WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic matter waves

  1. Evanescent light-matter Interactions in Atomic Cladding Wave Guides

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Liron; Goykhman, Ilya; Levy, Uriel

    2012-01-01

    Alkali vapors, and in particular rubidium, are being used extensively in several important fields of research such as slow and stored light non-linear optics3 and quantum computation. Additionally, the technology of alkali vapors plays a major role in realizing myriad industrial applications including for example atomic clocks magentometers8 and optical frequency stabilization. Lately, there is a growing effort towards miniaturizing traditional centimeter-size alkali vapor cells. Owing to the significant reduction in device dimensions, light matter interactions are greatly enhanced, enabling new functionalities due to the low power threshold needed for non-linear interactions. Here, taking advantage of the mature Complimentary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) compatible platform of silicon photonics, we construct an efficient and flexible platform for tailored light vapor interactions on a chip. Specifically, we demonstrate light matter interactions in an atomic cladding wave guide (ACWG), consisting of CMOS ...

  2. Search for light scalar dark matter with atomic gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Hogan, Jason M; Rajendran, Surjeet; Van Tilburg, Ken

    2016-01-01

    We show that gravitational wave detectors based on a type of atom interferometry are sensitive to ultralight scalar dark matter. Such dark matter can cause temporal oscillations in fundamental constants with a frequency set by the dark matter mass, and amplitude determined by the local dark matter density. The result is a modulation of atomic transition energies. This signal is ideally suited to a type of gravitational wave detector that compares two spatially separated atom interferometers referenced by a common laser. Such a detector can improve on current searches for electron-mass or electric-charge modulus dark matter by up to 10 orders of magnitude in coupling, in a frequency band complementary to that of other proposals. It demonstrates that this class of atomic sensors is qualitatively different from other gravitational wave detectors, including those based on laser interferometry. By using atomic-clock-like interferometers, laser noise is mitigated with only a single baseline. These atomic sensors ca...

  3. Matter-wave beam splitter on an atom chip for a portable atom-interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S J; Gang, S T; Kim, J B

    2016-01-01

    We construct a matter-wave beam splitter using 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate on an atom chip. Through the use of radio-frequency-induced double-well potentials, we were able to split a BEC into two clouds separated by distances ranging from 2.8 {\\mu}m to 57 {\\mu}m. Interference between these two freely expanding BECs has been observed. By varying the rf-field amplitude, frequency, or polarization, we investigate behaviors of the beam-splitter. From the perspective of practical use, our BEC manipulation system is suitable for application to interferometry since it is compact and the repetition rate is high due to the anodic bonded atom chip on the vacuum cell. The portable system occupies a volume of 0.5 m3 and operates at a repetition rate as high as ~0.2 Hz.

  4. Measuring the Gouy Phase of Matter Waves using Singular Atom Optics with Spinor BECs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Justin T.; Hansen, Azure; Murphree, Joseph D.; Jayaseelan, Maitreyi; Bigelow, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-01

    The Gouy phase is a propagation-dependent geometric phase found in confined waves as they propagate through a focus. Although it has been observed and studied extensively both in scalar and vector optical beams as well as in electron vortex beams, it has not yet been directly observed in ultracold matter waves. The Schrödinger equation has the same form as the paraxial wave equation from electromagnetism; expansion of a BEC upon release from a trap has the same mathematical form as a beam propagating away from a focus. We employ and extend this analogy between coherent optical beams and coherent matter waves to include spin angular momentum (polarization), which enables us measure the matter wave Gouy phase using coreless vortex spin textures in spinor BECs. Because the Gouy phase is dependent on the orbital angular momentum of the wave, the vortex and core states acquire different Gouy phase shifts. Parameters that are sensitive to the relative phase such as two-dimensional maps of the Stokes parameters rotate during evolution due to this phase difference. Using atom-optic polarimetry we can access the evolution of the atomic Stokes parameters and observe this rotation.

  5. Les Houches Summer School of Theoretical Physics : Session 72, Coherent Atomic Matter Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Westbrook, C; David, F; Coherent Atomic Matter Waves

    2001-01-01

    Progress in atomic physics has been so vigorous during the past decade that one is hard pressed to follow all the new developments. In the early 1990s the first atom interferometers opened a new field in which we have been able to use the wave nature of atoms to probe fundamental quantum me chanics questions as well as to make precision measurements. Coming fast on the heels of this development was the demonstration of Bose Einstein condensation in dilute atomic vapors which intensified research interest in studying the wave nature of matter, especially in a domain in which "macro scopic" quantum effects (vortices, stimulated scattering of atomic beams) are visible. At the same time there has been much progress in our understanding of the behavior of waves (notably electromagnetic) in complex media, both periodic and disordered. An obvious topic of speculation and probably of future research is whether any new insight or applications will develop if one examines the behavior of de Broglie waves in ana...

  6. From quantum turbulence to statistical atom optics: new perspectives in speckle matter wave

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, P E S; Telles, G D; Impens, F; Kaiser, R; Bagnato, V S

    2016-01-01

    Quantum Turbulence, the chaotic configuration of tangled quantized vortex lines, can be analyzed from the matter wave perspective in instead of the traditional fluid perspective. We report the observation of a remarkable similarity in between the dynamics of a freely expanding turbulent Bose-Einstein condensate and the propagation of an optical speckle pattern. Both follow very similar basic propagation characteristics. The second-order correlation is calculated and the typical correlation length of the two phenomena is used to substantiate the observations. The analogy between an expanding turbulent atomic condensate and a traveling optical speckle creates exciting prospects to investigate disordered quantum matter including the possibilities of a 3D speckle matter field.

  7. Localized spatially nonlinear matter waves in atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates with space-modulated nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yu-Qin; Li, Ji; Han, Wei; Wang, Deng-Shan; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic nonlinearity is the most remarkable characteristic of the Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) systems. Many studies have been done on atomic BECs with time- and space- modulated nonlinearities, while there is few work considering the atomic-molecular BECs with space-modulated nonlinearities. Here, we obtain two kinds of Jacobi elliptic solutions and a family of rational solutions of the atomic-molecular BECs with trapping potential and space-modulated nonlinearity and consider the effect of three-body interaction on the localized matter wave solutions. The topological properties of the localized nonlinear matter wave for no coupling are analysed: the parity of nonlinear matter wave functions depends only on the principal quantum number n, and the numbers of the density packets for each quantum state depend on both the principal quantum number n and the secondary quantum number l. When the coupling is not zero, the localized nonlinear matter waves given by the rational function, their topological properties are independent of the principal quantum number n, only depend on the secondary quantum number l. The Raman detuning and the chemical potential can change the number and the shape of the density packets. The stability of the Jacobi elliptic solutions depends on the principal quantum number n, while the stability of the rational solutions depends on the chemical potential and Raman detuning.

  8. Dynamics of bisolitonic matter waves in a Bose-Einstein condensate subjected to an atomic beam splitter and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dikande, Alain Moise; Ebobenow, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical scheme for an experimental implementation involving bisolitonic matter waves from an attractive Bose-Einstein condensate, is considered within the framework of a non-perturbative approach to the associate Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The model consists of a single condensate subjected to an expulsive harmonic potential creating a double-condensate structure, and a gravitational potential that induces atomic exchanges between the two overlapping post condensates. Using a non-isospectral scattering transform method, exact expressions for the bright-matter-wave bisolitons are found in terms of double-lump envelopes with the co-propagating pulses displaying more or less pronounced differences in their widths and tails depending on the mass of atoms composing the condensate.

  9. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  10. The Mystery of Matter, World of the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, William G.

    This booklet is one in the "World of the Atome Series" for junior high school students and their teachers. It describes the fascinating story of the search for the key to the structure of matter. These topics are reviewed: the chemical atom of the 19th century, the planetary atom, the wave atom, inside the elementary particles, and the mystery of…

  11. Nonautonomous matter waves in a waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Zhenya [Key Laboratory of Mathematics Mechanization, Institute of Systems Science, AMSS, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang Xiaofei [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); College of Science, Honghe University, Mengzi 661100 (China); Liu, W. M. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-08-15

    We present a physical model that describes the transport of Bose-Einstein-condensed atoms from a reservoir to a waveguide. By using the similarity and Moebius transformations, we study nonautonomous matter waves in Bose-Einstein condensates in the presence of an inhomogeneous source. Then, we find its various types of exact nonautonomous matter-wave solutions, including the W-shaped bright solitary waves, W-shaped and U-shaped dark solitary waves, periodic wave solutions, and rational solitary waves. The results show that these different types of matter-wave structures can be generated and effectively controlled by modulating the amplitude of the source. Our results may raise the possibility of some experiments and potential applications related to Bose-Einstein condensates in the presence of an inhomogeneous source.

  12. Matter-Wave Optics of Diatomic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    Lima , Peru (2010). S. Singh and P. Meystre, "Atomic probe Wigner tomography of a nanomechanical system," contributed paper, APS DAMOP Annual Meeting...Triangle Park , NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS matter-wave optics, ultracold molecules, polar molecules, quantum optomechanics, quantum-degenerate

  13. Multimode interferometer for guided matter waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Erika; Calarco, Tommaso; Folman, Ron; Andersson, Mauritz; Hessmo, Björn; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2002-03-11

    Atoms can be trapped and guided with electromagnetic fields, using nanofabricated structures. We describe the fundamental features of an interferometer for guided matter waves, built of two combined Y-shaped beam splitters. We find that such a device is expected to exhibit high contrast fringes even in a multimode regime, analogous to a white light interferometer.

  14. Gravitational wave detection using atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Jason

    2016-05-01

    The advent of gravitational wave astronomy promises to provide a new window into the universe. Low frequency gravitational waves below 10 Hz are expected to offer rich science opportunities both in astrophysics and cosmology, complementary to signals in LIGO's band. Detector designs based on atom interferometry have a number of advantages over traditional approaches in this band, including the possibility of substantially reduced antenna baseline length in space and high isolation from seismic noise for a terrestrial detector. In particular, atom interferometry based on the clock transition in group II atoms offers tantalizing new possibilities. Such a design is expected to be highly immune to laser frequency noise because the signal arises strictly from the light propagation time between two ensembles of atoms. This would allow for a gravitational wave detector with a single linear baseline, potentially offering advantages in cost and design flexibility. In support of these proposals, recent progress in long baseline atom interferometry in a 10-meter drop tower has enabled observation of matter wave interference with atomic wavepacket separations exceeding 50 cm and interferometer durations of more than 2 seconds. This approach can provide ground-based proof-of-concept demonstrations of many of the technical requirements of both terrestrial and satellite gravitational wave detectors.

  15. Inversion of an Atomic Wave Packet in a Circularly Polarized Electromagnetic Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Gao-Jian

    2001-01-01

    We study behavior of an atomic wave packet in a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave, and particularly calculate the atomic inversion of the wave packet. A general method of calculation is presented. The results are interesting. For example, if the wave packet is very narrow or/and the interaction is very strong, no matter the atom is initially in its ground state or excited state, the atomic inversion approaches zero as time approaches infinity. If the atom is initially in its ground state and excited state with the probability 1/2 respectively, and if the momentum density is an even function, then the atomic inversion equals zero at any time.``

  16. Avoided-level-crossing spectroscopy with dressed matter waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, André; Holthaus, Martin

    2008-12-12

    We devise a method for probing resonances of macroscopic matter waves in shaken optical lattices by monitoring their response to slow parameter changes, and show that such resonances can be disabled by particular choices of the driving amplitude. The theoretical analysis of this scheme reveals far-reaching analogies between dressed atoms and time periodically forced matter waves.

  17. Cold Matter Assembled Atom-by-Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Manuel; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Anschuetz, Eric R; Krajenbrink, Alexandre; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-01-01

    The realization of large-scale fully controllable quantum systems is an exciting frontier in modern physical science. We use atom-by-atom assembly to implement a novel platform for the deterministic preparation of regular arrays of individually controlled cold atoms. In our approach, a measurement and feedback procedure eliminates the entropy associated with probabilistic trap occupation and results in defect-free arrays of over 50 atoms in less than 400 ms. The technique is based on fast, real-time control of 100 optical tweezers, which we use to arrange atoms in desired geometric patterns and to maintain these configurations by replacing lost atoms with surplus atoms from a reservoir. This bottom-up approach enables controlled engineering of scalable many-body systems for quantum information processing, quantum simulations, and precision measurements.

  18. Atom Interferometry for Detection of Gravitational Waves: Progress and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy promises to provide a new window into the universe, collecting information about astrophysical systems and cosmology that is difficult or impossible to acquire by other methods. Detector designs based on atom interferometry offer a number of advantages over traditional approaches, including access to conventionally inaccessible frequency ranges and substantially reduced antenna baselines. Atomic physics techniques also make it possible to build a gravitational wave detector with a single linear baseline, potentially offering advantages in cost and design flexibility. In support of these proposals, recent progress in long baseline atom interferometry has enabled observation of matter wave interference with atomic wavepacket separations exceeding 10 cm and interferometer durations of more than 2 seconds. These results are obtained in a 10-meter drop tower incorporating large momentum transfer atom optics. This approach can provide ground-based proof-of-concept demonstrations of many of the technical requirements of both terrestrial and satellite gravitational wave detectors.

  19. International Conference on Neutrino Mass, Dark Matter and Gravitational Waves, Condensation of Atoms and Monopoles, Light-cone Quantization : Orbis Scientiae '96

    CERN Document Server

    Mintz, Stephan; Perlmutter, Arnold; Neutrino Mass, Dark Matter and Gravitational Waves, Condensation of Atoms and Monopoles, Light-cone Quantization : Orbis Scientiae '96

    1996-01-01

    The International Conference, Orbis Scientiae 1996, focused on the topics: The Neutrino Mass, Light Cone Quantization, Monopole Condensation, Dark Matter, and Gravitational Waves which we have adopted as the title of these proceedings. Was there any exciting news at the conference? Maybe, it depends on who answers the question. There was an almost unanimous agreement on the overall success of the conference as was evidenced by the fact that in the after-dinner remarks by one of us (BNK) the suggestion of organizing the conference on a biannual basis was presented but not accepted: the participants wanted the continuation of the tradition to convene annually. We shall, of course, comply. The expected observation of gravitational waves will constitute the most exciting vindication of Einstein's general relativity. This subject is attracting the attention of the experimentalists and theorists alike. We hope that by the first decade of the third millennium or earlier, gravitational waves will be detected,...

  20. Ghost Imaging with Matter Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakimov, Roman; Henson, Bryce; Shin, David; Hodgman, Sean; Dall, Robert; Baldwin, Kenneth; Truscott, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, high resolution ghost imaging of a macroscopic object using atoms. Ghost imaging is a novel technique in which the image emerges from cross-correlation of particles (usually photons)in two separate beams. One beam is detected with a single-pixel (bucket detector) after passing through the object, while the other beam does not interact with the object and is registered with high spatial resolution. Neither detector can reconstruct the image independently. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold metastable helium atoms originating from thecollision of two Bose-Einstein Condensates. After s-wave scattering the atoms form a spherical shell of strongly correlated pairs with opposite momenta. We extend this technique with more than a10-foldincrease in the number of correlated pairs available for eachsingle experiment run, by using higher-order Bragg scattering in the Kapitza-Dirac regime, with multiple shells generated from different diffraction orders. Using single-atom detection, we create ghost images of a target maskwith a resolution given by the width of the cross-corrrelation function of atomic momenta. Future extensions could include ghost interference and EPR tests.

  1. Axion dark matter detection using atomic transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikivie, P

    2014-11-14

    Dark matter axions may cause transitions between atomic states that differ in energy by an amount equal to the axion mass. Such energy differences are conveniently tuned using the Zeeman effect. It is proposed to search for dark matter axions by cooling a kilogram-sized sample to millikelvin temperatures and count axion induced transitions using laser techniques. This appears to be an appropriate approach to axion dark matter detection in the 10^{-4}  eV mass range.

  2. Axion Dark Matter Detection using Atomic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Sikivie, P

    2014-01-01

    Dark matter axions may cause transitions between atomic states that differ in energy by an amount equal to the axion mass. Such energy differences are conveniently tuned using the Zeeman effect. It is proposed to search for dark matter axions by cooling a kilogram-sized sample to milliKelvin temperatures and count axion induced transitions using laser techniques. This appears an appropriate approach to axion dark matter detection in the $10^{-4}$ eV mass range.

  3. Surface Acoustic Wave Atomizer and Electrostatic Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Yutaka

    A new methodology for fabricating thin film or micro patters of organic/bio material using surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer and electrostatic deposition is proposed and characteristics of atomization techniques are discussed in terms of drop size and atomization speed. Various types of SAW atomizer are compared with electrospray and conventional ultrasonic atomizers. It has been proved that SAW atomizers generate drops as small as electrospray and have very fast atomization speed. This technique is applied to fabrication of micro patterns of proteins. According to the result of immunoassay, the specific activity of immunoglobulin was preserved after deposition process.

  4. New Atomic Methods for Dark Matter Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Benjamin; Stadnik, Yevgeny; Dzuba, Vladimir; Flambaum, Victor; Leefer, Nathan; Budker, Dmitry

    2015-05-01

    We propose to exploit P and T violating effects in atoms, nuclei, and molecules to search for dark matter (eg axions) and various other cosmic fields. We perform calculations of electric dipole moments (EDMs) that a dark matter field would induce in atoms. Crucially, the effects we consider here are linear in the small parameter that quantifies the dark matter interaction strength; most current searches rely on effects that are at least quadratic in this parameter. The induced oscillating EDMs have the potential to be measured with very high accuracy, and experimental techniques in this field are evolving fast. Pairs of closely spaced opposite parity levels that are found in diatomic molecules will also lead to a significant enhancement in these effects. We are also interested in a possible explanation for the anomalous DAMA dark matter detection results based on DM-electron scattering. Our calculations may provide a possible mechanism for dark matter induced ionisation modulations that are not ruled out by other experiments. Alternatively, they could further reduce the available parameter space for certain dark matter models.

  5. Energy Wave Model of Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍细如

    2015-01-01

    proton emits energy wave, electron could sits any position away from nucleus, but be the most stable just when it sits at the trough of energy wave, and this position accords with Bohr radius and Schr?dinger equation.

  6. Excitation of knotted vortex lines in matter waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maucher, F.; Gardiner, S. A.; Hughes, I. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the creation of knotted ultracold matter waves in Bose-Einstein condensates via coherent two-photon Raman transitions with a Λ level configuration. The Raman transition allows an indirect transfer of atoms from the internal state | a> to the target state | b> via an excited state | e> , that would be otherwise dipole-forbidden. This setup enables us to imprint three-dimensional knotted vortex lines embedded in the probe field to the density in the target state. We elaborate on experimental feasibility as well as on subsequent dynamics of the matter wave.

  7. Vector Dark Matter Detection using Quantum Jump of Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Qiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Hidden sector $U(1)$ vector bosons created from inflationary fluctuations can be a substantial fraction of dark matter if their mass is around $10^{-5}$eV which is the order of the Lamb-shift between S wave and P wave in atoms. Due to the creation mechanism, the dark matter vector bosons are condensate with a very small velocity dispersion which makes their energy spectral density $\\rho_{cdm}/\\Delta E$ very high therefore boost the dark electric dipole transition rates in cooling atoms or ions if the energy gap between states equals the mass of vector bosons. The energy difference between quantum states in atoms can be tuned using the Zeeman effect. In addition, the excited state of atoms can be pumped into a highly excited state, order of eV above the ground state, with a tunable laser. The laser frequency is set so no other states will be excited. The highly excited state with a short lifetime then spontaneously emits photon which can be detected. Choices of target material are many depending on facility of...

  8. The role of Mie scattering in the seeding of matter-wave superradiance

    CERN Document Server

    Bachelard, Romain; Courteille, Philippe W; Piovella, Nicola; Stehle, Christian; Zimmermann, Claus; Slama, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Matter-wave superradiance is based on the interplay between ultracold atoms coherently organized in momentum space and a backscattered wave. Here, we show that this mechanism may be triggered by Mie scattering from the atomic cloud. We show that the system evolves into a superposition of states, where the scattering process imprints a {\\it phase grating} on the atomic dipoles. This grating generates coherent emission even when there is at most one excited atom in the system at a time, contributing to the backward light wave onset. The atomic recoil 'halos' created by the scattered light exhibit a strong anisotropy, in contrast to single-atom scattering.

  9. Quantum interference of molecules -- probing the wave nature of matter

    CERN Document Server

    Venugopalan, Anu

    2012-01-01

    The double slit interference experiment has been famously described by Richard Feynman as containing the "only mystery of quantum mechanics". The history of quantum mechanics is intimately linked with the discovery of the dual nature of matter and radiation. While the double slit experiment for light is easily undertsood in terms of its wave nature, the very same experiment for particles like the electron is somewhat more difficult to comprehend. By the 1920s it was firmly established that electrons have a wave nature. However, for a very long time, most discussions pertaining to interference experiments for particles were merely gedanken experiments. It took almost six decades after the establishment of its wave nature to carry out a 'double slit interference' experiment for electrons. This set the stage for interference experiments with larger particles. In the last decade there has been spectacular progress in matter-wave interefernce experiments. Today, molecules with over a hundred atoms can be made to i...

  10. Self-induced dipole force and filamentation instability of a matter wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, M.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of copropagating electromagnetic and matter waves is described with a set of coupled higher-order nonlinear Schrodinger equations. Optical self-focusing modulates an initially planar wave leading to the generation of dipole forces on the atoms. Atomic channeling due to the dipole...

  11. Interaction of Photon Vortex Beams with Atomic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyanik, Maria; Afanasev, Andrei; Carlson, Carl E.

    2017-01-01

    In our work we consider helical Bessel beams' (BB's) propagation and interaction with isotropic matter. Dynamical properties of the beams with non-zero orbital angular momentum (OAM), which are determined by spatial degrees of freedom and polarization, modify the fundamental processes in light-matter interactions. Circular dichroism of BBs propagating in hydrogen gas was considered within the frame of studying the vortex beams' attenuation due to photoabsorption in hydrogen gas. In this case, the phenomenon is due to the topology of the wave front, contrary to the zero OAM case, when the change in polarization state is due to matter inhomogeneity. The effect of circular dichroism has been predicted by calculating the beam ellipticity evolution when traversing an isotropic target. According to our results, the BBs' transverse ellipticity profile has a structure of concentric circular maxima which correspond to minima of the intensity. The characteristic polarization singularity arises on the beam axis as the result of interaction with matter. It is shown, that even for the case of the paraxial approximation the effect of circular dichroism takes place. These signatures can be used for theoretical and experimental analysis of the interactions of optical vortices with atomic matter.

  12. Discrete wave mechanics: The hydrogen atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, F T

    1986-08-01

    The quantum mechanical problem of the hydrogen atom is treated by use of a finite difference equation in place of Schrödinger's differential equation. The exact solution leads to a wave vector energy expression that is readily converted to the Bohr-Rydberg formula. (The calculations here reported are limited to spherically symmetric states.) The wave vectors reduce to the familiar solutions of Schrödinger's equation as c --> infinity. The internal consistency and limiting behavior provide support for the view that the equations employed could well constitute an approach to a relativistic formulation of wave mechanics.

  13. Wave Dark Matter and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Alan R.

    We explore a model of dark matter called wave dark matter (also known as scalar field dark matter and boson stars) which has recently been motivated by a new geometric perspective by Bray. Wave dark matter describes dark matter as a scalar field which satisfies the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. These equations rely on a fundamental constant Upsilon (also known as the "mass term'' of the Klein-Gordon equation). Specifically, in this dissertation, we study spherically symmetric wave dark matter and compare these results with observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies as a first attempt to compare the implications of the theory of wave dark matter with actual observations of dark matter. This includes finding a first estimate of the fundamental constant Upsilon. In the introductory Chapter 1, we present some preliminary background material to define and motivate the study of wave dark matter and describe some of the properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In Chapter 2, we present several different ways of describing a spherically symmetric spacetime and the resulting metrics. We then focus our discussion on an especially useful form of the metric of a spherically symmetric spacetime in polar-areal coordinates and its properties. In particular, we show how the metric component functions chosen are extremely compatible with notions in Newtonian mechanics. We also show the monotonicity of the Hawking mass in these coordinates. Finally, we discuss how these coordinates and the metric can be used to solve the spherically symmetric Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. In Chapter 3, we explore spherically symmetric solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations, the defining equations of wave dark matter, where the scalar field is of the form f(t, r) = eiotF(r) for some constant o ∈ R and complex-valued function F(r). We show that the corresponding metric is static if and only if F( r) = h(r)eia for some constant alpha ∈ R and real-valued function h(r). We describe the

  14. Scalar Field (Wave) Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Matos, T

    2016-01-01

    Recent high-quality observations of dwarf and low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies have shown that their dark matter (DM) halos prefer flat central density profiles. On the other hand the standard cold dark matter model simulations predict a more cuspy behavior. Feedback from star formation has been widely used to reconcile simulations with observations, this might be successful in field dwarf galaxies but its success in low mass galaxies remains uncertain. One model that have received much attention is the scalar field dark matter model. Here the dark matter is a self-interacting ultra light scalar field that forms a cosmological Bose-Einstein condensate, a mass of $10^{-22}$eV/c$^2$ is consistent with flat density profiles in the centers of dwarf spheroidal galaxies, reduces the abundance of small halos, might account for the rotation curves even to large radii in spiral galaxies and has an early galaxy formation. The next generation of telescopes will provide better constraints to the model that will help...

  15. An Atomic Gravitational Wave Interferometric Sensor (AGIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Savas; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Graham, Peter W.; /SLAC; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Rajendran, Surjeet; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-08-01

    We propose two distinct atom interferometer gravitational wave detectors, one terrestrial and another satellite-based, utilizing the core technology of the Stanford 10m atom interferometer presently under construction. Each configuration compares two widely separated atom interferometers run using common lasers. The signal scales with the distance between the interferometers, which can be large since only the light travels over this distance, not the atoms. The terrestrial experiment with baseline {approx} 1 km can operate with strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -19}/{radical}Hz in the 1 Hz-10 Hz band, inaccessible to LIGO, and can detect gravitational waves from solar mass binaries out to megaparsec distances. The satellite experiment with baseline {approx} 1000 km can probe the same frequency spectrum as LISA with comparable strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -20}/{radical}Hz. The use of ballistic atoms (instead of mirrors) as inertial test masses improves systematics coming from vibrations, acceleration noise, and significantly reduces spacecraft control requirements. We analyze the backgrounds in this configuration and discuss methods for controlling them to the required levels.

  16. Using Atomic Clocks to Detect Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Atomic clocks have recently reached a fractional timing precision of $<10^{-18}$. We point out that an array of atomic clocks, distributed along the Earth's orbit around the Sun, will have the sensitivity needed to detect the time dilation effect of mHz gravitational waves (GWs), such as those emitted by supermassive black hole binaries at cosmological distances. Simultaneous measurement of clock-rates at different phases of a passing GW provides an attractive alternative to the interferometric detection of temporal variations in distance between test masses separated by less than a GW wavelength, currently envisioned for the eLISA mission.

  17. Observation of Atom-Wave Beats Using a Kerr Modulator for Atom Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Décamps, B; Gillot, J; Vigué, J; Gauguet, A; Büchner, M

    2016-02-01

    A phase modulation puts the atom in a coherent superposition of quantum states with different kinetic energies. We have detected the interference of such modulated waves at the output of our atom interferometer, and we have observed beats at the difference of the modulation frequencies and its harmonics, in good agreement with theory. The phase modulations were produced by a Kerr phase modulator, i.e., by the propagation of the atom wave in a time-dependent electric field. An extension of this technique to electron interferometry should open the way to very high temporal resolution in electron microscopy.

  18. Detecting inertial effects with airborne matter-wave interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Geiger, Remi; Stern, Guillaume; Zahzam, Nassim; Cheinet, Patrick; Battelier, Baptiste; Villing, André; Moron, Frédéric; Lours, Michel; Bidel, Yannick; Bresson, Alexandre; Landragin, Arnaud; Bouyer, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Inertial sensors relying on atom interferometry offer a breakthrough advance in a variety of applications, such as inertial navigation, gravimetry or ground- and space-based tests of fundamental physics. These instruments require a quiet environment to reach their performance and using them outside the laboratory remains a challenge. Here we report the first operation of an airborne matter-wave accelerometer set up aboard a 0g plane and operating during the standard gravity (1g) and microgravity (0g) phases of the flight. At 1g, the sensor can detect inertial effects more than 300 times weaker than the typical acceleration fluctuations of the aircraft. We describe the improvement of the interferometer sensitivity in 0g, which reaches 2 x 10-4 ms-2 / \\surdHz with our current setup. We finally discuss the extension of our method to airborne and spaceborne tests of the Universality of free fall with matter waves.

  19. Coherent transport of matter waves in disordered optical potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Robert

    2007-07-01

    The development of modern techniques for the cooling and the manipulation of atoms in recent years, and the possibility to create Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases and to load them into regular optical lattices or disordered optical potentials, has evoked new interest for the disorder-induced localization of ultra-cold atoms. This work studies the transport properties of matter waves in disordered optical potentials, which are also known as speckle potentials. The effect of correlated disorder on localization is first studied numerically in the framework of the Anderson model. The relevant transport parameters in the configuration average over many different realizations of the speckle potential are then determined analytically, using self-consistent diagrammatic perturbation techniques. This allows to make predictions for a possible experimental observation of coherent transport phenomena for cold atoms in speckle potentials. Of particular importance are the spatial correlations of the speckle fluctuations, which are responsible for the anisotropic character of the single scattering processes in the effective medium. Coherent multiple scattering leads to quantum interference effects, which entail a renormalization of the diffusion constant as compared to the classical description. This so-called weak localization of matter waves is studied as the underlying mechanism for the disorder-driven transition to the Anderson-localization regime, explicitly taking into account the correlations of the speckle fluctuations. (orig.)

  20. Experimental constraint on dark matter detection with optical atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wcisło, P.; Morzyński, P.; Bober, M.; Cygan, A.; Lisak, D.; Ciuryło, R.; Zawada, M.

    2016-12-01

    The total mass density of the Universe appears to be dominated by dark matter. However, beyond its gravitational interactions at the galactic scale, little is known about its nature1. Several proposals have been advanced in recent years for the detection of dark matter2-4. In particular, a network of atomic clocks could be used to search for transient indicators of hypothetical dark matter5 in the form of stable topological defects; for example, monopoles, strings or domain walls6. The clocks become desynchronized when a dark-matter object sweeps through the network. This pioneering approach5 requires a comparison between at least two distant optical atomic clocks7-9. Here, by exploiting differences in the susceptibilities of the atoms and the cavity to the fine-structure constant10,11, we show that a single optical atomic clock12 is already sensitive to dark-matter events. This implies that existing optical atomic clocks13,14 can serve as a global topological-defect dark-matter observatory, without any further developments in experimental apparatus or the need for long phase-noise-compensated optical-fibre links15. Using optical atomic clocks, we explored a new dimension of astrophysical observations by constraining the strength of atomic coupling to hypothetical dark-matter cosmic objects. Under the conditions of our experiments, the degree of constraint was found to exceed the previously reported limits16 by more than three orders of magnitude.

  1. Resonance-Radiation Force Exerted by a Circularly Polarized Light on an Atomic Wave Packet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Yong-Hua; ZENG Gao-Jian; LI Jin-Hui

    2006-01-01

    We study the behaviour of an atomic wave packet in a circularly polarized light, and especially give the calculation of the radiative force exerted by the circularly polarized light on the atomic wave packet under the resonance condition. A general method of the calculation is presented and the result is interesting. For example, under the condition that the wave packet is very narrow or/and the interaction is very strong, no matter whether the atom is initially in its ground state or excited state, as time approaches to infinity, the resonance-radiation force exerted by the light on the atom approaches to zero. If the atom is initially in its ground state and excited state with the probability 1/2 respectively, and if the momentum density is a even function, then the resonance-radiation force exerted by the light on the atom is equal to zero.

  2. Wave mechanics of the hydrogen atom

    CERN Document Server

    Ogilvie, J F

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen atom is a system amenable to an exact treatment within Schroedinger's formulation of quantum mechanics according to coordinates in four systems -- spherical polar, paraboloidal, ellipsoidal and spheroconical coordinates; the latter solution is reported for the first time. Applications of these solutions include angular momenta, a quantitative calculation of the absorption spectrum and accurate plots of surfaces of amplitude functions. The shape of an amplitude function, and even the quantum numbers in a particular set to specify such an individual function, depend on the coordinates in a particular chosen system, and are therefore artefacts of that particular coordinate representation within wave mechanics. All discussion of atomic or molecular properties based on such shapes or quantum numbers therefore lacks general significance

  3. A Scheme of Interferometric Measurement of an Atomic Wave Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zheng-Dong; LIN Yu; ZENG Liang; PAN Qin-Min

    2000-01-01

    A new method to measure an atomic wave function is discussed. It effectively solves the problem of an initially random phase of a travelling-wave laser beam. The relationship between the measured data and the atomic wavefunction is presented, and the wave function's reconstruction procedure is also analyzed.PACS: 03.65. Bz, 03. 75. Dg

  4. Fifteen years of cold matter on the atom chip: promise, realizations, and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Mark; Amit, Omer; Zhou, Shuyu; Groswasser, David; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2016-10-01

    Here we review the field of atom chips in the context of Bose-Einstein Condensates (BEC) as well as cold matter in general. Twenty years after the first realization of the BEC and 15 years after the realization of the atom chip, the latter has been found to enable extraordinary feats: from producing BECs at a rate of several per second, through the realization of matter-wave interferometry, and all the way to novel probing of surfaces and new forces. In addition, technological applications are also being intensively pursued. This review will describe these developments and more, including new ideas which have not yet been realized.

  5. Fifteen Years of Cold Matter on the Atom Chip: Promise, Realizations, and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Mark; Zhou, Shuyu; Groswasser, David; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Here we review the field of atom chips in the context of Bose-Einstein Condensates (BEC) as well as cold matter in general. Twenty years after the first realization of the BEC and fifteen years after the realization of the atom chip, the latter has been found to enable extraordinary feats: from producing BECs at a rate of several per second, through the realization of matter-wave interferometry, and all the way to novel probing of surfaces and new forces. In addition, technological applications are also being intensively pursued. This review will describe these developments and more, including new ideas which have not yet been realized.

  6. Schroedinger's Wave Structure of Matter (WSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Milo; Haselhurst, Geoff

    2009-10-01

    The puzzling electron is due to the belief that it is a discrete particle. Einstein deduced this structure was impossible since Nature does not allow the discrete particle. Clifford (1876) rejected discrete matter and suggested structures in `space'. Schroedinger, (1937) also eliminated discrete particles writing: What we observe as material bodies and forces are nothing but shapes and variations in the structure of space. Particles are just schaumkommen (appearances). He rejected wave-particle duality. Schroedinger's concept was developed by Milo Wolff and Geoff Haselhurst (SpaceAndMotion.com) using the Scalar Wave Equation to find spherical wave solutions in a 3D quantum space. This WSM, the origin of all the Natural Laws, contains all the electron's properties including the Schroedinger Equation. The origin of Newton's Law F=ma is no longer a puzzle; It originates from Mach's principle of inertia (1883) that depends on the space medium and the WSM. Carver Mead (1999) at CalTech used the WSM to design Intel micro-chips correcting errors of Maxwell's magnetic Equations. Applications of the WSM also describe matter at molecular dimensions: alloys, catalysts, biology and medicine, molecular computers and memories. See ``Schroedinger's Universe'' - at Amazon.com

  7. Transverse multipolar light-matter couplings in evanescent waves

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Bonod, Nicolas; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to study the interaction between matter and evanescent fields. The approach is based on the decomposition of evanescent plane waves into multipoles of well-defined angular momentum transverse to both decay and propagation directions. We use the approach to identify the origin of the recently observed directional coupling of emitters into guided modes, and of the opposite Zeeman state excitation of atoms near a fiber. We explain how to rigorously quantify both effects, and show that the directionality and the difference in excitation rates grow exponentially with the multipolar order of the light-matter interaction. We also use the approach to study and maximize the transverse torque exerted by an evanescent plane wave onto a given spherical absorbing particle. The maximum occurs at the quadrupolar order of the particle, and for a particular polarization of the plane wave. All the obtained physical insights can be traced back to the two main features of the decomposition of evanescent pl...

  8. Condensed matter applied atomic collision physics, v.4

    CERN Document Server

    Datz, Sheldon

    1983-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 4: Condensed Matter deals with the fundamental knowledge of collision processes in condensed media.The book focuses on the range of applications of atomic collisions in condensed matter, extending from effects on biological systems to the characterization and modification of solids. This volume begins with the description of some aspects of the physics involved in the production of ion beams. The radiation effects in biological and chemical systems, ion scattering and atomic diffraction, x-ray fluorescence analysis, and photoelectron and Auger spectrosc

  9. Luther-Emery Phase and Atomic-Density Waves in a Trapped Fermion Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianlong, Gao; Rizzi, M.; Polini, Marco; Fazio, Rosario; Tosi, M. P.; Campo, V. L., Jr.; Capelle, K.

    2007-01-01

    The Luther-Emery liquid is a state of matter that is predicted to occur in one-dimensional systems of interacting fermions and is characterized by a gapless charge spectrum and a gapped spin spectrum. In this Letter we discuss a realization of the Luther-Emery phase in a trapped cold-atom gas. We study by means of the density-matrix renormalization-group technique a two-component atomic Fermi gas with attractive interactions subject to parabolic trapping inside an optical lattice. We demonstrate how this system exhibits compound phases characterized by the coexistence of spin pairing and atomic-density waves. A smooth crossover occurs with increasing magnitude of the atom-atom attraction to a state in which tightly bound spin-singlet dimers occupy the center of the trap. The existence of atomic-density waves could be detected in the elastic contribution to the light-scattering diffraction pattern.

  10. Transverse azimuthal dephasing of vortex spin wave in a hot atomic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Shuai; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Dong, Ming-Xin; Liu, Shi-Long; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-01-01

    Optical fields with orbital angular momentum (OAM) interact with medium have many remarkable properties with its unique azimuthal phase, showing many potential applications in high capacity information processing, high precision measurement etc. The dephasing mechanics of optical fields with OAM in an interface between light and matter plays a vital role in many areas of physics. In this work, we study the transverse azimuthal dephasing of OAM spin wave in a hot atomic gas via OAM storage. The transverse azimuthal phase difference between the control and probe beams is mapped onto the spin wave, which essentially results in dephasing of atomic spin wave. The dephasing of OAM spin wave can be controlled by the parameters of OAM topological charge and beam waist. Our results are helpful for studying OAM light interaction with matter, maybe hold a promise in OAM-based quantum information processing.

  11. Atomic physics precise measurements and ultracold matter

    CERN Document Server

    Inguscio, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atomic Physics provides an expert guide to two spectacular new landscapes in physics: precision measurements, which have been revolutionized by the advent of the optical frequency comb, and atomic physics, which has been revolutionized by laser cooling. These advances are not incremental but transformative: they have generated a consilience between atomic and many-body physics, precipitated an explosion of scientific and technological applications, opened new areas of research, and attracted a brilliant generation of younger scientists. The research is advancing so rapidly, the barrage of applications is so dazzling, that students can be bewildered. For both students and experienced scientists, this book provides an invaluable description of basic principles, experimental methods, and scientific applications.

  12. The Sagnac effect: 20 years of development in matter-wave interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Brynle; Dutta, Indranil; Meunier, Matthieu; Canuel, Benjamin; Gauguet, Alexandre; Bouyer, Philippe; Landragin, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Since the first atom interferometry experiments in 1991, measurements of rotation through the Sagnac effect in open-area atom interferometers has been studied. These studies have demonstrated very high sensitivity which can compete with state-of-the-art optical Sagnac interferometers. Since the early 2000s, these developments have been motivated by possible applications in inertial guidance and geophysics. Most matter-wave interferometers that have been investigated since then are based on two-photon Raman transitions for the manipulation of atomic wave packets. Results from the two most studied configurations, a space-domain interferometer with atomic beams and a time-domain interferometer with cold atoms, are presented and compared. Finally, the latest generation of cold atom interferometers and their preliminary results are presented.

  13. Searching for dilaton dark matter with atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Van Tilburg, Ken

    2014-01-01

    We propose an experiment to search for ultralight scalar dark matter (DM) with dilatonic interactions. Such couplings can arise for the dilaton as well as for moduli and axion-like particles in the presence of CP violation. Ultralight dilaton DM acts as a background field that can cause tiny but coherent oscillations in Standard Model parameters such as the fine structure constant and the proton-electron mass ratio. These minute variations can be detected through precise frequency comparisons of atomic clocks. Our experiment extends current searches for drifts in fundamental constants to the well-motivated high-frequency regime. Our proposed setups can probe scalars lighter than 10^-15 eV with discovery potential of dilatonic couplings as weak as 10^-11 times the strength of gravity, improving current equivalence principle bounds by up to 8 orders of magnitude. We point out potential 10^4 sensitivity enhancements with future optical and nuclear clocks, as well as possible signatures in gravitational wave dete...

  14. Parametric amplification of matter waves in dipolar spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deuretzbacher, F.; Gebreyesus, G.; Topic, O.;

    2010-01-01

    Spin-changing collisions may lead under proper conditions to the parametric amplification of matter waves in spinor Bose-Einstein condensates. Magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, although typically very weak in alkali-metal atoms, are shown to play a very relevant role in the amplification process...

  15. Hunting for topological dark matter with atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Derevianko, A

    2013-01-01

    The cosmological applications of atomic clocks so far have been limited to searches of the uniform-in-time drift of fundamental constants. In this paper, we point out that a transient in time change of fundamental constants can be induced by dark matter objects that have large spatial extent, and are built from light non-Standard Model fields. The stability of this type of dark matter can be dictated by the topological reasons. We point out that correlated networks of atomic clocks, some of them already in existence, can be used as a powerful tool to search for the topological defect dark matter, thus providing another important fundamental physics application to the ever-improving accuracy of atomic clocks. During the encounter with a topological defect, as it sweeps through the network, initially synchronized clocks will become desynchronized. Time discrepancies between spatially-separated clocks are expected to exhibit a distinct signature, encoding defect's space structure and its interaction strength wit...

  16. Concept of an ionizing time-domain matter-wave interferometer

    OpenAIRE

    Nimmrichter, Stefan; Haslinger, Philipp; Hornberger, Klaus; ARNDT, Markus

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the concept of an all-optical and ionizing matter-wave interferometer in the time domain. The proposed setup aims at testing the wave nature of highly massive clusters and molecules, and it will enable new precision experiments with a broad class of atoms, using the same laser system. The propagating particles are illuminated by three pulses of a standing ultraviolet laser beam, which detaches an electron via efficient single photon-absorption. Optical gratings may have periods as ...

