, daylighting simulation tools have been increasingly used by many architects, engineers and researchers to evaluate the day lighting performances of building design. Most of these tools employ CIE sky models for simulation. However, the accuracy and applicability of these tools for tropical sky are doubtable. The aim of this study was to validate the computer simulated result with scaled physical model results measured under real tropical...

  3. A precision analysis and determination of the technical requirements of an atom interferometer for gravity measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-ying WANG; Tao CHEN; Xiao-long WANG; Zhang ZHANG; Yun-fei XU; Qiang LIN

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the wave-front curvature of Raman pulses on the measurement precision of gravitational acceleration in atom interferometry is analysed by the method of a transmission matrix. It is shown that the measurement precision of gravitational acceleration is largely dependent on the spot size of the Raman pulse, the temporal interval between Raman pulses and the optical path difference of the two counter-propagating Raman pulses. Moreover, the influence of Doppler frequency shift on the precision is discussed. In order to get a certain measurement precision, the requirement for the accuracy of frequency scanning of the Raman pulse to compensate for the Doppler frequency shift is obtained.

  4. Atomic physics of strongly correlated systems. Progress report, 1 August 1980-31 July 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of electron correlations of doubly-excited electrons in hyperspherical coordinates, and differential and total cross sections for charge transfer and ionization in fast ion-atom collisions are reported

  5. Resonance Radiation and Excited Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Allan C. G.; Zemansky, Mark W.

    2009-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Physical and chemical effects connected with resonance radiation; 3. Absorption lines and measurements of the lifetime of the resonance state; 4. Collision processes involving excited atoms; 5. The polarization of resonance radiation; Appendix; Index.

  6. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: L D Landau in the Soviet Atomic Project: a documentary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, G. V.

    2008-09-01

    The article presents information about the participation of Academician L D Landau in the Soviet Atomic Project and is based on a study of archive documents of the First Main Directorate. Their analysis points to L D Landau's important contribution to the development of the theory of heterogeneous nuclear reactors and to the computational justification of the first designs of atomic and hydrogen bombs. Many of the quoted documents have never been published before.

  7. Measurement of atomic L shell Coster-Kronig yields (f12, f23 and f13) for some elements in the atomic number range 59≤Z≤90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-radiative transitions cause changes in the generation of the intensity of the L lines. In order to investigate the physical quantities relevant to the L lines affected by the non-radiative transitions, experimental measurements were carried out using a Si(Li) x-ray spectrometer. Atomic L shell Coster-Kronig yields (f12, f13 and f23) for some elements in the atomic number range 59≤Z≤90 were determined. These selected measured semi-empirical values were also fitted by least squares to polynomials in Z of the form ΣnanZn (except for f13) and compared with theoretical and with earlier fitted values. (author)

  8. Ultrafast quantum nondemolition measurements based on a diamond-shaped artificial atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, I.; Dumur, E.; Buisson, O.; Auffèves, A.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a quantum nondemolition (QND) readout scheme for a superconducting artificial atom coupled to a resonator in a circuit QED architecture, for which we estimate a very high measurement fidelity without Purcell effect limitations. The device consists of two transmons coupled by a large inductance, giving rise to a diamond-shaped artificial atom with a logical qubit and an ancilla qubit interacting through a cross-Kerr-like term. The ancilla is strongly coupled to a transmission line resonator. Depending on the qubit state, the ancilla is resonantly or dispersively coupled to the resonator, leading to a large contrast in the transmitted microwave signal amplitude. This original method can be implemented with a state-of-the-art Josephson parametric amplifier, leading to QND measurements in a few tens of nanoseconds with fidelity as large as 99.9%.

