WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic nucleus

  1. Atom as a "Dressed" Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Kalitvianski, V

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that electrostatic potential of atomic nucleus seen by a fast charged projectile at short distances is quite smeared due to nucleus motion around the atomic center of inertia. For example, the size of positive charge cloud in the Hydrogen ground state is much larger than the proper proton size. It is even bigger for the target atom in an excited state. Therefore the elastic scattering at large angles is generally weaker than the Rutherford one. In other words, the resulting elastic interaction with an atom at short distances is softer than the Colombian one due to a natural cutoff. In addition, the large angle scattering leads to the target atom excitations due to hitting the nucleus (inelastic processes). It is also shown that the Rutherford cross section is in fact the inclusive rather than the elastic one. These results are analogous to the QED ones. The difference and the value of the presented below non relativistic atomic calculations is in non perturbatively (exact) dressing that immediatel...

  2. Rutherford, Radioactivity, and the Atomic Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Kragh, Helge

    2012-01-01

    Modern atomic and nuclear physics took its start in the early part of the twentieth century, to a large extent based upon experimental investigations of radioactive phenomena. Foremost among the pioneers of the new kind of physics was Ernest Rutherford, who made fundamental contributions to the structure of matter for more than three decades and, in addition, founded important research schools in Manchester and Cambridge. This paper reviews the most important aspects of Rutherford's scientific work in the period from about 1900 to 1920, and it also refers to some of his last experiments of the 1930s. The emphasis is on his theory of radioactive disintegration (1902), the discovery of the atomic nucleus (1911), and the first artificially produced element transformation (1919). Following the transmutation experiments, Rutherford developed elaborate models of the atomic nucleus, but these turned out to be unsuccessful. Other subjects could be included, but the three mentioned are undoubtedly those of the greates...

  3. Contemporary models of the atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Nemirovskii, P E

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary Models of the Atomic Nucleus discusses nuclear structure and properties, expounding contemporary theoretical concepts of the low-energy nuclear processes underlying in nuclear models. This book focuses on subjects such as the optical nuclear model, unified or collective model, and deuteron stripping reaction. Other topics discussed include the basic nuclear properties; shell model; theoretical analysis of the shell model; and radiative transitions and alpha-decay. The deuteron theory and the liquid drop nuclear model with its application to fission theory are also mentioned, but o

  4. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  5. Charge, neutron, and weak size of the atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, G; Forssén, C; Jansen, G R; Nazarewicz, W; Papenbrock, T; Wendt, K A; Bacca, S; Barnea, N; Carlsson, B; Drischler, C; Hebeler, K; Hjorth-Jensen, M; Miorelli, M; Orlandini, G; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J

    2015-01-01

    What is the size of the atomic nucleus? This deceivably simple question is difficult to answer. While the electric charge distributions in atomic nuclei were measured accurately already half a century ago, our knowledge of the distribution of neutrons is still deficient. In addition to constraining the size of atomic nuclei, the neutron distribution also impacts the number of nuclei that can exist and the size of neutron stars. We present an ab initio calculation of the neutron distribution of the neutron-rich nucleus $^{48}$Ca. We show that the neutron skin (difference between radii of neutron and proton distributions) is significantly smaller than previously thought. We also make predictions for the electric dipole polarizability and the weak form factor; both quantities are currently targeted by precision measurements. Based on ab initio results for $^{48}$Ca, we provide a constraint on the size of a neutron star.

  6. K--Nucleus Potentials Consistent with Kaonic Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieply, A.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mares, J.

    2004-03-01

    Various models of the K- nucleus potential have been compared and tested in fits to kaonic atom data. The calculations give basically two vastly different predictions for the depth of the K- optical potential at the nuclear density. The study of the (K-stop, π ) reaction could help to distinguish between K- optical potentials as the Λ -hypernuclear formation rates are sensitive to the details of the initial-state K- wave function.

  7. Spin Symmetry for Anti-Lambda Spectrum in Atomic Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Chun-Yan; YAO Jiang-Ming; MENG Jie

    2009-01-01

    The spin symmetry of the anti-Lambda spectrum in nucleus ~(16)O is studied in the relativistic mean field theory.The spin-orbit splittings of spin doublets are found to be around 0.03-0.07 MeV and the dominant components of the Dirac spinor for the anti-Lambda spin doublets are found to be near identical.It is indicated that there is an even better spin symmetry in the anti-Lambda spectrum than that in the anti-nucleon spectrum.

  8. Spin Symmetry for Anti-Lambda Spectrum in atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Chunyan; Meng, Jie

    2009-01-01

    The spin symmetry of anti-Lambda spectrum in nucleus ^{16}O has been studied in the relativistic mean field theory. The spin-orbit splittings of spin doublets are found to be around 0.03-0.07 MeV and the dominant components of the Dirac spinor for the anti-Lambda spin doublets are found to be near identical. It indicates that there is an even better spin symmetry in the anti-Lambda spectrum than that in the anti-nucleon spectrum.

  9. Radiative emission of neutrino pair from nucleus and inner core electrons in heavy atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshimura, M

    2013-01-01

    Radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP) from atomic states is a new tool to experimentally investigate undetermined neutrino parameters such as the smallest neutrino mass, the nature of neutrino masses (Majorana vs Dirac), and their CP properties. We study effects of neutrino pair emission either from nucleus or from inner core electrons in which the zero-th component of quark or electron vector current gives rise to large coupling. Both the overall rate and the spectral shape of photon energy are given for a few cases of interesting target atoms. Calculated rates exceed those of previously considered target atoms by many orders of magnitudes.

  10. Atomic mass dependence of hadron production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Li-Hua; LIU Na; DUAN Chun-Gui

    2013-01-01

    Hadron production in lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering is studied in a quark energy loss model.The leading-order computations for hadron multiplicity ratios are presented and compared with the selected HERMES pions production data with the quark hadronization occurring outside the nucleus by means of the hadron formation time.It is found that the obtained energy loss per unit length is 0.440±0.013 GeV/fm for an outgoing quark by the global fit.It is confirmed that the atomic mass number dependence of hadron attenuation is theoretically and experimentally in good agreement with the A2/3 power law for quark hadronization occurring outside the nucleus.

  11. Dependence of the atomic energy levels on a superstrong magnetic field with account of a finite nucleus radius and mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godunov, S. I.; Vysotsky, M. I.

    2013-06-01

    The influence of the finiteness of the proton radius and mass on the energies of a hydrogen atom and hydrogenlike ions in a superstrong magnetic field is studied. The finiteness of the nucleus size pushes the ground energy level up leading to a nontrivial dependence of the value of the critical nucleus charge on the external magnetic field.

  12. Unravelling the Mystery of the Atomic Nucleus A Sixty Year Journey 1896 — 1956

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Unravelling the Mystery of the Atomic Nucleus tells the story of how, in the span of barely sixty years, we made a transition from the belief that matter was composed of indivisible atoms, to the discovery that in the heart of each atom lies a nucleus which is ten thousand times smaller than the atom, which nonetheless carries almost all its mass, and the transformations of which involve energies that could never be reached by chemical reactions. It was not a smooth transition. The nature of nuclei, their properties, the physical laws which govern their behaviour, and the possibility of controlling to some extent their transformations, were discovered in discontinuous steps, following paths which occasionally led to errors which in turn were corrected by further experimental discoveries. The story begins in 1896 when radioactivity was unexpectedly discovered and continues up to the nineteen-sixties. The authors describe the spectacular progress made by physics during that time, which not only revealed a new f...

  13. Precision X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms as a probe of low-energy kaon-nucleus interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, H; Beer, G; Bellotti, G; Berucci, C; Bragadireanu, A M; Bosnar, D; Cargnelli, M; Curceanu, C; Butt, A D; d'Uffizi, A; Fiorini, C; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Hayano, R S; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Iwasaki, M; Sandri, P Levi; Marton, J; Okada, S; Pietreanu, D; Piscicchia, K; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Tatsuno, H; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    In the exotic atoms where one atomic $1s$ electron is replaced by a $K^{-}$, the strong interaction between the $K^{-}$ and the nucleus introduces an energy shift and broadening of the low-lying kaonic atomic levels which are determined by only the electromagnetic interaction. By performing X-ray spectroscopy for Z=1,2 kaonic atoms, the SIDDHARTA experiment determined with high precision the shift and width for the $1s$ state of $K^{-}p$ and the $2p$ state of kaonic helium-3 and kaonic helium-4. These results provided unique information of the kaon-nucleus interaction in the low energy limit.

  14. P ,T -odd electron-nucleus interaction in atomic systems as an exchange by Higgs bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubukov, D. V.; Labzowsky, L. N.

    2016-06-01

    Scalar-pseudoscalar P ,T -odd interaction between the electron and the nucleus in atomic systems is constructed within the standard model as an exchange by Higgs boson. The necessary P - and T -violating contribution is obtained at the three-loop level on the basis of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. This contribution, unlike the corresponding contribution to the electron electric dipole moment (EDM), does not vanish since the "Higgs charges" of quarks, contrary to their electric charges, are flavor dependent. Order-of-magnitude estimates of the effect expressed as an "equivalent" electron EDM give the values within the range deeqv˜10-40-10-45e cm , depending on the known different estimates for the electron EDM. This can be compared with the known "benchmark" two-photon P ,T -odd electron-nucleus interaction effect, which provides deeqv˜10-38e cm .

  15. A computer code for calculations in the algebraic collective model of the atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Welsh, T A

    2016-01-01

    A Maple code is presented for algebraic collective model (ACM) calculations. The ACM is an algebraic version of the Bohr model of the atomic nucleus, in which all required matrix elements are derived by exploiting the model's SU(1,1) x SO(5) dynamical group. This, in particular, obviates the use of coefficients of fractional parentage. This paper reviews the mathematical formulation of the ACM, and serves as a manual for the code. The code makes use of expressions for matrix elements derived elsewhere and newly derived matrix elements of the operators [pi x q x pi]_0 and [pi x pi]_{LM}, where q_M are the model's quadrupole moments, and pi_N are corresponding conjugate momenta (-2>=M,N<=2). The code also provides ready access to SO(3)-reduced SO(5) Clebsch-Gordan coefficients through data files provided with the code.

  16. K--nucleus relativistic mean field potentials consistent with kaonic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.; Cieplý, A.

    1999-08-01

    K- atomic data are used to test several models of the K- nucleus interaction. The t(ρ)ρ optical potential, due to coupled channel models incorporating the Λ(1405) dynamics, fails to reproduce these data. A standard relativistic mean field (RMF) potential, disregarding the Λ(1405) dynamics at low densities, also fails. The only successful model is a hybrid of a theoretically motivated RMF approach in the nuclear interior and a completely phenomenological density dependent potential, which respects the low density theorem in the nuclear surface region. This best-fit K- optical potential is found to be strongly attractive, with a depth of 180+/-20 MeV at the nuclear interior, in agreement with previous phenomenological analyses.

  17. A computer code for calculations in the algebraic collective model of the atomic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, T. A.; Rowe, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    A Maple code is presented for algebraic collective model (ACM) calculations. The ACM is an algebraic version of the Bohr model of the atomic nucleus, in which all required matrix elements are derived by exploiting the model's SU(1 , 1) × SO(5) dynamical group. This paper reviews the mathematical formulation of the ACM, and serves as a manual for the code. The code enables a wide range of model Hamiltonians to be analysed. This range includes essentially all Hamiltonians that are rational functions of the model's quadrupole moments qˆM and are at most quadratic in the corresponding conjugate momenta πˆN (- 2 ≤ M , N ≤ 2). The code makes use of expressions for matrix elements derived elsewhere and newly derived matrix elements of the operators [ π ˆ ⊗ q ˆ ⊗ π ˆ ] 0 and [ π ˆ ⊗ π ˆ ] LM. The code is made efficient by use of an analytical expression for the needed SO(5)-reduced matrix elements, and use of SO(5) ⊃ SO(3) Clebsch-Gordan coefficients obtained from precomputed data files provided with the code.

  18. The dependence of the atomic energy levels on a superstrong magnetic field with account of a finite nucleus radius and mass

    CERN Document Server

    Godunov, S I

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the finiteness of the proton radius and mass on the energies of a hydrogen atom and hydrogen-like ions in a superstrong magnetic field is studied. The finiteness of the nucleus size pushes the ground energy level up leading to a nontrivial dependence of the value of critical nucleus charge on the external magnetic field.

  19. Evidence for a long-lived superheavy nucleus with atomic mass number A=292 and atomic number Z=~122 in natural Th

    CERN Document Server

    Marinov, A; Kolb, D; Pape, A; Kashiv, Y; Brandt, R; Gentry, R V; Miller, H W

    2008-01-01

    Evidence for the existence of a superheavy nucleus with atomic mass number A=292 and abundance (1-10)x10^(-12) relative to 232Th has been found in a study of natural Th using inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry. The measured mass matches the predictions [1,2] for the mass of an isotope with atomic number Z=122 or a nearby element. Its estimated half-life of t1/2 >= 10^8 y suggests that a long-lived isomeric state exists in this isotope. The possibility that it might belong to a new class of long-lived high spin super- and hyperdeformed isomeric states is discussed.[3-6

  20. Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) behavior of organic aerosol particles generated by atomization of water and methanol solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissman, T. A.; Varutbangkul, V.; Surratt, J. D.; Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2007-06-01

    Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) experiments were carried out for malonic acid, succinic acid, oxalacetic acid, DL-malic acid, glutaric acid, DL-glutamic acid monohydrate, and adipic acid, using both water and methanol as atomization solvents, at three operating supersaturations (0.11%, 0.21%, and 0.32%) in the Caltech three-column CCN instrument (CCNC3). Predictions of CCN behavior for five of these compounds were made using the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM). The experiments presented here expose important considerations associated with the laboratory measurement of the CCN behavior of organic compounds. Choice of atomization solvent results in significant differences in CCN activation for some of the compounds studied, which could result from residual solvent, particle morphology differences, and chemical reactions between the particle and gas phases. Also, significant changes in aerosol size distribution occurred after classification in a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) for malonic acid and glutaric acid, preventing confident interpretation of experimental data for these two compounds. Filter analysis of adipic acid atomized from methanol solution indicates that gas-particle phase reactions may have taken place after atomization and before methanol was removed from the sample gas stream. Careful consideration of these experimental issues is necessary for successful design and interpretation of laboratory CCN measurements.

  1. Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN behavior of organic aerosol particles generated by atomization of water and methanol solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Rissman

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN experiments were carried out for malonic acid, succinic acid, oxalacetic acid, DL-malic acid, glutaric acid, DL-glutamic acid monohydrate, and adipic acid, using both water and methanol as atomization solvents, at three operating supersaturations (0.11%, 0.21%, and 0.32% in the Caltech three-column CCN instrument (CCNC3. Predictions of CCN behavior for five of these compounds were made using the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM. The experiments presented here expose important considerations associated with the laboratory measurement of the CCN behavior of organic compounds. Choice of atomization solvent results in significant differences in CCN activation for some of the compounds studied, which could result from residual solvent, particle morphology differences, and chemical reactions between the particle and gas phases. Also, significant changes in aerosol size distribution occurred after classification in a differential mobility analyzer (DMA for malonic acid and glutaric acid, preventing confident interpretation of experimental data for these two compounds. Filter analysis of adipic acid atomized from methanol solution indicates that gas-particle phase reactions may have taken place after atomization and before methanol was removed from the sample gas stream. Careful consideration of these experimental issues is necessary for successful design and interpretation of laboratory CCN measurements.

  2. Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN behavior of organic aerosol particles generated by atomization of water and methanol solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Rissman

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN experiments were carried out for malonic acid, succinic acid, oxalacetic acid, DL-malic acid, glutaric acid, DL-glutamic acid monohydrate, and adipic acid, using both water and methanol as atomization solvents, at three operating supersaturations (0.11% 0.21%, and 0.32% in the Caltech three-column CCN instrument (CCNC3. Predictions of CCN behavior for five of these compounds were made using the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM. The experiments presented here expose important considerations associated with the laboratory measurement of the CCN behavior of organic compounds. Choice of atomization solvent results in significant differences in CCN activation for some of the compounds studied, which could result from residual solvent, particle morphology differences, and chemical reactions between the particle and gas phases. Also, significant changes in aerosol size distribution occurred after classification in a differential mobility analyzer (DMA for malonic acid and glutaric acid. Filter analysis of adipic acid atomized from methanol solution indicates that gas-particle phase reactions may have taken place after atomization and before the methanol was removed from the sample gas stream. Careful consideration of these experimental issues is necessary for successful design and interpretation of laboratory CCN measurements.

  3. Elastic response of the atomic nucleus in gauge space: Giant Pairing Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortignon, P. F.; Broglia, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    Due to quantal fluctuations, the ground state of a closed shell system A0 can become virtually excited in a state made out of the ground state of the neighbour nucleus \\vert gs(A_0+2) rangle ( \\vert gs(A_0-2) rangle ) and of two uncorrelated holes (particles) below (above) the Fermi surface. These J^{π} = 0+ pairing vibrational states have been extensively studied with two-nucleon transfer reactions. Away from closed shells, these modes eventually condense, leading to nuclear superfluidity and thus to pairing rotational bands with excitation energies much smaller than hbarω0, the energy separation between major shells. Pairing vibrations are the plastic response of the nucleus in gauge space, in a similar way in which low-lying quadrupole vibrations, i.e. surface vibrations with energies much smaller than hbarω0 whose eventual condensation leads to quadrupole deformed nuclei, provide an example of the plastic nuclear response in 3D space. While much is known, in particular concerning its damping, regarding the counterpart of quadrupole plastic modes, i.e. regarding the giant quadrupole resonances (GQR), J^{π} = 2+ elastic response of the nucleus with energies of the order of hbarω0, little is known regarding this subject concerning pairing modes (giant pairing vibrations, GPV). Consequently, the recently reported observation of L = 0 resonances, populated in the reactions 12C(18O,16O)14C and 13C(18O,16O)15C and lying at an excitation energy of the order of hbarω0, likely constitutes the starting point of a new field of research, that of the study of the elastic response of nuclei in gauge space. Not only that, but also the fact that the GPV have likely been serendipitously observed in these light nuclei when it has failed to show up in more propitious nuclei like Pb, provides unexpected and fundamental insight into the relation existing between basic mechanisms -Landau, doorway, compound damping- through which giant resonances acquire a finite lifetime, let

  4. Elastic response of the atomic nucleus in gauge space: Giant Pairing Vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortignon, P.F. [University of Milan, Department of Physics, Milan (Italy); INFN Sez. di Milano, Milan (Italy); Broglia, R.A. [University of Milan, Department of Physics, Milan (Italy); University of Copenhagen, The Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-09-15

    Due to quantal fluctuations, the ground state of a closed shell system A{sub 0} can become virtually excited in a state made out of the ground state of the neighbour nucleus vertical stroke gs(A{sub 0}+2) right angle (vertical stroke gs(A{sub 0}-2) right angle) and of two uncorrelated holes (particles) below (above) the Fermi surface. These J{sup π} = 0{sup +} pairing vibrational states have been extensively studied with two-nucleon transfer reactions. Away from closed shells, these modes eventually condense, leading to nuclear superfluidity and thus to pairing rotational bands with excitation energies much smaller than ℎω{sub 0}, the energy separation between major shells. Pairing vibrations are the plastic response of the nucleus in gauge space, in a similar way in which low-lying quadrupole vibrations, i.e. surface vibrations with energies much smaller than ℎω{sub 0} whose eventual condensation leads to quadrupole deformed nuclei, provide an example of the plastic nuclear response in 3D space. While much is known, in particular concerning its damping, regarding the counterpart of quadrupole plastic modes, i.e. regarding the giant quadrupole resonances (GQR), J{sup π} = 2{sup +} elastic response of the nucleus with energies of the order of ℎω{sub 0}, little is known regarding this subject concerning pairing modes (giant pairing vibrations, GPV). Consequently, the recently reported observation of L = 0 resonances, populated in the reactions {sup 12}C({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O){sup 14}C and {sup 13}C({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O){sup 15}C and lying at an excitation energy of the order of ℎω{sub 0}, likely constitutes the starting point of a new field of research, that of the study of the elastic response of nuclei in gauge space. Not only that, but also the fact that the GPV have likely been serendipitously observed in these light nuclei when it has failed to show up in more propitious nuclei like Pb, provides unexpected and fundamental insight into the relation

  5. First clear evidence of quantum chaos in the bound states of an atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, L; Gómez, J M G; Heusler, A

    2016-01-01

    We study the spectral fluctuations of the $^{208}$Pb nucleus using the complete experimental spectrum of 151 states up to excitation energies of $6.20$ MeV recently identified at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium at Garching, Germany. For natural parity states the results are very close to the predictions of Random Matrix Theory (RMT) for the nearest-neighbor spacing distribution. A quantitative estimate of the agreement is given by the Brody parameter $\\omega$, which takes the value $\\omega=0$ for regular systems and $\\omega \\simeq 1$ for chaotic systems. We obtain $\\omega=0.85 \\pm 0.02$ which is, to our knowledge, the closest value to chaos ever observed in experimental bound states of nuclei. By contrast, the results for unnatural parity states are far from RMT behavior. We interpret these results as a consequence of the strength of the residual interaction in $^{208}$Pb, which, according to experimental data, is much stronger for natural than for unnatural parity states. In addition our results show that ch...

  6. Complex wave-interference phenomena: From the atomic nucleus to mesoscopic systems to microwave cavities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pier A Mello

    2001-02-01

    Universal statistical aspects of wave scattering by a variety of physical systems ranging from atomic nuclei to mesoscopic systems and microwave cavities are described. A statistical model for the scattering matrix is employed to address the problem of quantum chaotic scattering. The model, introduced in the past in the context of nuclear physics, discusses the problem in terms of a prompt and an equilibrated component: it incorporates the average value of the scattering matrix to account for the prompt processes and satisfies the requirements of flux conservation, causality and ergodicity. The main application of the model is the analysis of electronic transport through ballistic mesoscopic cavities: it describes well the results from the numerical solutions of the Schrödinger equation for two-dimensional cavities.

  7. Interactions and low energy collisions between an alkali ion and an alkali atom of different nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Rakshit, Arpita; Berriche, Hamid; Deb, Bimalendu

    2015-01-01

    We study theoretically interaction potentials and low energy collisions between different alkali atoms and alkali ions. Specifically, we consider systems like X + Y$^{+}$, where X(Y$^{+})$ is either Li(Cs$^+$) or Cs((Li$^+$), Na(Cs$^+$) or Cs(Na$^+$) and Li(Rb$^+$) or Rb(Li$^+$). We calculate the molecular potentials of the ground and first two excited states of these three systems using pseudopotential method and compare our results with those obtained by others. We calculate ground-state scattering wave functions and cross sections of these systems for a wide range of energies. We find that, in order to get convergent results for the total scattering cross sections for energies of the order $1$ K, one needs to take into account at least 60 partial waves. In the low energy limit ($< 1 \\mu$K), elastic scattering cross sections exhibit Wigner law threshold behavior while in the high energy limit the cross sections go as $E^{-1/3}$. We discuss qualitatively the possibilities of forming cold molecular ion by ...

  8. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy and the fascinating angular momentum realm of the atomic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Paul, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    In 1974 Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson predicted the different ‘phases’ that may be expected in deformed nuclei as a function of increasing angular momentum and excitation energy all the way up to the fission limit. While admitting their picture was highly conjectural they confidently stated ‘...with the ingenious experimental approaches that are being developed, we may look forward with excitement to the detailed spectroscopic studies that will illuminate the behaviour of the spinning quantised nucleus’. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy has indeed been a major tool in studying the structure of atomic nuclei and has witnessed numerous significant advances over the last four decades. This article will select highlights from investigations at the Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark, and Daresbury Laboratory, UK, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, some of which have continued at other national laboratories in Europe and the USA to the present day. These studies illustrate the remarkable diversity of phenomena and symmetries exhibited by nuclei in the angular momentum-excitation energy plane that continue to surprise and fascinate scientists.

  9. The estimation of production rates of $\\pi^+K^-, \\pi^-K^+$ and $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ atoms in proton-nucleus interactions at 450 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Gorchakov, O

    2015-01-01

    Short-lived (τ ∼ 3 × 10 − 15 s) π+ K− , K+ π− and π+ π− atoms as well as long- lived (τ ≥ 1 × 10 − 11 s) π+ π− atoms produced in proton-nucleus interactions at 24 GeV/c are observed and studied in the DIRAC experiment at the CERN PS. The purpose of this paper is to show that the yields of the short-lived π+ K−, K+ π− and π+ π− atoms in proton-nucleus interactions at 450 GeV/c and θ lab = 4◦ are estimated to be, respectively, 17, 38 and 16 times higher per time unit. This may allow significantly improving the precision of their lifetime measurement and ππ and πK scattering length combinations |a0 − a2| and |a 1/2 − a3/2| . The yields of the long-lived π+ K− , K+ π− and π+ π− atoms at 450 GeV/c are estimated to be 370, 1600 and 750 times higher than at 24 GeV/c. This may allow the resonance method to be used for measuring the Lamb shift in the ππ atom and a new ππ scattering length combination 2 a0 + a2 to be obtained.

  10. The estimation of production rates of {\\pi }^{+}{K}^{-}, {\\pi }^{-}{K}^{+} and {\\pi }^{+}{\\pi }^{-} atoms in proton-nucleus interactions at 450 GeV c-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorchakov, O. E.; Nemenov, L. L.

    2016-09-01

    Short-lived (τ ˜ 3× {10}-15 s) {π }+{K}-, {K}+{π }- and {π }+{π }- atoms as well as long-lived (τ ≥slant 1× {10}-11 s) {π }+{π }- atoms produced in proton-nucleus interactions at 24 GeV c-1 are observed and studied in the DIRAC experiment at the CERN Proton Synchroton. The purpose of this paper is to show that the yields of the short-lived {π }+{K}-, {K}+{π }- and {π }+{π }- atoms in proton-nucleus interactions at 450 GeV c-1 and {θ }{{lab}}=4^\\circ are estimated to be, respectively 67 ± 13, 31 ± 6 and 15 ± 2 times higher. This may allow a significant improvement of the precision of their lifetime measurement and π π and π K scattering length combinations | {a}0-{a}2| and | {a}1/2-{a}3/2| . The yields of the long-lived {π }+{K}-, {K}+{π }- and {π }+{π }- atoms at 450 GeV c-1 are estimated to be 265 ± 53, 120 ± 24 and 60 ± 9 times higher per time unit than at 24 GeV c-1. This may allow the resonance method to be used for measuring the Lamb shift in the π π atom and a new π π scattering length combination 2{a}0+{a}2 to be obtained.

  11. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  12. Atomic Number Dependence of Hadron Production at Large Transverse Momentum in 300 GeV Proton--Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, J. W.; Frisch, H. J.; Shochet, M. J.; Boymond, J. P.; Mermod, R.; Piroue, P. A.; Sumner, R. L.

    1974-07-15

    In an experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory we have compared the production of large transverse momentum hadrons from targets of W, Ti, and Be bombarded by 300 GeV protons. The hadron yields were measured at 90 degrees in the proton-nucleon c.m. system with a magnetic spectrometer equipped with 2 Cerenkov counters and a hadron calorimeter. The production cross-sections have a dependence on the atomic number A that grows with P{sub 1}, eventually leveling off proportional to A{sup 1.1}.

  13. The estimation of production rates of $π^+ K^−, π^− K^+$ and $π^+π^−$ atoms in proton-nucleus interactions at 24 and 450 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Gorchakov, O

    2016-01-01

    Short-lived ( τ ∼ 3 × 10 − 15 s ) π + K − , K + π − and π + π − atoms as well as long-lived ( τ ≥ 1 × 10 − 11 s) π + π − atoms produced in proton-nucleus interactions at 24 GeV/c are observed and studied in the DIRAC experiment at the CERN P S. The purpose of this paper is to show that the yields of the short-lived π + K − , K + π − and π + π − atoms in proton-nucleus interactions at 450 GeV/c and θ lab = 4 ◦ are estimated to be, respectively, 17, 38 and 16 times higher. This may allow sign ificantly improving the precision of their lifetime measurement and ππ and πK scattering length combinations | a 0 − a 2 | and | a 1 / 2 − a 3 / 2 | . The yields of the long-lived π + K − , K + π − and π + π − atoms at 450 GeV/c are estimated to be 180,800 and 370 times higher p er time unit than at 24 GeV/c. This may allow the resonance method to be used for measuring the Lamb shift in the ππ atom and a new ππ scattering length combination 2a0 + a2 to be obtaine...

  14. Most probable distance between the nucleus and HOMO electron: the latent meaning of atomic radius from the product of chemical hardness and polarizability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarek, Paweł; Grochala, Wojciech

    2014-11-06

    The simple relationship between size of an atom, the Pearson hardness, and electronic polarizability is described. The estimated atomic radius correlates well with experimental as well as theoretical covalent radii reported in the literature. Furthermore, the direct connection of atomic radius to HOMO electron density and important notions of conceptual DFT (such as frontier molecular orbitals and Fukui function) has been shown and interpreted. The radial maximum of HOMO density distribution at (αη)(1/2) minimizes the system energy. Eventually, the knowledge of the Fukui function of an atom is sufficient to estimate its electronic polarizability, chemical potential, and hardness.

  15. Nuclear spin dependent parity violating electron-nucleus interaction in heavy atoms. The anapole moment and the perturbation of the hadronic vector neutral current by the hyperfine interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C.A. (Lab. de Physique Theorique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France))

    1991-10-24

    We present first a computation of the nuclear anapole moment of thallium by a method developed previously by the authors. Then we perform a detailed analysis of the spin dependent parity violating electron-nucleon potential generated by the hyperfine coupling perturbation upon the pseudoscalar interaction of the electron with the weak charge of the nucleus. This effect is found to be of order {alpha}G{sub F}A{sup 2/3} and represents, depending upon the nucleus, (10-70)% of the anapole moment contribution. In the case of thallium, it compensates almost exactly the contribution associated with the axial hadronic neutral current. This fact, together with other arguments given in the paper, makes thallium a favoured candidate for the anapole moment search provided accurate enough experiments can be performed. (orig.).

  16. Nuclear spin dependent parity violating electron-nucleus interaction in heavy atoms. The anapole moment and the perturbation of the hadronic vector neutral current by the hyperfine interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C. A.

    1991-10-01

    We present first a computation of the nuclear anapole moment of thallium by a method developed previously by the authors. Then we perform a detailed analysis of the spin dependent parity violating electron-nucleon potential generated by the hyperfine coupling perturbation upon the pseudoscalar interaction of the electron with the weak charge of the nucleus. This effect is found to be of order αG FA {2}/{3} and represents, depending upon the nucleus, (10-70)% of the anapole moment contribution. In the case of thallium, it compensates almost exactly the contribution associated with the axial hadronic neutral current. This fact, together with other arguments given in the paper, makes thallium a favoured candidate for the anapole moment search provided accurate enough experiments can be performed.

  17. Into the atom and beyond

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    Magnifying an atom to football pitch size. The dense nucleus, carrying almost all the atomic mass, is much smaller than the ball. The players (the electrons) would see something about the size of a marble!

  18. Hard sphere model of atom

    CERN Document Server

    Tsekov, R

    2014-01-01

    The finite size effect of electron and nucleus is accounted for in the model of atom. Due to their hard sphere repulsion the energy of the 1s orbital decreases and the corrections amount up to 8 % in Uranium. Several models for boundary conditions on the atomic nucleus surface are discussed as well.

  19. The atomic nucleus%原子核

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Shipman

    2004-01-01

    Einstein's equation, E= mc2, which relates mass to energy, has been known since 1905. But its important to the human race was not realized until 1939. In December of 1938 German scientists showed that,conditlons, uraniumqual parts withatoms would splitthe accompanyingunder appropriate into two approximately erelease of large amount of

  20. Nuclear effects in atomic transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Pálffy, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    Atomic electrons are sensitive to the properties of the nucleus they are bound to, such as nuclear mass, charge distribution, spin, magnetization distribution, or even excited level scheme. These nuclear parameters are reflected in the atomic transition energies. A very precise determination of atomic spectra may thus reveal information about the nucleus, otherwise hardly accessible via nuclear physics experiments. This work reviews theoretical and experimental aspects of the nuclear effects ...

  1. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  2. Coherent production of the long-lived pionium nP states in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Gevokyan, S

    2015-01-01

    The coherent production of the $nP$ states of the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ atoms ($A_{2\\pi}$) in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is considered as a possible source of the $A_{2\\pi}(nP)$ beam for the pionium Lamb-shift measurement. A general expression for estimation of the $A_{2\\pi}(nP)$ yields is derived in the framework of the equivalent photon approximation.

  3. Nucleus Driven Electronic Pulsation

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, H; Xue, S -S

    2014-01-01

    We derive and solve by the spectral method the equations for a neutral system of ultra-relativistic electrons that are compressed to the radius of the nucleus and subject to a driving force. This driving force can be thought of as originating from a nuclear breathing mode, a possibility we discuss in detail.

  4. About possibility to search the electron EDM at the level $10^{-28} \\div 10^{-30}$ e$\\cdot$cm and the constant of T-odd, P-odd scalar weak interaction of an electron with a nucleus at the level $10^{-5} \\div 10^{-7}$ in the heavy atoms and ferroelectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshevsky, V G

    2005-01-01

    The T-odd phenomenon of induction of the magnetic field by a static electric field provides to study the electron EDM and constants of T-odd, P-odd interaction of an electron with a nucleus. Measurement of this magnetic field for ferroelectric materials (like PbTiO_3) at the level B~3 10^{-18} G allows to derive the electric dipole moment of an electron at the level d_e ~ 10^{-30} e cm and the constant of T-odd scalar weak interaction of an electron with a nucleus at the level k_1^{nuc}10^{-9}. The atomic magnetometry makes possible to measure fields ~ 10^{-13} G/\\sqrt{Hz} now. This means that for 10 days operation one can expect to obtain B at the level B ~ 10^{-16}G, and, therefore, the limits for d_e in PbTiO_3 at the level d_e ~ 10^{-28} and k_1^{nuc}~10^{-7}. that makes the discussed method beneficial for measuring d_e and k_1^{nuc}.

  5. Neutrino nucleus cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Singh, S K; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of our calculation which has been performed to study the nuclear effects in the quasielastic, inelastic and deep inelastic scattering of neutrinos(antineutrinos) from nuclear targets. These calculations are done in the local density approximation. We take into account the effect of Pauli blocking, Fermi motion, Coulomb effect, renormalization of weak transition strengths in the nuclear medium in the case of the quasielastic reaction. The inelastic reaction leading to production of pions is calculated in a $\\Delta $- dominance model taking into account the renormalization of $\\Delta$ properties in the nuclear medium and the final state interaction effects of the outgoing pions with the residual nucleus. We discuss the nuclear effects in the $F_{3}^{A}(x)$ structure function in the deep inelastic neutrino(antineutrino) reaction using a relativistic framework to describe the nucleon spectral function in the nucleus.

  6. Heavy flavor in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus: quenching, flow and correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Nardi, M; De Pace, A; Monteno, M; Prino, F

    2015-01-01

    We present recent results for heavy-flavor observables in nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies, obtained with the POWLANG transport setup. The initial creation of c-cbar and b-bbar pairs is simulated with a perturbative QCD approach (POWHEG+PYTHIA); their propagation in the medium (created in the nucleus-nucleus or in proton-nucleus collision) is studied with the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow parameter of the final D mesons both in nucleus-nucleus and in (for the first time, in the POWLANG setup) proton-nucleus collisions and compare our results to experimental data.

  7. Nucleus-nucleus potential with shell-correction contribution

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, V Yu

    2015-01-01

    The full relaxed-density potential between spherical nuclei is considered as a sum of the macroscopic and shell-correction contributions. The macroscopic part of the potential is related to a nucleus-nucleus potential obtained in the framework of the extended Thomas-Fermi approach with the Skyrme and Coulomb forces and the relaxed-density ansatz for evaluation of proton and neutron densities of interacting nuclei. A simple prescription for the shell-correction part of the total potential is discussed. The parameters of the shell-correction and macroscopic parts of the relaxed-density potential are found by fitting the empirical barrier heights of the 89 nucleus-nucleus systems as well as macroscopic potentials evaluated for 1485 nucleus-nucleus systems at 12 distances around touching points.

  8. Antineutron-nucleus annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Botta, E

    2001-01-01

    The n-nucleus annihilation process has been studied by the OBELIX experiment at the CERN Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) in the (50-400) MeV/c projectile momentum range on C, Al, Cu, Ag, Sn, and Pb nuclear targets. A systematic survey of the annihilation cross- section, sigma /sub alpha /(A, p/sub n/), has been performed, obtaining information on its dependence on the target mass number and on the incoming n momentum. For the first time the mass number dependence of the (inclusive) final state composition of the process has been analyzed. Production of the rho vector meson has also been examined. (13 refs).

  9. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, H.; /Tufts U.; Garvey, G.; /Los Alamos; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  10. Nucleus-independent chemical shift criterion for aromaticity in Π-extended tetraoxa[8]circulenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baryshnikov, Gleb V.; Minaev, Boris F.; Pittelkow, Michael;

    2013-01-01

    Recently synthesized p-extended symmetrical tetraoxa[8]circulenes that exhibit electroluminescent properties were calculated at the density functional theory (DFT) level using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) approach to electron density distribution analysis. Nucleus-independent ...

  11. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  12. Narrow deeply bound K- and p atomic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2000-01-01

    Examples of recently predicted narrow `deeply bound' K- and p atomic states are shown. The saturation of widths for strong absorptive potentials due to the induced repulsion, and the resulting suppression of atomic wave functions within the nucleus, are demonstrated. Production reactions for K- atomic states using φ(1020) decay, and the (p,p) reaction for p atomic states, are discussed.

  13. Source size determination in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, J.L.; Kumar, B.S.; Bennett, M.J.; Diebold, G.E.; Pope, J.K. (Yale University, A. W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8124 (United States)); Sorge, H.; Sullivan, J.P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1994-08-29

    We describe a technique whereby the freeze-out interaction volumes of nucleus-nucleus collisions are extracted from a cascade (plus coalescence) model, after comparison to measured abundances of light nuclei. We conclude that the interaction volume undergoes significant expansion before light nuclei are produced.

  14. Cytotoxicity of nucleus-targeting fluorescent gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-Ya; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Mingxi; Xie, Zhi-Xiong; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell apoptosis/necrosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and mitochondrial membrane potential examinations were performed on different cell lines exposed to the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs. We found that the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. A possible mechanism for the cytotoxicity of the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs was proposed as follows: the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs induce the production of ROS, resulting in the oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components, in turn leading to apoptosis via a mitochondrial damage pathway. This work facilitates a better understanding of the toxicity of AuNCs, especially nucleus-targeting AuNCs.Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell

  15. Neurons of human nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazdanović Maja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Nucleus accumbens is a part of the ventral striatum also known as a drug active brain region, especially related with drug addiction. The aim of the study was to investigate the Golgi morphology of the nucleus accumbens neurons. Methods. The study was performed on the frontal and sagittal sections of 15 human brains by the Golgi Kopsch method. We classified neurons in the human nucleus accumbens according to their morphology and size into four types: type I - fusiform neurons; type II - fusiform neurons with lateral dendrite, arising from a part of the cell body; type III - pyramidal-like neuron; type IV - multipolar neuron. The medium spiny neurons, which are mostly noted regarding to the drug addictive conditions of the brain, correspond to the type IV - multipolar neurons. Results. Two regions of human nucleus accumbens could be clearly recognized on Nissl and Golgi preparations each containing different predominant neuronal types. Central part of nucleus accumbens, core region, has a low density of impregnated neurons with predominant type III, pyramidal-like neurons, with spines on secondary branches and rare type IV, multipolar neurons. Contrary to the core, peripheral region, shell of nucleus, has a high density of impregnated neurons predominantly contained of type I and type IV - multipolar neurons, which all are rich in spines on secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Conclusion. Our results indicate great morphological variability of human nucleus accumbens neurons. This requires further investigations and clarifying clinical significance of this important brain region.

  16. Heavy flavors in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardi Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step setup for heavy-flavor studies in high-energy nucleus-nucleus (AA and proton-nucleus (pA collisions is presented. The propagation of the heavy quarks in the medium is described in a framework provided by the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow parameter of the final Dmesons both in AA and in pA collisions and compare our results to experimental data.

  17. Heavy flavors in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Marzia

    2016-11-01

    A multi-step setup for heavy-flavor studies in high-energy nucleus-nucleus (AA) and proton-nucleus (pA) collisions is presented. The propagation of the heavy quarks in the medium is described in a framework provided by the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow parameter of the final Dmesons both in AA and in pA collisions and compare our results to experimental data.

  18. Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanford, Glenn Delfosse, Jr.

    1997-09-01

    An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e+e/sp- pair creation near a nucleus with the e+ being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

  19. Hyperpolarisation effects on the electric field gradient at a nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, P. W.

    1989-04-01

    The electric field gradient at the nucleus of an atom or ion depends quadratically on the external electric field through the ɛ hyperpolarisability. Ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations on the He, Ne and Ar isoelectronic series show that ɛ is positive for s 2 and negative for p 6 electronic configurations, always having the opposite sign to the Sternheimer antishielding factor. The ab initio values for free atoms and ions conflict in sign with the effective hyperpolarisation term in one ionic model of nuclear quadrupole constants of gaseous alkali halides but the sign of the empirical parameter could change if overlap damping of the Sternheimer response were included in the model.