  17. Hunting for dark matter with GPS and atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2015-05-01

    Atomic clocks are arguably the most accurate scientific instruments ever build. Modern clocks are astonishing timepieces guaranteed to keep time within a second over the age of the Universe. The cosmological applications of atomic clocks so far have been limited to searches of the uniform-in-time drift of fundamental constants. We point out that a transient in time change of fundamental constants (translating into clocks being sped up or slowed down) can be induced by dark matter objects that have large spatial extent, and are built from light non-Standard Model fields. The stability of this type of dark matter can be dictated by the topological reasons. We argue that correlated networks of atomic clocks, such as atomic clocks onboard satellites of the GPS constellation, can be used as a powerful tool to search for the topological defect dark matter. In other words, one could envision using GPS as a 50,000 km-aperture dark-matter detector. Similar arguments apply to terrestrial networks of atomic clocks. Details:

  18. 10 years of dark atoms of composite dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Khlopov, M Yu

    2015-01-01

    In 2005 Sheldon Glashow has proposed his sinister model, opening the path to composite-dark-matter scenarios, in which heavy stable electrically charged particles bound in neutral atoms play the role of dark matter candidates. Though the general problem of new stable single charged particles, forming with ordinary electrons anomalous isotopes of hydrogen, turned out to be unresolvable in Glashow's scenario, this scenario stimulated development of composite dark matter models, which can avoid the trouble of anomalous isotope overproduction. In the simplest case composite dark matter may consist of -2 charged particles, bound by ordinary Coulomb interaction with primordial helium in OHe dark matter model. The advantage and open problems of this model are discussed.

  19. Wave-particle duality in a Raman atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ai-Ai; Yang, Jun; Yan, Shu-Hua; Hu, Qing-Qing; Luo, Yu-Kun; Zhu, Shi-Yao

    2015-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the wave-particle duality based on a Raman atom interferometer, via the interaction between the atom and Raman laser, which is similar to the optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wave and which-way information are stored in the atomic internal states. For the φ - π - π/2 type of atom interferometer, we find that the visibility (V) and predictability (P) still satisfy the duality relation, P2 + V2 ≤ 1. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51275523) and the Special Research Found for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant No. 20134307110009).

  20. Spatially Homogeneous Entanglement for Matter-Wave Interferometry Created with Time-Averaged Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Kevin C; Wu, Baochen; Thompson, James K

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to generate spatially homogeneous entangled, spin-squeezed states of atoms appropriate for maintaining a large amount of squeezing even after release into the arm of a matter-wave interferometer or other free space quantum sensor. Using an effective intracavity dipole trap, we allow atoms to move along the cavity axis and time average their coupling to the standing wave used to generate entanglement via collective measurements, demonstrating 11(1) dB of directly observed spin squeezing. Our results show that time averaging in collective measurements can greatly reduce the impact of spatially inhomogeneous coupling to the measurement apparatus.

  1. Sensitivity of atom interferometry to ultralight scalar field dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Geraci, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the use of atom interferometry as a tool to search for Dark Matter (DM) composed of ultra-light scalar fields. Previous work on ultra-light DM detection using accelerometers has considered the possibility of equivalence principle violating effects whereby gradients in the dark matter field can directly produce relative accelerations between media of differing composition. In atom interferometers, we find that time-varying phase signals from oscillatory, or dilaton-like, DM can also arise due to changes in the atom rest mass that can occur between light-pulses throughout the interferometer sequence as well as changes in the earth's gravitational field. We estimate that several orders of magnitude of unexplored phase space for light DM fields can be probed with our proposed method.

  2. Sensitivity of Atom Interferometry to Ultralight Scalar Field Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Andrew A; Derevianko, Andrei

    2016-12-23

    We discuss the use of atom interferometry as a tool to search for dark matter (DM) composed of virialized ultralight fields (VULFs). Previous work on VULF DM detection using accelerometers has considered the possibility of equivalence-principle-violating effects whereby gradients in the dark matter field can directly produce relative accelerations between media of differing composition. In atom interferometers, we find that time-varying phase signals induced by coherent oscillations of DM fields can also arise due to changes in the atom rest mass that can occur between light pulses throughout the interferometer sequence as well as changes in Earth's gravitational field. We estimate that several orders of magnitude of unexplored phase space for VULF DM couplings can be probed due to these new effects.

  3. Entanglement between low- and high-lying atomic spin waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, D. S.; Wang, K.; Zhang, W.; Shi, S.; Dong, M. X.; Yu, Y. C.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Shi, B. S.; Guo, G. C.

    2016-11-01

    Establishing a quantum interface between different physical systems is of special importance for developing the practical versatile quantum networks. Entanglement between low- and high-lying atomic spin waves is essential for building up Rydberg-based quantum information engineering, which is also helpful to study the dynamics behavior of entanglement under external perturbations. Here, we report on the successful storage of a single photon as a high-lying atomic spin wave in a quantum regime. By storing a K-vector entanglement between a single photon and low-lying spin wave, we experimentally realize the entanglement between low- and high-lying atomic spin waves in two separated atomic systems. This makes our experiment a primary demonstration of Rydberg quantum memory of entanglement, representing a primary step toward the construction of a hybrid quantum interface.

  4. Laser Source for Atomic Gravity Wave Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an Atom Interferometry-based gravity wave detector (vs Optical Interferometry). Characterize a high power laser. Use Goddard Space Flight Center Mission...

  5. Dual Matter-Wave Inertial Sensors in Weightlessness

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Brynle; Chichet, Laure; Battelier, Baptiste; Lévèque, Thomas; Landragin, Arnaud; Bouyer, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Quantum technology based on cold-atom interferometers is showing great promise for fields such as inertial sensing and fundamental physics. However, the best precision achievable on Earth is limited by the free-fall time of the atoms, and their full potential can only be realized in Space where interrogation times of many seconds will lead to unprecedented sensitivity. Various mission scenarios are presently being pursued which plan to implement matter-wave inertial sensors. Toward this goal, we realize the first onboard operation of simultaneous $^{87}$Rb $-$ $^{39}$K interferometers in the weightless environment produced during parabolic flight. The large vibration levels ($10^{-2}~g/\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$), acceleration range ($0-1.8~g$) and rotation rates ($5$ deg/s) during flight present significant challenges. We demonstrate the capability of our dual-quantum sensor by measuring the E\\"{o}tv\\"{o}s parameter with systematic-limited uncertainties of $1.1 \\times 10^{-3}$ and $3.0 \\times 10^{-4}$ during standard- a...

  6. Atomic coherence in nondegenerate four-wave mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo Zhan-Chun; Sun Jiang; Liu Xia; Mi Xin; Yu Zu-He; Jiang Qian; Fu Pan-Ming; Wu Ling-An

    2007-01-01

    Two-photon resonant nondegenerate four-wave mixing (NFWM) with the addition of a coupling field in Ba atomic vapour has been studied. We find that coherence of the atomic level transitions leads to suppression of the NFWM signal, giving rise to a dip with a linewidth that is linearly proportional to the intensity of the coupling field.

  7. Development of a portable matter-wave gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desruelle, B.; Menoret, V.; Bouyer, P.; Landragin, A.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the results of the research activities conducted by our company for the development of its Absolute Quantum Gravimeter. This instrument relies on the utilization of a free-falling cloud of cold rubidium atoms, whose vertical acceleration is characterized using advanced matter-wave interferometry techniques. In order to meet the tight requirements expressed by geophysicists for field utilization, we have implemented several technological innovations, which allow us to combine state-of-the-art performance with simple operation and excellent transportability. The architecture of our gravimeter is based on the following innovations: - a hollow pyramidal reflector allows us to achieve all the functions (trapping, cooling, atomic state selection, interferometry and detection) with a single laser beam [1]. This scheme leads to a drastic simplification of the sensor head, and a strong reduction of its mass and volume. - An all-fibered laser system based on the frequency doubling of a seed laser operating at 1560 nm [2]. With this approach, we are able to obtain a very compact, reliable and easy to use laser source capable of generating two optical frequencies in the 780.23 nm range with an output power in excess of 250 mW, an excellent polarization extinction ratio and a fast tunability. - a real-time system dedicated to the compensation of ground vibrations [3]. This technique is based on the operation of a low noise seismometer, whose AC acceleration signal is used to correct the atomic interferometer signal. We give a detailed presentation of the instrument architecture and summarize the experimental results we have obtained with our first generation prototype. [1] A cold atom pyramidal gravimeter with a single laser beam, Q. Bodart et al, Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 134101 (2010) [2] "Light-pulse atom interferometry in microgravity", G. Stern et al, Eur. Phys. J. D 53, 353-357 (2009) [3]. "Limits in the sensitivity of a compact atomic interferometer ", J

  8. Detecting dark matter waves with precision measurement tools

    CERN Document Server

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Virialized Ultra-Light Fields (VULFs) while being viable cold dark matter candidates can also solve the standard model hierarchy problem. Direct searches for VULFs due to their non-particle nature require low-energy precision measurement tools. Here we consider scalar VULF candidates. While the previous proposals have focused on detecting coherent oscillations of the measured signals at the VULF Compton frequencies at the device location, here we point out that VULFs also have a distinct spatial signature, forming dark matter waves. Thereby the discovery reach can be improved by using distributed networks of precision measurement tools. We find the expected dark-matter wave signal by deriving spatio-temporal two-point VULF correlation function. Based on the developed formalism for coherence properties of dark-matter fields, we propose several experiments for dark matter wave detection. In the most basic version, the modifications to already running experiments are minor and only require GPS-assisted time-stam...

  9. Nanoscale light-matter interactions in atomic cladding waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Liron; Desiatov, Boris; Goykhman, Ilya; Levy, Uriel

    2013-01-01

    Alkali vapours, such as rubidium, are being used extensively in several important fields of research such as slow and stored light nonlinear optics quantum computation, atomic clocks and magnetometers. Recently, there is a growing effort towards miniaturizing traditional centimetre-size vapour cells. Owing to the significant reduction in device dimensions, light-matter interactions are greatly enhanced, enabling new functionalities due to the low power threshold needed for nonlinear interactions. Here, taking advantage of the mature platform of silicon photonics, we construct an efficient and flexible platform for tailored light-vapour interactions on a chip. Specifically, we demonstrate light-matter interactions in an atomic cladding waveguide, consisting of a silicon nitride nano-waveguide core with a rubidium vapour cladding. We observe the efficient interaction of the electromagnetic guided mode with the rubidium cladding and show that due to the high confinement of the optical mode, the rubidium absorption saturates at powers in the nanowatt regime.

  10. Searching for dark matter with optical atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Wcislo, Piotr; Bober, Marcin; Cygan, Agata; Lisak, Daniel; Ciurylo, Roman; Zawada, Michal

    2016-01-01

    One of the most fundamental questions of modern physics is the existence of yet unknown forms of matter and interactions. The total mass density of the Universe appears to be dominated by some hypothetical dark matter (DM). However, beyond its gravitational interaction at galactic scale, little is known about the DM nature and properties. One possibility is that it has a form of stable topological defects built from light scalar fields which, for nonzero DM-SM coupling, would result in transient variations of fundamental constants. Optical atomic clocks, highly sensitive to variations of the fine-structure constant, seem to be natural candidates for such searches. Here we demonstrate the first experimental constraint on the strength of transient DM-SM coupling determined with optical atomic clocks. Instead of measuring the phase difference between two distant clocks we determine a common component of their readouts. We show that our constraint, even for one-day measurement, greatly exceeds previous laboratory...

  11. Hybridizing matter-wave and classical accelerometers

    CERN Document Server

    Lautier, Jean; Hardin, Thomas; Merlet, Sebastien; Santos, Franck Pereira Dos; Landragin, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a hybrid accelerometer that benefits from the advantages of both conventional and atomic sensors in terms of bandwidth (DC to 430 Hz) and long term stability. First, the use of a real time correction of the atom interferometer phase by the signal from the classical accelerometer enables to run it at best performances without any isolation platform. Second, a servo-lock of the DC component of the conventional sensor output signal by the atomic one realizes a hybrid sensor. This method paves the way for applications in geophysics and in inertial navigation as it overcomes the main limitation of atomic accelerometers, namely the dead times between consecutive measurements.

  12. Hybridizing matter-wave and classical accelerometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautier, J.; Volodimer, L.; Hardin, T.; Merlet, S.; Lours, M.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.; Landragin, A., E-mail: arnaud.landragin@obspm.fr [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, 61 avenue de l' Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France)

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate a hybrid accelerometer that benefits from the advantages of both conventional and atomic sensors in terms of bandwidth (DC to 430 Hz) and long term stability. First, the use of a real time correction of the atom interferometer phase by the signal from the classical accelerometer enables to run it at best performance without any isolation platform. Second, a servo-lock of the DC component of the conventional sensor output signal by the atomic one realizes a hybrid sensor. This method paves the way for applications in geophysics and in inertial navigation as it overcomes the main limitation of atomic accelerometers, namely, the dead times between consecutive measurements.

  13. Hybridizing matter-wave and classical accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautier, J.; Volodimer, L.; Hardin, T.; Merlet, S.; Lours, M.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.; Landragin, A.

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate a hybrid accelerometer that benefits from the advantages of both conventional and atomic sensors in terms of bandwidth (DC to 430 Hz) and long term stability. First, the use of a real time correction of the atom interferometer phase by the signal from the classical accelerometer enables to run it at best performance without any isolation platform. Second, a servo-lock of the DC component of the conventional sensor output signal by the atomic one realizes a hybrid sensor. This method paves the way for applications in geophysics and in inertial navigation as it overcomes the main limitation of atomic accelerometers, namely, the dead times between consecutive measurements.

  14. Ionization of Atoms by Slow Heavy Particles, Including Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, B M; Flambaum, V V; Gribakin, G F

    2016-01-15

    Atoms and molecules can become ionized during the scattering of a slow, heavy particle off a bound electron. Such an interaction involving leptophilic weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) is a promising possible explanation for the anomalous 9σ annual modulation in the DAMA dark matter direct detection experiment [R. Bernabei et al., Eur. Phys. J. C 73, 2648 (2013)]. We demonstrate the applicability of the Born approximation for such an interaction by showing its equivalence to the semiclassical adiabatic treatment of atomic ionization by slow-moving WIMPs. Conventional wisdom has it that the ionization probability for such a process should be exponentially small. We show, however, that due to nonanalytic, cusplike behavior of Coulomb functions close to the nucleus this suppression is removed, leading to an effective atomic structure enhancement. We also show that electron relativistic effects actually give the dominant contribution to such a process, enhancing the differential cross section by up to 1000 times.

  15. Shock wave compression of condensed matter a primer

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Jerry W

    2012-01-01

    This book introduces the core concepts of the shock wave physics of condensed matter, taking a continuum mechanics approach to examine liquids and isotropic solids. The text primarily focuses on one-dimensional uniaxial compression in order to show the key features of condensed matter’s response to shock wave loading. The first four chapters are specifically designed to quickly familiarize physical scientists and engineers with how shock waves interact with other shock waves or material boundaries, as well as to allow readers to better understand shock wave literature, use basic data analysis techniques, and design simple 1-D shock wave experiments. This is achieved by first presenting the steady one-dimensional strain conservation laws using shock wave impedance matching, which insures conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Here, the initial emphasis is on the meaning of shock wave and mass velocities in a laboratory coordinate system. An overview of basic experimental techniques for measuring pressure...

  16. Path integrals, matter waves, and the double slit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Eric R.; Bach, Roger A.; Batelaan, Herman

    2015-11-01

    Basic explanations of the double slit diffraction phenomenon include a description of waves that emanate from two slits and interfere. The locations of the interference minima and maxima are determined by the phase difference of the waves. An optical wave, which has a wavelength λ and propagates a distance L, accumulates a phase of 2π L/λ . A matter wave, also having wavelength λ that propagates the same distance L, accumulates a phase of π L/λ , which is a factor of two different from the optical case. Nevertheless, in most situations, the phase difference, {{Δ }}\\varphi , for interfering matter waves that propagate distances that differ by {{Δ }}L, is approximately 2π {{Δ }}L/λ , which is the same value computed in the optical case. The difference between the matter and optical case hinders conceptual explanations of diffraction from two slits based on the matter-optics analogy. In the following article we provide a path integral description for matter waves with a focus on conceptual explanation. A thought experiment is provided to illustrate the validity range of the approximation {{Δ }}\\varphi ≈ 2π {{Δ }}L/λ .

  17. Ultrarelativistic quasiclassical wave functions in strong laser and atomic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Di Piazza, A

    2014-01-01

    The problem of an ultrarelativistic charge in the presence of an atomic and a plane-wave field is investigated in the quasiclassical regime by including exactly the effects of both background fields. Starting from the quasiclassical Green's function obtained in [Phys. Lett. B \\textbf{717}, 224 (2012)], the corresponding in- and out-wave functions are derived in the experimentally relevant case of the particle initially counterpropagating with respect to the plane wave. The knowledge of these electron wave functions opens the possibility of investigating a variety of problems in strong-field QED, where both the atomic field and the laser field are strong enough to be taken into account exactly from the beginning in the calculations.

  18. Resonant mode for gravitational wave detectors based on atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W.; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2016-11-01

    We describe an atom interferometric gravitational wave detector design that can operate in a resonant mode for increased sensitivity. By oscillating the positions of the atomic wave packets, this resonant detection mode allows for coherently enhanced, narrow-band sensitivity at target frequencies. The proposed detector is flexible and can be rapidly switched between broadband and narrow-band detection modes. For instance, a binary discovered in broadband mode can subsequently be studied further as the inspiral evolves by using a tailored narrow-band detector response. In addition to functioning like a lock-in amplifier for astrophysical events, the enhanced sensitivity of the resonant approach also opens up the possibility of searching for important cosmological signals, including the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by inflation. We give an example of detector parameters which would allow detection of inflationary gravitational waves down to ΩGW˜10-14 for a two-satellite space-based detector.

  19. Explicitly correlated wave function for a boron atom

    CERN Document Server

    Puchalski, Mariusz; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    We present results of high-precision calculations for a boron atom's properties using wave functions expanded in the explicitly correlated Gaussian basis. We demonstrate that the well-optimized 8192 basis functions enable a determination of energy levels, ionization potential, and fine and hyperfine splittings in atomic transitions with nearly parts per million precision. The results open a window to a spectroscopic determination of nuclear properties of boron including the charge radius of the proton halo in the $^8$B nucleus.

  20. Matter-wave diffraction at the natural limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Christian; Sclafani, Michele; Knobloch, Christian; Lilach, Yigal; Juffmann, Thomas; Kotakoski, Jani; Mangler, Clemens; Winter, Andreas; Turchanin, Andrey; Meyer, Jannik; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Arndt, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The high sensitivity of matter-wave interferometry experiments to forces and perturbations makes them an essential tool for precision measurements and tests of quantum physics. While mostly grating made of laser-light are used, material gratings have the advantage that they are independent of the particle's internal properties. This makes them universally applicable. However, the molecules will experience substantial van der Waals shifts while passing the grating slits, which suggests limiting this perturbation by reducing the material thickness. In a comprehensive study we compared the van der Waals interactions for free-standing gratings made from single and double layer graphene to masks commonly used in atom interferometry. From the population of high fringe orders we deduce a surprisingly strong electrical interaction between the polarizable molecules and the nanomasks. As even for these thinnest diffraction elements which-path information is not shared with the environment, we interpret this as an experimental affirmation of Bohr's arguments in his famous debate with Einstein.

  1. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  2. Controlled rephasing of single spin-waves in a quantum memory based on cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrera, Pau; Albrecht, Boris; Heinze, Georg; Cristiani, Matteo; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Quantum Photonics With Solids; Atoms Team

    2015-05-01

    Quantum memories for light allow a reversible transfer of quantum information between photons and long lived matter quantum bits. In atomic ensembles, this information is commonly stored in the form of single collective spin excitations (spin-waves). In this work we demonstrate that we can actively control the dephasing of the spin-waves created in a quantum memory based on a cold Rb87 atomic ensemble. The control is provided by an external magnetic field gradient, which induces an inhomogeneous broadening of the atomic hyperfine levels. We show that acting on this gradient allows to control the dephasing of individual spin-waves and to induce later a rephasing. The spin-waves are then mapped into single photons, and we demonstrate experimentally that the active rephasing preserves the sub-Poissonian statistics of the retrieved photons. Finally we show that this rephasing control enables the creation and storage of multiple spin-waves in different temporal modes, which can be selectively readout. This is an important step towards the implementation of a functional temporally multiplexed quantum memory for quantum repeaters. We acknowledge support from the ERC starting grant, the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, the Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional, and the International PhD- fellowship program ``la Caixa''-Severo Ochoa @ICFO.

  3. Evolutions of matter-wave bright soliton with spatially modulated nonlinearity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongshan Cheng; Fei Liu

    2009-01-01

    The evolution characteristics of a matter-wave bright soliton are investigated by means of the variational approach in the presence of spatially varying nonlinearity.It is found that the atom density envelope of the soliton is changed as a result of the spatial variation of the s-wave scattering length.The stable soliton can exist in appropriate initial conditions.The movement of the soliton depends on the sign and value of the coefficient of spatially modulated nonlinearity.These theoretical predictions are confirmed by the full numerical simulations of the one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

  4. The matter-wave laser interferometer gravitation antenna (MIGA: New perspectives for fundamental physics and geosciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canuel B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We are building a hybrid detector of new concept that couples laser and matter-wave interferometry to study sub Hertz variations of the strain tensor of space-time and gravitation. Using a set of atomic interferometers simultaneously manipulated by the resonant optical field of a 200 m cavity, the MIGA instrument will allow the monitoring of the evolution of the gravitational field at unprecedented sensitivity, which will be exploited both for geophysical studies and for Gravitational Waves (GWs detection. This new infrastructure will be embedded into the LSBB underground laboratory, ideally located away from major anthropogenic disturbances and benefitting from very low background noise.

  5. Extracting Information from the Atom-Laser Wave Function UsingInterferometric Measurement with a Laser Standing-Wave Grating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘正东; 武强; 曾亮; 林宇; 朱诗尧

    2001-01-01

    The reconstruction of the atom-laser wave function is performed using an interferometric measurement with a standing-wave grating, and the results of this scheme are studied. The relations between the measurement data and the atomic wave function are also presented. This scheme is quite applicable and effectively avoids the initial random phase problem of the method that employs the laser running wave. The information which is encoded in the atom-laser wave is extracted.

  6. Photofragmentation beam splitters for matter-wave interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dörre, Nadine; Geyer, Philipp; von Issendorff, Bernd; Haslinger, Philipp; Arndt, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Extending the range of quantum interferometry to a wider class of composite nanoparticles requires new tools to diffract matter-waves. Recently, pulsed photoionization light gratings have demonstrated their suitability for high mass matter-wave physics. Here we extend quantum interference experiments to a new class of particles by introducing photofragmentation beam splitters into time-domain matter-wave interferometry. Photofragmentation gratings can act on objects as different as van der Waals clusters and biomolecules which are thermally unstable and often resilient to single-photon ionization. We present data that demonstrate this coherent beam splitting mechanism with clusters of hexafluorobenzene and we show single-photon depletion gratings based both on fragmentation and ionization for clusters of vanillin.

  7. Photofragmentation Beam Splitters for Matter-Wave Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörre, Nadine; Rodewald, Jonas; Geyer, Philipp; von Issendorff, Bernd; Haslinger, Philipp; Arndt, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Extending the range of quantum interferometry to a wider class of composite nanoparticles requires new tools to diffract matter waves. Recently, pulsed photoionization light gratings have demonstrated their suitability for high mass matter-wave physics. Here, we extend quantum interference experiments to a new class of particles by introducing photofragmentation beam splitters into time-domain matter-wave interferometry. We present data that demonstrate this coherent beam splitting mechanism with clusters of hexafluorobenzene and we show single-photon depletion gratings based both on fragmentation and ionization for clusters of vanillin. We propose that photofragmentation gratings can act on a large set of van der Waals clusters and biomolecules which are thermally unstable and often resilient to single-photon ionization.

  8. Coordinate transformations and matter waves cloaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, G. R.; Moghaddam, A. G.; Mohammadkhani, R.

    2016-03-01

    Transformation method provides an efficient tool to control wave propagation inside the materials. Using the coordinate transformation approach, we study invisibility cloaks with sphere, cylinder and ellipsoid structures for electronic waves propagation. The underlying physics behind this investigation is the fact that Schrödinger equation with position dependent mass tensor and potentials has a covariant form which follows the coordinate transformation. Using this technique we obtain the exact spatial form of the mass tensor and potentials for a variety of cloaks with different shapes.

  9. Controllable vacuum-induced diffraction of matter-wave superradiance using an all-optical dispersive cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shih-Wei; Lu, Zhen-Kai; Gou, Shih-Chuan; Liao, Wen-Te

    2016-10-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) has played a central role in demonstrating the fundamental principles of the quantum world, and in particular those of atom-light interactions. Developing fast, dynamical and non-mechanical control over a CQED system is particularly desirable for controlling atomic dynamics and building future quantum networks at high speed. However conventional mirrors do not allow for such flexible and fast controls over their coupling to intracavity atoms mediated by photons. Here we theoretically investigate a novel all-optical CQED system composed of a binary Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) sandwiched by two atomic ensembles. The highly tunable atomic dispersion of the CQED system enables the medium to act as a versatile, all-optically controlled atomic mirror that can be employed to manipulate the vacuum-induced diffraction of matter-wave superradiance. Our study illustrates a innovative all-optical element of atomtroics and sheds new light on controlling light-matter interactions.

  10. Matter-wave bright solitons in effective bichromatic lattice potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Golam Ali Sekh

    2013-08-01

    Matter-wave bright solitons in bichromatic lattice potentials are considered and their dynamics for different lattice environments are studied. Bichromatic potentials are created from superpositions of (i) two linear optical lattices and (ii) a linear and a nonlinear optical lattice. Effective potentials are found for the solitons in both bichromatic lattices and a comparative study is done on the dynamics of solitons with respect to the effective potentials. The effects of dispersion on solitons in bichromatic lattices are studied and it is found that the dispersive spreading can be minimized by appropriate combinations of lattice and interaction parameters. Stability of nondispersive matter-wave solitons is checked from phase portrait analysis.

  11. New method for gravitational wave detection with atomic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W; Hogan, Jason M; Kasevich, Mark A; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2013-04-26

    Laser frequency noise is a dominant noise background for the detection of gravitational waves using long-baseline optical interferometry. Amelioration of this noise requires near simultaneous strain measurements on more than one interferometer baseline, necessitating, for example, more than two satellites for a space-based detector or two interferometer arms for a ground-based detector. We describe a new detection strategy based on recent advances in optical atomic clocks and atom interferometry which can operate at long baselines and which is immune to laser frequency noise. Laser frequency noise is suppressed because the signal arises strictly from the light propagation time between two ensembles of atoms. This new class of sensor allows sensitive gravitational wave detection with only a single baseline. This approach also has practical applications in, for example, the development of ultrasensitive gravimeters and gravity gradiometers.

  12. Future Gravitational Wave Detectors Based on Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Geiger, Remi

    2016-01-01

    We present the perspective of using atom interferometry for gravitational wave (GW) detection in the mHz to about 10 Hz frequency band. We focus on light-pulse atom interferometers which have been subject to intense developments in the last 25 years. We calculate the effect of the GW on the atom interferometer and present in details the atomic gradiometer configuration which has retained more attention recently. The principle of such a detector is to use free falling atoms to measure the phase of a laser, which is modified by the GW. We highlight the potential benefits of using atom interferometry compared to optical interferometry as well as the challenges which remain for the realization of an atom interferometry based GW detector. We present some of the important noise sources which are expected in such detectors and strategies to cirucumvent them. Experimental techniques related to cold atom interferometers are briefly explained. We finally present the current progress and projects in this rapidly evolvin...

  13. Suspension of atoms and gravimetry using a pulsed standing wave

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, K J; Sackett, C A

    2009-01-01

    Atoms from an otherwise unconfined 87Rb condensate are shown to be suspended against gravity using repeated reflections from a pulsed optical standing wave. Reflection efficiency was optimized using a triple-pulse sequence that, theoretically, provides accuracies better than 99.9%. Experimentally, up to 100 reflections are observed, leading to dynamical suspension for over 100 ms. The velocity sensitivity of the reflections can be used to determine the local gravitational acceleration. Further, a gravitationally sensitive atom interferometer was implemented using the suspended atoms, with packet coherence maintained for a similar time. These techniques could be useful for the precise measurement of gravity when it is impractical to allow atoms to fall freely over a large distance.

  14. Matter-wave propagation in optical lattices: geometrical and flat-band effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Mekena; Chern, Gia-Wei; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Chien, Chih-Chun

    2016-04-01

    The geometry of optical lattices can be engineered, allowing the study of atomic transport along paths arranged in patterns that are otherwise difficult to probe in the solid state. A question feasible to atomic systems is related to the speed of matter-wave propagation as a function of the lattice geometry. To address this issue, we investigated, theoretically, the quantum transport of noninteracting and weakly-interacting ultracold fermionic atoms in several 2D optical lattice geometries. We find that the triangular lattice has a higher propagation velocity compared to the square lattice, and the cross-linked square lattice has an even faster propagation velocity. The increase results from the mixing of the momentum states which leads to different group velocities in quantum systems. Standard band theory provides an explanation and allows for a systematic way to search and design systems with controllable matter-wave propagation. Moreover, the presence of a flat band such as in a two-leg ladder geometry leads to a dynamical density discontinuity due to its localized atoms. Possible realizations of those dynamical phenomena are discussed.

  15. Superradiant cascade emissions in an atomic ensemble via four-wave mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jen, H.H., E-mail: sappyjen@gmail.com

    2015-09-15

    We investigate superradiant cascade emissions from an atomic ensemble driven by two-color classical fields. The correlated pair of photons (signal and idler) is generated by adiabatically driving the system with large-detuned light fields via four-wave mixing. The signal photon from the upper transition of the diamond-type atomic levels is followed by the idler one which can be superradiant due to light-induced dipole–dipole interactions. We then calculate the cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) of the idler photon, which is a cumulative effect of interaction energy. We study its dependence on a cylindrical geometry, a conventional setup in cold atom experiments, and estimate the maximum CLS which can be significant and observable. Manipulating the CLS of cascade emissions enables frequency qubits that provide alternative robust elements in quantum network. - Highlights: • Superradiance from a cascade atomic transition. • Correlated photon pair generation via four-wave mixing. • Dynamical light–matter couplings in a phased symmetrical state. • Cooperative Lamb shift in a cylindrical atomic ensemble.

  16. Modal decomposition of a propagating matter wave via electron ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, S.; Kok, P.; Li, P.; Maiden, A. M.; Rodenburg, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    We employ ptychography, a phase-retrieval imaging technique, to show experimentally that a partially coherent high-energy matter (electron) wave emanating from an extended source can be decomposed into a set of mutually independent modes of minimal rank. Partial coherence significantly determines the optical transfer properties of an electron microscope and so there has been much work on this subject. However, previous studies have employed forms of interferometry to determine spatial coherence between discrete points in the wave field. Here we use the density matrix to derive a formal quantum mechanical description of electron ptychography and use it to measure a full description of the spatial coherence of a propagating matter wave field, at least within the fundamental uncertainties of the measurements we can obtain.

  17. Weak Nonlinear Matter Waves in a Trapped Spin-1 Condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Hong-Qiang; YANG Shu-Rong; XUE Ju-Kui

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of the weak nonlinear matter solitary waves in a spin-1 condensates with harmonic external potential are investigated analytically by a perturbation method. It is shown that, in the small amplitude limit, the dynamics of the solitary waves are governed by a variable-coefficient Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation. The reduction to the (KdV) equation may be useful to understand the dynamics of nonlinear matter waves in spinor BEGs. The analytical expressions for the evolution of soliton show that the small-amplitude vector solitons of the mixed types perform harmonic oscillations in the presence of the trap. Furthermore, the emitted radiation profiles and the soliton oscillation freauencv are also obtained.

  18. Wave mechanics in quantum phase space: hydrogen atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jun

    2007-01-01

    The rigorous sohutions of the stationary Schr(o)dinger equation for hydrogen atom are solved with the wave-mechanics method within the framework of the quantum phase-space representation established by Torres-Vega and Frederick. The "Fourier-like"projection transformations of wave function from the phase space to position and momentum spaces are extended to three-dimensional systems. The eigenfunctions in general position and momentum spaces could be obtained through the transformations from eigenfunction in the phase space.

  19. Gravitational wave detection with optical lattice atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kolkowitz, Shimon; Langellier, Nicholas; Lukin, Mikhail D; Walsworth, Ronald L; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a space-based gravitational wave detector consisting of two spatially separated, drag-free satellites sharing ultra-stable optical laser light over a single baseline. Each satellite contains an optical lattice atomic clock, which serves as a sensitive, narrowband detector of the local frequency of the shared laser light. A synchronized two-clock comparison between the satellites will be sensitive to the effective Doppler shifts induced by incident gravitational waves (GWs) at a level competitive with other proposed space-based GW detectors, while providing complementary features. The detected signal is a differential frequency shift of the shared laser light due to the relative velocity of the satellites, rather than a phase shift arising from the relative satellite positions, and the detection window can be tuned through the control sequence applied to the atoms' internal states. This scheme enables the detection of GWs from continuous, spectrally narrow sources, such as compact binary inspirals, ...

  20. Content-based image hashing using wave atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Fang; Leung Hon-Yin; Cheng Lee-Ming; Ji Xiao-Yong

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that robustness,fragility,and security are three important criteria of image hashing; however how to build a system that can strongly meet these three criteria is still a challenge.In this paper,a content-based image hashing scheme using wave atoms is proposed,which satisfies the above criteria.Compared with traditional transforms like wavelet transform and discrete cosine transform (DCT),wave atom transform is adopted for the sparser expansion and better characteristics of texture feature extraction which shows better performance in both robustness and fragility.In addition,multi-frequency detection is presented to provide an application-defined trade-off.To ensure the security of the proposed approach and its resistance to a chosen-plaintext attack,a randomized pixel modulation based on the Rényi chaotic map is employed,combining with the nonliner wave atom transform.The experimental results reveal that the proposed scheme is robust against content-preserving manipulations and has a good discriminative capability to malicious tampering.

  1. Black Hole Window into p-Wave Dark Matter Annihilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jessie; Shapiro, Stuart L; Fields, Brian D

    2015-12-01

    We present a new method to measure or constrain p-wave-suppressed cross sections for dark matter (DM) annihilations inside the steep density spikes induced by supermassive black holes. We demonstrate that the high DM densities, together with the increased velocity dispersion, within such spikes combine to make thermal p-wave annihilation cross sections potentially visible in γ-ray observations of the Galactic center (GC). The resulting DM signal is a bright central point source with emission originating from DM annihilations in the absence of a detectable spatially extended signal from the halo. We define two simple reference theories of DM with a thermal p-wave annihilation cross section and establish new limits on the combined particle and astrophysical parameter space of these models, demonstrating that Fermi Large Area Telescope is currently sensitive to thermal p-wave DM over a wide range of possible scenarios for the DM distribution in the GC.

  2. Selective Sommerfeld Enhancement of p-wave Dark Matter Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    We point out a mechanism for selective Sommerfeld enhancement (suppression) of odd (even) partial waves of dark matter co/annihilation. Using this, the usually velocity-suppressed p-wave annihilation can dominate the annihilation signals in the present Universe. The selection mechanism is a manifestation of an exchange symmetry, and generic for DM with off-diagonal long-range interactions. As a consequence, the relic and late-time annihilation rates are parametrically different and a distinctive phenomenology, with large but strongly velocity-dependent annihilation rates, is predicted.

  3. Gravitational Waves From SU(N) Glueball Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, Amarjit

    2016-01-01

    A hidden sector with pure non-abelian gauge symmetry is an elegant and just about the simplest model of dark matter. In this model the dark matter candidate is the lightest bound state made of the confined gauge fields, the dark glueball. In spite of its simplicity, the model has been shown to have several interesting non-standard implications in cosmology. In this work, we explore the gravitational waves from binary boson stars made of self-gravitating dark glueball fields as a natural and important consequence. We derive the dark SU($N$) star mass and radius as functions of the only two fundamental parameters in the model, the glueball mass $m$ and the number of colors $N$, and identify the regions that could be probed by the LIGO and future gravitational wave observatories.

  4. Decoherence of matter waves by thermal emission of radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hackermüller, L; Brezger, B; Zeilinger, Anton; Arndt, M; Hackermueller, Lucia; Hornberger, Klaus; Brezger, Bjoern; Zeilinger, Anton; Arndt, Markus

    2004-01-01

    Emergent quantum technologies have led to increasing interest in decoherence - the processes that limit the appearance of quantum effects and turn them into classical phenomena. One important cause of decoherence is the interaction of a quantum system with its environment, which 'entangles' the two and distributes the quantum coherence over so many degrees of freedom as to render it unobservable. Decoherence theory has been complemented by experiments using matter waves coupled to external photons or molecules, and by investigations using coherent photon states, trapped ions and electron interferometers. Large molecules are particularly suitable for the investigation of the quantum-classical transition because they can store much energy in numerous internal degrees of freedom; the internal energy can be converted into thermal radiation and thus induce decoherence. Here we report matter wave interferometer experiments in which C70 molecules lose their quantum behaviour by thermal emission of radiation. We find...

  5. Influence of conformational molecular dynamics on matter wave interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gring, Michael; Eibenberger, Sandra; Nimmrichter, Stefan; Berrada, Tarik; Arndt, Markus; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Hornberger, Klaus; Müri, Marcel; Mayor, Marcel; Böckmann, Marcus; Doltsinis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the influence of thermally activated internal molecular dynamics on the phase shifts of matter waves inside a molecule interferometer. While de Broglie physics generally describes only the center-of-mass motion of a quantum object, our experiment demonstrates that the translational quantum phase is sensitive to dynamic conformational state changes inside the diffracted molecules. The structural flexibility of tailor-made hot organic particles is sufficient to admit a mixture of strongly fluctuating dipole moments. These modify the electric susceptibility and through this the quantum interference pattern in the presence of an external electric field. Detailed molecular dynamics simulations combined with density functional theory allow us to quantify the time-dependent structural reconfigurations and to predict the ensemble-averaged square of the dipole moment which is found to be in good agreement with the interferometric result. The experiment thus opens a new perspective on matter wave interfe...

  6. Velocity selective trapping of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave

    CERN Document Server

    Argonov, V Yu

    2013-01-01

    The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field may suppress packet splitting for some atoms having specific velocities in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We propose that in a real experiment with cold atomic gas this effect may decrease the velocity distribution of atoms (the field traps the atoms with such specific velocities while all other atoms leave the field)

  7. New avenues for matter-wave-enhanced spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodewald, Jonas; Haslinger, Philipp; Dörre, Nadine; Stickler, Benjamin A.; Shayeghi, Armin; Hornberger, Klaus; Arndt, Markus

    2017-01-01

    We present matter-wave interferometry as a tool to advance spectroscopy for a wide class of nanoparticles, clusters and molecules. The high sensitivity of de Broglie interference fringes to external perturbations enables measurements in the limit of an individual particle absorbing only a single photon on average, or even no photon at all. The method allows one to extract structural and electronic information from the loss of the interference contrast. It is minimally invasive and works even for dilute ensembles.

  8. Decoherence of matter waves by thermal emission of radiation

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Emergent quantum technologies have led to increasing interest in decoherence - the processes that limit the appearance of quantum effects and turn them into classical phenomena. One important cause of decoherence is the interaction of a quantum system with its environment, which 'entangles' the two and distributes the quantum coherence over so many degrees of freedom as to render it unobservable. Decoherence theory has been complemented by experiments using matter waves coupled to external ph...

  9. Wave functions in SUSY cosmological models with matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, C. [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, A.P. E-143, C.P. 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Rosales, J.J. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica Electrica y Electronica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Prolongacion Tampico 912, Bellavista, Salamanca, Guanajuato (Mexico); Socorro, J. [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, A.P. E-143, C.P. 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)]. E-mail: socorro@fisica.ugto.mx; Torres, J. [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, A.P. E-143, C.P. 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Tkach, V.I. [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, A.P. E-143, C.P. 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2005-06-06

    In this work we consider the n=2 supersymmetric superfield approach for the FRW cosmological model and the corresponding term of matter content, perfect fluid with barotropic state equation p={gamma}{rho}. We are able to obtain a normalizable wave function (at zero energy) of the universe. Besides, the mass parameter spectrum is found for the closed FRW case in the Schrodinger picture, being similar to those obtained by other methods, using a black hole system.

  10. Peptides and proteins in matter wave interferometry: Challenges and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Ugur; Geyer, Philipp; Mairhofer, Lukas; Brand, Christian; Doerre, Nadine; Rodewald, Jonas; Schaetti, Jonas; Koehler, Valentin; Mayor, Marcel; Arndt, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Recent developments in matter wave physics suggest that quantum interferometry with biologically relevant nanomaterials is becoming feasible for amino acids, peptides, proteins and RNA/DNA strands. Quantum interference of biomolecules is interesting as it can mimic Schrödinger's cat states with molecules of high mass, elevated temperature and biological functionality. Additionally, the high internal complexity can give rise to a rich variety of couplings to the environment and new handles for quantitative tests of quantum decoherence. Finally, matter wave interferometers are highly sensitive force sensors and pave the way for quantum-assisted measurements of biomolecular properties in interaction with tailored or biomimetic environments. Recent interferometer concepts such as the Kapitza-Dirac-Talbot-Lau interferometer (KDTLI) or the Optical Time-domain Matter Wave interferometer (OTIMA) have already proven their potential for quantum optics in the mass range beyond 10000 amu and for metrology. Here we show our advances in quantum interferometry with vitamins and peptides and discuss methods of realizing cold, intense and sufficiently slow beams of synthetically tailored or hydrated polypeptides with promising properties for a new generation of quantum optics.

  11. Electron Rydberg wave packets in one-dimensional atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supriya Chatterjee; Amitava Choudhuri; Aparna Saha; B Talukdar

    2010-09-01

    An expression for the transition probability or form factor in one-dimensional Rydberg atom irradiated by short half-cycle pulse was constructed. In applicative contexts, our expression was found to be more useful than the corresponding result given by Landau and Lifshitz. Using the new expression for the form factor, the motion of a localized quantum wave packet was studied with particular emphasis on its revival and super-revival properties. Closed form analytical expressions were derived for expectation values of the position and momentum operators that characterized the widths of the position and momentum distributions. Transient phase-space localization of the wave packet produced by the application of a single impulsive kick was explicitly demonstrated. The undulation of the uncertainty product as a function of time was studied in order to visualize how the motion of the wave packet in its classical trajectory spreads throughout the orbit and the system becomes nonclassical. The process, however, repeats itself such that the atom undergoes a free evolution from a classical, to a nonclassical, and back to a classical state.

  12. Coherent cooling of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave: wave function and stochastic trajectory approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Argonov, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field may suppress packet splitting for some atoms having specific velocities in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We demonstrate and explain this effect numerically and analytically. Also we demonstrate that modulated field can not only trap, but also cool the atoms. We perform a numerical experiment with a large atomic ensebmble having wide initial velocity and energy distribution. During the experiment, most of atoms leave the wave while trapped atoms have narrow energy distribution

  13. Photo-Ionization of Hydrogen Atom in a Circularly Polarized Standing Electromagnetic Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang-Tao; ZHANG Qi-Ren; WANG Wan-Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Applying time-independent non-perturbative formalism to the photo-ionization of hydrogen atom immersed in a strong circularly polarized standing electromagnetic wave, we calculate the shift of energy levels and the distortion of wave functions for the hydrogen atom, the ionization cross section induced by the standing wave, and the angular distribution of photoelectrons and obtain some interesting results.