  9. Measurements of recombination coefficient of hydrogen atoms on plasma deposited thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have performed experiments in plasma afterglow in order to determine the recombination coefficients of plasma deposited thin films of tungsten and graphite. Plasma deposited films rather than bulk material were used in order to more closely emulate surface structure of plasma-facing material deposits in fusion reactors. We have also determined the recombination coefficient of 85250 borosilicate glass and Teflon. Plasma was created by means of a radio frequency generator in a mixture of argon and hydrogen at the pressures between 60 Pa and 280 Pa. The degree of dissociation of hydrogen molecules was found to be between 0.1 and 1. The H-atom density was measured by Fiber Optic Catalytic Probe. The recombination coefficient was determined by measuring the axial profile of the H-atom density and using Smith's side arm diffusion model. (author)

  10. Scheme for teleportation of entangled states without Bell-state measurement by using one atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang Wenchao; Zhang Lei; Zhang Aiping [Faculty of Science, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an 710055 (China); Dong Shihai, E-mail: qwcqj@163.com [Departamento de Fisica, Esc. Sup de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edificio 9, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico, DF 07738 (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    We propose a scheme for approximately and conditionally teleporting an entanglement of zero- and one-photon states from a cavity with left- and right-polarized modes to another similar one, with a fidelity exceeding 99%. Instead of using the Bell-state measurement, only one atom is used in our scheme. The time spent, the success probability and the feasibility of the proposed scheme are also discussed.

  11. Excitations of optically driven atomic condensate in a cavity: theory of photodetection measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E.; Öztop, Barış; Bordyuh, Mykola; Türeci, Hakan E.

    2012-01-01

    This content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details: IP Address: 212.175.32.130 This content was downloaded on 22/04/2014 at 11:58 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Excitations of optically driven atomic condensate in a cavity: theory of photodetection measurements View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPsc...

  12. Ramsey fringes in atomic interferometry: measurability of the influence of space-time curvature

    OpenAIRE

    Audretsch, Jürgen; Marzlin, Karl-Peter

    1993-01-01

    The influence od space-time curvature on quantum matter which can be theoretically described by covariant wave equations has not been experimentally established yet. In this paper we analyse in detail the suitability of the Ramsey atom beam interferometer for the measurement of the phase shift caused by the Riemannian curvature of the earth. It appears that the detection should be possible with minor modifications of existing devices within the near future. The paper is divided into two parts...

  13. Entanglement swapping without joint measurement via a Λ-type atom interacting with bimodal cavity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xiu; Li Hong-Cai; Yang Rong-Can; Huang Zhi-Ping

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme for realizing entanglement swapping in cavity QED. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of a two-mode cavity field with a A-type three-level atom. In contrast with the previously proposed schemes, the present scheme is ascendant, since the fidelity is 1.0 and the joint measurement isn't needed. And the scheme is experimentally feasible based on the current cavity QED technique.

  14. Measuring the Elasticity of Clathrin-Coated Vesicles via Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Albert J.; Prasad, Kondury; Smith, Paul D.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Nossal, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Using a new scheme based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigate mechanical properties of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). CCVs are multicomponent protein and lipid complexes of ∼100 nm diameter that are implicated in many essential cell-trafficking processes. Our AFM imaging resolves clathrin lattice polygons and provides height deformation in quantitative response to AFM-substrate compression force. We model CCVs as multilayered elastic spherical shells and, from AFM measurements, ...

  15. Measurement of Physical Libration of Enceladus and its Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P. C.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Burns, J. A.; Tajeddine, R.; Joseph, J.; Porco, C.

    2014-12-01

    Enceladus' interior structure [1] plays a critical role in understanding the composition and activity of the satellite's south polar geysers [2,3] and in interpreting its tectonic activity. Enceladus' physical rotational libration, a periodic wobble superposed upon its synchronous rotation and driven by the torques resulting from the satellite's slightly elliptical orbit, provides a means of constraining the interior structure. We use stereogrammetric solutions of control points of Enceladus in Cassini images to test rotation states, calculating the change in the control-point model's goodness of fit as we vary the predicted physical libration amplitude, and thus constraining Enceladus' moments of inertia. Our analysis of over 5300 measurements in 340 images indicates a physical libration amplitude of 0.11 deg. This libration amplitude is not consistent with a solid hydrostatic body (for which the amplitude should be about 0.04 deg), but would be consistent with some versions of recent models incorporating global subsurface oceans or non-hydrostatic cores. We will report on our continuing analysis and on the consistency of interior models with the observed physical libration. References. [1] Iess, L. et al. (2014) Science, 344, 78-80. [2] Porco, C. et al. (2014) Astron. J. 148,45. [3] Nimmo, F. et al. (2014) Astron. J. 148,46.