  20. Charged pion anisotropy in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poitou, J.; L' Hote, D.; Cavata, C.; Babinet, R.; Demoulins, M.; Fanet, H.; Gosset, J.; Lemaire, M.C.; Le Merdy, A.; Lucas, B.; Terrien, Y.; Valette, O. (CEN Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Alard, J.P.; Augerat, J.; Bastid, N.; Charmensat, P.; Dupieux, P.; Fraysse, L.; Marroncle, J.; Montarou, G.; Parizet, M.J.; Rahmani, A. (LPC Clermont-Ferrand, 63 - Aubiere (France)); Brochard, F.; Gorodetzky, P.; Racca, C. (CRN, 67 - Strasbourg (France))

    1992-01-27

    The momentum distributions with respect to the reaction plane for charged pions emitted in Ne-nucleus and Ar-nucleus collisions have been measured with the 4{pi} detector Diogene at the Saturne synchrotron. The reaction plane is estimated from the baryon momenta, using a standard technique for flow analysis. The pions exhibit a non-zero flow. For asymmetric systems, there is a preferential emission in the direction of the lighter (projectile) nucleus. Such a behaviour contradicts the predictions of INC calculations and is underestimated by QMD calculations which include mean field effects. It can be interpreted with a simple geometrical model in terms of absorption by the spectator nuclear matter. (orig.).

  1. Machines géantes pour sonder l'univers de l'atome

    CERN Multimedia

    Wilde, M, S

    1966-01-01

    To always more deeply explore the infinitely small world of the atom, Science is paradoxically brought to build buildings and machines increasingly larger - Giant accelerators producing high energy particle beams that can dissociate the structures of the atomic nucleus

  2. Quasielastic K-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Pace, A D; Oset, E

    1997-01-01

    Quasielastic K^+ - nucleus scattering data at q=290, 390 and 480 MeV/c are analyzed in a finite nucleus continuum random phase approximation framework, using a density-dependent particle-hole interaction. The reaction mechanism is consistently treated according to Glauber theory, keeping up to two-step inelastic processes. A good description of the data is achieved, also providing a useful constraint on the strength of the effective particle-hole interaction in the scalar-isoscalar channel at intermediate momentum transfers. We find no evidence for the increase in the effective number of nucleons participating in the reaction which has been reported in the literature.

  3. Higher-order Sternheimer shieldings of the hydrogen atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, P. W.; Steiner, E.

    Multiple perturbation theory is used to calculate the response of the electric field gradient at the nucleus of the hydrogen atom to external non-uniform fields. The parallel component of the field gradient at the nucleus in an axial field F with gradient F' and second derivative F'' has the perturbation expansion: [Enlarge Image

  4. Heavy-ion nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, M A; Haque, S

    2003-01-01

    Heavy ion-nucleus scattering is an excellent laboratory to probe high spin phenomena, exotic nuclei and for the analysis of various exit channels. The Strong Absorption Model or the generalized diffraction models, which are semi-classical in nature, have been employed in the description of various heavy ion-nucleus scattering phenomena with reasonable success. But one needs to treat the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically in the Wave Mechanical picture for the appropriate description of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering phenomena. We have brought the mathematics for the cross-section of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering to an analytic expression taking account of the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically. sup 9 Be, sup 1 sup 6 O, sup 2 sup 0 Ne and sup 3 sup 2 S heavy-ion beams elastic scattering from sup 2 sup 8 Si, sup 2 sup 4 Mg and sup 4 sup 0 Ca target nuclei at various projectile energies over the range 20-151 MeV have been analysed in terms of the 2-paramet...

  5. Similarity of atoms in molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cioslowski, J.; Nanayakkara, A. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Similarity of atoms in molecules is quantitatively assessed with a measure that employs electron densities within respective atomic basins. This atomic similarity measure does not rely on arbitrary assumptions concerning basis functions or 'atomic orbitals', is relatively inexpensive to compute, and has straightforward interpretation. Inspection of similarities between pairs of carbon, hydrogen, and fluorine atoms in the CH[sub 4], CH[sub 3]F, CH[sub 2]F[sub 2], CHF[sub 3], CF[sub 4], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 4], and C[sub 2]H[sub 6] molecules, calculated at the MP2/6-311G[sup **] level of theory, reveals that the atomic similarity is greatly reduced by a change in the number or the character of ligands (i.e. the atoms with nuclei linked through bond paths to the nucleus of the atom in question). On the other hand, atoms with formally identical (i.e. having the same nuclei and numbers of ligands) ligands resemble each other to a large degree, with the similarity indices greater than 0.95 for hydrogens and 0.99 for non-hydrogens. 19 refs., 6 tabs.

  6. Azimuthal correlation and collective behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A., E-mail: amitabha-62@rediffmail.com; Sarkar, S. [University of North Bengal, Department of Physics (India); Singh, G. [SUNY at Fredonia, Department of Computer and Information Science (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Various flow effects of nuclear and hadronic origin are investigated in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Nuclear emulsion data collected from {sup 84}Kr + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 1.52 GeV per nucleon and from {sup 28}Si + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 14.5 GeV per nucleon are used in the investigation. The transverse momentum distribution and the flow angle analysis show that collective behavior, like a bounce-off effect of the projectile spectators and a sidesplash effect of the target spectators, are present in our event samples. From an azimuthal angle analysis of the data we also see a direct flow of the projectile fragments and of the produced charged particles. On the other hand, for both data samples the target fragments exhibit a reverse flow, while the projectile fragments exhibit an elliptic flow. Relevant flow parameters are measured.

  7. Transverse Energy in nucleus-nucleus collisions: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tincknell, M.

    1988-11-15

    The status of Transverse Energy (E/sub T/) in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS is reviewed. The definition of E/sub T/ and its physical significance are discussed. The basic techniques and limitations of the experimental measurements are presented. The acceptances of the major experiments to be discussed are shown, along with remarks about their idiosyncrasies. The data demonstrate that the nuclear geometry of colliding spheres primarily determines the shapes of the observed spectra. Careful account of the acceptances is crucial to comparing and interpreting results. It is concluded that nuclear stopping power is high, and that the amount of energy deposited into the interaction volume is increasing with beam energy even at SPS energies. The energy densities believed to be obtained at the SPS are close to the critical values predicted for the onset of a quark-gluon plasma. 25 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Dimuon enhancement in nucleus-nucleus ultrarelativistic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordalo, Paula; Abreu, M.C.; Alessandro, B.; Alexa, C.; Arnaldi, R.; Astruc, J.; Atayan, M.; Baglin, C.; Baldit, A.; Bedjidian, M.; Bellaiche, F.; Beole, S.; Bohrani, A.; Boldea, V.; Bussiere, A.; Capelli, L.; Caponi, V.; Casagrande, L.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Chaurand, B.; Chevrot, I.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalo, C.; Comets, M.P.; Constans, N.; Constantinescu, S.; Contardo, D.; Cruz, J.; De Falco, A.; De Marco, N.; Dellacasa, G.; Devaux, A.; Dita, S.; Drapier, O.; Ducroux, L.; Espagnon, B.; Fargeix, J.; Ferreira, R.; Filippov, S.N.; Fleuret, F.; Force, P.; Gallio, M.; Gavrilov, Y.K.; Gerschel, C.; Giubellino, P.; Golubeva, M.B.; Gonin, M.; Gorodetzky, P.; Grigorian, A.A.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guber, F.F.; Guichard, A.; Gulkanyan, H.; Hakobyan, R.; Haroutunian, R.; Idzik, M.; Jouan, D.; Karavitcheva, T.L.; Kluberg, L.; Kossakowski, R.; Kurepin, A.B.; Landau, G.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lourenco, C.; Luquin, L.; Macciotta, P.; Mac Cormick, M.; Mandry, R.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Monteno, M.; Mourgues, S.; Musso, A.; Ohlsson-Malek, F.; Petiau, P.; Piccotti, A.; Pizzi, J.R.; Prado da Silva, W.L.; Puddu, G.; Quintans, C.; Racca, C.; Ramello, L.; Ramos, S.; Rato-Mendes, P.; Riccati, L.; Romana, A.; Ropotar, I.; Saturnini, P.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Shahoyan, R.; Silva, S.; Sitta, M.; Soave, C.; Sonderegger, P.; Tarrago, X.; Topilskaya, N.S.; Usai, G.L.; Varela, J.; Vercellin, E.; Villatte, L

    1999-12-27

    The study of muon pairs in the mass region 1.5 < M{sub {mu}}{sub {mu}} < 2.5 GeV/c{sup 2} in 450 GeV/c p-A, 200 GeV/nucleon S-U and 158 GeV/nucleon Pb-Pb collisions is presented. In p-A interactions, the dimuon signal mass spectra are well described by a superposition of Drell-Yan and charmed meson semi-leptonic decay contributions, in agreement with previous experiments when considering a linear A dependence. In nucleus-nucleus reactions, taking only into account these two physical ingredients, a dimuon enhancement both with increasing A{center_dot}B and centrality is observed.

  9. Nagaoka's atomic model and hyperfine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamura, Takashi T

    2016-01-01

    The prevailing view of Nagaoka's "Saturnian" atom is so misleading that today many people have an erroneous picture of Nagaoka's vision. They believe it to be a system involving a 'giant core' with electrons circulating just outside. Actually, though, in view of the Coulomb potential related to the atomic nucleus, Nagaoka's model is exactly the same as Rutherford's. This is true of the Bohr atom, too. To give proper credit, Nagaoka should be remembered together with Rutherford and Bohr in the history of the atomic model. It is also pointed out that Nagaoka was a pioneer of understanding hyperfine interactions in order to study nuclear structure.

  10. Experiments with Ξ- atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, C. J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments with Ξ- atoms are proposed in order to study the nuclear interaction of Ξ hyperons. The production of Ξ- in the (K-,K+) reaction, the Ξ- stopping in matter, and its atomic cascade are incorporated within a realistic evaluation of the results expected for Ξ- x-ray spectra across the periodic table, using an assumed Ξ-nucleus optical potential Vopt. Several optimal targets for measuring the strong-interaction shift and width of the x-ray transition to the ``last'' atomic level observed are singled out: F, Cl, I, and Pb. The sensitivity of these observables to the parameters of Vopt is considered. The relevance of such experiments is discussed in the context of strangeness -2 nuclear physics and multistrange nuclear matter. Finally, with particular reference to searches for the H dibaryon, the properties of Ξ-d atoms are also discussed. The role of Stark mixing and its effect on S and P state capture of Ξ- by the deuteron together with estimates of the resulting probability for producing the H dibaryon are considered in detail.

  11. Atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Reichel, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a stimulating and multifaceted picture of a rapidly developing field. The first part reviews fundamentals of atom chip research in tutorial style, while subsequent parts focus on the topics of atom-surface interaction, coherence on atom chips, and possible future directions of atom chip research. The articles are written by leading researchers in the field in their characteristic and individual styles.

  12. Atomic energy

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    Interviews following the 1991 co-operation Agreement between the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning the participation in the Large Hadron Collider Project (LHC) . With Chidambaram, R, Chairman, Atomic Energy Commission and Secretary, Department of Atomic Energy, Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India and Professor Llewellyn-Smith, Christopher H, Director-General, CERN.

  13. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  14. Classifiers for centrality determination in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Altsybeev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Centrality, as a geometrical property of the collision, is crucial for the physical interpretation of nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus experimental data. However, it cannot be directly accessed in event-by-event data analysis. Common methods for centrality estimation in A-A and p-A collisions usually rely on a single detector (either on the signal in zero-degree calorimeters or on the multiplicity in some semi-central rapidity range). In the present work, we made an attempt to develop an approach for centrality determination that is based on machine-learning techniques and utilizes information from several detector subsystems simultaneously. Different event classifiers are suggested and evaluated for their selectivity power in terms of the number of nucleons-participants and the impact parameter of the collision. Finer centrality resolution may allow to reduce impact from so-called volume fluctuations on physical observables being studied in heavy-ion experiments like ALICE at the LHC and fixed target exper...

  15. The Atomic and Nuclear Physics of Atomic EDMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupp, Timothy

    2016-09-01

    Atomic Electric-Dipole-Moment (EDM) measurements employ low-energy atomic and precision-measurement techniques to measure the effects of elementary particle forces that affect the distribution of charge and mass in the nucleus, which is probed by the atomic electrons. Experiments and their interpretation strongly overlap atomic and nuclear physics in the experimental and theoretical problems presented. On the experimental side, the atomic EDM couples to electric fields while the magnetic dipole moment couples to magnetic fields requiring exquisite control and characerization of the magnetic fields. Measuring the tiny frequency shifts requires clock-comparisons and a large signal-to-noise ratio for frequency resolution much smaller than the linewidths, which are lmitied by observation times. To address the experimental challenges, I will discuss systematic effects related to magnetic fields and techniques of magnetometry and co-magntometery as well as optical pumping and related techniques that enhance signal-to-noise. I will also address the interpretation of atomic EDMs in terms of a set of low-energy parameters that relate to effective-field-theory coefficients, and I will empshaize the need for improved calculations from both atomic-theory and nuclear theory.

  16. Nuclear polarization effects in muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2013-01-01

    We illustrate how nuclear polarization corrections in muonic atoms can be formally connected to inelastic response functions of a nucleus. We first discuss the point-nucleon approximation and then include finite-nucleon-size corrections. As an example, we compare our ab-initio calculation of the third Zemach moment in the muonic Helium-4 ion to previous phenomenological results.

  17. Cell nucleus - physical limitation of a quasar-galaxy association. Cell, DNA and cosmological background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muheim, J.T. (Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland). Lab. fuer Festkoerperphysik)

    1985-03-15

    The author extends his analogy of atomic structure to cosmological structures to include the cell nucleus and DNA replication. From this the author believes that there is extraterrestrial life within 34 light years of us and that telepathy is possible within the solar system.

  18. Resonances in -light nucleus systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Khemchandani; N G Kelkar; M Nowakowski; B K Jain

    2006-04-01

    We locate resonances in -light nucleus elastic scattering using the time delay method. We solve few-body equations within the finite rank approximation in order to calculate the -matrices and hence the time delay for the - 3He and - 4He systems. We find a resonance very close to the threshold in - 3 He elastic scattering, at about 0.5 MeV above threshold with a width of ∼ 2 MeV. The calculations also hint at the presence of sub-threshold states in both the cases.

  19. Turbulent mixing condensation nucleus counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavliev, Rashid

    The construction and operating principles of the Turbulent Mixing Condensation Nucleus Counter (TM CNC) are described. Estimations based on the semiempirical theory of turbulent jets and the classical theory of nucleation and growth show the possibility of detecting particles as small as 2.5 nm without the interference of homogeneous nucleation. This conclusion was confirmed experimentally during the International Workshop on Intercomparison of Condensation Nuclei and Aerosol Particle Counters (Vienna, Austria). Number concentration, measured by the Turbulent Mixing CNC and other participating instruments, is found to be essentially equal.

  20. Intrinsic electric dipole moments of paramagnetic atoms : Rubidium and cesium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nataraj, H. S.; Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.; Mukherjee, D.

    2008-01-01

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) of paramagnetic atoms is sensitive to the intrinsic EDM contribution from that of its constituent electrons and a scalar-pseudoscalar (S-PS) electron-nucleus interaction. The electron EDM and the S-PS contributions to the EDMs of these atoms scale as approximate to Z

  1. Determination of Coil Inductances Cylindrical Iron Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azeddine Mazouz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the investigation and development of a structure and performance characteristics of a coil iron nucleus cylindrical (C.I.N.C. The coil iron nucleus cylindrical is a nonlinear electro radio in which the moving of the nucleus in a sense or in other causes change in inductance and can reach extreme values at the superposition of nucleus and coil centers. The variation of the inductance and the degree of freedom of movement of the nucleus can lead to a device with electromechanical conversion The aim of this paper is the determination and visualization of self inductance and mutual of the (C.I.N.C based on geometric dimensions and the displacement of the nucleus.  

  2. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1989-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  3. Projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huazheng; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2015-01-01

    The mouse precuneiform nucleus has been proposed as the midbrain locomotion center, a function ascribed to its caudal neighbor, cuneiform nucleus, in the rat, cat and other species. The present study investigated the projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus in the mouse using retrograde tracer injections (fluoro-gold) into the precuneiform nucleus and anterograde tracer injections (biotinylated dextran amine) into the central amygdaloid nucleus. The entire central amygdaloid nucleus except the rostral pole had retrogradely labeled neurons, especially in the middle portion where labeled neurons were densely packed. Anterogradely labeled amygdaloid fibers approached the precuneiform nucleus from the area ventrolateral to it and terminated in the entire precuneiform nucleus. Labeled fibers were also found in laminae 5 and 6 in the upper cervical cord on the ipsilateral side. The present study is the first demonstration of projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus. This projection may underpin the role of the precuneiform nucleus in the modulation of the cardiovascular activity.

  4. Crossing axons in the third nerve nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienfang, D C

    1975-12-01

    The research presented in this paper studied the pathway taken by the crossed fibers of the third nerve nucleus in an animal whose nucleus has been well mapped and found to correlate well with higher mammals and man. Autoradiography using tritiated amino acid labeled the cell bodies an axons of the left side of the oculomotor nucleus of the cat. Axons so labeled could be seen emerging from the ventral portion of the left nucleus through the median longitudinal fasciculus (mlf) to join the left oculomotor nerve. Labeled axons were also seen to emerge from the medial border of the caudal left nucleus, cross the midline, and pass through the right nucleus and the right mlf to join the right oculomotor nerve. These latter axons must be the crossed axons of the superior rectus and levator palpebrae subnuclei. Since the path of these crossed axons is through the caudal portion of the nucleus of the opposite side, the destruction of one lateral half of the oculomotor nucleus would result in a bilateral palsy of the crossed subnuclei. Bilateral palsy of the superior rectus and bilateral assymetrical palsy of the levator palpebrae muscles would result.

  5. Observing atomic collapse resonances in artificial nuclei on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wong, Dillon; Shytov, Andrey V; Brar, Victor W; Choi, Sangkook; Wu, Qiong; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Regan, William; Zettl, Alex; Kawakami, Roland K; Louie, Steven G; Levitov, Leonid S; Crommie, Michael F

    2013-05-10

    Relativistic quantum mechanics predicts that when the charge of a superheavy atomic nucleus surpasses a certain threshold, the resulting strong Coulomb field causes an unusual atomic collapse state; this state exhibits an electron wave function component that falls toward the nucleus, as well as a positron component that escapes to infinity. In graphene, where charge carriers behave as massless relativistic particles, it has been predicted that highly charged impurities should exhibit resonances corresponding to these atomic collapse states. We have observed the formation of such resonances around artificial nuclei (clusters of charged calcium dimers) fabricated on gated graphene devices via atomic manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope. The energy and spatial dependence of the atomic collapse state measured with scanning tunneling microscopy revealed unexpected behavior when occupied by electrons.

  6. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  7. Study of Hadron Production in Hadron-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    Selyuzhenkov, I; Klochkov, V; Kowalski, S; Kaptur, E A; Kowalik, K L; Dominik, W M; Krasnoperov, A; Feofilov, G; Vinogradov, L; Kovalenko, V; Johnson, S R; Mills, G B; Planeta, R J; Rubbia, A; Marton, K; Messerly, B A; Puzovic, J; Bogomilov, M V; Bravar, A; Sgalaberna, D; Renfordt, R A E; Deveaux, M; Engel, R R; Grzeszczuk, A; Davis, N; Kuich, M; Lyubushkin, V; Kondratev, V; Kadija, K; Diakonos, F; Slodkowski, M A; Rauch, W H; Pistillo, C; Laszlo, A; Nakadaira, T; Hasegawa, T; Sadovskiy, A; Morozov, S; Petukhov, O; Szuba, M K; Mathes, H; Herve, A E; Roehrich, D; Marino, A D; Grebieszkow, K; Wlodarczyk, Z; Rybczynski, M A; Wojtaszek-szwarc, A; Nirkko, M C; Sakashita, K; Golubeva, M; Kurepin, A; Manic, D; Kolev, D I; Kisiel, J E; Rondio, E; Larsen, D T; Czopowicz, T R; Seyboth, P; Turko, L; Guber, F; Marin, V; Busygina, O; Taranenko, A; Cirkovic, M; Gazdzicki, M; Roth, M A; Pulawski, S M; Aduszkiewicz, A M; Bunyatov, S; Vechernin, V; Nagai, Y; Anticic, T; Dynowski, K M; Mackowiak-pawlowska, M K; Stefanek, G; Pavin, M; Fodor, Z P; Nishikawa, K; Tada, M; Kobayashi, T; Blondel, A P P; Damyanova, A; Stroebele, H W; Posiadala, M Z; Kolesnikov, V; Andronov, E; Zimmerman, E D; Antoniou, N; Majka, Z; Di luise, S; Veberic, D; Dumarchez, J; Naskret, M; Ivashkin, A; Tsenov, R V; Koziel, M G; Schmidt, K J; Melkumov, G; Popov, B; Panagiotou, A; Richter-was, E M; Ereditato, A; Paolone, V; Unger, M T; Wilczek, A G; Stepaniak, J M; Matulewicz, T N; Seryakov, A; Susa, T; Staszel, P P; Brzychczyk, J; Maksiak, B; Tefelski, D B; Kucewicz, W; Dorosz, P A

    2007-01-01

    The NA61/SHINE (SHINE = SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) experiment is a large acceptance hadron spectrometer at the CERN SPS for the study of the hadronic final states produced in interactions of various beam particles (pions, protons, C, S and In) with a variety of fixed targets at the SPS energies. The main components of the current detector were constructed and used by the NA49 experiment. The physics program of NA61/SHINE consists of three main subjects. In the first stage of data taking (2007-2009) measurements of hadron production in hadron-nucleus interactions needed for neutrino (T2K) and cosmic-ray (Pierre Auger and KASCADE) experiments will be performed. In the second stage (2009-2011) hadron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus interactions needed as reference data for a better understanding of nucleus-nucleus reactions will be studied. In the third stage (2009-2013) energy dependence of hadron production properties will be measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as in p+p a...

  8. Computer Simulation of Atoms Nuclei Structure Using Information Coefficients of Proportionality

    CERN Document Server

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2012-01-01

    The latest research of the proportionality of atomic weights of chemical elements made it possible to obtain 3 x 3 matrices for the calculation of information coefficients of proportionality Ip that can be used for 3D modeling of the structure of atom nucleus. The results of computer simulation show high potential of nucleus structure research for the characterization of their chemical and physical properties.

  9. Commissural axons of the mouse cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M Christian; Drottar, Marie; Benson, Thane E; Darrow, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The axons of commissural neurons that project from one cochlear nucleus to the other were studied after labeling with anterograde tracer. Injections were made into the dorsal subdivision of the cochlear nucleus in order to restrict labeling only to the group of commissural neurons that gave off collaterals to, or were located in, this subdivision. The number of labeled commissural axons in each injection was correlated with the number of labeled radiate multipolar neurons, suggesting radiate neurons as the predominant origin of the axons. The radiate commissural axons are thick and myelinated, and they exit the dorsal acoustic stria of the injected cochlear nucleus to cross the brainstem in the dorsal half, near the crossing position of the olivocochlear bundle. They enter the opposite cochlear nucleus via the dorsal and ventral acoustic stria and at its medial border. Reconstructions of single axons demonstrate that terminations are mostly in the core and typically within a single subdivision of the cochlear nucleus. Extents of termination range from narrow to broad along both the dorsoventral (i.e., tonotopic) and the rostrocaudal dimensions. In the electron microscope, labeled swellings form synapses that are symmetric (in that there is little postsynaptic density), a characteristic of inhibitory synapses. Our labeled axons do not appear to include excitatory commissural axons that end in edge regions of the nucleus. Radiate commissural axons could mediate the broadband inhibition observed in responses to contralateral sound, and they may balance input from the two ears with a quick time course.

  10. Asymptotics for Two-dimensional Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nam, Phan Thanh; Portmann, Fabian; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the ground state energy of an atom confined to two dimensions with an infinitely heavy nucleus of charge $Z>0$ and $N$ quantum electrons of charge -1 is $E(N,Z)=-{1/2}Z^2\\ln Z+(E^{\\TF}(\\lambda)+{1/2}c^{\\rm H})Z^2+o(Z^2)$ when $Z\\to \\infty$ and $N/Z\\to \\lambda$, where $E^{\\TF}(\\lambd...

  11. BFKL Pomeron calculus: solution to equations for nucleus-nucleus scattering in the saturation domain

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, Carlos; Meneses, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we solve the equation for nucleus-nucleus scattering in the BFKL Pomeron calculus, suggested by Braun. We find these solutions analytically at high energies as well as numerically in the entire region of energies inside the saturation region. The semi-classical approximation is used to select out the infinite set of the parasite solutions. The nucleus-nucleus cross sections at high energy are estimated and compared with the Glauber-Gribov approach. It turns out that the exact formula gives the estimates that are very close to the ones based on Glauber-Gribov formula which is important for the practical applications

  12. Excitation of heavy hydrogen-like ions by light atoms in relativistic collisions with large momentum transfers

    CERN Document Server

    Najjari, B

    2012-01-01

    We present a theory for excitation of heavy hydrogen-like projectile-ions by light target-atoms in collisions where the momentum transfers to the atom are very large on the atomic scale. It is shown that in this process the electrons and the nucleus of the atom behave as (quasi-) free particles with respect to each other and that their motion is governed by the field of the nucleus of the ion. The effect of this field on the atomic particles can be crucial for the contribution to the excitation of the ion caused by the electrons of the atom. Due to comparatively very large nuclear mass, however, this field can be neglected in the calculation of the contribution to the excitation due to the nucleus of the atom.

  13. Ionization of Atoms by Intense Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Froehlich, Juerg; Schlein, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    The process of ionization of a hydrogen atom by a short infrared laser pulse is studied in the regime of very large pulse intensity, in the dipole approximation. Let $A$ denote the integral of the electric field of the pulse over time at the location of the atomic nucleus. It is shown that, in the limit where $|A| \\to \\infty$, the ionization probability approaches unity and the electron is ejected into a cone opening in the direction of $-A$ and of arbitrarily small opening angle. Asymptotics of various physical quantities in $|A|^{-1}$ is studied carefully. Our results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data reported in \\cite{1,2}.

  14. INFERNO - A better model of atoms in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, D. A.

    1982-03-01

    A self-consistent field model of atoms in dense plasmas has been devised and incorporated in a computer program. In the model there is a uniform positive charge distribution with a hole in it and at the center of the hole an atomic nucleus. There are electrons, in both bound and continuum states, in sufficient number to form an electrically neutral system. The Dirac equation is used so that high Z atoms can be dealt with. A finite temperature is assumed, and a mean field (average atom) approximation is used in statistical averages. Applications have been made to equations of states and to photoabsorption.

  15. Atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  16. Onset of Deconfinement in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions - Past, Present and Future -

    CERN Document Server

    Gazdzicki, Marek

    2007-01-01

    In 2007 Mark I. Gorenstein celebrated his 60th birthday. This report is dedicated to Mark and it sketches the results obtained during the past ten years of our collaboration and friendship. They concern search for and study of the onset of deconfinement in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  17. The Atomic orbitals of the topological atom

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador Sedano, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These c...

  18. Explicitly correlated wave function for a boron atom

    CERN Document Server

    Puchalski, Mariusz; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    We present results of high-precision calculations for a boron atom's properties using wave functions expanded in the explicitly correlated Gaussian basis. We demonstrate that the well-optimized 8192 basis functions enable a determination of energy levels, ionization potential, and fine and hyperfine splittings in atomic transitions with nearly parts per million precision. The results open a window to a spectroscopic determination of nuclear properties of boron including the charge radius of the proton halo in the $^8$B nucleus.

  19. Organisation of the human dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutcherov, Yuri; Mai, Juergen K; Ashwell, Ken W; Paxinos, George

    2004-01-19

    This study used acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry to reveal the organization of the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DM) in the human. Topographically, the human DM is similar to DM in the monkey and rat. It is wedged between the paraventricular nucleus, dorsally, and the ventromedial nucleus, ventrally. Laterally, DM borders the lateral hypothalamic area while medially it approaches the 3rd ventricle. The AChE staining distinguished two subcompartments of the human DM: the larger diffuse and the smaller compact DM. The subcompartmental organization of the human DM appears homologous to that found in the monkey and less complex than that reported in rats. Understanding of the organization of DM creates meaningful anatomical reference for physiological and pharmacological studies in the human hypothalamus.

  20. The nucleus: a black box being opened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, R; Humbel, B; de Jong, L

    1991-12-01

    Until recently our knowledge about the structural and functional organization of the cell nucleus was very limited. Recent technical developments in the field of ultrastructural analysis, combined with ongoing research on the properties of the nuclear matrix, give new insight into how the nucleus is structured. Two types of observations shape our ideas about nuclear organization. First, most nuclear functions (replication, transcription, RNA processing, and RNA transport) are highly localized within the nucleus, rather than diffusely distributed. Moreover, they are associated with the nuclear matrix. Second, chromatin is organized in discrete loops, bordered by nuclear matrix attachment sequences (MARs). Each loop may contain one or several genes. The arrangement of chromatin in loops has profound consequences for the regulation of gene expression.

  1. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  2. UNCOVERING THE NUCLEUS CANDIDATE FOR NGC 253

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günthardt, G. I.; Camperi, J. A. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (Argentina); Agüero, M. P. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, and CONICET (Argentina); Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Schirmer, M. [Gemini Observatory, AURA (United States); Bosch, G., E-mail: gunth@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: camperi@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: mpaguero@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: rdiaz@gemini.edu, E-mail: pgomez@gemini.edu, E-mail: mschirmer@gemini.edu, E-mail: guille@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (CONICET-UNLP) (Argentina)

    2015-11-15

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H{sub 2} rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  3. Atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter [Albuquerque, NM; Johnson, Cort N [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  4. Measurements of the Near-Nucleus Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with the Alice Far-Ultraviolet Spectrograph on Rosetta

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, Paul D; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Feaga, Lori M; Parker, Joel Wm; Schindhelm, Eric; Steffl, Andrew J; Stern, S Alan; Weaver, Harold A; Sierks, Holger; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-01-01

    Aims. The Alice far-ultraviolet spectrograph onboard Rosetta is designed to observe emissions from various atomic and molecular species from within the coma of comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko and to determine their spatial distribution and evolution with time and heliocentric distance. Methods. Following orbit insertion in August 2014, Alice made observations of the inner coma above the limbs of the nucleus of the comet from cometocentric distances varying between 10 and 80 km. Depending on the position and orientation of the slit relative to the nucleus, emissions of atomic hydrogen and oxygen were initially detected. These emissions are spatially localized close to the nucleus and spatially variable with a strong enhancement above the comet's neck at northern latitudes. Weaker emission from atomic carbon and CO were subsequently detected. Results. Analysis of the relative line intensities suggests photoelectron impact dissociation of H2O vapor as the source of the observed H I and O I emissions. The electr...

  5. Inner Structure of Boiling Nucleus and Interfacial Energy Between Nucleus and Bulk Liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Dong; TIAN Yong; PENG Xiao-Feng; WANG Bu-Xuan

    2004-01-01

    @@ A model of two-region structure of a nucleus is proposed to describe nucleus evolution. The interfacial tension between bulk liquid phase and nucleus is dependent on the density gradient in the transition region and varies with the structure change of the transition region. With the interfacial tension calculated using this model, the predicted nucleation rate is very close to the experimental measurement. Furthermore, this model and associated analysis provide solid theoretical evidence to clarify the definition of nucleation rate and understand the nucleation phenomenon with insight into the physical nature.

  6. Nucleus-Nucleus Potential at Near-Barrier Energies from Self Consistent Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Skalski, J

    2003-01-01

    We determine the static nucleus-nucleus potential from Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations with the Skyrme interaction. To this aim, HF equations are solved on a spatial mesh, with the initial configuration consisting of target and projectile positioned at various relative distances. For a number of reaction partners, the calculated barrier heights reasonably well compare with those extracted from the measured fusion and capture cross sections. At smaller target-projectile distances, our results show the intrinsic barriers to heavy compound nucleus formation. We speculate on their possible connection with the fusion hindrance observed for large Z sub T Z sub P.

  7. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  8. An organism arises from every nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurullah Keklikoglu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The fact that, cloning using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT method has been performed, opened new horizons for cloning, and changed the way of our understanding and approach to cell and nucleus. The progress in cloning technology, brought the anticipation of the ability to clone an organism from each somatic cell nucleus. Therefore, the 'Cell Theory' is about to take the additional statement as "An organism arises from every nucleus". The development of gene targeting procedures which can be applied with SCNT, showed us that it may be possible to obtain different versions of the original genetic constitution of a cell. Because of this opportunity which is provided by SCNT, in reproductive cloning, it would be possible to clone enhanced organisms which can adapt to different environmental conditions and survive. Furthermore, regaining the genetic characteristics of ancestors or reverse herediter variations would be possible. On the other hand, in therapeutic cloning, more precise and easily obtainable alternatives for cell replacement therapy could be presented. However, while producing healthier or different organisms from a nucleus, it is hard to foresee the side effects influencing natural processes in long term is rather difficult.

  9. Nucleus-associated actin in Amoeba proteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdieva, Mariia; Bogolyubov, Dmitry; Podlipaeva, Yuliya; Goodkov, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The presence, spatial distribution and forms of intranuclear and nucleus-associated cytoplasmic actin were studied in Amoeba proteus with immunocytochemical approaches. Labeling with different anti-actin antibodies and staining with TRITC-phalloidin and fluorescent deoxyribonuclease I were used. We showed that actin is abundant within the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm of A. proteus cells. According to DNase I experiments, the predominant form of intranuclear actin is G-actin which is associated with chromatin strands. Besides, unpolymerized actin was shown to participate in organization of a prominent actin layer adjacent to the outer surface of nuclear envelope. No significant amount of F-actin was found in the nucleus. At the same time, the amoeba nucleus is enclosed in a basket-like structure formed by circumnuclear actin filaments and bundles connected with global cytoplasmic actin cytoskeleton. A supposed architectural function of actin filaments was studied by treatment with actin-depolymerizing agent latrunculin A. It disassembled the circumnuclear actin system, but did not affect the intranuclear chromatin structure. The results obtained for amoeba cells support the modern concept that actin is involved in fundamental nuclear processes that have evolved in the cells of multicellular organisms.

  10. Uncovering the nucleus candidate for NGC 253

    CERN Document Server

    Günthardt, G I; Camperi, J A; Díaz, R J; Gomez, P L; Bosch, G; Schirmer, M

    2015-01-01

    NGC253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst which becomes the best candidate to study the relationship between starburst and AGN activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus. The near infrared spectroscopy could be advantageous in order to shed light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis and through the brightest infrared source. We present evidence showing that the brightest near infrared and mid infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a stellar supercluster, in fact, presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. It is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.0" of the symmetry center of the galactic bar. Moreover, our data indicate that this object i...

  11. Weak interaction and nucleus: the relationship keeps on; Interaction faible et noyau: l'histoire continue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, J. [Subatech, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, 44 - Nantes (France); Frere, J.M.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Volpe, C.; Marteau, J.; Lhuillier, D.; Vignaud, D.; Legac, R.; Marteau, J.; Legac, R

    2003-07-01

    This document gathers the lectures made at the Joliot-Curie international summer school in 2003 whose theme, that year, was the relationship between weak interaction and nucleus. There were 8 contributions whose titles are: 1) before the standard model: from beta decay to neutral currents; 2) the electro-weak theory and beyond; 3) testing of the standard model at low energies; 4) description of weak processes in nuclei; 5) 20.000 tonnes underground, an approach to the neutrino-nucleus interaction; 6) parity violation from atom to nucleon; 7) how neutrinos got their masses; and 8) CP symmetry.

  12. Nonequilibrium distribution functions of nucleons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Anchishkin, D; Cleymans, J; 10.5488/CMP.16.13201

    2013-01-01

    The collision smearing of the nucleon momenta about their initial values during relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is investigated. To a certain degree, our model belongs to the transport type, and we investigate the evolution of the nucleon system created at a nucleus-nucleus collision. However, we parameterize this development by the number of collisions of every particle during evolution rather than by the time variable. It is assumed that the group of nucleons which leave the system after the same number of collisions can be joined in a particular statistical ensemble. The nucleon nonequilibrium distribution functions, which depend on a certain number of collisions of a nucleon before freeze-out, are derived.

  13. Hypoxia activates nucleus tractus solitarii neurons projecting to the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    King, T. Luise; Heesch, Cheryl M.; Clark, Catharine G.; Kline, David D.; Hasser, Eileen M.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral chemoreceptor afferent information is sent to the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS), integrated, and relayed to other brain regions to alter cardiorespiratory function. The nTS projects to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), but activation and phenotype of these projections during chemoreflex stimulation is unknown. We hypothesized that activation of PVN-projecting nTS neurons occurs primarily at high intensities of hypoxia. We assessed ventilation and cardiovascular para...

  14. Study of -nucleus interaction through the formation of -nucleus bound state

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Jha; B J Roy; A Chatterjee; H Machner

    2006-05-01

    The question of possible existence of -mesic nuclei is quite intriguing. Answer to this question will deeply enrich our understanding of -nucleus interaction which is not so well-understood. We review the experimental efforts for the search of -mesic nuclei and describe the physics motivation behind it. We present the description of an experiment for the search of -nucleus bound state using the GeV proton beam, currently being performed at COSY.

  15. Centrality Dependence of Flow in High-Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨红艳; 周代翠; 杨纯斌; 蔡勖

    2002-01-01

    Directed flow and elliptic flow of final state particles in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions in the EMU01 experiment have been studied. The dependences of directed flow and elliptic flow on incident energy and impact centrality of outgoing particles are presented. The results exhibit strong dependence of flow on centrality and energy. We also suggest a more reliable way to determine the event plane resolution here.

  16. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M., E-mail: Masaki.Hori@mpq.mpg.de; Sótér, A.; Aghai-Khozani, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik (Germany); Barna, D. [CERN (Switzerland); Dax, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland); Hayano, R. S.; Murakami, Y.; Yamada, H. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π{sup −} beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π{sup −} occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN.

  17. Kaonic atoms and in-medium K-N amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2012-05-01

    Recent work on the connection between in-medium subthreshold K-N amplitudes and kaonic atom potentials is updated by using a next to leading order chirally motivated coupled channel separable interaction model that reproduces K¯N observables at low energies, including the very recent SIDDHARTA results for the atomic K--hydrogen 1s level shift and width. The corresponding K--nucleus potential is evaluated self-consistently within a single-nucleon approach and is critically reviewed with respect to empirical features of phenomenological optical potentials. The need to supplement the single-nucleon based approach with multi-nucleon interactions is demonstrated by showing that additional empirical absorptive and dispersive terms, beyond the reach of chirally motivated K--nucleus potentials, are required in order to achieve good agreement with the bulk of the data on kaonic atoms.

  18. Laser Spectroscopy of Muonic Atoms and Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Fernandes, Luis M P; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Amaro, Fernando D; Amaro, Pedro; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Franke, Beatrice; Galtier, Sandrine; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L; Götzfried, Johannes; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hildebrandt, Malte; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kirch, Klaus; Knecht, Andreas; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Bigot, Eric-Olivier Le; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Machado, Jorge; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; Santos, Joaquim M F dos; Santos, José Paulo; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Szabo, Csilla I; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Voss, Andreas; Weichelt, Birgit; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy of the Lamb shift (2S-2P energy difference) in light muonic atoms or ions, in which one negative muon $\\mu^-$ is bound to a nucleus, has been performed. The measurements yield significantly improved values of the root-mean-square charge radii of the nuclei, owing to the large muon mass, which results in a vastly increased muon wave function overlap with the nucleus. The values of the proton and deuteron radii are 10 and 3 times more accurate than the respective CODATA values, but 7 standard deviations smaller. Data on muonic helium-3 and -4 ions is being analyzed and will give new insights. In future, the (magnetic) Zemach radii of the proton and the helium-3 nuclei will be determined from laser spectroscopy of the 1S hyperfine splittings, and the Lamb shifts of muonic Li, Be and B can be used to improve the respective charge radii.

  19. Why do we have a caudate nucleus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villablanca, Jaime R

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand the physiological role of the caudate nucleus, we combine here our laboratory data on cats with reports of patients with selective damage to this nucleus. Cats with bilateral removal of the caudate nuclei showed a stereotyped behavior consisting of persistently approaching and then following a person, another cat, or any object, and attempting to contact the target. Simultaneously, the animals exhibited a friendly disposition and persistent docility together with purring and forelimbs treading/kneading. The magnitude and duration of this behavior was proportional to the extent of the removal reaching a maximum after ablations of 65% or more of the caudate tissue. These cats were hyperactive but they had lost the feline elegance of movements. Additional features of acaudate cats were: (1) postural and accuracy deficits (plus perseveration) in paw usage tasks including bar pressing for food reward; (2) cognitive and perceptual impairments on a T-maze battery of tasks and on the bar pressing tasks; (3) blockage or blunting of the species-specific behavioral response to a single injection of morphine; Unilateral caudate nucleus removal did not produce global behavioral effects, but only deficit in the contralateral paw contact placing reaction and paw usage/bar pressing. Moreover and surprisingly, we found hypertrophy of the ipsilateral caudate nucleus following prenatal focal neocortical removal. The findings in human were also behavioral (not neurological) and also occurred with unilateral caudate damage. The main manifestations consisted of loss of drive (apathy), obsessive-compulsive behavior, cognitive deficits, stimulus-bound perseverative behavior, and hyperactivity. Based on all of the above data we propose that the specific function of the caudate nucleus is to control approach-attachment behavior, ranging from plain approach to a target, to romantic love. This putative function would account well for the caudate involvement in the

  20. Transverse momentum spectra in high-energy nucleus-nucleus, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Jie

    2011-01-01

    The transverse momentum distributions of final-state particles produced in nucleus-nucleus (AA),proton-nucleus (pA),and proton-proton (pp) collisions at high energies are investigated using a multisource ideal gas model.Our calculated results show that the contribution of hard emission can be neglected in the study of transverse momentum spectra of charged pions and kaons produced in Cu-Cu collisions at (√SNN)=22.5 GeV.And if we consider the contribution of hard emission,the transverse momentum spectra of p and (P) produced in Cu-Cu collisions at (√SNN)=22.5 GeV,KsO produced in Pb-Pb collisions at 158 A GeV,J/ψ particles produced in p-Pb collisions at 400 GeV and π+,K+,p produced in proton-proton collisions at (√S)=200 GeV,can be described by the model,especially in the tail part of spectra.