  14. Treatment of Ion-Atom Collisions Using a Partial-Wave Expansion of the Projectile Wavefunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, T. G.; Foster, M.; Colgan, J.; Madison, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge…

  15. Dark Matter searches using gravitational wave bar detectors: quark nuggets and newtorites

    CERN Document Server

    Bassan, M; D'Antonio, S.; Fafone, V.; Giordano, G.; Marini, A.; Minenkov, Y.; Modena, I.; Pallottino, G.V.; Pizzella, G.; Rocchi, A.; Ronga, F.; Visco, M.

    2016-01-01

    Many experiments have searched for supersymmetric WIMP dark matter, with null results. This may suggest to look for more exotic possibilities, for example compact ultra-dense quark nuggets, widely discussed in literature with several different names. Nuclearites are an example of candidate compact objects with atomic size cross section. After a short discussion on nuclearites, the result of a nuclearite search with the gravitational wave bar detectors Nautilus and Explorer is reported. The geometrical acceptance of the bar detectors is 19.5 $\\rm m^2$ sr, that is smaller than that of other detectors used for similar searches. However, the detection mechanism is completely different and is more straightforward than in other detectors. The experimental limits we obtain are of interest because, for nuclearites of mass less than $10^{-5}$ g, we find a flux smaller than that one predicted considering nuclearites as dark matter candidates. Particles with gravitational only interactions (newtorites) are another examp...

  16. Matter-wave soliton bouncing on a reflecting surface under the effect of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseghir, A.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Baizakov, B. B.; Abdullaev, F. Kh.

    2014-08-01

    The dynamics of a matter-wave soliton bouncing on the reflecting surface (atomic mirror) under the effect of gravity has been studied by analytical and numerical means. The analytical description is based on the variational approach. Resonant oscillations of the soliton's center of mass and width, induced by appropriate modulation of the atomic scattering length and the slope of the linear potential, are analyzed. In numerical experiments we observe the Fermi-type acceleration of the soliton when the vertical position of the reflecting surface is periodically varied in time. Analytical predictions are compared to the results of numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and qualitative agreement between them is found.

  17. Quantum reflection of bright solitary matter-waves from a narrow attractive potential

    CERN Document Server

    Marchant, A L; Yu, M M H; Rakonjac, A; Helm, J L; Polo, J; Weiss, C; Gardiner, S A; Cornish, S L

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation of quantum reflection from a narrow, attractive, potential using bright solitary matter-waves formed from a 85Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. We create narrow potentials using a tightly focused, red-detuned laser beam, and observe reflection of up to 25% of the atoms, along with the trapping of atoms at the position of the beam. We show that the observed reflected fraction is much larger than theoretical predictions for a narrow Gaussian potential well; a more detailed model of bright soliton propagation, accounting for the generic presence of small subsidiary intensity maxima in the red-detuned beam, suggests that these small intensity maxima are the cause of this enhanced reflection.

  18. Formation of two-dimensional nonspreading atomic wave packets in the field of two standing light waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efremov, MA; Petropavlovsky, SV; Fedorov, MV; Schleich, WP; Yakovlev, VP

    2005-01-01

    The formation of two-dimensional nonspreading atomic wave packets produced in the interaction of a beam of two-level atoms with two standing light waves polarised in the same plane is considered. The mechanism providing a dispersionless particle dynamics is the balance of two processes: a rapid deca

  19. Collisional-inhomogeneity-induced generation of matter-wave dark solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-4515 (United States); Kevrekidis, P.G., E-mail: kevrekid@gmail.co [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-4515 (United States); Horikis, T.P. [Department of Mathematics, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Frantzeskakis, D.J. [Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens 15784 (Greece)

    2010-08-16

    We propose an experimentally relevant protocol for the controlled generation of matter-wave dark solitons in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). In particular, using direct numerical simulations, we show that by switching-on a spatially inhomogeneous (step-like) change of the s-wave scattering length, it is possible to generate a controllable number of dark solitons in a quasi-one-dimensional BEC. A similar phenomenology is also found in the two-dimensional setting of 'disk-shaped' BECs but, as the solitons are subject to the snaking instability, they decay into vortex structures. A detailed investigation of how the parameters involved affect the emergence and evolution of solitons and vortices is provided.

  20. MIGA: combining laser and matter wave interferometry for mass distribution monitoring and advanced geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuel, B.; Pelisson, S.; Amand, L.; Bertoldi, A.; Cormier, E.; Fang, B.; Gaffet, S.; Geiger, R.; Harms, J.; Holleville, D.; Landragin, A.; Lefèvre, G.; Lhermite, J.; Mielec, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Riou, I.; Bouyer, P.

    2016-04-01

    The Matter-Wave laser Interferometer Gravitation Antenna, MIGA, will be a hybrid instrument composed of a network of atom interferometers horizontally aligned and interrogated by the resonant field of an optical cavity. This detector will provide measurements of sub Hertz variations of the gravitational strain tensor. MIGA will bring new methods for geophysics for the characterization of spatial and temporal variations of the local gravity field and will also be a demonstrator for future low frequency Gravitational Wave (GW) detections. MIGA will enable a better understanding of the coupling at low frequency between these different signals. The detector will be installed underground in Rustrel (FR), at the "Laboratoire Souterrain Bas Bruit" (LSBB), a facility with exceptionally low environmental noise and located far away from major sources of anthropogenic disturbances. We give in this paper an overview of the operating mode and status of the instrument before detailing simulations of the gravitational background noise at the MIGA installation site.

  1. MIGA: Combining laser and matter wave interferometry for mass distribution monitoring and advanced geodesy

    CERN Document Server

    Canuel, B; Amand, L; Bertoldi, A; Cormier, E; Fang, B; Gaffet, S; Geiger, R; Harms, J; Holleville, D; Landragin, A; Lefèvre, G; Lhermite, J; Mielec, N; Prevedelli, M; Riou, I; Bouyer, P

    2016-01-01

    The Matter-Wave laser Interferometer Gravitation Antenna, MIGA, will be a hybrid instrument composed of a network of atom interferometers horizontally aligned and interrogated by the resonant field of an optical cavity. This detector will provide measurements of sub Hertz variations of the gravitational strain tensor. MIGA will bring new methods for geophysics for the characterization of spatial and temporal variations of the local gravity field and will also be a demonstrator for future low frequency Gravitational Wave (GW) detections. MIGA will enable a better understanding of the coupling at low frequency between these different signals. The detector will be installed underground in Rustrel (FR), at the "Laboratoire Souterrain Bas Bruit" (LSBB), a facility with exceptionally low environmental noise and located far away from major sources of anthropogenic disturbances. We give in this paper an overview of the operating mode and status of the instrument before detailing simulations of the gravitational backg...

  2. The matter-wave laser interferometer gravitation antenna : a new tool for underground geophysical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyer, P.

    2015-12-01

    Since its first demonstration in 1991, Atomic Interferometry (AI) has shown to be an extremely performing probe of inertial forces. More recently, AI has revealed sensitivities to acceleration or rotation competing with or even beating state-of-the art sensors based on other technologies. The high stability and accuracy of AI sensors relying on cold atoms is at the basis of several applications ranging from fundamental physics (e.g. tests of general relativity and measurements of fundamental constants), geophysics (gravimetry, gradiometry) and inertial navigation. We are currently building a large scale matter-wave detector which will open new applications in geoscience and fundamental physics. In contrast to standard AI based sensors, our matter-wave laser interferometer gravitation antenna (MIGA) exploits the superb seismic environment of a low noise underground laboratory. This new infrastructure is embedded into the LSBB underground laboratory, in France, ideally located away from major anthropogenic disturbances and benefitting from very low background noise. MIGA combines atom and laser interferometry techniques, manipulating an array of atomic ensembles distributed along the antenna to simultanously read out seismic effects, inertial effects and eventually the passage of a gravity wave. The first version uses a set of three atomic sensors placed along an optical cavity. The spatial resolution obtained with this configuration will enable the separation of the seismic, inertial and GW contributions. This technique will bring unprecedented sensitivities to gravity gradients variations and open new perspectives for sub Hertz gravity wave and geodesic detection. MIGA will provide measurements of gravity gradients variations limited only by the AI shot noise, which will allow sensitivities of about 10-13 s-2Hz-1/2@ 2Hz. This instrument will then be capable to spatially resolve 1 m3 of water a distances of about 100 m, which opens important potential applications

  3. Discrete Wave-Packet Representation in Nuclear Matter Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Müther, H; Kukulin, V I; Pomerantsev, V N

    2016-01-01

    The Lippmann-Schwinger equation for the nucleon-nucleon $t$-matrix as well as the corresponding Bethe-Goldstone equation to determine the Brueckner reaction matrix in nuclear matter are reformulated in terms of the resolvents for the total two-nucleon Hamiltonians defined in free space and in medium correspondingly. This allows to find solutions at many energies simultaneously by using the respective Hamiltonian matrix diagonalization in the stationary wave packet basis. Among other important advantages, this approach simplifies greatly the whole computation procedures both for coupled-channel $t$-matrix and the Brueckner reaction matrix. Therefore this principally novel scheme is expected to be especially useful for self-consistent nuclear matter calculations because it allows to accelerate in a high degree single-particle potential iterations. Furthermore the method provides direct access to the properties of possible two-nucleon bound states in the nuclear medium. The comparison between reaction matrices f...

  4. Trapping of Atoms by the Counter-Propagating Stochastic Light Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Romanenko, Victor I

    2016-01-01

    We show that the field of counter-propagating stochastic light waves, one of which repeats the other, can form an one-dimension trap for atoms. The confinement of an ensemble of atoms in the trap and their simultaneous cooling can be achieved without using auxiliary fields. The temperature of the atomic ensemble depends on the autocorrelation time of the waves, their intensity and the detuning of the carrier frequency of the waves from the atomic transition frequency. The numerical simulation is carried out for sodium atoms.

  5. Decoherence of matter waves by thermal emission of radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackermüller, Lucia; Hornberger, Klaus; Brezger, Björn; Zeilinger, Anton; Arndt, Markus

    2004-02-19

    Emergent quantum technologies have led to increasing interest in decoherence--the processes that limit the appearance of quantum effects and turn them into classical phenomena. One important cause of decoherence is the interaction of a quantum system with its environment, which 'entangles' the two and distributes the quantum coherence over so many degrees of freedom as to render it unobservable. Decoherence theory has been complemented by experiments using matter waves coupled to external photons or molecules, and by investigations using coherent photon states, trapped ions and electron interferometers. Large molecules are particularly suitable for the investigation of the quantum-classical transition because they can store much energy in numerous internal degrees of freedom; the internal energy can be converted into thermal radiation and thus induce decoherence. Here we report matter wave interferometer experiments in which C70 molecules lose their quantum behaviour by thermal emission of radiation. We find good quantitative agreement between our experimental observations and microscopic decoherence theory. Decoherence by emission of thermal radiation is a general mechanism that should be relevant to all macroscopic bodies.

  6. Discrete wave-packet representation in nuclear matter calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müther, H.; Rubtsova, O. A.; Kukulin, V. I.; Pomerantsev, V. N.

    2016-08-01

    The Lippmann-Schwinger equation for the nucleon-nucleon t matrix as well as the corresponding Bethe-Goldstone equation to determine the Brueckner reaction matrix in nuclear matter are reformulated in terms of the resolvents for the total two-nucleon Hamiltonians defined in free space and in medium correspondingly. This allows one to find solutions at many energies simultaneously by using the respective Hamiltonian matrix diagonalization in the stationary wave-packet basis. Among other important advantages, this approach simplifies greatly the whole computation procedures both for the coupled-channel t matrix and the Brueckner reaction matrix. Therefore this principally novel scheme is expected to be especially useful for self-consistent nuclear matter calculations because it allows one to accelerate in a high degree single-particle potential iterations. Furthermore the method provides direct access to the properties of possible two-nucleon bound states in the nuclear medium. The comparison between reaction matrices found via the numerical solution of the Bethe-Goldstone integral equation and the straightforward Hamiltonian diagonalization shows a high accuracy of the method suggested. The proposed fully discrete approach opens a new way to an accurate treatment of two- and three-particle correlations in nuclear matter on the basis of the three-particle Bethe-Faddeev equation by an effective Hamiltonian diagonalization procedure.

  7. Jeans Analysis for Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies in Wave Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shu-Rong; Chiueh, Tzihong

    2016-01-01

    Observations suggest that dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies exhibit large constant-density cores in the centers, which can hardly be explained by dissipationless cold dark matter simulations. Wave dark matter (${\\psi {\\rm DM}}$), characterized by a single parameter, the dark matter particle mass $m_{\\psi}$, predicts a central soliton core in every galaxy arising from quantum pressure against gravity. Here we apply Jeans analysis to the kinematic data of eight classical dSphs so as to constrain $m_{\\psi}$, and obtain $m_{\\psi}=1.18_{-0.24}^{+0.28}\\times10^{-22}{\\,\\rm eV}$ and $m_{\\psi}=1.79_{-0.33}^{+0.35}\\times10^{-22}{\\,\\rm eV}~(2\\sigma)$ using the observational data sets of Walker et al. (2007) and Walker et al. (2009b), respectively. We show that the estimate of $m_{\\psi}$ is sensitive to the dSphs kinematic data sets and is robust to various models of stellar density profile. We also consider multiple stellar subpopulations in dSphs and find consistent results. This mass range of $m_{\\psi}$ is in good agre...

  8. Dynamics of Bose-Einstein Condensates: Exact Representation and Topological Classification of Coherent Matter Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Jia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the bifurcation theory of dynamical systems, we present the exact representation and topological classification of coherent matter waves in Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs, such as solitary waves and modulate amplitude waves (MAWs. The existence and multiplicity of such waves are determined by the parameter regions selected. The results show that the characteristic of coherent matter waves can be determined by the “angular momentum” in attractive BECs while for repulsive BECs; the waves of the coherent form are all MAWs. All exact explicit parametric representations of the above waves are exhibited and numerical simulations support the result.

  9. Density dependence of the /s-wave repulsion in pionic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    2002-11-01

    Several mechanisms of density dependence of the s-wave repulsion in pionic atoms, beyond the conventional model, are tested by parameter fits to a large (106 points) set of data from 16O to 238U, including 'deeply bound' states in 205Pb. Special attention is paid to the proper choice of nuclear density distributions. A density-dependent isovector scattering amplitude suggested recently by Weise to result from a density dependence of the pion decay constant is introduced and found to account for most of the so-called anomalous repulsion. The presence of such an effect might indicate partial chiral symmetry restoration in dense matter. The anomalous repulsion is fully accounted for when an additional relativistic impulse approximation term is included in the potential.

  10. High sensitive detection of high-order partial wave scattering in photoassociation of ultralcold atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yu-Qing; Ma Jie; Wu Ji-Zhou; Zhang Yi-Chi; Zhao Yan-Ting; Wang Li-Rong; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2012-01-01

    We report on the observation of enhanced high-order partial wave scattering from atom-atom interaction via changing the temperature of a magneto-optical trap in the process of photoassociation. The high-order scattering partial wave is directly manifested through the large signal amplitude of the rovibrational resonance levels of trap-loss spectroscopy from photoassociation.

  11. The s-wave repulsion and deeply bound pionic atoms: fact and fancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2003-06-01

    Fits to a large data set of pionic atoms show that the 'missing' s-wave repulsion is accounted for when a density dependence suggested recently by Weise is included in the isovector term of the s-wave pion optical potential. The importance of using large data sets is demonstrated and the role of deeply bound pionic atom states is discussed.

  12. Index of refraction of molecular nitrogen for sodium matter waves

    CERN Document Server

    Loreau, J; Dalgarno, A

    2013-01-01

    We calculate the index of refraction of sodium matter waves propagating through a gas of nitrogen molecules. We use a recent ab initio potential for the ground state of the NaN_2 Van der Waals complex to perform quantal close-coupling calculations and compute the index of refraction as a function of the projectile velocity. We obtain good agreement with the available experimental data. We show that the refractive index contains glory oscillations, but that they are damped by the averaging over the thermal motion of the N_2 molecules. These oscillations appear at lower temperatures and projectile velocity. We also investigate the behavior of the refractive index at low temperature and low projectile velocity to show its dependence on the rotational state of N_2, and discuss the advantage of using diatomic molecules as projectiles.

  13. Searching for Scalar Dark Matter in Atoms and Astrophysical Phenomena: Variation of Fundamental Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Stadnik, Yevgeny V; Flambaum, Victor V; Dzuba, Vladimir A

    2015-01-01

    We propose to search for scalar dark matter via its effects on the electromagnetic fine-structure constant and particle masses. Scalar dark matter that forms an oscillating classical field produces `slow' linear-in-time drifts and oscillating variations of the fundamental constants, while scalar dark matter that forms topological defects produces transient-in-time variations of the constants of Nature. These variations can be sought for with atomic clock, laser interferometer and pulsar timing measurements. Atomic spectroscopy and Big Bang nucleosynthesis measurements already give improved bounds on the quadratic interaction parameters of scalar dark matter with the photon, electron, and light quarks by up to 15 orders of magnitude, while Big Bang nucleosynthesis measurements provide the first such constraints on the interaction parameters of scalar dark matter with the massive vector bosons.

  14. Manifestations of dark matter and variations of fundamental constants in atoms and astrophysical phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Stadnik, Y V

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of recent developments in the detection of light bosonic dark matter, including axion, pseudoscalar axion-like and scalar dark matter, which form either a coherently oscillating classical field or topological defects (solitons). We emphasise new high-precision laboratory and astrophysical measurements, in which the sought effects are linear in the underlying interaction strength between dark matter and ordinary matter, in contrast to traditional detection schemes for dark matter, where the effects are quadratic or higher order in the underlying interaction parameters and are extremely small. New terrestrial experiments include measurements with atomic clocks, spectroscopy, atomic and solid-state magnetometry, torsion pendula, ultracold neutrons, and laser interferometry. New astrophysical observations include pulsar timing, cosmic radiation lensing, Big Bang nucleosynthesis and cosmic microwave background measurements. We also discuss various recently proposed mechanisms for the inducti...

  15. Analysis of Nanometer Structure for Chromium Atoms in Gauss Standing Laser Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; ZHU Bao-Hua; XIONG Xian-Ming

    2010-01-01

    @@ The equation of motion of two-level chromium atoms in Gauss standing laser wave is discussed and the distribution of chromium atoms is given under different transverse velocity conditions.The results show that the focusing position of atoms will be affected by the transverse velocity of atoms.Based on the four-order Runge-Kutta method,the locus of chromium atoms in Gauss standing laser wave is simulated.The three-dimensional characteristics of nanometer structures are stimulated under perfect and emanative conditions.

  16. Theory of light-matter interactions in cascade and diamond type atomic ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Jen, Hsiang-Hua

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate the quantum mechanical interaction of light with matter in the form of a gas of ultracold atoms: the atomic ensemble. We present a theoretical analysis of two problems, which involve the interaction of quantized electromagnetic fields (called signal and idler) with the atomic ensemble (i) cascade two-photon emission in an atomic ladder configuration, and (ii) photon frequency conversion in an atomic diamond configuration. The motivation of these studies comes from potential applications in long-distance quantum communication where it is desirable to generate quantum correlations between telecommunication wavelength light fields and ground level atomic coherences. We develop a theory of correlated signal-idler pair correlation. The analysis is complicated by the possible generation of multiple excitations in the atomic ensemble. An analytical treatment is given in the limit of a single excitation assuming adiabatic laser excitations. The analysis predicts superradiant timescales ...

  17. Directing Matter: Toward Atomic-Scale 3D Nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Borisevich, Albina Y; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lupini, Andrew R; Rack, Philip D; Unocic, Raymond R; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kalinin, Sergei V; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2016-06-28

    Enabling memristive, neuromorphic, and quantum-based computing as well as efficient mainstream energy storage and conversion technologies requires the next generation of materials customized at the atomic scale. This requires full control of atomic arrangement and bonding in three dimensions. The last two decades witnessed substantial industrial, academic, and government research efforts directed toward this goal through various lithographies and scanning-probe-based methods. These technologies emphasize 2D surface structures, with some limited 3D capability. Recently, a range of focused electron- and ion-based methods have demonstrated compelling alternative pathways to achieving atomically precise manufacturing of 3D structures in solids, liquids, and at interfaces. Electron and ion microscopies offer a platform that can simultaneously observe dynamic and static structures at the nano- and atomic scales and also induce structural rearrangements and chemical transformation. The addition of predictive modeling or rapid image analytics and feedback enables guiding these in a controlled manner. Here, we review the recent results that used focused electron and ion beams to create free-standing nanoscale 3D structures, radiolysis, and the fabrication potential with liquid precursors, epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxides with atomic layer precision, as well as visualization and control of individual dopant motion within a 3D crystal lattice. These works lay the foundation for approaches to directing nanoscale level architectures and offer a potential roadmap to full 3D atomic control in materials. In this paper, we lay out the gaps that currently constrain the processing range of these platforms, reflect on indirect requirements, such as the integration of large-scale data analysis with theory, and discuss future prospects of these technologies.

  18. Cooperatively enhanced light transmission in cold atomic matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kemp, Kasie; Havey, M D; Sokolov, I M; Kupriyanov, D V

    2014-01-01

    We report enhanced transmission in measurements of the spectral dependence of forward light scattering by a high-density and cold ensemble of 87Rb atoms. This phenomenon, which is a result of dipole-dipole interaction induced cooperative light scattering in the atomic sample, implies a significant departure from the traditional density dependence of the transmitted light as embodied in the Beer-Lambert Law. Absolute values of the density-dependent forward light scattering cross-section are extracted from the measurements.

  19. Matter, dark matter and gravitational waves from a GUT-scale U(1) phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domcke, Valerie

    2013-09-15

    The cosmological realization of the spontaneous breaking of B-L, the difference of baryon and lepton number, can generate the initial conditions for the hot early universe. In particular, we show that entropy, dark matter and a matter-antimatter asymmetry can be produced in accordance with current observations. If B-L is broken at the grand unification scale, F-term hybrid inflation can be realized in the false vacuum of unbroken B-L. The phase transition at the end of inflation, governed by tachyonic preheating, spontaneously breaks the U(1){sub B-L} symmetry and sets the initial conditions for the following perturbative reheating phase. We provide a detailed, time-resolved picture of the reheating process. The competition of cosmic expansion and entropy production leads to an intermediate plateau of constant temperature, which controls both the generated lepton asymmetry and the dark matter abundance. This enables us to establish relations between the neutrino and superparticle mass spectrum, rendering this mechanism testable. Moreover, we calculate the entire gravitational wave spectrum for this setup. This yields a promising possibility to probe cosmological B - L breaking with forthcoming gravitational wave detectors such as eLISA, advanced LIGO and BBO/DECIGO. The largest contribution is obtained from cosmic strings which is, for typical parameter values, at least eight orders of magnitude higher then the contribution from inflation. Finally, we study the possibility of realizing hybrid inflation in a superconformal framework. We find that superconformal D-term inflation is an interesting possibility generically leading to a two-field inflation model, but in its simplest version disfavoured by the recently published Planck data.

  20. Slowly moving matter-wave gap soliton propagation in weak random nonlinear potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ming-Rui; Zhang Yong-Liang; Jiang Xun-Ya; Zi Jian

    2008-01-01

    We systematically investigate the motion of slowly moving matter-wave gap solitons in a nonlinear potential, produced by the weak random spatial variation of the atomic scattering length. With the weak randomness, we construct an effective-particle theory to study the motion of gap solitons. Based on the effective-particle theory, the effect of the randomness on gap solitous is obtained, and the motion of gap solitons is finally solved. Moreover, the analytic results for the general behaviours of gap soliton motion, such as the ensemble-average speed and the reflection probability depending on the weak randomness are obtained. We find that with the increase of the random strength the ensemble-average speed of gap solitons decreases slowly where the reduction is proportional to the variance of the weak randomness, and the reflection probability becomes larger. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the numerical simulations based on the Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

  1. Gravitational Wave Detection with Single-Laser Atom Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Tinto, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A new design for a broadband detector of gravitational radiation relies on two atom interferometers separated by a distance L. In this scheme, only one arm and one laser are used for operating the two atom interferometers. The innovation here involves the fact that the atoms in the atom interferometers are not only considered as perfect test masses, but also as highly stable clocks. Atomic coherence is intrinsically stable, and can be many orders of magnitude more stable than a laser.

  2. Sound Wave in Hot Dense Matter Created in Heavy Ion Collision

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, X.; Yang, Z.

    2005-01-01

    A model to study the sound wave in hot dense matter created in heavy ion collisions by jet is proposed.The preliminary data of jet shape analysis of PHENIX Collaboration for all centralities and two directions is well explained in this model. Then the wavelength of the sound wave, the natural frequency of the hot dense matter and the speed of sound wave are estimated from the fit.

  3. Influence of Atomic Motion on a Microlaser in an Optical Standing-Wave Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敬涛; 冯勋立; 张文琦; 徐至展

    2002-01-01

    We study the microlaser in an optical standing-wave cavity injected with two-level atoms. The results have shown the obvious infIuence of atomic centre-of-mass motion on the microlaser, such as the photon distribution, the linewidth and the frequency shift. It was found that when the momentum of atoms is comparable to that of photons, the influence of atomic motion is dominated and the number of photons in the microlaser can be greatly enhanced, owing to part of the atomic kinetic energy being transferred to the resonator. This work provides a comparison of the related studies on the atomic motion under special assumptions.

  4. Dynamics of Periodic Waves in Bose-Einstein Condensate with Time-Dependent Atomic Scattering Length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua-Mei

    2007-01-01

    Evolution of periodic waves and solitary waves in Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with time-dependent atomic scattering length in an expulsive parabolic potential is studied. Based on the mapping deformation method, we successfully obtain periodic wave solutions and solitary wave solutions, including the bright and dark soliton solutions. The results in this paper include some in the literatures [Plys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 050402 and Chin. Phys. Lett. 22(2005) 1855].

  5. Atom Interferometry for detection of Gravity Waves-a Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atom interferometers are more sensitive to inertial effects. This is because atoms in their inertial frame are ideal test masses for detection of gravity effects...

  6. Electron Scattering From Atoms, Molecules, Nuclei, and Bulk Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Whelan, Colm T

    2005-01-01

    Topics that are covered include electron scattering in the scanning TEM; basic theory of inelastic electron imaging; study of confined atoms by electron excitation; helium bubbles created in extreme pressure with application to nuclear safety; lithium ion implantation; electron and positron scattering from clusters; electron scattering from physi- and chemi-absorbed molecules on surfaces; coincidence studies; electron scattering from biological molecules; electron spectroscopy as a tool for environmental science; electron scattering in the presence of intense fields; electron scattering from astrophysical molecules; electon interatctions an detection of x-ray radiation.

  7. Study of Atomization of a Water Jet by High-Intensity Aerial Ultrasonic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Youichi

    2001-05-01

    An experimental study has been carried out on the atomization of a water jet by aerially radiating it with high-intensity ultrasonic waves. A sound source that enables the linear generation of high-intensity aerial ultrasonic waves (frequency: approximately 20 kHz) is combined with a cylindrical reflection plate in order to create a standing-wave sound field. An attempt has been made to atomize a water jet of 1 mm diameter by passing it through the above sound field at a velocity of approximately 30 m/s. It has been clarified that nodes of sound pressure in the standing-wave sound field are effective for the atomization of a water jet. In addition, the atomizing phenomenon of a water jet has been observed precisely. The relation between the intensity of sound waves required for atomization and the radiation duration has also been clarified. Even the radiation of sound waves for only 2 ms atomizes water. This suggests that a very fast water jet at 300-500 m/s might be atomized.

  8. Treatment of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Colgan, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wong, T G [SANTA CLARA U; Madison, D H [MISSOURI U

    2008-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge scattering quantities. Here we show that such calculations are possible using modern high-performance computing. We demonstrate the utility of our method by examining elastic scattering of protons by hydrogen and helium atoms, problems familiar to undergraduate students of atomic scattering. Application to ionization of helium using partial-wave expansions of the projectile wavefunction, which has long been desirable in heavy-ion collision physics, is thus quite feasible.

  9. Nonconventional Methods in Teaching Matter, Atoms, Molecules and the Periodic Table for Nonmajor Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, Abour A.; Adams, Gerald E.; Cannon, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes several activities used to teach students from middle school age to college nonmajors about the nature of matter, atoms, molecules and the periodic table. Strategies integrate such approaches as hands-on activities, visualization, writing, demonstrations, role play, and guided inquiry. For example, the periodic table is viewed as a town…

  10. Dynamics and Matter-Wave Solitons in Bose-Einstein Condensates with Two- and Three-Body Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By means of similarity transformation, this paper proposes the matter-wave soliton solutions and dynamics of the variable coefficient cubic-quintic nonlinear Schrödinger equation arising from Bose-Einstein condensates with time-dependent two- and three-body interactions. It is found that, under the effect of time-dependent two- and three-body interaction and harmonic potential with time-dependent frequency, the density of atom condensates will gradually diminish and finally collapse.

  11. Matter-Wave Solitons in Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates with Tunable Interactions and Time Varying Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宣恒农; 左苗

    2011-01-01

    We present three families of exact matter-wave soliton solutions for an effective one-dimension two- component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with tunable interactions, harmonic potential and gain or loss term. We investigate the dynamics of bright-bright solitons, bright-dark solitons and dark-dark solitons for the time-dependent expulsive harmonic trap potential, periodically modulated harmonic trap potential, and kinklike modulated harmonic trap potential. Through the Feshbach resonance, these dynamics can be realized in experiments by suitable control of time-dependent trap parameters, atomic interactions, and interaction with thermal cloud.

  12. Statics and dynamics of a self-bound matter-wave quantum ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    We study the statics and dynamics of a stable, mobile, three-dimensional matter-wave spherical quantum ball created in the presence of an attractive two-body and a very small repulsive three-body interaction. The quantum ball can propagate with a constant velocity in any direction in free space and its stability under a small perturbation is established numerically and variationally. In frontal head-on and angular collisions at large velocities two quantum balls behave like quantum solitons. Such collision is found to be quasielastic and the quantum balls emerge after collision without any change of direction of motion and velocity and with practically no deformation in shape. When reflected by a hard impenetrable plane, the quantum ball bounces off like a wave obeying the law of reflection without any change of shape or speed. However, in a collision at small velocities two quantum balls coalesce to form a larger ball which we call a quantum-ball breather. We point out the similarity and difference between the collision of two quantum and classical balls. The present study is based on an analytic variational approximation and a full numerical solution of the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equation using the parameters of 7Li atoms.

  13. Optical precursor with four-wave mixing and storage based on a cold-atom ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dong-Sheng; Jiang, Yun Kun; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-03-06

    We observed optical precursors in four-wave mixing based on a cold-atom gas. Optical precursors appear at the edges of pulses of the generated optical field, and propagate through the atomic medium without absorption. Theoretical analysis suggests that these precursors correspond to high-frequency components of the signal pulse, which means the atoms cannot respond quickly to rapid changes in the electromagnetic field. In contrast, the low-frequency signal components are absorbed by the atoms during transmission. We also showed experimentally that the backward precursor can be stored using a Raman transition of the atomic ensemble and retrieved later.

  14. Dynamics of spontaneous radiation of atoms scattered by a resonance standing light wave

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorov, MV; Efremov, MA; Yakovlev, VP; Schleich, WP

    2003-01-01

    The scattering of atoms by a resonance standing light wave is considered under conditions when the lower of two resonance levels is metastable, while the upper level rapidly decays due to mainly spontaneous radiative transitions to the nonresonance levels of an atom. The diffraction scattering regim

  15. Manifestations of Dark matter and variation of the fundamental constants in atomic and astrophysical phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flambaum, Victor

    2016-05-01

    Low-mass boson dark matter particles produced after Big Bang form classical field and/or topological defects. In contrast to traditional dark matter searches, effects produced by interaction of an ordinary matter with this field and defects may be first power in the underlying interaction strength rather than the second or fourth power (which appears in a traditional search for the dark matter). This may give a huge advantage since the dark matter interaction constant is extremely small. Interaction between the density of the dark matter particles and ordinary matter produces both `slow' cosmological evolution and oscillating variations of the fundamental constants including the fine structure constant alpha and particle masses. Recent atomic dysprosium spectroscopy measurements and the primordial helium abundance data allowed us to improve on existing constraints on the quadratic interactions of the scalar dark matter with the photon, electron and light quarks by up to 15 orders of magnitude. Limits on the linear and quadratic interactions of the dark matter with W and Z bosons have been obtained for the first time. In addition to traditional methods to search for the variation of the fundamental constants (atomic clocks, quasar spectra, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, etc) we discuss variations in phase shifts produced in laser/maser interferometers (such as giant LIGO, Virgo, GEO600 and TAMA300, and the table-top silicon cavity and sapphire interferometers), changes in pulsar rotational frequencies (which may have been observed already in pulsar glitches), non-gravitational lensing of cosmic radiation and the time-delay of pulsar signals. Other effects of dark matter and dark energy include apparent violation of the fundamental symmetries: oscillating or transient atomic electric dipole moments, precession of electron and nuclear spins about the direction of Earth's motion through an axion condensate, and axion-mediated spin-gravity couplings, violation of Lorentz

  16. Effects of ion-atom collisions on the propagation and damping of ion-acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; D'Angelo, N.; Jensen, Vagn Orla;

    1968-01-01

    Experiments are described on ion-acoustic wave propagation and damping in alkali plasmas of various degrees of ionization. An increase of the ratio Te/Ti from 1 to approximately 3-4, caused by ion-atom collisions, results in a decrease of the (Landau) damping of the waves. At high gas pressure and....../or low wave frequency a "fluid" picture adequately describes the experimental results....

  17. Photoionization of neutral atoms by X waves carrying orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Robert A.; Seipt, Daniel; Beerwerth, Randolf; Ornigotti, Marco; Szameit, Alexander; Fritzsche, Stephan; Surzhykov, Andrey

    2016-10-01

    In contrast to plane waves, twisted or vortex beams have a complex spatial structure. Both their intensity and energy flow vary within the wave front. Beyond that, polychromatic vortex beams, such as X waves, have a spatially dependent energy distribution. We propose a method to measure this (local) energy spectrum. The method is based on the measurement of the energy distribution of photoelectrons from alkali-metal atoms. On the basis of our fully relativistic calculations, we argue that even ensembles of atoms can be used to probe the local energy spectrum of short twisted pulses.

  18. On Wave Dark Matter, Shells in Elliptical Galaxies, and the Axioms of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Bray, Hubert L

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a sequel to the author's paper entitled "On Dark Matter, Spiral Galaxies, and the Axioms of General Relativity" [arXiv:1004.4016] which explored a geometrically natural axiomatic definition for dark matter modeled by a scalar field satisfying the Einstein-Klein-Gordon wave equations which, after much calculation, was shown to be consistent with the observed spiral and barred spiral patterns in disk galaxies. We give an update on where things stand on this "wave dark matter" model of dark matter (aka scalar field dark matter and boson stars), an interesting alternative to the WIMP model of dark matter, and discuss how it has the potential to help explain the long-observed interleaved shell patterns, also known as ripples, in the images of elliptical galaxies.

  19. A Gravitational Wave Detector Based on an Atom Interferometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gravitational waves are tiny perturbations in the curvature of space-time that arise from accelerating masses – according to Einstein’s general...

  20. Laser-Driven Ultra-Relativistic Plasmas - Nuclear Fusion in Coulomb Shock Waves, Rouge Waves, and Background Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-05

    AND SUBTITLE LASER-DRIVEN ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC PLASMAS - NUCLEAR FUSION IN COULOMB SHOCK WAVES, ROUGE WAVES, AND BACKGROUND MATTER. 5a.  CONTRACT...blackbody radiation on free electrons .........................9 2.vi. Proposal of ultimate test of laser nuclear fusion efficiency in clusters...domain of energies and temperatures, with applications in particular to controlled nuclear fusion . 2. Final technical report on the grant #F49620-11-1

  1. Generation of multipartite continuous-variable entanglement via atomic spin wave: Heisenberg-Langevin approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xihua; Shang, Jie; Xue, Bolin; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Min

    2014-05-19

    We conduct theoretical studies on the effects of various parameters on generation of multipartite continuous-variable entanglement via atomic spin wave induced by the strong coupling and probe fields in the Λ-type electromagnetically induced transparency configuration in a realistic atomic ensemble by using the Heisenberg-Langevin formalism. It is shown that the increase of the atomic density and/or Rabi frequencies of the scattering fields, as well as the decrease of the coherence decay rate of the lower doublet would strengthen the degree of multipartite entanglement. This provides a clear evidence that the creation of multicolor multipartite entangled narrow-band fields to any desired number with a long correlation time can be achieved conveniently by using atomic spin wave in an atomic ensemble with large optical depth, which may find interesting applications in quantum information processing and quantum networks.

  2. Atom-interferometric gravitational-wave detection using heterodyne laser links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a gravitational-wave detection method based on heterodyne laser links and light-pulse atom interferometry that enables high sensitivity gravitational-wave detection in the 0.1-mHz to 1-Hz frequency band using a single, long (>108 m), detector baseline. The detection baseline in previous atom-based proposals was constrained by the need for a reference laser to remain collimated over the optical propagation path between two satellites. Here we circumvent this requirement by employing a strong local oscillator laser near each atom ensemble that is phase referenced or phase locked to the reference laser beam. Longer baselines offer a number of potential advantages, including enhanced sensitivity, simplified atom optics, and reduced atomic source flux requirements.

  3. Coherent control of light-matter interactions in polarization standing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xu; MacDonald, Kevin F.; Plum, Eric; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that standing waves formed by two coherent counter-propagating light waves can take a variety of forms, offering new approaches to the interrogation and control of polarization-sensitive light-matter interactions in ultrathin (subwavelength thickness) media. In contrast to familiar energy standing waves, polarization standing waves have constant electric and magnetic energy densities and a periodically varying polarization state along the wave axis. counterintuitively, anisotropic ultrathin (meta)materials can be made sensitive or insensitive to such polarization variations by adjusting their azimuthal angle.

  4. Apparatus to study matter-wave quantum optics in spin space in a sodium spinor Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematollahi, Delaram; Zhang, Qimin; Altermatt, Joseph; Zhong, Shan; Goodman, Matthew; Bhagat, Anita; Schwettmann, Arne

    2016-05-01

    We present our apparatus designed to study matter-wave quantum optics in spin space, including our recently finished vacuum system and laser systems. Microwave-dressed spin-exchange collisions in a sodium spinor Bose-Einstein condensate provide a precisely controllable nonlinear interaction that generates squeezing and acts as a source of entanglement. As a consequence of this entanglement between atoms with magnetic quantum numbers m = +1 and m = -1, the noise of population measurements can be reduced below the shot noise. Versatile microwave pulse sequences will be used to implement an interferometer, a phase-sensitive amplifier and other devices. With an added ion detector to detect Rydberg atoms via pulsed-field ionization, we plan to study the effect of Rydberg excitations on the spin evolution of the ultracold gas.

  5. Stationary rotary force waves on the liquid-air core interface of a swirl atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, J. J.; Cooper, D.; Yule, A. J.; Nasr, G. G.

    2016-10-01

    A one-dimensional wave equation, applicable to the waves on the surface of the air-core of a swirl atomizer is derived analytically, by analogy to the similar one-dimensional wave equation derivation for shallow-water gravity waves. In addition an analogy to the flow of water over a weir is used to produce an analytical derivation of the flow over the lip of the outlet of a swirl atomizer using the principle of maximum flow. The principle of maximum flow is substantiated by reference to continuity of the discharge in the direction of streaming. For shallow-water gravity waves, the phase velocity is the same expression as for the critical velocity over the weir. Similarly, in the present work, the wave phase velocity on the surface of the air-core is shown to be the same expression as for the critical velocity for the flow at the outlet. In addition, this wave phase velocity is shown to be the square root of the product of the radial acceleration and the liquid thickness, as analogous with the wave phase velocity for shallow water gravity waves, which is the square root of the product of the acceleration due to gravity and the water depth. The work revisits the weirs and flumes work of Binnie et al. but using a different methodology. The results corroborate with the work of Binnie. High speed video, Laser Doppler Anemometry and deflected laser beam experimental work has been carried out on an oversize Perspex (Plexiglas) swirl atomizer. Three distinctive types of waves were detected: helical striations, low amplitude random ripples and low frequency stationary waves. It is the latter wave type that is considered further in this article. The experimentally observed waves appear to be stationary upon the axially moving flow. The mathematical analysis allows for the possibility of a negative value for the phase velocity expression. Therefore the critical velocity and the wave phase velocity do indeed lead to stationary waves in the atomizer. A quantitative comparison

  6. Searching for Axion Dark Matter in Atoms: Oscillating Electric Dipole Moments and Spin-Precession Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Benjamin M; Flambaum, Victor V; Dzuba, Vladimir A

    2015-01-01

    We propose to search for axion dark matter via the oscillating electric dipole moments that axions induce in atoms and molecules. These moments are produced through the intrinsic oscillating electric dipole moments of nucleons and through the $P,T$-violating nucleon-nucleon interaction mediated by pion exchange, both of which arise due to the axion-gluon coupling, and also directly through the axion-electron interaction. Axion dark matter may also be sought for through the spin-precession effects that axions produce by directly coupling to fermion spins.

  7. What is matter? The fundamental ontology of atomism and structural realism

    CERN Document Server

    Esfeld, Michael; Oldofredi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We set out a fundamental ontology of atomism in terms of matter points. While being most parsimonious, this ontology is able to match both classical and quantum mechanics, and it remains a viable option for any future theory of cosmology that goes beyond current quantum physics. The matter points are structurally individuated: all there is to them are the spatial relations in which they stand; neither a commitment to intrinsic properties nor to an absolute space is required. The spatial relations change. All that is needed to capture change is a dynamical structure, namely dynamical relations as expressed in terms of the dynamical parameters of a physical theory.

  8. Vacuum Rabi Oscillation of an Atom without Rotating-Wave Approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fa-Qiang; LIU Wei-Ci; LIANG Rui-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ We have investigated vacuum Rabi oscillation of an atom coupled with single-mode cavity field exactly, and compared the results with that of the Jaynes-Cummings (J-C) model.The results show that for resonant case, there is no Rabi oscillation for an atom.For small detuning and weak coupling case, the probability for the atom in excited state oscillates against time with different frequencies and amplitudes from that of the J-C model.It exhibits that the counter-rotating wave interaction could significantly effect the dynamic hehaviour of the atom, even under the condition in which the RWA is considered to be justified.