  16. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research an Oxford Instruments Company, Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States)

    2015-06-22

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  17. Physical activity parenting measurement and research: challenges, explanations, and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Kirsten K; Mâsse, Louise C; Timperio, Anna; Frenn, Marilyn D; Saunders, Julie; Mendoza, Jason A; Gobbi, Erica; Hanson, Phillip; Trost, Stewart G

    2013-08-01

    Physical activity (PA) parenting research has proliferated over the past decade, with findings verifying the influential role that parents play in children's emerging PA behaviors. This knowledge, however, has not translated into effective family-based PA interventions. During a preconference workshop to the 2012 International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity annual meeting, a PA parenting workgroup met to: (1) Discuss challenges in PA parenting research that may limit its translation, (2) identify explanations or reasons for such challenges, and (3) recommend strategies for future research. Challenges discussed by the workgroup included a proliferation of disconnected and inconsistently measured constructs, a limited understanding of the dimensions of PA parenting, and a narrow conceptualization of hypothesized moderators of the relationship between PA parenting and child PA. Potential reasons for such challenges emphasized by the group included a disinclination to employ theory when developing measures and examining predictors and outcomes of PA parenting as well as a lack of agreed-upon measurement standards. Suggested solutions focused on the need to link PA parenting research with general parenting research, define and adopt rigorous standards of measurement, and identify new methods to assess PA parenting. As an initial step toward implementing these recommendations, the workgroup developed a conceptual model that: (1) Integrates parenting dimensions from the general parenting literature into the conceptualization of PA parenting, (2) draws on behavioral and developmental theory, and (3) emphasizes areas which have been neglected to date including precursors to PA parenting and effect modifiers. PMID:23944918

  18. Physical measurements for quality control in industrial radiation sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of ionizing radiation has brought about a growing industry for the sterilization of disposable surgical equipment, medical supplies, and containers for biological specimens. For many products, irradiation has become an alternative to autoclaving or gas treatment by ethylene oxide. Over fifteen years of experience with industrial sterilization by cobalt-60 gamma radiation have shown that radiation methods provide a clear advantage over gas sterilization, in that sterilization can be performed on non-permeable sealed packages. Moreover, regulatory agencies, such as the Food and Drug Administration in the U.S.A., are reappraising the requirements for sterility assurance. For products released to the public, consideration is now being given to the use of physical dosimetry, i.e., the measurement of radiation dose by physical methods. This is based on a knowledge of the microbial burden of the product before sterilization and on the probability of killing microorganisms by a given radiation dose. Because physical dosimetry is easier to control and less complicated than biological tests, it may be considered in the future the basis for quality assurance of the sterilized product. Some of the problems associated with standardized measurement techniques in radiation sterilization include the choice of dosimetry and its calibration, as well as methods and procedures used to minimize errors due to variations in radiation flux density, source geometry with respect to the product, and environmental factors. (author)

  19. Measurements of edge density profiles on TdeV using the injection of laser-ablated lithium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, G.; Stansfield, B.; Michaud, D.; Ross, G.G.; Lachambre, J.L.; Gauvreau, J.L. [Centre canadien de fusion magnetique, Varennes, Quebec, J3X1S1 (CANADA)

    1997-01-01

    An atom injector using laser blow off of lithium is installed on TdeV to obtain the radial edge profile of electron density near the throat of the top divertor. The profile is reconstructed from the emissivity of the LiI (2p{sup 2}P{r_arrow}2s{sup 2}S) transition at 670.8 nm. A short review of the diagnostic is given describing the experimental setup, the measurement procedures, and the density profile reconstruction method. Effects of plasma biasing on the edge electron density profile and the response of the edge profile to the line-average central electron density are shown to illustrate the diagnostic capabilities. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Measurements of the sticking time and sticking probability of Rb atoms on a polydimethylsiloxane coating