  1. The atomic orbitals of the topological atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador, Pedro; Mayer, István

    2013-06-07

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These correspond to atomic hybrids that closely resemble the core and valence shells of the atom. The occupation numbers of the remaining effective orbitals are almost negligible, except for atoms with hypervalent character. In addition, the molecular orbitals of a calculation can be exactly expressed as a linear combination of this orthonormalized set of numerical atomic orbitals, and the Mulliken population analysis carried out on this basis set exactly reproduces the original QTAIM atomic populations of the atoms. Approximate expansion of the molecular orbitals over a much reduced set of orthogonal atomic basis functions can also be accomplished to a very good accuracy with a singular value decomposition procedure.

  2. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  3. Single pion production in neutrino nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, E; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2013-01-01

    We study one pion production in both charged and neutral current neutrino nucleus scattering for neutrino energies below 2 GeV. We use a theoretical model for one pion production at the nucleon level that we correct for medium effects. The results are incorporated into a cascade program that apart from production also includes the pion final state interaction inside the nucleus. Besides, in some specific channels coherent pion production is also possible and we evaluate its contribution as well. Our results for total and differential cross sections are compared with recent data from the MiniBooNE Collaboration. The model provides an overall acceptable description of data, better for NC than for CC channels, although theory is systematically below data. Differential cross sections, folded with the full neutrino flux, show that most of the missing pions lie on the forward direction and at high energies.

  4. Protein quality control in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie V.; Poulsen, Esben Guldahl; Rebula, Caio A.

    2014-01-01

    to aggregate, cells have evolved several elaborate quality control systems to deal with these potentially toxic proteins. First, various molecular chaperones will seize the misfolded protein and either attempt to refold the protein or target it for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system...... to be particularly active in protein quality control. Thus, specific ubiquitin-protein ligases located in the nucleus, target not only misfolded nuclear proteins, but also various misfolded cytosolic proteins which are transported to the nucleus prior to their degradation. In comparison, much less is known about...... these mechanisms in mammalian cells. Here we highlight recent advances in our understanding of nuclear protein quality control, in particular regarding substrate recognition and proteasomal degradation....

  5. Coherency in Neutrino-Nucleus Elastic Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kerman, S; Deniz, M; Wong, H T; Chen, J -W; Li, H B; Lin, S T; Liu, C -P; Yue, Q

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering provides a unique laboratory to study the quantum mechanical coherency effects in electroweak interactions, towards which several experimental programs are being actively pursued. We report results of our quantitative studies on the transitions towards decoherency. A parameter ($\\alpha$) is identified to describe the degree of coherency, and its variations with incoming neutrino energy, detector threshold and target nucleus are studied. The ranges of $\\alpha$ which can be probed with realistic neutrino experiments are derived, indicating complementarity between projects with different sources and targets. Uncertainties in nuclear physics and in $\\alpha$ would constrain sensitivities in probing physics beyond the standard model. The maximum neutrino energies corresponding to $\\alpha$>0.95 are derived.

  6. Correlations in neutrino-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Van Cuyck, Tom; Jachowicz, Natalie; González-Jiménez, Raul; Martini, Marco; Ryckebusch, Jan; Van Dessel, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed study of charged-current quasielastic neutrino-nucleus scattering and of the influence of correlations on one- and two-nucleon knockout processes. The quasielastic neutrino-nucleus scattering cross sections, including the influence of long-range correlations, are evaluated within a continuum random phase approximation approach. The short-range correlation formalism is implemented in the impulse approximation by shifting the complexity induced by the correlations from the wave functions to the operators. The model is validated by confronting $(e,e^\\prime)$ cross-section predictions with electron scattering data in the kinematic region where the quasielastic channel is expected to dominate. Further, the $^{12}$C$(\

  7. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This report summarizes investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions and nucleon-nucleus charge-exchange reactions. The work was carried out with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the cyclotrons at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland, and at Indiana University (IUCF), as a collaborative effort among several laboratories and universities. The experimental activity at LAMPF involved measurements of new data on pion double-charge-exchange scattering, some initial work on a new Neutral Meson Spectrometer system, a search for deeply-bound pionic atoms, measurements of elastic scattering, and studies of the (n,p) reaction on various nuclei. At PSI measurements of pion quasielastic scattering were carried out, with detection of the recoil proton. Work on the analysis of data from a previous experiment at PSI on pion absorption in nuclei was continued. This experiment involved using a detector system that covered nearly the full solid angle.

  8. Theoretical highlights of neutrino-nucleus interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Ruso, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The recent theoretical developments in the field of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the few-GeV region are reviewed based on the presentations made at the NuInt09 Workshop. The topics of electron scattering and its connections with neutrino interactions, neutrino induced quasielastic scattering and pion production (coherent and incoherent) are covered, with special emphasis on the challenges that arise in the comparison with new experimental data.

  9. Neutrino-nucleus CCQE-like scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Nieves, J; Simo, I Ruiz; Sanchez, F; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2014-01-01

    RPA correlations, spectral function and 2p2h (multi-nucleon) effects on charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions without emitted pions are discussed. We pay attention to the influence of RPA and multi-nucleon mechanisms on the MiniBooNE and MINERvA flux folded differential cross sections, the MiniBooNE flux unfolded total cross section and the neutrino energy reconstruction.

  10. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  11. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, Gregory [Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States); Kulkarni, Gourihar [Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70°C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  12. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  13. Atomic phase diagram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shichun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-Cheng model, atomic phase diagram or electron density versus atomic radius diagram describing the interaction properties of atoms of different kinds in equilibrium state is developed. Atomic phase diagram is established based on the two-atoms model. Besides atomic radius, electron density and continuity condition for electron density on interfaces between atoms, the lever law of atomic phase diagram involving other physical parameters is taken into account, such as the binding energy, for the sake of simplicity.

  14. Beyond Schiff Moment: Atomic EDMs from Two-Photon Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Satoru; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Interpretation of atomic EDM searches requires careful consideration of the Schiff theorem, which states that a neutral system of non-relativistic point charges interacting only electrostatically has zero net EDM. Atomic EDMs arise from breakdowns in the assumptions to the Schiff theorem. Conventionally, the leading contributions to EDMs of diamagnetic atoms are thought to be nuclear Schiff moments, which arise due to finite sizes of nuclei. We revisit the argument to derive the Schiff moment contribution to atomic EDMs and find that atomic EDMs can be generated from non-electrostatic interactions, namely 2 successive electron-nucleus interactions involving transverse electric multipoles. We estimate that this contribution can be comparable to the Schiff moment effect.

  15. Intrinsic electric dipole moments of paramagnetic atoms: rubidium and cesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, H S; Sahoo, B K; Das, B P; Mukherjee, D

    2008-07-18

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) of paramagnetic atoms is sensitive to the intrinsic EDM contribution from that of its constituent electrons and a scalar-pseudoscalar (S-PS) electron-nucleus interaction. The electron EDM and the S-PS contributions to the EDMs of these atoms scale as approximately Z;{3}. Thus, the heavy paramagnetic atoms will exhibit large EDM enhancement factors. However, the sizes of the couplings are so small that they are of interest of high precision atomic experiments. In this work we have computed the EDM enhancement factors of the ground states of Rb and Cs due to both the electron EDM and the S-PS EDM using the relativistic coupled-cluster theory. The importance of determining precise ab initio enhancement factors and experimental results of atomic EDMs in deducing a reliable limit on the electron EDM is emphasized.

  16. Cold Matter Assembled Atom-by-Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Manuel; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Anschuetz, Eric R; Krajenbrink, Alexandre; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-01-01

    The realization of large-scale fully controllable quantum systems is an exciting frontier in modern physical science. We use atom-by-atom assembly to implement a novel platform for the deterministic preparation of regular arrays of individually controlled cold atoms. In our approach, a measurement and feedback procedure eliminates the entropy associated with probabilistic trap occupation and results in defect-free arrays of over 50 atoms in less than 400 ms. The technique is based on fast, real-time control of 100 optical tweezers, which we use to arrange atoms in desired geometric patterns and to maintain these configurations by replacing lost atoms with surplus atoms from a reservoir. This bottom-up approach enables controlled engineering of scalable many-body systems for quantum information processing, quantum simulations, and precision measurements.

  17. Doughnut shape atom traps with arbitrary inclination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez y Masegosa, R.; Moya C, H.; Chavez C, S. [INAOE, A.P. 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Since the invention of magneto-optical trap (MOT), there have been several experimental and theoretical studies of the density distribution in these devices. To the best of our knowledge, only horizontal orbital traps have been observed, perpendicular to the coil axis. In this work we report the observation of distributions of trapped atoms in pure circular orbits without a nucleus whose orbital plane is tilted up to 90diam. with respect to the horizontal plane. We have used a stabilized time phase optical array in our experiments and conventional equipment used for MOT. (Author)

  18. Probing Hadron Structure in Proton-Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Zaslavsky, David

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the behavior of large atomic nuclei (heavy ions) in high-energy collisions has been the focus of a concerted research effort over the past 10-15 years, with a recent focus on transverse momentum-dependent (or "unintegrated") parton distributions and their high-energy behavior. With the advent of high-energy proton-nucleus collisions at RHIC and the LHC, we are able to experimentally test this behavior for the first time. In this dissertation, I examine two sample predictions of this high-energy behavior. First, I analyze the azimuthal angular correlation for Drell-Yan pair and associated hadron production. I show that the correlation is a sensitive probe of the underlying gluon distribution, and a proper prediction of the correlation at all angles requires a gluon distribution with physically realistic behavior at all momenta. I'll then describe a numerical calculation of the cross section for inclusive hadron production, incorporating all corrections up to next-to-leading order in the strong co...

  19. Strong interaction physics from hadronic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, C. J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    1997-08-01

    Hadronic atoms provide a unique laboratory for studying strong interactions and nuclear medium effects at zero kinetic energy. Previous results from analyses of strong-interaction data consisting of level shifts, widths and yields in π-, K -, p¯ and ∑ - atoms are reviewed. Recent results from fits to comprehensive sets of data in terms of density-dependent optical potentials that respect the low-density limit, where the interaction tends to the free hadron nucleon value, are discussed. The importance of using realistic nuclear density distributions is highlighted. The introduction of density dependence in most cases significantly improves the fit to the data and leads to some novel results. For K - atoms, a substantial attraction of order 200 MeV in nuclear matter is suggested, with interesting repercussions for K¯ condensation and the evolution of strangeness in high-density stars. For p¯ atoms it is found that a reasonable p-wave strength can be accommodated in the fitted optical potential, in agreement with the energy dependence observed for some low-energy p¯N reactions. For ∑ - atoms, the fitted potential becomes repulsive inside the nucleus, implying that Σ hyperons generally do not bind in nuclei in agreement with recent measurements. This repulsion significantly affects calculated masses of neutron stars.

  20. Jet tomography of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions at next-to-leading order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitev, Ivan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Ben - Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that jet observables are highly sensitive to the characteristics of the vacuum and the in-medium QCD parton showers and propose techniques that exploit this sensitivity to constrain the mechanism of quark and gluon energy loss in strongly-interacting plasmas. As a first example, we calculate the inclusive jet cross section in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions to {Omicron}({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}). Theoretical predictions for the medium-induced jet broadening and the suppression of the jet production rate due to cold and hot nuclear matter effects in Au+Au and Cu+Cu reactions at RHIC are presented.

  1. Electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions relating to space radiation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the papers within this report deal with electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions which are of concern in the space radiation program. In particular, the removal of one and two nucleons via both electromagnetic and strong interaction processes has been extensively investigated. The theory of relativistic Coulomb fission has also been developed. Several papers on quark models also appear. Finally, note that the theoretical methods developed in this work have been directly applied to the task of radiation protection of astronauts. This has been done by parameterizing the theoretical formalism in such a fashion that it can be used in cosmic ray transport codes.

  2. Azimuthal correlations of hadrons and fragments in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Two-particle (two-fragment) azimuthal correlation functions are studied by using a simple formula which describes uniformly azimuthal distributions of final-state charged particles and nuclear fragments.This formula is obtained in the framework of a multi-source thermal model (or multi-source ideal gas model).The calculated results are compared and found to be in agreement with the experimental data of charged hadrons and nuclear fragments in nucleus-nucleus collisions at intermediate and high energies.

  3. Transverse energy distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 200 GeV/nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baglin, C.; Baldisseri, A.; Bussiere, A.; Guillaud, J.P.; Kossakowski, R.; Liaud, P.; Staley, F. (Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, 74 - Annecy-le-Vieux (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules); Baldit, A.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Felgeyrolles, X.; Force, P.; Fredj, L.; Landaud, G.; Vazeille, F. (Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France)); Sonderegger, P. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Abreu, M.C.; Bordalo, P.; Ferreira, R.; Gago, J.M.; Lourenco, C.; Peralta, L.; Pimenta, M.; Ramos, S.; Silva, S.; Varela, J. (LIP, Lisbon (Portugal)); Gerschel, C.; Jouan, D.; Papillon, S.; Tarrago, X. (Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)); Bus; NA38 Collaboration

    1990-11-22

    The transverse energy E{sub T} distributions of nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the framework of a simple geometrical model. The distributions for inclusive production of J/{psi} and muon pairs in the mass continuum are analyzed. The shape of the E{sub T} distribution of the continuum agrees with the model. The previously observed decrease of the ratio (J/{psi})/continuum with increasing E{sub T} is due to the behavior of the J/{psi}. (orig.).

  4. Aspects of Coulomb dissociation and interference in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystrand, Joakim; Baltz, Anthony; Klein, Spencer R.

    2001-10-21

    Coherent vector meson production in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions is discussed. These interactions may occur for impact parameters much larger than the sum of the nuclear radii. Since the vector meson production is always localized to one of the nuclei, the system acts as a two-source interferometer in the transverse plane. By tagging the outgoing nuclei for Coulomb dissociation it is possible to obtain a measure of the impact parameter and thus the source separation in the interferometer. This is of particular interest since the life-time of the vector mesons are generally much shorter than the impact parameters of the collisions.

  5. Antiproton nucleus potentials from global fits to antiprotonic X-rays and radiochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2005-11-01

    We report on global fits of optical-model parameters to 90 data points for p¯ X-rays and 17 data points of radiochemical data put together. By doing separate fits to the two kinds of data it is possible to determine phenomenologically the radial region where the absorption of antiprotons takes place and to obtain neutron densities which represent the average behaviour over the periodic table. A finite-range attractive and absorptive p¯-nuclear isoscalar potential fits the data well. Self-consistent dynamical calculations within the RMF model demonstrate that the polarization of the nucleus by the atomic antiproton is negligible.

  6. Hydrogen atom wave function and eigen energy in the Rindler space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, De-Chang

    2016-10-01

    We study the hydrogen atom eigenstate energy and wave function in the Rindler space. The probability distribution is tilted because the electric field of the nucleus is no longer spherically symmetric. The hydrogen atom therefore cannot be treated exactly in the same way as what it is in an inertial frame. We also find that if the external force accelerates only the nucleus and then the nucleus accelerates its surrounding electrons through electromagnetic force, the electrons can tunnel through the local energy gap and split the hydrogen atom into an ion. This is similar to what one expects from the Stark effect. However, the critical acceleration is about 3 ×1022 m /s2. It is well beyond the gravitational acceleration on a regular star surface.

  7. Hydrogen atom wave function and eigen energy in the Rindler space

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, De-Chang

    2016-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom eigenstate energy and wave function in the Rindler space. The probability distribution is tilted because the electric field of the nucleus is no longer spherically symmetric. The hydrogen atom therefore cannot be treated exactly in the same way as what it is in an inertial frame. We also find that if the external force accelerates only the nucleus and then the nucleus accelerates its surrounding electrons through electromagnetic force, the electrons can tunnel through the local energy gap and split the hydrogen atom into an ion. This is similar to what one expects from the Stark effect. However, the critical acceleration is about $3\\times 10^{22} m/s^2$. It is well beyond the gravitational acceleration on a regular star surface.

  8. Recent results on (anti)nucleus and (anti)hyperon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN SPS energies

    CERN Document Server

    Melkumov, G L; Anticic, T; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, J; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Buncic, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gazdzicki, M; Genchev, V; Georgopoulos, G; Grebieszkow, K; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kikola, D; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kliemant, M; Kniege, S; Kolesnikov, V I; Kornas, E; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; Laszlo, A; Lacey, R; Van Leeuwen, M; Lvai, P; Litov, L; Lungwitz, B; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Mateev, M; Melkumov, G L; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczynski, S; Nicolic, V; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Petridis, A; Peryt, W; Pikna, M; Pluta, J; Prindle, D; Pühlhofer, F; Renfordt, R; Roland, C; Roland5, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Seyboth, P; Strabel, C; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpetery, I; Sziklai, J; Szuba, M; Szymanski, P; Trubnikov, V; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek11, A; Yoo, I K; Zimnyi, J; Wetzler, A

    2007-01-01

    The NA49 experiment has collected comprehensive data on particle production in nucleus-nucleus collisions over the whole SPS beam energies range, the critical energy domain where the expected phase transition to a deconfined phase is expected to occur. The latest results from Pb+Pb collisions between 20$A$ GeV and 158$A$ GeV on baryon stopping and light nuclei production as well as those for strange hyperons are presented. The measured data on $p$, $\\bar{p}$, $\\Lambda$, $\\bar{\\Lambda}$, $\\Xi^-$ and $\\bar{\\Xi}^+$ production were used to evaluate the rapidity distributions of net-baryons at SPS energies and to compare with the results from the AGS and the RHIC for central Pb+Pb (Au+Au) collisions. The dependence of the yield ratios and the inverse slope parameter of the $m_t$ spectra on the collision energy and centrality, and the mass number of the produced nuclei $^3He$, $t$, $d$ and $\\bar{d}$ are discussed within coalescence and statistical approaches. Analysis of the total multiplicity exhibits remarkable a...

  9. A thalamic input to the nucleus accumbens mediates opiate dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingjie; Wienecke, Carl F R; Nachtrab, Gregory; Chen, Xiaoke

    2016-02-11

    Chronic opiate use induces opiate dependence, which is characterized by extremely unpleasant physical and emotional feelings after drug use is terminated. Both the rewarding effects of a drug and the desire to avoid withdrawal symptoms motivate continued drug use, and the nucleus accumbens is important for orchestrating both processes. While multiple inputs to the nucleus accumbens regulate reward, little is known about the nucleus accumbens circuitry underlying withdrawal. Here we identify the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus as a prominent input to the nucleus accumbens mediating the expression of opiate-withdrawal-induced physical signs and aversive memory. Activity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus to nucleus accumbens pathway is necessary and sufficient to mediate behavioural aversion. Selectively silencing this pathway abolishes aversive symptoms in two different mouse models of opiate withdrawal. Chronic morphine exposure selectively potentiates excitatory transmission between the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus and D2-receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons via synaptic insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Notably, in vivo optogenetic depotentiation restores normal transmission at these synapses and robustly suppresses morphine withdrawal symptoms. This links morphine-evoked pathway- and cell-type-specific plasticity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus to nucleus accumbens circuit to opiate dependence, and suggests that reprogramming this circuit holds promise for treating opiate addiction.

  10. Atom Lithography with a Chromium Atomic Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; LI Tong-Bao

    2006-01-01

    @@ Direct write atom lithography is a new technique in which resonant light is used to pattern an atomic beam and the nanostructures are formed when the atoms deposit on the substrate. We design an experiment setup to fabricate chromium nanolines by depositing an atomic beam of 52 Cr through an off-resonant laser standing wave with the wavelength of 425.55 nm onto a silicon substrate. The resulting nanolines exhibit a period of 215 ± 3 nm with height of 1 nm.

  11. Experimental study of collective flow phenomena in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chkhaidze, L V; Kharkhelauri, L L

    2002-01-01

    The results of the experimental study of collective flow phenomena, such as the sideward and elliptic flow of nuclear matter, discovered during the last 10-15 years in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions are presented in this review. Sideward (often termed directed) and elliptic flows have been observed for protons, antiprotons, light nuclei, pions, kaons, and lambdas emitted in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 0.1-1.8 GeV/nucleon of LBL Bevalac and GSI/SIS by Plastic-Ball, Streamer Chamber, EOS-NPC, FOPI, LAND, TAPS, and KAOS collaborations; at 2-4 GeV/nucleon of Dubna JINR by SKM-200-GIBS, Propane Buble Chamber, and Emulsion Chamber collaborations; at 2-14 GeV/nucleon of BNL AGS, by the E877, E895, and E917 collaborations; and at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon of CERN SPS, by the WA98 and NA49 collaborations and more recently by the STAR at RHIC BNL. In the review, the results of the SKM-200-GIBS collaboration of JINR are presented and compared with the results of different experiments by Bevalac, GSI/SIS, BNL, and...

  12. Ventromedial arcuate nucleus communicates peripheral metabolic information to the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, C.-X.; Vliet, J. van der; Dai, J.; Yin, G.; Ru, L.; Buijs, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    The arcuate nucleus (ARC) is crucial for the maintenance of energy homeostasis as an integrator of long- and short-term hunger and satiety signals. The expression of receptors for metabolic hormones, such as insulin, leptin, and ghrelin, allows ARC to sense information from the periphery and signal

  13. Existence of a ground state for the confined hydrogen atom in non-relativistic QED

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amour, Laurent; Faupin, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    We consider a system of a hydrogen atom interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field. Instead of fixing the nucleus, we assume that the system is confined by its center of mass. This model is used in theoretical physics to explain the Lamb-Dicke effect. After a brief review of the literat......We consider a system of a hydrogen atom interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field. Instead of fixing the nucleus, we assume that the system is confined by its center of mass. This model is used in theoretical physics to explain the Lamb-Dicke effect. After a brief review...

  14. 5-hydroxytryptamine-mediated apnea caused by the habenular nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Weihong Lin; Jinghua Wang; Min Huang; Chunyong Wang; Mingxian Li; Shao Wang

    2011-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine contributes to the control of activities of the dilator muscle in the upper respiratory tract, and is derived from the raphe nuclei, in which the habenular nucleus exerts a sustained inhibitory effect. In the present study, respiratory motion curve of the genioglossus muscle and peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine changes were observed following L-glutamate stimulation of the habenular nucleus of adult Wistar rats. Results showed that the rats had apnea and decreased plasma 5-hydroxytryptamine content after the neurons in habenular nucleus were excited. Genioglossus muscle electromyogram amplitude and integral were significantly reduced. The genioglossus myoelectric activity and respiratory motion curve were similar to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, thus confirming that the habenular nucleus is the key nucleus involved in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and is the primary regulated center in the raphe nuclei. Stimulation of the habenular nucleus may suppress 5-hydroxytryptamine release and result in apnea, which is similar to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

  15. Caudal topographic nucleus isthmi and the rostral nontopographic nucleus isthmi in the turtle, Pseudemys scripta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno, M I; Ulinski, P S

    1987-07-15

    Isthmotectal projections in turtles were examined by making serial section reconstructions of axonal and dendritic arborizations that were anterogradely or retrogradely filled with HRP. Two prominent tectal-recipient isthmic nuclei--the caudal magnocellular nucleus isthmi (Imc) and the rostral magnocellular nucleus isthmi (Imr)--exhibited strikingly different patterns of organization. Imc cells have flattened, bipolar dendritic fields that cover a few percent of the area of the cell plate constituting the nucleus and they project topographically to the ipsilateral tectum without local axon branches. The topography was examined explicitly at the single-cell level by using cases with two injections at widely separated tectal loci. Each Imc axon terminates as a compact swarm of several thousand boutons placed mainly in the upper central gray and superficial gray layers. One Imc terminal spans less that 1% of the tectal surface. Imr cells, by contrast, have large, sparsely branched dendritic fields overlapped by local axon collaterals while distally, their axons nontopographically innervate not only the deeper layers of the ipsilateral tectum but also ipsilateral Imc. Imr receives a nontopographic tectal input that contrasts with the topographic tectal input to Imc. Previous work on nucleus isthmi emphasized the role of the contralateral isthmotectal projection (which originates from a third isthmic nucleus in turtles) in mediating binocular interactions in the tectum. The present results on the two different but overlapping ipsilateral tecto-isthmo-tectal circuits set up by Imc and Imr are discussed in the light of physiological evidence for selective attention effects and local-global interactions in the tectum.

  16. Superallowed Gamow-Teller decay of the doubly magic nucleus 100Sn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinke, C B; Böhmer, M; Boutachkov, P; Faestermann, T; Geissel, H; Gerl, J; Gernhäuser, R; Górska, M; Gottardo, A; Grawe, H; Grębosz, J L; Krücken, R; Kurz, N; Liu, Z; Maier, L; Nowacki, F; Pietri, S; Podolyák, Zs; Sieja, K; Steiger, K; Straub, K; Weick, H; Wollersheim, H-J; Woods, P J; Al-Dahan, N; Alkhomashi, N; Ataç, A; Blazhev, A; Braun, N F; Čeliković, I T; Davinson, T; Dillmann, I; Domingo-Pardo, C; Doornenbal, P C; de France, G; Farrelly, G F; Farinon, F; Goel, N; Habermann, T C; Hoischen, R; Janik, R; Karny, M; Kaşkaş, A; Kojouharov, I M; Kröll, Th; Litvinov, Y; Myalski, S; Nebel, F; Nishimura, S; Nociforo, C; Nyberg, J; Parikh, A R; Procházka, A; Regan, P H; Rigollet, C; Schaffner, H; Scheidenberger, C; Schwertel, S; Söderström, P-A; Steer, S J; Stolz, A; Strmeň, P

    2012-06-20

    The shell structure of atomic nuclei is associated with 'magic numbers' and originates in the nearly independent motion of neutrons and protons in a mean potential generated by all nucleons. During β(+)-decay, a proton transforms into a neutron in a previously not fully occupied orbital, emitting a positron-neutrino pair with either parallel or antiparallel spins, in a Gamow-Teller or Fermi transition, respectively. The transition probability, or strength, of a Gamow-Teller transition depends sensitively on the underlying shell structure and is usually distributed among many states in the neighbouring nucleus. Here we report measurements of the half-life and decay energy for the decay of (100)Sn, the heaviest doubly magic nucleus with equal numbers of protons and neutrons. In the β-decay of (100)Sn, a large fraction of the strength is observable because of the large decay energy. We determine the largest Gamow-Teller strength so far measured in allowed nuclear β-decay, establishing the 'superallowed' nature of this Gamow-Teller transition. The large strength and the low-energy states in the daughter nucleus, (100)In, are well reproduced by modern, large-scale shell model calculations.

  17. Radial sensitivity of kaonic atoms and strongly bound K¯ states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnea, N.; Friedman, E.

    2007-02-01

    The strength of the low-energy K--nucleus real potential has recently received renewed attention in view of experimental evidence for the possible existence of strongly bound K- states. Previous fits to kaonic atom data led to either “shallow” or “deep” potentials, where only the former are in agreement with chiral approaches but only the latter can produce strongly bound states. Here we explore the uncertainties of the K--nucleus optical potentials, obtained from fits to kaonic atom data, using the functional derivatives of the best-fit χ2 values with respect to the potential. We find that only the deep type of potential provides information that is applicable to the K- interaction in the nuclear interior.

  18. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  19. Atomic and molecular manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Work with individual atoms and molecules aims to demonstrate that miniaturized electronic, optical, magnetic, and mechanical devices can operate ultimately even at the level of a single atom or molecule. As such, atomic and molecular manipulation has played an emblematic role in the development of the field of nanoscience. New methods based on the use of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) have been developed to characterize and manipulate all the degrees of freedom of individual atoms and molecules with an unprecedented precision. In the meantime, new concepts have emerged to design molecules and substrates having specific optical, mechanical and electronic functions, thus opening the way to the fabrication of real nano-machines. Manipulation of individual atoms and molecules has also opened up completely new areas of research and knowledge, raising fundamental questions of "Optics at the atomic scale", "Mechanics at the atomic scale", Electronics at the atomic scale", "Quantum physics at the atomic sca...

  20. Nucleus properties of P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meech, Karen J.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Mueller, Beatrice E. A.; Dicksion, Matthew W.; Li, Heide R.

    1993-01-01

    Time series photometric measurements are presented of Comet P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 at a heliocentric distance of 5.886 AU when the comet possessed an extensive coma. The light curve shows a modulation caused by the rotation of the nucleus. The rotation period is considerably shorter than the 5 day period found by Whipple (1980), and we find substantial evidence that the nucleus may be in a complex spin state characterized by two periods 14.0 and 32.3 hr. Models of the rate at which the rotational light curve range decreases as a function of the amount of coma in the aperture have determined that the projected maximum to minimum axis ratio of the comet is 2.6 and that the product of the albedo times the rotationally averaged nucleus radius size is 9.54 +/- 0.3 sq km. Assuming a minimum geometric albedo of pR = 0.04, the maximum projected average nucleus radius is 15.44 +/-0.2 km, which is only 44 percent of the size estimated by Roemer (1966). However, using the albedo determined by Cruikshank & Brown (1983) of p = 0.13, the nucleus radius is only RN = 8.6 +/-0.l km. Because of the unknown nucleus orientation, these will be upper limits to the nucleus size. It appears that the nucleus of P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 is not the large nucleus that it has been believed to be for nearly 40 yr.

  1. Comment on mesic-atom Auger-rate calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, A.; Fried, Z.

    1983-07-01

    Auger rates for a mesic atom consisting of a lithium nucleus and two electrons are presented. It is shown that the results are sensitive to the screening of the initial and final state of the ejected electron by the spectator electron. These results are compared to transition rates one would obtain by following the procedure used by Burbridge and de Borde, which neglect screening of one electron by the others. Our results show a 40% reduction in transition rates.

  2. Interpretation of Hund's multiplicity rule for the carbon atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Kenta; Maezono, Ryo; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Yasuhara, Hiroshi; Towler, M D; Needs, R J

    2004-10-15

    Hund's multiplicity rule is investigated for the carbon atom using quantum Monte Carlo methods. Our calculations give an accurate account of electronic correlation and obey the virial theorem to high accuracy. This allows us to obtain accurate values for each of the energy terms and therefore to give a convincing explanation of the mechanism by which Hund's rule operates in carbon. We find that the energy gain in the triplet with respect to the singlet state is due to the greater electron-nucleus attraction in the higher spin state, in accordance with Hartree-Fock calculations and studies including correlation. The method used here can easily be extended to heavier atoms.

  3. Saturation Effect of Projectile Excitation in Ion-Atom Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukoyama, Takeshi; Lin, Chii-Dong

    Calculations of projectile K-shell electron excitation cross sections for He-like ions during ion-atom collisions have been performed in the distortion approximation by the use of Herman-Skillman wave functions. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data for several targets. The excitation cross sections deviate from the first-Born approximation and show the saturation effect as a function of target atomic number. This effect can be explained as the distortion of the projectile electronic states by the target nucleus.

  4. Experimental investigation of linear-chain structured nucleus in 14C

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaguchi, H; Hayakawa, S; Sakaguchi, Y; Abe, K; Nakao, T; Suhara, T; Iwasa, N; Kim, A; Kim, D H; Cha, S M; Kwag, M S; Lee, J H; Lee, E J; Chae, K Y; Wakabayashi, Y; Imai, N; Kitamura, N; Lee, P; Moon, J Y; Lee, K B; Akers, C; Jung, H S; Duy, N N; Khiem, L H; Lee, C S

    2016-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that a cluster of nucleons can be formed in the interior of an atomic nucleus, and such clusters may occupy molecular-like orbitals, showing characteristics similar to normal molecules consisting of atoms. Chemical molecules having a linear alignment are commonly seen in nature, such as carbon dioxide. A similar linear alignment of the nuclear clusters, referred to as linear-chain cluster state (LCCS), has been studied since the 1950s, however, up to now there is no clear experimental evidence demonstrating the existence of such a state. Recently, it was proposed that an excess of neutrons may offer just such a stabilizing mechanism, revitalizing interest in the nuclear LCCS, specifically with predictions for their emergence in neutron-rich carbon isotopes. Here we present the experimental observation of {\\alpha}-cluster states in the radioactive 14C nucleus. Using the 10Be+{\\alpha} resonant scattering method with a radioactive beam, we observed a series of levels which completely agre...

  5. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P. (eds.)

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  6. Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sherwood

    1997-12-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted by the Program Committee for presentation at the Workshop on Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples, held in Milpitas, California, January 16-18, 1989. Conveners are Sherwood Chang (NASA Ames Research Center) and Larry Nyquist (NASA Johnson Space Center). Program Committee members are Thomas Ahrens (ex-officio; California Institute of Technology), Lou Allamandola (NASA Ames Research Center), David Blake (NASA Ames Research Center), Donald Brownlee (University of Washington, Seattle), Theodore E. Bunch (NASA Ames Research Center), Humberto Campins (Planetary Science Institute), Jeff Cuzzi (NASA Ames Research Center), Eberhard Griin (Max-Plank-Institut fiir Kemphysik), Martha Hanner (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Alan Harris (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), John Kerrid-e (University of Califomia, Los Angeles), Yves Langevin (University of Paris), Gerhard Schwehm (ESTEC), and Paul Weissman (Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Logistics and administrative support for the workshop were provided by the Lunar and Planetary Institute Projects Office.

  7. Presenting the Bohr Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haendler, Blanca L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching the Bohr atom at both freshman and advanced levels. Focuses on the development of Bohr's ideas, derivation of the energies of the stationary states, and the Bohr atom in the chemistry curriculum. (SK)

  8. Atomic Storage States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪凯戈; 朱诗尧

    2002-01-01

    We present a complete description of atomic storage states which may appear in the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The result shows that the spatial coherence has been included in the atomic collective operators and the atomic storage states. In some limits, a set of multimode atomic storage states has been established in correspondence with the multimode Fock states of the electromagnetic field. This gives a better understanding of the fact that, in BIT, the optical coherent information can be preserved and recovered.

  9. Atoms Talking to SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, J E; Kim, Z; Wood, A K; Anderson, J R; Dragt, A J; Hafezi, M; Lobb, C J; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L; Taylor, J M; Vlahacos, C P; Wellstood, F C

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to couple trapped $^{87}$Rb atoms to a superconducting flux qubit through a magnetic dipole transition. We plan to trap atoms on the evanescent wave outside an ultrathin fiber to bring the atoms to less than 10 $\\mu$m above the surface of the superconductor. This hybrid setup lends itself to probing sources of decoherence in superconducting qubits. Our current plan has the intermediate goal of coupling the atoms to a superconducting LC resonator.

  10. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individ...

  11. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, A.; Niegemann, J.; Ma, P.; Haffner, C; Pedersen, A.; Luisier, M.; Hafner, C.; Schimmel, T.; Leuthold, J.

    2016-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore’s law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocat...

  12. Heavy flavors in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardi Marzia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step setup for heavy-flavor studies in high-energy nucleus-nucleus (AA collisions — addressing within a comprehensive framework the initial QQ¯$Q\\overline Q $ production, the propagation in the hot medium until decoupling and the final hadronization and decays — is presented. The propagation of the heavy quarks in the medium is described in a framework provided by the relativistic Langevin equation and the corresponding numerical results are compared to experimental data from RHIC and the LHC. In particular, outcomes for the nuclear modification factor RAA and for the elliptic flow υ2 of D/B mesons, heavy-flavor electrons and non-prompt J/ψ’s are displayed.

  13. CASTOR: Centauro and strange object research in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelis, A.L.S.; Bartke, J.; Bogolyubsky, M.Yu.; Gadysz-Dziadus, E.; Kharlov, Yu.V.; Kurepin, A.B.; Maevskaya, A.I.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Sadovsky, S.A.; Stefanski, P.; Wodarczyk, Z

    2001-04-01

    We present a phenomenological model which describes the formation of a Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation region in nucleus-nucleus interactions in the upper atmosphere and at the LHC, and its decay to non-strange baryons and Strangelets. Strangelets are assimilated to the 'strongly penetrating component' frequently observed accompanying hadron-rich cosmic ray events. We describe the CASTOR subdetector for the ALICE experiment at the LHC. CASTOR will probe, in an event-by-event mode, the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6 {<=} {eta} {<=} 7.2 in 5.5 x A TeV central Pb + Pb collisions. It will look for events with pronounced imbalance between hadronic and photonic content and for deeply penetrating objects. We present results of simulations for the response of the CASTOR calorimeter to the passage of Strangelets.

  14. CASTOR Centauro and Strange Object Research in nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bartke, Jerzy; Chileev, K; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Golubeva, M B; Guber, F F; Karavitcheva, T L; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Tiflov, V V; Wlodarczyk, Z

    2002-01-01

    We describe the CASTOR detector designed to probe the very forward, baryon-rich rapidity region in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC. We present a phenomenological model describing the formation of a QGP fireball in a high baryochemical potential environment, and its subsequent decay into baryons and strangelets. The model explains Centauros and the long-penetrating component and makes predictions for the LHC. Simulations of Centauro-type events were done. To study the response of the apparatus to new effects different exotic species (DCC, Centauros, strangelets etc.) were passed through the deep calorimeter. The energy deposition pattern in the calorimeter appears to be a new clear signature of the QGP.

  15. CASTOR Centauro And STrange Object Research in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wiodarczyk, Z

    2001-01-01

    We present a phenomenological model which describes the formation of a Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation region in nucleus-nucleus interactions in the upper atmosphere and at the LHC, and its decay to non-strange baryons and Strangelets. Strangelets are assimilated to the "strongly penetrating component" frequently observed accompanying hadron-rich cosmic ray events. We describe the CASTOR subdetector for the ALICE experiment at the LHC. CASTOR will probe, in an event-by-event mode, the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6< eta <7.2 in 5.5*A TeV central Pb+Pb collisions. It will look for events with pronounced imbalance between hadronic and photonic content and for deeply penetrating objects. We present results of simulations for the response of the CASTOR calorimeter to the passage of Strangelets. (15 refs).

  16. Study of Strange and Multistrange Particles in Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Vande vyvre, P; Feofilov, G; Snoeys, W; Hetland, K F; Campbell, M; Klempt, W

    2002-01-01

    % NA57\\\\ \\\\ The goal of the experiment is to study the production of strange and multi-strange particles in nucleus-nucleus collisions. This study was initiated at the OMEGA spectrometer, where three ion experiments have been performed: WA85 (S-W and p-W collisions at 200 A GeV/c), WA94 (S-S and p-S collisions at 200 A GeV/c) and WA97 (Pb-Pb, p-Pb and p-Be collisions at 160 A GeV/c).\\\\ \\\\ The experiment aims at extending the scope of WA97 by:\\\\ \\\\ - investigating the beam energy dependence of the enhancements of multi-strange particle production reported by the previous experiments, and by\\\\ \\\\\\\\ \\\\- measuring the yields of strange and multi-strange particles over an extended centrality range compared with the previous experiments.\\\\ \\\\ The apparatus consists mainly of silicon pixel detector planes.

  17. Experimental and phenomenological investigations of QCD matter in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronic, Anton

    2014-07-15

    This thesis is heterogeneous, comprising experimental papers at low energies (SIS-18 at GSI) and at the LHC, papers on phenomenology of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions, and papers on detectors. The overview covers the experimental papers and those on phenomenology. I have chosen to write it in a general manner, intended to be accessible to non-experts. It emphasizes recent measurements and their understanding at the LHC. The detector papers, which address many principle aspects of gaseous detectors, are summarized and placed in context in the review I co-wrote and which closes the stack. The detector papers included here are the outcome of an R and D program for the Transition Radiation Detector of ALICE.

  18. Jet energy loss and bulk parton collectivity in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Huan-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    Nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC produce high temperature and high energy density matter which exhibits paxtonic degrees of freedom. We will discuss measurements of nuclear modification factors for light hadrons and non-photonic electrons from heavy quark decays, which reflect the flavor dependence of energy loss of high momentum partons traversing the dense QCD medium. The dense QCD medium responds to energy loss of high momentum patrons in a pattern consistent with that expected from a hydrodynamic fluid. The hadronization of bulk partonic matter exhibits collectivity with effective partonic degrees of freedom. Nuclear collisions at RHIC provide an intriguing environment, where many constituent quark ingredients are readily available for possible formation of exotic particles through quark coalescence or recombinations.