  9. Semi-classical description of matter wave interferometers and hybrid quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Mathias

    2015-02-16

    This work considers the semi-classical description of two applications involving cold atoms. This is, on one hand, the behavior of a BOSE-EINSTEIN condensate in hybrid systems, i.e. in contact with a microscopic object (carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, etc.). On the other, the evolution of phase space distributions in matter wave interferometers utilizing ray tracing methods was discussed. For describing condensates in hybrid systems, one can map the GROSS-PITAEVSKII equation, a differential equation in the complex-valued macroscopic wave function, onto a system of two differential equations in density and phase. Neglecting quantum dispersion, one obtains a semiclassical description which is easily modified to incorporate interactions between condensate and microscopical object. In our model, these interactions comprise attractive forces (CASIMIR-POLDER forces) and loss of condensed atoms due to inelastic collisions at the surface of the object. Our model exhibited the excitation of sound waves that are triggered by the object's rapid immersion, and spread across the condensate thereafter. Moreover, local particle loss leads to a shrinking of the bulk condensate. We showed that the total number of condensed particles is decreasing potentially in the beginning (large condensate, strong mean field interaction), while it decays exponentially in the long-time limit (small condensate, mean field inetraction negligible). For representing the physics of matter wave interferometers in phase space, we utilized the WIGNER function. In semi-classical approximation, which again consists in ignoring the quantum dispersion, this representation is subject to the same equation of motion as classical phase space distributions, i.e. the LIOUVILLE equation. This implies that time evolution of theWIGNER function follows a phase space flow that consists of classical trajectories (classical transport). This means, for calculating a time-evolved distribution, one has know the initial

  10. Twin Matter Waves for Interferometry Beyond the Classical Limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lücke, Bernd; Scherer, Manuel; Kruse, Jens;

    2011-01-01

    Interferometers with atomic ensembles constitute an integral part of modern precision metrology. However, these interferometers are fundamentally restricted by the shot noise limit, which can only be overcome by creating quantum entanglement among the atoms. We used spin dynamics in Bose-Einstein...

  11. A discussion on the double wave theory and its applications to description of radiation atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The double wave theory (DWT), sometimes called the“non_statistical quantum mechanics” by its proposer, describes the state of each single particle in an ensemble with two wave functions which have a parameter corresponding to the particle. However the basic postulates of the DWT show that this theory can hardly describe any quantum rules of the microscopic world. In the double wave descriptions, the wave feature of the behavior of microscopic particles and the discontinuity characteristic of energy almost disappear. The discussions on several problems of the radiation atoms made by the DWT's proposer on the basis of this theory are either mathematically incorrect or inconsistent with experiments and the usual theory.

  12. Quantum physics of light and matter photons, atoms, and strongly correlated systems

    CERN Document Server

    Salasnich, Luca

    2017-01-01

    This compact but exhaustive textbook, now in its significantly revised and expanded second edition, provides an essential introduction to the field quantization of light and matter with applications to atomic physics and strongly correlated systems. Following an initial review of the origins of special relativity and quantum mechanics, individual chapters are devoted to the second quantization of the electromagnetic field and the consequences of light field quantization for the description of electromagnetic transitions. The spin of the electron is then analyzed, with particular attention to its derivation from the Dirac equation. Subsequent topics include the effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the atomic spectra and the properties of systems composed of many interacting identical particles. The book also provides a detailed explanation of the second quantization of the non-relativistic matter field, i.e., the Schrödinger field, which offers a powerful tool for the investigation of many-body...

  13. Goos-Hänchen-like shift of three-level matter wave incident on Raman beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhenglu; Hu, Liyun; Xu, XueXiang; Liu, Cunjin

    2014-07-01

    When a three-level atomic wavepacket is obliquely incident on a "edium slab" consisting of two far-detuned laser beams, there exists lateral shift between reflection and incident points at the surface of a "medium slab", analogous to optical Goos-Hanchen effect. We evaluate lateral shifts for reflected and transmitted waves via expansion of reflection and transmission coefficients, in contrast to the stationary phase method. Results show that lateral shifts can be either positive or negative dependent on the incident angle and the atomic internal state. Interestingly, a giant lateral shift of transmitted wave with high transmission probability is observed, which is helpful to observe such lateral shifts experimentally. Different from the two-level atomic wave case, we find that quantum interference between different atomic states plays crucial role on the transmission intensity and corresponding lateral shifts.

  14. Quantum jumps induced by matter-wave fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, J M; Zippilli, S; Morigi, G

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically study the occurrence of quantum jumps in the resonance fluorescence of a trapped atom. Here, the atom is laser cooled in a configuration of level such that the occurrence of a quantum jump is associated to a change of the vibrational center-of-mass motion by one phonon. The statistics of the occurrence of the dark fluorescence period is studied as a function of the physical parameters and the corresponding features in the spectrum of resonance fluorescence are identified. We discuss the information which can be extracted on the atomic motion from the observation of a quantum jump in the considered setup.

  15. Dark matter scattering on electrons: Accurate calculations of atomic excitations and implications for the DAMA signal

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, B M; Flambaum, V V; Pospelov, M; Stadnik, Y V

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the WIMP-type dark matter scattering on electrons that results in atomic ionization, and can manifest itself in a variety of existing direct-detection experiments. Unlike the WIMP-nucleon scattering, where current experiments probe typical interaction strengths much smaller than the Fermi constant, the scattering on electrons requires a much stronger interaction to be detectable, which in turn requires new light force carriers. We account for such new forces explicitly, by introducing a mediator particle with scalar or vector couplings to dark matter and to electrons. We then perform state of the art numerical calculations of atomic ionization relevant to the existing experiments. Our goals are to consistently take into account the atomic physics aspect of the problem (e.g., the relativistic effects, which can be quite significant), and to scan the parameter space: the dark matter mass, the mediator mass, and the effective coupling strength, to see if there is any part of the parameter space that c...

  16. Strong light-matter coupling in two-dimensional atomic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiaoze; Sun, Zheng; Xia, Fengnian; Lin, Erh-chen; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Kéna-Cohen, Stéphane; Menon, Vinod M

    2014-01-01

    Two dimensional (2D) atomic crystals of graphene, and transition metal dichalcogenides have emerged as a class of materials that show strong light-matter interaction. This interaction can be further controlled by embedding such materials into optical microcavities. When the interaction is engineered to be stronger than the dissipation of light and matter entities, one approaches the strong coupling regime resulting in the formation of half-light half-matter bosonic quasiparticles called microcavity polaritons. Here we report the evidence of strong light-matter coupling and formation of microcavity polaritons in a two dimensional atomic crystal of molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) embedded inside a dielectric microcavity at room temperature. A Rabi splitting of 46 meV and highly directional emission is observed from the MoS2 microcavity owing to the coupling between the 2D excitons and the cavity photons. Realizing strong coupling effects at room temperature in a disorder free potential landscape is central to the ...

  17. Workshop on Waves and Particles in Light and Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Merwe, Alwyn; Waves and Particles in Light and Matter

    1994-01-01

    The Great Veil, Reality, and Louis de Broglie (O. Costa de Beauregard). The Fallacy of the Arguments Against Local Realism in Quantum Phenomena (A.O. Barut). Restoring Locality with FasterThanLight Velocities (P.H. Eberhard). The WaveParticle Duality and the AharonovBohm Effect (M. Ferrero, E. Santos). De Broglie's Waves in Space and Time (A. Garuccio). Interferometry with De Broglie Waves (F. Hasselbach). Quantum Mechanics of Ultracold Neutrons (V.K. Ignatovich). The Physical Interpretation of Special Relativity (S.J. Prokhovnik). Quantum Neutron Optics (H. Rauch). Some Comments on th

  18. Do Neutrino Wave Functions Overlap and Does it Matter?

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Cheng-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Studies of neutrinos commonly ignore anti-symmetrization of their wave functions. This implicitly assumes that either spatial wave functions for neutrinos with approximately the same momentum do not overlap or their overlapping has no measurable consequences. We examine these assumptions by considering the evolution of three-dimensional neutrino wave packets (WPs). We find that it is perfectly adequate to treat accelerator and reactor neutrinos as separate WPs for typical experimental setup. While solar and supernova neutrinos correspond to overlapping WPs, they can be treated effectively as non-overlapping for analyses of their detection.

  19. Statics and dynamics of a self-bound dipolar matter-wave droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    We study the statics and dynamics of a stable, mobile, self-bound three-dimensional dipolar matter-wave droplet created in the presence of a tiny repulsive three-body interaction. In frontal collision with an impact parameter and in angular collision at large velocities along all directions two droplets behave like quantum solitons. Such a collision is found to be quasi elastic and the droplets emerge undeformed after collision without any change of velocity. However, in a collision at small velocities the axisymmeric dipolar interaction plays a significant role and the collision dynamics is sensitive to the direction of motion. For an encounter along the z direction at small velocities, two droplets, polarized along the z direction, coalesce to form a larger droplet—a droplet molecule. For an encounter along the x direction at small velocities, the same droplets stay apart and never meet each other due to the dipolar repulsion. The present study is based on an analytic variational approximation and a numerical solution of the mean-field Gross–Pitaevskii equation using the parameters of 52Cr atoms.

  20. Carrier-wave Rabi-flopping signatures in high-order harmonic generation for alkali atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappina, M F; Pérez-Hernández, J A; Landsman, A S; Zimmermann, T; Lewenstein, M; Roso, L; Krausz, F

    2015-04-10

    We present a theoretical investigation of carrier-wave Rabi flopping in real atoms by employing numerical simulations of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in alkali species. Given the short HHG cutoff, related to the low saturation intensity, we concentrate on the features of the third harmonic of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) atoms. For pulse areas of 2π and Na atoms, a characteristic unique peak appears, which, after analyzing the ground state population, we correlate with the conventional Rabi flopping. On the other hand, for larger pulse areas, carrier-wave Rabi flopping occurs, and is associated with a more complex structure in the third harmonic. These characteristics observed in K atoms indicate the breakdown of the area theorem, as was already demonstrated under similar circumstances in narrow band gap semiconductors.

  1. Carrier-wave Rabi flopping signatures in high-order harmonic generation for alkali atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ciappina, M F; Landsman, A S; Zimmermann, T; Lewenstein, M; Roso, L; Krausz, F

    2015-01-01

    We present the first theoretical investigation of carrier-wave Rabi flopping in real atoms by employing numerical simulations of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in alkali species. Given the short HHG cutoff, related to the low saturation intensity, we concentrate on the features of the third harmonic of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) atoms. For pulse areas of 2$\\pi$ and Na atoms, a characteristic unique peak appears, which, after analyzing the ground state population, we correlate with the conventional Rabi flopping. On the other hand, for larger pulse areas, carrier-wave Rabi flopping occurs, and is associated with a more complex structure in the third harmonic. These new characteristics observed in K atoms indicate the breakdown of the area theorem, as was already demonstrated under similar circumstances in narrow band gap semiconductors.

  2. Manipulating localized matter waves in multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, K; Muruganandam, P; Senthilvelan, M; Lakshmanan, M

    2016-03-01

    We analyze vector localized solutions of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with variable nonlinearity parameters and external trap potentials through a similarity transformation technique which transforms the two coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations into a pair of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with constant coefficients under a specific integrability condition. In this analysis we consider three different types of external trap potentials: a time-independent trap, a time-dependent monotonic trap, and a time-dependent periodic trap. We point out the existence of different interesting localized structures; namely, rogue waves, dark- and bright-soliton rogue waves, and rogue-wave breatherlike structures for the above three cases of trap potentials. We show how the vector localized density profiles in a constant background get deformed when we tune the strength of the trap parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the nature of the trajectories of the nonautonomous rogue waves. We also construct the dark-dark rogue wave solution for the repulsive-repulsive interaction of two-component BECs and analyze the associated characteristics for the three different kinds of traps. We then deduce single-, two-, and three-composite rogue waves for three-component BECs and discuss the correlated characteristics when we tune the strength of the trap parameter for different trap potentials.

  3. Influence of separating distance between atomic sensors for gravitational wave detection

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Biao; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2015-01-01

    We consider a recent scheme of gravitational wave detection using atomic interferometers as inertial sensors, and reinvestigate its configuration using the concept of sensitivity functions. We show that such configuration can suppress noise without influencing the gravitational wave signal. But the suppression is insufficient for the direct observation of gravitational wave signals, so we analyse the behaviour of the different noises influencing the detection scheme. As a novel method, we study the relations between the measurement sensitivity and the distance between two interferometers, and find that the results derived from vibration noise and laser frequency noise are in stark contrast to that derived from the shot noise, which is significant for the configuration design of gravitational wave detectors using atomic interferometers.

  4. Unconventional Density Wave and Superfluidity in Cold Atom Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    fillings between quarter and half, with on-site and 16 30 nearest-neighbor repulsion [26]. Its application to the coupled quarter-filled ladders with...result that Majorana fermions can be generated as a zero-energy mode in the excitation spectrum of a half-quantum vortex in a (p + ip)-wave superconductor ...spin populations have been studied in electronic mate- rials, such as magnetic-field-induced organic superconductors [63, 64]. Mixtures of different

  5. Magneto-optical trap formed by elliptically polarised light waves for Mg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikov, O. N.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Goncharov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a magneto-optical trap (MOT) formed by elliptically polarised waves for 24Mg atoms on a closed optical 3P2 → 3D3 (λ = 383.8 nm) transition in the ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration of the field. Compared with a known MOT formed by circularly polarised waves (σ+ - σ- configuration), the suggested configuration of the trap formed by fields of ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration allows deeper sub-Doppler cooling of trapped 24Mg atoms, which cannot be implemented in a conventional trap formed by fields of σ+ - σ- configuration.

  6. Localized atomic basis set in the projector augmented wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Vanin, Marco; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    representation. The possibility to switch seamlessly between the two representations implies that simulations employing the local basis can be fine tuned at the end of the calculation by switching to the grid, thereby combining the strength of the two representations for optimal performance. The implementation...... is tested by calculating atomization energies and equilibrium bulk properties of a variety of molecules and solids, comparing to the grid results. Finally, it is demonstrated how a grid-quality structure optimization can be performed with significantly reduced computational effort by switching between...

  7. Cooling and trapping of three-level atoms in a bichromatic standing wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, H.; Cai, T.; Bigelow, N. P.; Grove, T. T.; Gould, P. L.

    1995-02-01

    We show that a three-level atom in the cascade configuration can be stably trapped and cooled in one dimension by an intense bichromatic standing wave. At the two-photon resonance, rectified dipole forces result in a deep potential well which can be used to localize the atoms in space. In the vicinity of the rectified potential minimum, the spatial dependence of the dressed state energies can lead to a velocity dependence of the force which produces damping of the atomic motion. Consideration of the heating effects of momentum diffusion indicates that cooling and stable trapping at low temperatures is possible in such a bichromatic field.

  8. Evolution of spin-dependent atomic wave packets in a harmonic potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Ling-Hua; Liu Min; Kong Ling-Bo; Chen Ai-Xi; Zhan Ming-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated theoretically the evolution of spin-dependent atomic wave packets in a harmonic magnetic trapping potential. For a Bose-condensed gas, which undergoes a Mott insulator transition and a spin-dependent transport, the atomic wavefunction can be described by an entangled single-atom state. Due to the confinement of the -harmonic potential, the density distributions exhibit periodic decay and revival, which is different from the case of free expansion after switching off the combined harmonic and optical lattice potential.

  9. Experimental Evidence for the Attraction of Matter by Electromagnetic Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lidgren, Hans

    2010-01-01

    We present measurement results demonstrating that a conducting lead sphere exposed to electromagnetic (e/m) waves in the infrared (IR) regime, is attracted by e/m waves. The result may seem surprising and against conventional wisdom that electromagnetic wave forcing should lead to a repulsive force. Nonetheless, all our experiments show that the attractive force can be determined quantitatively, and that they are reproducible. Our experiment setup is a Cavendish torsion-balance experiment with lead spheres, one of the spheres intermittently irradiated by IR light. Because the Cavendish experiment is well known, simple, and readily available, the results can be easily verified or falsified. However, to avoid Bernoulli and other external forcing effects, the entire experimental setup should be placed in a vacuum chamber. In our case the experiments were performed at \\approx 4 \\cdot 10^-7 mbar. One of the 20 g lead spheres was intermittently irradiated by infrared radiation from a lamp covered by an aluminium fo...

  10. Comparative Sensitivities of Gravitational Wave Detectors Based on Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.; Thorpe, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe. Whether this potential advantage outweighs the additional complexity associated with including atom interferometers will require further study.

  11. Room temperature strong light-matter coupling in 3D THz meta-atoms (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulillo, Bruno; Manceau, Jean-Michel; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund; Colombelli, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate strong light-matter coupling at room temperature in the terahertz (THz) spectral region using 3D meta-atoms with extremely sub-wavelength volumes. Using an air-bridge fabrication scheme, we have implemented sub-wavelength 3D THz micro-resonators that rely on suspended loop antennas connected to semiconductor-filled patch cavities. We have experimentally shown that they possess the functionalities of lumped LC resonators: their frequency response can be adjusted by independently tuning the inductance associated the antenna element or the capacitance provided by the metal-semiconductor-metal cavity. Moreover, the radiation coupling and efficiency can be engineered acting on the design of the loop antenna, similarly to conventional RF antennas. Here we take advantage of this rich playground in the context of cavity electrodynamics/intersubband polaritonics. In the strong light-matter coupling regime, a cavity and a two-level system exchange energy coherently at a characteristic rate called the vacuum Rabi frequency ΩR which is dominant with respect to all other loss mechanisms involved. The signature, in the frequency domain, is the appearance of a splitting between the bare cavity and material system resonances: the new states are called upper and a lower polariton branches. So far, most experimental demonstrations of strong light-matter interaction between an intersubband transition and a deeply sub-wavelength mode in the THz or mid-infrared ranges rely on wavelength-scale or larger resonators such as photonic crystals, diffractive gratings, dielectric micro-cavities or patch cavities. Lately, planar metamaterials have been used to enhance the light-matter interaction and strongly reduce the interaction volume by engineering the electric and magnetic resonances of the individual subwavelength constituents. In this contribution we provide evidence of strong coupling between a THz intersubband transition and an extremely sub-wavelength mode (≈λ/10

  12. Towards Relativistic Atomic Physics and Post-Minkowskian Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lusanna, Luca

    2009-01-01

    A review is given of the formulation of relativistic atomic theory, in which there is an explicit realization of the Poincare' generators, both in the inertial and in the non-inertial rest-frame instant form of dynamics in Minkowski space-time. This implies the need to solve the problem of the relativistic center of mass of an isolated system and to describe the transitions from different conventions for clock synchronization, namely for the identifications of instantaneous 3-spaces, as gauge transformations. These problems, stemming from the Lorentz signature of space-time, are a source of non-locality, which induces a spatial non-separability in relativistic quantum mechanics, with implications for relativistic entanglement. Then the classical system of charged particles plus the electro-magnetic field is studied in the framework of ADM canonical tetrad gravity in asymptotically Minkowskian space-times admitting the ADM Poincare' group at spatial infinity, which allows to get the general relativistic extens...

  13. Long-living BLOCH oscillations of matter waves in periodic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, M; Konotop, V V; Bludov, Yu V

    2008-07-18

    The dynamics of matter waves in linear and nonlinear optical lattices subject to a spatially uniform linear force is studied both analytically and numerically. It is shown that by properly designing the spatial dependence of the scattering length it is possible to induce long-living Bloch oscillations of gap-soliton matter waves in optical lattices. This occurs when the effective nonlinearity and the effective mass of the soliton have opposite signs for all values of the crystal momentum in the Brillouin zone. The results apply to all systems modeled by the periodic nonlinear Schrödinger equation, including propagation of light in photonic and photorefractive crystals with tilted band structures.

  14. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovsky, Yu. E.

    2015-12-01

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory "Dulkyn" which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM.

  15. On gravitational wave-Cherenkov radiation from photons when passing through diffused dark matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shu-Xu

    2017-03-01

    Analogous to Cherenkov radiation, when a particle moves faster than the propagation velocity of gravitational wave in matter (v > cg), we expect gravitational wave-Cherenkov radiation (GWCR). In the situation that a photon travels across diffuse dark matters, the GWCR condition is always satisfied, photon will thence lose its energy all along the path. This effect has long been ignored in the practice of astrophysics and cosmology without justification with serious calculation. We study this effect for the first time, and shows that this energy loss time of the photon is far longer than the Hubble time and therefore justify the practice of ignoring this effect in the context of astrophysics.

  16. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovsky, Yu. E., E-mail: Pokrovskiy-YE@nrcki.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory “Dulkyn” which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM.

  17. Adiabatic asymmetric scattering of atoms in the field of a standing wave

    CERN Document Server

    Hakobyan, M V; Ishkhanyan, A M

    2015-01-01

    A model of the asymmetric coherent scattering process (caused by initial atomic wave-packet splitting in the momentum space) taking place at the large detuning and adiabatic course of interaction for an effective two-state system interacting with a standing wave of laser radiation is discussed. We show that the same form of initial wave-packet splitting may lead to different, in general, diffraction patterns for opposite, adiabatic and resonant, regimes of the standing-wave scattering. We show that the scattering of the Gaussian wave packet in the adiabatic case presents refraction (a limiting form of the asymmetric scattering) in contrast to the bi-refringence (the limiting case of the high-order narrowed scattering) occurring in the resonant scattering.

  18. Intrinsic Resolution of Molecular Electronic Wave Functions and Energies in Terms of Quasi-atoms and Their Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Aaron C; Schmidt, Michael W; Gordon, Mark S; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2017-02-09

    A general intrinsic energy resolution has been formulated for strongly correlated wave functions in the full molecular valence space and its subspaces. The information regarding the quasi-atomic organization of the molecular electronic structure is extracted from the molecular wave function without introducing any additional postulated model state wave functions. To this end, the molecular wave function is expressed in terms of quasi-atomic molecular orbitals, which maximize the overlap between subspaces of the molecular orbital space and the free-atom orbital spaces. As a result, the molecular wave function becomes the superposition of a wave function representing the juxtaposed nonbonded quasi-atoms and a wave function describing the interatomic electron migrations that create bonds through electron sharing. The juxtaposed nonbonded quasi-atoms are shown to consist of entangled quasi-atomic states from different atoms. The binding energy is resolved as a sum of contributions that are due to quasi-atom formation, quasiclassical electrostatic interactions, and interatomic interferences caused by electron sharing. The contributions are further resolved according to orbital interactions. The various transformations that generate the analysis are determined by criteria that are independent of the working orbital basis used for calculating the molecular wave function. The theoretical formulation of the resolution is quantitatively validated by an application to the C2 molecule.

  19. Multiple photon-echo rephasing of coherent matter waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Ruizhi; Yue, Xuguang; Xu, Xia; Lu, Haichang; Zhou, Xiaoji, E-mail: xjzhou@pku.edu.cn

    2015-03-20

    We investigate the multiple photon echo processes in a Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) with inhomogeneous momentum broadening. By applying Bragg pulses with adjusted frequency mismatch to induce multiple rephasing, the BEC satisfies the coherence condition for successive superradiance. The atomic system can be efficiently transferred to a high momentum state step by step and emits multiple photon echo signals. These echo signals as a sequence show increasing widths and descending peaks, reflecting a residual dephasing effect due to kinetic-energy phase discrepancy during the population inversions. Our work may contribute to the coherence maintenance for ultracold atomic gas in the quantum information area and the high-precision measurement of atomic momentum width. - Highlights: • A multipulse protocol to induce multiple photon echo rephasing of a BEC is proposed. • Our method is a new and efficient way to transfer the BEC to high momentum modes. • Our method can extend a BEC's coherence time. • The echo sequence is analyzed to study the residual dephasing effect. • The echo decaying is useful in high-precision measurement of BEC's momentum width.

  20. A Resonant Mode for Gravitational Wave Detectors based on Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Peter W; Kasevich, Mark A; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new atom interferometric gravitational wave detector design that can operate in a resonant mode for increased sensitivity. By oscillating the positions of the atomic wavepackets, this resonant detection mode allows for coherently enhanced, narrow-band sensitivity at target frequencies. The proposed detector is flexible and can be rapidly switched between broadband and narrow-band detection modes without changing hardware. For instance, a new binary discovered in broadband mode can subsequently be studied further as the inspiral evolves by using a tailored narrow-band detector response. In addition to functioning like a lock-in amplifier for astrophysical events, the enhanced sensitivity of the resonant approach also opens up the possibility of searching for important cosmological signals, including the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by inflation. We give an example of detector parameters which would allow detection of inflationary gravitational waves down to $\\Omega_\\text{GW} ...

  1. Shock Wave Attenuation Using Foam Obstacles: Does Geometry Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjoo Jeon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A shock wave impact study on open and closed cell foam obstacles was completed to assess attenuation effects with respect to different front face geometries of the foam obstacles. Five different types of geometries were investigated, while keeping the mass of the foam obstacle constant. The front face, i.e., the side where the incident shock wave impacts, were cut in geometries with one, two, three or four convergent shapes, and the results were compared to a foam block with a flat front face. Results were obtained by pressure sensors located upstream and downstream of the foam obstacle, in addition to high-speed schlieren photography. Results from the experiments show no significant difference between the five geometries, nor the two types of foam.

  2. Room temperature strong light-matter coupling in three dimensional terahertz meta-atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulillo, B.; Manceau, J.-M.; Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.; Colombelli, R.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate strong light-matter coupling in three dimensional terahertz meta-atoms at room temperature. The intersubband transition of semiconductor quantum wells with a parabolic energy potential is strongly coupled to the confined circuital mode of three-dimensional split-ring metal-semiconductor-metal resonators that have an extreme sub-wavelength volume (λ/10). The frequency of these lumped-element resonators is controlled by the size and shape of the external antenna, while the interaction volume remains constant. This allows the resonance frequency to be swept across the intersubband transition and the anti-crossing characteristic of the strong light-matter coupling regime to be observed. The Rabi splitting, which is twice the Rabi frequency (2ΩRabi), amounts to 20% of the bare transition at room temperature, and it increases to 28% at low-temperature.

  3. Magnetically-modulated atomic force microscopy for analysis of soft matter systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageshima, Masami

    2012-11-01

    Experimental method of studying viscoelasticity, a common idea to understand properties of microscopic biological soft matter systems, especially single biopolymer chains, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with magnetically- driven cantilever is surveyed. The experimental setup of applying well-characterized excitation to the cantilever and the analysis method to derive the viscoelasticity of the system under study are briefly introduced. Examples of measuring viscoelasticity of single peptide molecule and single titin molecule are shown. Considering the close relation of viscoelasticity and the time-scale for nonequilibrium dynamics in soft matter, extension of the method to a frequency-resolved analysis is attempted. A result of measuring viscoelasticity spectrum of a single dextran chain is shown. Challenges in further progress of the method are also described.

  4. Strong light-matter coupling from atoms to solid-state systems

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The physics of strong light-matter coupling has been addressed in different scientific communities over the last three decades. Since the early eighties, atoms coupled to optical and microwave cavities have led to pioneering demonstrations of cavity quantum electrodynamics, Gedanken experiments, and building blocks for quantum information processing, for which the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded in 2012. In the framework of semiconducting devices, strong coupling has allowed investigations into the physics of Bose gases in solid-state environments, and the latter holds promise for exploiting light-matter interaction at the single-photon level in scalable architectures. More recently, impressive developments in the so-called superconducting circuit QED have opened another fundamental playground to revisit cavity quantum electrodynamics for practical and fundamental purposes. This book aims at developing the necessary interface between these communities, by providing future researchers with a robust conceptu...

  5. The stability of matter from atoms to stars : selecta of Elliott H. Lieb

    CERN Document Server

    Lieb, Elliott H

    2005-01-01

    This collection of papers -- starting with a brilliant article by one of the masters of the field -- gives an excellent current review of our knowledge of matter. Partially basing his own work on a variational formulation of quantum mechanics, E.H. Lieb links the difficult question of the stability of matter with important problems in functional analysis. Here the reader will find general results together with deep insights into quantum systems combined with papers on the structure of atoms and molecules, the thermodynamic limit, and stellar structures. The book is suitable as an accompanying text or recommended reading for a graduate course in quantum mechanics. In the third edition, two new sections were added: one contains papers on quantum electrodynamics, and the other on Boson systems. In this fourth edition, these topics have been further developed, extending the book by approximately 120 pages.

  6. Introduction to the physics of matter basic atomic, molecular, and solid-state physics

    CERN Document Server

    Manini, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    This book offers an up-to-date, compact presentation of basic topics in the physics of matter, from atoms to molecules to solids, including elements of statistical mechanics. The adiabatic separation of the motion of electrons and nuclei in matter and its spectroscopic implications are outlined for molecules and recalled regularly in the study of the dynamics of gases and solids. Numerous experiments are described and more than 160 figures give a clear visual impression of the main concepts. Sufficient detail of mathematical derivations is provided to enable students to follow easily. The focus is on present-day understanding and especially on phenomena fitting various independent-particle models. The historical development of this understanding, and phenomena such as magnetism and superconductivity, where interparticle interactions and nonadiabatic effects play a crucial role, are mostly omitted. A final outlook section stimulates the curiosity of the reader to pursue the study of such advanced topics in gra...

  7. Topological matter. Observation of Majorana fermions in ferromagnetic atomic chains on a superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadj-Perge, Stevan; Drozdov, Ilya K; Li, Jian; Chen, Hua; Jeon, Sangjun; Seo, Jungpil; MacDonald, Allan H; Bernevig, B Andrei; Yazdani, Ali

    2014-10-31

    Majorana fermions are predicted to localize at the edge of a topological superconductor, a state of matter that can form when a ferromagnetic system is placed in proximity to a conventional superconductor with strong spin-orbit interaction. With the goal of realizing a one-dimensional topological superconductor, we have fabricated ferromagnetic iron (Fe) atomic chains on the surface of superconducting lead (Pb). Using high-resolution spectroscopic imaging techniques, we show that the onset of superconductivity, which gaps the electronic density of states in the bulk of the Fe chains, is accompanied by the appearance of zero-energy end-states. This spatially resolved signature provides strong evidence, corroborated by other observations, for the formation of a topological phase and edge-bound Majorana fermions in our atomic chains.

  8. Atmospheric Pressure Method and Apparatus for Removal of Organic Matter with Atomic and Ionic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Rutledge, Sharon K. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A gas stream containing ionic and atomic oxygen in inert gas is used to remove organic matter from a substrate. The gas stream is formed by flowing a mixture of gaseous oxygen in an inert gas such as helium at atmospheric pressure past a high voltage, current limited, direct current arc which contacts the gas mixture and forms the ionic and atomic oxygen. The arc is curved at the cathode end and the ionic oxygen formed by the arc nearer to the anode end of the arc is accelerated in a direction towards the cathode by virtue of its charge. The relatively high mass to charge ratio of the ionic oxygen enables at least some of it to escape the arc before contacting the cathode and it is directed onto the substrate. This is useful for cleaning delicate substrates such as fine and historically important paintings and delicate equipment and the like.

  9. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadnik, Y V

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field $\\phi = \\phi_0 \\cos(m_\\phi t)$, can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the Standard Model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive new limits on the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to $2-3$ orders of magnitude.

  10. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field ϕ =ϕ0cos(mϕt ) , can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the standard model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive limits on the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  11. An Atom Trap Trace Analysis System for Measuring Krypton Contamination in Xenon Dark Matter Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Elena; Loose, Andre; Goetzke, Luke W; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) system to measure Kr in Xe at the part per trillion (ppt) level, a prerequisite for the sensitivity achievable with liquid xenon dark matter detectors beyond the current generation. Since Ar and Kr have similar laser cooling wavelengths, the apparatus has been tested with Ar to avoid contamination prior to measuring Xe samples. A radio-frequency (RF) plasma discharge generates a beam of metastable Ar which is optically collimated, slowed, and trapped using standard magneto-optical techniques. We detect the fluorescence of single trapped $^{40}$Ar atoms with a signal to noise ratio of 5. The measured system efficiency of $3 \\times 10^{-9}$ for Ar corresponds to an expected Kr in Xe sensitivity at the ppt level.

  12. Design and Fabrication of a Chip-based Continuous-wave Atom Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Power, E P; Vanderelzen, B; Herrera-Fierro, P; Murphy, R; Yalisove, S M; Raithel, G

    2012-01-01

    We present a design for a continuous-wave (CW) atom laser on a chip and describe the process used to fabricate the device. Our design aims to integrate quadrupole magnetic guiding of ground state Rb atoms with continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling to create a continuous Bose-Einstein condensate; out-coupled atoms from the condensate should realize a CW atom laser. We choose a geometry with three wires embedded in a spiral pattern in a silicon subtrate. The guide features an integrated solenoid to mitigate spin-flip losses and provide a tailored longitudinal magnetic field. Our design also includes multiple options for atom interferometry: accomodations are in place for laser-generated atom Fabry-Perot and Mach-Zehnder interferometers, and a pair of atomic beam X-splitters is incorporated for an all-magnetic atom Mach-Zehnder setup. We demonstrate the techniques necessary to fabricate our device using existing micro- and nano-scale fabrication equipment, and discuss future options for modified desi...

  13. AN ANTHOLOGY OF THE DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENTS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNIQUE. PART 34: DISCOVERY AND STUDY OF QUANTUM-WAVE NATURE OF MICROSCOPIC WORLD OF MATTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Baranov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Implementation of brief analytical review of the basic distinguished scientific achievements of the world scientists-physicists in area of discovery and study of quantum-wave nature of physical processes and phenomena flowing in the microscopic world of circumferential people matter. Methodology. Scientific methods of collection, analysis and analytical treatment of scientific and technical information in area of theoretical and experimental physics, devoted the results of researches| of quantum and physical processes flowing in nature on atomic and subatomic levels. Results. The brief scientific and technical review of the basic scientific discovery and achievements of scientists-physicists is resulted in area of structure of atom of matter, generation, radiation, distribution and absorption of physical bodies of short-wave hertzian waves, indicative on a dominating role in the microscopic financial world of positions and conformities to the law of wave (by quantum mechanics, carrying especially probabilistic character a microstructure. Originality. Systematization is executed with exposition in the short concentrated form| of the known materials| on the quantum theory (electromagnetic of caloradiance, quantum theory of atom, electronic waves, quantum theory of actinoelectricity, quantum statistics of microparticless, quantum theory of the phenomenon superfluidity of liquid helium, quantum electronics and quantum-wave nature of drift of lone electrons in the metal of explorers with an electric current. Practical value. Popularization and deepening of fundamental physical and technical knowledges for students and engineer and technical specialists in area of classic and quantum physics, extending their scientific range of interests, and also support a further scientific study by them surrounding nature and to development of scientific and technical progress in society.

  14. Effect of light assisted collisions on matter wave coherence in superradiant Bose-Einstein condensates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampel, Nir Shlomo; Griesmaier, Axel Rudolf; Steenstrup, Mads Peter Hornbak;

    2012-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the effects of light assisted collisions on the coherence between momentum states in Bose-Einstein condensates. The onset of superradiant Rayleigh scattering serves as a sensitive monitor for matter-wave coherence. A subtle interplay of binary and collective effects...

  15. Dual matter-wave inertial sensors in weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Brynle; Antoni-Micollier, Laura; Chichet, Laure; Battelier, Baptiste; Lévèque, Thomas; Landragin, Arnaud; Bouyer, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    Quantum technology based on cold-atom interferometers is showing great promise for fields such as inertial sensing and fundamental physics. However, the finite free-fall time of the atoms limits the precision achievable on Earth, while in space interrogation times of many seconds will lead to unprecedented sensitivity. Here we realize simultaneous 87Rb-39K interferometers capable of operating in the weightless environment produced during parabolic flight. Large vibration levels (10-2 g Hz-1/2), variations in acceleration (0-1.8 g) and rotation rates (5° s-1) onboard the aircraft present significant challenges. We demonstrate the capability of our correlated quantum system by measuring the Eötvös parameter with systematic-limited uncertainties of 1.1 × 10-3 and 3.0 × 10-4 during standard- and microgravity, respectively. This constitutes a fundamental test of the equivalence principle using quantum sensors in a free-falling vehicle. Our results are applicable to inertial navigation, and can be extended to the trajectory of a satellite for future space missions.

  16. Comparison of atom interferometers and light interferometers as space-based gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G; Thorpe, J I

    2012-05-25

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational-wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, noninertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g., multiple-arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and, in principle, favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe.

  17. Comparison of Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers as Space-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe.

  18. P-wave holographic superconductor/insulator phase transitions affected by dark matter sector

    CERN Document Server

    Rogatko, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The holographic approach to building the p-wave superconductors results in three different models: the Maxwell-vector, the SU(2) Yang-Mills and the helical one. In the probe limit approximation, we analytically examine the properties of the first two models in the theory with {\\it dark matter} sector. It turns out that the effect of dark matter on the Maxwell-vector p-wave model is the same as on the s-wave superconductor studied earlier. For the non-Abelian model we study the phase transitions between p-wave holographic insulator/superconductor and metal/superconductor. Studies of marginally stable modes in the theory under consideration allow us to determine features of p-wave holographic droplet in a constant magnetic field. The superconducting transition temperature increases with the growth of the {\\it dark matter} sector coupling constant $\\alpha$, while the critical chemical potential $\\mu_c$ for the quantum phase transition between insulator and metal is a decreasing function of $\\alpha$.

  19. Acoustic omni meta-atom for decoupled access to all octants of a wave parameter space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Sukmo; Cho, Choonlae; Jeong, Jun-ho; Park, Namkyoo

    2016-01-01

    The common behaviour of a wave is determined by wave parameters of its medium, which are generally associated with the characteristic oscillations of its corresponding elementary particles. In the context of metamaterials, the decoupled excitation of these fundamental oscillations would provide an ideal platform for top–down and reconfigurable access to the entire constitutive parameter space; however, this has remained as a conceivable problem that must be accomplished, after being pointed out by Pendry. Here by focusing on acoustic metamaterials, we achieve the decoupling of density ρ, modulus B−1 and bianisotropy ξ, by separating the paths of particle momentum to conform to the characteristic oscillations of each macroscopic wave parameter. Independent access to all octants of wave parameter space (ρ, B−1, ξ)=(+/−,+/−,+/−) is thus realized using a single platform that we call an omni meta-atom; as a building block that achieves top–down access to the target properties of metamaterials. PMID:27687689

  20. Detecting the gravitational wave background from primordial black hole dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Clesse, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    The black hole merging rates inferred after the gravitational-wave detection by Advanced LIGO/VIRGO and the relatively high mass of the progenitors are consistent with models of dark matter made of massive primordial black holes (PBH). PBH binaries emit gravitational waves in a broad range of frequencies that will be probed by future space interferometers (LISA) and pulsar timing arrays (PTA). The amplitude of the stochastic gravitational-wave background expected for PBH dark matter is calculated taking into account various effects such as initial eccentricity of binaries, PBH velocities, mass distribution and clustering. It allows a detection by the LISA space interferometer, and possibly by the PTA of the SKA radio-telescope. Interestingly, one can distinguish this background from the one of non-primordial massive binaries through a specific frequency dependence, resulting from the maximal impact parameter of binaries formed by PBH capture, depending on the PBH velocity distribution and their clustering pro...

  1. Matter-wave dark solitons in box-like traps

    CERN Document Server

    Sciacca, M; Parker, N G

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the experimental development of quasi-homogeneous Bose-Einstein condensates confined in box-like traps, we study numerically the dynamics of dark solitons in such traps at zero temperature. We consider the cases where the side walls of the box potential rise either as a power-law or a Gaussian. While the soliton propagates through the homogeneous interior of the box without dissipation, it typically dissipates energy during a reflection from a wall through the emission of sound waves, causing a slight increase in the soliton's speed. We characterise this energy loss as a function of the wall parameters. Moreover, over multiple oscillations and reflections in the box-like trap, the energy loss and speed increase of the soliton can be significant, although the decay eventually becomes stabilized when the soliton equilibrates with the ambient sound field.

  2. Evanescent-wave trapping and evaporative cooling of an atomic gas near two-dimensionality

    CERN Document Server

    Hammes, M; Engeser, B; Nägerl, H C; Grimm, R

    2003-01-01

    A dense gas of cesium atoms at the crossover to two-dimensionality is prepared in a highly anisotropic surface trap that is realized with two evanescent light waves. Temperatures as low as 100nK are reached with 20.000 atoms at a phase-space density close to 0.1. The lowest quantum state in the tightly confined direction is populated by more than 60%. The system offers intriguing prospects for future experiments on degenerate quantum gases in two dimensions.

  3. Relative-intensity squeezing at audio frequencies using four-wave mixing in an atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    McCormick, C F; Lett, P D; Marino, A M

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of four-wave mixing in hot atomic vapor to generate up to -7.1 dB of measured relative-intensity squeezing. Due to its intrinsic simplicity, our system is strongly decoupled from environmental noise, and we observe more than -4 dB of squeezing down to frequencies as low as 5 kHz. This robust source of narrowband squeezed light may be useful for a variety of applications, such as coupling to atomic ensembles and enhancing the sensitivity of photothermal spectroscopy.

  4. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  5. Demonstration of atomic frequency comb memory for light with spin-wave storage

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We present a light-storage experiment in a praseodymium-doped crystal where the light is mapped onto an inhomogeneously broadened optical transition shaped into an atomic frequency comb. After absorption of the light the optical excitation is converted into a spin-wave excitation by a control pulse. A second control pulse reads the memory (on-demand) by reconverting the spin-wave excitation to an optical one, where the comb structure causes a photon-echo type rephasing of the dipole moments a...

  6. Distorted wave theories for dressed-ion-atom collisions with GSZ projectile potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, J M; Rivarola, R D [Instituto de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR) and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, IngenierIa y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Avenida Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Fainstein, P D, E-mail: monti@ifir-conicet.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de EnergIa Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2011-10-14

    The continuum distorted wave and the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state approximations for electron emission in ion-atom collisions are generalized to the case of dressed projectiles. The interaction between the dressed projectile and the active electron is represented by the analytic Green-Sellin-Zachor (GSZ) potential. Doubly differential cross sections as a function of the emitted electron energy and angle are computed. The region of the binary encounter peak is analysed in detail. Interference structures appear in agreement with the experimental data and are interpreted as arising from the coherent interference between short- and long-range scattering amplitudes.

  7. New prospects and techniques for matter wave interferometry with ions

    CERN Document Server

    Schütz, Georg; Pooch, Andreas; Schneeweiss, Philipp; Rauschenbeutel, Arno; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Stibor, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We present new developments and potential applications for the first ion-interferometer realized by Maier et al. [1-4], that verified at the end of the last century biprism interference and diffraction of 3 keV helium ions. The design of the setup is based on a coherent field emission source, an electrostatically charged biprism wire as a beam splitter and a multi-channel plate detector. However, due to deficiencies of the coherent ion source in the setup of Maier et al., the interference signal was low, therefore long integration times had to be accepted. In addition, the production of a significant uncharged particle radiation produced a high background intensity. The rest of the instrument proved to have excellent electron and ion optical properties and a high mechanical and electrical stability. Here we describe in detail the original setup and the major innovations to overcome the deficiencies. We introduce a novel single-atom metal tip [5] as a stable, coherent and monochromatic field emission ion sourc...

  8. Gravitational waves from dark matter collapse in a star

    CERN Document Server

    Kurita, Yasunari

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the collapse of clusters of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the core of a Sun-like star and the possible formation of mini-black holes and the emission of gravity waves. When the number of WIMPs is small, thermal pressure balances the WIMP cluster's self gravity. If the number of WIMPs is larger than a critical number, thermal pressure cannot balance gravity and the cluster contracts. If WIMPs are collisionless and bosonic, the cluster collapses directly to form a mini-black hole. For fermionic WIMPs, the cluster contracts until it is sustained by Fermi pressure, forming a small compact object. If the fermionic WIMP mass is smaller than $4\\times 10^2$ GeV, the radius of the compact object is larger than its Schwarzschild radius and Fermi pressure temporally sustains its self gravity, halting the formation of a black hole. If the fermionic WIMP mass is larger than $4\\times 10^2$ GeV, the radius is smaller than its Schwarzschild radius and the compact object becomes a mini-black h...