    CERN Document Server

    Atutov, S N

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a systematic study of Knudsen s flow of Rb atoms in cylindrical capillary cells coated with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) compound. The purpose of the investigation is to determine the characterization of the coating in terms of the sticking probability and sticking time of Rb on the two types of coating of high and median viscosities. We report the measurement of the sticking probability of the Rb atom to the coating that is equal to 4.3 10 -5 and corresponds to the number of bounces of 2.3 10 4 at room temperature. These parameters are the same for the two kinds of PDMS used. We find that at room temperature the sticking times for high viscosity and median viscosity PDMS are 22 +- 3 mks and 49 +- 6 mks, respectively. These sticking times are about million times larger than the sticking time derived from the surface Rb atom adsorption energy and temperature of the coating. A tentative explanation of this surprising result, based on the bulk diffusion of the atoms that collide with t...

  1. Scale Factor Measurements for a Gyroscope Based on an Expanding Cloud of Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, Gregory; Pelle, Bruno; Riedl, Stefan; Kitching, John; Donley, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    We present an atom interferometer that can simultaneously measure two-axis rotations and one-axis accelerations with a single cloud of atoms in an active evacuated volume of about 1 cm3. This is accomplished by extending the point-source interferometry technique (Dickerson et al. PRL, 111, 083001, 2013) to a compact regime. In this technique, the cloud of atoms is imaged after the interferometer sequence. Rotations cause spatial fringes to appear across the cloud. To realize a gyroscope with this method, it is necessary to know how the wave-vector of the spatial fringes, k, is related to the rotation rate, Ω. If the cloud is initially infinitesimally small, it can be shown that k = FΩ with a scale factor F determined by the time between interferometer pulses, the total free expansion time, and the wavelength of the interrogating laser. However, the point-source approximation is not appropriate in our case because the final size of the cloud in our experiment is between 1.4 and 5 times its initial size. We show experimentally that in this finite expansion regime the phase gradient is still well described by k = FΩ , but the scale factor F depends on the initial distribution of the atoms. We also present modeling that explains this dependence.

  2. Measurements of the Diameter and Velocity Distributions of Atomized Tablet-Coating Solutions for Pharmaceutical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterday, Kathryn; Aliseda, Alberto; Lasheras, Juan

    2009-11-01

    The atomization of colloidal suspensions is of particular interest to the manufacturing of tablets and pills used as drug delivery systems by the pharmaceutical industry. At various stages in the manufacturing process, the tablets are coated with a spray of droplets produced by co-axial atomizers. The mechanisms of droplet size and spray formation in these types of atomizers are dominated by Kelvin-Helmholtz and Raleigh-Taylor instabilities for both low[1] and high[2] Ohnesorge numbers. We present detailed phase Doppler measurements of the Sauter Mean Diameter of the droplets produced by co-axial spray atomizers using water-based colloidal suspensions with solid concentrations ranging from fifteen to twenty percent and acetone-based colloidal suspensions with solid concentrations ranging from five to ten percent. Our results compare favorably with predictions by Aliseda's model. This suggests that the final size distribution is mainly determined by the instabilities caused by the sudden acceleration of the liquid interface. [1]Varga, C. M., et al. (2003) J. Fluid Mech. 497:405-434 [2]Aliseda, A. et al. (2008). J. Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 34(2), 161-175.

  3. Nobel Prize in Physics 1997 "for development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light" : Steven Chu, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and William D. Phillips

    CERN Multimedia

    Audiovideo service

    1998-01-01

    Prof. C. Cohen-Tannoudji presents "manipulating atoms with light" . By using quasi-resonant exchanges of energy, linear and angular momentum between atoms and photons, it is possible to polarize atoms, to displace their energy levels and to control their position and their velocity. A few physical mechanisms allowing one to trap atoms and to cool them in the microKelvin, and even in the nanoKelvin range, will be described. Various possible applications of such ultracold atoms will be also reviewed.