  19. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  20. Challenges in the description of the atomic nucleus: Unification and interdisciplinarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortignon, P. F.; Broglia, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear physics, in general, and theoretical nuclear physics, in particular, have provided the physics community at large, among other things, with the paradigm of spontaneous symmetry breaking phenomena in finite many-body systems. The study of the associated mechanisms of symmetry restoration has shed light on the microscopic structure of the corresponding condensates, in particular on the superfluid phase, allowing to study Cooper pair tunnelling into superfluid nuclei (related to the Josephson effect), in terms of individual quantum states and reaching, in doing so, a new milestone: that of unifying structure and reactions, these last processes being found at the basis of the formulation of quantum mechanics (probability interpretation, Born). In the process, nuclear physicists have extended the validity of BCS theory of superconductivity to the single Cooper pair situation, let alone discovering unexpected mechanism to break gauge invariance. The insight obtained from pair transfer research is likely to have important consequences in the study of double charge exchange processes, and thus in the determination of the nuclear matrix element associated with neutrinoless double beta decay, eventually providing an important test of the Standard Model. Time, thus, seems ripe for nuclear theorists to take centre stage, backed by a wealth of experimental information and by their interdisciplinary capacity to connect basic physical concepts across the borders. With the help of these elements they can aim at fully revealing the many facets of their femtometer many-body system, from vacuum zero point fluctuations to new exotic modes of nuclear excitations and of their interweaving, resulting in powerful effective field theories. Unless. Unless they are not able to free themselves from words like ab initio or fundamental, and to adapt a relax attitude concerning Skyrme, tensor, etc., forces, as well as regarding the quest for "the" Hamiltonian.

  1. Challenges in the description of the atomic nucleus: Unification and interdisciplinarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortignon, P.F. [University of Milan, Department of Physics, Milan (Italy); INFN, Milan (Italy); Broglia, R.A. [University of Milan, Department of Physics, Milan (Italy); University of Copenhagen, The Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-03-15

    Nuclear physics, in general, and theoretical nuclear physics, in particular, have provided the physics community at large, among other things, with the paradigm of spontaneous symmetry breaking phenomena in finite many-body systems. The study of the associated mechanisms of symmetry restoration has shed light on the microscopic structure of the corresponding condensates, in particular on the superfluid phase, allowing to study Cooper pair tunnelling into superfluid nuclei (related to the Josephson effect), in terms of individual quantum states and reaching, in doing so, a new milestone: that of unifying structure and reactions, these last processes being found at the basis of the formulation of quantum mechanics (probability interpretation, Born). In the process, nuclear physicists have extended the validity of BCS theory of superconductivity to the single Cooper pair situation, let alone discovering unexpected mechanism to break gauge invariance. The insight obtained from pair transfer research is likely to have important consequences in the study of double charge exchange processes, and thus in the determination of the nuclear matrix element associated with neutrinoless double beta decay, eventually providing an important test of the Standard Model. Time, thus, seems ripe for nuclear theorists to take centre stage, backed by a wealth of experimental information and by their interdisciplinary capacity to connect basic physical concepts across the borders. With the help of these elements they can aim at fully revealing the many facets of their femtometer many-body system, from vacuum zero point fluctuations to new exotic modes of nuclear excitations and of their interweaving, resulting in powerful effective field theories. Unless. Unless they are not able to free themselves from words like ab initio or fundamental, and to adapt a relax attitude concerning Skyrme, tensor, etc., forces, as well as regarding the quest for ''the'' Hamiltonian. (orig.)

  2. 64 International conference "NUCLEUS-2014" Fundamental problems of nuclear physics, atomic power engineering and nuclear technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasnikov, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Тезисы 64 международной конференции «ЯДРО-2014» (Фундаментальные проблемы ядерной физики, атомной энергетики и ядерных технологий), БГУ, Минск, 1 – 4 июля 2014 года. The scientific program of the conference covers almost all problems in nuclear physics and its applications such as: neutron-rich nuclei, nuclei far from stability valley, giant resonances, many-phonon and many-quasiparticle states in nuclei, high-spin and super-deformed states in nuclei, synthesis of super-heavy elements, ...

  3. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  4. A Frame Nucleus on a Two-side Prequantale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUShao-xian; WANGShun-qin; MAFei-fei

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a Frame nucleus and prime elements in a Prequantale are defined. The concrete structure of a Frame prequantic quotient is considered, and the relation between the half-prime element and the Frame nucleus in a two-side Prequantale are obtained.

  5. The subthalamic nucleus : Part I: Development, cytology, topography and connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marani, Enrico; Heida, Tjitske; Lakke, Egbert A.J.F.; Usunoff, Kamen G.

    2008-01-01

    This monograph on the subthalamic nucleus accentuates in Part I the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections. The light and electron microscopical cytology concerns the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types p

  6. Inversion symmetry breaking of atomic bound states in strong and short laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Stooß, Veit; Ott, Christian; Blättermann, Alexander; Ding, Thomas; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In any atomic species, the spherically symmetric potential originating from the charged nucleus results in fundamental symmetry properties governing the structure of atomic states and transition rules between them. If atoms are exposed to external electric fields, these properties are modified giving rise to energy shifts such as the AC Stark-effect in varying fields and, contrary to this in a constant (DC) electric field for high enough field strengths, the breaking of the atomic symmetry which causes fundamental changes in the atom's properties. This has already been observed for atomic Rydberg states with high principal quantum numbers. Here, we report on the observation of symmetry breaking effects in Helium atoms for states with principal quantum number n=2 utilizing strong visible laser fields. These findings were enabled by temporally resolving the dynamics better than the sub-optical cycle of the applied laser field, utilizing the method of attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (ATAS). We ident...

  7. Hyperfine splitting in non-relativistic QED: uniqueness of the dressed hydrogen atom ground state

    CERN Document Server

    Amour, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    We consider a free hydrogen atom composed of a spin-1/2 nucleus and a spin-1/2 electron in the standard model of non-relativistic QED. We study the Pauli-Fierz Hamiltonian associated with this system at a fixed total momentum. For small enough values of the fine-structure constant, we prove that the ground state is unique. This result reflects the hyperfine structure of the hydrogen atom ground state.

  8. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    CERN Document Server

    Emboras, Alexandros; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or at most - a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ration of 10 dB and operation at room temperature with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of a CMOS compatible, integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the single-atom level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully i...

  9. Glycine immunoreactivity of multipolar neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus which project to the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, J R; Ross, A T; Gillespie, M B; Ryugo, D K

    1999-06-14

    Certain distinct populations of neurons in the dorsal cochlear nucleus are inhibited by a neural source that is responsive to a wide range of acoustic frequencies. In this study, we examined the glycine immunoreactivity of two types of ventral cochlear nucleus neurons (planar and radiate) in the rat which project to the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and thus, might be responsible for this inhibition. Previously, we proposed that planar neurons provided a tonotopic and narrowly tuned input to the DCN, whereas radiate neurons provided a broadly tuned input and thus, were strong candidates as the source of broadband inhibition (Doucet and Ryugo [1997] J. Comp. Neurol. 385:245-264). We tested this idea by combining retrograde labeling and glycine immunohistochemical protocols. Planar and radiate neurons were first retrogradely labeled by injecting biotinylated dextran amine into a restricted region of the dorsal cochlear nucleus. The labeled cells were visualized using streptavidin conjugated to indocarbocyanine (Cy3), a fluorescent marker. Sections that contained planar or radiate neurons were then processed for glycine immunocytochemistry using diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. Immunostaining of planar neurons was light, comparable to that of excitatory neurons (pyramidal neurons in the DCN), whereas immunostaining of radiate neurons was dark, comparable to that of glycinergic neurons (cartwheel cells in the dorsal cochlear nucleus and principal cells in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radiate neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus subserve the wideband inhibition observed in the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

  10. Uniaxial compressive stress induced nuclear quadrupole interaction at the {sup 111}Cd nucleus in n-doped silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessema, Genene [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) and Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen und Kernphysik, Nussalle 14-16, 53115 Bonn (Germany)]. E-mail: genene@gmx.net

    2006-03-01

    Stress induced quadrupole interaction at the probe nucleus ({sup 111}Cd) in silicon has been studied using the perturbed {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlation (PAC) method. The extra nuclear field, at the sites of the nuclei, is produced via the disturbances of the surrounding charges by the action of a uniaxial compressive stress on the samples. However, the probes situated at various lattice locations in the sample showed different responses for the same value of stress. The various lattice environments are mainly caused by the involvement of either tellurium or antimony donor atoms in the samples. As a result, the donor free substitutional probe atoms experience a finite nuclear quadrupole interaction due to the broken symmetry of the charge distribution upon uniaxial compression; those probe atoms, which form pairs with donors, exhibit a strong electric-field gradient (EFG) that appears to be pressure independent.

  11. Inside a plant nucleus: discovering the proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovská, Beáta; Šebela, Marek; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear proteins are a vital component of eukaryotic cell nuclei and have a profound effect on the way in which genetic information is stored, expressed, replicated, repaired, and transmitted to daughter cells and progeny. Because of the plethora of functions, nuclear proteins represent the most abundant components of cell nuclei in all eukaryotes. However, while the plant genome is well understood at the DNA level, information on plant nuclear proteins remains scarce, perhaps with the exception of histones and a few other proteins. This lack of knowledge hampers efforts to understand how the plant genome is organized in the nucleus and how it functions. This review focuses on the current state of the art of the analysis of the plant nuclear proteome. Previous proteome studies have generally been designed to search for proteins involved in plant response to various forms of stress or to identify rather a modest number of proteins. Thus, there is a need for more comprehensive and systematic studies of proteins in the nuclei obtained at individual phases of the cell cycle, or isolated from various tissue types and stages of cell and tissue differentiation. All this in combination with protein structure, predicted function, and physical localization in 3D nuclear space could provide much needed progress in our understanding of the plant nuclear proteome and its role in plant genome organization and function.

  12. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, John H.; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St. John, Peter C.; Wang, Thomas J.; Bales, Benjamin B.; Doyle, Francis J.; Herzog, Erik D.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2016-04-04

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure.

  13. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, John H; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St John, Peter C; Wang, Thomas J; Bales, Benjamin B; Doyle, Francis J; Herzog, Erik D; Petzold, Linda R

    2016-04-19

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure.

  14. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nucleus $^{286}$Fl

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, Dorin N

    2016-01-01

    The decimal logarithm of spontaneous fission half-life of the superheavy nucleus $^{286}$Fl experimentally determined is $\\log_{10} T_f^{exp} (s) = -0.632$. We present a method to calculate the half-life based on the cranking inertia and the deformation energy, functions of two independent surface coordinates, using the best asymmetric two center shell model. In the first stage we study the statics. At a given mass asymmetry up to about $\\eta=0.5$ the potential barrier has a two hump shape, but for larger $\\eta$ it has only one hump. The touching point deformation energy versus mass asymmetry shows the three minima, produced by shell effects, corresponding to three decay modes: spontaneous fission, cluster decay and $\\alpha$~decay. The least action trajectory is determined in the plane $(R,\\eta)$ where $R$ is the separation distance of the fission fragments and $\\eta$ is the mass asymmetry. We may find a sequence of several trajectories one of which gives the least action. The parametrization with two deforma...

  15. Observation of the antimatter helium-4 nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang; in both cases, matter and antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying antimatter. The antimatter helium-4 nucleus (4He), also known as the anti-α (α), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the α-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level. Antimatter nuclei with B Collider (RHIC; ref. 6) in 10(9) recorded gold-on-gold (Au+Au) collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 200 GeV and 62 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair. The yield is consistent with expectations from thermodynamic and coalescent nucleosynthesis models, providing an indication of the production rate of even heavier antimatter nuclei and a benchmark for possible future observations of 4He in cosmic radiation.

  16. Schiff theorem and the electric dipole moments of hydrogen-like atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, C. -P.; Haxton, W. C.; Ramsey-Musolf, M. J.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; Dieperink, A. E. L.; Barnes, PD; Cooper, MD; Eisenstein, RA; VanHecke, H; Stephenson, GJ

    2006-01-01

    The Schiff theorem is revisited in this work and the residual P- and T-odd electron-nucleus interaction, after the shielding takes effect, is completely specified. An application is made to the electric dipole moments of hydrogen-like atoms, whose qualitative features and systematics have important

  17. Long range intermolecular forces in triatomic systems: connecting the atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The long-range forces that act between three atoms are analysed in both atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations. Expressions for atom-diatom dispersion coefficients are obtained in terms of 3-body nonadditive coefficients. The anisotropy of atom-diatom C_6 dispersion coefficients arises primarily from nonadditive triple-dipole and quadruple-dipole forces, while pairwise-additive forces and nonadditive triple-dipole and dipole-dipole-quadrupole forces contribute significantly to atom-di...

  18. Development of the human dorsal nucleus of the vagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gang; Zhu, Hua; Zhou, Xiangtian; Qu, Jia; Ashwell, K W S; Paxinos, G

    2008-01-01

    The dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve plays an integral part in the control of visceral function. The aim of the present study was to correlate structural and chemical changes in the developing nucleus with available data concerning functional maturation of human viscera and reflexes. The fetal development (ages 9 to 26 weeks) of the human dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve has been examined with the aid of Nissl staining and immunocytochemistry for calbindin and tyrosine hydroxylase. By 13 weeks, the dorsal vagal nucleus emerges as a distinct structure with at least two subnuclei visible in Nissl stained preparations. By 15 weeks, three subnuclei (dorsal intermediate, centrointermediate and ventrointermediate) were clearly discernible at the open medulla level with caudal and caudointermediate subnuclei visible at the level of the area postrema. All subnuclei known to exist in the adult were visible by 21 weeks and cytoarchitectonic differentiation of the nucleus was largely completed by 25 weeks. The adult distribution pattern of calbindin and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons was also largely completed by 21 weeks, although morphological differentiation of labeled neurons continued until the last age examined (26 weeks). The structural development of the dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve appears to occur in parallel with functional maturation of the cardiovascular and gastric movements, which the nucleus controls.

  19. K- and p¯ deeply bound atomic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    1999-12-01

    The strongly absorptive optical potentials Vopt which have been deduced from the strong-interaction level shifts and widths in X-ray spectra of K- and p¯ atoms produce effective repulsion leading to substantial suppression of the atomic wave functions within the nucleus. The width of atomic levels then saturates as function of the strength of Im Vopt. We find that `deeply bound' atomic states, which are inaccessible in the atomic cascade process, are generally narrow, due to this mechanism, over the entire periodic table and should be reasonably well resolved. These predictions are insensitive to Vopt, provided it was fitted to the observed X-ray spectra. In contrast, the nuclear states bound by Vopt are very broad and their spectrum depends sensitively on details of Vopt. We discuss production reactions for K- atomic states using slow K- mesons from the decay of the φ(1020) vector meson, and the ( p¯,p ) reaction for p¯ atomic states. Rough cross section estimates are given.

  20. Higher-order corrections to electron-nucleus bremsstrahlung cross sections above a few MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, A.; Martins, M. N.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that the first calculations of nuclear bremsstrahlung cross sections were performed for relativistic electrons more than 80 years ago by Sauter, Bethe and Heitler, and Racah, a fully satisfactory solution to this problem is still missing up to the present day. Numerical approaches are impractical for electrons with energies above a few MeV because they require a prohibitively large number of partial waves. Analytic formulae need to describe simultaneously and accurately the interaction with the Coulomb field of the nucleus and the screening effect of the atomic electrons. In the present paper, a state-of-the-art analytic calculation will be discussed. In particular, higher-order corrections to the interaction with the Coulomb field of the nucleus, a subject seldom tackled in the past, are included and compared extensively with published data. The emerged difficulties will be highlighted, but unfortunately they can be overcome only with future large coordinated theoretical and experimental efforts.

  1. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies. [New Mexico State Univ. , Las Cruces, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This report summarizes investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions and nucleon-nucleus charge-exchange reactions. The work was carried out with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the cyclotrons at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland, and at Indiana University (IUCF), as a collaborative effort among several laboratories and universities. The experimental activity at LAMPF involved measurements of new data on pion double-charge-exchange scattering, some initial work on a new Neutral Meson Spectrometer system, a search for deeply-bound pionic atoms, measurements of elastic scattering, and studies of the (n,p) reaction on various nuclei. At PSI measurements of pion quasielastic scattering were carried out, with detection of the recoil proton. Work on the analysis of data from a previous experiment at PSI on pion absorption in nuclei was continued. This experiment involved using a detector system that covered nearly the full solid angle.

  2. Quarkonium-nucleus bound states from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beane, S.  R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chang, E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Cohen, S.  D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Detmold, W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lin, H. -W. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Orginos, K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Parreño, A. [Univ., de Barcelona, Marti Franques (Spain); Savage, M.  J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-11

    Quarkonium-nucleus systems are composed of two interacting hadronic states without common valence quarks, which interact primarily through multi-gluon exchanges, realizing a color van der Waals force. We present lattice QCD calculations of the interactions of strange and charm quarkonia with light nuclei. Both the strangeonium-nucleus and charmonium-nucleus systems are found to be relatively deeply bound when the masses of the three light quarks are set equal to that of the physical strange quark. Extrapolation of these results to the physical light-quark masses suggests that the binding energy of charmonium to nuclear matter is B < 40 MeV.

  3. Nonthermal Fluctuations and Mechanics of the Active Cell Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, K; Byrd, H; MacKintosh, F C; Kilfoil, M L

    2013-01-01

    We present direct measurements of fluctuations in the nucleus of yeast cells. While prior work has shown these fluctuations to be active and non-thermal in character, their origin and time dependence are not understood. We show that nuclear fluctuations can be quantitatively understood by uncorrelated, active force fluctuations driving a nuclear medium that is dominated by an uncondensed DNA solution, for which we perform rheological measurements on an in vitro model system under similar conditions to what is expected in the nucleus. We conclude that the eukaryotic nucleus of living cells is a nonequilibrium soft material whose fluctuations are actively driven, and are far from thermal in their time dependence.

  4. Atomic homodyne detection of weak atomic transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Mevan; Elliott, D S

    2007-01-26

    We have developed a two-color, two-pathway coherent control technique to detect and measure weak optical transitions in atoms by coherently beating the transition amplitude for the weak transition with that of a much stronger transition. We demonstrate the technique in atomic cesium, exciting the 6s(2)S(1/2) --> 8s(2)S(1/2) transition via a strong two-photon transition and a weak controllable Stark-induced transition. We discuss the enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for this measurement technique over that of direct detection of the weak transition rate, and project future refinements that may further improve its sensitivity and application to the measurement of other weak atomic interactions.

  5. The Software Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Javanainen, Juha

    2016-01-01

    By putting together an abstract view on quantum mechanics and a quantum-optics picture of the interactions of an atom with light, we develop a corresponding set of C++ classes that set up the numerical analysis of an atom with an arbitrary set of angular-momentum degenerate energy levels, arbitrary light fields, and an applied magnetic field. As an example, we develop and implement perturbation theory to compute the polarizability of an atom in an experimentally relevant situation.

  6. The Software Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanainen, Juha

    2017-03-01

    By putting together an abstract view on quantum mechanics and a quantum-optics picture of the interactions of an atom with light, we develop a corresponding set of C++ classes that set up the numerical analysis of an atom with an arbitrary set of angular-momentum degenerate energy levels, arbitrary light fields, and an applied magnetic field. As an example, we develop and implement perturbation theory to compute the polarizability of an atom in an experimentally relevant situation.

  7. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  8. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1995-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is promarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  9. Atomicity in Electronic Commerce,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    tremendous demand for the ability to electronically buy and sell goods over networks. Electronic commerce has inspired a large variety of work... commerce . It then briefly surveys some major types of electronic commerce pointing out flaws in atomicity. We pay special attention to the atomicity...problems of proposals for digital cash. The paper presents two examples of highly atomic electronic commerce systems: NetBill and Cryptographic Postage Indicia.

  10. Dephasing in an atom

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    When an atom in vacuum is near a surface of a dielectric the energy of a fluctuating electromagnetic field depends on a distance between them resulting, as known, in the force called van der Waals one. Besides this fluctuation phenomenon there is one associated with formation of a mean electric field which is equivalent to an order parameter. In this case atomic electrons are localized within atomic distances close to the atom and the total ground state energy is larger, compared to the bare ...

  11. Structural Description of Polyaromatic Nucleus in Residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Huicheng; Yan Yongjie; Sun Wanfu; Wang Jifeng

    2007-01-01

    The proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy(1H-NMR),the synchronous fluorescence spectrometry(SFS)and the rutheniam ions catalyzed oxidation(RICO)method wen used to determine the chemical structure of polyaromatic nucleus in Oman residue fractions.The results of1H-NMR analyses showed that the average numbers of aromatic rings in the aromatics,resins and asphaltenes units were 3.2,5.6 and 8.2.respectively.SFS was used to investigate the distribution of aromatic tings in residue fractions,the main distribution range of aromatic rings in aromatics,resins and asphaltenes were 3-4 rings,3-5 rings and more than 5 tings,respectively.The aromatic network in residue fractions was oxidized to produce numerous carboxylic acids.The types and content of benzenepolycarboxylic acids,such as phthalic acid,benzenetricarboxylic acids,benzenetetracarbOxylic acids,benzenepentacarboxylic acid and benzenehexacarboxylic acid disclosed the condensed types of aromatic nuclei in the core.The biphenyl fraction(BIPH),the cata-condensed fraction(CATA),the peri-condensed fraction(PERI)and the condensed index(BCI)were calculated based on the benzenepolycarboxylic acids formed.The results implied that there was less biphenyl type structures in all residue fractions.The aromatics fraction was almost composed of the cata-condensed type system,and the asphaltenes fraction was wholly composed of the peri-condensed type system,while in the resins fraction co-existed the two types,herein the peri-condensed type Was predominant over the cata-condensed type.Based on the analytical results obtained in the study,the components-aromatics,resins and asphaltenes-were given the likely structural models.

  12. Poroelasticity of cell nuclei revealed through atomic force microscopy characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fanan; Lan, Fei; Liu, Bin; Liu, Lianqing; Li, Guangyong

    2016-11-01

    With great potential in precision medical application, cell biomechanics is rising as a hot topic in biology. Cell nucleus, as the largest component within cell, not only contributes greatly to the cell's mechanical behavior, but also serves as the most vital component within cell. However, cell nucleus' mechanics is still far from unambiguous up to now. In this paper, we attempted to characterize and evaluate the mechanical property of isolated cell nuclei using Atomic Force Microscopy with a tipless probe. As indicated from typical indentation, changing loading rate and stress relaxation experiment results, cell nuclei showed significant dynamically mechanical property, i.e., time-dependent mechanics. Furthermore, through theoretical analysis, finite element simulation and stress relaxation experiment, the nature of nucleus' mechanics was better described by poroelasticity, rather than viscoelasticity. Therefore, the essence of nucleus' mechanics was clarified to be poroelastic through a sophisticated analysis. Finally, we estimated the poroelastic parameters for nuclei of two types of cells through a combination of experimental data and finite element simulation.

  13. Formation and identification of Centauro and Strangelets in nucleus- nucleus collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Filippov, S N; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wlodarczyk, Z

    1999-01-01

    We present a phenomenological model for the formation and decay of a cosmic ray Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation rapidity region in nucleus-nucleus interactions. Our model naturally incorporates the $9 possibility of strangelet formation, Strangelets being conjectured to be the "strongly penetrating component" observed in hadron-rich cosmic ray events. Based on this model we have performed Monte-Carlo simulations to study the $9 Centauro and strangelet dynamic and kinematic characteristics in central Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energies, as well as their identification by the detector system CASTOR. CASTOR is being developed for the ALICE heavy ion experiment at $9 the LHC and will probe the very forward pseudorapidity region 5.6

  14. Formation and identification of Centauro and strangelets in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelis, A.L.S.; Bartke, J.; Bogolyubsky, M.Yu.; Filippov, S.N.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Kharlov, Yu.V.; Kurepin, A.B.; Maevskaya, A.I.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Sadovsky, S.A.; Stefanski, P.; Wlodarczyk, Z

    1999-03-01

    We present a phenomenological model for the formation and decay of a cosmic ray Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation rapidity region in nucleus-nucleus interactions. Our model naturally incorporates the possibility of Strangelet formation, Strangelets being conjectured to be the 'strongly penetrating component' observed in hadron-rich cosmic ray events. Based on this model we have performed Monte-Carlo simulations to study the Centauro and Strangelet dynamic and kinematic characteristics in central Pb + Pb collisions at LHC energies, as well as their identification by the detector system CASTOR. CASTOR is being developed for the ALICE heavy ion experiment at the LHC and will probe the very forward pseudorapidity region 5.6 {<=} {eta} {<=} 7.2, characterized by very high baryon density. CASTOR is optimised to search for Centauro signatures and long penetrating objects. Simulations show that CASTOR is well able to distinguish events with abnormal values of E{sub em}/E{sub had} or N{sub {gamma}}/N{sub ch}. In addition simulations of the transition curves of Strangelets traversing the CASTOR calorimeter show long penetration and many-maxima structure such as observed in cosmic ray events.

  15. Quantitative analysis of the fusion cross sections using different microscopic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel, A.; Alharbi, T.

    2017-01-01

    The fusion cross sections for reactions involving medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems are investigated near and above the Coulomb barrier using the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. The microscopic nuclear interaction potential is computed by four methods, namely: the double-folding model based on a realistic density-dependent M3Y NN interaction with a finite-range exchange part, the Skyrme energy density functional in the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi approximation, the generalized Proximity potential, and the Akyüz-Winther interaction. The comparison between the calculated and the measured values of the fusion excitation functions indicates that the calculations of the DFM give quite satisfactory agreement with the experimental data, being much better than the other methods. New parameterized forms for the fusion barrier heights and positions are presented. Furthermore, the effects of deformation and orientation degrees of freedom on the distribution of the Coulomb barrier characteristics as well as the fusion cross sections are studied for the reactions 16 O + 70 Ge and 28 Si + 100 Mo. The calculated values of the total fusion cross sections are compared with coupled channel calculations using the code CCFULL and compared with the experimental data. Our results reveal that the inclusion of deformations and orientation degrees of freedom improves the comparison with the experimental data.

  16. Heavy-flavor dynamics in nucleus-nucleus collisions: from RHIC to LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Monteno, M; Beraudo, A; De Pace, A; Molinari, A; Nardi, M; Prino, F

    2011-01-01

    The stochastic dynamics of c and b quarks in the fireball created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC is studied employing a relativistic Langevin equation, based on a picture of multiple uncorrelated random collisions with the medium. Heavy-quark transport coefficients are evaluated within a pQCD approach, with a proper HTL resummation of medium effects for soft scatterings. The Langevin equation is embedded in a multi-step setup developed to study heavy-flavor observables in pp and AA collisions, starting from a NLO pQCD calculation of initial heavy-quark yields, complemented in the nuclear case by shadowing corrections, k_T-broadening and nuclear geometry effects. Then, only for AA collisions, the Langevin equation is solved numerically in a background medium described by relativistic hydrodynamics. Finally, the propagated heavy quarks are made hadronize and decay into electrons. Results for the nuclear modification factor R_AA of heavy-flavor hadrons and electrons from their semi-leptonic decays...

  17. Charm quarks as a probe of matter produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yasir

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Direct measurement of hadrons containing charm quark carries important information about the initial stage of the nucleus-nucleus collision at relativistic energies. The study of open charm in Pb-Pb collisions at SPS energies will be a powerful tool to investigate the production of heavy flavours and their interaction with the medium produced in such collisions. A feasibility study was initiated for the measurement of the D0 mesons (open charm by its two-body decay into pion and kaon in central Pb-Pb collision at SPS energies in NA61/SHINE experiment. To generate the physical input we used AMPT (A Multi Phase Transport Model event generator and employed GEANT4 application to describe particle transport through the NA61/SHINE experimental setup supplemented by a future vertex detector (VD that will allow for precise vertex reconstruction close to the primary interaction point. The results of the simulation shows that this measurement is feasible with a dedicated VD which allows the precise tracking close to the target.

  18. Statistical Model of the Early Stage of nucleus-nucleus collisions with exact strangeness conservation

    CERN Document Server

    Poberezhnyuk, R V; Gorenstein, M I

    2015-01-01

    The Statistical Model of the Early Stage, SMES, describes a transition between confined and deconfined phases of strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The model was formulated in the late 1990s for central Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS energies. It predicted several signals of the transition (onset of deconfinement) which were later observed by the NA49 experiment. The grand canonical ensemble was used to calculate entropy and strangeness production. This approximation is valid for reactions with mean multiplicities of particles carrying conserved charges being significantly larger than one. Recent results of NA61/SHINE on hadron production in inelastic p+p interactions suggest that the deconfinement may also take place in these reactions. However, in this case mean multiplicity of particles with non-zero strange charge is smaller than one. Thus for the modeling of p+p interactions the exact strangeness conservation has to be implemented in the SMES. This extension of the SMES ...

  19. Nuclear mean field and double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Khoa, Dao T; Loan, Doan Thi; Loc, Bui Minh

    2016-01-01

    Realistic density dependent CDM3Yn versions of the M3Y interaction have been used in an extended Hartree-Fock (HF) calculation of nuclear matter (NM), with the nucleon single-particle potential determined from the total NM energy based on the Hugenholtz-van Hove theorem that gives rise naturally to a rearrangement term (RT). Using the RT of the single-nucleon potential obtained exactly at different NM densities, the density- and energy dependence of the CDM3Yn interactions was modified to account properly for both the RT and observed energy dependence of the nucleon optical potential. Based on a local density approximation, the double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential has been extended to take into account consistently the rearrangement effect and energy dependence of the nuclear mean-field potential, using the modified CDM3Yn interactions. The extended double-folding model was applied to study the elastic $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C and $^{16}$O+$^{12}$C scattering at the refractive energies, wher...

  20. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Interaction with the Arcuate Nucleus; Essential for Organizing Physiological Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Ruiz, Mara

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is generally considered the master clock, independently driving all circadian rhythms. We recently demonstrated the SCN receives metabolic and cardiovascular feedback adeptly altering its neuronal activity. In the present study, we show that microcuts effectively removing SCN-arcuate nucleus (ARC) interconnectivity in Wistar rats result in a loss of rhythmicity in locomotor activity, corticosterone levels, and body temperature in constant dark (DD) conditions. Elimination of these reciprocal connections did not affect SCN clock gene rhythmicity but did cause the ARC to desynchronize. Moreover, unilateral SCN lesions with contralateral retrochiasmatic microcuts resulted in identical arrhythmicity, proving that for the expression of physiological rhythms this reciprocal SCN-ARC interaction is essential. The unaltered SCN c-Fos expression following glucose administration in disconnected animals as compared to a significant decrease in controls demonstrates the importance of the ARC as metabolic modulator of SCN neuronal activity. Together, these results indicate that the SCN is more than an autonomous clock, and forms an essential component of a larger network controlling homeostasis. The present novel findings illustrate how an imbalance between SCN and ARC communication through circadian disruption could be involved in the etiology of metabolic disorders. PMID:28374011

  1. The hydrogen atom confined by one and two hard cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsa, A.; Alcaraz-Pelegrina, J. M.; Le Sech, C.

    2017-02-01

    The bound states of the H atom in a semi-infinite space limited by one or two conical boundaries are studied. The exact solution when the nucleus is located at the apex of the conical boundaries is obtained. A rapid increase of the energy when the cone angle opens and tends to π / 2 is found. A second situation with the atom separated from the summit of the cone is considered. The changes on the energy and the electronic structure are analyzed. The quantum force is evaluated by calculating the energy derivative versus the distance to the cone vertex. One of the forces exerted on the tip of an Atomic Force Microscope can be modelized by a hard cone probing the electron cloud in the contact mode. Our numerical results show that the quantum force present an important dependence with the cone angle and it vanishes rapidly as the distance increases.

  2. Optical dipole trapping of radium atoms for EDM search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, W. L.; Sulai, I. A.; Parker, R. H.; Bailey, K.; Greene, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Korsch, W.; Lu, Z.-T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Singh, J.

    2010-03-01

    We are developing an EDM search based on laser-cooled and trapped Ra-225 (half-life = 15 d) atoms. Due to octupole deformation of the nucleus, Ra-225 is predicted to be 2-3 orders of magnitude more sensitive to T-violating interactions than Hg-199, which currently sets the most stringent limits in the nuclear sector. Recently, we have succeeded in transferring Ra-226 atoms from a MOT into an optical dipole trap formed by a fiber laser beam at 1550 nm. For the EDM measurement, the cold atoms will be moved into the neighboring vacuum chamber inside magnetic shields where a pair of electrodes apply a 10 kV cm-1electric field. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  3. Ionization of Atoms by Slow Heavy Particles, Including Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, B M; Flambaum, V V; Gribakin, G F

    2016-01-15

    Atoms and molecules can become ionized during the scattering of a slow, heavy particle off a bound electron. Such an interaction involving leptophilic weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) is a promising possible explanation for the anomalous 9σ annual modulation in the DAMA dark matter direct detection experiment [R. Bernabei et al., Eur. Phys. J. C 73, 2648 (2013)]. We demonstrate the applicability of the Born approximation for such an interaction by showing its equivalence to the semiclassical adiabatic treatment of atomic ionization by slow-moving WIMPs. Conventional wisdom has it that the ionization probability for such a process should be exponentially small. We show, however, that due to nonanalytic, cusplike behavior of Coulomb functions close to the nucleus this suppression is removed, leading to an effective atomic structure enhancement. We also show that electron relativistic effects actually give the dominant contribution to such a process, enhancing the differential cross section by up to 1000 times.

  4. Interpretation of Hund's multiplicity rule for the atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Kenta; Maezono, Ryo; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Towler, M. D.

    2005-03-01

    We have studied Hund's multiplicity rule for the carbon atom using quantum Monte Carlo methods[1]. Our calculations give a high-level description of electron correlation and satisfy the virial theorem to high accuracy. This allows us to obtain accurate and reliable values for each of the energy terms and therefore to give a convincing explanation of the mechanism by which Hund's rule operates in carbon. We obtain the following results: (1) the energy gain in the triplet with respect to the singlet state is due to the greater electron-nucleus attraction in the higher spin state, and (2) the electron-electron repulsion in the triplet is greater than that in the singlet, in accordance with Hartree-Fock results and studies including correlation. Although our main topic is the carbon atom, we would also like to show our current results of the nitrogen atom.[1]K. Hongo, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 121, 7144 (2004).

  5. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  6. Nucleus management in manual small incision cataract surgery by phacosection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleus management is critical in manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS, as the integrity of the tunnel, endothelium and posterior capsule needs to be respected. Several techniques of nucleus management are in vogue, depending upon the specific technique of MSICS. Nucleus can be removed in toto or bisected or trisected into smaller segments. The pressure in the eye can be maintained at the desired level with the use of an anterior chamber maintainer or kept at atmospheric levels. In MSICS, unlike phacoemulsification, there is no need to limit the size of the tunnel or restrain the size of capsulorrhexis. Large well-structured tunnels and larger capsulorrhexis provide better control on the surgical maneuvers. Safety and simplicity of MSICS has made it extremely popular. The purpose of this article is to describe nucleus management by phacosection in MSICS.

  7. Isotope Dependence of Superheavy Nucleus Formation Cross Section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zu-Hua; BAG Jing-Dong

    2006-01-01

    The dynamical process in the superheavy nucleus synthesis is studied on the basis of the two-dimensional Smolu-chowski equation. Special attention is paid to the isotope dependence of the cross section for the superheavy nucleus formation by means of making a comparison among the reaction systems of 54Fe + 204Pb, 56Fe + 206Pb, and 58Fe + 208Pb. It is found by this comparison that the formation cross section is very sensitive to the conditional saddle-point height and the neutron separation energy of the compound nucleus. Reaction systems with lower height of conditional saddle-point and smaller neutron separation energy are more favourable for the synthesis of the superheavy nucleus.

  8. Low-energy antinucleon-nucleus interaction revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    2015-08-01

    Annihilation cross sections of antiprotons and antineutrons on the proton between 50 and 400 MeV/c show Coulomb focusing below 200 MeV/c and almost no charge-dependence above 200 MeV/c. Similar comparisons for heavier targets are not possible for lack of overlap between nuclear targets studied with and beams. Interpolating between -nucleus annihilation cross sections with the help of an optical potential to compare with -nucleus annihilation cross sections reveal unexpected features of Coulomb interactions in the latter. Direct comparisons between -nucleus and -nucleus annihilations at very low energies could be possible if cross sections are measured on the same targets and at the same energies as the available cross sections for . Such measurements may be feasible in the foreseeable future.

  9. Harmonic oscillator model for the helium atom

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A harmonic oscillator model in four dimensions is presented for the helium atom to estimate the distance to the inner and outer electron from the nucleus, the angle between electrons and the energy levels. The method is algebraic and is not based on the choice of correct trial wave function. Three harmonic oscillators and thus three quantum numbers are sufficient to describe the two-electron system. We derive a simple formula for the energy in the general case and in the special case of the Wannier Ridge. For a set of quantum numbers the distance to the electrons and the angle between the electrons are uniquely determined as the intersection between three surfaces. We show that the excited states converge either towards ionization thresholds or towards extreme parallel or antiparallel states and provide an estimate of the ground state energy.

  10. Nuclear Excitations by Antiprotons and Antiprotonic Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The proposal aims at the investigation of nuclear excitations following the absorption and annihilation of stopped antiprotons in heavier nuclei and at the same time at the study of the properties of antiprotonic atoms. The experimental arrangement will consist of a scintillation counter telescope for the low momentum antiproton beam from LEAR, a beam degrader, a pion multiplicity counter, a monoisotopic target and Ge detectors for radiation and charged particles. The data are stored by an on-line computer.\\\\ \\\\ The Ge detectors register antiprotonic x-rays and nuclear @g-rays which are used to identify the residual nucleus and its excitation and spin state. Coincidences between the two detectors will indicate from which quantum state the antiprotons are absorbed and to which nuclear states the various reactions are leading. The measured pion multiplicity characterizes the annihilation process. Ge&hyphn. and Si-telescopes identify charged particles and determine their energies.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment will gi...

  11. Truncal ataxia from infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyun; Ryoo, Sookyung; Moon, So Young; Seo, Sand Won; Na, Duk L

    2012-08-01

    Truncal ataxia in medullary infarction may be caused by involvement of the lateral part of the medulla; however, truncal ataxia in infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) has received comparatively little attention. We report a patient with truncal ataxia due to medial medullary infarction located in the ION. A lesion in the ION could produce a contralateral truncal ataxia due to increased inhibitory input to the contralesional vestibular nucleus from the contralesional flocculus.

  12. The integrative role of the pedunculopontine nucleus in human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Brian; Welter, Marie-Laure; Belaid, Hayat; Fernandez Vidal, Sara; Bardinet, Eric; Grabli, David; Karachi, Carine

    2015-05-01

    The brainstem pedunculopontine nucleus has a likely, although unclear, role in gait control, and is a potential deep brain stimulation target for treating resistant gait disorders. These disorders are a major therapeutic challenge for the ageing population, especially in Parkinson's disease where gait and balance disorders can become resistant to both dopaminergic medication and subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Here, we present electrophysiological evidence that the pedunculopontine and subthalamic nuclei are involved in distinct aspects of gait using a locomotor imagery task in 14 patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing surgery for the implantation of pedunculopontine or subthalamic nuclei deep brain stimulation electrodes. We performed electrophysiological recordings in two phases, once during surgery, and again several days after surgery in a subset of patients. The majority of pedunculopontine nucleus neurons (57%) recorded intrasurgically exhibited changes in activity related to different task components, with 29% modulated during visual stimulation, 41% modulated during voluntary hand movement, and 49% modulated during imaginary gait. Pedunculopontine nucleus local field potentials recorded post-surgically were modulated in the beta and gamma bands during visual and motor events, and we observed alpha and beta band synchronization that was sustained for the duration of imaginary gait and spatially localized within the pedunculopontine nucleus. In contrast, significantly fewer subthalamic nucleus neurons (27%) recorded intrasurgically were modulated during the locomotor imagery, with most increasing or decreasing activity phasically during the hand movement that initiated or terminated imaginary gait. Our data support the hypothesis that the pedunculopontine nucleus influences gait control in manners extending beyond simply driving pattern generation. In contrast, the subthalamic nucleus seems to control movement execution that is not likely to be gait

  13. Shell Correction at the Saddle Point for Superheavy Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张炜; 张时声; 张双全; 孟杰

    2003-01-01

    The potential energy surface for superheavy nucleus has been studied within the framework of the constrained relativistic mean field theory, and the shell correction energy as a function of deformation has been extracted by the Strutinsky shell correction procedure. Contrary to the usual expectation, the shell correction energy at the saddle point is too important to be neglected, and it has essential contribution to the fission barrier in superheavy nucleus.

  14. Greek Atomic Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Duane H. D.

    1981-01-01

    Focusing on history of physics, which began about 600 B.C. with the Ionian Greeks and reaching full development within three centuries, suggests that the creation of the concept of the atom is understandable within the context of Greek physical theory; so is the rejection of the atomic theory by the Greek physicists. (Author/SK)

  15. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  16. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.

  17. When Atoms Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  18. A FIBER APPARATUS IN THE NUCLEUS OF THE YEAST CELL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinow, C. F.; Marak, J.