  9. Comparing Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry Approaches to Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Thorpe, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Thoroughly studied classic space-based gravitational-wave missions concepts such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) are based on laser-interferometry techniques. Ongoing developments in atom-interferometry techniques have spurred recently proposed alternative mission concepts. These different approaches can be understood on a common footing. We present an comparative analysis of how each type of instrument responds to some of the noise sources which may limiting gravitational-wave mission concepts. Sensitivity to laser frequency instability is essentially the same for either approach. Spacecraft acceleration reference stability sensitivities are different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but acceleration noise requirements are nonetheless similar. Each approach has distinct additional measurement noise issues.

  10. Statistical analysis of thermospheric gravity waves from Fabry-Perot Interferometer measurements of atomic oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. K. Ford

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Data from the Fabry-Perot Interferometers at KEOPS (Sweden, Sodankylä (Finland, and Svalbard (Norway, have been analysed for gravity wave activity on all the clear nights from 2000 to 2006. A total of 249 nights were available from KEOPS, 133 from Sodankylä and 185 from the Svalbard FPI. A Lomb-Scargle analysis was performed on each of these nights to identify the periods of any wave activity during the night. Comparisons between many nights of data allow the general characteristics of the waves that are present in the high latitude upper thermosphere to be determined. Comparisons were made between the different parameters: the atomic oxygen intensities, the thermospheric winds and temperatures, and for each parameter the distribution of frequencies of the waves was determined. No dependence on the number of waves on geomagnetic activity levels, or position in the solar cycle, was found. All the FPIs have had different detectors at various times, producing different time resolutions of the data, so comparisons between the different years, and between data from different sites, showed how the time resolution determines which waves are observed. In addition to the cutoff due to the Nyquist frequency, poor resolution observations significantly reduce the number of short-period waves (<1 h period that may be detected with confidence. The length of the dataset, which is usually determined by the length of the night, was the main factor influencing the number of long period waves (>5 h detected. Comparisons between the number of gravity waves detected at KEOPS and Sodankylä over all the seasons showed a similar proportion of waves to the number of nights used for both sites, as expected since the two sites are at similar latitudes and therefore locations with respect to the auroral oval, confirming this as a likely source region. Svalbard showed fewer waves with short periods than KEOPS data for a season when both had the same time resolution data

  11. Non-isentropic layers in matter behind shock and ramp compression waves

    CERN Document Server

    Khishchenko, Konstantin V

    2014-01-01

    According to the ideal fluid dynamics approach, the temperature and entropy values of a medium undergo a jump increase in the shock front as well as on contact interface between different materials after the shock wave propagation, but remain constant behind the shock front out of the contact interface. In the real condensed matter, the shock fronts and transition regions near the interfaces have finite thicknesses; therefore, the temperature field is disturbed around the interfaces. In this work, such disturbances are numerically analyzed for the problems of formation of the steady shock wave at impact and ramp loading of metals, reflection of the steady shock wave from a free surface, and the shock wave passing through the interface between two different materials. Theoretical analysis and computations show that the non-isentropic layers (the high-entropy ones with the increased temperature and the low-entropy ones with the decreased temperature) arise near the interfaces in the above problems of shock and ...

  12. Wave-atoms-based multipurpose scheme via perceptual image hashing and watermarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Fu, Qi-Kai; Cheng, Lee-Ming

    2012-09-20

    This paper presents a novel multipurpose scheme for content-based image authentication and copyright protection using a perceptual image hashing and watermarking strategy based on a wave atom transform. The wave atom transform is expected to outperform other transforms because it gains sparser expansion and better representation for texture than other traditional transforms, such as wavelet and curvelet transforms. Images are decomposed into multiscale bands with a number of tilings using the wave atom transform. Perceptual hashes are then extracted from the features of tiling in the third scale band for the purpose of content-based authentication; simultaneously, part of the selected hashes are designed as watermarks, which are embedded into the original images for the purpose of copyright protection. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme shows great performance in content-based authentication by distinguishing the maliciously attacked images from the nonmaliciously attacked images. Moreover, watermarks extracted from the proposed scheme also achieve high robustness against common malicious and nonmalicious image-processing attacks, which provides excellent copyright protection for images.

  13. Hydrogen atom wave function and eigen energy in the Rindler space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, De-Chang

    2016-10-01

    We study the hydrogen atom eigenstate energy and wave function in the Rindler space. The probability distribution is tilted because the electric field of the nucleus is no longer spherically symmetric. The hydrogen atom therefore cannot be treated exactly in the same way as what it is in an inertial frame. We also find that if the external force accelerates only the nucleus and then the nucleus accelerates its surrounding electrons through electromagnetic force, the electrons can tunnel through the local energy gap and split the hydrogen atom into an ion. This is similar to what one expects from the Stark effect. However, the critical acceleration is about 3 ×1022 m /s2. It is well beyond the gravitational acceleration on a regular star surface.

  14. Hydrogen atom wave function and eigen energy in the Rindler space

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, De-Chang

    2016-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom eigenstate energy and wave function in the Rindler space. The probability distribution is tilted because the electric field of the nucleus is no longer spherically symmetric. The hydrogen atom therefore cannot be treated exactly in the same way as what it is in an inertial frame. We also find that if the external force accelerates only the nucleus and then the nucleus accelerates its surrounding electrons through electromagnetic force, the electrons can tunnel through the local energy gap and split the hydrogen atom into an ion. This is similar to what one expects from the Stark effect. However, the critical acceleration is about $3\\times 10^{22} m/s^2$. It is well beyond the gravitational acceleration on a regular star surface.

  15. Non-Markovian dynamics in pulsed and continuous wave atom lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Breuer, H P; Kappler, B; Petruccione, F

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of atom lasers with a continuous output coupler based on two-photon Raman transitions is investigated. With the help of the time-convolutionless projection operator technique the quantum master equations for pulsed and continuous wave (cw) atom lasers are derived. In the case of the pulsed atom laser the power of the time-convolutionless projection operator technique is demonstrated through comparison with the exact solution. It is shown that in an intermediate coupling regime where the Born-Markov approximation fails the results of this algorithm agree with the exact solution. To study the dynamics of a continuous wave atom laser a pump mechanism is included in the model. Whereas the pump mechanism is treated within the Born-Markov approximation, the output coupling leads to non-Markovian effects. The solution of the master equation resulting from the time-convolutionless projection operator technique exhibits strong oscillations in the occupation number of the Bose-Einstein condensate. These os...

  16. Gravitational Wave Signatures of Dark Matter Sub-Millimeter Primordial Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Davoudiasl, Hooman

    2016-01-01

    We entertain the possibility that primordial black holes of mass $\\sim (10^{24} - 10^{26})$ g, with sub-millimeter Schwarzschild radii, constitute all or a significant fraction of cosmic dark matter, as allowed by various constraints. In case such primordial black holes get captured in orbits around neutron stars or astrophysical black holes in our galactic neighborhood, gravitational waves from the resulting "David & Goliath" binaries could be detectable at Advanced LIGO or Advanced Virgo from days to years, for a range of possible parameters. The proposed Einstein Telescope would further expand the reach for dark matter primordial black holes in this search mode.

  17. Aspects of the theory of atoms and coherent matter and their interaction with electromagnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, Halvor Moell

    2002-07-01

    In the present work I have outlined and contributed to the time-dependent theory of the interaction between atoms and electromagnetic fields and the theory of Bose-Einstein condensates. New numerical methods and algorithms have been developed and applied in practice. Calculations have exhibited certain new dynamical features. All these calculations are in a regime where the applied field is of the same magnitude as the atomic field. In the case of BEC we have investigated the use of time-dependent methods to calculate the excitation frequencies. We also investigated the possibility of nonlinear coupling for a scissors mode and found no such contributions to damping which is consistent with other studies . Special emphasis has also been paid to the gyroscopic motion of rotating BEC where several models were investigated. Briefly, the main conclusions are: (1) Rydberg wave packets appear for direct excitations of Rydberg atoms for long pulses. (2) The survival of just a few states is decided by symmetry of the Hamiltonian. (3) For few cycle intense pulses classical and quantum mechanics show remarkable similarity. (4) Time-dependent methods for finding excitation frequencies have been shown to be very efficient. (5) New dynamical features is shown in gyroscopic motion of BEC. (6) It was shown that no nonlinear mixing of scissors modes occur in the standard Gross-Pitaevskii regime. As mentioned in the introduction, this work is a part of very active research fields and new progress is constantly reported. Thus, the present work cannot be concluded as a closed loop. The fast development of grid based numerical solutions for atoms in intense fields will surely make great contribution to solve many of today's problems. It is a very important area of research to understand both nonperturbative atomic response and highly nonlinear optics. In the field of Bose-Einstein condensation the new experimental achievements constantly drive the field forward. The new

  18. Size Effects on Surface Elastic Waves in a Semi-Infinite Medium with Atomic Defect Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mirzade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates small-scale effects on the Rayleigh-type surface wave propagation in an isotopic elastic half-space upon laser irradiation. Based on Eringen’s theory of nonlocal continuum mechanics, the basic equations of wave motion and laser-induced atomic defect dynamics are derived. Dispersion equation that governs the Rayleigh surface waves in the considered medium is derived and analyzed. Explicit expressions for phase velocity and attenuation (amplification coefficients which characterize surface waves are obtained. It is shown that if the generation rate is above the critical value, due to concentration-elastic instability, nanometer sized ordered concentration-strain structures on the surface or volume of solids arise. The spatial scale of these structures is proportional to the characteristic length of defect-atom interaction and increases with the increase of the temperature of the medium. The critical value of the pump parameter is directly proportional to recombination rate and inversely proportional to deformational potentials of defects.

  19. Demonstration of atomic frequency comb memory for light with spin-wave storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzelius, Mikael; Usmani, Imam; Amari, Atia; Lauritzen, Björn; Walther, Andreas; Simon, Christoph; Sangouard, Nicolas; Minár, Jirí; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Gisin, Nicolas; Kröll, Stefan

    2010-01-29

    We present a light-storage experiment in a praseodymium-doped crystal where the light is mapped onto an inhomogeneously broadened optical transition shaped into an atomic frequency comb. After absorption of the light, the optical excitation is converted into a spin-wave excitation by a control pulse. A second control pulse reads the memory (on-demand) by reconverting the spin-wave excitation to an optical one, where the comb structure causes a photon-echo-type rephasing of the dipole moments and directional retrieval of the light. This combination of photon-echo and spin-wave storage allows us to store submicrosecond (450 ns) pulses for up to 20 mus. The scheme has a high potential for storing multiple temporal modes in the single-photon regime, which is an important resource for future long-distance quantum communication based on quantum repeaters.

  20. Entanglement of light-shift compensated atomic spin waves with telecom light

    CERN Document Server

    Dudin, Y O; Zhao, R; Blumoff, J Z; Kennedy, T A B; Kuzmich, A

    2010-01-01

    Entanglement of a 795 nm light polarization qubit and an atomic Rb spin wave qubit for a storage time of 0.1 s is observed by measuring the violation of Bell's inequality (S = 2.65 \\pm 0.12). Long qubit storage times are achieved by pinning the spin wave in a 1064 nm wavelength optical lattice, with a magic-valued magnetic field superposed to eliminate lattice-induced dephasing. Four-wave mixing in a cold Rb gas is employed to perform light qubit conversion between near infra red (795 nm) and telecom (1367 nm) wavelengths, and after propagation in a telecom fiber, to invert the conversion process. Observed Bell inequality violation (S = 2.66 \\pm 0.09), at 10 ms storage, confirms preservation of memory/light entanglement through the two stages of light qubit frequency conversion.

  1. Localization of Matter Fields in the 5D Standing Wave Braneworld

    CERN Document Server

    Gogberashvili, Merab

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the localization problem of matter fields within the 5D standing wave braneworld. In this model the brane emits anisotropic waves into the bulk with different amplitudes along different spatial dimensions. We show that in the case of increasing warp factor there exist the pure gravitational localization of all kinds of quantum and classical particles on the brane. For classical particles the anisotropy of the background metric is hidden, brane fields exhibit standard Lorentz symmetry in spite of anisotropic nature of the primordial 5D metric.

  2. Constraining the MIT Bag Model of Quark Matter with Gravitational Wave Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Benhar, O; Gualtieri, L; Marassi, S; Benhar, Omar; Ferrari, Valeria; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Marassi, Stefania

    2006-01-01

    Most theoretical studies of strange stars are based on the MIT bag model of quark matter, whose main parameter, the bag constant B, is only loosely constrained by phenomenology. We discuss the possibility that detection of gravitational waves emitted by a compact star may provide information on both the nature of the source and the value of B. Our results show that the combined knowledge of the frequency of the emitted gravitational wave and of the mass or the radiation radius of the source allows one to discriminate between strange stars and neutron stars and set stringent bounds on the bag constants.

  3. Gravitational wave generation by interaction of high power lasers with matter. Part II: Ablation and Piston models

    CERN Document Server

    Kadlecová, Hedvika; Weber, Stefan; Korn, Georg

    2016-01-01

    We analyze theoretical models of gravitational waves generation in the interaction of high intensity laser with matter, namely ablation and piston models. We analyse the generated gravitational waves in linear approximation of gravitational theory. We derive the analytical formulas and estimates for the metric perturbations and the radiated power of generated gravitational waves. Furthermore we investigate the characteristics of polarization and the behaviour of test particles in the presence of gravitational wave which will be important for the detection.

  4. Pairwise entanglement and readout of atomic-ensemble and optical wave-packet modes in traveling-wave Raman interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wasilewski, W; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    We analyze quantum entanglement of Stokes light and atomic electronic polarization excited during single-pass, linear-regime, stimulated Raman scattering in terms of optical wave-packet modes and atomic-ensemble spatial modes. The output of this process is confirmed to be decomposable into multiple discrete, bosonic mode pairs, each pair undergoing independent evolution into a two-mode squeezed state. For this we extend the Bloch-Messiah reduction theorem, previously known for discrete linear systems (S. L. Braunstein, Phys. Rev. A, vol. 71, 055801 (2005)). We present typical mode functions in the case of one-dimensional scattering in an atomic vapor. We find that in the absence of dispersion, one mode pair dominates the process, leading to a simple interpretation of entanglement in this continuous-variable system. However, many mode pairs are excited in the presence of dispersion-induced temporal walkoff of the Stokes, as witnessed by the photon-count statistics. We also consider the readout of the stored at...

  5. Atomic Hydrogen Gas in Dark-Matter Minihalos and the Compact High Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Sternberg, A; Wolfire, M G

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the coupled hydrostatic and ionization structures of pressure-supported gas clouds that are confined by gravitationally dominant dark-matter (DM) mini-halos and by an external bounding pressure provided by a hot medium. We focus on clouds that are photoionized and heated by the present-day background metagalactic field and determine the conditions for the formation of warm (WNM), and multi-phased (CNM/WNM) neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) cores in the DM-dominated clouds. We consider LCDM dark-matter halos, and we compute models for a wide range of halo masses, total cloud gas masses, and external bounding pressures. We present models for the pressure-supported HI structures observed in the Local Group dwarf galaxies Leo A and Sag DIG. We then construct minihalo models for the multi-phased (and low-metallicity) compact high-velocity HI clouds (CHVCs). If the CHVCs are drawn from the same family of halos that successfully reproduce the dwarf galaxy observations, then the CHVCs must be "circumgalactic ...

  6. Quantum molecular dynamics study of expanded beryllium: evolution from warm dense matter to atomic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dafang; Liu, Haitao; Zeng, Siliang; Wang, Cong; Wu, Zeqing; Zhang, Ping; Yan, Jun

    2014-07-31

    By performing quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, we investigate the equation of states, electrical and optical properties of the expanded beryllium at densities two to one-hundred lower than the normal solid density, and temperatures ranging from 5000 to 30000 K. With decreasing the density of Be, the optical response evolves from the one characteristic of a simple metal to the one of an atomic fluid. By fitting the optical conductivity spectra with the Drude-Smith model, it is found that the conducting electrons become localized at lower densities. In addition, the negative derivative of the electrical resistivity on temperature at density about eight lower than the normal solid density demonstrates that the metal to nonmetal transition takes place in the expanded Be. To interpret this transition, the electronic density of states is analyzed systematically. Furthermore, a direct comparison of the Rosseland opacity obtained by using QMD and the standard opacity code demonstrates that QMD provides a powerful tool to validate plasma models used in atomic physics approaches in the warm dense matter regime.

  7. Gravitational waves in Fully Constrained Formulation in a dynamical spacetime with matter content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero-Carrion, Isabel; Cerda-Duran, Pablo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741, Garching (Germany); Ibanez, Jose MarIa, E-mail: chabela@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: cerda@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: jose.m.ibanez@uv.es [Departamento de AstronomIa y Astrofisica, Universidad de Valencia, C/ Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-09-22

    We analyze numerically the behaviour of the hyperbolic sector of the Fully Constrained Formulation (FCF) (Bonazzola et al. 2004). The numerical experiments allow us to be confident in the performances of the upgraded version of the CoCoNuT code (Dimmelmeier et al. 2005) by replacing the Conformally Flat Condition (CFC), an approximation of Einstein equations, by FCF. First gravitational waves in FCF in a dynamical spacetime with matter content will be shown.

  8. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Intense shock waves and extreme states of matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortov, Vladimir E.

    2007-04-01

    The physical properties of hot dense matter over a broad domain of the phase diagram are of immediate interest in astrophysics, planetary physics, power engineering, controlled thermonuclear fusion, impulse technologies, enginery, and several special applications. The use of intense shock waves in dynamic physics and high-pressure chemistry has made the exotic high-energy-density states of matter a subject of laboratory experiments and enabled advancing by many orders of magnitude along the pressure scale to range into the megabars and even gigabars. The present report reviews the latest experimental research involving shock waves in nonideal plasmas under conditions of strong collective interparticle interaction. The results of investigations into the thermodynamic, transport, and optical properties of strongly compressed hot matter, as well as into its composition and conductivity, are discussed. Experimental techniques for high energy density cumulation, the drivers of intense shock waves, and methods for the fast diagnostics of high-energy plasma are considered. Also discussed are compression-stimulated physical effects: pressure-induced ionization, plasma phase transitions, the deformation of bound states, plasma blooming ('transparentization' of plasma), etc. Suggestions for future research are put forward.

  9. Goos-Hanchen-like shift of three-level matter wave incident on Raman beams

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Zhenglu; Hu, Liyun; Xu, XueXiang; Liu, Cunjin

    2013-01-01

    When a three-level atomic wavepacket is obliquely incident on a "edium slab" consisting of two far-detuned laser beams, there exists lateral shift between reflection and incident points at the surface of a "medium slab", analogous to optical Goos-Hanchen effect. We evaluate lateral shifts for reflected and transmitted waves via expansion of reflection and transmission coefficients, in contrast to the stationary phase method. Results show that lateral shifts can be either positive or negative ...

  10. P-wave Annihilating Dark Matter from a Decaying Predecessor and the Galactic Center Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Choquette, Jeremie; Cornell, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter (DM) annihilations have been widely studied as a possible explanation of excess gamma rays from the galactic center seen by Fermi/LAT. However most such models are in conflict with constraints from dwarf spheroidals. Motivated by this tension, we show that p-wave annihilating dark matter can easily accommodate both sets of observations due to the lower DM velocity dispersion in dwarf galaxies. Explaining the DM relic abundance is then challenging. We outline a scenario in which the usual thermal abundance is obtained through s-wave annihilations of a metastable particle, that eventually decays into the p-wave annihilating DM of the present epoch. The couplings and lifetime of the decaying particle are constrained by big bang nucleosynthesis, the cosmic microwave background and direct detection, but significant regions of parameter space are viable. A sufficiently large p-wave cross section can be found by annihilation into light mediators, that also give rise to Sommerfeld enhancement. A predictio...

  11. Fourth American Physical Society Topical Conference on Shock Waves in Condensed Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Shock Waves in Condensed Matter

    1986-01-01

    The Fourth American Physical Society Topical Conference on Shock Waves in Condensed Matter was held in Spokane, Washington, July 22-25, 1985. Two hundred and fifty scientists and engineers representing thirteen countries registered at the conference. The countries represented included the United States of America, Australia, Canada, The People's Repub­ lic of China, France, India, Israel, Japan, Republic of China (Taiwan), United Kingdom, U. S. S. R, Switzerland and West Germany. One hundred and sixty-two technical papers, cov­ ering recent developments in shock wave and high pressure physics, were presented. All of the abstracts have been published in the September 1985 issue of the Bulletin of the American Physical Society. The topical conferences, held every two years since 1979, have become the principal forum for shock wave studies in condensed materials. Both formal and informal technical discussions regarding recent developments conveyed a sense of excitement. Consistent with the past conferences, th...

  12. Using Concept Maps as Instructional Materials to Foster the Understanding of the Atomic Model and Matter-Energy Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Joana G.; Correia, Paulo R. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the use of concept maps (Cmaps) as instructional materials prepared by teachers, to foster the understanding of chemistry. We choose fireworks as a macroscopic event to teach basic chemical principles related to the Bohr atomic model and matter-energy interaction. During teachers' Cmap navigation, students can experience…

  13. Which One Is Better? Jigsaw II versus Jigsaw IV on the Subject of the Building Blocks of Matter and Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Hakan; Buyukaltay, Didem

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of using Jigsaw II and Jigsaw IV techniques on the subject of "Atoms-The Basic Unit of Matter" in science course of 6th grade on academic achievement was examined. Pre-test post-test control group research was used in the study. Study population is all secondary schools in Turgutlu district of Manisa province…

  14. Demonstration of a Sagnac-Type Cold Atom Interferometer with Stimulated Raman Transitions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ping; LI Run-Bing; YAN Hui; WANG Jin; ZHAN Ming-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    @@ Cold-matter-wave Sagnac interferometers possess many advantages over their thermal atomic beam counterparts when they are used as precise inertial sensors. We report a realization of a Sagnac-type interferometer with cold atoms.

  15. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  16. Rydberg Matter clusters of alkali metal atoms: the link between meteoritic matter, polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE), sporadic sodium layers, polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs, NLCs), and ion chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Olofson, Frans; Holmlid, Leif

    2010-01-01

    A material exists which links together the influx of meteoritic matter from interplanetary space, the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE), the sporadic sodium layers, the polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs, NLCs), and the observed ion chemistry in the mesosphere. The evidence in these research fields is here analyzed and found to agree well with the properties of Rydberg Matter (RM). This material has been studied with numerous methods in the laboratory. Alkali atoms, mainly Na, reach the mesosphere in the form of interplanetary (meteoritic, cometary) dust. The planar RM clusters NaN usually contain N = 19, 37 or 61 atoms, and have the density of air at 90 km altitude where they float. The diameters of the clusters are 10-100 nm from laboratory high precision radio frequency spectroscopic studies. Such experiments show that RM clusters interact strongly with radar frequencies: this explains the radio frequency heating and reflection studies of PMSE layers. The clusters give the low temperature in the mesosphere...

  17. Influence of laser power on deposition of the chromium atomic beam in laser standing wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional deposition of collimated Cr atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field with wavelength of 425.55 nm is examined from particle-optics approach by using an adaptive step size,fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm.The influence of laser power on deposition of atoms in laser standing wave is discussed and the simulative result shows that the FWHM of nanometer stripe is 102 nm and contrast is 2:1 with laser power equal to 3 mW,the FWHM is 1.2 nm and contrast is 32:1 with laser power equal to 16 mW,but with laser power increase,equal to 50 mW,the nonmeter structure forms the multi-crests and exacerbates.

  18. Simulation of Chromium Atom Deposition Pattern in a Gaussain Laser Standing Wave with Different Laser Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; ZHU Bao-Hua

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional deposition of a neutral chromium atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field is discussed by using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm. The deposition pattern of neutral chromium atoms in a laser standing wave with different laser power is discussed and the simulation result shows that the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of a nanometer stripe is 115nm and the contrast is 2.5:1 with laser power 3.93mW; the FWHM is 0.Snm and the contrast is 27:1 with laser power 16mW, the optimal laser power; but with laser power increasing to 50mW, the nanometer structure forms multi-crests and the quality worsens quickly with increasing laser power.

  19. Influence of laser power on deposition of the chromium atomic beam in laser standing wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG WenTao; ZHU BaoHua; ZHANG BaoWu; LI TongBao

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional deposition of collimated Cr atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field with wavelength of 425.55 nm is examined from particle-optics approach by using an adaptive step size, fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm. The influence of laser power on depo-sition of atoms in laser standing wave is discussed and the simulative result shows that the FWHM of nanometer stripe is 102 nm and contrast is 2:1 with laser power equal to 3 mW, the FWHM is 1.2 nm and contrast is 32:1 with laser power equal to 16 mW, but with laser power increase, equal to 50 mW, the nonmeter structure forms the multi-crests and exacerbates.

  20. Analytical study of four-wave mixing with large atomic coherence

    CERN Document Server

    Korsunsky, E A; Marangos, J P; Bergmann, K

    2002-01-01

    Four-wave mixing in resonant atomic vapors based on maximum coherence induced by Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP) is investigated theoretically. We show the advantages of a coupling scheme involving maximum coherence and demonstrate how a large atomic coherence between a ground and an highly excited state can be prepared by SCRAP. Full analytic solutions of the field propagation problem taking into account pump field depletion are derived. The solutions are obtained with the help of an Hamiltonian approach which in the adiabatic limit permits to reduce the full set of Maxwell-Bloch equations to simple canonical equations of Hamiltonian mechanics for the field variables. It is found that the conversion efficiency reached is largely enhanced if the phase mismatch induced by linear refraction is compensated. A detailed analysis of the phase matching conditions shows, however, that the phase mismatch contribution from the Kerr effect cannot be compensated simultaneously with linear refraction contrib...

  1. A Measurement of Atomic X-ray Yields in Exotic Atoms and Implications for an Antideuteron-Based Dark Matter Search

    CERN Document Server

    Aramaki, T; Craig, W W; Fabris, L; Gahbauer, F; Hailey, C J; Koglin, J E; Madden, N; Mori, K; Yu, H T; Ziock, K P

    2013-01-01

    The General AntiParticle Spectrometer (GAPS) is a novel approach for indirect dark matter searches that exploits cosmic antideuterons. GAPS utilizes a distinctive detection method using atomic X-rays and charged particles from the exotic atom as well as the timing, stopping range and dE/dX energy deposit of the incoming particle, which provides excellent antideuteron identification. Prior to the future balloon experiment, an accelerator test was conducted in 2004 and 2005 at KEK, Japan, in order to precisely measure the X-ray yields of antiprotonic exotic atoms formed with different target materials. The X-ray yields of the exotic atoms with Al and S targets were obtained as $\\sim$ 75%, which are higher than were previously assumed in. A simple, but comprehensive cascade model has been developed not only to evaluate the measurement results but also to predict the X-ray yields of the exotic atoms formed with any materials in the GAPS instrument. The cascade model is extendable to any kind of exotic atom (any n...

  2. Photoionization microscopy of the lithium atom: Wave-function imaging of quasibound and continuum Stark states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S.; Harb, M. M.; Ollagnier, A.; Robicheaux, F.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Barillot, T.; Lépine, F.; Bordas, C.

    2016-07-01

    Photoionization of an atom in the presence of a uniform static electric field provides the unique opportunity to expand and visualize the atomic wave function at a macroscopic scale. In a number of seminal publications dating back to the 1980s, Fabrikant, Demkov, Kondratovich, and Ostrovsky showed that this goal could be achieved by projecting slow (meV) photoionized electrons onto a position-sensitive detector and underlined the distinction between continuum and resonant contributions. The uncovering of resonant signatures was achieved fairly recently in experiments on the nonhydrogenic lithium atoms [Cohen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 183001 (2013)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.183001. The purpose of the present article is the general description of these findings, with emphasis on the various manifestations of resonant character. From this point of view, lithium has been chosen as an illustrative example between the two limiting cases of hydrogen, where resonance effects are more easily identified, and heavy atoms like xenon, where resonant effects were not observed.

  3. Two-atom energy spectrum in a harmonic trap near a Feshbach resonance at higher partial waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akira; Liang, Yi; Bhaduri, Rajat K.

    2009-09-01

    Two atoms in an optical lattice may be made to interact strongly at higher partial waves near a Feshbach resonance. These atoms, under appropriate constraints, could be bosonic or fermionic. The universal l=2 energy spectrum for such a system, with a caveat, is presented in this paper and checked with the spectrum obtained by direct numerical integration of the Schrödinger equation. The results reported here extend those of Yip for p -wave resonance [S.-K. Yip, Phys. Rev. A 78, 013612 (2008)], while exploring the limitations of a universal expression for the spectrum for the higher partial waves.

  4. Observation of four-wave mixing in caesium atoms using a noncycling transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Li-Rong; Ma Jie; Zhao Jian-Ming; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the generation of four-wave mixing (FWM) signal using a noncycling transition of caesium atoms is investigated when the pumping laser is locked to the transition 6S1/2F = 4 → 6P3/2F' = 4, and meanwhile the probe frequency is scanned across the 6S1/2F = 4 → 6P3/2 transition. The efficiency of the four-wave mixing signal as a function of the intensity of the pumping beams and the detuning of the pumping beams is also studied. In order to increase the detection efficiency, a repumping laser which is resonant with 6S1/2F = 3 → 6P3/2F' = 4 transition is used. A theoretical model is also introduced, and the theoretical results are in qualitative agreement with experimental ones.

  5. Atom-field entanglement in the Jaynes Cummings model without rotating wave approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Mirzaee; M. Batavani

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a structure for obtaining the exact eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the Jaynes–Cummings model (JCM) without the rotating wave approximation (RWA). We study the evolution of the system in the strong coupling region using the time evolution operator without RWA. The entanglement of the system without RWA is investigated using the Von Neumann entropy as an entanglement measure. It is interesting that in the weak coupling regime, the population of the atomic levels and Von Neumann entropy without RWA model shows a good agreement with the RWA whereas in strong coupling domain, the results of these two models are quite different.

  6. Partial Wave Cross Sections for Collisions between Helium Atoms and Hydrogen Halide Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Chun-Ri; CHENG Xin-Lu; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2007-01-01

    The close-coupling method is utilized to calculate partial cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering of He atoms with HX (X=F, Cl, Br) molecule based on the CCSD (T) potential energy surfaces obtained in the previous research. The calculation is performed at the incident energy of 200 me V. The rationality of our results has been confirmed by comparison with the available theoretical results. The tendency of the elastic and inelastic rotational excitation partial wave cross sections varying with the reduced mass of the three systems is obtained.

  7. Shock wave propagation in semi-crystalline polyethylene: An atomic-scale investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Robert M.; O'Connor, Thomas C.; Yeh, In-Chul; Chantawansri, Tanya L.; Sirk, Timothy W.; Robbins, Mark O.; Andzelm, Jan W.

    Highly oriented polyethylene (PE) fibers are used in protection applications, therefore elucidation of their response under high strain-rate impact events is vital. Although PE fibers can have high crystallinity (>95%), they also contain defects such as amorphous domains. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate shock propagation through crystalline, amorphous, and semi-crystalline PE. We generate compressive shock waves of varying strength, quantify their dynamics, and characterize their effect on material properties at the atomic scale. In the semi-crystalline PE model, the differing density and molecular order of amorphous PE and crystalline PE result in differing shock impedances, which causes reflection and refraction of shock waves at interfaces between the phases. We quantify the properties (e.g. pressure, velocity) of the reflected and refracted waves, which differ from those of the incident wave, and compare with results from impedance matching. We also examine the reflection, absorption, and transmission of energy at the crystalline-amorphous interface. Depending on shock strength, amorphous defects can dissipate shock energy, which attenuates the shock and leads to effects such as localized heating.

  8. Subshell fitting of relativistic atomic core electron densities for use in QTAIM analyses of ECP-based wave functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Todd A; Frisch, Michael J

    2011-11-17

    Scalar-relativistic, all-electron density functional theory (DFT) calculations were done for free, neutral atoms of all elements of the periodic table using the universal Gaussian basis set. Each core, closed-subshell contribution to a total atomic electron density distribution was separately fitted to a spherical electron density function: a linear combination of s-type Gaussian functions. The resulting core subshell electron densities are useful for systematically and compactly approximating total core electron densities of atoms in molecules, for any atomic core defined in terms of closed subshells. When used to augment the electron density from a wave function based on a calculation using effective core potentials (ECPs) in the Hamiltonian, the atomic core electron densities are sufficient to restore the otherwise-absent electron density maxima at the nuclear positions and eliminate spurious critical points in the neighborhood of the atom, thus enabling quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses to be done in the neighborhoods of atoms for which ECPs were used. Comparison of results from QTAIM analyses with all-electron, relativistic and nonrelativistic molecular wave functions validates the use of the atomic core electron densities for augmenting electron densities from ECP-based wave functions. For an atom in a molecule for which a small-core or medium-core ECPs is used, simply representing the core using a simplistic, tightly localized electron density function is actually sufficient to obtain a correct electron density topology and perform QTAIM analyses to obtain at least semiquantitatively meaningful results, but this is often not true when a large-core ECP is used. Comparison of QTAIM results from augmenting ECP-based molecular wave functions with the realistic atomic core electron densities presented here versus augmenting with the limiting case of tight core densities may be useful for diagnosing the reliability of large-core ECP models in

  9. Diffuse interstellar bands (DIB): co-planar doubly excited He and metal atoms embedded in Rydberg Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Holmlid, Leif

    2011-01-01

    The interpretation of the more than 300 diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) is one of the most long-standing problems in interstellar spectra since the two first bands were reported in 1921. We now predict the frequencies of 260 diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) using the Rydberg Matter model we have developed previously. These transitions involve mainly He atoms, but other two-electron atoms like Ca and other metals can take part in the absorption processes. Approximately 70% of the total intensity of the DIBs is due to absorption in doubly excited states and 30% in singly excited He atoms. The doubly excited states are in inverted states while the He atoms are thermal. The possibilities to observe DIBs in the UV and NIR ranges are discussed and band positions are predicted.

  10. Finite nuclear size and Lamb shift of p-wave atomic states

    CERN Document Server

    Milstein, A I; Terekhov, I S

    2003-01-01

    We consider corrections to the Lamb shift of p-wave atomic states due to the finite nuclear size (FNS). In other words, these are radiative corrections to the atomic isotop shift related to FNS. It is shown that the structure of the corrections is qualitatively different from that for s-wave states. The perturbation theory expansion for the relative correction for a $p_{1/2}$-state starts from $\\alpha\\ln(1/Z\\alpha)$-term, while for $s_{1/2}$-states it starts from $Z\\alpha^2$ term. Here $\\alpha$ is the fine structure constant and $Z$ is the nuclear charge. In the present work we calculate the $\\alpha$-terms for $2p$-states, the result for $2p_{1/2}$-state reads $(8\\alpha/9\\pi)[\\ln(1/(Z\\alpha)^2)+0.710]$. Even more interesting are $p_{3/2}$-states. In this case the ``correction'' is by several orders of magnitude larger than the ``leading'' FNS shift.

  11. Quantum correlations by four-wave-mixing in atomic vapor. Theory and Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Glorieux, Quentin

    2011-01-01

    We study both theoretically and experimentally the generation of quantum correlations in the continuous variable regime by way of four-wave mixing in a hot atomic vapor. Two theoretical approaches have been developed. On one side, we study the four-wave mixing under the "classical" non-linear optics point of view. In such a way we obtain the evolution equation for an ideal linear amplifier in a {\\chi}^(3) medium. On the other side, we present a microscopic model with 4 levels in the double-{\\Lambda} configuration to calculate the {\\chi}^(3) coefficient in a atomic vapor dressed with a laser. This calculation allows us to derive the spectra of intensity noise for interesting parameters. The experimental part of this work describes the demonstration of this effect on the D1 line of rubidium 85. We present a measurement of relative intensity squeezing as high as -9.2dB below the standard quantum limit, and an original regime where quantum correlations have been measured without amplification.These results have b...

  12. A unified explanation for dark matter and electroweak baryogenesis with direct detection and gravitational wave signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chala, Mikael [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Nardini, Germano [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Sobolev, Ivan [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. for Nuclear Research; Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Particle Physics and Cosmology

    2016-05-15

    A minimal extension of the Standard Model that provides both a dark matter candidate and a strong first-order electroweak phase transition (EWPT) consists of two additional Lorentz and gauge singlets. In this paper we work out a composite Higgs version of this scenario, based on the coset SO(7)/SO(6). We show that by embedding the elementary fermions in appropriate representations of SO(7), all dominant interactions are described by only three free effective parameters. Within the model dependencies of the embedding, the theory predicts one of the singlets to be stable and responsible for the observed dark matter abundance. At the same time, the second singlet introduces new CP-violation phases and triggers a strong first-order EWPT, making electroweak baryogenesis feasible. It turns out that this scenario does not conflict with current observations and it is promising for solving the dark matter and baryon asymmetry puzzles. The tight predictions of the model will be accessible at the forthcoming dark matter direct detection and gravitational wave experiments.

  13. Unified explanation for dark matter and electroweak baryogenesis with direct detection and gravitational wave signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chala, Mikael; Nardini, Germano; Sobolev, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    A minimal extension of the Standard Model that provides both a dark matter candidate and a strong first-order electroweak phase transition (EWPT) consists of two additional Lorentz and gauge singlets. In this paper we work out a composite Higgs version of this scenario, based on the coset S O (7 )/S O (6 ). We show that by embedding the elementary fermions in appropriate representations of S O (7 ), all dominant interactions are described by only three free effective parameters. Within the model dependencies of the embedding, the theory predicts one of the singlets to be stable and responsible for the observed dark matter abundance. At the same time, the second singlet introduces new C P -violation phases and triggers a strong first-order EWPT, making electroweak baryogenesis feasible. It turns out that this scenario does not conflict with current observations and it is promising for solving the dark matter and baryon asymmetry puzzles. The tight predictions of the model will be accessible at the forthcoming dark matter direct detection and gravitational wave experiments.

  14. Gravitational Waves as a New Probe of Bose-Einstein Condensate Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, P S Bhupal; Ohmer, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    There exists a class of ultralight Dark Matter (DM) models which could form a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the early universe and behave as a single coherent wave instead of individual particles in galaxies. We show that a generic BEC DM halo intervening along the line of sight of a gravitational wave (GW) signal could induce an observable change in the speed of GW, with the effective refractive index depending only on the mass and self-interaction of the constituent DM particles and the GW frequency. Hence, we propose to use the deviation in the speed of GW as a new probe of the BEC DM parameter space. With a multi-messenger approach to GW astronomy and/or with extended sensitivity to lower GW frequencies, the entire BEC DM parameter space can be effectively probed by our new method in the near future.

  15. Schematic way to find solution of the outcoupled matter wave with a source term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayitno, T. B. [Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Universitas Negeri Jakarta, Jl. Pemuda Rawamangun No. 10, Jakarta, 13220 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09

    We propose a schematic way to obtain solution of the outcoupled atom laser beam wave function in the presence of a source term where the beam is influenced by gravity. In this case, we only focus on the external potentials inside the region of Bose-Einstein condensate that are generated by electromagnetic source and gravity. Since the evolution of the atom laser beam can be portrayed through the ordinary Schrödinger equation with a source, we are allowed to express the general solution as the superposition of the homogeneous solution and particular solution. With the given external potentials and ansatz solutions, we attain that the obtained energy depends on the parameter constituting to the ratio between the longitudinal frequency and transverse frequency.

  16. The importance of being atomic: Ecological invasions as random walks instead of waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reluga, Timothy C

    2016-12-01

    Invasions are one of the most easily identified spatial phenomena in ecology, and have inspired a rich variety of theories for ecologists' and naturalists' consideration. However, a number of arguments over the sensitivities of invasion rates to stochasticity, density-dependence, dimension, and discreteness persist in the literature. The standard mathematical approach to invasions is based on Fisher's analysis of traveling waves solutions for the spread of an advantageous allele. In this paper, we exploit an alternative theory based on Ellner's premise that species invasions are best interpreted not as waves, but as random walks, and that the discreteness of living organisms is fundamentally important. Using a density-dependent invasion model in a stationary environment with indivisible (atomic) individuals where reproduction and dispersal are stochastic and independent, we show 4 key properties of Ellner's invasions previously suggested by simulation analysis: (1) greater spatial dispersal stochasticity quickens invasions, (2) greater demographic stochasticity slows invasions, (3) negative density-dependence slows invasions, and (4) greater temporal dispersal stochasticity quickens invasions. We prove the first three results by using generating functions and stochastic-dominance methods to rank furthest-forward dispersal distributions. The fourth result is proven in the special case of atomless theory, but remains an open conjecture in atomic theory. In addition, we explain why, unlike atomless invasions, an infinitely wide atomic invasion in two-dimensions can travel faster than a finite-width invasion and a one-dimensional invasion. The paper concludes with a classification of invasion dynamics based on dispersal kernel tails.

  17. Low Frequency Gravitational Wave Detection With Ground Based Atom Interferometer Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Chaibi, W; Canuel, B; Bertoldi, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new detection strategy for gravitational waves (GWs) below few Hertz based on a correlated array of atom interferometers (AIs). Our proposal allows to reduce the Newtonian Noise (NN) which limits all ground based GW detectors below few Hertz, including previous atom interferometry-based concepts. Using an array of long baseline AI gradiometers yields several estimations of the NN, whose effect can thus be reduced via statistical averaging. Considering the km baseline of current optical detectors, a NN rejection of factor 2 could be achieved, and tested with existing AI array geometries. Exploiting the correlation properties of the gravity acceleration noise, we show that a 10-fold or more NN rejection is possible with a dedicated configuration. Considering a conservative NN model and the current developments in cold atom technology, we show that strain sensitivities below $1\\times 10^{-19}/ \\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ in the $ 0.3-3 \\ \\text{Hz}$ frequency band can be within reach, with a peak sensitivity o...

  18. Comparison between two models of absorption of matter waves by a thin time-dependent barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Maximilien; Beau, Mathieu; Goussev, Arseni

    2015-11-01

    We report a quantitative, analytical, and numerical comparison between two models of the interaction of a nonrelativistic quantum particle with a thin time-dependent absorbing barrier. The first model represents the barrier by a set of time-dependent discontinuous matching conditions, which are closely related to Kottler boundary conditions used in stationary-wave optics as a mathematical basis for Kirchhoff diffraction theory. The second model mimics the absorbing barrier with an off-diagonal δ potential with a time-dependent amplitude. We show that the two models of absorption agree in their predictions in a semiclassical regime, the regime readily accessible in modern experiments with ultracold atoms.