  4. Some considerations on the physical measure of seismic intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Min; XIE Li-li; XU Long-jun

    2005-01-01

    The study on seismic intensity can be traced prior to the time that modern seismology was established. In its early stage the seismic intensity was designed to serve as a measure in scaling the severity of earthquake damage to civil engineering and environmental structures. Also the seismic intensity is usually assigned by engineers and seismologists with one or two characteristic parameters of earthquake ground motions to reflect earthquake damage potential so as to be able to serve as an input earthquake load for seismic design of structures. So choosing a proper parameter to reflect the action of seismic intensity is the main objective of the research on physical measure of seismic intensity. However, since various kinds of structures have quite different damage mechanisms there will exist great differences in damages to different structures located at the same area during the same earthquake. Particularly, In some cases, quite different damages have happened even to the structures of same kind due to many other factors such as different construction materials, different configurations or on the different types of sites where structures located. In addition, the ground motion parameters, which result in damage to structures, are not the single peak value of ground motion. Hence, this paper emphasizes that the research on new physical measure of seismic intensity should not only consider the structural characteristics but also take into account other parameters such as duration, energy of ground motion and so on. In particular, as the physical measures of intensity, different ground motion parameter should be adopted for different structures.

  5. Medical physics in Europe following recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    OpenAIRE

    Casar Bozidar; Lopes Maria do Carmo; Drljević Advan; Gershkevitsh Eduard; Pesznyak Csilla

    2016-01-01

    Background Medical physics is a health profession where principles of applied physics are mostly directed towards the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. The key role of the medical physics expert in safe and effective use of ionizing radiation in medicine was widely recognized in recent European reference documents like the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (2014), and European Commission Radiation Protection No. 174, European Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert (2...

  6. A Measurement of Atomic X-ray Yields in Exotic Atoms and Implications for an Antideuteron-Based Dark Matter Search

    CERN Document Server

    Aramaki, T; Craig, W W; Fabris, L; Gahbauer, F; Hailey, C J; Koglin, J E; Madden, N; Mori, K; Yu, H T; Ziock, K P

    2013-01-01

    The General AntiParticle Spectrometer (GAPS) is a novel approach for indirect dark matter searches that exploits cosmic antideuterons. GAPS utilizes a distinctive detection method using atomic X-rays and charged particles from the exotic atom as well as the timing, stopping range and dE/dX energy deposit of the incoming particle, which provides excellent antideuteron identification. Prior to the future balloon experiment, an accelerator test was conducted in 2004 and 2005 at KEK, Japan, in order to precisely measure the X-ray yields of antiprotonic exotic atoms formed with different target materials. The X-ray yields of the exotic atoms with Al and S targets were obtained as $\\sim$ 75%, which are higher than were previously assumed in. A simple, but comprehensive cascade model has been developed not only to evaluate the measurement results but also to predict the X-ray yields of the exotic atoms formed with any materials in the GAPS instrument. The cascade model is extendable to any kind of exotic atom (any n...

  7. Recent measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation: nuclear physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J

    2001-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for hadron therapy overlap the low end of the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation applications, Z=1-26 and approximately 100-1000 MeV/nucleon. It has been known for some time that the nuclear interactions of the incident ions must be taken into account both in treatment planning and in understanding and addressing the effects of galactic cosmic ray ions on humans in space. Until relatively recently, most of the studies of nuclear fragmentation and transport in matter were driven by the interests of the nuclear physics and later, the hadron therapy communities. However, the experimental and theoretical methods and the accelerator facilities developed for use in heavy ion nuclear physics are directly applicable to radiotherapy and space radiation studies. I will briefly review relevant data taken recently at various accelerators, and discuss the implications of the measurements for radiotherapy, radiobiology and space radiation research.

  8. Recent measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation: nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.