    1966-01-01

    The structure and mode of division of the nucleus of budding yeast cells have been studied by phase-contrast microscopy during life and by ordinary microscopy after Helly fixation. The components of the nucleus were differentially stained by the Feulgen procedure, with Giemsa solution after hydrolysis, and with iron alum haematoxylin. New information was obtained in cells fixed in Helly's by directly staining them with 0.005% acid fuchsin in 1% acetic acid in water. Electron micrographs have been made of sections of cells that were first fixed with 3% glutaraldehyde, then divested of their walls with snail juice, and postfixed with osmium tetroxide. Light and electron microscopy have given concordant information about the organization of the yeast nucleus. A peripheral segment of the nucleus is occupied by relatively dense matter (the "peripheral cluster" of Mundkur) which is Feulgen negative. The greater part of the nucleus is filled with fine-grained Feulgen-positive matter of low density in which chromosomes could not be identified. Chromosomes become visible in this region under the light microscope at meiosis. In the chromatin lies a short fiber with strong affinity for acid fuchsin. The nucleus divides by elongation and constriction, and during this process the fiber becomes long and thin. Electron microscopy has resolved it into a bundle of dark-edged 150 to 180 A filaments which extends between "centriolar plaques" that are attached to the nuclear envelope. PMID:5331666

  19. Maximally Atomic Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Brzozowski

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The atoms of a regular language are non-empty intersections of complemented and uncomplemented quotients of the language. Tight upper bounds on the number of atoms of a language and on the quotient complexities of atoms are known. We introduce a new class of regular languages, called the maximally atomic languages, consisting of all languages meeting these bounds. We prove the following result: If L is a regular language of quotient complexity n and G is the subgroup of permutations in the transition semigroup T of the minimal DFA of L, then L is maximally atomic if and only if G is transitive on k-subsets of 1,...,n for 0 <= k <= n and T contains a transformation of rank n-1.

  20. Coaxial airblast atomizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to quantify the characteristics of the sprays of coaxial injectors with particular emphasis on those aspects relevant to the performance of rocket engines. Measurements for coaxial air blast atomizers were obtained using air to represent the gaseous stream and water to represent the liquid stream. A wide range of flow conditions were examined for sprays with and without swirl for gaseous streams. The parameters varied include Weber number, gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, swirl, and nozzle geometry. Measurements were made with a phase Doppler velocimeter. Major conclusions of the study focused upon droplet size as a function of Weber number, effect of gas flow rate on atomization and spray spread, effect of nozzle geometry on atomization and spread, effect of swirl on atomization, spread, jet recirculation and breakup, and secondary atomization.

  1. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  2. Physics of atomic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    This advanced textbook presents an extensive and diverse study of low-energy nuclear physics considering the nucleus as a quantum system of strongly interacting constituents. The contents guide students from the basic facts and ideas to more modern topics including important developments over the last 20 years, resulting in a comprehensive collection of major modern-day nuclear models otherwise unavailable in the current literature. The book emphasizes the common features of the nucleus and other many-body mesoscopic systems currently in the center of interest in physics. The authors have also included full problem sets that can be selected by lecturers and adjusted to specific interests for more advanced students, with many chapters containing links to freely available computer code. As a result, readers are equipped for scientific work in mesoscopic physics.

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Nucleus/Shell TiO2/HAP Complex Nanophotocatalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongfei LIU; Xiaonong CHENG; Juan YANG; Xuehua YAN; Hebin SHI

    2007-01-01

    A rapid and more efficient method was developed to prepare nucleus/shell titania/hydroxyapatite (TiO2/HAP)complex nanophotocatalyst. Hydroxyapatite (5μm) which had been dissolved with 0.1 mol/L HCI was formed on the surface of the nanosized anatase titania powders by increasing the pH value of the solution at 90℃ in the water bath for only several hours .The microstructure and morphology of the resulting sample were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) and atomic force microscope (AFM). The results indicated that nucleus/shell structural TiO2/HAP was formed in our experiments, and the thickness of the coating layer was about 5 nm. Photocatalytic decomposition of methyl orange was utilized to test the photocatalysis of the resulting samples and the result was compared with that of pure anatase titania powders (about 20 nm). It was shown that the photocatalytic activity of the sample was not decreased due to the coating of HAP.

  4. Neutron resonances in the compound nucleus: Parity nonconservation to dynamic temperature measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, V.W.

    1997-08-01

    Experiments using epithermal neutrons that interact to form compound-nuclear resonances serve a wide range of scientific applications. Changes in transmission which are correlated to polarization reversal in incident neutrons have been used to study parity nonconservation in the compound nucleus for a wide range of targets. The ensemble of measured parity asymmetries provides statistical information for the extraction of the rms parity-violating mean-square matrix element as a function of mass. Parity nonconservation in neutron resonances can also be used to determine the polarization of neutron beams. Finally the motion of target atoms results in an observed temperature-dependent Doppler broadening of resonance line widths. This broadening can be used to determine temperatures on a fast time scale of one microsecond or less.

  5. High-spin States in Odd-odd 140Pr Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuHaiping; GuoYingxiang; ZhouXiaohong; ZhangYuhu; LeiXiangguo; LiuMinliang; LuoPeng; SongLitao; WangHualei; XieChengying; ZhengYong; GuoWentao; ZhuLihua; WuXiaoguang

    2003-01-01

    The high-spin level structures of doubly odd nucleus 140Pr have been investigated by means of the 130Te(14N,4n)140Pr reaction. The 14N beam was obtained from the HI-13 tandem accelerator of China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing. The target is an enriched 130Te metallic foil of 1.67mg/cm2 thickness with a 10.37mg/cm2 Pb backing. Measurements of γ-ray singles, γ-γ-t coincidences and γ-ray excitation function were performed with twelve BGO(AC)HPGe detectors. Based on detailed analysis of γ-γ coincidence relationships, γ-ray

  6. Atoms and Molecules Interacting with Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Straten, Peter; Metcalf, Harold

    2016-02-01

    Part I. Atom-Light Interaction: 1. The classical physics pathway; Appendix 1.A. Damping force on an accelerating charge; Appendix 1.B. Hanle effect; Appendix 1.C. Optical tweezers; 2. Interaction of two-level atoms and light; Appendix 2.A. Pauli matrices for motion of the bloch vector; Appendix 2.B. The Ramsey method; Appendix 2.C. Echoes and interferometry; Appendix 2.D. Adiabatic rapid passage; Appendix 2.E Superposition and entanglement; 3. The atom-light interaction; Appendix 3.A. Proof of the oscillator strength theorem; Appendix 3.B. Electromagnetic fields; Appendix 3.C. The dipole approximation; Appendix 3.D. Time resolved fluorescence from multi-level atoms; 4. 'Forbidden' transitions; Appendix 4.A. Higher order approximations; 5. Spontaneous emission; Appendix 5.A. The quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator; Appendix 5.B. Field quantization; Appendix 5.C. Alternative theories to QED; 6. The density matrix; Appendix 6.A. The Liouville-von Neumann equation; Part II. Internal Structure: 7. The hydrogen atom; Appendix 7.A. Center-of-mass motion; Appendix 7.B. Coordinate systems; Appendix 7.C. Commuting operators; Appendix 7.D. Matrix elements of the radial wavefunctions; 8. Fine structure; Appendix 8.A. The Sommerfeld fine-structure constant; Appendix 8.B. Measurements of the fine structure 9. Effects of the nucleus; Appendix 9.A. Interacting magnetic dipoles; Appendix 9.B. Hyperfine structure for two spin =2 particles; Appendix 9.C. The hydrogen maser; 10. The alkali-metal atoms; Appendix 10.A. Quantum defects for the alkalis; Appendix 10.B. Numerov method; 11. Atoms in magnetic fields; Appendix 11.A. The ground state of atomic hydrogen; Appendix 11.B. Positronium; Appendix 11.C. The non-crossing theorem; Appendix 11.D. Passage through an anticrossing: Landau-Zener transitions; 12. Atoms in electric fields; 13. Rydberg atoms; 14. The helium atom; Appendix 14.A. Variational calculations; Appendix 14.B. Detail on the variational calculations of the ground state

  7. Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic-production processes due to two-photon exchange in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Feynman diagrams for two-photon exchange are evaluated using quantum electrodynamics. The total cross section and stopping power for projectile and target nuclei of identical charge are found to be significant for heavy nuclei above a few GeV per nucleon-incident energy.

  8. Production of. pi. /sup 0/ and eta mesons in hadron-nucleus interactions at 10. 5 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimenko, S.A.; Bannikov, A.V.; Velousov, V.I.; Blik, A.M.; Kolosov, V.N.; Krumshtein, Z.V.; Kut' in, V.M.; Pavlinov, A.I.; Romanovskii, V.I.; Solov' ev, A.S.

    1983-11-01

    Cross sections have been measured for the inclusive production of ..pi../sup 0/ and eta mesons in interaction of the hadrons ..pi../sup +/, K/sup +/, and p with the nuclei H, C, Al, and Cu in the beam-fragmentation region x/sub F/> or approx. =0.6 at momentum 10.5 GeV/c. A decrease of the yield of eta mesons relative to ..pi../sup 0/ mesons is observed with increase of the atomic number of the nucleus in ..pi../sup +/A interactions.

  9. On the hyperfine structure of the triplet $n^{3}S-$states of the four-electron atoms and ions

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, Alexei M

    2016-01-01

    Hyperfine structures of the triplet $n^3S-$states in the four-electron Be-atom(s) and Be-like ions are considered. It is shown that to determine the hyperfine structure splitting in such atomic systems one needs to know the triplet electron density at the central atomic nucleus $\\rho_T(0)$. We have developed the procedure which allows allows one to determine the triplet electron density $\\rho_T(0)$ for arbitrary four-electron atoms and ions.

  10. The interfascicular trigeminal nucleus: a precerebellar nucleus in the mouse defined by retrograde neuronal tracing and genetic fate mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuhong; Tvrdik, Petr; Makki, Nadja; Machold, Robert; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2013-02-15

    We have found a previously unreported precerebellar nucleus located among the emerging fibers of the motor root of the trigeminal nerve in the mouse, which we have called the interfascicular trigeminal nucleus (IF5). This nucleus had previously been named the tensor tympani part of the motor trigeminal nucleus (5TT) in rodent brain atlases, because it was thought to be a subset of small motor neurons of the motor trigeminal nucleus innervating the tensor tympani muscle. However, following injection of retrograde tracer in the cerebellum, the labeled neurons in IF5 were found to be choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) negative, indicating that they are not motor neurons. The cells of IF5 are strongly labeled in mice from Wnt1Cre and Atoh1 CreER lineage fate mapping, in common with the major precerebellar nuclei that arise from the rhombic lip and that issue mossy fibers. Analysis of sections from mouse Hoxa3, Hoxb1, and Egr2 Cre labeled lineages shows that the neurons of IF5 arise from rhombomeres caudal to rhombomere 4, most likely from rhombomeres 6-8. We conclude that IF5 is a significant precerebellar nucleus in the mouse that shares developmental gene expression characteristics with mossy fiber precerebellar nuclei that arise from the caudal rhombic lip.

  11. Fluctuations and correlations in nucleus-nucleus collisions within transport approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konchakovski, Volodymyr P.

    2009-10-01

    The current thesis is devoted to a systematic study of fluctuations and correlations in heavy-ion collisions, which might be considered as probes for the phase transition and the critical point in the phase diagram, within the Hadron-String- Dynamics (HSD) microscopic transport approach. This is a powerful tool to study nucleus-nucleus collisions and allows to completely simulate experimental collisions on an event-by-event basis. Thus, the transport model has been used to study fluctuations and correlations including the influence of experimental acceptance as well as centrality, system size and collision energy. The comparison to experimental data can separate the effects induced by a phase transition since there is no phase transition in the HSD version used here. Firstly the centrality dependence of multiplicity fluctuations has been studied. Different centrality selections have been performed in the analysis in correspondence to the experimental situation. For the fixed target experiment NA49 events with fixed numbers of the projectile participants have been studied while in the collider experiment PHENIX centrality classes of events have been defined by the multiplicity in certain phase space region. A decrease of participant number fluctuations (and thus volume fluctuations) in more central collisions for both experiments has been obtained. Another area of this work addresses to transport model calculations of multiplicity fluctuations in nucleus-nucleus collisions as a function of colliding energy and system size. This study is in full correspondence to the experimental program of the NA61 Collaboration at the SPS. Central C+C, S+S, In+In, and Pb+Pb nuclear collisions at Elab = 10, 20, 30, 40, 80, 158 AGeV have been investigated. The expected enhanced fluctuations - attributed to the critical point and phase transition - can be observed experimentally on top of a monotonic and smooth 'hadronic background'. These findings should be helpful for the

  12. 78 FR 58571 - Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, and The Yankee Atomic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... Atomic Power Company, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, and The Yankee Atomic Electric Company... Power Company (Maine Yankee), Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (Connecticut Yankee), and the Yankee Atomic Electric Company (Yankee Atomic) (together, ``licensees'' or ``the Yankee Companies'')...

  13. Linear atomic quantum coupler

    CERN Document Server

    El-Orany, Faisal A A

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we develop the notion of the linear atomic quantum coupler. This device consists of two modes propagating into two waveguides, each of them includes a localized and/or a trapped atom. These waveguides are placed close enough to allow exchanging energy between them via evanescent waves. Each mode interacts with the atom in the same waveguide in the standard way, i.e. as the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM), and with the atom-mode in the second waveguide via evanescent wave. We present the Hamiltonian for the system and deduce the exact form for the wavefunction. We investigate the atomic inversions and the second-order correlation function. In contrast to the conventional linear coupler, the atomic quantum coupler is able to generate nonclassical effects. The atomic inversions can exhibit long revival-collapse phenomenon as well as subsidiary revivals based on the competition among the switching mechanisms in the system. Finally, under certain conditions, the system can yield the results of the two-m...

  14. Atomic Structure Theory Lectures on Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Walter R

    2007-01-01

    Atomic Structure Theory is a textbook for students with a background in quantum mechanics. The text is designed to give hands-on experience with atomic structure calculations. Material covered includes angular momentum methods, the central field Schrödinger and Dirac equations, Hartree-Fock and Dirac-Hartree-Fock equations, multiplet structure, hyperfine structure, the isotope shift, dipole and multipole transitions, basic many-body perturbation theory, configuration interaction, and correlation corrections to matrix elements. Numerical methods for solving the Schrödinger and Dirac eigenvalue problems and the (Dirac)-Hartree-Fock equations are given as well. B-spline basis sets are used to carry out sums arising in higher-order many-body calculations. Illustrative problems are provided, together with solutions. FORTRAN programs implementing the numerical methods in the text are included.

  15. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of

  16. The red nucleus and the rubrospinal projection in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huazheng; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2012-04-01

    We studied the organization and spinal projection of the mouse red nucleus with a range of techniques (Nissl stain, immunofluorescence, retrograde tracer injections into the spinal cord, anterograde tracer injections into the red nucleus, and in situ hybridization) and counted the number of neurons in the red nucleus (3,200.9 ± 230.8). We found that the rubrospinal neurons were mainly located in the parvicellular region of the red nucleus, more lateral in the rostral part and more medial in the caudal part. Labeled neurons were least common in the rostral and caudal most parts of the red nucleus. Neurons projecting to the cervical cord were predominantly dorsomedially placed and neurons projecting to the lumbar cord were predominantly ventrolaterally placed. Immunofluorescence staining with SMI-32 antibody showed that ~60% of SMI-32-positive neurons were cervical cord-projecting neurons and 24% were lumbar cord-projecting neurons. SMI-32-positive neurons were mainly located in the caudomedial part of the red nucleus. A study of vGluT2 expression showed that the number and location of glutamatergic neurons matched with those of the rubrospinal neurons. In the anterograde tracing experiments, rubrospinal fibers travelled in the dorsal portion of the lateral funiculus, between the lateral spinal nucleus and the calretinin-positive fibers of the lateral funiculus. Rubrospinal fibers terminated in contralateral laminae 5, 6, and the dorsal part of lamina 7 at all spinal cord levels. A few fibers could be seen next to the neurons in the dorsolateral part of lamina 9 at levels of C8-T1 (hand motor neurons) and L5-L6 (foot motor neurons), which is consistent with a view that rubrospinal fibers may play a role in distal limb movement in rodents.

  17. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.

    1997-12-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  18. Atomic entanglement and decoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genes, Claudiu

    The generation of entanglement in atomic systems plays a central topic in the fields of quantum information storage and processing. Moreover, a special category of entangled states of multi-atom ensembles, spin squeezed states, have been proven to lead to considerable improvement in the sensitivity of precision measurements compared to systems involving uncorrelated atoms. A treatment of entanglement in open systems is, however, incomplete without a precise description of the process of decoherence which necessarily accompanies it. The theory of entanglement and decoherence are the two main topics of this thesis. Methods are described for the generation of strong correlations in large atomic ensembles using either cavity quantum electrodynamics or measurement outcome conditioned quantum dynamics. Moreover, the description of loss of entanglement resulting from the coupling to a noise reservoir (electromagnetic vacuum) is explored. A spin squeezing parameter is used throughout this thesis as both a measure of entanglement strength and as an indication of the sensitivity improvement above the so-called standard quantum limit (sensitivity obtained with uncorrelated particles) in metrology. The first scheme considered consists of a single mode cavity field interacting with a collection of atoms for which spin squeezing is produced in both resonant and off-resonant regimes. In the resonant case, transfer of squeezing from a field state to the atoms is analyzed, while in the off-resonant regime squeezing is produced via an effective nonlinear interaction (one-axis twisting Hamiltonian). A second, more experimentally realistic case, is one involving the interaction of free space atoms with laser pulses; a projective measurement of a source field originating from atomic fluctuations provides a means of preparing atomic collective states such as spin squeezed and Schrodinger cat states. A new "unravelling" is proposed, that employs the detection of photon number in a single

  19. Atom probe tomography today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Cerezo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks and also the atomic-level characterization of interfaces in multilayers, oxide films, and semiconductor materials and devices.

  20. Physics of the atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wehr, Russell M; Adair, Thomas W

    1984-01-01

    The fourth edition of Physics of the Atom is designed to meet the modern need for a better understanding of the atomic age. It is an introduction suitable for students with a background in university physics and mathematical competence at the level of calculus. This book is designed to be an extension of the introductory university physics course into the realm of atomic physics. It should give students a proficiency in this field comparable to their proficiency in mechanics, heat, sound, light, and electricity.

  1. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  2. Single-atom nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Prati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Single-Atom Nanoelectronics covers the fabrication of single-atom devices and related technology, as well as the relevant electronic equipment and the intriguing new phenomena related to single-atom and single-electron effects in quantum devices. It also covers the alternative approaches related to both silicon- and carbon-based technologies, also from the point of view of large-scale industrial production. The publication provides a comprehensive picture of the state of the art at the cutting edge and constitutes a milestone in the emerging field of beyond-CMOS technology. Although there are

  3. EINSTEIN, SCHROEDINGER, AND ATOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider gravitation theory in multidimensional space. The model of the metric satisfying the basic requirements of quantum theory is proposed. It is shown that gravitational waves are described by the Liouville equation and the Schrodinger equation as well. The solutions of the Einstein equations describing the stationary states of arbitrary quantum and classical systems with central symmetry have been obtained. Einstein’s atom model has been developed, and proved that atoms and atomic nuclei can be represented as standing gravitational waves

  4. Rydberg atoms in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, Yu N; Ignjatovic, Lj M; Sakan, N M; Sreckovic, V A; Zakharov, M Yu; Bezuglov, N N; Klycharev, A N; 10.1016/j.newar.2009.07.003

    2012-01-01

    Elementary processes in astrophysical phenomena traditionally attract researchers attention. At first this can be attributed to a group of hemi-ionization processes in Rydberg atom collisions with ground state parent atoms. This processes might be studied as a prototype of the elementary process of the radiation energy transformation into electrical one. The studies of nonlinear mechanics have shown that so called regime of dynamic chaos should be considered as typical, rather than exceptional situation in Rydberg atoms collision. From comparison of theory with experimental results it follows that a such kind of stochastic dynamic processes, occurred during the single collision, may be observed.

  5. Inside the Hydrogen Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Nowakowski, M; Fierro, D Bedoya; Manjarres, A D Bermudez

    2016-01-01

    We apply the non-linear Euler-Heisenberg theory to calculate the electric field inside the hydrogen atom. We will demonstrate that the electric field calculated in the Euler-Heisenberg theory can be much smaller than the corresponding field emerging from the Maxwellian theory. In the hydrogen atom this happens only at very small distances. This effect reduces the large electric field inside the hydrogen atom calculated from the electromagnetic form-factors via the Maxwell equations. The energy content of the field is below the pair production threshold.

  6. Atom chip gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  7. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  8. Atomic & Molecular Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic & Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  9. Topics in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Charles E

    2006-01-01

    The study of atomic physics propelled us into the quantum age in the early twentieth century and carried us into the twenty-first century with a wealth of new and, in some cases, unexplained phenomena. Topics in Atomic Physics provides a foundation for students to begin research in modern atomic physics. It can also serve as a reference because it contains material that is not easily located in other sources. A distinguishing feature is the thorough exposition of the quantum mechanical hydrogen atom using both the traditional formulation and an alternative treatment not usually found in textbooks. The alternative treatment exploits the preeminent nature of the pure Coulomb potential and places the Lenz vector operator on an equal footing with other operators corresponding to classically conserved quantities. A number of difficult to find proofs and derivations are included as is development of operator formalism that permits facile solution of the Stark effect in hydrogen. Discussion of the classical hydrogen...

  10. Atomical Grothendieck categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Năstăsescu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the study of Gabriel dimension of a Grothendieck category, we introduce the concept of atomical Grothendieck category, which has only two localizing subcategories, and we give a classification of this type of Grothendieck categories.

  11. Atomic Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) is a new technology which can be used for developing high performance laser components for atom-based sensors...

  12. Alteration of Paramecium candatum germinal nucleus morphology after UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokin, S.I. (Leningradskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Biologicheskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst.)

    1982-09-01

    A study was made on morphologic changes of micronucleus (Mi) after whole-body ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of paramecia as well as after local irradiation of this nucleus or the area of macronucleus (Ma). The whole-body irradiation of its Ma part leads to generative nucleus growth in sizes and chromatin structure change, which is expressed in occurence of large chromatin bodies. Aftereffects of local action on Mi for viable descendants are expressed in nucleus size transformation (usually in reduction), gaining ''comet-shaped'' form and probably in reduction of dna amount. Irradiation of Ma and total effect on cell cause Mi changes of reversible character. All morphologic changes of Mi after local ultraviolet irradiation are conserved in descendants and are not photoreactivated. Possible reasons for this phenomenon are discussed. The results obtained make it possible to speak about different mechanisms of action on Mi in the case of local and whole-body UV irradiation of cell. The effect of irradiated Ma on generative nucleus, but not direct damage of this nucleus is the reason for Mi morphologic reconstruction after whole-body action on paramecium.

  13. Optical atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  14. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert Crepaz; Li Yuan Ley; Rainer Dumke

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage...

  15. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  16. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  17. Electric dipole moment of ^{129}Xe atom

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Yashpal; Das, B P

    2013-01-01

    The parity (P) and time-reversal (T) odd coupling constant associated with the tensor-pseudotensor (T-PT) electron-nucleus interaction and the nuclear Schiff moment (NSM) have been determined by combining the result of the measurement of the electric dipole moment (EDM) of ^{129}Xe atom and calculations based on the relativistic coupled-cluster (RCC) theory. Calculations using various relativistic many-body methods have been performed at different levels of approximation. The accuracies of these calculations are estimated by comparing the results of the calculated dipole polarizability of the ground state of the above atom with the most precise available experimental data. The non-linear terms that arise in the RCC theory at the singles and doubles approximation (CCSD method) were found to be crucial for achieving high accuracy in the calculations. Our results for the ^{129}Xe EDM due to the odd T-PT interaction and the NSM are, respectively, d_A=0.501 x 10^{-20} C_T |e|cm and d_A=0.336 x 10^{-17} S/(|e| fm^...

  18. Extreme alpha-clustering in the 18O nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, E D; Goldberg, V Z; Brown, S; Robson, D; Crisp, A M; Cottle, P D; Fu, C; Giles, J; Green, B W; Kemper, K W; Lee, K; Roeder, B T; Tribble, R E

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the 18O nucleus at excitation energies above the alpha decay threshold was studied using 14C+alpha resonance elastic scattering. A number of states with large alpha reduced widths have been observed, indicating that the alpha-cluster degree of freedom plays an important role in this N not equal Z nucleus. However, the alpha-cluster structure of this nucleus is very different from the relatively simple pattern of strong alpha-cluster quasi-rotational bands in the neighboring 16O and 20Ne nuclei. A 0+ state with an alpha reduced width exceeding the single particle limit was identified at an excitation energy of 9.9+/-0.3 MeV. We discuss evidence that states of this kind are common in light nuclei and give possible explanations of this feature.

  19. Reaction cross sections of the deformed halo nucleus 31Ne

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Y; Sagawa, H

    2012-01-01

    Using the Glauber theory, we calculate reaction cross sections for the deformed halo nucleus $^{31}$Ne. To this end, we assume that the $^{31}$Ne nucleus takes the $^{30}$Ne + $n$ structure. In order to take into account the rotational excitation of the core nucleus $^{30}$Ne, we employ the particle-rotor model (PRM). We compare the results to those in the adiabatic limit of PRM, that is, the Nilsson model, and show that the Nilsson model works reasonably well for the reaction cross sections of $^{31}$Ne. We also investigate the dependence of the reaction cross sections on the ground state properties of $^{31}$Ne, such as the deformation parameter and the p-wave component in the ground state wave function.

  20. Separable Representation of Multichannel Nucleon-Nucleus Optical Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Hlophe, Linda

    2016-01-01

    One important ingredient for many applications of nuclear physics to astrophysics, nuclear energy, and stockpile stewardship are cross sections for reactions of neutrons with rare isotopes. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g. (d,p) reactions, should be used. Those (d,p) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. Optical potentials representing the effective interactions in the neutron (proton) nucleus subsystem are usually non-Hermitian as well as energy-dependent. Including excitations of the nucleus in the calculation requires a multichannel optical potential. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a separable, energy-dependent multichannel representation of complex, energy-dependent optical potentials that contain excitations of the nucleus and that fulfill r...

  1. The stellar population of the decoupled nucleus in M 31

    CERN Document Server

    Silchenko, O K; Vlasyuk, V V

    1998-01-01

    The results of a spectroscopic and photometric investigation of the central region of M 31 are presented. An analysis of absorption-index radial profiles involving magnesium, calcium, and iron lines has shown that the unresolved nucleus of M 31 is distinct by its increased metallicity; unexpectedly, among two nuclei of M 31, it is the faintest one located exactly in the dynamical center of the galaxy (and dynamically decoupled) which is chemically distinct. The Balmer absorption line H-beta has been included into the analysis to disentangle metallicity and age effects; an age difference by a factor 3 is detected between stellar populations of the nucleus and of the bulge, the nucleus being younger. The morphological analysis of CCD images has revealed the presence of a nuclear stellar-gaseous disk with a radius of some 100 pc, the gas component of which looks non-stationary, well inside the bulge of M 31.

  2. Microinjection of limonene into caudate nucleus inhibits IMC of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Guo; Xin Yi Zhu; Yi Quan Wei; De Zhi Yang

    2000-01-01

    AIM We have discovered that Limonene modulates interdigestive myoelectrical complexes (IMCs) ofgastrointestinal tract in rats. In this research we will elucidate weather limonene affects acetylcholine M-receptor in caudate nucleus.METHODS Changes of IMCs were studied after limonene and/or atropine were microinjected into caudatenucleus. IMCs were recorded by a RM-6200 four-channel recorder and then delivered to Maclab and PowerMacintosh.RESULTS The active phases of IMCs occupied about 40% of total cycle in average. After microinjection oflimonene into caudate nucleus, the active phases were significantly shortened, while the cycle time of IMCswere not changed significantly. The inhibitory effects of limonene were abolished by pretreatment withatropine, whilst the atropine has no effect on IMCs.CONCLUSION It is suggested that limonene inhabits the gastrointestinal IMCs by affecting M-receptor incaudate nucleus.

  3. Low energy neutron inelastic scattering on /sup 152/Sm nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, D.J.R.; Cabezas, S.R.; Lopez, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of inelastic neutron scattering by the nucleus /sup 152/Sm at incident energies of 2.47 and 2.75 MeV using the coupled-channel method has been made. Consideration is made of the 2/sup +//0.122 MeV/, 4/sup +//0.366 MeV/ and 2/sup +//1.086 MeV/excited states. It is shown that in this energy range the process may be described satisfactorily considering /sup 152/Sm as a deformed nucleus with non-axial symmetry, given the quadrupole and hexadecapole deformations. The scattering process through the compound nucleus is calculated according to the Hauser-Feshbach formula with width fluctuation correction. It is shown that the presence of direct excitation process is partly due to the non-axiality of /sup 152/Sm.

  4. New integral formula and its applications to light nucleus reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    A new integral formula, which has not been compiled in any integral tables or mathematical softwares, is proposed to obtain the analytical energy-angular spectra of the particles that are sequentially emitted from the discrete energy levels of the residual nuclei in the statistical theory of light nucleus reaction (STLN). In the cases of the neutron induced light nucleus reactions, the demonstration of the kinetic energy conservation in the sequential emission processes becomes straightforward thanks to this new integral formula and it is also helpful to largely reduce the volume of file-6 in nuclear reaction databases. Furthermore, taking p+$^9$Be reaction at 18 MeV as an example, this integral formula is extended to calculate the energy-angular spectra of the sequentially emitted neutrons for proton induced light nucleus reactions in the frame of STLN.

  5. Effective potentials for atom-atom interaction at low temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Bo

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the concept and design of effective atom-atom potentials that accurately describe any physical processes involving only states around the threshold. The existence of such potentials gives hope to a quantitative, and systematic, understanding of quantum few-atom and quantum many-atom systems at relatively low temperatures.

  6. Brain networks modulated by subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accolla, Ettore A; Herrojo Ruiz, Maria; Horn, Andreas; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Draganski, Bogdan; Kühn, Andrea A

    2016-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an established treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Given the frequent occurrence of stimulation-induced affective and cognitive adverse effects, a better understanding about the role of the subthalamic nucleus in non-motor functions is needed. The main goal of this study is to characterize anatomical circuits modulated by subthalamic deep brain stimulation, and infer about the inner organization of the nucleus in terms of motor and non-motor areas. Given its small size and anatomical intersubject variability, functional organization of the subthalamic nucleus is difficult to investigate in vivo with current methods. Here, we used local field potential recordings obtained from 10 patients with Parkinson's disease to identify a subthalamic area with an analogous electrophysiological signature, namely a predominant beta oscillatory activity. The spatial accuracy was improved by identifying a single contact per macroelectrode for its vicinity to the electrophysiological source of the beta oscillation. We then conducted whole brain probabilistic tractography seeding from the previously identified contacts, and further described connectivity modifications along the macroelectrode's main axis. The designated subthalamic 'beta' area projected predominantly to motor and premotor cortical regions additional to connections to limbic and associative areas. More ventral subthalamic areas showed predominant connectivity to medial temporal regions including amygdala and hippocampus. We interpret our findings as evidence for the convergence of different functional circuits within subthalamic nucleus' portions deemed to be appropriate as deep brain stimulation target to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Potential clinical implications of our study are illustrated by an index case where deep brain stimulation of estimated predominant non-motor subthalamic nucleus induced hypomanic behaviour.

  7. Silk fibroin porous scaffolds for nucleus pulposus tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Chao; Yang, Qiang [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhu, Meifeng [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Du, Lilong [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhang, Jiamin [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Ma, Xinlong [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Xu, Baoshan, E-mail: xubaoshan99@126.com [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Wang, Lianyong, E-mail: wly@nankai.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are structurally complex tissue that hold the vertebrae together and provide mobility to spine. The nucleus pulposus (NP) degeneration often results in degenerative IVD disease that is one of the most common causes of back and neck pain. Tissue engineered nucleus pulposus offers an alternative approach to regain the function of the degenerative IVD. The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of porous silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds fabricated by paraffin-sphere-leaching methods with freeze-drying in the application of nucleus pulposus regeneration. The prepared scaffold possessed high porosity of 92.38 ± 5.12% and pore size of 165.00 ± 8.25 μm as well as high pore interconnectivity and appropriate mechanical properties. Rabbit NP cells were seeded and cultured on the SF scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy, histology, biochemical assays and mechanical tests revealed that the porous scaffolds could provide an appropriate microstructure and environment to support adhesion, proliferation and infiltration of NP cells in vitro as well as the generation of extracellular matrix. The NP cell–scaffold construction could be preliminarily formed after subcutaneously implanted in a nude mice model. In conclusion, The SF porous scaffold offers a potential candidate for tissue engineered NP tissue. - Highlights: • Paraffin microsphere-leaching method is used to fabricate silk fibroin scaffold. • The scaffold has appropriate mechanical property, porosity and pore size • The scaffold supports growth and infiltration of nucleus pulposus cells. • Nucleus pulposus cells can secrete extracellular matrix in the scaffolds. • The scaffold is a potential candidate for tissue engineered nucleus pulposus.

  8. Immobility, inheritance and plasticity of shape of the yeast nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrulis Erik D

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since S. cerevisiae undergoes closed mitosis, the nuclear envelope of the daughter nucleus is continuous with that of the maternal nucleus at anaphase. Nevertheless, several constitutents of the maternal nucleus are not present in the daughter nucleus. The present study aims to identify proteins which impact the shape of the yeast nucleus and to learn whether modifications of shape are passed on to the next mitotic generation. The Esc1p protein of S. cerevisiae localizes to the periphery of the nucleoplasm, can anchor chromatin, and has been implicated in targeted silencing both at telomeres and at HMR. Results Upon increased Esc1p expression, cell division continues and dramatic elaborations of the nuclear envelope extend into the cytoplasm. These "escapades" include nuclear pores and associate with the nucleolus, but exclude chromatin. Escapades are not inherited by daughter nuclei. This exclusion reflects their relative immobility, which we document in studies of prezygotes. Moreover, excess Esc1p affects the levels of multiple transcripts, not all of which originate at telomere-proximal loci. Unlike Esc1p and the colocalizing protein, Mlp1p, overexpression of selected proteins of the inner nuclear membrane is toxic. Conclusion Esc1p is the first non-membrane protein of the nuclear periphery which – like proteins of the nuclear lamina of higher eukaryotes – can modify the shape of the yeast nucleus. The elaborations of the nuclear envelope ("escapades" which appear upon induction of excess Esc1p are not inherited during mitotic growth. The lack of inheritance of such components could help sustain cell growth when parental nuclei have acquired potentially deleterious characteristics.

  9. Teleportation of Atomic States for Atoms in a Lambda Configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, E S

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss a scheme of teleportation of atomic states making use of three-level lambda atoms. The experimental realization proposed makes use of cavity QED involving the interaction of Rydberg atoms with a micromaser cavity prepared in a coherent state. We start presenting a scheme to prepare atomic EPR states involving two-level atoms via the interaction of these atoms with a cavity. In our scheme the cavity and some atoms play the role of auxiliary systems used to achieve the teleportation.

  10. Separable Representation of Proton-Nucleus Optical Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Hlophe, L; Elster, Ch; Nunes, F M; Arbanas, G; Escher, J E; Thompson, I J

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a new approach for solving the three-body problem for (d,p) reactions in the Coulomb-distorted basis in momentum space was proposed. Important input quantities for such calculations are the scattering matrix elements for proton- and neutron-nucleus scattering. We present a generalization of the Ernst-Shakin-Thaler scheme in which a momentum space separable representation of proton-nucleus scattering matrix elements can be calculated in the Coulomb basis. The viability of this method is demonstrated by comparing S-matrix elements obtained for p$+^{48}$Ca and p$+^{208}$Pb for a phenomenological optical potential with corresponding coordinate space calculations.

  11. Odd-Even Nucleus Calculation Using exp(S) Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaila, Bogdan; Heisenberg, Jochen

    1997-04-01

    We apply the equation of motion technique to calculate the ground state and excited states of the nucleus ^15N. First, we define a complete basis for ^15N relative to the reference ^16O ground state, | A >. Then, the eigenstate | (A-1)j > with energy Ej are given as a linear superposition of these basis configurations. Assuming that this state is an eigenstate of the many-body Hamiltonian, we solve an eigenvalue problem for the energies and wave functions describing the excited states of the ^15N nucleus.

  12. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Tomasz [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Juszczak, Cezary [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  13. Spectra Statistics for the Odd-Odd Nucleus 86Nb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Ren-Rong; ZHU Shun-Quan; CHENG Nan-Pu

    2001-01-01

    The energy levels of the odd-odd nucleus 86 Nb at low spins are calculated by using quasi-particles plus a rotor model. The distribution of the nearest-neighbour spacing and the spectral rigidity are studied. We find that the chaotic degree of the energy spectra increases with the increasing spin and reaches a maximum at I = 10; then it decreases gradually for spins above I = 10. The recoil term in the model Haniltonian makes the energy spectra slightly regular. The Coriolis force, however, makes the spectra chaotic and plays a major role in the spectral statistics of the odd-odd nucleus 86Nb.

  14. Formation and decay of a hot compound nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, B.V.; Dalmolin, F.T.; Dutra, M.; Santos, T.J., E-mail: brett@ita.br [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos SP (Brazil); Souza, S.R. [Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre RS, (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Donangelo, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de la Republica de Uruguay, Montevideo (Uruguay); Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre RS, (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The compound nucleus plays an important role in nuclear reactions over a wide range of projectile-target combinations and energies. The limits that angular momentum places on its formation and existence are, for the most part, well understood. The limits on its excitation energy are not as clear. Here we first analyze general geometrical and thermodynamical features of a hot compound nucleus. We then discuss the manners by which it can decay and close by speculating on the high energy limit to its formation and existence. (author)

  15. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge G. Morfín

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  16. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfín, Jorge G.; Nieves, Juan; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  17. Total reaction cross sections for 20-30 MeV pions and the anomaly of pionic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Goldring, A.; Johnson, R. R.; Meirav, O.; Vetterli, D.; Weber, P.; Altman, A.

    1991-03-01

    Total reaction cross sections of 20 MeV π- and 30 MeV π+ and π- have been measured for carbon and nickel targets. The experimental results are in very good agreement with calculations based on commonly accepted pion-nucleus potentials but disagree with calculations based on the potentials associated with the so-called pionic atom anomaly.

  18. Universal bosonic tetramers of dimer-atom-atom structure

    OpenAIRE

    Deltuva, A.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable four-boson states having an approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are studied using momentum-space integral equations for the four-particle transition operators. For a given Efimov trimer the universal properties of the lowest associated tetramer are determined. The impact of this tetramer on the atom-trimer and dimer-dimer collisions is analyzed. The reliability of the three-body dimer-atom-atom model is studied.

  19. Lattice model for amyloid peptides: OPEP force field parametrization and applications to the nucleus size of Alzheimer's peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thanh Thuy; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    Coarse-grained protein lattice models approximate atomistic details and keep the essential interactions. They are, therefore, suitable for capturing generic features of protein folding and amyloid formation at low computational cost. As our aim is to study the critical nucleus sizes of two experimentally well-characterized peptide fragments Aβ16-22 and Aβ37-42 of the full length Aβ1-42 Alzheimer's peptide, it is important that simulations with the lattice model reproduce all-atom simulations. In this study, we present a comprehensive force field parameterization based on the OPEP (Optimized Potential for Efficient protein structure Prediction) force field for an on-lattice protein model, which incorporates explicitly the formation of hydrogen bonds and directions of side-chains. Our bottom-up approach starts with the determination of the best lattice force parameters for the Aβ16-22 dimer by fitting its equilibrium parallel and anti-parallel β-sheet populations to all-atom simulation results. Surprisingly, the calibrated force field is transferable to the trimer of Aβ16-22 and the dimer and trimer of Aβ37-42. Encouraged by this finding, we characterized the free energy landscapes of the two decamers. The dominant structure of the Aβ16-22 decamer matches the microcrystal structure. Pushing the simulations for aggregates between 4-mer and 12-mer suggests a nucleus size for fibril formation of 10 chains. In contrast, the Aβ37-42 decamer is largely disordered with mixed by parallel and antiparallel chains, suggesting that the nucleus size is >10 peptides. Our refined force field coupled to this on-lattice model should provide useful insights into the critical nucleation number associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Single-atom spintronics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susan Z. HUA; Matthew R. SULLIVAN; Jason N. ARMSTRONG

    2006-01-01

    Recent work on magnetic quantum point contacts (QPCs) was discussed. Complete magnetoresistance loops across Co QPCs as small as a single atom was measured. The remarkable feature of these QPCs is the rapid oscillatory decay in magnetoresistance with the increase of contact size. In addition,stepwise or quantum magnetoresistance loops are observed,resulting from varying transmission probability of the available discrete conductance channels because the sample is cycled between the ferromagnetic (F) and antiferromagnetic (AF) aligned states. Quantized conductance combined with spin dependent transmission of electron waves gives rise to a multi-channel system with a quantum domain wall acting as a valve,i.e.,a quantum spin-valve. Behavior of a few-atom QPC is built on the behavior of a single-atom QPC and hence the summarization of results as 'single-atom spintronics'. An evolutionary trace of spin-dependent electron transmission from a single atom to bulk is provided,the requisite hallmarks of artefact-free magnetoresistance is established across a QPC - stepwise or quantum magnetoresistance loops and size dependent oscillatory magnetoresistance.

  1. Quantum magnetism through atomic assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinelli, A.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents an experimental study of magnetic structures, composed of only a few atoms. Those structures are first built atom-by-atom and then locally probed, both with a low-temperature STM. The technique that we use to assemble them is vertical atom manipulation, while to study their phy

  2. CASTOR The ALICE forward detector for identification of Centauros and Strangelets in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Filippov, S N; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wlodarczyk, Z; Kharlov, Yu. V.