  19. Atomization off thin water films generated by high-frequency substrate wave vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Manor, Ofer; Winkler, Andreas; Schmidt, Hagen; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2012-11-01

    Generating aerosol droplets via the atomization of thin aqueous films with high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) offers several advantages over existing nebulization methods, particularly for pulmonary drug delivery, offering droplet sizes in the 1-5-μm range ideal for effective pulmonary therapy. Nevertheless, the physics underlying SAW atomization is not well understood, especially in the context of thin liquid film formation and spreading and how this affects the aerosol production. Here, we demonstrate that the film geometry, governed primarily by the applied power and frequency of the SAW, indeed plays a crucial role in the atomization process and, in particular, the size of the atomized droplets. In contrast to the continuous spreading of low surface energy liquids atop similar platforms, high surface energy liquids such as water, in the present case, are found to undergo transient spreading due to the SAW to form a quasisteady film whose height is determined by self-selection of the energy minimum state associated with the acoustic resonance in the film and whose length arises from a competition between acoustic streaming and capillary effects. This is elucidated from a fundamental model for the thin film spreading behavior under SAW excitation, from which we show good agreement between the experimentally measured and theoretically predicted droplet dimension, both of which consistently indicate a linear relationship between the droplet diameter and the mechanical power coupled into the liquid by the SAW (the latter captured by an acoustic Weber number to the two thirds power, and the reciprocal of the SAW frequency).

  20. Dicke-Narrowing Spectroscopy of Doubly Dressed Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Singly Dressed Four-Wave-Mixing in a Confined Atomic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuan-Yuan; BAI Jin-Wao; LI-Li; ZHANG Wei-Feng; LI Chang-Biao; NIE Zhi-Qiang; GAN Chen-Li; ZHANG Yan-Peng

    2008-01-01

    Dicke-narrowing effect appears both in doubly dressed electromagnetically induced transparency and singly dressed four-wave-mixing lines due to the contribution of slow atoms resulting from de-excited effects of atom-wall collision and transient behaviour of atoms in a confined system. A robust recipe for high resolution spectroscopy of electromagnetically induced transparency dressed by two fields and four-wave-mixing lines comparable with the cold atoms is achievable in a thin vapour cell in experiments.

  1. Probing the properties of quantum matter; an experimental study in three parts using ultracold atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bons, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    The three experiments described in this thesis investigate fundamental properties of ultracold atoms. Using laser cooling and evaporative cooling, a dilute gas of sodium atoms is cooled to ~100 nK. Under these circumstances a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) forms, where millions of atoms collapse int

  2. Enhanced harmonic generation and wave-mixing via two-color multiphoton excitation of atoms/molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Avetissian, H K; Mkrtchian, G F

    2016-01-01

    We consider harmonics generation and wave-mixing by two-color multi photon resonant excitation of three-level atoms/molecules in strong laser fields. The coherent part of the spectra corresponding to multicolor harmonics generation is investigated. The obtained analytical results on the basis of generalized rotating wave approximation are in a good agreement with numerical calculations. The results applied to the hydrogen atom and homonuclear diatomic molecular ion show that one can achieve efficient generation of moderately high multicolor harmonics via multiphoton resonant excitation by appropriate laser pulses.

  3. Searching for an Oscillating Massive Scalar Field as a Dark Matter Candidate Using Atomic Hyperfine Frequency Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, A; Guéna, J; Abgrall, M; Bize, S; Wolf, P

    2016-08-05

    We use 6 yrs of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual rubidium and caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions, and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the rubidium/caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but provide improved constraints on the coupling of the putative scalar field to standard matter. Our limits are complementary to previous results that were only sensitive to the fine structure constant and improve them by more than an order of magnitude when only a coupling to electromagnetism is assumed.

  4. Searching for an oscillating massive scalar field as a dark matter candidate using atomic hyperfine frequency comparisons

    CERN Document Server

    Hees, A; Abgrall, M; Bize, S; Wolf, P

    2016-01-01

    We use six years of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual Rubidium and Caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the Rubidium/Caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but provide improved constraints on the coupling of the putative scalar field to standard matter. Our limits are complementary to previous results that were only sensitive to the fine-structure constant, and improve them by more than an order of magnitude when only a coupling to electromagnetism is assumed.

  5. Searching for an Oscillating Massive Scalar Field as a Dark Matter Candidate Using Atomic Hyperfine Frequency Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, A.; Guéna, J.; Abgrall, M.; Bize, S.; Wolf, P.

    2016-08-01

    We use 6 yrs of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual rubidium and caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions, and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the rubidium/caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but provide improved constraints on the coupling of the putative scalar field to standard matter. Our limits are complementary to previous results that were only sensitive to the fine structure constant and improve them by more than an order of magnitude when only a coupling to electromagnetism is assumed.

  6. Atomic ionization by sterile-to-active neutrino conversion and constraints on dark matter sterile neutrinos with germanium detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Chi, Hsin-Chang; Lin, Shin-Ted; Liu, C.-P.; Singh, Lakhwinder; Wong, Henry T.; Wu, Chih-Liang; Wu, Chih-Pan

    2016-05-01

    The transition magnetic moment of a sterile neutrino can give rise to its conversion to an active neutrino through radiative decay or nonstandard interaction (NSI) with matter. For sterile neutrinos of keV-mass as dark matter candidates, their decay signals are actively searched for in cosmic x-ray spectra. In this work, we consider the NSI that leads to atomic ionization, which can be detected by direct dark matter experiments. It is found that this inelastic scattering process for a nonrelativistic sterile neutrino has a pronounced enhancement in the differential cross section at energy transfer about half of its mass, manifesting experimentally as peaks in the measurable energy spectra. The enhancement effects gradually smear out as the sterile neutrino becomes relativistic. Using data taken with low-threshold low-background germanium detectors, constraints on sterile neutrino mass and its transition magnetic moment are derived and compared with those from astrophysical observations.

  7. Evolution of the wave function of an atom hit by a photon in a three-grating interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenovic, Dusan; Bozic, Mirjana [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Sanz, Angel S [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Davidovic, Milena [Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar Kralja Aleksandra 73, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)], E-mail: arsenovic@phy.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: bozic@phy.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: asanz@imaff.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: milena@grf.bg.ac.yu

    2009-07-15

    In 1995, Chapman et al (1995 Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 2783) showed experimentally that the interference contrast in a three-grating atom interferometer does not vanish in the presence of scattering events with photons, as required by the complementarity principle. In this work, we present an analytical study of this experiment by determining the evolution of an atom's wave function along the three-grating Mach-Zehnder interferometer under the assumption that the atom is hit by a photon after passing through the first grating. The consideration of a transverse wave function in momentum representation is essential in this study. As is shown, the number of atoms transmitted through the third grating is given by a simple periodic function of the lateral shift along this grating, both in the absence and in the presence of photon scattering. Moreover, the relative contrast (laser on/laser off) is shown to be a simple analytical function of the ratio d{sub p}/{lambda}{sub i}, where d{sub p} is the distance between atomic paths at the scattering locus and {lambda} {sub i} the scattered photon wavelength. We argue that this dependence, being in agreement with experimental results, can be considered as showing compatibility between the wave and corpuscle properties of atoms.

  8. Output Rate of Atomic Four-Wave Mixing in Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-Hua; LI Wei-Bing; PENG Ju-Cun

    2004-01-01

    In this letter, following the proposal of Heurich et al. [Phys. Rev. A63 (2001) 033605], we analyze and discuss output rate of atomic four-wave mixing in the two-component Bose-Einstein condensate under the condition of the steady state. The results show that the magnitude of the signal beam increases with the increase of the intensity of the probe beam, up to a saturated value, then it decreases as the probe beam increases. The influence of the interaction range on the signal beam is also predicted. In particular, it is worth while pointing out that in contrast to the previous solutions, our obtained analytical solutions are of very simple and explicit forms, which open the door for further investigating the related physical mechanisms.

  9. Continuous-wave, single-frequency 229 nm laser source for laser cooling of cadmium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneda, Yushi; Merzlyak, Yevgeny; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayashida, Keitaro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Continuous-wave output at 229 nm for the application of laser cooling of Cd atoms was generated by the 4th harmonic using two successive second harmonic generation stages. Employing a single-frequency optically pumped semiconductor laser as a fundamental source, 0.56 W of output at 229 nm was observed with a 10-mm long, Brewster-cut BBO crystal in an external cavity with 1.62 W of 458 nm input. Conversion efficiency from 458 nm to 229 nm was more than 34%. By applying a tapered amplifier as a fundamental source, we demonstrated magneto-optical trapping of all stable Cd isotopes including isotopes $^{111}$Cd and $^{113}$Cd, which are applicable to optical lattice clocks.

  10. Tunneling wave packets of atoms from intense elliptically polarized fields in natural geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Meng; Li, Min; Liu, Ming-Ming; Liu, Yunquan

    2017-02-01

    We study strong-field tunneling of atoms in intense elliptically polarized laser fields in natural tunneling geometry. We obtain the temporal- and spatial-dependent tunneling ionization rates, the transverse and longitudinal momentum distributions, and the position distributions of the tunnel exit in parabolic coordinates. The tunneling electron wave packets at the tunnel exit are three dimensionally characterized for both momentum and spatial distributions. The conjunction between the tunneling point and the classical propagation of the widely used semiclassical model are naturally connected. We further calculate the ellipticity-dependent photoelectron momentum distributions on the detector, which are validated by comparison with the exact results through numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The theory clarifies crucial questions about strong-field tunneling ionization, which has important implications for the attoclock with elliptical or circular fields, photoelectron holography, molecular orbital imaging, etc.

  11. Complex wave-interference phenomena: From the atomic nucleus to mesoscopic systems to microwave cavities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pier A Mello

    2001-02-01

    Universal statistical aspects of wave scattering by a variety of physical systems ranging from atomic nuclei to mesoscopic systems and microwave cavities are described. A statistical model for the scattering matrix is employed to address the problem of quantum chaotic scattering. The model, introduced in the past in the context of nuclear physics, discusses the problem in terms of a prompt and an equilibrated component: it incorporates the average value of the scattering matrix to account for the prompt processes and satisfies the requirements of flux conservation, causality and ergodicity. The main application of the model is the analysis of electronic transport through ballistic mesoscopic cavities: it describes well the results from the numerical solutions of the Schrödinger equation for two-dimensional cavities.

  12. Improved spacecraft radio science using an on-board atomic clock: application to gravitational wave searches

    CERN Document Server

    Tinto, Massimo; Prestage, John D; Armstrong, J W

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in space-qualified atomic clocks (low-mass, low power-consumption, frequency stability comparable to that of ground-based clocks) can enable interplanetary spacecraft radio science experiments at unprecedented Doppler sensitivities. The addition of an on-board digital receiver would allow the up- and down-link Doppler frequencies to be measured separately. Such separate, high-quality measurements allow optimal data combinations that suppress the currently-leading noise sources: phase scintillation noise from the Earth's atmosphere and Doppler noise caused by mechanical vibrations of the ground antenna. Here we provide a general expression for the optimal combination of ground and on-board Doppler data and compute the sensitivity such a system would have to low-frequency gravitational waves (GWs). Assuming a plasma scintillation noise calibration comparable to that already demonstrated with the multi-link CASSINI radio system, the space-clock/digital-receiver instrumentation enhancements would ...

  13. Matter-wave laser Interferometric Gravitation Antenna (MIGA): New perspectives for fundamental physics and geosciences

    CERN Document Server

    Geiger, R; Bertoldi, A; Canuel, B; Chaibi, W; Danquigny, C; Dutta, I; Fang, B; Gaffet, S; Gillot, J; Holleville, D; Landragin, A; Merzougui, M; Riou, I; Savoie, D; Bouyer, P

    2015-01-01

    The MIGA project aims at demonstrating precision measurements of gravity with cold atom sensors in a large scale instrument and at studying the associated powerful applications in geosciences and fundamental physics. The firt stage of the project (2013-2018) will consist in building a 300-meter long optical cavity to interrogate atom interferometers and will be based at the low noise underground laboratory LSBB based in Rustrel, France. The second stage of the project (2018-2023) will be dedicated to science runs and data analyses in order to probe the spatio-temporal structure of the local gravity field of the LSBB region, which represents a generic site of hydrological interest. MIGA will also assess future potential applications of atom interferometry to gravitational wave detection in the frequency band 0.1-10 Hz hardly covered by future long baseline optical interferometers. This paper presents the main objectives of the project, the status of the construction of the instrument and the motivation for the...

  14. Bilayer honeycomb lattice with ultracold atoms: Multiple Fermi surfaces and incommensurate spin density wave instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Santanu; Sensarma, Rajdeep

    2016-12-01

    We propose an experimental setup using ultracold atoms to implement a bilayer honeycomb lattice with Bernal stacking. In the presence of a potential bias between the layers and at low densities, fermions placed in this lattice form an annular Fermi sea. The presence of two Fermi surfaces leads to interesting patterns in Friedel oscillations and RKKY interactions in the presence of impurities. Furthermore, a repulsive fermion-fermion interaction leads to a Stoner instability towards an incommensurate spin density wave order with a wave vector equal to the thickness of the Fermi sea. The instability occurs at a critical interaction strength which goes down with the density of the fermions. We find that the instability survives interaction renormalization due to vertex corrections and discuss how this can be seen in experiments. We also track the renormalization group flows of the different couplings between the fermionic degrees of freedom, and find that there are no perturbative instabilities, and that Stoner instability is the strongest instability which occurs at a critical threshold value of the interaction. The critical interaction goes to zero as the chemical potential is tuned towards the band bottom.

  15. Generation of single photons with highly tunable wave shape from a cold atomic quantum memory

    CERN Document Server

    Farrera, Pau; Albrecht, Boris; Ho, Melvyn; Chávez, Matías; Teo, Colin; Sangouard, Nicolas; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    We report on a single photon source with highly tunable photon shape based on a cold ensemble of Rubidium atoms. We follow the DLCZ scheme to implement an emissive quantum memory, which can be operated as a photon pair source with controllable delay. We find that the temporal wave shape of the emitted read photon can be precisely controlled by changing the shape of the driving read pulse. We generate photons with temporal durations varying over three orders of magnitude up to 10 {\\mu}s without a significant change of the read-out efficiency. We prove the non-classicality of the emitted photons by measuring their antibunching, showing near single photon behavior at low excitation probabilities. We also show that the photons are emitted in a pure state by measuring unconditional autocorrelation functions. Finally, to demonstrate the usability of the source for realistic applications, we create ultra-long single photons with a rising exponential or doubly peaked wave shape which are important for several quantum...

  16. Gravitational waves from first order phase transitions as a probe of an early matter domination era and its inverse problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, Gabriela, E-mail: Gabriela.Barenboim@uv.es; Park, Wan-Il, E-mail: Wanil.Park@uv.es

    2016-08-10

    We investigate the gravitational wave background from a first order phase transition in a matter-dominated universe, and show that it has a unique feature from which important information about the properties of the phase transition and thermal history of the universe can be easily extracted. Also, we discuss the inverse problem of such a gravitational wave background in view of the degeneracy among macroscopic parameters governing the signal.

  17. Interaction of a two-level atom with single-mode optical field beyond the rotating wave approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ju; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-11-17

    One of the simplest models involving the atom-field interaction is the coupling of a single two-level atom with single-mode optical field. Under the rotating wave approximation, this problem is reduced to a form that can be solved exactly. But the approximation is only valid when the two levels are resonant or nearly resonant with the applied electromagnetic radiation. Here we present an analytical solution without the rotating wave approximation and applicable to general atom-field interaction far away from the resonance. We find that there exists remarkable influence of the initial phase of optical field on the Rabi oscillations and Rabi splitting, and this issue cannot be explored in the context of the rotating wave approximation. Due to the retention of the counter-rotating terms, higher-order harmonic appears during the Rabi splitting. The analytical solution suggests a way to regulate and control the quantum dynamics of a two-level atom and allows for exploring more essential features of the atom-field interaction.

  18. Evolution of Matter Wave Interference of Bose-Condensed Gas in a 1D Optical Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhi-Jun; ZHANG Dong-Mei

    2007-01-01

    For a Bose-condensed gas in a combined potential consisting of an axially-symmetric harmonic magnetic trap and one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice, using the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii (G-P) equation and the propagator method, we obtain the analytical result of the order parameter for matter wave interference at any time. The evolution of the interference pattern under a variation of the relative phase △φ between successive subcondensates trapped on an optical lattices is also studied. For △φ = π, the interference pattern is symmetric with two sharp peaks, which are symmetrically located on a straight line on both sides of a vacant central peak and moving apart from each other. This work is in agreement with available experimental results.

  19. Liquid Water through Density-Functional Molecular Dynamics: Plane-Wave vs Atomic-Orbital Basis Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Miceli, Giacomo; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    We determine and compare structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of liquid water at near ambient conditions through density-functional molecular dynamics simulations, when using either plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets. In both frameworks, the electronic structure and the atomic forces are self-consistently determined within the same theoretical scheme based on a nonlocal density functional accounting for van der Waals interactions. The overall properties of liquid water achieved within the two frameworks are in excellent agreement with each other. Thus, our study supports that implementations with plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets yield equivalent results and can be used indiscriminately in study of liquid water or aqueous solutions.

  20. Dipolar matter-wave solitons in two-dimensional anisotropic discrete lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaiyu; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Qiang; Shi, Yuhan; Pang, Wei; Li, Yongyao

    2016-05-01

    We numerically demonstrate two-dimensional (2D) matter-wave solitons in the disk-shaped dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) trapped in strongly anisotropic optical lattices (OLs) in a disk's plane. The considered OLs are square lattices which can be formed by interfering two pairs of plane waves with different intensities. The hopping rates of the condensates between two adjacent lattices in the orthogonal directions are different, which gives rise to a linearly anisotropic system. We find that when the polarized orientation of the dipoles is parallel to disk's plane with the same direction, the combined effects of the linearly anisotropy and the nonlocal nonlinear anisotropy strongly influence the formations, as well as the dynamics of the lattice solitons. Particularly, the isotropy-pattern solitons (IPSs) are found when these combined effects reach a balance. Motion, collision, and rotation of the IPSs are also studied in detail by means of systematic simulations. We further find that these IPSs can move freely in the 2D anisotropic discrete system, hence giving rise to an anisotropic effective mass. Four types of collisions between the IPSs are identified. By rotating an external magnetic field up to a critical angular velocity, the IPSs can still remain localized and play as a breather. Finally, the influences from the combined effects between the linear and the nonlocal nonlinear anisotropy with consideration of the contact and/or local nonlinearity are discussed too.

  1. The role of the wave function in the GRW matter density theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egg, Matthias [University of Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    Every approach to quantum mechanics postulating some kind of primitive ontology (e.g., Bohmian particles, a mass density field or flash-like collapse events) faces the challenge of clarifying the ontological status of the wave function. More precisely, one needs to spell out in what sense the wave function ''governs'' the behaviour of the primitive ontology, such that the empirical predictions of standard quantum mechanics are recovered. For Bohmian mechanics, this challenge has been addressed in recent papers by Belot and Esfeld et al. In my talk, I do the same for the matter density version of the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber theory (GRWm). Doing so will highlight relevant similarities and differences between Bohmian mechanics and GRWm. The differences are a crucial element in the evaluation of the relative strengths and weaknesses of the two approaches, while the similarities can shed light on general characteristics of the primitive ontology approach, as opposed to other interpretative approaches to quantum mechanics.

  2. Quantum physics of light and matter a modern introduction to photons, atoms and many-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Salasnich, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The book gives an introduction to the field quantization (second quantization) of light and matter with applications to atomic physics. The first chapter briefly reviews the origins of special relativity and quantum mechanics and the basic notions of quantum information theory and quantum statistical mechanics. The second chapter is devoted to the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, while the third chapter shows the consequences of the light field quantization in the description of electromagnetic transitions.In the fourth chapter it is analyzed the spin of the electron, and in particular its derivation from the Dirac equation, while the fifth chapter investigates the effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the atomic spectra (Stark and Zeeman effects). The sixth chapter describes the properties of systems composed by many interacting identical particles by introducing the Hartree-Fock variational method, the density functional theory, and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Finally,...

  3. Inertial quantum sensors using light and matter

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, B; Bouyer, P

    2016-01-01

    The past few decades have seen dramatic progress in our ability to manipulate and coherently control matter-waves. Although the duality between particles and waves has been well tested since de Broglie introduced the matter-wave analog of the optical wavelength in 1924, manipulating atoms with a level of coherence that enables one to use these properties for precision measurements has only become possible with our ability to produce atomic samples exhibiting temperatures of only a few millionths of a degree above absolute zero. Since the initial experiments a few decades ago, the field of atom optics has developed in many ways, with both fundamental and applied significance. The exquisite control of matter waves offers the prospect of a new generation of force sensors exhibiting unprecedented sensitivity and accuracy, for applications from navigation and geophysics to tests of general relativity. Thanks to the latest developments in this field, the first commercial products using this quantum technology are n...

  4. Atomic quantum simulation of dynamical gauge fields coupled to fermionic matter: from string breaking to evolution after a quench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, D; Dalmonte, M; Müller, M; Rico, E; Stebler, P; Wiese, U-J; Zoller, P

    2012-10-26

    Using a Fermi-Bose mixture of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice, we construct a quantum simulator for a U(1) gauge theory coupled to fermionic matter. The construction is based on quantum links which realize continuous gauge symmetry with discrete quantum variables. At low energies, quantum link models with staggered fermions emerge from a Hubbard-type model which can be quantum simulated. This allows us to investigate string breaking as well as the real-time evolution after a quench in gauge theories, which are inaccessible to classical simulation methods.

  5. Atomic Quantum Simulation of Dynamical Gauge Fields coupled to Fermionic Matter: From String Breaking to Evolution after a Quench

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee D.; Dalmonte M.; Muller M; Rico E.; Stebler P.; Wiese U.-J.; Zoller P.

    2012-01-01

    Using a Fermi-Bose mixture of ultra-cold atoms in an optical lattice, we construct a quantum simulator for a U(1) gauge theory coupled to fermionic matter. The construction is based on quantum links which realize continuous gauge symmetry with discrete quantum variables. At low energies, quantum link models with staggered fermions emerge from a Hubbard-type model which can be quantum simulated. This allows us to investigate string breaking as well as the real-time evolution after a quench in ...

  6. Matter, energy, and heat transfer in a classical ballistic atom pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Tommy A; Das, Kunal K; Mitchell, Kevin A; Aubin, Seth; Delos, John B

    2014-11-01

    A ballistic atom pump is a system containing two reservoirs of neutral atoms or molecules and a junction connecting them containing a localized time-varying potential. Atoms move through the pump as independent particles. Under certain conditions, these pumps can create net transport of atoms from one reservoir to the other. While such systems are sometimes called "quantum pumps," they are also models of classical chaotic transport, and their quantum behavior cannot be understood without study of the corresponding classical behavior. Here we examine classically such a pump's effect on energy and temperature in the reservoirs, in addition to net particle transport. We show that the changes in particle number, of energy in each reservoir, and of temperature in each reservoir vary in unexpected ways as the incident particle energy is varied.

  7. The Spheronic Toy Universe: How Special Relativity may be Visualised to Emerge from a Wave-Nature of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Manfred; Kroupa, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    We construct an idealised universe for didactic purposes. This universe is assumed to consist of absolute Euclidean space and to be filled with a classical medium which allows for sound waves. A known solution to the wave equation describing the dynamics of the medium is a standing spherical wave. Although this is a problem of classical mechanics, we demonstrate that the Lorentz transformation is required to generate a moving solution from the stationary one. Both solutions are here collectively referred to as "spherons". These spherons exhibit properties which have analogues in the physical description of matter with rest mass, among them de Broglie like phase waves and at the same time "relativistic" effects such as contraction and a speed limit. This leads to a theory of special relativity by assuming the point of view of an observer made of such spheronic "matter". The argument made here may thus be useful as a visualisation or didactic approach to the real universe, in which matter has wave-like properties and obeys the laws of special relativity.

  8. The spheronic toy universe: how special relativity may be visualized to emerge from a wave-nature of matter

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    We construct an idealized universe for didactic purposes. This universe is assumed to consist of absolute Euclidean space and to be filled with a classical medium which allows for sound waves. A known solution to the wave equation describing the dynamics of the medium is a standing spherical wave. Although this is a problem of classical mechanics, we demonstrate that the Lorentz transformation is required to generate a moving solution from the stationary one. Both solutions are here collectively referred to as "spherons". These spherons exhibit properties which have analogues in the physical description of matter with rest mass, among them de Broglie like phase waves and at the same time "relativistic" effects such as contraction and a speed limit. This leads to a theory of special relativity by assuming the point of view of an observer made of such spheronic "matter". The argument made here may thus be useful as a visualisation or didactic approach to the real universe, in which matter has wave-like properti...

  9. Violation of the PT-symmetry and structure formation in the dark matter-gravitational wave interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Bastos, Catarina

    2016-01-01

    In flat spacetime, quantum fluctuations in dark matter, as described as a Bose-Einstein condensate, are stable and display a relativistic Bogoliubov dispersion relation. In the weak gravitational field limit, both relativistic and nonrelativistic models self-gravitating dark matter suggest the formation of structures as the result of a dynamical (Jeans) instability. Here, we show that in the presence of spontaneous symmetry breaking of the dark matter field, the gravitational wave is damped for wave-lengths larger than the Jeans length. Such energy is converted to the Bogoliubov modes of the BEC that in their turn become unstable and grow, leading to the formation of structures even in the absence of expansion. Remarkably, this compensated attenuation/amplification mechanism is the signature of a discrete PT-symmetry-breaking of the system.

  10. Born approximation for scattering of wave packets on atoms. I. Theoretical background for scattering of a wave packet on a potential field

    CERN Document Server

    Karlovets, D V; Serbo, V G

    2015-01-01

    Laser photons carrying non-zero orbital angular momentum are known and exploited during the last twenty years. Recently it has been demonstrated experimentally that such (twisted) electrons can be produced and even focused to a subnanometer scale. Thus, twisted electrons emerge as a new tool in atomic physics. The state of a twisted electron can be considered as a specific wave packet of plane waves. In the present paper-I we consider elastic scattering of the wave packets of fast non-relativistic particles on a potential field. We obtain simple and convenient formulae for a number of events in such a scattering. The equations derived represent, in fact, generalization of the well-known Born approximation for the case when finite sizes and inhomogeneity of the initial packet should be taken into account. To illustrate the obtained results, we consider two simple models corresponding to scattering of a Gaussian wave packet on the Gaussian potential and on the hydrogen atom. The scattering of twisted electrons ...

  11. Atom gravimeters and gravitational redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Peter; Borde, Christian J; Reynaud, Serge; Salomon, Christophe; Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude; 10.1038/nature09340

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper, H. Mueller, A. Peters and S. Chu [A precision measurement of the gravitational redshift by the interference of matter waves, Nature 463, 926-929 (2010)] argued that atom interferometry experiments published a decade ago did in fact measure the gravitational redshift on the quantum clock operating at the very high Compton frequency associated with the rest mass of the Caesium atom. In the present Communication we show that this interpretation is incorrect.

  12. High-Frequency Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Entanglement via Atomic Memory Effects in Four-Wave Mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xue-Hua; HU Xiang-Ming; KONG Ling-Feng; ZHANG Xiu

    2010-01-01

    @@ Atomic memory effects occur when the atomic relaxation times are comparable to or much longer than the cavity relaxation times.We show that by using the memory effects,it is possible to obtain high-frequency Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement between a pair of Stokes and anti-Stokes fields in a four-wave mixing system.The physical origin is traced to the dynamical Stark splittings of dressed states due to the parametrically amplified fields.This mechanism provides an alternative and efficient way for sideband entanglement.

  13. Probing Matter-Field and Atom-Number Correlations in Optical Lattices by Global Nondestructive Addressing

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlowski, Wojciech; Mekhov, Igor B

    2014-01-01

    We show that light scattering from an ultracold gas reveals not only density correlations, but also matter-field interference at its shortest possible distance in an optical lattice, which defines key properties such as tunneling and matter-field phase gradients. This signal can be enhanced by concentrating probe light between lattice sites rather than at density maxima. As addressing between two single sites is challenging, we focus on global nondestructive scattering, allowing probing order parameters, matter-field quadratures and their squeezing. The scattering angular distribution displays peaks even if classical diffraction is forbidden and we derive generalized Bragg conditions. Light scattering distinguishes all phases in the Mott insulator - superfluid - Bose glass phase transition.

  14. Atomic ionization by sterile-to-active neutrino conversion and constraints on dark matter sterile neutrinos with germanium detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Lin, Shin-Ted; Liu, C -P; Singh, Lakhwinder; Wong, Henry T; Wu, Chih-Liang; Wu, Chih-Pan

    2016-01-01

    The transition magnetic moment of a sterile-to-active neutrino conversion gives rise to not only radiative decay of a sterile neutrino, but also its non-standard interaction (NSI) with matter. For sterile neutrinos of keV-mass as dark matter candidates, their decay signals are actively searched for in cosmic X-ray spectra. In this work, we consider the NSI that leads to atomic ionization, which can be detected by direct dark matter experiments. It is found that this inelastic scattering process for a nonrelativistic sterile neutrino has a pronounced enhancement in the differential cross section at energy transfer about half of its mass, manifesting experimentally as peaks in the measurable energy spectra. The enhancement effects gradually smear out as the sterile neutrino becomes relativistic. Using data taken with germanium detectors that have fine energy resolution in keV and sub-keV regimes, constraints on sterile neutrino mass and its transition magnetic moment are derived and compared with those from ast...

  15. Analytical study of dynamics of matter-wave solitons in lossless nonlinear discrete bi-inductance transmission lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kengne, E; Lakhssassi, A

    2015-03-01

    We consider a lossless one-dimensional nonlinear discrete bi-inductance electrical transmission line made of N identical unit cells. When lattice effects are considered, we use the reductive perturbation method in the semidiscrete limit to show that the dynamics of modulated waves can be modeled by the classical nonlinear Schrödinger (CNLS) equation, which describes the modulational instability and the propagation of bright and dark solitons on a continuous-wave background. Our theoretical analysis based on the CNLS equation predicts either two or four frequency regions with different behavior concerning the modulational instability of a plane wave. With the help of the analytical solutions of the CNLS equation, we investigate analytically the effects of the linear capacitance CS on the dynamics of matter-wave solitons in the network. Our results reveal that the linear parameter CS can be used to manipulate the motion of bright, dark, and kink soliton in the network.

  16. Evolution of the atomic and molecular gas content of galaxies in dark matter haloes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popping, Gergö; Behroozi, Peter S.; Peeples, Molly S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a semi-empirical model to infer the atomic and molecular hydrogen content of galaxies as a function of halo mass and time. Our model combines the star formation rate (SFR)-halo mass-redshift relation (constrained by galaxy abundances) with inverted SFR-surface density relations to infer g

  17. Ethanol separation from ethanol-water solution by ultrasonic atomization and its proposed mechanism based on parametric decay instability of capillary wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masanori; Matsuura, Kazuo; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2001-02-01

    We show the experimental data of selective ethanol separation from ethanol-water solution, using ultrasonic atomization. Pure ethanol could be obtained directly from a solution with several mol% ethanol-water solution at 10 °C. This result can be explained in terms of parametric decay instability of capillary wave, in which high localization and accumulation of acoustic energy occur, leading to ultrasonic atomization. That is, parametric decay instability condenses the energy of longitudinal waves in a highly localized surface area of the capillary wave, and causes ultrasonic atomization.

  18. Dual-dressed four-wave mixing and dressed six-wave mixing in a five-level atomic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cuicui Zuo; Yigang Du; Tong Jiang; Zhiqiang Nie; Yanpeng Zhang; Huaibin Zheng; Chenli Gan; Weifeng Zhang; Keqing Lu

    2008-01-01

    We study the co-existing four-wave mixing (FWM) process with two dressing fields and the six-wave mixing (SWM) process with one dressing field in a five-level system with carefully arranged laser beams. We also show two kinds of doubly dressing mechanisms in the FWM process. FWM and SWM signals propagatingalong the same direction compete with each other. With the properly controlled dressing fields, the FWM signals can be suppressed, while the SWM signals have been enhanced.

  19. Constraining warm dark matter mass with cosmic reionization and gravitational wave

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, W W; Cheng, K S

    2016-01-01

    We constrain the warm dark matter (WDM) particle mass with the observations of cosmic reionization and CMB optical depth. We suggest that the GWs from stellar mass black holes (BHs) could give a further constraint on WDM particle mass for future observations. The star formation rates (SFRs) of Population I/II (Pop I/II) and Population III (Pop III) stars are also derived. If the metallicity of the universe have been enriched beyond the critical value of $Z_{\\rm crit}=10^{-3.5}Z_{\\odot}$, the star formation shift from Pop III to Pop I/II stars. Our results show that the SFRs are quite dependent on the WDM particle mass, especially at high redshifts. Combing with the reionization history and CMB optical depth derived from the recent \\emph{Planck} mission, we find that the current data requires the WDM particle mass in a narrow range of $1 < m_x < 3$ keV. Furthermore, we suggest that the stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB) produced by stellar BHs could give a further constraint on the WDM parti...

  20. Gravitational waves as a probe of dark matter mini-spikes

    CERN Document Server

    Eda, Kazunari; Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Silk, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies show that an intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) may develop a dark matter (DM) mini-halo according to some BH formation scenarios. We consider a binary system composed of an IMBH surrounded by a DM mini-spike and a stellar mass object orbiting around the IMBH. The binary evolves due to gravitational pull and dynamical friction from the DM mini-spike and back-reaction from its gravitational wave (GW) radiation which can be detected by future space-borne GW experiments such as eLISA/NGO. We consider a single power-law model for the DM mini-spike which is assumed to consist of non-annihilating DM particles and demonstrate that an eLISA/NGO detection of GW from such a binary enables us to measure the DM mini-spike parameters very accurately. For instance, in our reference case originally advocated by Zhao and Silk (2005) and Bertone et al. (2005), we could determine the power-law index $\\alpha$ of the DM mini-spike radial profile with a 1 $\\sigma$ relative error of $\\pm 5\\times 10^{-6}$ for a GW s...

  1. Soliton Atom Laser with Quantum State Transfer Property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiong-Jun; JING Hui; GE Mo-Lin

    2006-01-01

    @@ We study the nonlinear effects in the quantum states transfer technique from photons to matter waves in the three-level case, which may provide the formation of a soliton atom laser with nonclassical atoms. The validity of quantum transfer mechanism is confirmed in the presence of the intrinsic nonlinear atomic interactions. The accompanied frequency chirp effect is shown to have no influence on the grey solitons formed by the output atom laser and the possible quantum depletion effect is also briefly discussed.

  2. Dynamic stability and manipulation of bright matter-wave solitons by optical lattices in Bose-Einstein condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Chang-Sheng; Li Jing; Zong Feng-De

    2012-01-01

    An extended variation approach to describing the dynamic evolution of self-attractive Bose-Einstein condensates is developed.We consider bright matter-wave solitons in the presence of a parabolic magnetic potential and a timespace periodic optical lattice.The dynamics of condensates is shown to be well approximated by four coupled nonlinear differential equations.A noteworthy feature is that the extended variation approach gives a critical strength ratio to support multiple stable lattice sites for the condensate.We further examine the existence of the solitons and their stabilities at the multiple stable lattice sites. In this case,the analytical predictions of Bose-Einstein condensates variational dynamics are found to be in good agreement with numerical simulations.We then find a stable region for successful manipulating matter-wave solitons without collapse,which are dragged from an initial stationary to a prescribed position by a moving periodic optical lattice.

  3. Identification of toxic and other matters in wines by the method of Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr.Sc. Vlora Gashi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Quality wines are produced in our country. The main objective of this paper was identification of toxic matter, heavy metals and minerals in wines as final produce, with a view of improving nutritional quality of our wines, produced in 2008-2009. Another important fact for this research was the determination of the presence of remnants from protective solutions containing toxic elements (Cu and Pb[1]. [1] Evgjini Papazisi Tonin Rjolli Dr. Abdul Sinani "Food Technology and Environ-mental Protection (Teknologji ushqimore dhe mbrojtje mjedisi1".

  4. Inertial quantum sensors using light and matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, B.; Bertoldi, A.; Bouyer, P.

    2016-05-01

    The past few decades have seen dramatic progress in our ability to manipulate and coherently control matter-waves. Although the duality between particles and waves has been well tested since de Broglie introduced the matter-wave analog of the optical wavelength in 1924, manipulating atoms with a level of coherence that enables one to use these properties for precision measurements has only become possible with our ability to produce atomic samples exhibiting temperatures of only a few millionths of a degree above absolute zero. Since the initial experiments a few decades ago, the field of atom optics has developed in many ways, with both fundamental and applied significance. The exquisite control of matter waves offers the prospect of a new generation of force sensors exhibiting unprecedented sensitivity and accuracy, for applications from navigation and geophysics to tests of general relativity. Thanks to the latest developments in this field, the first commercial products using this quantum technology are now available. In the future, our ability to create large coherent ensembles of atoms will allow us an even more precise control of the matter-wave and the ability to create highly entangled states for non-classical atom interferometry.

  5. Similarity of the Doppler shifted time-symmetric electromagnetic field of a Dirac particle to the de Broglie matter wave

    CERN Document Server

    Lush, David C

    2016-01-01

    It is investigated whether the Planck-Einstein relation between the energy and frequency of light quanta, and the de Broglie wavelength of matter can be wholly or partially explained as consequences of the relativistic Doppler shift of electromagnetic fields caused by oscillating electric dipoles within the elementary particles constituting light and matter, and their electromagnetic interaction with similarly constituted particles. Assuming the oscillation is at the zitterbewegung frequency of the Dirac electron theory, the photon energy is found to be approximately half the value expected according to the Planck-Einstein relation. The relativistically Doppler shifted time-symmetric electromagnetic field due to the particle is found to have a superluminal phase velocity equal to that of the de Broglie matter wave, a group velocity equal to the particle velocity, and a wavelength of \\(h/p\\).

  6. Wave onset in central gray matter - its intrinsic optical signal and phase transitions in extracellular polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VERA M. FERNANDES-DE-LIMA

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The brain is an excitable media in which excitation waves propagate at several scales of time and space. ''One-dimensional'' action potentials (millisecond scale along the axon membrane, and spreading depression waves (seconds to minutes at the three dimensions of the gray matter neuropil (complex of interacting membranes are examples of excitation waves. In the retina, excitation waves have a prominent intrinsic optical signal (IOS. This optical signal is created by light scatter and has different components at the red and blue end of the spectrum. We could observe the wave onset in the retina, and measure the optical changes at the critical transition from quiescence to propagating wave. The results demonstrated the presence of fluctuations preceding propagation and suggested a phase transition. We have interpreted these results based on an extrapolation from Tasaki's experiments with action potentials and volume phase transitions of polymers. Thus, the scatter of red light appeared to be a volume phase transition in the extracellular matrix that was caused by the interactions between the cellular membrane cell coat and the extracellular sugar and protein complexes. If this hypothesis were correct, then forcing extracellular current flow should create a similar signal in another tissue, provided that this tissue was also transparent to light and with a similarly narrow extracellular space. This control tissue exists and it is the crystalline lens. We performed the experiments and confirmed the optical changes. Phase transitions in the extracellular polymers could be an important part of the long-range correlations found during wave propagation in central nervous tissue.O encéfalo é um meio excitável no qual ondas de excitação se propagam em várias escalas de tempo e espaço. Potenciais de axônios ''unidimensionais'' (escala de milisegundos ao longo da membrana axonal e ondas de depressão alastrante (segundos a minutos nas três dimens

  7. A coupled microwave-cavity system in the Rydberg-atom cavity detector for dark matter axions

    CERN Document Server

    Tada, M; Shibata, M; Kominato, K; Ogawa, I; Funahashi, H; Yamamoto, K; Matsuki, S

    2001-01-01

    A coupled microwave-cavity system of cylindrical TM$_{010}$ single-mode has been developed to search for dark matter axions around 10 $\\mu {\\rm eV}$(2.4 GHz) with the Rydberg-atom cavity detector at 10 mK range temperature. One component of the coupled cavity (conversion cavity) made of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper is used to convert an axion into a single photon with the Primakoff process in the strong magnetic field, while the other component (detection cavity) made of Nb is utilized to detect the converted photons with Rydberg atoms passed through it without magnetic field. Top of the detection cavity is attached to the bottom flange of the mixing chamber of a dilution refrigerator, thus the whole cavity is cooled down to 10 mK range to reduce the background thermal blackbody-photons in the cavity. The cavity resonant frequency is tunable over $\\sim$ 15% by moving dielectric rods inserted independently into each part of the cavities along the cylindrical axis. In order to reduce the heat load from ...

  8. Effects of ``atomic depletion'' on four-wave mixing in potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehendale, S. C.; Gupta, P. K.; Rustagi, K. C.

    1983-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental results are presented for a four-wave mixing process involving two photons generated internally by stimulated electronic Raman scattering. Effects of saturation of the Stokes wave due to loss of population in the ground state are analyzed in some detail. It is shown that phase mismatch and the absorption of the generated wave play an important role in determining the efficiency of the mixing process.

  9. Measuring the weak value of momentum in a double slit atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, J.; Edmunds, P. D.; Barker, P. F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the development of an experiment to measure the weak value of the transverse momentum operator (local momentum [1]) of cold atoms passing through a matter- wave interferometer. The results will be used to reconstruct the atom's average trajectories. We describe our progress towards this goal using laser cooled argon atoms.

  10. Theoretical Analysis of Time-Dependent Wave-Packet Dynamics:Proton Impact Excitation (2s- 2p) with Li Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shao-Hao; WANG Feng; LI Jia-Ming

    2004-01-01

    Introducing a theoretical method to treat time-dependent wave-packet dynamics for atom collisions, we calculate the cross sections of proton impact excitation (2s - 2p) with a Li atom by directly numerically integrating the time-dependent Schrodinger equation on a three-dimensional Cartesian mesh. Our calculated results are in good agreement with the available experimental measurements.

  11. Strong light-matter interactions in heterostructures of atomically thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britnell, L; Ribeiro, R M; Eckmann, A; Jalil, R; Belle, B D; Mishchenko, A; Kim, Y-J; Gorbachev, R V; Georgiou, T; Morozov, S V; Grigorenko, A N; Geim, A K; Casiraghi, C; Castro Neto, A H; Novoselov, K S

    2013-06-14

    The isolation of various two-dimensional (2D) materials, and the possibility to combine them in vertical stacks, has created a new paradigm in materials science: heterostructures based on 2D crystals. Such a concept has already proven fruitful for a number of electronic applications in the area of ultrathin and flexible devices. Here, we expand the range of such structures to photoactive ones by using semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs)/graphene stacks. Van Hove singularities in the electronic density of states of TMDC guarantees enhanced light-matter interactions, leading to enhanced photon absorption and electron-hole creation (which are collected in transparent graphene electrodes). This allows development of extremely efficient flexible photovoltaic devices with photoresponsivity above 0.1 ampere per watt (corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of above 30%).

  12. Mass predictions of atomic nuclei in the infinite nuclear matter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, R. C.; Satpathy, L.