    2001-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for hadron therapy overlap the low end of the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation applications, Z=1-26 and approximately 100-1000 MeV/nucleon. It has been known for some time that the nuclear interactions of the incident ions must be taken into account both in treatment planning and in understanding and addressing the effects of galactic cosmic ray ions on humans in space. Until relatively recently, most of the studies of nuclear fragmentation and transport in matter were driven by the interests of the nuclear physics and later, the hadron therapy communities. However, the experimental and theoretical methods and the accelerator facilities developed for use in heavy ion nuclear physics are directly applicable to radiotherapy and space radiation studies. I will briefly review relevant data taken recently at various accelerators, and discuss the implications of the measurements for radiotherapy, radiobiology and space radiation research.

  9. EDITORIAL: The 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases The 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Marić, Dragana; Malović, Gordana

    2011-03-01

    This special issue consists of papers that are associated with invited lectures, workshop papers and hot topic papers presented at the 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases (ESCAMPIG XX). This conference was organized in Novi Sad (Serbia) from 13 to 17 July 2010 by the Institute of Physics of the University of Belgrade. It is important to note that this is not a conference 'proceedings'. Following the initial selection process by the International Scientific Committee, all papers were submitted to the journal by the authors and have been fully peer reviewed to the standard required for publication in Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST). The papers are based on presentations given at the conference but are intended to be specialized technical papers covering all or part of the topic presented by the author during the meeting. The ESCAMPIG conference is a regular biennial Europhysics Conference of the European Physical Society focusing on collisional and radiative aspects of atomic and molecular physics in partially ionized gases as well as on plasma-surface interaction. The conference focuses on low-temperature plasma sciences in general and includes the following topics: Atomic and molecular processes in plasmas Transport phenomena, particle velocity distribution function Physical basis of plasma chemistry Plasma surface interaction (boundary layers, sheath, surface processes) Plasma diagnostics Plasma and discharges theory and simulation Self-organization in plasmas, dusty plasmas Upper atmospheric plasmas and space plasmas Low-pressure plasma sources High-pressure plasma sources Plasmas and gas flows Laser-produced plasmas During ESCAMPIG XX special sessions were dedicated to workshops on: Atomic and molecular collision data for plasma modeling, organized by Professors Z Lj Petrovic and N Mason Plasmas in medicine, organized by Dr N Puac and Professor G Fridman. The conference topics were represented in the

  10. Objectively Measured Physical Activity Is Associated with Brain Volumetric Measurements in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Klaren, Rachel E; Hubbard, Elizabeth A.; Motl, Robert W.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Wetter, Nathan C.; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Little is known about physical activity and its association with volumes of whole brain gray matter and white matter and deep gray matter structures in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Purpose. This study examined the association between levels of physical activity and brain volumetric measures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in MS. Method. 39 persons with MS wore an accelerometer for a 7-day period and underwent a brain MRI. Normalized GM volume (NGMV), normalized WM v...

  11. Validation of the historical adulthood physical activity questionnaire (HAPAQ against objective measurements of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Christopher J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lifetime physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE is an important determinant of risk for many chronic diseases but remains challenging to measure. Previously reported historical physical activity (PA questionnaires appear to be reliable, but their validity is less well established. Methods We sought to design and validate an historical adulthood PA questionnaire (HAPAQ against objective PA measurements from the same individuals. We recruited from a population-based cohort in Cambridgeshire, UK, (Medical Research Council Ely Study in whom PA measurements, using individually calibrated heart rate monitoring, had been obtained in the past, once between 1994 and 1996 and once between 2000 and 2002. 100 individuals from this cohort attended for interview. Historical PA within the domains of home, work, transport, sport and exercise was recalled using the questionnaire by asking closed questions repeated for several discrete time periods from the age of 20 years old to their current age. The average PAEE from the 2 periods of objective measurements was compared to the self-reported data from the corresponding time periods in the questionnaire. Results Significant correlations were observed between HAPAQ-derived and objectively measured total PAEE for both time periods (Spearman r = 0.44; P Conclusions HAPAQ demonstrates convergent validity for total PAEE and vigorous PA. This instrument will be useful for ranking individuals according to their past PA in studies of chronic disease aetiology, where activity may be an important underlying factor contributing to disease pathogenesis.