    1999-01-01

    The physics motivation for a very forward detector for the ALICE heavy ion experiment at the CERN LHC is discussed. A phenomenological model describing the formation and decay of a Centauro fireball in nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The CASTOR detector which is aimed to measure the hadronic and photonic content of an interaction and to identify deeply penetrating objects in the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6 < eta < 7.2 in an event-by-event mode is described. Results of simulations of the expected response of the calorimeter, and in particular to the passage of strangelets, are presented.

  3. Sampling the Hydrogen Atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graves N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A model is proposed for the hydrogen atom in which the electron is an objectively real particle orbiting at very near to light speed. The model is based on the postulate that certain velocity terms associated with orbiting bodies can be considered as being af- fected by relativity. This leads to a model for the atom in which the stable electron orbits are associated with orbital velocities where Gamma is n /α , leading to the idea that it is Gamma that is quantized and not angular momentum as in the Bohr and other models. The model provides a mechanism which leads to quantization of energy levels within the atom and also provides a simple mechanical explanation for the Fine Struc- ture Constant. The mechanism is closely associated with the Sampling theorem and the related phenomenon of aliasing developed in the mid-20th century by engineers at Bell labs.

  4. Energy Wave Model of Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍细如

    2015-01-01

    proton emits energy wave, electron could sits any position away from nucleus, but be the most stable just when it sits at the trough of energy wave, and this position accords with Bohr radius and Schr?dinger equation.

  5. A discrete variable representation for electron-hydrogen atom scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaucher, L.F.

    1994-08-01

    A discrete variable representation (DVR) suitable for treating the quantum scattering of a low energy electron from a hydrogen atom is presented. The benefits of DVR techniques (e.g. the removal of the requirement of calculating multidimensional potential energy matrix elements and the availability of iterative sparse matrix diagonalization/inversion algorithms) have for many years been applied successfully to studies of quantum molecular scattering. Unfortunately, the presence of a Coulomb singularity at the electrically unshielded center of a hydrogen atom requires high radial grid point densities in this region of the scattering coordinate, while the presence of finite kinetic energy in the asymptotic scattering electron also requires a sufficiently large radial grid point density at moderate distances from the nucleus. The constraints imposed by these two length scales have made application of current DVR methods to this scattering event difficult.

  6. Decaying Dark Atom Constituents and Cosmic Positron Excess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belotsky, K.; Khlopov, M.; Kouvaris, C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a scenario where dark matter is in the form of dark atoms that can accommodate the experimentally observed excess of positrons in PAMELA and AMS-02 while being compatible with the constraints imposed on the gamma-ray ux from Fermi/LAT. This scenario assumes that the dominant component...... of dark matter is in the form of a bound state between a helium nucleus and a -2 particle and a small component is in the form of a WIMP-like dark atom compatible with direct searches in underground detectors. One of the constituents of this WIMP-like state is a +2 metastable particle with a mass of 1 Te...

  7. Korean atomic bomb victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Yukuo

    2009-01-01

    After colonizing Korea, Japan invaded China, and subsequently initiated the Pacific War against the United States, Britain, and their allies. Towards the end of the war, U.S. warplanes dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which resulted in a large number of Koreans who lived in Hiroshima and Nagasaki suffering from the effects of the bombs. The objective of this paper is to examine the history of Korea atomic bomb victims who were caught in between the U.S., Japan, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea).

  8. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  9. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia C. Capelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's, all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules, the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  10. Optically pumped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Happer, William; Walker, Thad

    2010-01-01

    Covering the most important knowledge on optical pumping of atoms, this ready reference is backed by numerous examples of modelling computation for optical pumped systems. The authors show for the first time that modern scientific computing software makes it practical to analyze the full, multilevel system of optically pumped atoms. To make the discussion less abstract, the authors have illustrated key points with sections of MATLAB codes. To make most effective use of contemporary mathematical software, it is especially useful to analyze optical pumping situations in the Liouville spa

  11. Atoms in Agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, Thomas S. [University of Tennessee

    1965-01-01

    Agriculture benefits from the applications of research. Radioactive techniques have been used to study soils, plants, microbes, insects, farm animals, and new ways to use and preserve foodstuffs. Radioactive atoms are not used directly by farmers but are used in research directed by the U. S. Department of Agriculture and Atomic Energy Commission, by the agricultural experiment stations of the various states, and by numerous public and private research institutions. From such research come improved materials and methods which are used on the farm.

  12. Calcium-regulated import of myosin IC into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Ivan V; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2016-06-01

    Myosin IC is a molecular motor involved in intracellular transport, cell motility, and transcription. Its mechanical properties are regulated by calcium via calmodulin binding, and its functions in the nucleus depend on import from the cytoplasm. The import has recently been shown to be mediated by the nuclear localization signal located within the calmodulin-binding domain. In the present paper, it is demonstrated that mutations in the calmodulin-binding sequence shift the intracellular distribution of myosin IC to the nucleus. The redistribution is displayed by isoform B, described originally as the "nuclear myosin," but is particularly pronounced with isoform C, the normally cytoplasmic isoform. Furthermore, experimental elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration induces a rapid import of myosin into the nucleus. The import is blocked by the importin β inhibitor importazole. These findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby calmodulin binding prevents recognition of the nuclear localization sequence by importin β, and the steric inhibition of import is released by cell signaling leading to the intracellular calcium elevation. The results establish a mechanistic connection between the calcium regulation of the motor function of myosin IC in the cytoplasm and the induction of its import into the nucleus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Saturating Cronin effect in ultrarelativistic proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Papp, G; Fái, G; Papp, Gabor; Levai, Peter; Fai, George

    2000-01-01

    Pion and photon production cross sections are analyzed in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions at energies 20 GeV < s^1/2 < 60 GeV. We separate the proton-proton and nuclear contributions to transverse-momentum broadening and suggest a new mechanism for the nuclear enhancement in the high transverse-momentum region.

  14. Rapid feedback processing in human nucleus accumbens and motor thalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schüller, T.; Gründler, T.O.J.; Jocham, G.; Klein, T.A.; Timmermann, L.; Visser-Vandewalle, V.E.R.M.; Kuhn, J.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and thalamus are integral parts in models of feedback processing. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been successfully employed to alleviate symptoms of psychiatric conditions including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome (TS). Common target structu

  15. Nucleus accumbens dopamine receptors in the consolidation of spatial memory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mele, A.; Avena, M.; Roullet, P.; Leonibus, E. de; Mandillo, S.; Sargolini, F.; Coccurello, R.; Oliverio, A.

    2004-01-01

    Nucleus accumbens dopamine is known to play an important role in motor activity and in behaviours governed by drugs and natural reinforcers, as well as in non-associative forms of learning. At the same time, activation of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors has been suggested to promote intracellular event

  16. The nucleus of Darkschwitsch in Pantodactylus schreiberii Wiegmann (Lacertilia, Reptilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, J C

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear mass considered the representative of the nucleus of Darkschwitsch in reptiles in studied. It is composed of small, stellate, pyriform or rounded cells, with two or three dendritic trunks resolved in a plexus near the cellular body. Its axons take an ascending direction to the posterior commissure, and not to be medial longitudinal fasciculus as has been conventionally described.

  17. RELATIVISTIC CALCULATIONS OF THE SUPERHEAVY NUCLEUS 114-298

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOERSMA, HF

    1993-01-01

    We investigate ground-state properties of the superheavy nucleus with N = 184 and Z = 114, (298)114, using conventional relativistic mean-field theory and density-dependent mean-field theory, which reproduces Dirac-Brueckner calculations in nuclear matter. Our calculations provide support for N = 18

  18. Empirical Example of Nucleus with Transitional Dynamical Symmetry X(5)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张大立; 赵惠英

    2002-01-01

    By analysing the energy spectrum, E2 transition rates and branching ratios, it is shown explicitly that the nucleus 150Nd provides an empirical example with X(5) symmetry at the critical point of the transition from U(5) to SU(3) symmetry.

  19. Deexcitation of superdeformed bands in the nucleus Tb-151

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finck, C; Appelbe, D; Beck, FA; Byrski, T; Cullen, D; Curien, D; deFrance, G; Duchene, G; Erturk, S; Haas, B; Khadiri, N; Kharraja, B; Prevost, D; Rigollet, C; Stezowski, O; Twin, P; Vivien, JP; Zuber, K

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to get more informations about the decay-out of superdeformed bands. One of the best candidates in the mass A similar or equal to 150 region for that kind of research is the nucleus Tb-151. From previous works, it has been established that the first excited band goes lower in

  20. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Ke-Mian [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Chang, Chia-Chun [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shen, Qing-Ji [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); Sung, Li-Ying, E-mail: liyingsung@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Ji-Long, E-mail: jilong.liu@dpag.ox.ac.uk [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  1. Brackett Gamma Imaging of the Nucleus of M83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosthwaite, L. P.; Turner, J. L.; Beck, S. C.; Meier, D. S.

    2004-12-01

    The gas-rich nucleus of barred spiral galaxy, M83, is a hotbed of star formation, with a total infrared luminosity of 4 X 109 Lo. We have observed the nucleus of M83 with the near infrared spectrometer, NIRSPEC, on Keck 2 to obtain high resolution Brγ recombination line spectra of the nucleus. Simultaneous imaging with the SCAM camera in a broadband K filter shows the position of the slit on the near-infrared galaxy. This allows us to map the nucleus with a continuum reference. The SCAM image shows a bright peak at the nucleus and a complex semi-circular arc of emission to the southwest. We stepped the 0.5'' X 24'' length slit in small declination increments to map a 20'' X 20'' region just west of the nucleus. Individual spectra were used to form a ra-dec-lambda cube and an integrated intensity map of Brγ . A total of 1.1 X 10-16 W m-2 of Brγ emission is detected in the map, in good agreement with previous low resolution observations (Turner, Ho, & Beck 1987, ApJ, 313, 644). This is not corrected for extinction within the molecular clouds in M83 or to the nebulae themselves and is therefore a lower limit to the true Brγ flux. Extinction is estimated to be at least a magnitude in the near-IR as measured in larger (4'') beams (Turner et al.) The bulk of the Brγ emission extends along the northern portion of the near-IR continuum semi-circle. Twenty percent of the total Brγ emission comes from single a 3'' (FWHM) source located 5'' west of the near-IR nucleus. The complementary NIRSPEC Brα data we have obtained will eventually allow us to evaluate the near-IR extinction on subarcsecond sizescales and obtain an extinction-corrected estimate of the Lyman continuum rate and therefore the number of ionizing stars.

  2. Physical interrelation of volatile and refractories in a cometary nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulle, Marco; Alice Team; Stern, Alan; CONSTERT Team; Kofman, Wlodek; COSIMA Team; Hilchenbach, Martin; GIADA Team; Rotundi, Alessandra; MIDAS Team; Bentley, Mark; MIRO Team; Hofstadter, Mark; OSIRIS Team; Sierks, Holger; ROSINA Team; Altwegg, Kathrin; RPC Team; Nilsson, Hans; Burch, James; Eriksson, Anders; Heinz-Glassmeier, Karl; Henri, Pierre; Carr, Christopher; RSI Team; Paetzold, Martin; , VIRTIS Team; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Lander Team; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; IDS Team; Gruen, Eberhard; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Weissman, Paul; Project Scientist Team; Taylor, Matt; Buratti, Bonnie; Altobelli, Nicolas; Choukroun, Mathieu; Ground-Based Observations Team; Snodgrass, Colin

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta mission has been taking measurements of its target comet Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since early 2014 and will complete operations at the end of September 2016. The mission Science Management Plan, in 1994, laid out the the prime goals and themes of the mission. These five themes were: 1) To study the global characterisation of the Nuclues, the determination of the dynamics properties , surface morpholy and composition of the comet. 2) Examination of the Chemical, Mineralogical and isotopic compositions of volatiles and refractories in a cometary nucleus.3) Physical interrelation of volatile and refractories in a cometary nucleus4) Study the development of cometary activity and the process in the surface layer of the nucleus and in the inner coma5) The origins of comets, the relationship between cometary and interstellar material and the implications for the origin of the solar system,To cover all aspects of the Rosetta mission in this special Show case session, this abstracts is one of 5, with this particular presentation focusing on theme 3, in particular on a) The dust-to-gas ratio; b) distributed sources of volatiles; c) seasonal evolution of the dust size distribution.a) The dust-to-gas ratio has been provided by coma observations measuring the gas and dust loss rates from the nucleus surface. The ratio of these two loss rates provides a lower limit of the dust-to-gas ratio at the nucleus surface, since it does not take into account the largest chunks unable to leave the nucleus, or falling back due to the dominant gravity. We review the value inferred so far, its time evolution, and new techniques to directly measure it in the nucleus.b) Evidences offered by Rosetta observations of gas sublimating from dust particles are up to now faint. We report the few available observations and an estimate of the probable average water content in dust particles inferred by 3D gas-dynamical codes of 67P coma.c) The dust-size distribution tunes the sizes

  3. Structures and functions in the crowded nucleus: new biophysical insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald eHancock

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Concepts and methods from the physical sciences have catalysed remarkable progress in understanding the cell nucleus in recent years. To share this excitement with physicists and encourage their interest in this field, this review offers an overview of how the physics which underlies structures and functions in the nucleus is becoming more clear thanks to methods which have been developed to simulate and study macromolecules, polymers, and colloids. The environment in the nucleus is very crowded with macromolecules, making entropic (depletion forces major determinants of interactions. Simulation and experiments are consistent with their key role in forming membraneless compartments such as nucleoli, PML and Cajal bodies, and discrete territories for chromosomes. The chromosomes, giant linear polyelectrolyte polymers, exist in vivo in a state like a polymer melt. Looped conformations are predicted in crowded conditions, and have been confirmed experimentally and are central to the regulation of gene expression. Polymer theory has revealed how the chromosomes are so highly compacted in the nucleus, forming a crumpled globule with fractal properties which avoids knots and entanglements in DNA while allowing facile accessibility for its replication and transcription. Entropic repulsion between looped polymers can explain the confinement of each chromosome to a discrete region of the nucleus. Crowding and looping are predicted to facilitate finding the specific targets of factors which modulate activities of DNA. Simulation shows that entropic effects contribute to finding and repairing potentially lethal double-strand breaks in DNA by increasing the mobility of the broken ends, favouring their juxtaposition for repair. Signaling pathways are strongly influenced by crowding, which favours a processive mode of response (consecutive reactions without releasing substrates. This new information contributes to understanding the sometimes counter

  4. Structures and functions in the crowded nucleus: new biophysical insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Ronald

    2014-09-01

    Concepts and methods from the physical sciences have catalysed remarkable progress in understanding the cell nucleus in recent years. To share this excitement with physicists and encourage their interest in this field, this review offers an overview of how the physics which underlies structures and functions in the nucleus is becoming more clear thanks to methods which have been developed to simulate and study macromolecules, polymers, and colloids. The environment in the nucleus is very crowded with macromolecules, making entropic (depletion) forces major determinants of interactions. Simulation and experiments are consistent with their key role in forming membraneless compartments such as nucleoli, PML and Cajal bodies, and discrete "territories" for chromosomes. The chromosomes, giant linear polyelectrolyte polymers, exist in vivo in a state like a polymer melt. Looped conformations are predicted in crowded conditions, and have been confirmed experimentally and are central to the regulation of gene expression. Polymer theory has revealed how the chromosomes are so highly compacted in the nucleus, forming a "crumpled globule" with fractal properties which avoids knots and entanglements in DNA while allowing facile accessibility for its replication and transcription. Entropic repulsion between looped polymers can explain the confinement of each chromosome to a discrete region of the nucleus. Crowding and looping are predicted to facilitate finding the specific targets of factors which modulate activities of DNA. Simulation shows that entropic effects contribute to finding and repairing potentially lethal double-strand breaks in DNA by increasing the mobility of the broken ends, favouring their juxtaposition for repair. Signaling pathways are strongly influenced by crowding, which favours a processive mode of response (consecutive reactions without releasing substrates). This new information contributes to understanding the sometimes counter-intuitive consequences.

  5. Scalar-pseudoscalar interaction in the francium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripnikov, L. V.; Maison, D. E.; Mosyagin, N. S.

    2017-02-01

    Fr atom can be successively used to search for the atomic permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) [Hyperfine Interact. 236, 53 (2015), 10.1007/s10751-015-1193-1; J. Phys.: Conference Series 691, 012017 (2016), 10.1088/1742-6596/691/1/012017]. It can be induced by the permanent electron EDM predicted by modern extensions of the standard model to be nonzero at the level accessible by the new generation of EDM experiments. We consider another mechanism of the atomic EDM generation in Fr. This is caused by the scalar-pseudoscalar nucleus-electron neutral current interaction with the dimensionless strength constant kT ,P. Similar to the electron EDM this interaction violates both spatial parity and time-reversal symmetries and can also induce permanent atomic EDM. It was shown in [Phys. Rev. D 89, 056006 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.056006] that the scalar-pseudoscalar contribution to the atomic EDM can dominate over the direct contribution from the electron EDM within the standard model. We report high-accuracy combined all-electron and two-step relativistic coupled cluster treatment of the effect from the scalar-pseudoscalar interaction in the Fr atom. Up to the quadruple cluster amplitudes within the coupled cluster method with single, double, triple, and noniterative quadruple amplitudes, CCSDT(Q), were included in correlation treatment. This calculation is required for the interpretation of the experimental data in terms of kT ,P. The resulted EDM of the Fr atom expressed in terms of kT ,P is dFr=kT ,P4.50 ×10-18e cm , where e is the (negative) charge of the electron. The value of the ionization potential of the 2S1 /2 ground state of Fr calculated within the same methods is in very good agreement with the experimental datum.

  6. Atomism, Pragmatism, Holism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John P.

    1986-01-01

    Examines three world views influencing curriculum development--atomism (underpinning competency-based education), pragmatism (promoting inquiry-based approaches), amd holism (associated with confluent or Waldorf education). Holism embodies the perennial philosophy and attempts to integrate cognitive, affective, and transpersonal dimensions,…

  7. Chiral atomically thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Joo; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Ziegler, Zack; Ogawa, Yui; Noguez, Cecilia; Park, Jiwoong

    2016-06-01

    Chiral materials possess left- and right-handed counterparts linked by mirror symmetry. These materials are useful for advanced applications in polarization optics, stereochemistry and spintronics. In particular, the realization of spatially uniform chiral films with atomic-scale control of their handedness could provide a powerful means for developing nanodevices with novel chiral properties. However, previous approaches based on natural or grown films, or arrays of fabricated building blocks, could not offer a direct means to program intrinsic chiral properties of the film on the atomic scale. Here, we report a chiral stacking approach, where two-dimensional materials are positioned layer-by-layer with precise control of the interlayer rotation (θ) and polarity, resulting in tunable chiral properties of the final stack. Using this method, we produce left- and right-handed bilayer graphene, that is, a two-atom-thick chiral film. The film displays one of the highest intrinsic ellipticity values (6.5 deg μm-1) ever reported, and a remarkably strong circular dichroism (CD) with the peak energy and sign tuned by θ and polarity. We show that these chiral properties originate from the large in-plane magnetic moment associated with the interlayer optical transition. Furthermore, we show that we can program the chiral properties of atomically thin films layer-by-layer by producing three-layer graphene films with structurally controlled CD spectra.

  8. Atomic and Molecular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-25

    The topics investigated experimentally and theoretically by the Pittsburgh Atomic Sciences Institute with applications to high power laser development and atmospheric IR backgrounds are enumerated. Reports containing the detailed scientific progress in these studies are cited. Finally, a list of the journal articles describing the results of the programs, with full references, is given.

  9. Energy from the Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patricia L.

    This curriculum guide was written to supplement fifth and sixth grade science units on matter and energy. It was designed to provide more in-depth material on the atom. The first part, "Teacher Guide," contains background information, biographical sketches of persons in the history of nuclear energy, vocabulary, answer sheets, management sheets…

  10. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Josh B; Dick, Don D; McDonnell, Stephen J; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H G; Owen, William R; Alexander, Justin D; Jaeger, David L; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J; Wallace, Robert M; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M; Randall, John N; Von Ehr, James

    2015-07-17

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure.

  11. Atomic physics and reality

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    An account of the long standing debate between Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein regarding the validity of the quantum mechanical description of atomic phenomena.With physicts, John Wheeler (Texas), John Bell (CERN), David Rohm (London), Abner Shimony (Boston), Alain Aspect (Paris)

  12. ARGININE VASOPRESSIN GENE EXPRESSION IN SUPRAOPTIC NUCLEUS AND PARAVENTRICULAR NUCLEUS OF HYPOTHALAMOUS FOLLOWING CEREBRAL ISCHEMIA AND REPERFUSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Background. Our previous studies indicated that the increased arginine vasopressin(AVP) in ischemic brain regions of gerbils could exacerbate the ischemic brain edema. This experiments is further clarify the relation between AVP and cerebral ischemia at the molecular level. Methods. The contents of AVP, AVP mRNA, AVP immunoreactive(ir) neurons in supraoptic nucleus(SON)and paraventricular nucleus(PVN) after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion were respectively determined by radioim-munoassay(RIA), immunocytochemistry( Ⅱ C), situ hybridization and computed image pattem analysis. Results. The contents of AVP in SON, PVN were increased, and the AVP ir positive neurons in SON and PVN were also significantly increased as compared with the controls after ischemia and reperfusion. And there were very light staining of AVP ir positive neurons in the other brain areas such as suprachiasmatic nucleus (SC) and periven-tricular hypothalamic nucleus (PE), but these have no significant changes as compared with the controls. During dif-ferent periods of cerebral ischemia (30~ 120 min) and reperfusion (30 min), AVP mRNA expression in SON and PVN were more markedly increased than the controls. Condusions. The transcription of AVP gene elevated, then promoting synthesis and release of AVP in SON,PVN. Under the specific condition of cerebral ischemia and repeffusion, the activity and contents of central AVP in-creased abnormally is one of the important factors which causes ischemia brain damage.

  13. Responses of primate caudal parabrachial nucleus and Kolliker-fuse nucleus neurons to whole body rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Carey D.; McGee, David M.; Zhou, Jianxun; Scudder, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    The caudal aspect of the parabrachial (PBN) and Kolliker-Fuse (KF) nuclei receive vestibular nuclear and visceral afferent information and are connected reciprocally with the spinal cord, hypothalamus, amygdala, and limbic cortex. Hence, they may be important sites of vestibulo-visceral integration, particularly for the development of affective responses to gravitoinertial challenges. Extracellular recordings were made from caudal PBN cells in three alert, adult female Macaca nemestrina through an implanted chamber. Sinusoidal and position trapezoid angular whole body rotation was delivered in yaw, roll, pitch, and vertical semicircular canal planes. Sites were confirmed histologically. Units that responded during rotation were located in lateral and medial PBN and KF caudal to the trochlear nerve at sites that were confirmed anatomically to receive superior vestibular nucleus afferents. Responses to whole-body angular rotation were modeled as a sum of three signals: angular velocity, a leaky integration of angular velocity, and vertical position. All neurons displayed angular velocity and integrated angular velocity sensitivity, but only 60% of the neurons were position-sensitive. These responses to vertical rotation could display symmetric, asymmetric, or fully rectified cosinusoidal spatial tuning about a best orientation in different cells. The spatial properties of velocity and integrated velocity and position responses were independent for all position-sensitive neurons; the angular velocity and integrated angular velocity signals showed independent spatial tuning in the position-insensitive neurons. Individual units showed one of three different orientations of their excitatory axis of velocity rotation sensitivity: vertical-plane-only responses, positive elevation responses (vertical plane plus ipsilateral yaw), and negative elevation axis responses (vertical plane plus negative yaw). The interactions between the velocity and integrated velocity components

  14. Atomic Coherent Trapping and Properties of Trapped Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guo-Jian; XIA Li-Xin; XIE Min

    2006-01-01

    Based on the theory of velocity-selective coherent population trapping, we investigate an atom-laser system where a pair of counterpropagating laser fields interact with a three-level atom. The influence of the parametric condition on the properties of the system such as velocity at which the atom is selected to be trapped, time needed for finishing the coherent trapping process, and possible electromagnetically induced transparency of an altrocold atomic medium,etc., is studied.

  15. Mapping the Two-Component Atomic Fermi Gas to the Nuclear Shell-Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özen, C.; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2014-01-01

    of the external potential becomes important. A system of two-species fermionic cold atoms with an attractive zero-range interaction is analogous to a simple model of nucleus in which neutrons and protons interact only through a residual pairing interaction. In this article, we discuss how the problem of a two......-component atomic fermi gas in a tight external trap can be mapped to the nuclear shell model so that readily available many-body techniques in nuclear physics, such as the Shell Model Monte Carlo (SMMC) method, can be directly applied to the study of these systems. We demonstrate an application of the SMMC method...

  16. Role of Nuclear Coulomb Attraction in Nonsequential Double Ionization of Argon Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤清彬; 张东玲; 李盈傧; 余本海

    2011-01-01

    The microscopic recollision dynamics in strong-field nonsequential double ionization of Ar atoms is in- vestigated using three-dimensional classical ensembles. By adjusting the nuclear Coulomb potential, we can excellently reproduce the experimental results both within the laser intensity regimes well above the reeollision threshold and well below the recollision threshold quantitatively. More importantly, our trajectory analysis clearly reveals the particular electronic dynamics in recollision process: the momentum of the recolliding electron encounters a sudden change both in magnitude and in direction when it approaches the nucleus closely, which show that the nuclear Coulomb attraction plays a key role in the recollision process of nonsequential double ionization of Ar atoms.

  17. Proton-induced alginment of the L/sub 3/-subshell in heavy atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jitschin, W.; Kaschuba, A.; Kleinpoppen, H.; Lutz, H.O.

    1982-01-01

    The proton-induced alignment of the L-shell in heavy atoms (54 <= Z <= 92) has been studied my measuring the anisotropy of the emitted x radiation. The proton energies ranged from 150 keV to 10 MeV. The alignment in different target atoms was found to approximately follow a universal curve. Calculations in Born approximation as well as in the semiclassical approach give a good description of the observed alignment at high projectile velocities. In the low energy regime the deflection of the projectile in the Coulomb field of the target nucleus has to be taken into account to obtain agreement between theory and experiment.

  18. Production of bound triplet $\\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$ system in collisions of electrons with atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Artéaga-Romero, N; Serbo, V G

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the production of orthodimuonium (OM) ($\\mu^{+} nuclei or atoms. This reaction was previously studied by Holvik and Olsen [Phys. Rev. D 35, 2124 (1987)] on the basis of a bremsstrahlung mechanism where OM is produced by only one virtual photon. In the present paper we consider a competing three-photon mechanism where the production of OM results from the collision of a photon generated by the electron with two photons emitted by the nucleus. We derive the corresponding spectrum and production rate of OM and show that the three-photon mechanism is the dominant one for heavy atom target.

  19. On the determination of the pion effective mass in nuclei from pionic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    1998-07-01

    The binding energies of the deeply bound 1s and 2p states in pionic atoms of 207Pb, recently established experimentally in the 208Pb(d,3He) reaction, have been used by several groups to derive the pion effective mass in nuclear matter. We show that these binding energies are fully consistent with `normal' pionic atoms and that the real part of the pion-nucleus potential at the center of 207Pb is 28+/-3 MeV and not 20 MeV as suggested previously.

  20. Towards weighing individual atoms by high-angle scattering of electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Argentero, G; Kotakoski, J; Eder, F R; Meyer, J C

    2015-01-01

    We consider theoretically the energy loss of electrons scattered to high angles when assuming that the primary beam can be limited to a single atom. We discuss the possibility of identifying the isotopes of light elements and of extracting information about phonons in this signal. The energy loss is related to the mass of the much heavier nucleus, and is spread out due to atomic vibrations. Importantly, while the width of the broadening is much larger than the energy separation of isotopes, only the shift in the peak positions must be detected if the beam is limited to a single atom. We conclude that the experimental case will be challenging but is not excluded by the physical principles as far as considered here. Moreover, the initial experiments demonstrate the separation of gold and carbon based on a signal that is related to their mass, rather than their atomic number.

  1. Laser spectroscopy of the antiprotonic helium atom – its energy levels and state lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hidetoshi, Yamaguchi

    2003-01-01

    The antiprotonic atom is a three-body exotic system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus. Its surprising longevity was found and has been studied for more than 10 years. In this work, transition energies and lifetimes of this exotic atom were systematically studied by using the antiproton beam of AD(Antiproton Decelerator) facility at CERN, with an RFQ antiproton decelerator, a narrow-bandwidth laser, Cerenkov counters with fast-response photomultiplier tubes, and cryogenic helium target systems. Thirteen transition energies were determined with precisions of better than 200 ppb by a laser spectroscopy method, together with the elimination of the shift effect caused by collisions with surrounding atoms. Fifteen lifetimes (decay rates) of short-lived states were determined from the time distributions of the antiproton-annihilation signals and the resonance widths of the atomic spectral lines. The relation between the magnitude of the decay rates and the transition multipolarity was inv...

  2. Excitation of hydrogen atoms in collisions with helium atoms: the role of electron–electron interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frémont, F.; Belyaev, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    Cross sections for producing H(nl) excited state atoms in H(1s) + He(1s2) collisions are calculated using the CTMC method, at impact energies ranging from 20 eV to 100 keV. The role of the electron correlation is studied. In the first step, the interactions between each pair of the three electrons are neglected. This leads to disagreement of the calculated total cross section for producing H(2l) atoms with previous experimental and theoretical results. In a second step, the electron–electron interaction is taken into account in a rigorous way, that is, in the form of the pure Coulomb potential. To make sure that the He target is stable before the collision, phenomenological potentials for the electron–helium-nucleus interactions that simulate the Heisenberg principle are included in addition to the Coulomb potential. The excitation cross section calculated in the frame of this model is in remarkable agreement with previous data in the range between 200 eV and 5 keV. At other energies, discrepancies are revealed, but only by a factor of less than 2 at high energies. The present results show the decisive role of the electron–electron interaction during collisions. In addition, they demonstrate the ability of classical mechanics to take into account the effects of the electron correlation.

  3. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Nagata, Y; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Hayano, R; Knudsen, H; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Leali, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 Histone Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998285,SRX9...98283 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 All antigens Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998285...,SRX998283 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 Histone Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998285,SRX9...98283 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 Histone Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998283,SRX9...98285 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  15. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 All antigens Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998283...,SRX998285 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 All antigens Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998285...,SRX998283 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 Histone Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998285,SRX9...98283 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 All antigens Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998285...,SRX998283 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  19. Optical atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Poli, N; Gill, P; Tino, G M

    2014-01-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femto-second optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in $10^{18}$. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  20. Rotary cup slurry atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, H. T.; Marnicio, R. J.

    1983-06-01

    The theory of a two-phase flow in a rotating cup atomizer is described. The analysis considers the separation of the solid and liquid media thus realistically modeling the flow of two layers along the inner cup wall: a slurry of increasing solids concentration and a supernatent liquid layer. The analysis is based on the earlier work of Hinze and Milborn (1950) which addressed the flow within a rotary cup for a homogeneous liquid. The superimposition of a settling velocity under conditions of high centrifugal acceleration permits the extended analysis of the separation of the two phases. Appropriate boundary conditions have been applied to the film's free surface and the cup wall and to match the flow characteristics at the liquid-slurry interface. The changing slurry viscosity, increasing nonlinearly with growing solid loading, was also considered. A parameter study illustrates the potential for a cup design to provide optimal slurry and liquid film thicknesses for effective atomization.

  1. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  2. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  3. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  4. Atom Interferometry Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-19

    Casher effect . RECENT PUBLICATION Atom Optics, David W. Keith and David E. Pritchard, New frontiers in QED and Quantumoptics, (Plenum Press, New York...frequencies (< 10 Hz) where the passive system is least effective . The reduction of relative motion provided by the active system will allow us to use much...experimental objective will probably be a demonstration of Berry’s phase with bosons. Another possibility would be an improved measurement of the Aharonov

  5. Artificial Rydberg atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Yong S. [Center for Computational Nanoscience, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306 (United States)], E-mail: ysjoe@bsu.edu; Mkrtchian, Vanik E. [Institute for Physical Research, Armenian Academy of Sciences, Ashtarak-2, 378410, Republic of Armenia (Armenia); Lee, Sun H. [Center for Computational Nanoscience, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306 (United States)

    2009-03-02

    We analyze bound states of an electron in the field of a positively charged nanoshell. We find that the binding and excitation energies of the system decrease when the radius of the nanoshell increases. We also show that the ground and the first excited states of this system have remarkably the same properties of the highly excited Rydberg states of a hydrogen-like atom, i.e., a high sensitivity to the external perturbations and long radiative lifetimes.

  6. Strange exotic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    1998-08-01

    Exotic atoms of K- and Σ- are analyzed using density-dependent optical potentials constrained by a low-density limit. Emphasis is placed on radial sensitivities of the real potential. A potential depth of 180MeV inside nuclei is confirmed for K-. For Σ- a shallow attractive potential outside the nuclear surface becomes repulsive in the interior. The information content of limited data sets is demonstrated.

  7. Atomic lighthouse effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Máximo, C E; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease in magnetic field efficiency.

  8. The Atomic Lighthouse Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Máximo, C E; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease of the magnetic field efficiency.

  9. Real and Hybrid Atomic Orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D. B.; Fowler, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that the Schrodinger equation for the hydrogenlike atom separates in both spheroconal and prolate spheroidal coordinates and that these separations provide a sound theoretical basis for the real and hybrid atomic orbitals. (Author/SK)

  10. Exporting RNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Alwin; Hurt, Ed

    2007-10-01

    The transport of RNA molecules from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is fundamental for gene expression. The different RNA species that are produced in the nucleus are exported through the nuclear pore complexes via mobile export receptors. Small RNAs (such as tRNAs and microRNAs) follow relatively simple export routes by binding directly to export receptors. Large RNAs (such as ribosomal RNAs and mRNAs) assemble into complicated ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles and recruit their exporters via class-specific adaptor proteins. Export of mRNAs is unique as it is extensively coupled to transcription (in yeast) and splicing (in metazoa). Understanding the mechanisms that connect RNP formation with export is a major challenge in the field.

  11. The identification of musical instruments through nucleus cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasmeder, M L; Lutman, M E

    2006-09-01

    In this study, self-reported ability to recognize musical instruments was investigated by means of a questionnaire, which was sent to a group of adult Nucleus cochlear implant users and a group of normally hearing subjects. In addition, spectrograms and electrodograms were produced and analysed for samples of music played on 10 different musical instruments. Self-reported ability to recognize some instruments was poor in the group of implant users, particularly for the saxophone, tuba and clarinet. Electrodograms showed that these instruments could only be identified using distorted spectral information or reduced temporal information. Other instruments, such as the drum and piano, could be identified using temporal information. Limited spectral resolution makes the recognition of musical instruments difficult for Nucleus implant users.

  12. Relativistic Spin-Isospin Dependent Response Function of Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liang-Gang; CHEN Wei; AI Bao-Quan; ZHENG Xiao-Ping; Masahiro Nakano

    2000-01-01

    A full relativistic formalism is employed to derive the relativistic particle-hole and delta-hole excitation polariza tion insertion of pion propagator in nuclear matter. The spin-isospin-dependent response function of nucleus at high energy-momentum transfer is calculated with the nuclear matter approximation. The short range correlation effect, two-nucleon absorption and nucleus form factor effects are included in the calculation. The position and width of the resonance peak of the spin-isospin mode are reproduced and found to be coincident with experiment data. The position of the peak and its width is sensitive to Landau-Migdal parameter g' which is about 0.6.

  13. Efficient And Portable SDR Waveform Development: The Nucleus Concept

    CERN Document Server

    Ramakrishnan, Venkatesh; Kempf, Torsten; Kammler, David; Ascheid, Gerd; Meyr, Heinrich; Adrat, Marc; Antweiler, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Future wireless communication systems should be flexible to support different waveforms (WFs) and be cognitive to sense the environment and tune themselves. This has lead to tremendous interest in software defined radios (SDRs). Constraints like throughput, latency and low energy demand high implementation efficiency. The tradeoff of going for a highly efficient implementation is the increase of porting effort to a new hardware (HW) platform. In this paper, we propose a novel concept for WF development, the Nucleus concept, that exploits the common structure in various wireless signal processing algorithms and provides a way for efficient and portable implementation. Tool assisted WF mapping and exploration is done efficiently by propagating the implementation and interface properties of Nuclei. The Nucleus concept aims at providing software flexibility with high level programmability, but at the same time limiting HW flexibility to maximize area and energy efficiency.

  14. Proton emission from an oblate nucleus {sup 151}Lu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procter, M.G., E-mail: mark.procter@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cullen, D.M.; Taylor, M.J.; Alharshan, G.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Ferreira, L.S. [Centro de Física das Interacções Fundamentais, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Maglione, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Galilei”, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via Marzolo 8, I-3513, Padova (Italy); Auranen, K.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.T.; Jakobsson, U.; Julin, R.; Herzáň, A.; Konki, J.; Leino, M. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Pakarinen, J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Partanen, J. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, D-50937, Köln (Germany); Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); and others

    2013-08-09

    Excited states in the proton-unbound nucleus {sup 151}Lu have been established using γ-ray coincidence techniques. The lifetime of the first excited state above the proton-emitting ground state has been measured using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method combined with recoil-decay tagging. The experimental level scheme and extracted lifetime have been compared with state-of-the-art theoretical calculations based upon a non-adiabatic deformed Woods–Saxon potential. This comparison suggests that the proton-emitting ground state in {sup 151}Lu is mildly oblate with a deformation β=−0.11{sub −0.05}{sup +0.02} and represents the best evidence to date for proton emission from an oblate nucleus.

  15. Experiments on parity violation in the compound nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, J.D.

    1996-09-01

    Results from experiments that measure parity-violating longitudinal asymmetries in the scattering of epithermal neutrons from compound-nuclear resonances at the Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos are discussed. Parity non-conserving asymmetries have been observed for many p-wave resonances in a single target. Measurements were performed on several nuclei in the mass region of A-100 and A-230. The statistical model of the compound nucleus provides a theoretical basis for extracting mean-squared matrix elements from the experimental asymmetry data, and for interpreting the mean-squared matrix elements. The constraints on the weak meson-exchange couplings calculated from the compound-nucleus asymmetry data agree qualitatively with the results from few-body and light-nuclei experiments. For all nuclei but {sup 232}Th measured asymmetries have random signs. For {sup 232}Th eight of eight measured asymmetries are positive. This phenomenon is discussed in terms or doorway models.

  16. Theoretical description of the decay chain of the nucleus 294118

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiczewski, Adam

    2016-09-01

    The decay chain of the nucleus 294118, the heaviest nucleus observed (at JINR-Dubna) up to now, is analyzed theoretically. The α-decay energies {Q}α , the α-decay and the spontaneous-fission half-lives, {T}α and {T}{{sf}}, are studied. The analysis of the α decay is based on a phenomenological model using only three parameters. The calculations are performed in three variants using masses obtained with three nuclear-mass models accurately describing masses of heaviest nuclei. The experimental {Q}α energies are reconstructed with the average of the absolute values of the discrepancies: 180 keV, 270 keV and 290 keV, in the three variants considered. Measured half-lives {T}α are reproduced within the average ratios: 2.9, 9.8 and 5.2 in these variants.

  17. $K^+$-nucleus potentials from $K^+$-nucleon amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, E

    2016-01-01

    Optical potentials for $K^+$-nucleus interactions are constructed from $K^+$-nucleon amplitudes using recently developed algorithm based on $K^+$-N kinematics in the nuclear medium. With the deep penetration of $K^+$ mesons into the nucleus at momenta below 800~MeV/c it is possible to test this approach with greater sensitivity than hitherto done with $K^-$ and pions. The energy-dependence of experimental reaction and total cross sections on nuclei is better reproduced with this approach compared to fixed-energy amplitudes. The inclusion of Pauli correlations in the medium also improves the agreement between calculation and experiment. The absolute scale of the cross sections is reproduced very well for $^6$Li but for C, Si and Ca calculated cross sections are (23$\\pm4$)\\% smaller than experiment, in agreement with earlier analyses. Two phenomenological models that produce such missing strength suggest that the imaginary part of the potential needs about 40\\% enhancement.

  18. Pairing reentrance in warm rotating $^{104}$Pd nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, N Quang; Agrawal, B K; Datar, V M; Mitra, A; Chakrabarty, D R

    2015-01-01

    Pairing reentrance phenomenon in the warm rotating $^{104}$Pd nucleus is studied within the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-based approach (the FTBCS1). The theory takes into account the effect of quasiparticle number fluctuations on the pairing field at finite temperature and angular momentum within the pairing model plus noncollective rotation along the symmetry axis. The numerical calculations for the pairing gaps and nuclear level densities (NLD), of which an anomalous enhancement has been experimentally observed at low excitation energy $E^*$ and high angular momentum $J$, show that the pairing reentrance is seen in the behavior of pairing gap obtained within the FTBCS1 at low $E$ and high $J$. This leads to the enhancement of the FTBCS1 level densities, in good agreement with the experimental observation. This agreement indicates that the observed enhancement of the NLD might be the first experimental detection of the pairing reentrance in a finite nucleus.