    2012-07-01

    We present here the mass excesses, binding energies, one- and two-neutron, one- and two-proton and α-particle separation energies of 6727 nuclei in the ranges 4≤Z≤120 and 8≤A≤303 calculated in the infinite nuclear matter model. Compared to our predictions of 1999 mass table, the present ones are obtained using larger data base of 2003 mass table of Wapstra and Audi and resorting to higher accuracy in the solutions of the η-differential equations of the INM model. The local energy η's supposed to carry signature of the characteristic properties of nuclei are found to possess the predictive capability. In fact η-systematics reveal new magic numbers in the drip-line regions giving rise to new islands of stability supported by relativistic mean field theoretic calculations. This is a manifestation of a new phenomenon where shell-effect overcomes the instability due to repulsive components of the nucleon-nucleon force broadening the stability peninsula. The two-neutron separation energy-systematics derived from the present mass predictions reveal a general new feature for the existence of islands of inversion in the exotic neutron-rich regions of nuclear landscape, apart from supporting the presently known islands around 31Na and 62Ti. The five global parameters representing the properties of infinite nuclear matter, the surface, the Coulomb and the pairing terms are retained as per our 1999 mass table. The root-mean-square deviation of the present mass-fit to 2198 known masses is 342 keV, while the mean deviation is 1.3 keV, reminiscent of no left-over systematic effects. This is a substantive improvement over our 1999 mass table having rms deviation of 401 keV and mean deviation of 9 keV for 1884 data nuclei.

  13. Mass Predictions of Atomic Nuclei in the Infinite Nuclear Matter Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, R C

    2012-01-01

    We present here the mass excesses, binding energies, one- and two- neutron, one and two- proton and \\alpha-particle separation energies of 6727 nuclei in the ranges 4 \\leq Z \\leq 120 and 8 \\leq A \\leq 303 calculated in the infinite nuclear matter model. Compared to our predictions of 1999 mass table, the present ones are obtained using larger data base of 2003 mass table of Wapstra and Audi and resorting to higher accuracy in the solutions of the \\eta-differential equations of the INM model. The local energy \\eta's supposed to carry signature of the characteristic properties of nuclei are found to possess the predictive capability. In fact \\eta-systematics reveal new magic numbers in the drip-line regions giving rise to new islands of stability supported by relativistic mean field theoretic calculations. This is a manifestation of a new phenomenon where shell-effect overcomes the instability due to repulsive components of the nucleon-nucleon force broadening the stability peninsula. The two-neutron separation...

  14. Weak-light rogue waves, breathers, and their active control in a cold atomic gas via electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyang; Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2016-06-01

    We propose a scheme to demonstrate the existence of optical Peregrine rogue waves and Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers and realize their active control via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The system we suggest is a cold, Λ -type three-level atomic gas interacting with a probe and a control laser fields and working under EIT condition. We show that, based on EIT with an incoherent optical pumping, which can be used to cancel optical absorption, (1+1)-dimensional optical Peregrine rogue waves, Akhmediev breathers, and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers can be generated with very low light power. In addition, we demonstrate that the Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers in (2+1)-dimensions obtained can be actively manipulated by using an external magnetic field. As a result, these breathers can display trajectory deflections and bypass obstacles during propagation.

  15. Four-Wave Mixing Scheme in a Four-Level Ladder-Type Atomic System Based on Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-Hua; CHEN Ai-Xi; PENG Ju-Cun

    2004-01-01

    @@ A nonlinear optical four-wave mixing scheme is presented and analysed for the generation of coherent light in a nearly four-level ladder-type atomic system in the context of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT).We find that EIT can suppress nonlinear photon absorption and the peak of the generated mixing field is located at the centre of the transparency window where the loss is minimal, though there is a dip in the centre. Such a nonlinear optical process can also be used for generating coherent short-wavelength radiation.

  16. Wave packet studies of the vibrational predissociation of three and four-atom van der Waals complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, S.K.

    1994-03-01

    Vibrational predissociation of XI{sub 2} and X{sub 2}I{sub 2} van der Waals complexes, with X = He and Ne, is studied with wave packets. Three-dimensional calculations are carried out on the three-atom systems. Suitable X{center_dot}{center_dot}I potential interactions are determined, and product distributions are predicted. Reduced dimension models of X{sub 2}I{sub 2}(v{prime}) {yields} 2X + I{sub 2}(v < v{prime}) are investigated. Comparison is made with available experimental results. Mechanistic issues, including the role of intramolecular vibrational relaxation resonances, are addressed.

  17. Evolution of the atomic and molecular gas content of galaxies in dark matter haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Popping, G; Peeples, M S

    2014-01-01

    We present a semi-empirical model to infer the atomic and molecular hydrogen content of galaxies as a function of halo mass and time. Our model combines the SFR-halo mass-redshift relation (constrained by galaxy abundances) with inverted SFR-surface density relations to infer galaxy H I and H2 masses. We present gas scaling relations, gas fractions, and mass functions from z = 0 to z = 3 and the gas properties of galaxies as a function of their host halo masses. Predictions of our work include: 1) there is a ~ 0.2 dex decrease in the H I mass of galaxies as a function of their stellar mass since z = 1.5, whereas the H2 mass of galaxies decreases by > 1 dex over the same period. 2) galaxy cold gas fractions and H2 fractions decrease with increasing stellar mass and time. Galaxies with M* > 10^10 Msun are dominated by their stellar content at z < 1, whereas less-massive galaxies only reach these gas fractions at z = 0. We find the strongest evolution in relative gas content at z < 1.5. 3) the SFR to gas m...

  18. Collective transport for active matter run-and-tumble disk systems on a traveling-wave substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sándor, Cs.; Libál, A.; Reichhardt, C.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson

    2017-01-01

    We examine numerically the transport of an assembly of active run-and-tumble disks interacting with a traveling-wave substrate. We show that as a function of substrate strength, wave speed, disk activity, and disk density, a variety of dynamical phases arise that are correlated with the structure and net flux of disks. We find that there is a sharp transition into a state in which the disks are only partially coupled to the substrate and form a phase-separated cluster state. This transition is associated with a drop in the net disk flux, and it can occur as a function of the substrate speed, maximum substrate force, disk run time, and disk density. Since variation of the disk activity parameters produces different disk drift rates for a fixed traveling-wave speed on the substrate, the system we consider could be used as an efficient method for active matter species separation. Within the cluster phase, we find that in some regimes the motion of the cluster center of mass is in the opposite direction to that of the traveling wave, while when the maximum substrate force is increased, the cluster drifts in the direction of the traveling wave. This suggests that swarming or clustering motion can serve as a method by which an active system can collectively move against an external drift.

  19. Slow and stored light under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency and four wave mixing in an atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nathaniel Blair

    The recent prospect of efficient, reliable, and secure quantum communication relies on the ability to coherently and reversibly map nonclassical states of light onto long-lived atomic states. A promising technique that accomplishes this employs Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT), in which a strong classical control field modifies the optical properties of a weak signal field in such a way that a previously opaque medium becomes transparent to the signal field. The accompanying steep dispersion in the index of refraction allows for pulses of light to be decelerated, then stored as an atomic excitation, and later retrieved as a photonic mode. This dissertation presents the results of investigations into methods for optimizing the memory efficiency of this process in an ensemble of hot Rb atoms. We have experimentally demonstrated the effectiveness of two protocols for yielding the best memory efficiency possible at a given atomic density. Improving memory efficiency requires operation at higher optical depths, where undesired effects such as four-wave mixing (FWM) become enhanced and can spontaneously produce a new optical mode (Stokes field). We present the results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the FWM-EIT interaction under continuous-wave (cw), slow light, and stored light conditions. In particular, we provide evidence that indicates that while a Stokes field is generated upon retrieval of the signal field, any information originally encoded in a seeded Stokes field is not independently preserved during the storage process. We present a simple model that describes the propagation dynamics and provides an intuitive description of the EIT-FWM process.

  20. Coherence theory of atomic de Broglie waves and electromagnetic near fields

    OpenAIRE

    Henkel, Carsten

    2005-01-01

    Die Arbeit untersucht theoretisch die Wechselwirkung neutraler Teilchen (Atome, Moleküle) mit Oberflächen, soweit sie durch das elektromagnetische Feld vermittelt wird. Spektrale Energiedichten und Kohärenzfunktionen werden hergeleitet und liefern eine umfassende Charakterisierung des Felds auf der sub-Wellenlängen-Skala. Die Ergebnisse finden auf zwei Teilgebieten Anwendung: in der integrierten Atomoptik, wo ultrakalte Atome an thermische Oberflächen koppeln, und in der Nahfeldoptik, wo eine...

  1. Materials, matter and particles a brief history

    CERN Document Server

    Woolfson, Michael M

    2010-01-01

    This book traces the history of ideas about the nature of matter and also the way that mankind has used material resources that the world offers. Starting with the ideas of ancient civilizations that air, earth, fire and water were the basic ingredients of all matter, it traces the development of the science of chemistry beginning within the ranks of the alchemists. First, the idea of elements grew and then the atomic nature of matter was verified. Physicists had entered the scene, showing the nature of atoms in terms of fundamental particles and then introducing the concept of wave-particle d

  2. Constraining Warm Dark Matter Mass with Cosmic Reionization and Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei-Wei; Wang, F. Y.; Cheng, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    We constrain the warm dark matter (WDM) particle mass with observations of cosmic reionization and CMB optical depth. We suggest that the gravitational waves (GWs) from stellar-mass black holes (BHs) could give a further constraint on WDM particle mass for future observations. The star formation rates (SFRs) of Population I/II (Pop I/II) and Population III (Pop III) stars are also derived. If the metallicity of the universe is enriched beyond the critical value of {Z}{{crit}}={10}-3.5 {Z}⊙ , the star formation shifts from Pop III to Pop I/II stars. Our results show that the SFRs are quite dependent on the WDM particle mass, especially at high redshifts. Combined with the reionization history and CMB optical depth derived from the recent Planck mission, we find that the current data require the WDM particle mass to be in a narrow range of 1 {{keV}}≲ {m}{{x}}≲ 3 {{keV}}. Furthermore, we suggest that the stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB) produced by stellar BHs could give a further constraint on the WDM particle mass for future observations. For {m}{{x}}=3 {{keV}}, with Salpeter (Chabrier) initial mass function (IMF), the SGWB from Pop I/II BHs has a peak amplitude of {{{Ω }}}{{GW}}≈ 2.8× {10}-9 (5.0× {10}-9) at f=316{{Hz}}, while the GW radiation at f\\lt 10 Hz is seriously suppressed. For {m}{{x}}=1 {{keV}}, the SGWB peak amplitude is the same as that for {m}{{x}}=1 {{keV}}, but a little lower at low frequencies. Therefore, it is hard to constrain the WDM particle mass by the SGWB from Pop I/II BHs. To assess the detectability of the GW signal, we also calculate the signal-to-noise ratios (S/N), which are {{S}}/{{N}}=37.7 (66.5) and 27 (47.7) for {m}{{x}}=3 {{keV}} and {m}{{x}}=1 {{keV}} for the Einstein Telescope with Salpeter (Chabrier) IMF, respectively. The SGWB from Pop III BHs is very dependent on the WDM particle mass, the GW strength could be an order of magnitude different, and the frequency band could be two times different for {m

  3. Exact Solution for Phenomenon of atomic Collapse and Revival under Rotating Wave and Anti-Rotating Wave Approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Bang-Fu; WANG Xiao-Yun; TANG Yan-Fang; MI Xian-Wu; ZHAO He-Ping

    2011-01-01

    An accurate method to solve the Jaynes-Cummings (J-C) Hamiltonian has been investigated here. The phenomenon of atomic collapse and revival predicted by Jaynes-Cummings model is demonstrated. Solutions are consistent with the precious such as using the operator method. Furthermore, the Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian including the anti-rotating term is also solved precisely using this accurate way so that results agree with experiments better.Essences of the anti-rotating term are revealed. We discuss the relations of the phenomenon of atonic collapse and revival with the average photons number, the light field phase angle, the resonant frequency, and the size of coupling constant. The discussions may make one select suitable conditions to carry out experiment well and study the virtual light field effect on cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  4. Spin-sensitive atom mirror via spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lu; Zheng, Ren-Fei; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    Based on the spin-orbit coupling recently implemented in a neutral cold-atom gas, we propose a scheme to realize spin-dependent scattering of cold atoms. In particular we consider a matter wave packet of cold-atom gas impinging upon a step potential created by the optical light field, inside of which the atoms are subject to spin-orbit interaction. We show that the proposed system can act as a spin polarizer or spin-selective atom mirror for the incident atomic beam. The principle and the operating parameter regime of the system are carefully discussed.

  5. Unlocking the full potential of wave-matter nonlinear coupling in the epsilon-near-zero regime

    CERN Document Server

    Ciattoni, Alessandro; Marini, Andrea; Di Falco, Andrea; Faccio, Daniele; Scalora, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, unconventional metamaterial properties have triggered a revolution of electromagnetic research which has unveiled novel scenarios of wave-matter interaction. A very small dielectric permittivity is a leading example of such unusual features, since it produces an exotic static-like regime where the electromagnetic field is spatially slowly-varying over a physically large region. The so-called epsilon-near-zero metamaterials thus offer an ideal platform where to manipulate the inner details of the "stretched" field. Here we theoretically prove that a standard nonlinearity is able to operate such a manipulation to the point that even a thin slab produces a dramatic nonlinear pulse transformation, if the dielectric permittivity is very small within the field bandwidth. The predicted non-resonant releasing of full nonlinear coupling produced by the epsilon-near-zero condition does not resort to any field enhancement mechanisms and opens novel routes to exploiting matter nonlinearity for steering t...

  6. 缀饰原子的简化波函数%A Simplified Wave Function for Dressed Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李书民; 陈激; 周子舫; 张声涛

    2003-01-01

    A wave function for laser dressed atom is derived as a perturbative solution of the time-dependent Schrdinger equation in the velocity gauge. With the use of the average excitation energy approximation and the closure approximation, the solution is reduced to a time-dependent operator acting on the "bare" atomic state. In soft-photon approximation, the average excitation energy only appears in the first and second order terms of field frequency. Such a simplified dressed wave function is useful in the calculation of laser-assisted scattering, especially in the laser-assisted rearrangement collisions.%作为含时薛定谔方程的微扰近似解, 在速度规范下给出了激光场中缀饰原子的一个波函数. 利用平均激发能近似和完备关系, 可将此波函数简化为一个含时的相乘算符作用于无场时的"裸原子"态上. 在软光子近似下, 平均激发能仅出现在光场频率的一阶和二阶项上. 此波函数适用于计算激光辅助的散射过程, 特别是重排过程.

  7. The pump-probe coupling of matter wave packets to remote lattice states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherson, Jacob F; Park, Sung Jong; Pedersen, Poul Lindholm;

    2012-01-01

    containing a Bose–Einstein condensate. The evolution of these wave packets is monitored in situ and their six-photon reflection at a band gap is observed. In direct analogy with pump–probe spectroscopy, a probe pulse allows for the resonant de-excitation of the wave packet into states localized around...

  8. First Results of the GPS.DM Observatory: Search for Dark Matter and Exotic Physics with Atomic Clocks and GPS Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Benjamin; Blewitt, Geoff; Dailey, Conner; Pospelov, Maxim; Rollings, Alex; Sherman, Jeff; Williams, Wyatt; Derevianko, Andrei; GPS. DM Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Despite the overwhelming cosmological evidence for the existence of dark matter, and the considerable effort of the scientific community over decades, there is no evidence for dark matter in terrestrial experiments. The GPS.DM observatory uses the existing GPS constellation as a 50,000 km-aperture sensor array, analysing the satellite and terrestrial atomic clock data for exotic physics signatures. In particular, the collaboration searches for evidence of transient variations of fundamental constants correlated with the Earth's galactic motion through the dark matter halo. There already exists more than 10 years of good clock timing data that can be used in the search. This type of search is particularly sensitive to exotic forms of dark matter, such as topological defects. Supported by the NSF.

  9. Visualizing the Subsurface of Soft Matter: Simultaneous Topographical Imaging, Depth Modulation, and Compositional Mapping with Triple Frequency Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares, Santiago; Ebeling, Daniel; Eslami, Babak

    2014-03-01

    Characterization of subsurface morphology and mechanical properties with nanoscale resolution and depth control is of significant interest in soft matter fields like biology and polymer science, where buried structural and compositional features can be important. However, controllably ``feeling'' the subsurface is a challenging task for which the available imaging tools are relatively limited. This presentation describes a trimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging scheme, whereby three eigenmodes of the microcantilever probe are used as separate control ``knobs'' to simultaneously measure the topography, modulate sample indentation by the tip during tip-sample impact, and map compositional contrast, respectively. This method is illustrated through computational simulation and experiments conducted on ultrathin polymer films with embedded glass nanoparticles. By actively increasing the tip-sample indentation using a higher eigenmode of the cantilever, one is able to gradually and controllably reveal glass nanoparticles that are buried tens of nanometers deep under the surface, while still being able to refocus on the surface. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the U.S. Department of Energy (conceptual method development and experimental work, award DESC-0008115) and the U.S. National Science Foundation (computational work, award CMMI-0841840).

  10. Atomic force microscopy study on the microtopography of natural organic matter and newly formed hydrous MnO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jin; MA Jun; SHI Xuehua

    2007-01-01

    To understand the water purification mechanism of potassium permanganate as a coagulation-aid during the preoxidation process,the microtopography of its reductive products,the newly formed hydrous manganese dioxide and the aged hydrous manganese dioxide,was investigated.The morphology of natural organic matter(NOM)adsorbed by the newly formed hydrous manganese dioxide was also compared with that of NOM alone.By using the tapping mode atomic force microscopy(AFM),the observation results show that the newly formed hydrous manganese dioxide possess a perforated sheet(with a thickness of 0-1.75 nm)as well as some spherical particle structures compared with the hydrous manganese dioxide with 2 h aging time,which demonstrated that the newly formed hydrous manganese dioxide had a large surface area and adsorption capacity.When 1 mmol/L newly formed hydrous manganese dioxide was added,the microtopography of NOM molecules shifted from a loosely dispersed pancake shape(with adsorption height of 5-8.5 nm)to a densely dispersed and uniform spherical structure.These results provide a valid proof that it is the perfect adsorption capability of the newly formed hydrous manganese dioxide that might result in the coagulation aid effect of potassium permanganate preoxidation.

  11. A new probe of dark matter properties: gravitational waves from an intermediate mass black hole embedded in a dark matter mini-spike

    CERN Document Server

    Eda, Kazunari; Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Silk, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    An intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) may have a dark matter (DM) mini-halo around it and develop a spiky structure within less than a parsec from the IMBH. When a stellar mass object is captured by the mini-halo, it eventually infalls into such an IMBH due to gravitational wave back reaction which in turn could be observed directly by future space-borne gravitational wave experiments such as eLISA/NGO. In this paper, we show that the GW detectability strongly depends on the radial profile of the DM distribution. So if the GW is detected, the power index, that is, the DM density distribution would be determined very accurately. The DM density distribution obtained would make it clear how the IMBH has evolved from a seed BH and whether the IMBH has experienced major mergers in the past. Unlike the gamma ray observations of DM annihilation, GW is just sensitive to the radial profile of the DM distribution and even to non-interacting DM. Hence the effect we demonstrate here can be used as a new and powerful pro...

  12. Efimov Superchemistry:Quantum Dynamical Theory for Coherent Atom-Trimer Conversion in a Repulsive Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Hui; GENG Zhen-Duo

    2008-01-01

    @@ We show that by making a generalized atom-molecule dark state,coherent creation of triatomic molecules can be enhanced in a repulsive atomic Bose-Einstein condensate.The dynamics of heteronuclear trimer creation is significantJy different from the homonuclear case and further enhancement can be realized by controlling its chemical reaction channels,The possibility of manipulating atom-trimer conversion provides an appealing research area for current coherent matter-wave optics.

  13. Train of high-power femtosecond pulses: Probe wave in a gas of prepared atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradyan, Gevorg; Muradyan, Atom Zh.

    2009-09-01

    We present a method for generating a regular train of ultrashort optical pulses in a prepared two-level medium. The train develops from incident monochromatic probe radiation traveling in a medium of atoms, which are in a quantum mechanical superposition of dressed internal states. In the frame of linear theory for the probe radiation, the energy of individual pulses is an exponentially growing function of atom density and of interaction cross section. Pulse repetition rate is determined by the pump field’s generalized Rabi frequency and can be around 1 THz and greater. We also show that the terms, extra to the dipole approximation, endow the gas by a new property: nonsaturating dependence of refractive index on dressing monochromatic field intensity. Contribution of these nonsaturating terms can be compatible with the main dipole approximation term contribution in the wavelength region of about ten micrometers (the range of CO2 laser) or larger.

  14. Kinetic-energy matrix elements for atomic Hylleraas-CI wave functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Frank E

    2016-05-28

    Hylleraas-CI is a superposition-of-configurations method in which each configuration is constructed from a Slater-type orbital (STO) product to which is appended (linearly) at most one interelectron distance rij. Computations of the kinetic energy for atoms by this method have been difficult due to the lack of formulas expressing these matrix elements for general angular momentum in terms of overlap and potential-energy integrals. It is shown here that a strategic application of angular-momentum theory, including the use of vector spherical harmonics, enables the reduction of all atomic kinetic-energy integrals to overlap and potential-energy matrix elements. The new formulas are validated by showing that they yield correct results for a large number of integrals published by other investigators.

  15. Dynamics of atomic spin-orbit-state wave packets produced by short-pulse laser photodetachment

    CERN Document Server

    Law, S M K

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the experiment by Hultgren et al. [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 87}, 031404 (2013)] on orbital alignment and quantum beats in coherently excited atomic fine-structure manifolds produced by short-pulse laser photodetachment of C$^-$, Si$^-$ and Ge$^-$ negative ions, and derive a formula that describes the beats. Analysis of the experimental data enables us to extract the non-coherent background contribution for each species, and indicates the need for a full density matrix treatment of the problem.

  16. Faraday Waves in Cold-Atom Systems with Two- and Three-Body Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomio, Lauro; Gammal, A.; Abdullaev, F. K.

    2017-03-01

    We report an investigation on Bose-Einstein condensates with two-body (cubic) and three-body (quintic) interactions in the corresponding nonlinear Schrödinger equation, considering s-wave two-body scattering length a_s periodically varying in time. For the quintic interacting term, the dependence on a_s was considered within two models, being quadratic or quartic. It was shown that parametric instabilities can lead to th e generation of Faraday wave resonances in this system, with wavelengths depending on the background scattering length, as well as on the corresponding modulation parameters. A few sample results are shown here for repulsive a_s, in case of quadratic and quartic three-body interactions. The effect of dissipation is also verified on the amplitude of the resonances. Analytical predictions for the resonance positions are confirmed by our numerical simulations.

  17. Contrasting Galaxy Formation from Quantum Wave Dark Matter, $\\psi$DM, with $\\Lambda$CDM, using Planck and Hubble Data

    CERN Document Server

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Broadhurst, Tom; Huang, Kuan-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The newly established luminosity functions of high-z galaxies at $4 \\lesssim z \\lesssim 10$ can provide a stringent check on dark matter models that aim to explain the core properties of dwarf galaxies. The cores of dwarf spheroidal galaxies are understood to be too large to be accounted for by free streaming of warm dark matter without overly suppressing the formation of such galaxies. Here we demonstrate with cosmological simulations that wave dark matter, $\\psi$DM, appropriate for light bosons such as axions, does not suffer this problem, given a boson mass of $m_{\\psi} \\ge 1.2 \\times 10^{-22}{\\,\\rm eV}$ ($2\\sigma$). In this case, the halo mass function is suppressed below $\\sim 10^{10}{\\,M_\\odot}$ at a level that is consistent with the high-z luminosity functions, while simultaneously generating the kpc-scale cores in dwarf galaxies arising from the solitonic ground state in $\\psi$DM. We demonstrate that the reionization history in this scenario is consistent with the Thomson optical depth recently report...

  18. A study of the origin, nature, and behavior of particulate matter and metallic atoms in the mesosphere, lower thermosphere, and at the mesopause. [using lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poultney, S. K.

    1973-01-01

    In a study of particulate matter and metallic atoms in the vicinity of the mesopause, three areas have received the most effort. These areas are: the significance of cometary dust influxes to the earth's atmosphere; the relation of nightglows to atmospheric motions and aerosols; and the feasibility of using an airborne resonant scatter lidar to study polar noctilucent clouds, the sodium layer, and fireball dust.

  19. Quantifying uncertainty in the measurement of arsenic in suspended particulate matter by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with hydride generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahuja Tarushee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Arsenic is the toxic element, which creates several problems in human being specially when inhaled through air. So the accurate and precise measurement of arsenic in suspended particulate matter (SPM is of prime importance as it gives information about the level of toxicity in the environment, and preventive measures could be taken in the effective areas. Quality assurance is equally important in the measurement of arsenic in SPM samples before making any decision. The quality and reliability of the data of such volatile elements depends upon the measurement of uncertainty of each step involved from sampling to analysis. The analytical results quantifying uncertainty gives a measure of the confidence level of the concerned laboratory. So the main objective of this study was to determine arsenic content in SPM samples with uncertainty budget and to find out various potential sources of uncertainty, which affects the results. Keeping these facts, we have selected seven diverse sites of Delhi (National Capital of India for quantification of arsenic content in SPM samples with uncertainty budget following sampling by HVS to analysis by Atomic Absorption Spectrometer-Hydride Generator (AAS-HG. In the measurement of arsenic in SPM samples so many steps are involved from sampling to final result and we have considered various potential sources of uncertainties. The calculation of uncertainty is based on ISO/IEC17025: 2005 document and EURACHEM guideline. It has been found that the final results mostly depend on the uncertainty in measurement mainly due to repeatability, final volume prepared for analysis, weighing balance and sampling by HVS. After the analysis of data of seven diverse sites of Delhi, it has been concluded that during the period from 31st Jan. 2008 to 7th Feb. 2008 the arsenic concentration varies from 1.44 ± 0.25 to 5.58 ± 0.55 ng/m3 with 95% confidence level (k = 2.

  20. Controlling multi-wave mixing signals via photonic band gap of electromagnetically induced absorption grating in atomic media

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiqi; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Chen, Haixia; Zhang, Huaibin; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate dressed multi-wave mixing (MWM) and the reflection of the probe beam due to electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) grating can coexist in a five-level atomic ensemble. The reflection is derived from the photonic band gap (PBG) of EIA grating, which is much broader than the PBG of EIT grating. Therefore, EIA-type PBG can reflect more energy from probe than EIT-type PBG does, which can effectively affect the MWM signal. The EIA-type as well as EIT-type PBG can be controlled by multiple parameters including the frequency detunings, propagation angles and powers of the involved light fields. Also, the EIA-type PBG by considering both the linear and third-order nonlinear refractive indices is also investigated. The theoretical analysis agrees well with the experimental results. This investigation has potential applications in all-optical communication and information processing.

  1. Storage and Retrieval of Image using a Four-Wave Mixing System in a Cold Atomic Ensemble

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jinghui; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Shi, Baosen; Zou, Xubo; Guo, Guangcan

    2012-01-01

    We realized storage and retrieval of image of light in a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap of Rubidium 85 using a four-wave mixing system. When we imprint an image on a signal laser beam, the generated idler field also carries this image information. The retrieved signal and idler fields are observed this image information. That means the spatial patterns of the signal and idler are simultaneously mapped into the long-lived ground state coherence of the atoms. It is worth noticing that the retrieval efficiency is oscillating due to the time evolution of the ground state coherence in a uniform magnetic field. This image storage result holds promise for application in image processing, remote sensing and quantum communication.

  2. Continuous-wave, single-frequency 229  nm laser source for laser cooling of cadmium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Yushi; Yarborough, J M; Merzlyak, Yevgeny; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayashida, Keitaro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-02-15

    Continuous-wave output at 229 nm for the application of laser cooling of Cd atoms was generated by the fourth harmonic using two successive second-harmonic generation stages. Employing a single-frequency optically pumped semiconductor laser as a fundamental source, 0.56 W of output at 229 nm was observed with a 10-mm long, Brewster-cut BBO crystal in an external cavity with 1.62 W of 458 nm input. Conversion efficiency from 458 nm to 229 nm was more than 34%. By applying a tapered amplifier (TA) as a fundamental source, we demonstrated magneto-optical trapping of all stable Cd isotopes including isotopes Cd111 and Cd113, which are applicable to optical lattice clocks.

  3. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Subsonic radiation waves in neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loseva, T. V.; Nemchinov, I. V.

    1989-02-01

    Numerical methods are used to investigate the propagation of plane subsonic radiation waves in neon from an obstacle in the direction opposite to the incident radiation of Nd and CO2 lasers. An analysis is made of the influence of the power density of the incident radiation (in the range 10-100 MW/cm2) and of the initial density of neon (beginning from the normal valuep ρ0 up to 10ρ0) on the various characteristics of subsonic radiation waves. It is shown that waves traveling in neon can provide an effective source of radiation with a continuous spectrum and an efficiency of ~ 12-27% in the ultraviolet range (with a characteristic photon energy ~ 5-10 eV).

  4. High frequency surface acoustic wave resonator-based sensor for particulate matter detection

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Sanju; Cole, Marina; Villa-López, Farah Helue; Gardner, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of high frequency Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator-based (SAWR) sensors, for the detection of micron and sub-micron sized particles. The sensor comprises two 262 MHz ST-cut quartz based Rayleigh wave SAWRs where one is used for particle detection and the other as a reference. Electro-acoustic detection of different sized particles shows a strong relationship between mass sensitivity (Δf/Δm) and particle diameter (Dp). This enables frequency-dependent S...

  5. Spin-wave storage using chirped control fields in atomic frequency comb-based quantum memory

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that an inhomogeneously broadened optical transition shaped into an atomic frequency comb can store a large number of temporal modes of the electromagnetic field at the single photon level without the need to increase the optical depth of the storage material. The readout of light modes is made efficient thanks to the rephasing of the optical-wavelength coherence similarly to photon echo-type techniques and the re-emission time is given by the comb structure. For on-demand r...

  6. Self-Channeling of High-Power Long-Wave Infrared Pulses in Atomic Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, K.; Kolesik, M.; Wright, E. M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.

    2017-02-01

    We simulate and elucidate the self-channeling of high-power 10 μ m infrared pulses in atomic gases. The major new result is that the peak intensity can remain remarkably stable over many Rayleigh ranges. This arises from the balance between the self-focusing, diffraction, and defocusing caused by the excitation induced dephasing due to many-body Coulomb effects that enhance the low-intensity plasma densities. This new paradigm removes the Rayleigh range limit for sources in the 8 - 12 μ m atmospheric transmission window and enables transport of individual multi-TW pulses over multiple kilometer ranges.

  7. Zero-order filter for diffractive focusing of de Broglie matter waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eder, S. D.; Ravn, A. K.; Samelin, B.

    2017-01-01

    conditions the atom focusing at lower source stagnation pressures (broader velocity distributions) is better than what has previously been predicted. We present simulations with the software ray-tracing simulation package MCSTAS using a realistic helium source configuration, which gives very good agreement...

  8. Atomic scale images of acceptors in III-V semiconductors. Band bending, tunneling paths and wave functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loth, S.

    2007-10-26

    This thesis reports measurements of single dopant atoms in III-V semiconductors with low temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS). It investigates the anisotropic spatial distribution of acceptor induced tunneling processes at the {l_brace}110{r_brace} cleavage planes. Two different tunneling processes are identified: conventional imaging of the squared acceptor wave function and resonant tunneling at the charged acceptor. A thorough analysis of the tip induced space charge layers identifies characteristic bias windows for each tunnel process. The symmetry of the host crystal's band structure determines the spatial distribution of the tunneling paths for both processes. Symmetry reducing effects at the surface are responsible for a pronounced asymmetry of the acceptor contrasts along the principal [001] axis. Uniaxial strain fields due to surface relaxation and spin orbit interaction of the tip induced electric field are discussed on the basis of band structure calculations. High-resolution STS studies of acceptor atoms in an operating p-i-n diode confirm that an electric field indeed changes the acceptor contrasts. In conclusion, the anisotropic contrasts of acceptors are created by the host crystal's band structure and concomitant symmetry reduction effects at the surface. (orig.)

  9. Electronic and atomic structures of the Sr3Ir4Sn13 single crystal: A possible charge density wave material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.-T.; Srivastava, M. K.; Wu, C.-C.; Hsieh, S.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.; Shao, Y.-C.; Liang, Y.-H.; Du, C.-H.; Chiou, J.-W.; Cheng, C.-M.; Chen, J.-L.; Pao, C.-W.; Lee, J.-F.; Kuo, C. N.; Lue, C. S.; Wu, M.-K.; Pong, W.-F.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray scattering (XRS), x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic techniques were used to study the electronic and atomic structures of the high-quality Sr3Ir4Sn13 (SIS) single crystal below and above the transition temperature (T* ≈ 147 K). The evolution of a series of modulated satellite peaks below the transition temperature in the XRS experiment indicated the formation of a possible charge density wave (CDW) in the (110) plane. The EXAFS phase derivative analysis supports the CDW-like formation by revealing different bond distances [Sn1(2)-Sn2] below and above T* in the (110) plane. XANES spectra at the Ir L3-edge and Sn K-edge demonstrated an increase (decrease) in the unoccupied (occupied) density of Ir 5d-derived states and a nearly constant density of Sn 5p-derived states at temperatures T atomic structures and the CDW-like phase in the SIS single crystal. PMID:28106144

  10. A CALCULATION OF SEMI-EMPIRICAL ONE-ELECTRON WAVE FUNCTIONS FOR MULTI-ELECTRON ATOMS USED FOR ELEMENTARY PROCESS SIMULATION IN NONLOCAL PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Tchernycheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The paper deals with development outcomes for creation method of one-electron wave functions of complex atoms, relatively simple, symmetrical for all atom electrons and free from hard computations. The accuracy and resource intensity of the approach are focused on systematic calculations of cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes of inelastic collisions of atoms or molecules with electrons (ionization, excitation, excitation transfer, and others. Method. The method is based on a set of two iterative processes. At the first iteration step the Schrödinger equation was solved numerically for the radial parts of the electron wave functions in the potential of the atomic core self-consistent field. At the second iteration step the new approximationfor the atomic core field is created that uses found solutions for all one-electron wave functions. The solution optimization for described multiparameter problem is achieved by the use of genetic algorithm. The suitability of the developed method was verified by comparing the calculation results with numerous data on the energies of atoms in the ground and excited states. Main Results. We have created the run-time version of the program for creation of sets of one-electron wave functions and calculation of the cross sections and constants of collisional transition rates in the first Born approximation. The priori available information about binding energies of the electrons for any many-particle system for creation of semi-empirical refined solutions for the one-electron wave functions can be considered at any step of this procedure. Practical Relevance. The proposed solution enables a simple and rapid preparation of input data for the numerical simulation of nonlocal gas discharge plasma. The approach is focused on the calculation of discharges in complex gas mixtures requiring inclusion in the model of a large number of elementary collisional and radiation

  11. Non-triviality matters: examining the interplay between s-wave superconductivity and topological surface states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snelder, Marieke

    2015-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is to understand the correlations present at the s-wave/three-dimensional topological insulator interface both theoretically and experimentally. In the future, devices containing these kind of interfaces can be used to create and manipulate a Majorana zero-energy mode w

  12. Decay of Langmuir wave in dense plasmas and warm dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Son, S; Moon, Sung Joon

    2010-01-01

    The decays of the Langmuir waves in dense plasmas are computed using the dielectric function theory widely used in the solid state physics. Four cases are considered: a classical plasma, a Maxwellian plasma, a degenerate quantum plasma, and a partially degenerate plasma. The result is considerably different from the conventional Landau damping theory.

  13. Polarized Spatial Splitting of Four-Wave Mixing Signal in Multi-Level Atomic Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yu-Xin; ZHAO Jin-Yan; SONG Yue; DAI Guo-Xian; HUO Shu-Li; ZHANG Yan-Peng

    2011-01-01

    @@ We illustrate our experimental observation of the periodic changes of spatial splitting of the generated four-wave mixing(FWM)signal induced by different polarization states of one of the dressing beams.It is pointed out that the changes of intensity of the dressing beam and the FWM signal have influences on the spatial splitting and their influences compete with each other.The differences between p- and s-polarized FWM beams are demonstrated.The influences of the dressing beams, which lead to the larger spatial splitting with different polarization states or frequency detuning, are observed as well.%We illustrate our experimental observation of the periodic changes of spatial splitting of the generated four-wave mixing (FWM) signal induced by different polarization states of one of the dressing beams. It is pointed out that the changes of intensity of the dressing beam and the FWM signal have influences on the spatial splitting and their influences compete with each other. The differences between p- and s-polarized FWM beams are demonstrated.The influences of the dressing beams, which lead to the larger spatial splitting with different polarization states or frequency detuning, are observed as well.

  14. Understanding the core-halo relation of quantum wave dark matter from 3D simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Liao, Ming-Hsuan; Woo, Tak-Pong; Wong, Shing-Kwong; Chiueh, Tzihong; Broadhurst, Tom; Hwang, W-Y Pauchy

    2014-12-31

    We examine the nonlinear structure of gravitationally collapsed objects that form in our simulations of wavelike cold dark matter, described by the Schrödinger-Poisson (SP) equation with a particle mass ∼10(-22)  eV. A distinct gravitationally self-bound solitonic core is found at the center of every halo, with a profile quite different from cores modeled in the warm or self-interacting dark matter scenarios. Furthermore, we show that each solitonic core is surrounded by an extended halo composed of large fluctuating dark matter granules which modulate the halo density on a scale comparable to the diameter of the solitonic core. The scaling symmetry of the SP equation and the uncertainty principle tightly relate the core mass to the halo specific energy, which, in the context of cosmological structure formation, leads to a simple scaling between core mass (Mc) and halo mass (Mh), Mc∝a(-1/2)Mh(1/3), where a is the cosmic scale factor. We verify this scaling relation by (i) examining the internal structure of a statistical sample of virialized halos that form in our 3D cosmological simulations and by (ii) merging multiple solitons to create individual virialized objects. Sufficient simulation resolution is achieved by adaptive mesh refinement and graphic processing units acceleration. From this scaling relation, present dwarf satellite galaxies are predicted to have kiloparsec-sized cores and a minimum mass of ∼10(8)M⊙, capable of solving the small-scale controversies in the cold dark matter model. Moreover, galaxies of 2×10(12)M⊙ at z=8 should have massive solitonic cores of ∼2×10(9)M⊙ within ∼60  pc. Such cores can provide a favorable local environment for funneling the gas that leads to the prompt formation of early stellar spheroids and quasars.

  15. A unified explanation for dark matter and electroweak baryogenesis with direct detection and gravitational wave signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Chala, Mikael; Sobolev, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    A minimal extension of the Standard Model that provides both a dark matter candidate and a strong first-order electroweak phase transition (EWPT) consists of two additional Lorentz and gauge singlets. In this paper we work out a composite Higgs version of this scenario, based on the coset $SO(7)/SO(6)$. We show that by embedding the elementary fermions in appropriate representations of $SO(7)$, all dominant interactions are described by only three free effective parameters. Within the model dependencies of the embedding, the theory predicts one of the singlets to be stable and responsible for the observed dark matter abundance. At the same time, the second singlet introduces new $CP$-violation phases and triggers a strong first-order EWPT, making electroweak baryogenesis feasible. It turns out that this scenario does not conflict with current observations and it is promising for solving the dark matter and baryon asymmetry puzzles. The tight predictions of the model will be accessible at the forthcoming dark ...

  16. d-wave superfluid with gapless edges in a cold-atom trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne-Louise Gadsbølle; Francis Song, H.; Le Hur, Karyn

    2012-01-01

    We consider a strongly repulsive fermionic gas in a two-dimensional optical lattice confined by a harmonic trapping potential. To address the strongly repulsive regime, we consider the t-J Hamiltonian. The presence of the harmonic trapping potential enables the stabilization of coexisting and com...... is revealed by a downturn of the Fermi liquid order parameter at the center of the trap where the d-wave gap has a maximum. The density profile evolves linearly with distance.......We consider a strongly repulsive fermionic gas in a two-dimensional optical lattice confined by a harmonic trapping potential. To address the strongly repulsive regime, we consider the t-J Hamiltonian. The presence of the harmonic trapping potential enables the stabilization of coexisting...

  17. Experimental Demonstration of Direct Path State Characterization by Strongly Measuring Weak Values in a Matter-Wave Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkmayr, Tobias; Geppert, Hermann; Lemmel, Hartmut; Waegell, Mordecai; Dressel, Justin; Hasegawa, Yuji; Sponar, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    A method was recently proposed and experimentally realized for characterizing a quantum state by directly measuring its complex probability amplitudes in a particular basis using so-called weak values. Recently, Vallone and Dequal [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 040502 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.040502] showed theoretically that weak measurements are not a necessary condition to determine the weak value. Here, we report a measurement scheme used in a matter-wave interferometric experiment in which the neutron path system's quantum state was characterized via direct measurements, using both strong and weak interactions. Experimental evidence is given that strong interactions outperform weak ones for tomographic accuracy. Our results are not limited to neutron interferometry, but can be used in a wide range of quantum systems.

  18. Study of double bond equivalents and the numbers of carbon and oxygen atom distribution of dissolved organic matter with negative-mode FT-ICR MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, EunJung; Yeo, In Joon; Jeong, Byungkwan; Shin, Yongsik; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2011-06-01

    A strong linear relationship was observed between the average double bond equivalence (DBE) and the ratio of carbon to oxygen atoms in oxygenated compounds of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Data were acquired by a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS), equipped with a negative-mode electrospray ionization source. The slope and y-intercepts extracted from the linear relationship can be used to compare DOM samples originating from different locations. Significant differences in these parameters were observed between inland riverine and offshore coastal DOM samples. Offshore coastal DOM molecules underwent a change of one DBE for each removal or addition of two oxygen atoms. This suggested the existence of multiple carboxyl groups, each of which contains a double bond and two oxygen atoms. Inland riverine samples exhibited a change of ~1.5 DBE following the addition or removal of two oxygen atoms. This extra change in DBE was attributed to cyclic structures or unsaturated chemical bonds. The DBE value with maximum relative abundance and the minimum DBE value for each class of oxygenated compounds showed that approximately two oxygen atoms contributed to a unity change in DBE. The qualitative analyses given here are in a good agreement with results obtained from analyses using orthogonal analytical techniques. This study demonstrates that DBE and the carbon number distribution, observed by high resolution mass spectrometry, can be valuable in elucidating and comparing structural features of oxygenated molecules of DOM.

  19. What is matter? The unchangeable, atoms and the nothing, electromagnetic fields, quantum mechanics; Was ist Materie? Das Unveraenderbare, Atome und das Nichts, Elektromagnetische Felder, Quantenmechanik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, Harald [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Astronomie; Hochschule fuer Philosophie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    In this CD an introduction is given to the philosophical description of matter starting from the philosophy of Demokrit and scholastics, going then via classical mechanics to the terms of fields, and concluding finally with quantum mechanics and the fundamental structure of particles together with a consideration of cosmology. (HSI)

  20. Matter-wave solutions of Bose-Einstein condensates with three-body interaction in linear magnetic and time-dependent laser fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Etienne Wamba; Timoléon C. Kofané; Alidou Mohamadou

    2012-01-01

    We construct,through a further extension of the tanh-function method,the matter-wave solutions of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with a three-body interaction.The BECs are trapped in a potential comprising the linear magnetic and the time-dependent laser fields.The exact solutions obtained include soliton solutions,such as kink and antikink as well as bright,dark,multisolitonic modulated waves.We realize that the motion and the shape of the solitary wave can be manipulated by controlling the strengths of the fields.