  12. Measuring the loss tangent of polymer materials with atomic force microscopy based methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) quantitatively maps viscoelastic parameters of polymers on the nanoscale by several methods. The loss tangent, the ratio between dissipated and stored energy, was measured on a blend of thermoplastic polymer materials by a dynamic contact method, contact resonance, and by a recently developed loss tangent measurement by amplitude modulation AFM. Contact resonance measurements were performed both with dual AC resonance tracking and band excitation (BE), allowing for a reference-free measurement of the loss tangent. Amplitude modulation AFM was performed where a recent interpretation of the phase signal under certain operating conditions allows for the loss tangent to be calculated. The loss tangent measurements were compared with values expected from time–temperature superposed frequency-dependent dynamical mechanical curves of materials and reveal that the loss tangents determined from the BE contact resonance method provide the most accurate values. (paper)

  13. Development of a 2D temperature measurement technique for combustion diagnostics using 2-line atomic fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstroem, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the development and application of a novel planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique for temperature measurements in a variety of combusting flows. Accurate measurement of temperature is an essential task in combustion diagnostics, since temperature is one of the most fundamental quantities for the characterization of combustion processes. The technique is based on two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) from small quantities of atomic indium (In) seeded into the fuel. It has been developed from small-scale experiments in laboratory flames to the point where practical combustion systems can be studied. The technique is conceptually simple and reveals temperature information in the post-flame regions. The viability of the technique has been tested in three extreme measurement situations: in spark ignition engine combustion, in ultra-lean combustion situations such as lean burning aero-engine concepts and, finally, in fuel-rich combustion. TLAF was successfully applied in an optical Sl engine using isooctane as fuel. The wide temperature sensitivity, 700 - 3000 K, of the technique using indium atoms allowed measurements over the entire combustion cycle in the engine to be performed. In applications in lean combustion a potential problem caused by the strong oxidation processes of indium atoms was encountered. This limits measurement times due to deposits of absorbing indium oxide on measurement windows. The seeding requirement is a disadvantage of the technique and can be a limitation in some applications. The results from experiments performed in sooting flames are very promising for thermometry measurements in such environments. Absorption by hydrocarbons and other native species was found to be negligible. Since low laser energies and low seeding concentrations could be used, the technique did not, unlike most other incoherent optical thermometry techniques, suffer interferences from LII of soot particles or LIF from PAH

  14. Reliable measurement of elastic modulus of cells by nanoindentation in an atomic force microscope

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Zhoulong

    2012-04-01

    The elastic modulus of an oral cancer cell line UM1 is investigated by nanoindentation in an atomic force microscope with a flat-ended tip. The commonly used Hertzian method gives apparent elastic modulus which increases with the loading rate, indicating strong effects of viscoelasticity. On the contrary, a rate-jump method developed for viscoelastic materials gives elastic modulus values which are independent of the rate-jump magnitude. The results show that the rate-jump method can be used as a standard protocol for measuring elastic stiffness of living cells, since the measured values are intrinsic properties of the cells. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Calibrating a novel multi-sensor physical activity measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advancing the field of physical activity (PA) monitoring requires the development of innovative multi-sensor measurement systems that are feasible in the free-living environment. The use of novel analytical techniques to combine and process these multiple sensor signals is equally important. This paper describes a novel multi-sensor 'integrated PA measurement system' (IMS), the lab-based methodology used to calibrate the IMS, techniques used to predict multiple variables from the sensor signals, and proposes design changes to improve the feasibility of deploying the IMS in the free-living environment. The IMS consists of hip and wrist acceleration sensors, two piezoelectric respiration sensors on the torso, and an ultraviolet radiation sensor to obtain contextual information (indoors versus outdoors) of PA. During lab-based calibration of the IMS, data were collected on participants performing a PA routine consisting of seven different ambulatory and free-living activities while wearing a portable metabolic unit (criterion measure) and the IMS. Data analyses on the first 50 adult participants are presented. These analyses were used to determine if the IMS can be used to predict the variables of interest. Finally, physical modifications for the IMS that could enhance the feasibility of free-living use are proposed and refinement of the prediction techniques is discussed