  19. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of the nucleus {sup 139}Ce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Cata-Danil, I.; Ivascu, M.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Mihailescu, L.C.; Rusu, C.; Suliman, G. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest (Romania)

    2006-03-15

    Gamma-ray coincidence techniques are used to determine new level structures in the N=81 nucleus {sup 139}Ce, at low spins and excitation energies with the {sup 139}La(p,n{gamma}) reaction at 5.0 and 6.0 MeV incident energy, and at high spins with the {sup 130}Te({sup 12}C,3n{gamma}) reaction at 50.5 MeV, respectively. Lifetime determinations are also made in the (p,n{gamma}) reaction with the centroid DSA method. The observed level structures are discussed by comparison with existing calculations and with those in the neighbouring nucleus {sup 140}Ce. (orig.)

  20. Neutral current neutrino-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Leitner, T; Mosel, U

    2006-01-01

    We have extended our model for charged current neutrino-nucleus interactions to neutral current reactions. For the elementary neutrino-nucleon interaction, we take into account quasielastic scattering, Delta excitation and the excitation of the resonances in the second resonance region. Our model for the neutrino-nucleus collisions includes in-medium effects such as Fermi motion, Pauli blocking, nuclear binding, and final-state interactions. They are implemented by means of the Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) coupled-channel transport model. This allows us to study exclusive channels, namely pion production and nucleon knockout. We find that final-state interactions modify considerably the distributions through rescattering, charge-exchange and absorption. Side-feeding induced by charge-exchange scattering is important in both cases. In the case of pions, there is a strong absorption associated with the in-medium pionless decay modes of the Delta, while nucleon knockout exhibits a considerable enh...

  1. ηproduction in proton-nucleus collisions near threshold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG You-Chang; CHEN Hong; JIANG Huan-Qing

    2008-01-01

    The η-meson production in proton-nucleus(pA)collisions near threshold is studied within a relativistic meson-exchange model.The primary production amplitude is presented in the distorted-wave impulse approximation for the nucleus with isospin 0 or [1]by assuming that N*(1535)is excited via a meson exchange and then decays into η and nucleon pair(ηN).Taking 18O and 12C nuclei as examples,we evaluate the production cross sections as a function of the incident proton energy,and analyze the effects of nuclear medium and various meson-exchange contributions.Finally we discuss implications for further experimental studies at the Cooling Storage Ring(CSR)in Lanzhou.

  2. Determination of the {\\eta}'-nucleus optical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Nanova, M; Paryev, E Ya; Bayadilov, D; Bantes, B; Beck, R; Beloglazov, Y A; Böse, S; Brinkmann, K -T; Challand, Th; Crede, V; Dahlke, T; Dietz, F; Drexler, P; Eberhardt, H; Elsner, D; Ewald, R; Fornet-Ponse, K; Friedrich, S; Frommberger, F; Funke, Ch; Gottschall, M; Gridnev, A; Grüner, M; Gutz, E; Hammann, Ch; Hammann, D; Hannappel, J; Hartmann, J; Hillert, W; Hoffmeister, P; Honisch, Ch; Jaegle, I; Kaiser, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammer, S; Keshelashvili, I; Kleber, V; Klein, F; Klempt, E; Krusche, B; Lang, M; Lopatin, I V; Maghrbi, Y; Makonyi, K; Müller, J; Odenthal, T; Piontek, D; Schaepe, S; Schmidt, Ch; Schmieden, H; Schmitz, R; Seifen, T; Thiel, A; Thoma, U; van Pee, H; Walther, D; Wendel, Ch; Wiedner, U; Wilson, A; Winnebeck, A; Zenke, F

    2013-01-01

    The excitation function and momentum distribution of $\\eta^\\prime$ mesons have been measured in photon induced reactions on $^{12}{}$C in the energy range of 1250-2600 MeV. The experiment was performed with tagged photon beams from the ELSA electron accelerator using the Crystal Barrel and TAPS detectors. The data are compared to model calculations to extract information on the sign and magnitude of the real part of the $\\eta^\\prime$-nucleus potential. Within the model, the comparison indicates an attractive potential of -($37 \\pm 10(stat)\\pm10(syst)$) MeV depth at normal nuclear matter density. Since the modulus of this depth is larger than the modulus of the imaginary part of the $\\eta^\\prime$-nucleus potential of -($10\\pm2.5$) MeV, determined by transparency ratio measurements, a search for resolved $\\eta^\\prime$-bound states appears promising.

  3. Leading Neutrons From Polarized Proton-Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeliovich, B Z; Schmidt, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Leading neutron production on protons is known to be subject to strong absorptive corrections, which have been under debate for a long time. On nuclear targets these corrections are significantly enhanced and push the partial cross sections of neutron production to the very periphery of the nucleus. As a result, the A-dependences of inclusive and diffractive neutron production turn out to be similar. The mechanism of \\pi-a_1 interference, which successfully explained the observed single-spin asymmetry of neutrons in polarized pp interactions, is extended here to polarized pA collisions. Corrected for nuclear effects it explains well the magnitude and sign of the asymmetry A_N observed in inelastic events, resulting in a violent break up of the nucleus. However the excessive magnitude of A_N observed in the diffractive sample, remains a challenge.

  4. Neutrino-nucleus interactions at the LBNF near detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosel, Ulrich [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    The reaction mechanisms for neutrino interactions with an {sup 40}Ar nucleus with the LBNF flux are calculated with the Giessen-Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) transport-theoretical implementation of these interactions. Quasielastic scattering, many-body effects, pion production and absorption and Deep Inelastic Scattering are discussed; they all play a role at the LBNF energies and are experimentally entangled with each other. Quasielastic scattering makes up for only about 1/3 of the total cross section whereas pion production channels make up about 2/3 of the total. This underlines the need for a consistent description of the neutrino-nucleus reaction that treats all channels on an equal, consistent footing. The results discussed here can also serve as useful guideposts for the Intermediate Neutrino Program.

  5. Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions at the LBNF Near Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mosel, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The reaction mechanisms for neutrino interactions with an $^{40}Ar$ nucleus with the LBNF flux are calculated with the Giessen-Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) transport-theoretical implementation of these interactions. Quasielastic scattering, many-body effects, pion production and absorption and Deep Inelastic Scattering are discussed; they all play a role at the LBNF energies and are experimentally entangled with each other. Quasielastic scattering makes up for only about 1/3 of the total cross section whereas pion production channels make up about 2/3 of the total. This underlines the need for a consistent description of the neutrino-nucleus reaction that treats all channels on an equal, consistent footing. The results discussed here can also serve as useful guideposts for the Intermediate Neutrino Program.

  6. Electromagnetic properties of the Beryllium-11 nucleus in Halo EFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammer H.-W.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We compute electromagnetic properties of the Beryllium-11 nucleus using an effective field theory that exploits the separation of scales in this halo system. We fix the parameters of the EFT from measured data on levels and scattering lengths in the 10Be plus neutron system. We then obtain predictions for the B(E1 strength of the 1/2+ to 1/2− transition in the 11Be nucleus. We also compute the charge radius of the ground state of 11Be. Agreement with experiment within the expected accuracy of a leading-order computation in this EFT is obtained. We also indicate how higher-order corrections that affect both s-wave and p-wave 10 Be-neutron interactions will affect our results.

  7. K+-nucleus potentials from K+-nucleon amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    2016-10-01

    Optical potentials for K+-nucleus interactions are constructed from K+-nucleon amplitudes using recently developed algorithm based on K+-N kinematics in the nuclear medium. With the deep penetration of K+ mesons into the nucleus at momenta below 800 MeV / c it is possible to test this approach with greater sensitivity than hitherto done with K- and pions. The energy-dependence of experimental reaction and total cross sections on nuclei is better reproduced with this approach compared to fixed-energy amplitudes. The inclusion of Pauli correlations in the medium also improves the agreement between calculation and experiment. The absolute scale of the cross sections is reproduced very well for 6Li but for C, Si and Ca calculated cross sections are (23 ± 4)% smaller than experiment, in agreement with earlier analyses. Two phenomenological models that produce such missing strength suggest that the imaginary part of the potential needs about 40% enhancement.

  8. NPY and VGF Immunoreactivity Increased in the Arcuate Nucleus, but Decreased in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, of Type-II Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Saderi; Roberto Salgado-Delgado; Rafael Avendaño-Pradel; Maria del Carmen Basualdo; Gian-Luca Ferri; Laura Chávez-Macías; Juan E Olvera Roblera; Carolina Escobar; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2012-01-01

    Ample animal studies demonstrate that neuropeptides NPY and α-MSH expressed in Arcuate Nucleus and Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, modulate glucose homeostasis and food intake. In contrast is the absence of data validating these observations for human disease. Here we compare the post mortem immunoreactivity of the metabolic neuropeptides NPY, αMSH and VGF in the infundibular nucleus, and brainstem of 11 type-2 diabetic and 11 non-diabetic individuals. α-MSH, NPY and tyrosine hydroxylase i...

  9. Ghost imaging with atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakimov, R. I.; Henson, B. M.; Shin, D. K.; Hodgman, S. S.; Dall, R. G.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Truscott, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    Ghost imaging is a counter-intuitive phenomenon—first realized in quantum optics—that enables the image of a two-dimensional object (mask) to be reconstructed using the spatio-temporal properties of a beam of particles with which it never interacts. Typically, two beams of correlated photons are used: one passes through the mask to a single-pixel (bucket) detector while the spatial profile of the other is measured by a high-resolution (multi-pixel) detector. The second beam never interacts with the mask. Neither detector can reconstruct the mask independently, but temporal cross-correlation between the two beams can be used to recover a ‘ghost’ image. Here we report the realization of ghost imaging using massive particles instead of photons. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold, metastable helium atoms, which originate from s-wave scattering of two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. We use higher-order Kapitza-Dirac scattering to generate a large number of correlated atom pairs, enabling the creation of a clear ghost image with submillimetre resolution. Future extensions of our technique could lead to the realization of ghost interference, and enable tests of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement and Bell’s inequalities with atoms.

  10. Zitterbewegung in Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, Poliana; Egues, J. Carlos

    2013-03-01

    In condensed matter systems, the coupling between spatial and spin degrees of freedom through the spin-orbit (SO) interaction offers the possibility of manipulating the electron spin via its orbital motion. The proposal by Datta and Das of a `spin transistor' for example, highlights the use of the SO interaction to control the electron spin via electrical means. Recently, arrangements of crossed lasers and magnetic fields have been used to trap and cool atoms in optical lattices and also to create light-induced gauge potentials, which mimic the SO interactions in real solids. In this work, we investigate the Zitterbewegung in cold atoms by starting from the effective SO Hamiltonian derived in Ref.. Cross-dressed atoms as effective spins can provide a proper setting in which to observe this effect, as the relevant parameter range of SO strengths may be more easily attainable in this context. We find a variety of peculiar Zitterbewegung orbits in real and pseudo-spin spaces, e.g., cycloids and ellipses - all of which obtained with realistic parameters. This work is supported by FAPESP, CAPES and CNPq.

  11. Nucleus accumbens μ-opioid receptors mediate social reward

    OpenAIRE

    Trezza, Viviana; Damsteegt, Ruth; Achterberg, E J Marijke; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J

    2011-01-01

    Positive social interactions are essential for emotional well-being and proper behavioral development of young individuals. Here, we studied the neural underpinnings of social reward, by investigating the involvement of opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in social play behavior, a highly rewarding social interaction in adolescent rats. Intra-NAc infusion of morphine (0.05–0.1 μg) increased pinning and pouncing, characteristic elements of social play behavior in rats, and ...

  12. Nucleus-associated intermediate filaments from chicken erythrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Chicken erythrocyte nuclei prepared by isolation in isotonic KCl and Nonidet P-40 detergent were found to contain numerous attached filaments with a mean diameter of 11.0 nm. In polypeptide content and solubility properties, they resembled the vimentin type of intermediate filament found in cells of mesenchymal origin. Examination of their association with the nucleus suggests that more than a simple membrane attachment is involved.

  13. High-spin states in the {sup 96}Tc nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Cata-Danil, I.; Ivascu, M.; Marginean, N.; Rusu, C.; Stroe, L.; Ur, C.A. [National Inst. of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Gizon, A.; Gizon, J. [Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires, IN2P3-CNRS/UPJ, Grenoble (France); Nyako, B.; Timar, J.; Zolnai, L. [Inst. of Nuclear Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Boston, A.J.; Joss, D.T.; Paul, E.S.; Semple, A.T. [Oliver Lodge Lab., Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom); Parry, C.M. [Dept. of Physics, York Univ., Heslington, York (United Kingdom)

    2001-03-01

    High-spin states in the {sup 96}Tc nucleus have been studied with the reactions {sup 82}Se({sup 19}F,5n{gamma}) at 68 MeV and Zn({sup 36}S,{alpha}pxn) at 130 MeV. Two {gamma}-ray cascades (irregular bandlike structures) have been observed up to an excitation energy of about 10 MeV and spin 21-22{Dirac_h}. (orig.)

  14. High-spin states in the {sup 97}Tc nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Cata-Danil, I.; Ivascu, M.; Marginean, N.; Rusu, C.; Stroe, L.; Ur, C.A. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest 76900 (Romania); Gadea, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy)

    2003-04-01

    High-spin states in the {sup 97}Tc nucleus have been studied by in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy with the reaction {sup 82}Se({sup 19}F,4n{gamma}) at 68 MeV incident energy. Excited states have been observed up to about 8 MeV excitation and spin 43/2{Dirac_h}. The observed level scheme is compared with results of shell model calculations. (orig.)

  15. {alpha}-nucleus potentials and photon-induced nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galaviz, D. E-mail: redondo@ikp.tu-darmstadt.de; Babilon, M.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Hillier, R.; Mate, Z.; Mohr, P.; Rauscher, T.; Somorjai, E.; Zilges, A.; Zolnai, L

    2003-05-05

    New data for the {sup 112,124}Sn({alpha},{alpha}){sup 112,124}Sn reaction have been measured and are presently analyzed. Results of the {sup 112} Sn x {alpha} potential at the energy E{sub c.m.} {approx} 14 MeV are presented. The determination of this {alpha}-nucleus potential may allow a prediction of the {sup 112}Sn({alpha},{gamma}){sup 116}Te cross section.

  16. How did nucleus and sexual reproduction come into being?

    OpenAIRE

    Ping Xie

    2016-01-01

    The origin of eukaryote is a fundamental, forbidding evolutionary puzzle, and the popular scenarios of eukaryogenesis are far from being clear. So far, there have been various theories (e.g., syntrophic model, autogenous model, viral eukaryogenesis model, exomembrane hypothesis), but few explain why. I observed that C-value (the amount of DNA contained within a haploid nucleus) increased by 3.5 orders of magnitude from prokaryote to eukaryotes, which is inconceivably close to the packing rati...

  17. Theoretical Aspects of Coherent Elastic Neutrino Nucleus Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Gail

    2014-09-01

    We will discuss the physics potential of coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. This standard model process has never been directly measured, although there are a number of experiments proposed at stopped pion/muon or reactor sites that could make such a first detection. Such a measurement opens up the possibility for a number of interesting physics probes. We will review these from a theoretical point of view, with a particular focus on the nuclear-neutron form factor.

  18. Decay of the N =126 , 213Fr nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pragati, Deo, A. Y.; Podolyák, Zs.; Walker, P. M.; Algora, A.; Rubio, B.; Agramunt, J.; Fraile, L. M.; Al-Dahan, N.; Alkhomashi, N.; Briz, J. A.; Aguado, M. E. Estevez; Farrelly, G.; Gelletly, W.; Herlert, A.; Köster, U.; Maira, A.

    2016-12-01

    γ rays following the EC/β+ and α decay of the N = 126, 213Fr nucleus have been observed at the CERN isotope separator on-line (ISOLDE) facility with the help of γ -ray and conversion-electron spectroscopy. These γ rays establish several hitherto unknown excited states in 213Rn. Also, five new α -decay branches from the 213Fr ground state have been discovered. Shell model calculations have been performed to understand the newly observed states in 213Rn.

  19. PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OF HYPERALGESIA EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza Grava, André Luiz; Ferrari,Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs (dexamethasone, indomethacin, atenolol and indomethacin plus atenolol) and analgesic drugs (morphine) on hyperalgesia experimentally induced by the nucleus pulposus (NP) in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats of weights ranging from 220 to 250 g were used in the study. Hyperalgesia was induced by means of a fragment of NP removed from the sacrococcygeal region that was placed in contact w...

  20. Cloud condensation nucleus behaviour of selected dicarboxylic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mia Frosch Mogensbæk; Nielsen, Ole Faurskov; Bilde, Merete

    .g. Anttila et al, 2005). Particles composed of two such compounds, namely glutaric acid and pimelic acid, have been studied using a cloud condensation nucleus counter (University of Wyoming, Model 100B). The behaviour of pimelic acid seems to agree quite well with the predictions of Köhler theory. This......., and Riekkola, M.L , Determination of organic acids in aerosol particles from a coniferous forest by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, Journal of Separation Science, 28, 337-346, 2005....

  1. Hidden Glashow resonance in neutrino–nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Alikhanov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Today it is widely believed that s-channel excitation of an on-shell W boson, commonly known as the Glashow resonance, can be initiated in matter only by the electron antineutrino in the process ν¯ee−→W− at the laboratory energy around 6.3 PeV. In this Letter we argue that the Glashow resonance within the Standard Model also occurs in neutrino–nucleus collisions. The main conclusions are as follows. 1 The Glashow resonance can be excited by both neutrinos and antineutrinos of all the three flavors scattering in the Coulomb field of a nucleus. 2 The Glashow resonance in a neutrino–nucleus reaction does not manifest itself as a Breit–Wigner-like peak in the cross section but the latter exhibits instead a slow logarithmic-law growth with the neutrino energy. The resonance turns thus out to be hidden. 3 More than 98% of W bosons produced in the sub-PeV region in neutrino-initiated reactions in water/ice will be from the Glashow resonance. 4 The vast majority of the Glashow resonance events in a neutrino detector are expected at energies from a few TeV to a few tens of TeV, being mostly initiated by the conventional atmospheric neutrinos dominant in this energy range. Calculations of the cross sections for Glashow resonance excitation on the oxygen nucleus as well as on the proton are carried out in detail. The results of this Letter can be useful for studies of neutrino interactions at large volume water/ice neutrino detectors. For example, in the IceCube detector one can expect 0.3 Glashow resonance events with shower-like topologies and the deposited energies above 300 TeV per year. It is therefore likely already to have at least one Glashow resonance event in the IceCube data set.

  2. The TLC: a novel auditory nucleus of the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña, Enrique; Viñuela, Antonio; Marshall, Allen F; Fitzpatrick, Douglas C; Aparicio, M-Auxiliadora

    2007-11-28

    We have identified a novel nucleus of the mammalian brain and termed it the tectal longitudinal column (TLC). Basic histologic stains, tract-tracing techniques and three-dimensional reconstructions reveal that the rat TLC is a narrow, elongated structure spanning the midbrain tectum longitudinally. This paired nucleus is located close to the midline, immediately dorsal to the periaqueductal gray matter. It occupies what has traditionally been considered the most medial region of the deep superior colliculus and the most medial region of the inferior colliculus. The TLC differs from the neighboring nuclei of the superior and inferior colliculi and the periaqueductal gray by its distinct connections and cytoarchitecture. Extracellular electrophysiological recordings show that TLC neurons respond to auditory stimuli with physiologic properties that differ from those of neurons in the inferior or superior colliculi. We have identified the TLC in rodents, lagomorphs, carnivores, nonhuman primates, and humans, which indicates that the nucleus is conserved across mammals. The discovery of the TLC reveals an unexpected level of longitudinal organization in the mammalian tectum and raises questions as to the participation of this mesencephalic region in essential, yet completely unexplored, aspects of multisensory and/or sensorimotor integration.

  3. Nucleus- and cell-specific gene expression in monkey thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Karl D; Choudary, Prabhakara V; Jones, Edward G

    2007-02-06

    Nuclei of the mammalian thalamus are aggregations of neurons with unique architectures and input-output connections, yet the molecular determinants of their organizational specificity remain unknown. By comparing expression profiles of thalamus and cerebral cortex in adult rhesus monkeys, we identified transcripts that are unique to dorsal thalamus or to individual nuclei within it. Real-time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization analyses confirmed the findings. Expression profiling of individual nuclei microdissected from the dorsal thalamus revealed additional subsets of nucleus-specific genes. Functional annotation using Gene Ontology (GO) vocabulary and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis revealed overrepresentation of GO categories related to development, morphogenesis, cell-cell interactions, and extracellular matrix within the thalamus- and nucleus-specific genes, many involved in the Wnt signaling pathway. Examples included the transcription factor TCF7L2, localized exclusively to excitatory neurons; a calmodulin-binding protein PCP4; the bone extracellular matrix molecules SPP1 and SPARC; and other genes involved in axon outgrowth and cell matrix interactions. Other nucleus-specific genes such as CBLN1 are involved in synaptogenesis. The genes identified likely underlie nuclear specification, cell phenotype, and connectivity during development and their maintenance in the adult thalamus.

  4. Coexistence of central nucleus, cores, and rods: Diagnostic relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinakaran, Sathiyabama; Kumar, Rashmi Santhosh; Thakkar, Ravindra; Narayanappa, Gayathri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital myopathies (CMs) though considered distinct disorders, simultaneous occurrence of central nucleus, nemaline rods, and cores in the same biopsy are scarcely reported. Objective: A retrospective reassessment of cases diagnosed as CMs to look for multiple pathologies missed, if any, during the initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Enzyme histochemical, and immunohistochemical-stained slides from 125 cases diagnosed as congenital myopathy were reassessed. Results: The study revealed 15 cases (12%) of congenital myopathy with more than one morphological feature. Central nucleus with cores (n = 11), central nucleus, nemaline rods and cores (n = 3), and nemaline rods with cores (n = 1). 4/11 cases were diagnosed as centronuclear myopathy (CNM) in the first instance; in addition, cores were revealed on reassessment. Discussion: The prevalence of CMs of all neuromuscular disorders is approximately 6 in 100,000 live births, with regional variations. Three main defined CMs include centro nuclear myopathy (CNM), nemaline rod myopathy (NRM), and central core disease (CCD). However, they are more diverse with overlapping clinical and histopathological features, thus broadening the spectra within each category of congenital myopathy. Conclusion: Identification of cases with overlap of pathological features has diagnostic relevance. PMID:27293330

  5. An off-centered active galactic nucleus in NGC 3115

    CERN Document Server

    Menezes, R B; Ricci, T V

    2014-01-01

    NGC 3115 is an S0 galaxy that has always been considered to have a pure absorption-line spectrum. Some recent studies have detected a compact radio-emitting nucleus in this object, coinciding with the photometric center and with a candidate for the X-ray nucleus. This is evidence of the existence of a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the galaxy, although no emission line has ever been observed. We report the detection of an emission-line spectrum of a type 1 AGN in NGC 3115, with an H$\\alpha$ luminosity of $L_{H\\alpha} = (4.2 \\pm 0.4) \\times 10^{37}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Our analysis revealed that this AGN is located at a projected distance of $\\sim 0.29" \\pm 0.05"$ (corresponding to $\\sim 14.3 \\pm 2.5$ pc) from the stellar bulge center, which is coincident with the kinematic center of this object's stellar velocity map. The black hole corresponding to the observed off-centered AGN may form a binary system with a black hole located at the stellar bulge center. However, it is also possible that the dis...

  6. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paves Heiti

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area.

  7. Study of the structure of borromean nucleus 17Ne

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Fei; HUA Hui; YE Yan-Lin; LI Zhi-Huan; JIANG Dong-Xing; MA Li-Ying; GE Yu-Cheng; ZHENG Tao; SONG Yu-Shou; LI Xiang-Qing; Qureshi Faisal-Jamil

    2009-01-01

    The 17Ne nucleus is a possible candidate with a two-proton borromean halo structure. Since the theoretical model is difficult to handle the three-body system, it is difficult to determine the two-proton halo structure in 17Ne. In the present research, we try to study the breakup reaction of 17Ne. For the Borromean nuclei, one-proton knockout results in an unstable nucleus which is decaying further by proton emission. This process will result in an angular correlation between the direction of the aligned recoiling unstable nucleus and its decay products. The angular correlations can give us information about the configuration of the valence proton in the 17Ne. Furthermore, theoretical calculations indicate that the momentum distributions of 16F c.m are sensitive to the structure of the halo in 17Ne. Thus the measurement of momentum distributions of 16F c.m may also give us conclusive information on the structure of 17Ne. The present experiment has been done at IMP in Lanzhou using the radioactive beam 17Ne at 30.8 MeV/u on a 43mg/cm2 12C target. The data analysis is under procedure and the primary results are provided.

  8. Neutrino-Nucleus Cross Sections for Oscillation Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Katori, Teppei

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations physics is entered in the precision era. In this context accelerator-based neutrino experiments need a reduction of systematic errors to the level of a few percent. Today one of the most important sources of systematic errors are neutrino-nucleus cross sections which in the hundreds-MeV to few-GeV energy region are known with a precision not exceeding 20%. In this article we review the present experimental and theoretical knowledge of the neutrino-nucleus interaction physics. After introducing neutrino oscillation physics and accelerator-based neutrino experiments, we overview general aspects of the neutrino-nucleus cross sections, both theoretical and experimental views. Then we focus on these quantities in different reaction channels. We start with the quasielastic and quasielastic-like cross section, putting a special emphasis on multinucleon emission channel which attracted a lot of attention in the last few years. We review the main aspects of the different microscopic models for th...

  9. Integration of sensory quanta in cuneate nucleus neurons in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Bengtsson

    Full Text Available Discriminative touch relies on afferent information carried to the central nervous system by action potentials (spikes in ensembles of primary afferents bundled in peripheral nerves. These sensory quanta are first processed by the cuneate nucleus before the afferent information is transmitted to brain networks serving specific perceptual and sensorimotor functions. Here we report data on the integration of primary afferent synaptic inputs obtained with in vivo whole cell patch clamp recordings from the neurons of this nucleus. We find that the synaptic integration in individual cuneate neurons is dominated by 4-8 primary afferent inputs with large synaptic weights. In a simulation we show that the arrangement with a low number of primary afferent inputs can maximize transfer over the cuneate nucleus of information encoded in the spatiotemporal patterns of spikes generated when a human fingertip contact objects. Hence, the observed distributions of synaptic weights support high fidelity transfer of signals from ensembles of tactile afferents. Various anatomical estimates suggest that a cuneate neuron may receive hundreds of primary afferents rather than 4-8. Therefore, we discuss the possibility that adaptation of synaptic weight distribution, possibly involving silent synapses, may function to maximize information transfer in somatosensory pathways.

  10. Maturation of firing pattern in chick vestibular nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, M; Hirsch, J C; Peusner, K D

    2006-08-25

    The principal cells of the chick tangential nucleus are vestibular nucleus neurons participating in the vestibuloocular and vestibulocollic reflexes. In birds and mammals, spontaneous and stimulus-evoked firing of action potentials is essential for vestibular nucleus neurons to generate mature vestibular reflex activity. The emergence of spike-firing pattern and the underlying ion channels were studied in morphologically-identified principal cells using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from brain slices of late-term embryos (embryonic day 16) and hatchling chickens (hatching day 1 and hatching day 5). Spontaneous spike activity emerged around the perinatal period, since at embryonic day 16 none of the principal cells generated spontaneous action potentials. However, at hatching day 1, 50% of the cells fired spontaneously (range, 3 to 32 spikes/s), which depended on synaptic transmission in most cells. By hatching day 5, 80% of the principal cells could fire action potentials spontaneously (range, 5 to 80 spikes/s), and this activity was independent of synaptic transmission and showed faster kinetics than at hatching day 1. Repetitive firing in response to depolarizing pulses appeared in the principal cells starting around embryonic day 16, when calcium-dependent potassium current modulated both the spontaneous and evoked spike firing activity. Altogether, these in vitro studies showed that during the perinatal period, the principal cells switched from displaying no spontaneous spike activity at resting membrane potential and generating one spike on depolarization to the tonic firing of spontaneous and evoked action potentials.

  11. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  12. A transport set-up for heavy-flavour observables in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Nardi, Marzia; Beraudo, A; De Pace, A; Molinari, A; Monteno, M; Prino, F; Sitta, M

    2014-01-01

    A multi-step setup for heavy-flavour studies in high-energy nucleus–nucleus collisions is presented. The initial hard production of View the MathML sourceQ$\\bar{Q}$ pairs is simulated with the POWHEG pQCD event generator, interfaced with the PYTHIA parton shower. In a nucleus–nucleus collision the propagation of the heavy quarks in the medium is described through the relativistic Langevin equation. The numerical results are compared to experimental data from the RHIC and the LHC. In particular we show the comparisons of the nuclear modification factor of D-mesons, non-prompt J/ψJ/ψ's and heavy-flavour electrons. Furthermore, first results on azimuthal correlations of heavy quark pair and open charm/beauty meson pairs are presented.

  13. Formation of Centauro and Strangelets in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the LHC and their Identification by the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Filippov, S N; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wlodarczyk, Z

    1999-01-01

    Presentation made at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference, ICRC'99We present a phenomenological model which describes the formation of a Centauro fireball in nucleus-nucleus interactions in the upper atmosphere and at the LHC, and its decay to non-strange baryons and Strangelets. We describe the CASTOR detector for the ALICE experiment at the LHC. CASTOR will probe, in an event-by-event mode, the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6eta7.2 in 5.5xA TeV central Pb+Pb collisions. We present results of simulations for the response of the CASTOR calorimeter and, in particular, to the transversal of Strangelets.

  14. CASTOR A Forward Detector for the Identification of Centauro and Strangelets in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Filippov, S N; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wlodarczyk, Z

    2000-01-01

    Presentation made at the XXVIIIth Symposium on Multiparticle Dynamics, 6-11 September 1998, Delphi and published in World ScientificThe physics motivation for a very forward detector to be employed in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC is discussed. A phenomenological model describing the formation and decay of a Centauro fireball in nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The CASTOR detector which is aimed to measure the hadronic and photonic content of an interaction and to identify deeply penetrating objects in the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6eta7.2 in an event-by-event mode is described. Results of simulations of the expected response of the calorimeter and, in particular, to the passage of strangelets, are presented.

  15. Distinct effect of orphanin FQ in nucleus raphe magnus and nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis on the rat tail flick reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z; Zhang, Y; Wu, G

    2001-06-22

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of orphanin FQ (OFQ) microinjected into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) and the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NGC) on pain modulation. The tail-flick latency (TFL) was used as a behavioral index of nociceptive responsiveness. The result showed microinjection of OFQ into the NRM significantly increased the TFL, whereas microinjection of OFQ into the NGC decreased the TFL, suggesting the analgesic effect of OFQ in the NRM and the hyperalgesic effect of OFQ in the NGC. As there are three classes of putative pain modulating neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), the hyperalgesic or analgesic effect of OFQ in the RVM might depend upon the different class of the neurons being acted.

  16. Nucleus-encoded periplastid-targeted EFL in chlorarachniophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gile, Gillian H; Keeling, Patrick J

    2008-09-01

    Chlorarachniophytes are cercozoan amoeboflagellates that acquired photosynthesis by enslaving a green alga, which has retained a highly reduced nucleus called a nucleomorph. The nucleomorph lacks many genes necessary for its own maintenance and expression, suggesting that some genes have been moved to the host nucleus and their products are now targeted back to the periplastid compartment (PPC), the reduced eukaryotic cytoplasm of the endosymbiont. Protein trafficking in chlorarachniophytes is therefore complex, including nucleus-encoded plastid-targeted proteins, nucleomorph-encoded plastid-targeted proteins, and nucleus-encoded periplastid-targeted proteins. A major gap in our understanding of this system is the PPC-targeted proteins because none have been described in any chlorarachniophytes. Here we describe the first such protein, the GTPase EFL. EFL was characterized from 7 chlorarachniophytes, and 2 distinct types were found. One is related to foraminiferan EFL and lacks an amino-terminal extension. The second, distantly related, type encodes an amino-terminal extension consisting of a signal peptide followed by sequence sharing many characteristics with transit peptides from nucleus-encoded plastid-targeted proteins and which we conclude is most likely PPC targeted. Western blotting with antibodies specific to putative host and PPC-targeted EFL from the chlorarachniophytes Bigelowiella natans and Gymnochlora stellata is consistent with posttranslational cleavage of the leaders from PPC-targeted proteins. Immunolocalization of both proteins in B. natans confirmed the cytosolic location of the leaderless EFL and a distinct localization pattern for the PPC-targeted protein but could not rule out a plastid location (albeit very unlikely). We sought other proteins with a similar leader and identified a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 1 encoding a bipartite extension with the same properties. Transit peptide sequences were characterized from all 3

  17. Serotonergic modulation of astrocytic activity in the hamster suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, J D; Chen, L

    1999-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effects of central serotonin receptor activation on the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of Syrian hamsters. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical procedures were used to examine the effects of systemic application of the serotonin-1A and serotonin-7 receptor agonist, (+/-)-2-dipropyl-amino-8-hydroxyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT; 3.75 mg/kg) on the contents and distribution of glial fibrillary acidic protein in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Administration of 8-OH-DPAT at midday caused a significant reduction in immunoreactive glial fibrillary acidic protein content within 1 h of injection, compared to vehicle controls. This effect was not evident 3 h after drug injection. Treatment with 8-OH-DPAT during the late dark phase had little effect on glial fibrillary acidic protein content. The 8-OH-DPAT-induced reduction in glial fibrillary acidic protein content seen at midday was blocked partially by pretreatment with the serotonin-2 and serotonin-7 receptor antagonist, ritanserin, and more substantially by pretreatment with the serotonin-1A receptor antagonist, NAN-190. Treatment with 8-OH-DPAT also caused a significant redistribution of immunoreactive glial fibrillary acidic protein, such that the dense mesh-like appearance seen in vehicle controls was significantly reduced. The 8-OH-DPAT treatment also significantly decreased expression of polysialic acid, a cell-surface molecule associated with neural plasticity. Immunoblot assessments of glial fibrillary acidic protein contents 2 h before and 1 h after lights off revealed a significant time-of-day difference in glial fibrillary acidic protein expression, with lowest levels occurring at the latter time-point, associated with maximal endogenous serotonin release in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Collectively, these results indicate that acute plastic changes in glial fibrillary acidic protein

  18. Nuclear internal conversion between bound atomic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemin, J. F.; Harston, M. R.; Karpeshin, F. F.; Carreyre, J.; Attallah, F.; Aleonard, M. M.; Scheurer, J. N.; Boggaert, G.; Grandin, J. R.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2003-01-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results for rate of decay of the (3/2)+ isomeric state in 125Te versus the ionic charge state. For charge state larger than 44 the nuclear transition lies below the threshold for emission of a K-shell electron into the continuum with the result that normal internal conversion is energetically forbiden. Rather surprisingly, for the charge 45 and 46 the lifetime of the level was found to have a value close to that in neutral atoms. We present direct evidence that the nuclear transition could still be converted but without the emission of the electron into the continuum, the electron being promoted from the K-shell to an other empty bound state lying close to the continuum. We called this process BIC. The experimental results agree whith theoretical calculations if BIC resonances are taken into account. This leads to a nuclear decay constant that is extremely sensitive to the precise initial state and simple specification of the charge state is no longer appropriate. The contribution to decay of the nucleus of BIC has recently been extended to the situation in which the electron is promoted to an intermediate filled bound state (PFBIC) with an apparent violation of the Pauli principle. Numerical results of the expected dependence of PFBIC on the charge state will be presented for the decay of the 77.351 keV level in 197Au.

  19. Superscaling in electron-nucleus scattering and its link to CC and NC QE neutrino-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Barbaro, M B; Caballero, J A; Donnelly, T W; Gonzalez-Jimenez, R; Ivanov, M; Udias, J M

    2013-01-01

    The superscaling approach (SuSA) to neutrino-nucleus scattering, based on the assumed universality of the scaling function for electromagnetic and weak interactions, is reviewed. The predictions of the SuSA model for bot CC and NC differential and total cross sections are presented and compared with the MiniBooNE data. The role of scaling violations, in particular the contribution of meson exchange currents in the two-particle two-hole sector, is explored.

  20. Superscaling in electron-nucleus scattering and its link to CC and NC QE neutrino-nucleus scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, M. B. [Università di Torino and INFN, Sezione di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy); Amaro, J. E. [Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Caballero, J. A.; González-Jiménez, R. [Universidad de Sevilla, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Donnelly, T. W. [CTP, LNS and Department of Physics, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ivanov, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Udías, J. M. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The superscaling approach (SuSA) to neutrino-nucleus scattering, based on the assumed universality of the scaling function for electromagnetic and weak interactions, is reviewed. The predictions of the SuSA model for bot CC and NC differential and total cross sections are presented and compared with the MiniBooNE data. The role of scaling violations, in particular the contribution of meson exchange currents in the two-particle two-hole sector, is explored.

  1. Effects of dark atom excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Cudell, Jean-René; Wallemacq, Quentin

    2014-01-01

    New stable quarks and charged leptons may exist and be hidden from detection, as they are bound by Coulomb interaction in neutral dark atoms of composite dark matter. This possibility leads to fundamentally new types of indirect effects related to the excitation of such dark atoms followed by their electromagnetic de-excitation. Stable -2 charged particles, bound to primordial helium in O-helium (OHe) atoms, represent the simplest model of dark atoms. Here we consider the structure of OHe atomic levels which is a necessary input for the indirect tests of such composite dark matter scenarios, and we give the spectrum of electromagnetic transitions from the levels excited in OHe collisions.

  2. Atom lens without chromatic aberrations

    CERN Document Server

    Efremov, Maxim A; Schleich, Wolfgang P

    2012-01-01

    We propose a lens for atoms with reduced chromatic aberrations and calculate its focal length and spot size. In our scheme a two-level atom interacts with a near-resonant standing light wave formed by two running waves of slightly different wave vectors, and a far-detuned running wave propagating perpendicular to the standing wave. We show that within the Raman-Nath approximation and for an adiabatically slow atom-light interaction, the phase acquired by the atom is independent of the incident atomic velocity.

  3. Topics in atomic collision theory

    CERN Document Server

    Geltman, Sydney; Brueckner, Keith A

    1969-01-01

    Topics in Atomic Collision Theory originated in a course of graduate lectures given at the University of Colorado and at University College in London. It is recommended for students in physics and related fields who are interested in the application of quantum scattering theory to low-energy atomic collision phenomena. No attention is given to the electromagnetic, nuclear, or elementary particle domains. The book is organized into three parts: static field scattering, electron-atom collisions, and atom-atom collisions. These are in the order of increasing physical complexity and hence necessar

  4. Doping of Semiconducting Atomic Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Due to the rapid progress in atom manipulation technology, atomic chain electronics would not be a dream, where foreign atoms are placed on a substrate to form a chain, and its electronic properties are designed by controlling the lattice constant d. It has been shown theoretically that a Si atomic chain is metallic regardless of d and that a Mg atomic chain is semiconducting or insulating with a band gap modified with d. For electronic applications, it is essential to establish a method to dope a semiconducting chain, which is to control the Fermi energy position without altering the original band structure. If we replace some of the chain atoms with dopant atoms randomly, the electrons will see random potential along the chain and will be localized strongly in space (Anderson localization). However, if we replace periodically, although the electrons can spread over the chain, there will generally appear new bands and band gaps reflecting the new periodicity of dopant atoms. This will change the original band structure significantly. In order to overcome this dilemma, we may place a dopant atom beside the chain at every N lattice periods (N > 1). Because of the periodic arrangement of dopant atoms, we can avoid the unwanted Anderson localization. Moreover, since the dopant atoms do not constitute the chain, the overlap interaction between them is minimized, and the band structure modification can be made smallest. Some tight-binding results will be discussed to demonstrate the present idea.

  5. Heat transport through atomic contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosso, Nico; Drechsler, Ute; Menges, Fabian; Nirmalraj, Peter; Karg, Siegfried; Riel, Heike; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2017-02-06

    Heat transport and dissipation at the nanoscale severely limit the scaling of high-performance electronic devices and circuits. Metallic atomic junctions serve as model systems to probe electrical and thermal transport down to the atomic level as well as quantum effects that occur in one-dimensional (1D) systems. Whereas charge transport in atomic junctions has been studied intensively in the past two decades, heat transport remains poorly characterized because it requires the combination of a high sensitivity to small heat fluxes and the formation of stable atomic contacts. Here we report heat-transfer measurements through atomic junctions and analyse the thermal conductance of single-atom gold contacts at room temperature. Simultaneous measurements of charge and heat transport reveal the proportionality of electrical and thermal conductance, quantized with the respective conductance quanta. This constitutes a verification of the Wiedemann-Franz law at the atomic scale.

  6. Atomic mechanics of solids

    CERN Document Server

    MacPherson, A K

    1990-01-01

    This volume brings together some of the presently available theoretical techniques which will be useful in the design of solid-state materials. At present, it is impossible to specify the atomic composition of a material and its macroscopic physical properties. However, the future possibilities for such a science are being laid today. This is coming about due to the development of fast, cheap computers which will be able to undertake the calculations which are necessary.Since this field of science is fairly new, it is not yet quite clear which direction of analysis will eventually prov

  7. Atom Probe Tomography 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas F.; Larson, David J.

    2012-08-01

    In the world of tomographic imaging, atom probe tomography (APT) occupies the high-spatial-resolution end of the spectrum. It is highly complementary to electron tomography and is applicable to a wide range of materials. The current state of APT is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on applications and data analysis as they apply to many fields of research and development including metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and organic materials. We also provide a brief review of the history and the instrumentation associated with APT and an assessment of the existing challenges in the field.

  8. Atomic data for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.); Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  9. Achieving atomic resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Spence

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the nanotube in 19915 by high resolution electron microscopy (HREM, following closely on the discovery of fullerenes, has initiated a new field of science known as nanoscience. (In fact the fullerene buckyball itself was first observed in 1980, by HREM1. While nanoscience now spans many disciplines, from molecular biology to quantum computing, for all of them, the HREM technique has become the indispensable tool for analyzing the atomic structure of individual bulk nanostructural elements. However this method has long been the technique of choice whenever questions of microstructural characterization arise in materials science.

  10. Low-lying dipole strength in the N = 28 shell-closure nucleus {sup 52}Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Haridas; Beller, Jacob; Benouaret, Nadia; Enders, Joachim; Hartmann, Timo; Karg, Oliver; Neumann-Cosel, Peter von; Pietralla, Norbert; Ponomarev, Vladimir Yu.; Romig, Christopher; Schnorrenberger, Linda; Volz, Stephan; Zweidinger, Markus [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Scheck, Marcus [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); School of Engineering, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley (United Kingdom); SUPA, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Low-lying electric and magnetic dipole strengths (E1 and M1, respectively) of atomic nuclei have drawn considerable attention in the last decade. The low-lying dipole strength of the N = 28 closed-shell nucleus {sup 52}Cr was studied with nuclear resonance fluorescence up to 9.9 MeV, using bremsstrahlung at the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator S-DALINAC. Twenty-eight spin-1 states were observed between 5.0 and 9.5 MeV excitation energy, 14 of those for the first time and uncertainties for cross sections were reduced in many cases. Both, electric dipole excitations (E1, around 8 MeV) and magnetic dipole excitations (M1, around 9 MeV) were detected. Microscopic calculations within the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model were performed using a basis which includes one-, two-, and three-phonon configurations to interpret the dipole strength distributions of {sup 52}Cr and show good agreement with experimental results.

  11. The Double Nucleus and Central Black Hole of M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John; Bender, Ralf

    1999-09-01

    New spectroscopy of M31 supports Tremaine's model in which both nuclei are parts of a single eccentric disk of stars orbiting the black hole (BH). The kinematics and Hubble Space Telescope photometry are used to measure the offset of the BH from the center of mass. This confirms that the BH mass is ~3×107 Msolar by a technique that is nearly independent of stellar-dynamical models. We present spectroscopy of the nucleus of M31 obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and Subarcsecond Imaging Spectrograph. Spectra at the Ca infrared triplet lines (seeing σ*=0.27") are used to measure the stellar kinematics, and spectra at the Mg I b lines (σ*=0.31") are used to measure metallicities. We also measure nonparametric line-of-sight velocity distributions (LOSVDs). All spectra confirm the steep rotation and velocity dispersion gradients that imply that M31 contains a 3.3×107 Msolar central dark object. At σ*=0.27", the maximum bulge-subtracted rotation velocity of the nucleus is 233+/-4 km s-1 on the P2 side, and the maximum velocity dispersion is 287+/-9 km s-1. The dispersion peak is displaced by 0.20"+/-0.03" from the velocity center in the direction opposite to P1, confirming a result by Bacon and coworkers. The higher surface brightness nucleus, P1, is colder than the bulge, with σ~=100 km s-1 at r~=1''. Cold light from P1 contributes at the velocity center; this explains part of the σ(r) asymmetry. The nucleus is cold at r>~1'' on both sides of the center. Our results are used to test Tremaine's model in which the double nucleus is a single eccentric disk of stars orbiting the BH. (1) The model predicts that the velocity center of the nucleus is displaced by 0.2" from P2 toward P1. Our observations show a displacement of 0.08"+/-0.01" before bulge subtraction and 0.10"+/-0.01" after bulge subtraction. (2) The model predicts a minimum σ~=135 km s-1 at P1. We observe σ=123+/-2 km s-1. Observations (1) and (2) may be reconciled with the model if its

  12. Neuromorphic atomic switch networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius V Avizienis

    Full Text Available Efforts to emulate the formidable information processing capabilities of the brain through neuromorphic engineering have been bolstered by recent progress in the fabrication of nonlinear, nanoscale circuit elements that exhibit synapse-like operational characteristics. However, conventional fabrication techniques are unable to efficiently generate structures with the highly complex interconnectivity found in biological neuronal networks. Here we demonstrate the physical realization of a self-assembled neuromorphic device which implements basic concepts of systems neuroscience through a hardware-based platform comprised of over a billion interconnected atomic-switch inorganic synapses embedded in a complex network of silver nanowires. Observations of network activation and passive harmonic generation demonstrate a collective response to input stimulus in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Further, emergent behaviors unique to the complex network of atomic switches and akin to brain function are observed, namely spatially distributed memory, recurrent dynamics and the activation of feedforward subnetworks. These devices display the functional characteristics required for implementing unconventional, biologically and neurally inspired computational methodologies in a synthetic experimental system.

  13. Ghost Imaging with Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Khakimov, R I; Shin, D K; Hodgman, S S; Dall, R G; Baldwin, K G H; Truscott, A G

    2016-01-01

    Ghost imaging is a technique -- first realized in quantum optics -- in which the image emerges from cross-correlation between particles in two separate beams. One beam passes through the object to a bucket (single-pixel) detector, while the second beam's spatial profile is measured by a high resolution (multi-pixel) detector but never interacts with the object. Neither detector can reconstruct the image independently. However, until now ghost imaging has only been demonstrated with photons. Here we report the first realisation of ghost imaging of an object using massive particles. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold metastable helium atoms, originating from two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) via $s$-wave scattering. We use the higher-order Kapitza-Dirac effect to generate the large number of correlated atom pairs required, enabling the creation of a ghost image with good visibility and sub-millimetre resolution. Future extensions could include ghost interfe...

  14. Atom-by-atom assembly of defect-free one-dimensional cold atom arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Manuel; Bernien, Hannes; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Anschuetz, Eric R.; Krajenbrink, Alexandre; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-11-01

    The realization of large-scale fully controllable quantum systems is an exciting frontier in modern physical science. We use atom-by-atom assembly to implement a platform for the deterministic preparation of regular one-dimensional arrays of individually controlled cold atoms. In our approach, a measurement and feedback procedure eliminates the entropy associated with probabilistic trap occupation and results in defect-free arrays of more than 50 atoms in less than 400 milliseconds. The technique is based on fast, real-time control of 100 optical tweezers, which we use to arrange atoms in desired geometric patterns and to maintain these configurations by replacing lost atoms with surplus atoms from a reservoir. This bottom-up approach may enable controlled engineering of scalable many-body systems for quantum information processing, quantum simulations, and precision measurements.

  15. A kilobyte rewritable atomic memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalff, F. E.; Rebergen, M. P.; Fahrenfort, E.; Girovsky, J.; Toskovic, R.; Lado, J. L.; Fernández-Rossier, J.; Otte, A. F.

    2016-11-01

    The advent of devices based on single dopants, such as the single-atom transistor, the single-spin magnetometer and the single-atom memory, has motivated the quest for strategies that permit the control of matter with atomic precision. Manipulation of individual atoms by low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy provides ways to store data in atoms, encoded either into their charge state, magnetization state or lattice position. A clear challenge now is the controlled integration of these individual functional atoms into extended, scalable atomic circuits. Here, we present a robust digital atomic-scale memory of up to 1 kilobyte (8,000 bits) using an array of individual surface vacancies in a chlorine-terminated Cu(100) surface. The memory can be read and rewritten automatically by means of atomic-scale markers and offers an areal density of 502 terabits per square inch, outperforming state-of-the-art hard disk drives by three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the chlorine vacancies are found to be stable at temperatures up to 77 K, offering the potential for expanding large-scale atomic assembly towards ambient conditions.

  16. Can Atomic Force Microscopy Achieve Atomic Resolution in Contact Mode?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, M. R.; Pérez, Rubén; Payne, M. C.

    2001-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy operating in the contact mode is studied using total-energy pseudopotential calculations. It is shown that, in the case of a diamond tip and a diamond surface, it is possible for a tip terminated by a single atom to sustain forces in excess of 30 nN. It is also shown that imaging at atomic resolution may be limited by blunting of the tip during lateral scanning.

  17. Stereotactic localization and visualization of the subthalamic nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wei-gao; WANG Hai-yang; LIN Zhi-guo; SHEN Hong; CHEN Xiao-guang; FU Yi-li; GAO Wen-peng

    2009-01-01

    Background The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is widely recognized as one of the most important and commonly targeted nuclei in stereotactic and functional neurosurgery. The success of STN surgery depends on accuracy in target determination. Construction of a digitalized atlas of STN based on stereotactic MRI will play an instrumental role in the accuracy of anatomical localization. The aim of this study was to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) target location of STN in stereotactic space and construct a digitalized atlas of STN to accomplish the visualization of the STN on stereotactic MRI, thus providing clinical guidance on the precise anatomical localization of STN.Methods One hundred and twenty healthy people volunteered to be scanned by 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning with 1-mm-thick slice in the standard stereotactic space between 2005 and 2006. One adult male was selected for 3D reconstruction of STN. The precess of 3D reconstruction included identification, manual segmentation, extraction,conservation and reconstruction.Results There was a significant correlation between the coordinates and age (P <0.05). The volume of left STN was significantly larger than the right STN, and there was a significant negative correlation between volume and age (P <0.05).The surface of the STN nucleus after 3D reconstruction appeared smooth, natural and realistic. The morphological feature of STN on the individual brain could be visualized directly in 3D. The 3D reconstructed STN could be rotated,zoomed and displayed at any direction in the stereotactic space. The anteroposterior diameter of the STN nucleus was longer than the vertical and transverse diameters in 3D space. The 3D reconstruction of STN manifested typical structure of the "dual lens".Conclusions The visualization of individual brain atlas based on stereotactic MRI is feasible. However, software for automated segmentation, extraction and registration of MR images need to be further developed.

  18. Tractography patterns of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas-Arroyave, Nora; Lauro, Peter M; Huang, Ling; Hallett, Mark; Horovitz, Silvina G; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Lungu, Codrin

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation therapy is an effective symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease, yet the precise mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic effects remain unclear. Although the targets of deep brain stimulation are grey matter structures, axonal modulation is known to play an important role in deep brain stimulation's therapeutic mechanism. Several white matter structures in proximity to the subthalamic nucleus have been implicated in the clinical benefits of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. We assessed the connectivity patterns that characterize clinically beneficial electrodes in Parkinson's disease patients, after deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We evaluated 22 patients with Parkinson's disease (11 females, age 57 ± 9.1 years, disease duration 13.3 ± 6.3 years) who received bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus at the National Institutes of Health. During an initial electrode screening session, one month after deep brain stimulation implantation, the clinical benefits of each contact were determined. The electrode was localized by coregistering preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative computer tomography images and the volume of tissue activated was estimated from stimulation voltage and impedance. Brain connectivity for the volume of tissue activated of deep brain stimulation contacts was assessed using probabilistic tractography with diffusion-tensor data. Areas most frequently connected to clinically effective contacts included the thalamus, substantia nigra, brainstem and superior frontal gyrus. A series of discriminant analyses demonstrated that the strength of connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus were positively associated with clinical effectiveness. The connectivity patterns observed in our study suggest that the modulation of white matter tracts directed to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus is associated with favourable clinical

  19. Recognizing nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J.; Smith, Daniel; Calogero, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Doping graphene by heteroatoms such as nitrogen presents an attractive route to control the position of the Fermi level in the material. We prepared N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111) surfaces via chemical vapor deposition of two different molecules. Using scanning tunneling microscopy images...... as a benchmark, we show that the position of the dopant atoms can be determined using atomic force microscopy. Specifically, the frequency shift-distance curves Delta f(z) acquired above a N atom are significantly different from the curves measured over a C atom. Similar behavior was found for N-doped graphene...

  20. A trapped atom interferometer with ultracold Sr atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xian; Mazzoni, Tommaso; Poli, Nicola; Tino, Guglielmo M

    2016-01-01

    We report on a trapped atom interferometer based on Bragg diffraction and Bloch oscillations with alkaline-earth-metal atoms. We use a Ramsey-Bord\\'e Bragg interferometer with $^{88}$Sr atoms combined with Bloch oscillations to extend the interferometer time. Thanks to a long coherence time for Bloch oscillations of $^{88}$Sr atoms, we observed interference up to 1 s evolution time in the lattice. A detailed study of decoherence sources during the Bloch phase is also presented. While still limited in sensitivity by lattice lifetime and beam inhomogeneity this result opens the way to high contrast trapped interferometers with extended interrogation time.

  1. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  2. Atomic Data: Division B / Commission 14 / Working Group Atomic Data

    CERN Document Server

    Nave, Gillian; Zhao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes laboratory measurements of atomic wavelengths, energy levels, hyperfine and isotope structure, energy level lifetimes, and oscillator strengths. Theoretical calculations of lifetimes and oscillator strengths are also included. The bibliography is limited to species of astrophysical interest. Compilations of atomic data and internet databases are also included. Papers are listed in the bibliography in alphabetical order, with a reference number in the text. Comprehensive lists of references for atomic spectra can be found in the NIST Atomic Spectra Bibliographic Databases http://physics.nist.gov/asbib.

  3. Isospin symmetry violation, meson production and -nucleus interaction studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B J Roy; V Jha; A Chatterje; H Machner; GEM Collaboration

    2006-05-01

    We have studied isospin symmetry violation in nuclear reactions by measuring simultaneously the cross-section of the following two reactions + → 3H + and + → 3He 0. The experiment was perfomed at the cooler synchrotron accelerator. COSY, Jülich at several beam energies close to the corresponding production threshold. We also have ongoing programmes on -nucleus final-state interaction studies via + 6Li → 7Be + reactions, high resolution search for dibaryonic resonances and lambda-proton final state interaction studies. The experimental details and results obtained so far are presented here.

  4. New method of estimation of cosmic ray nucleus energy

    CERN Document Server

    Korotkova, N A; Postnikov, E B; Roganova, T M; Sveshnikova, L G; Turundaevskij, A N

    2002-01-01

    The new approach to estimation of primary cosmic nucleus energy is presented. It is based on measurement of spatial density of secondary particles, originated in nuclear interactions in the target and strengthened by thin converter layer. The proposed method allows creation of relatively lightweight apparatus of large square with large geometrical factor and can be applied in satellite and balloon experiments for all nuclei in a wide energy range of 10 sup 1 sup 1 -10 sup 1 sup 6 eV/particle. The physical basis of the method, full Monte Carlo simulation, the field of application are presented

  5. Research Program towards Observation of Neutrino-Nucleus Coherent Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, H T

    2006-01-01

    The article describes the research program pursued by the TEXONO Collaboration towards an experiment to observe coherent scattering between neutrinos and the nucleus at the power reactor. The motivations of studying this process are surveyed. In particular, a threshold of 100-200 eV has been achieved with an ultra-low-energy germanium detector prototype. This detection capability at low energy can also be adapted to conduct searches of Cold Dark Matter in the low-mass region as well as to enhance the sensitivities in the study of neutrino magnetic moments.

  6. Collective Band Structures in Neutron-Rich 108Mo Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Huai-Bo; WANG Jian-Guo; XU Qiang; ZHU Sheng-Jiang; J. H. Hamilton; A. V. Ramayya; J. K. Hwang; Y. X. Luo; J. O. Rasmussen; I. Y. Lee; CHE Xing-Lai

    2007-01-01

    High spin states in the neutron-rich 108Mo nucleus are studied by measuring prompt γ-rays following the spontaneous fission of 252Cf with a Gammasphere detector array. The ground-state band is confirmed, and the one-phonon γ-vibrational band is updated with spin up to 12 h. A new collective band with the band head level at 1422.4 keV is suggested as a two-phonon γ-vibrational band. Another new band is proposed as a two-quasi-proton excitation band. Systematic characteristics of the collective bands are discussed.

  7. Hypersexuality following subthalamic nucleus stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Paresh; Bhargava, Pranshu

    2008-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation is an established surgical treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). Though the motor benefits of STN stimulation are well understood, its cognitive and behavioral effects are still not fully understood. Manic psychosis, hypersexuality, pathological gambling and mood swings are associated with advanced PD. There have been reports to suggest improvement or worsening in these symptoms following STN deep brain stimulation (DBS). We report two cases as the sole behavioral side-effects of STN stimulation despite good clinical improvement on long-term follow-up. These patients and literature review suggests the complex role of STN stimulation in motor and behavioral control.

  8. Hypersexuality following subthalamic nucleus stimulation for Parkinson′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doshi Paresh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Subthalamic nucleus (STN stimulation is an established surgical treatment for Parkinson′s disease (PD. Though the motor benefits of STN stimulation are well understood, its cognitive and behavioral effects are still not fully understood. Manic psychosis, hypersexuality, pathological gambling and mood swings are associated with advanced PD. There have been reports to suggest improvement or worsening in these symptoms following STN deep brain stimulation (DBS. We report two cases as the sole behavioral side-effects of STN stimulation despite good clinical improvement on long-term follow-up. These patients and literature review suggests the complex role of STN stimulation in motor and behavioral control.

  9. Electric multipole response of the halo nucleus {sup 6}He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jagjit; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Chatterjee, R. [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Roorkee (India)

    2016-07-15

    The role of different continuum components in the weakly bound nucleus {sup 6}He is studied by coupling unbound spd-waves of {sup 5}He by means of simple pairing contact-delta interaction. The results of our previous investigations in a model space containing only p-waves showed the collective nature of the ground state and allowed the calculation of the electric quadrupole transitions. We extend this simple model by including also sd-continuum neutron states and we investigate the electric monopole, dipole and octupole response of the system for transitions to the continuum, discussing the contribution of different configurations. (orig.)

  10. [Mutations in the personality nucleus at puberty and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiopu, U

    1989-01-01

    The author considers that analysing the personality by means of concrete research, the axis "self-perceptual Ego and the prospective, ideal Ego" make up an operational axis included in personality nucleus. The selected interference of the alter image about the Ego permanently readjusts this axis. In this purpose an adjective checklist and the projective test TST in two alternative have been used. The author concludes that during puberty and adolescence several changes take place as far as the number of adjective used, descriptors prevailing characteristics, and affective finality are concerned.

  11. The exosome and RNA quality control in the nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Vanacova, Stepanka; Stef, Richard

    2007-01-01

    To control the quality of RNA biogenesis in the nucleus, cells use sophisticated molecular machines. These machines recognize and degrade not only RNA trimmings—the leftovers of RNA processing—but also incorrectly processed RNAs that contain defects. By using this mechanism, cells ensure that only high-quality RNAs are engaged in protein synthesis and other cellular processes. The exosome—a complex of several exoribonucleolytic and RNA-binding proteins—is the central 3′-end RNA degradation an...

  12. Spatial regulation and organization of DNA replication within the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U

    2010-01-01

    Duplication of chromosomal DNA is a temporally and spatially regulated process. The timing of DNA replication initiation at various origins is highly coordinated; some origins fire early and others late during S phase. Moreover, inside the nuclei, the bulk of DNA replication is physically organized in replication factories, consisting of DNA polymerases and other replication proteins. In this review article, we discuss how DNA replication is organized and regulated spatially within the nucleus and how this spatial organization is linked to temporal regulation. We focus on DNA replication in budding yeast and fission yeast and, where applicable, compare yeast DNA replication with that in bacteria and metazoans.

  13. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Blanton, Elizabeth L; Sarazin, Craig L; Randall, Scott W; McNamara, Brian R; ),

    2010-01-01

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves.

  14. Magnetic Moment of Proton Drip-Line Nucleus (9)C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuta, K.; Fukuda, M.; Tanigaki, M.; Minamisono, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Mihara, M.; Onishi, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Harada, A.; Sasaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic moment of the proton drip-line nucleus C-9(I(sup (pi)) = 3/2, T(sub 1/2) = 126 ms) has been measured for the first time, using the beta-NMR detection technique with polarized radioactive beams. The measure value for the magnetic moment is 1mu(C-9)! = 1.3914 +/- 0.0005 (mu)N. The deduced spin expectation value of 1.44 is unusually larger than any other ones of even-odd nuclei.

  15. On the symmetries of the 12C nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Cseh, J

    2016-01-01

    The consequences of some symmetries of the three-alpha system are discussed. In particular, the recent description of the low-energy spectrum of the 12C nucleus in terms of the Algebraic Cluster Model (ACM) is compared to that of the Semimicroscopic Algebraic Cluster Model (SACM). The previous one applies interactions of a D3h geometric symmetry [1], while the latter one has a U(3) multichannel dynamical symmetry, that connects the shell and cluster pictures. The available data is in line with both descriptions.

  16. Natural orbital description of the halo nucleus 6He

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, Ch; Vary, J P; Maris, P

    2016-01-01

    Ab initio calculations of nuclei face the challenge of simultaneously describing strong short-range internucleon correlations and the long-range properties of weakly-bound halo nucleons. Natural orbitals, which diagonalize the one-body density matrix, provide a basis which is better matched to the physical structure of the many-body wave function. We demonstrate that the use of natural orbitals significantly improves convergence for ab initio no-core configuration interaction calculations of the neutron halo nucleus 6He, relative to the traditional oscillator basis.

  17. Neutrino-nucleus interactions and the determination of oscillation parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Benhar, Omar; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide

    2015-01-01

    We review the status and prospects of theoretical studies of neutrino-nucleus interactions, and discuss the influence of the treatment of nuclear effects on the determination of oscillation parameters. The models developed to describe the variety of reaction mechanisms contributing to the nuclear cross sections are analysed, with emphasis placed on their capability to reproduce the available electron scattering data.The impact of the uncertainties associated with the description of nuclear dynamics on the the oscillation parameters is illustrated through examples, and possible avenues towards a better understanding of the signals detected by long baseline experiments are outlined.

  18. Modelling of compound nucleus formation in fusion of heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Torres, A

    2004-01-01

    A new model that includes the time-dependent dynamics of the single-particle (s.p.) motion in conjunction with the macroscopic evolution of the system is proposed for describing the compound nucleus (CN) formation in fusion of heavy nuclei. The diabaticity initially keeps the entrance system around its contact configuration, but the gradual transition from the diabatic to the adiabatic potential energy surface (PES) leads to fusion or quasifission. Direct measurements of the probability for CN formation are crucial to discriminate between the current models.

  19. Anisomycin infusions in the parabrachial nucleus and taste neophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-You; Amodeo, Leslie Renee; Arthurs, Joe; Reilly, Steve

    2012-11-01

    To investigate whether de novo protein synthesis in the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) is required for recovery from taste neophobia, anisomycin (a protein synthesis inhibitor) was infused immediately after consumption of a novel saccharin solution (Experiment 1). Unexpectedly, this PBN treatment caused a reduction in saccharin intake. In addition, we found that the anisomycin-induced suppression of tastant intake was attenuated by prior intra-PBN infusions of lidocaine (Experiment 2). This pattern of results raises concerns about using anisomycin to investigate memory consolidation processes in the PBN. Thus, a different manipulation may be needed to examine the nature of the neuroplastic changes that occur in the PBN during taste memory formation.

  20. Red nucleus and rubrospinal tract disorganization in the absence of Pou4f1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus E. eMartinez-Lopez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The red nucleus is a neuronal population that plays an important role in forelimb motor control and locomotion. Histologically it is subdivided into two subpopulations, the parvocellular red nucleus located in the diencephalon and the magnocellular red nucleus in the mesencephalon. The red nucleus integrates signals from motor cortex and cerebellum and projects to spinal cord interneurons and motor neurons through the rubrospinal tract. Pou4f1 is a transcription factor highly expressed in this nucleus that has been related to its specification. Here we profoundly analyzed consequences of Pou4f1 loss-of-function in development, maturation and axonal projection of the red nucleus. Surprisingly, red nucleus neurons are specified and maintained in the mutant, no cell death was detected. Nevertheless, the nucleus appeared disorganized with a strong delay in radial migration and with a wider neuronal distribution; the neurons did not form a compacted population as they do in controls, Robo1 and Slit2 were miss-expressed. Cplx1 and Npas1, expressed in the red nucleus, are transcription factors involved in neurotransmitter release, neuronal maturation and motor function processes among others. In our mutant mice, both transcription factors are lost, suggesting an abnormal maturation of the red nucleus. The resulting altered nucleus occupied a wider territory. Finally, we examined rubrospinal tract development and found that the red nucleus neurons were able to project to the spinal cord but their axons appeared defasciculated. These data suggest that Pou4f1 is necessary for the maturation of red nucleus neurons but not for their specification and maintenance.

  1. Optical nanofibres and neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Nieddu, Thomas; Chormaic, Sile Nic

    2015-01-01

    Optical nanofibres are increasingly being used in cold atom experiments due to their versatility and the clear advantages they have when developing all-fibred systems for quantum technologies. They provide researchers with a method of overcoming the Rayleigh range for achieving high intensities in a focussed beam over a relatively long distance, and can act as a noninvasive tool for probing cold atoms. In this review article, we will briefly introduce the theory of mode propagation in an ultrathin optical fibre and highlight some of the more significant theoretical and experimental progresses to date, including the early work on atom probing, manipulation and trapping, the study of atom-dielectric surface interactions, and the more recent observation of nanofibre-mediated nonlinear optics phenomena in atomic media. The functionality of optical nanofibres in relation to the realisation of atom-photon hybrid quantum systems is also becoming more evident as some of the earlier technical challenges are surpassed ...

  2. Variational electrodynamics of Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, Jayme

    2013-01-01

    We study extrema with velocity discontinuities for the variational electromagnetic two-body problem. Along $C^2$ segments, these broken extrema satisfy the Euler-Lagrange equations of the variational principle, which are neutral differential delay equations with state-dependent deviating arguments. At points where accelerations are not defined and velocities are discontinuous, broken extrema satisfy Weierstrass-Erdmann corner conditions that energies and momenta are continuous. Here we construct periodic broken extrema near the $C^{\\infty}$ two-body circular orbits, using piecewise-defined $C^2$ solutions of the neutral differential delay equations along regular segments and a variational approximation for the boundary-layer segments. Broken periodic extrema with an integer number of corner points bifurcate from a discrete set of circular orbits, with scales defined by the Weierstrass-Erdmann corner conditions. We consider the three cases of hydrogen, muonium and positronium atoms. In each case the broken ext...

  3. Einstein's Hydrogen Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S

    2011-01-01

    In 1905, Einstein formulated his special relativity for point particles. For those particles, his Lorentz covariance and energy-momentum relation are by now firmly established. How about the hydrogen atom? It is possible to perform Lorentz boosts on the proton assuming that it is a point particle. Then what happens to the electron orbit? The orbit could go through an elliptic deformation, but it is not possible to understand this problem without quantum mechanics, where the orbit is a standing wave leading to a localized probability distribution. Is this concept consistent with Einstein's Lorentz covariance? Dirac, Wigner, and Feynman contributed important building blocks for understanding this problem. The remaining problem is to assemble those blocks to construct a Lorentz-covariant picture of quantum bound states based on standing waves. It is shown possible to assemble those building blocks using harmonic oscillators.

  4. Atomic Basic Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  5. Atomic transportation via carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan

    2009-01-01

    The transportation of helium atoms in a single-walled carbon nanotube is reported via molecular dynamics simulations. The efficiency of the atomic transportation is found to be dependent on the type of the applied loading and the loading rate as well as the temperature in the process. Simulations show the transportation is a result of the van der Waals force between the nanotube and the helium atoms through a kink propagation initiated in the nanotube.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics in atom optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Wenyu; Dyrting, S.; Milburn, G.J. [Queensland Univ., St. Lucia, QLD (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    In this paper theoretical work on classical and quantum nonlinear dynamics of cold atoms is reported. The basic concepts in nonlinear dynamics are reviewed and then applied to the motion of atoms in time-dependent standing waves and to the atomic bouncer. The quantum dynamics for the cases of regular and chaotic classical dynamics is described. The effect of spontaneous emission and external noise is also discussed. 104 refs., 1 tab., 21 figs.

  7. Inertial measurement using atom interferometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA; Aiai; YANG; Jun; YAN; Shuhua; LUO; Yukun; HU; Qingqing; WEI; Chunhua; LI; Zehuan

    2015-01-01

    The recent advances of atom interferometer and its application in precision inertial measurement are review ed. The principle,characteristics and implementation of atom interferometer are introduced and it can be used to measure gravitational acceleration,gravity gradient and rotation for its high sensitivity. We also present the principle,structure and new progress of gravimeter,gravity gradiometer and gyroscope based on atom interferometer.

  8. Atomic laser-beam finder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viering, Kirsten; Medellin, David; Mo, Jianyong; Raizen, Mark G

    2012-11-05

    We report on an experimental method to align a laser beam to a cloud of atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We show how balanced lock-in detection leads to a very sensitive method to align the laser beam to the atoms in the plane perpendicular to the propagation direction. This provides a very reliable and fast way of aligning laser beams to atoms trapped in a MOT.

  9. Ion-atom hybrid systems

    CERN Document Server

    Willitsch, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The study of interactions between simultaneously trapped cold ions and atoms has emerged as a new research direction in recent years. The development of ion-atom hybrid experiments has paved the way for investigating elastic, inelastic and reactive collisions between these species at very low temperatures, for exploring new cooling mechanisms of ions by atoms and for implementing new hybrid quantum systems. The present lecture reviews experimental methods, recent results and upcoming developments in this emerging field.

  10. Bloch oscillations in atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Cladé, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    In Paris, we are using an atom interferometer to precisely measure the recoil velocity of an atom that absorbs a photon. In order to reach a high sensitivity, many recoils are transferred to atoms using the Bloch oscillations technique. In this lecture, I will present in details this technique and its application to high precision measurement. I will especially describe in details how this method allows us to perform an atom recoil measurement at the level of $1.3 \\times 10^{-9}$. This measurement is used in the most precise determination of the fine structure constant that is independent of quantum electrodynamics.

  11. HPAM: Hirshfeld partitioned atomic multipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elking, Dennis M.; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2012-02-01

    An implementation of the Hirshfeld (HD) and Hirshfeld-Iterated (HD-I) atomic charge density partitioning schemes is described. Atomic charges and atomic multipoles are calculated from the HD and HD-I atomic charge densities for arbitrary atomic multipole rank l on molecules of arbitrary shape and size. The HD and HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are tested by comparing molecular multipole moments and the electrostatic potential (ESP) surrounding a molecule with their reference ab initio values. In general, the HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are found to better reproduce ab initio electrostatic properties over HD atomic charges/multipoles. A systematic increase in precision for reproducing ab initio electrostatic properties is demonstrated by increasing the atomic multipole rank from l=0 (atomic charges) to l=4 (atomic hexadecapoles). Both HD and HD-I atomic multipoles up to rank l are shown to exactly reproduce ab initio molecular multipole moments of rank L for L⩽l. In addition, molecular dipole moments calculated by HD, HD-I, and ChelpG atomic charges only ( l=0) are compared with reference ab initio values. Significant errors in reproducing ab initio molecular dipole moments are found if only HD or HD-I atomic charges used. Program summaryProgram title: HPAM Catalogue identifier: AEKP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 500 809 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 424 494 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: Any Operating system: Linux RAM: Typically, a few hundred megabytes Classification: 16.13 External routines: The program requires 'formatted checkpoint' files obtained from the Gaussian 03 or Gaussian 09 quantum chemistry program. Nature of problem: An ab initio

  12. Automatic leukocyte nucleus segmentation by intuitionistic fuzzy divergence based thresholding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jati, Arindam; Singh, Garima; Mukherjee, Rashmi; Ghosh, Madhumala; Konar, Amit; Chakraborty, Chandan; Nagar, Atulya K

    2014-03-01

    The paper proposes a robust approach to automatic segmentation of leukocyte's nucleus from microscopic blood smear images under normal as well as noisy environment by employing a new exponential intuitionistic fuzzy divergence based thresholding technique. The algorithm minimizes the divergence between the actual image and the ideally thresholded image to search for the final threshold. A new divergence formula based on exponential intuitionistic fuzzy entropy has been proposed. Further, to increase its noise handling capacity, a neighborhood-based membership function for the image pixels has been designed. The proposed scheme has been applied on 110 normal and 54 leukemia (chronic myelogenous leukemia) affected blood samples. The nucleus segmentation results have been validated by three expert hematologists. The algorithm achieves an average segmentation accuracy of 98.52% in noise-free environment. It beats the competitor algorithms in terms of several other metrics. The proposed scheme with neighborhood based membership function outperforms the competitor algorithms in terms of segmentation accuracy under noisy environment. It achieves 93.90% and 94.93% accuracies for Speckle and Gaussian noises, respectively. The average area under the ROC curves comes out to be 0.9514 in noisy conditions, which proves the robustness of the proposed algorithm.

  13. Monte Carlo Simulation for Statistical Decay of Compound Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick M.B.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We perform Monte Carlo simulations for neutron and γ-ray emissions from a compound nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory. This Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshbach (MCHF method calculation, which gives us correlated information between emitted particles and γ-rays. It will be a powerful tool in many applications, as nuclear reactions can be probed in a more microscopic way. We have been developing the MCHF code, CGM, which solves the Hauser-Feshbach theory with the Monte Carlo method. The code includes all the standard models that used in a standard Hauser-Feshbach code, namely the particle transmission generator, the level density module, interface to the discrete level database, and so on. CGM can emit multiple neutrons, as long as the excitation energy of the compound nucleus is larger than the neutron separation energy. The γ-ray competition is always included at each compound decay stage, and the angular momentum and parity are conserved. Some calculations for a fission fragment 140Xe are shown as examples of the MCHF method, and the correlation between the neutron and γ-ray is discussed.

  14. Gas Accretion in the M32 Nucleus: Past & Present

    CERN Document Server

    Seth, Anil C

    2010-01-01

    Using adaptive optics assisted Gemini/NIFS data, I study the present and past gas accretion in the central 3" of the M32 nucleus. From changes in the spectral slope and CO line depths near the center, I find evidence for unresolved dust emission resulting from BH accretion. With a luminosity of ~2e38 erg/s, this dust emission appears to be the most luminous tracer of current BH accretion, two orders of magnitude more luminous than previously detected X-ray emission. These observations suggest that using high resolution infrared data to search for dust emission may be an effective way to detect other nearby, low luminosity BHs, such as those in globular clusters. I also examine the fossil evidence of gas accretion contained in the kinematics of the stars in the nucleus. The higher-order moments (h3 and h4) of the line-of-sight velocity distribution show patterns that are remarkably similar to those seen on larger scales in elliptical galaxies and in gas-rich merger simulations. The kinematics suggests the pres...

  15. Nucleus-Dependent Valence-Space Approach to Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroberg, S. R.; Calci, A.; Hergert, H.; Holt, J. D.; Bogner, S. K.; Roth, R.; Schwenk, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a nucleus-dependent valence-space approach for calculating ground and excited states of nuclei, which generalizes the shell-model in-medium similarity renormalization group to an ensemble reference with fractionally filled orbitals. Because the ensemble is used only as a reference, and not to represent physical states, no symmetry restoration is required. This allows us to capture three-nucleon (3 N ) forces among valence nucleons with a valence-space Hamiltonian specifically targeted to each nucleus of interest. Predicted ground-state energies from carbon through nickel agree with results of other large-space ab initio methods, generally to the 1% level. In addition, we show that this new approach is required in order to obtain convergence for nuclei in the upper p and s d shells. Finally, we address the 1+/3+ inversion problem in 22Na and 46V. This approach extends the reach of ab initio nuclear structure calculations to essentially all light- and medium-mass nuclei.

  16. Finding Hierarchical and Overlapping Dense Subgraphs using Nucleus Decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshadhri, Comandur [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Pinar, Ali [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sariyuce, Ahmet Erdem [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catalyurek, Umit [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Finding dense substructures in a graph is a fundamental graph mining operation, with applications in bioinformatics, social networks, and visualization to name a few. Yet most standard formulations of this problem (like clique, quasiclique, k-densest subgraph) are NP-hard. Furthermore, the goal is rarely to nd the \\true optimum", but to identify many (if not all) dense substructures, understand their distribution in the graph, and ideally determine a hierarchical structure among them. Current dense subgraph nding algorithms usually optimize some objective, and only nd a few such subgraphs without providing any hierarchy. It is also not clear how to account for overlaps in dense substructures. We de ne the nucleus decomposition of a graph, which represents the graph as a forest of nuclei. Each nucleus is a subgraph where smaller cliques are present in many larger cliques. The forest of nuclei is a hierarchy by containment, where the edge density increases as we proceed towards leaf nuclei. Sibling nuclei can have limited intersections, which allows for discovery of overlapping dense subgraphs. With the right parameters, the nuclear decomposition generalizes the classic notions of k-cores and k-trusses. We give provable e cient algorithms for nuclear decompositions, and empirically evaluate their behavior in a variety of real graphs. The tree of nuclei consistently gives a global, hierarchical snapshot of dense substructures, and outputs dense subgraphs of higher quality than other state-of-theart solutions. Our algorithm can process graphs with tens of millions of edges in less than an hour.

  17. Evaluation of novel injectable hydrogels for nucleus pulposus replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernengo, J; Fussell, G W; Smith, N G; Lowman, A M

    2008-01-01

    Branched copolymers composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) are being investigated as an in situ forming replacement for the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc. A family of copolymers was synthesized by varying the molecular weight of the PEG blocks and molar ratio of NIPAAm monomer units to PEG branches. Gel swelling, dissolution, and compressive mechanical properties were characterized over 90 days and stress relaxation behavior over 30 days immersion in vitro. It was found that the NIPAAm to PEG molar ratio did not affect the equilibrium swelling and compressive mechanical properties. However, gel elasticity exhibited a dependency on both the PEG block molecular weight and content. The equilibrium gel water content increased and compressive modulus decreased with increasing PEG block size. While all of the branched copolymers showed significant increases in stress relaxation time constant compared to the homopolymer (p < 0.05), the high PEG content PNIPAAm-PEG (4600 and 8000 g/mol) exhibited the maximum elasticity. Because of its high water content, requisite stiffness and high elastic response, PNIPAAm-PEG (4600 g/mol) will be further evaluated as a candidate material for nucleus pulposus replacement.

  18. Neutrino-nucleus reactions based on recent structure studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshio [Department of Physics and Graduate School of Integrated Basic Sciences, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    Neutrino-nucleus reactions are studied with the use of new shell model Hamiltonians, which have proper tensor components in the interactions and prove to be successful in the description of Gamow-Teller (GT) strengths in nuclei. The new Hamiltonians are applied to obtain new neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections in {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 56}Fe and {sup 56}Ni induced by solar and supernova neutrinos. The element synthesis by neutrino processes in supernova explosions is discussed with the new cross sections. The enhancement of the production yields of {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B and {sup 55}Mn is obtained while fragmented GT strength in {sup 56}Ni with two-peak structure is found to result in smaller e-capture rates at stellar environments. The monopole-based universal interaction with tensor force of π+ρ meson exchanges is used to evaluate GT strength in {sup 40}Ar and ν-induced reactions on {sup 40}Ar. It is found to reproduce well the experimental GT strength in {sup 40}Ar.

  19. Black hole in the West Nucleus of Arp 220

    CERN Document Server

    Downes, D

    2007-01-01

    We present new observations with the IRAM Interferometer, in its longest-baseline configuration, of the CO(2-1) line and the 1.3mm dust radiation from the Arp 220 nuclear region. The dust source in the West nucleus has a size of 0.19 x 0.13 arcsec and a 1.3mm brightness temperature of 90K. This implies that the dust ring in the West nucleus has a high opacity, with tau = 1 at 1.1mm. Not only is the dust ring itself optically thick in the submm and far-IR, but it is surrounded by the previously-known, rapidly rotating molecular disk of size 0.5 arcsec that is also optically thick in the mid-IR. The molecular ring is cooler than the hot dust disk because the CO(2-1) line is seen in absorption against the dust disk. The dust ring is massive (1E9 solar masses), compact (radius 35pc), and hot (true dust temperature 170K). It resembles rather strikingly the dust ring detected around the quasar APM 08279+52, and is most unlike the warm, extended dust sources in starburst galaxies. Because there is a strong temperatu...

  20. Formation of the avian nucleus magnocellularis from the auditory anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Susan J; Rubel, Edwin W; Nishi, Rae

    2006-10-01

    In the avian auditory system, the neural network for computing the localization of sound in space begins with bilateral innervation of nucleus laminaris (NL) by nucleus magnocellularis (NM) neurons. We used antibodies against the neural specific markers Hu C/D, neurofilament, and SV2 together with retrograde fluorescent dextran labeling from the contralateral hindbrain to identify NM neurons within the anlage and follow their development. NM neurons could be identified by retrograde labeling as early as embryonic day (E) 6. While the auditory anlage organized itself into NM and NL in a rostral-to-caudal fashion between E6 and E8, labeled NM neurons were visible throughout the extent of the anlage at E6. By observing the pattern of neuronal rearrangements together with the pattern of contralaterally projecting NM fibers, we could identify NL in the ventral anlage. Ipsilateral NM fibers contacted the developing NL at E8, well after NM collaterals had projected contralaterally. Furthermore, the formation of ipsilateral connections between NM and NL neurons appeared to coincide with the arrival of VIIIth nerve fibers in NM. By E10, immunoreactivity for SV2 was heavily concentrated in the dorsal and ventral neuropils of NL. Thus, extensive pathfinding and morphological rearrangement of central auditory nuclei occurs well before the arrival of cochlear afferents. Our results suggest that NM neurons may play a central role in formation of tonotopic connections in the auditory system.