  16. Atomic and molecular physics and data activities for astrophysics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic astrophysics group at ORNL produces, collects, evaluates, and disseminates atomic and molecular data relevant to astrophysics and actively models various astrophysical environments utilizing this information. With the advent of the World Wide Web, these data are also being placed on-line to facilitate their use by end-users. In this brief report, the group's recent activities in data production and in modeling are highlighted. For example, the authors describe recent calculations of elastic and transport cross sections relevant to ionospheric and heliospheric studies, charge transfer between metal ions and metal atoms and novel supernova nebular spectra modeling, ion-molecule collision data relevant to planetary atmospheres and comets, and data for early universe modeling

  17. Cold atoms: A field enabled by light

    CERN Document Server

    Fallani, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Besides being a source of energy, light can also cool gases of atoms down to the lowest temperatures ever measured, where atomic motion almost stops. The research field of cold atoms has emerged as a multidisciplinary one, highly relevant, e.g., for precision measurements, quantum gases, simulations of many-body physics, and atom optics. In this focus article, we present the field as seen in 2015, and emphasise the fundamental role in its development that has been played by mastering.

  18. Ground-state atomic polarization relaxation-time measurement of Rb filled hypocycloidal core-shaped Kagome HC-PCF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, T. D.; Ilinova, E.; McFerran, J. J.; Jouin, J.; Debord, B.; Alharbi, M.; Thomas, P.; Gérôme, F.; Benabid, F.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the measurement of ground-state atomic polarization relaxation time of Rb vapor confined in five different hypocycloidal core-shape Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fibers made with uncoated silica glass. We are able to distinguish between wall-collision and transit-time effects in an optical waveguide and deduce the contribution of the atom’s dwell time at the core wall surface. In contrast with conventional macroscopic atomic cell configuration, and in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, the measured relaxation times were found to be at least one order of magnitude longer than the limit set by atom-wall collisional from thermal atoms. This extended relaxation time is explained by the combination of a stronger contribution of the slow atoms in the atomic polarization build-up, and of the relatively significant contribution of dwell time to the relaxation process of the ground state polarization.

  19. Calculating the energy of electron in H-atom using modified SUSY physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. V. S. Seshavatharam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper considering the authors previously proposed SUSY concept - ‘fermion and boson mass ratio is close to 2.26’ and considering the electroweak neutral boson, an attempt is made to understand the total energy of revolving electron in the Hydrogen atom. Thus in this paper authors succeeded in extending the basic applications of SUSY and Electroweak theory to atomic level. With further research and analysis, the hidden secrets of electroweak unification can be understood very easily.

  20. Atom interferometric measurement of ``Big G'' on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwood, Elizabeth; Kurkcuoglu, Doga Murat; Clark, Charles W.; Edwards, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Recent measurements of Newton's universal gravitational constant (``Big G'') using atom interferometric methods have increased the uncertainty in the value of this important fundamental constant. We have developed tools for rapid simulation and evaluation of atom interferometer (AI) schemes that can be implemented in the Cold Atom Laboratory to be deployed to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2017. We have approximated the solution of the rotating-frame Gross-Pitaevskii equation in both one and three dimensions by using the Lagrangian Variational Method (LVM). The LVM trial wave function is a sum of Nc Gaussian clouds and we have derived equations of motion for the centers, widths, and phase parameters of these clouds. These equations of motion can be rapidly solved for many different AI designs enabling the estimation interferometer sensitivity and the effects of errors. We present two potential schemes as for measuring ``Big G'' on the ISS. These include a Mach-Zehnder-like scheme as well as a design similar to a Foucault Pendulum. Supported by NSF Grant PHY-1413768.