  1. Evolution of Matter Wave Interference of Bose-Condensed Gas in a 2D Optical Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUZhi-Jun; LINGuo-Cheng; XUJun; LIZhen

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the average particle-number distribution of the atoms in the combined potential of 2D optical lattices and 31) harmonic magnetic trap based on the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. After the combined potential is switched of[, and only the optical lattice is switched off, we give the analytical results of the wavefunction of the Bosecondensed gas at any time t by using a propagator method. For both disk-shaped and cigar-shaped Bose-condensed gas,we discuss the evolution process of the central and side peaks of the interference pattern.

  2. Incommensurate atomic density waves in the high-pressure IVb phase of barium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Arakcheeva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The host–guest structures of elements at high pressure discovered a decade ago still leave many open questions due to the lack of precise models based on full exploitation of the diffraction data. This concerns in particular Ba IV, which is stable in the range 12–45 GPa. With the example of phase Ba IVb, which is characterized here for the first time, a systematic analysis is presented of possible host–guest structure models based on high-quality single-crystal diffraction data obtained with synchrotron radiation at six different pressures between 16.5 and 19.6 GPa. It is shown that a new incommensurately modulated (IM structure model better fits the experimental data. Unlike the composite models which are commonly reported for the Ba IV phases, the IM model reveals a density wave and its pressure-dependent evolution. The crucial role played by the selected model in the interpretation of structure evolution under pressure is discussed. The findings give a new experimental basis for a better understanding of the nature of host–guest structures.

  3. Unified field theory from the classical wave equation: Preliminary application to atomic and nuclear structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múnera, Héctor A.

    2016-07-01

    It is postulated that there exists a fundamental energy-like fluid, which occupies the flat three-dimensional Euclidean space that contains our universe, and obeys the two basic laws of classical physics: conservation of linear momentum, and conservation of total energy; the fluid is described by the classical wave equation (CWE), which was Schrödinger's first candidate to develop his quantum theory. Novel solutions for the CWE discovered twenty years ago are nonharmonic, inherently quantized, and universal in the sense of scale invariance, thus leading to quantization at all scales of the universe, from galactic clusters to the sub-quark world, and yielding a unified Lorentz-invariant quantum theory ab initio. Quingal solutions are isomorphic under both neo-Galilean and Lorentz transformations, and exhibit nother remarkable property: intrinsic unstability for large values of ℓ (a quantum number), thus limiting the size of each system at a given scale. Unstability and scale-invariance together lead to nested structures observed in our solar system; unstability may explain the small number of rows in the chemical periodic table, and nuclear unstability of nuclides beyond lead and bismuth. Quingal functions lend mathematical basis for Boscovich's unified force (which is compatible with many pieces of evidence collected over the past century), and also yield a simple geometrical solution for the classical three-body problem, which is a useful model for electronic orbits in simple diatomic molecules. A testable prediction for the helicoidal-type force is suggested.

  4. Nonadiabatic quantum chaos in atom optics

    CERN Document Server

    Prants, S V

    2012-01-01

    Coherent dynamics of atomic matter waves in a standing-wave laser field is studied. In the dressed-state picture, wave packets of ballistic two-level atoms propagate simultaneously in two optical potentials. The probability to make a transition from one potential to another one is maximal when centroids of wave packets cross the field nodes and is given by a simple formula with the single exponent, the Landau--Zener parameter $\\kappa$. If $\\kappa \\gg 1$, the motion is essentially adiabatic. If $\\kappa \\ll 1$, it is (almost) resonant and periodic. If $\\kappa \\simeq 1$, atom makes nonadiabatic transitions with a splitting of its wave packet at each node and strong complexification of the wave function as compared to the two other cases. This effect is referred as nonadiabatic quantum chaos. Proliferation of wave packets at $\\kappa \\simeq 1$ is shown to be connected closely with chaotic center-of-mass motion in the semiclassical theory of point-like atoms with positive values of the maximal Lyapunov exponent. Th...

  5. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1989-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  6. Gravitational waves in dynamical spacetimes with matter content in the Fully Constrained Formulation

    CERN Document Server

    Cordero-Carrión, Isabel; Ibáñez, José María

    2011-01-01

    The Fully Constrained Formulation (FCF) of General Relativity is a novel framework introduced as an alternative to the hyperbolic formulations traditionally used in numerical relativity. The FCF equations form a hybrid elliptic-hyperbolic system of equations including explicitly the constraints. We present an implicit-explicit numerical algorithm to solve the hyperbolic part, whereas the elliptic sector shares the form and properties with the well known Conformally Flat Condition (CFC) approximation. We show the stability andconvergence properties of the numerical scheme with numerical simulations of vacuum solutions. We have performed the first numerical evolutions of the coupled system of hydrodynamics and Einstein equations within FCF. As a proof of principle of the viability of the formalism, we present 2D axisymmetric simulations of an oscillating neutron star. In order to simplify the analysis we have neglected the back-reaction of the gravitational waves into the dynamics, which is small (<2 %) for ...

  7. Average-atom model for two-temperature states and ionic transport properties of aluminum in the warm dense matter regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yong; Fu, Yongsheng; Bredow, Richard; Kang, Dongdong; Redmer, Ronald; Yuan, Jianmin

    2017-03-01

    The average-atom model combined with the hyper-netted chain approximation is an efficient tool for electronic and ionic structure calculations for warm dense matter. Here we generalize this method in order to describe non-equilibrium states with different electron and ion temperature as produced in laser-matter interactions on ultra-short time scales. In particular, the electron-ion and ion-ion correlation effects are considered when calculating the electron structure. We derive an effective ion-ion pair-potential using the electron densities in the framework of temperature-depended density functional theory. Using this ion-ion potential we perform molecular dynamics simulations in order to determine the ionic transport properties such as the ionic diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity through the ionic velocity autocorrelation functions.

  8. Zinc sulfide and terbium-doped zinc sulfide films grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, S J; Nam, K S

    1998-01-01

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) and terbium-doped ZnS (ZnS:Tb) thin films were grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). In the present work, ZnCl sub 2 , H sub 2 S, and tris (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptandionato) terbium (Tb(tmhd) sub 3) were used as the precursors. The dependence of crystallinity and Cl content of ZnS films was investigated on the growth temperature. ZnS and ZnS:Tb films grown at temperatures ranging from 400 to 500 .deg. C showed a hexagonal-2H crystalline structure. The crystallinity of ZnS film was greatly enhanced as the temperature increased. At growth temperatures higher than 450.deg.C, the films showed preferred orientation with mainly (002) diffraction peak. The Cl content decreased from approximately 9 to 1 at.% with the increase in growth temperature from 400 to 500 .deg. C. The segregation of Cl near the surface region and the incorporation of O from Tb(tmhd) sub 3 during ALE process were also observed using Auger electron spectroscopy. The ALE-grown ZnS and ZnS:Tb films re...

  9. Atom chip gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  10. Universal diffraction of atoms and molecules from a quantum reflection grating

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, B.; W. Zhang; Schöllkopf, W.

    2016-01-01

    Since de Broglie’s work on the wave nature of particles, various optical phenomena have been observed with matter waves of atoms and molecules. However, the analogy between classical and atom/molecule optics is not exact because of different dispersion relations. In addition, according to de Broglie’s formula, different combinations of particle mass and velocity can give the same de Broglie wavelength. As a result, even for identical wavelengths, different molecular properties such as electri...

  11. Richard L. Greene Dissertation Award in Experimental Condensed Matter or Materials Physics Talk: Towards single atom magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Susanne

    Magnetic anisotropy is a fundamental property of magnetic materials that governs the stability and directionality of their magnetization. At the atomic level, magnetic anisotropy originates from anisotropy in the orbital angular momentum (L) and the spin-orbit coupling that connects the spin moment of a magnetic atom to the spatial symmetry of its ligand field environment. Generally, the ligand field, that is necessary for the anisotropy, also quenches the orbital moment and reduces the total magnetic moment of the atom to its spin component. However, careful design of the coordination geometry of a single atom can restore the orbital moment while inducing uniaxial anisotropy, as we present here for single atoms deposited on top of a thin MgO film. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements show a large magnetic anisotropy of 19 meV for iron and 58 meV for cobalt, as well as relaxation times of many milliseconds. These results offer a strategy, based on symmetry arguments and careful tailoring of the interaction with the environment, for the rational design of nanoscopic permanent magnets and single atom magnets.

  12. The collapse of the wave function in the joint metric-matter quantization for inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    It has been argued that the standard inflationary scenario suffers from a serious deficiency as a model for the origin of the seeds of cosmic structure: it can not truly account for the transition from an early homogeneous and isotropic stage to another one lacking such symmetries. The issue has often been thought as a standard instance of the "quantum measurement problem", but as has been recently argued by some of us the situation reaches a critical level in the cosmological context of interest here. This has lead to a proposal in which the standard paradigm is supplemented by a hypothesis concerning the self-induced dynamical collapse of the wave function, as representing the physical mechanism through which such change of symmetry is brought forth. This proposal was formulated within the context of semiclassical gravity. Here we investigate an alternative realization of such idea implemented directly within the standard analysis in terms of a quantum field jointly describing the inflaton and metric pertur...

  13. Effective equations for matter-wave gap solitons in higher-order transversal states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, A Muñoz; Delgado, V

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate that an important class of nonlinear stationary solutions of the three-dimensional (3D) Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) exhibiting nontrivial transversal configurations can be found and characterized in terms of an effective one-dimensional (1D) model. Using a variational approach we derive effective equations of lower dimensionality for BECs in (m,n(r)) transversal states (states featuring a central vortex of charge m as well as n(r) concentric zero-density rings at every z plane) which provides us with a good approximate solution of the original 3D problem. Since the specifics of the transversal dynamics can be absorbed in the renormalization of a couple of parameters, the functional form of the equations obtained is universal. The model proposed finds its principal application in the study of the existence and classification of 3D gap solitons supported by 1D optical lattices, where in addition to providing a good estimate for the 3D wave functions it is able to make very good predictions for the μ(N) curves characterizing the different fundamental families. We have corroborated the validity of our model by comparing its predictions with those from the exact numerical solution of the full 3D GPE.

  14. Complex Scalar Field Dark Matter and the Stochastic Gravitational Wave Background from Inflation: New Cosmological Constraints and Detectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bohua; Shapiro, Paul R.; Rindler-Daller, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    We consider an alternative to WIMP cold dark matter (CDM), ultralight bosonic dark matter (m≥10-22 eV) described by a complex scalar field (SFDM), of which the comoving particle number density is conserved after particle production during standard reheating (w=p/ρ=0). In a ΛSFDM universe, SFDM starts relativistic, evolving from stiff (w=1) to radiation-like (w=1/3), before becoming nonrelativistic at late times (w=0). Thus, before the familiar radiation-dominated phase, there is an even earlier phase of stiff-SFDM-domination, during which the expansion rate is higher than in ΛCDM. The transitions between these phases, determined by SFDM particle mass m, and coupling strength λ, of a quartic self-interaction, are therefore constrained by cosmological observables, particularly Neff, the effective number of neutrino species during BBN, and zeq, the redshift of matter-radiation equality. Furthermore, since the homogeneous energy density contributed by the stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB) from inflation is amplified during the stiff phase, relative to the other components, the SGWB can contribute a radiation-like component large enough to affect these observables. This same amplification makes possible detection of this SGWB at high frequencies by current laser interferometer experiments, e.g., aLIGO/Virgo, eLISA. For SFDM particle parameters that satisfy these cosmological constraints, the amplified SGWB is detectable by aLIGO, for values of tensor-to-scalar ratio r currently allowed by CMB polarization measurements, for a broad range of possible reheat temperatures Tre. For a given r, if SFDM parameters marginally satisfy cosmological constraints (maximizing total SGWB energy density), the SGWB is maximally detectable when modes that reenter the horizon when reheating ends have frequencies in the 10-50 Hz aLIGO band today. For example, if r=0.01, the maximally detectable model for (λ/(mc2)2, m)=(10-18 eV-1cm3, 8×10-20 eV) has Tre=104 GeV, for

  15. Phase-modulated electronic wave-packet interferometry reveals high resolution vibronic spectra of free Rb atoms and Rb*He molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bruder, Lukas; Stienkemeier, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Phase-modulated wave-packet interferometry is combined with mass-resolved photoion detection to investigate rubidium atoms attached to helium nanodroplets in a molecular beam experiment. The spectra of atomic Rb electronic states show a vastly enhanced sensitivity and spectral resolution when compared to conventional pump-probe wave-packet interferometry. Furthermore, the formation of Rb*He exciplex molecules is probed and for the first time a fully resolved vibrational spectrum for transitions between the lowest excited $5\\Pi_{3/2}$ and the high-lying electronic states $2^2\\Pi$, $4^2\\Delta$, $6^2\\Sigma$ is obtained and compared to theory. The feasibility of applying coherent multidimensional spectroscopy to dilute cold gas phase samples is demonstrated in these experiments.

  16. Creation evidence of the second non-dispersive Zakharenko wave by helium atomic beams in superfluid helium-II at low temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A A Zakharenko

    2007-10-01

    In this work, the experimental results of the creation of the second non-dispersive Zakharenko wave (ph = g ≠ 0) in the negative roton branch (the so-called second sound) of the bulk elementary excitations (BEEs) energy spectra are introduced. Several BEE signals detected by a bolometer situated in the isotopically pure liquid helium-II at low temperatures ∼ 100 mK are shown, which give evidence of negative roton creation in the liquid by helium atomic beams striking the liquid surface. The negative roton signals were clearly distinguished by the following ways: the negative roton signal created by helium atomic beams appeared earlier than the positive roton signal created by the beams, and presence of both positive and negative roton signals together. It is natural that the negative roton creation by the beams requires the 4He-atom energies ∼ 12 K, while the positive roton creation by the atomic beams requires energies ∼ 35 K. Therefore, successive increase in the heater power resulting in an increase in the 4He-atom energies gives solid evidence that the negative rotons are first created in the liquid by the helium atomic beams.

  17. Quantum–classical correspondence in chaotic dynamics of laser-driven atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prants, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    This paper is a review article on some aspects of quantum–classical correspondence in chaotic dynamics of cold atoms interacting with a standing-wave laser field forming an optical lattice. The problem is treated from both (semi)classical and quantum points of view. In both approaches, the interaction of an atomic electic dipole with the laser field is treated quantum mechanically. Translational motion is described, at first, classically (atoms are considered to be point-like objects) and then quantum mechanically as a propagation of matter waves. Semiclassical equations of motion are shown to be chaotic in the sense of classical dynamical chaos. Point-like atoms in an absolutely deterministic and rigid optical lattice can move in a random-like manner demonstrating a chaotic walking with typical features of classical chaos. This behavior is explained by random-like ‘jumps’ of one of the atomic internal variable when atoms cross nodes of the standing wave and occurs in a specific range of the atom-field detuning. When treating atoms as matter waves, we show that they can make nonadiabatic transitions when crossing the standing-wave nodes. The point is that atomic wave packets split at each node in the same range of the atom-field detuning where the classical chaos occurs. The key point is that the squared amplitude of those semiclassical ‘jumps’ equal to the quantum Landau–Zener parameter which defines the probability of nonadiabatic transitions at the nodes. Nonadiabatic atomic wave packets are much more complicated compared to adiabatic ones and may be called chaotic in this sense. A few possible experiments to observe some manifestations of classical and quantum chaos with cold atoms in horizontal and vertical optical lattices are proposed and discussed.

  18. 基于非局部TV正则化的波原子去噪算法%Denoising Algorithm with Wave Atoms Based on Nonlocal TV Regularization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴玉莲; 冯象初

    2011-01-01

    结合新的多尺度几何分析工具波原子和非局部TV正则化提出了一种新的纹理图像去噪模型.该模型充分利用了波原子对振荡纹理图像的稀疏表示和非局部TV能较好地处理纹理图像的优点,使得新方法处理后的纹理图像避免了伪吉布斯振荡现象.实验结果表明,新方法的信噪比有一定提高,在保持图像的细节方面与单纯的波原子阈值和非局部TV比较也有明显的改善,取得了比较好的视觉效果.%A novel denoising model for texture images was proposed, which combines the new multiscale geometric analysis tool-wave atoms and nonlocal total variation regularization scheme. This model well considers the advantages:wave atoms which has the ability of sparse representation of the oscillatory texture images and nonlocal TV version has the ability to handle better textures. Numerical experiments show that the proposed model significantly improves the SNR, performance of preserving details is much better than both only wave atoms threshold and nonlocal TV, therefore together with better visual effects.

  19. 77 FR 36300 - In the Matter of Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company; Haddam Neck Plant; Confirmatory Order...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    .... Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission), (Agencywide Documents Access and Management System... safety and security matters, including access to security information and to special nuclear material in... and safeguards information and to special nuclear material shall be controlled by Connecticut...

  20. Once again about Einsteins realism: the matter waves and Bells inequalities from the point of view of the special theory of relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Kudriavtcev, Iurii

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility to give a classical explanation to the specifics and physical sense of de Broglie matter waves when studying the microparticle as an object of non zero size, from the point of view of the special theory of relativity. We show that the particularities of de Broglie matter waves and the results of the experimental verifications of Bell inequalities for the pairs of entangled photons are naturally interpreted as the results of implementation of the conclusions of the special theory of relativity to the microparticles. We conclude that it is appropriate to go back to the search of the new means of realistic description of the nature proposed by Einstein and his realistic worldview that states that the world studied by the science is real and every part of it at any moment of time has objective physical characteristics.

  1. Quantum dynamics through a wave packet method to study electron-hydrogen and atom-dihydrogen collisions; Dynamique quantique par une methode de paquets d'ondes. Etude des collisions electron-hydrogene et atome-dihydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouret, L

    2002-11-01

    The thesis concerns the development and implementation of numerical methods for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We first considered the case of electron-hydrogen scattering. The originality of our method is the use of a non-uniform radial grid defined by a Schwarz interpolation based on a Coulomb reference function. This grid allows many hydrogen bound states and associated matrix elements of various operators to be reproduced to machine accuracy. The wave function is propagated in time using a Split-Operator method. The efficiency of our method allows the wave function to be propagated out to large distances for all partial waves. We obtain excitation and ionization cross sections in excellent agreement with the best experimental and theoretical data. We subsequently adapted the method and the program package to study reactive atom-dihydrogen scattering. The wave packet is described using product Jacobi coordinates on a regular grid of radial coordinates combined with a basis of Legendre polynomials for the angular part (partial wave S). The wave function is analysed using a time-to-energy Fourier transform, which provides results over the energy range covered by the initial wave packet in one calculation. The method was first tested on the quasi-direct (F,H2) reaction and then applied to the indirect (C(1D),H2)reaction. The state-to-state reaction probabilities are in good agreement with those obtained by a time-independent approach. In particular, the strongly resonant structure of the (C(1D),H2) reaction probabilities is well reproduced. (author)

  2. Veselago lensing with ultracold atoms in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Leder, Martin; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Veselago pointed out that electromagnetic wave theory allows for materials with a negative index of refraction, in which most known optical phenomena would be reversed. A slab of such a material can focus light by negative refraction, an imaging technique strikingly different from conventional positive refractive index optics, where curved surfaces bend the rays to form an image of an object. Here we demonstrate Veselago lensing for matter waves, using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A relativistic, i.e. photon-like, dispersion relation for rubidium atoms is realized with a bichromatic optical lattice potential. We rely on a Raman $\\pi$-pulse technique to transfer atoms between two different branches of the dispersion relation, resulting in a focusing completely analogous to the effect described by Veselago for light waves. Future prospects of the demonstrated effects include novel sub-de Broglie wave imaging applications.

  3. Negative refraction of ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices with nonuniform artificial gauge fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ai-Xia, E-mail: zhangax@nwnu.edu.cn; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the reflection and refraction of ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices exposed to a nonuniform artificial magnetic field. The introduction of the nonuniform artificial magnetic field to the optical lattice for suitable designer magnetic potential barrier can lead to a series of intriguing reflection and refraction phenomena of atoms, including reflection, positive refraction, negative refraction and atomic matter wave splitting. Both the occurrence and the distribution of these reflection and refraction scenarios can be coherently controlled by the nonuniform artificial magnetic field. In particular, the regions close to the boundary of reflection demonstrate two more interesting propagation modes, i.e., a reflected branch of atoms comprising a positive or negative refracted branch of atoms with almost same atom population will be excited simultaneously at the magnetic potential barrier. The results can be a guide for the coherent control of the matter waves in optical lattices and the design of new atom optics devices. - Highlights: • Ultra-cold atoms in OL with nonuniform magnetic field are studied. • Matter wave reflection, refraction and splitting are coherently controlled. • Results provide a guide for the design of new atomic optics devices.

  4. Wave-based liquid-interface metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Fontana, P W; Shats, M

    2017-01-01

    The control of matter motion at liquid–gas interfaces opens an opportunity to create two-dimensional materials with remotely tunable properties. In analogy with optical lattices used in ultra-cold atom physics, such materials can be created by a wave field capable of dynamically guiding matter into periodic spatial structures. Here we show experimentally that such structures can be realized at the macroscopic scale on a liquid surface by using rotating waves. The wave angular momentum is transferred to floating micro-particles, guiding them along closed trajectories. These orbits form stable spatially periodic patterns, the unit cells of a two-dimensional wave-based material. Such dynamic patterns, a mirror image of the concept of metamaterials, are scalable and biocompatible. They can be used in assembly applications, conversion of wave energy into mean two-dimensional flows and for organising motion of active swimmers. PMID:28181490

  5. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  6. Theoretical Studies Relating to the Interaction of Radiation with Matter: Atomic Collision Processes Occurring in the Presence of Radiation Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    Received I8 Marcha 19S0) A theory or collisaoiilly aided radia1tise excitalion (CA RE) for tirci.levelc svylen’s inl the wc.iL-ficld limit is rrcsecd...P(~\\?\\\\rA(Ulf’ where that I = 0 is the time of closest aipproach between - ~ the active atom and the pci turber. A f (0 - cosO)h (1, Apart fromn the

  7. Average-atom treatment of relaxation time in x-ray Thomson scattering from warm dense matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W R; Nilsen, J

    2016-03-01

    The influence of finite relaxation times on Thomson scattering from warm dense plasmas is examined within the framework of the average-atom approximation. Presently most calculations use the collision-free Lindhard dielectric function to evaluate the free-electron contribution to the Thomson cross section. In this work, we use the Mermin dielectric function, which includes relaxation time explicitly. The relaxation time is evaluated by treating the average atom as an impurity in a uniform electron gas and depends critically on the transport cross section. The calculated relaxation rates agree well with values inferred from the Ziman formula for the static conductivity and also with rates inferred from a fit to the frequency-dependent conductivity. Transport cross sections determined by the phase-shift analysis in the average-atom potential are compared with those evaluated in the commonly used Born approximation. The Born approximation converges to the exact cross sections at high energies; however, differences that occur at low energies lead to corresponding differences in relaxation rates. The relative importance of including relaxation time when modeling x-ray Thomson scattering spectra is examined by comparing calculations of the free-electron dynamic structure function for Thomson scattering using Lindhard and Mermin dielectric functions. Applications are given to warm dense Be plasmas, with temperatures ranging from 2 to 32 eV and densities ranging from 2 to 64 g/cc.

  8. Spectrum, radial wave functions, and hyperfine splittings of the Rydberg states in heavy alkali-metal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanayei, Ali; Schopohl, Nils

    2016-07-01

    We present numerically accurate calculations of the bound-state spectrum of the highly excited valence electron in the heavy alkali-metal atoms solving the radial Schrödinger eigenvalue problem with a modern spectral collocation method that applies also for a large principal quantum number n ≫1 . As an effective single-particle potential we favor the reputable potential of Marinescu et al. [Phys. Rev. A 49, 982 (1994)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.49.982. Recent quasiclassical calculations of the quantum defect of the valence electron agree for orbital angular momentum l =0 ,1 ,2 ,... overall remarkably well with the results of the numerical calculations, but for the Rydberg states of rubidium and also cesium with l =3 this agreement is less fair. The reason for this anomaly is that in rubidium and cesium the potential acquires for l =3 deep inside the ionic core a second classical region, thus invalidating a standard Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) calculation with two widely spaced turning points. Comparing then our numerical solutions of the radial Schrödinger eigenvalue problem with the uniform analytic WKB approximation of Langer constructed around the remote turning point rn,j ,l (" close=")n -δ0)">+ we observe everywhere a remarkable agreement, apart from a tiny region around the inner turning point rn,j ,l (-). For s states the centrifugal barrier is absent and no inner turning point exists: rn,j ,0 (-)=0 . With the help of an ansatz proposed by Fock we obtain for the s states a second uniform analytic approximation to the radial wave function complementary to the WKB approximation of Langer, which is exact for r →0+ . From the patching condition, that is, for l =0 the Langer and Fock solutions should agree in the intermediate region 0 application we consider recent spectroscopic data for the hyperfine splittings of the isotopes 85Rb and 87Rb and find a remarkable agreement with the predicted scaling relation An,j ,0 (HFS )=const .

  9. Two-Pulse Atomic Coherent Control (2PACC) Spectroscopy of Eley-Rideal Reactions. An Application of an Atom Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, S F; Jorgensen, Solvejg; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2003-01-01

    A spectroscopic application of the atom laser is suggested. The spectroscopy termed 2PACC employs the coherent properties of matter-waves from a two pulse atom laser. These waves are employed to control a gas-surface chemical recombination reaction. The method is demonstrated for an Eley-Rideal reaction of a hydrogen or alkali atom-laser pulse where the surface target is an adsorbed hydrogen atom. The reaction yields either a hydrogen or alkali hydride molecule. The desorbed gas phase molecular yield and its internal state is shown to be controlled by the time and phase delay between two atom-laser pulses. The calculation is based on solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation in a diabatic framework. The probability of desorption which is the predicted 2PACC signal has been calculated as a function of the pulse parameters.

  10. Determination of mercury in airborne particulate matter collected on glass fiber filters using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Rennan G.O., E-mail: rgoa01@terra.com.br [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica Ambiental, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Campus Sao Cristovao, 49.100-000, Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Vignola, Fabiola; Castilho, Ivan N.B. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borges, Daniel L.G.; Welz, Bernhard [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Smichowski, Patricia [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ferreira, Sergio L.C. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-290, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Becker-Ross, Helmut [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V., Department Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    A study has been undertaken to assess the capability of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of mercury in airborne particulate matter (APM) collected on glass fiber filters using direct solid sampling. The main Hg absorption line at 253.652 nm was used for all determinations. The certified reference material NIST SRM 1648 (Urban Particulate Matter) was used to check the accuracy of the method, and good agreement was obtained between published and determined values. The characteristic mass was 22 pg Hg. The limit of detection (3{sigma}), based on ten atomizations of an unexposed filter, was 40 ng g{sup -1}, corresponding to 0.12 ng m{sup -3} in the air for a typical air volume of 1440 m{sup 3} collected within 24 h. The limit of quantification was 150 ng g{sup -1}, equivalent to 0.41 ng m{sup -3} in the air. The repeatability of measurements was better than 17% RSD (n = 5). Mercury concentrations found in filter samples loaded with APM collected in Buenos Aires, Argentina, were between < 40 ng g{sup -1} and 381 {+-} 24 ng g{sup -1}. These values correspond to a mercury concentration in the air between < 0.12 ng m{sup -3} and 1.47 {+-} 0.09 ng m{sup -3}. The proposed procedure was found to be simple, fast and reliable, and suitable as a screening procedure for the determination of mercury in APM samples.

  11. Noncollinear wave mixing of attosecond XUV and few-cycle optical laser pulses in gas-phase atoms: Toward multidimensional spectroscopy involving XUV excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Warrick, Erika R.; Fidler, Ashley; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2016-11-01

    Ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy, which records transient wave-mixing signals in a medium, is a powerful tool to access microscopic information using light sources in the radio-frequency and optical regimes. The extension of this technique towards the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) or even x-ray regimes holds the promise to uncover rich structural or dynamical information with even higher spatial or temporal resolution. Here, we demonstrate noncollinear wave mixing between weak XUV attosecond pulses and a strong near-infrared (NIR) few-cycle laser pulse in gas phase atoms (one photon of XUV and two photons of NIR). In the noncollinear geometry the attosecond and either one or two NIR pulses interact with argon atoms. Nonlinear XUV signals are generated in a spatially resolved fashion as required by phase matching. Different transition pathways can be identified from these background-free nonlinear signals according to the specific phase-matching conditions. Time-resolved measurements of the spatially gated XUV signals reveal electronic coherences of Rydberg wave packets prepared by a single XUV photon or XUV-NIR two-photon excitation, depending on the applied pulse sequences. These measurements open possible applications of tabletop multidimensional spectroscopy to the study of dynamics associated with valence or core excitation with XUV photons.

  12. Atom laser dynamics in a tight waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, A del; Lizuain, I; Muga, J G [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica, UPV-EHU, Apartado. 644, Bilbao (Spain); Pons, M [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, E.U.I.T. de Minas y Obras Publicas, UPV-EHU, 48901 Barakaldo (Spain); Moshinsky, M [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: adolfo.delcampo@ehu.es

    2008-02-15

    We study the transient dynamics that arise during the formation of an atom laser beam in a tight waveguide. The time dependent density profile develops a series of wiggles which are related to the diffraction in time phenomenon. The apodization of matter waves, which relies on the use of smooth aperture functions, allows to suppress such oscillations in a time interval, after which there is a revival of the diffraction in time. The revival time scale is directly related to the inverse of the harmonic trap frequency for the atom reservoir.

  13. Determination of dopant atomic positions with kinematical X-ray standing waves; Untersuchung von Fremdatomen in kristallinen Materialien mit kinematischen stehenden Roentgenwellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, Bente

    2011-11-15

    Recent advances in the kinematic X-ray standing wave technique (KXSW) for the determination of the atomic coordinates and displacement parameters in nonperfect crystalline materials are described in this thesis. The methodology has been improved by considering three significant aspects: - the inclusion of weak multiple beam contributions - the excitation of secondary fluorescence in multiple-element samples - the influence of the crystal mosaicity on the fluorescence yield. The improvements allowed to successfully apply the method to investigate complex oxide materials of current interest for potential device applications. The thermally-induced interdiffusion of cobalt and manganese thin films on zinc oxide single crystals has been studied to determine which lattice sites are occupied preferentially. The data analysis revealed that after thermal diffusion the adsorbed atoms occupied zinc sites in the host lattice. The mean deviation of the cobalt atomic position from the zinc lattice site was comparable to the thermal displacement parameter of the zinc atoms. In the case of manganese a secondary phase was found on the surface. Measurements performed on LaSrMnO{sub 4} provided new insight concerning the rotation of the oxygen octahedron around the manganese atoms and the concomitant displacements of the strontium and lanthanum atoms. It was found that the oxygen octahedra are rotated around the [100]-direction by 4,5 . The measurements in transmission geometry performed on titanium dioxide (rutile) demonstrated that KXSW measurements in the Laue geometry is a viable technique. By performing KXSW under grazing-incidence conditions it is possible to achieve depth resolution. The results clearly show that the extended KXSW technique is a versatile method for characterizing complex material systems. (orig.)

  14. A new approach for the determination of silicon in airborne particulate matter using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, A; Limbeck, A

    2009-07-30

    In this work a new procedure for element specific analysis of silicon in airborne particulate matter is presented. The method is based on a preliminary treatment of the aerosol samples with nitric acid and perchloric acid leading to a mineralization of the organic sampling substrate, dissolution of soluble material and a homogeneous suspension of the remaining non-soluble sample fraction. ETAAS measurement of the derived slurries was performed using a Zr-treated graphite tube which prevents the formation of stable silicon carbide during sample measurement. Losses of volatile silicon species during sample pyrolysis were overcome by using Co(II) as matrix modifier and a pyrolysis temperature of only 300 degrees C. Furthermore this low pyrolysis temperature prevents charring of organic material which enables accurate ETAAS analysis. The method including the developed pretreatment procedure was evaluated using the Standard reference material 2709 (San Joaquin Soil) from NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD, USA). Suitability for measurement of Si in airborne particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter aerosol samples and comparison of derived results with the findings obtained for the same samples after microwave digestion and subsequent ETAAS measurement. Finally the developed procedure was applied for the analysis of silicon in PM10 collected at an urban site in Vienna (Austria). Matrix matched calibration has been used for quantification of derived absorption signals. With the use of 20 microL sample injection volume for ETAAS analysis an instrumental detection limit of 52.2 microg L(-1) was obtained, which translates to method detection limits of approximately 0.52 microg m(-3) when considering the volumes of air collected per investigated aerosol sample. The reproducibility of analysis given as the relative standard deviation was 4.4% (n=12). Derived concentrations for Si in PM10 varied between 0.8 and 7.2 microg m(-3) which

  15. Atomic long-range order effects on Curie temperature and adiabatic spin-wave dynamics in strained Fe-Co alloy films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönecker, Stephan; Li, Xiaoqing; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2016-08-01

    The strained Fe-Co alloy in body-centered tetragonal (bct) structure has raised considerable interest due to its giant uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy. On the basis of the classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian with ab initio interatomic exchange interactions, we perform a theoretical study of fundamental finite temperature magnetic properties of Fe1 -xCox alloy films as a function of three variables: chemical composition 0.3 ≤x ≤0.8 , bct geometry [a ,c (a )] arising from in-plane strain and associated out-of-plane relaxation, and atomic long-range order (ALRO). The Curie temperatures TC(x ,a ) obtained from Monte Carlo simulations display a competition between a pronounced dependence on tetragonality, strong ferromagnetism in the Co-rich alloy, and the beginning instability of ferromagnetic order in the Fe-rich alloy when c /a →√{2 } . Atomic ordering enhances TC and arises mainly due to different distributions of atoms in neighboring coordination shells rather than altering exchange interactions significantly. We investigate the ordering effect on the shape of the adiabatic spin-wave spectrum for selected pairs (x ,a ) . Our results indicate that long-wavelength acoustic spin-wave excitations show dependencies on x , a , and ALRO similar to those of TC. The directional anisotropy of the spin-wave stiffness d (x ,a ) peaks in narrow ranges of composition and tetragonality. ALRO exhibits a strong effect on d for near equiconcentration Fe-Co. We also discuss our findings in the context of employing Fe-Co as perpendicular magnetic recording medium.

  16. Space-time resolved simulation of femtosecond nonlinear light-matter interactions using a holistic quantum atomic model: application to near-threshold harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesik, M; Wright, E M; Andreasen, J; Brown, J M; Carlson, D R; Jones, R J

    2012-07-02

    We introduce a new computational approach for femtosecond pulse propagation in the transparency region of gases that permits full resolution in three space dimensions plus time while fully incorporating quantum coherent effects such as high-harmonic generation and strong-field ionization in a holistic fashion. This is achieved by utilizing a one-dimensional model atom with a delta-function potential which allows for a closed-form solution for the nonlinear optical response due to ground-state to continuum transitions. It side-steps evaluation of the wave function, and offers more than one hundred-fold reduction in computation time in comparison to direct solution of the atomic Schrödinger equation. To illustrate the capability of our new computational approach, we apply it to the example of near-threshold harmonic generation in Xenon, and we also present a qualitative comparison between our model and results from an in-house experiment on extreme ultraviolet generation in a femtosecond enhancement cavity.

  17. Space-time resolved simulation of femtosecond nonlinear light-matter interactions using a holistic quantum atomic model: Application to near-threshold harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Kolesik, M; Andreasen, J; Brown, J M; Carlson, D R; Jones, R J; 10.1364/OE.20.016113

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new computational approach for femtosecond pulse propagation in the transparency region of gases that permits full resolution in three space dimensions plus time while fully incorporating quantum coherent effects such as high-harmonic generation and strong-field ionization in a holistic fashion. This is achieved by utilizing a one-dimensional model atom with a delta-function potential which allows for a closed-form solution for the nonlinear optical response due to ground-state to continuum transitions. It side-steps evaluation of the wave function, and offers more than one hundred-fold reduction in computation time in comparison to direct solution of the atomic Schr\\"odinger equation. To illustrate the capability of our new computational approach, we apply it to the example of near-threshold harmonic generation in Xenon, and we also present a qualitative comparison between our model and results from an in-house experiment on extreme ultraviolet generation in a femtosecond enhancement cavity.

  18. Dual-Beam Atom Laser Driven by Spinor Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Aveline, David

    2007-01-01

    An atom laser now undergoing development simultaneously generates two pulsed beams of correlated Rb-87 atoms. (An atom laser is a source of atoms in beams characterized by coherent matter waves, analogous to a conventional laser, which is a source of coherent light waves.) The pumping mechanism of this atom laser is based on spinor dynamics in a Bose-Einstein condensate. By virtue of the angular-momentum conserving collisions that generate the two beams, the number of atoms in one beam is correlated with the number of atoms in the other beam. Such correlations are intimately linked to entanglement and squeezing in atomic ensembles, and atom lasers like this one could be used in exploring related aspects of Bose-Einstein condensates, and as components of future sensors relying on atom interferometry. In this atom-laser apparatus, a Bose-Einstein condensate of about 2 x 10(exp 6) Rb-87 atoms at a temperature of about 120 micro-K is first formed through all-optical means in a relatively weak singlebeam running-wave dipole trap that has been formed by focusing of a CO2-laser beam. By a technique that is established in the art, the trap is loaded from an ultrahigh-vacuum magnetooptical trap that is, itself, loaded via a cold atomic beam from an upstream two-dimensional magneto-optical trap that resides in a rubidium-vapor cell that is differentially pumped from an adjoining vacuum chamber, wherein are performed scientific observations of the beams ultimately generated by the atom laser.

  19. Nonlinear Waves in a Cigar-Shaped Bose-Einstein Condensate with Dissipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Qiu-Ying; YANG Xiao-Xian; ZHANG Gui-Qing; SHI Yu-Ren; ZHANG Ying-Yue; DUAN Wen-Shan; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the possibIe nonlinear waves of atomic matter waves in a cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate with dissipation. The waves can be described by a KdV-type equation. The KdV-type equation has a solitary wave solution. The amplitude, speed, and width of the wave vary exponentially with time t. The dissipative term of γ plays an important role for the wave amplitude, speed, and width. Comparisons have been given between the analytical solutions and the numerical results. It is shown that both are in good agreement.

  20. Wave and Particle in Molecular Interference Lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Juffmann, Thomas; Geyer, Philipp; Major, Andras G; Deachapunya, Sarayut; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Arndt, Markus; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.263601

    2010-01-01

    The wave-particle duality of massive objects is a cornerstone of quantum physics and a key property of many modern tools such as electron microscopy, neutron diffraction or atom interferometry. Here we report on the first experimental demonstration of quantum interference lithography with complex molecules. Molecular matter-wave interference patterns are deposited onto a reconstructed Si(111) 7x7 surface and imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy. Thereby both the particle and the quantum wave character of the molecules can be visualized in one and the same image. This new approach to nanolithography therefore also represents a sensitive new detection scheme for quantum interference experiments.

  1. Wave and particle in molecular interference lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juffmann, Thomas; Truppe, Stefan; Geyer, Philipp; Major, András G; Deachapunya, Sarayut; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Arndt, Markus

    2009-12-31

    The wave-particle duality of massive objects is a cornerstone of quantum physics and a key property of many modern tools such as electron microscopy, neutron diffraction or atom interferometry. Here we report on the first experimental demonstration of quantum interference lithography with complex molecules. Molecular matter-wave interference patterns are deposited onto a reconstructed Si(111) 7x7 surface and imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy. Thereby both the particle and the quantum wave character of the molecules can be visualized in one and the same image. This new approach to nanolithography therefore also represents a sensitive new detection scheme for quantum interference experiments.

  2. Atom lens without chromatic aberrations

    CERN Document Server

    Efremov, Maxim A; Schleich, Wolfgang P

    2012-01-01

    We propose a lens for atoms with reduced chromatic aberrations and calculate its focal length and spot size. In our scheme a two-level atom interacts with a near-resonant standing light wave formed by two running waves of slightly different wave vectors, and a far-detuned running wave propagating perpendicular to the standing wave. We show that within the Raman-Nath approximation and for an adiabatically slow atom-light interaction, the phase acquired by the atom is independent of the incident atomic velocity.

  3. "The hydrogen atom of fluid dynamics"--introduction to the Taylor-Couette flow for soft matter scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardin, M A; Perge, C; Taberlet, N

    2014-05-28

    The flow between concentric cylinders is routinely used in soft matter studies. In many cases, the purpose of the setup is rheometric: the idea is to relate macroscopic changes in material properties to microscopic changes in the structure of the material. The correspondence between the modifications of the microscopic structure and the macroscopic flow often relies on viscometric assumptions, which require the flow to be at least laminar. Flow instabilities are usually neglected because the viscosities of the materials are high and the geometries are small, such that the creeping flow approximation can be used. Nonetheless, the phenomenology of viscoelastic instabilities that emerged in the last twenty years warns us that flows can become turbulent without inertia, in particular flows between concentric cylinders. Given the strong similarities between inertial hydrodynamic instabilities and viscoelastic instabilities, a general knowledge of the former is advised for any researcher working on complex fluids. In this tutorial review, we focus on the inertial instability of isothermal and incompressible Newtonian fluids flowing between concentric cylinders. We highlight important aspects that can guide the study and control of instabilities in complex fluids in general.

  4. Goos-H\\"anchen shifts in spin-orbit-coupled cold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lu; Qin, Jie-Li; Lan, Zhihao; Dong, Guangjiong; Zhang, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    We consider a matter wave packet of cold atom gas impinging upon a step potential created by the optical light field. In the presence of spin-orbit (SO) coupling, the atomic eigenstates contain two types of evanescent states, one of which is the ordinary evanescent state with pure imaginary wave vector while the other possesses complex wave vector and is recognized as oscillating evanescent state. We show that the presence and interplay of these two types of evanescent states can give rise to...

  5. Wave-particle duality of C(60) molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, M; Nairz, O; Vos-Andreae, J; Keller, C; van der Zouw, G; Zeilinger, A

    1999-10-14

    Quantum superposition lies at the heart of quantum mechanics and gives rise to many of its paradoxes. Superposition of de Broglie matter waves' has been observed for massive particles such as electrons, atoms and dimers, small van der Waals clusters, and neutrons. But matter wave interferometry with larger objects has remained experimentally challenging, despite the development of powerful atom interferometric techniques for experiments in fundamental quantum mechanics, metrology and lithography. Here we report the observation of de Broglie wave interference of C(60) molecules by diffraction at a material absorption grating. This molecule is the most massive and complex object in which wave behaviour has been observed. Of particular interest is the fact that C(60) is almost a classical body, because of its many excited internal degrees of freedom and their possible couplings to the environment. Such couplings are essential for the appearance of decoherence, suggesting that interference experiments with large molecules should facilitate detailed studies of this process.

  6. Maxwell Matters

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenberg, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Charges are everywhere because most atoms are charged. Chemical bonds are formed by electrons with their charge. Charges move and interact according to Maxwell's equations in space and in atoms where the equations of electrodynamics are embedded in Schroedinger's equation as the potential. Maxwell's equations are universal, valid inside atoms and between stars from times much shorter than those of atomic motion (0.1 femtoseconds) to years (32 mega-seconds). Maxwell's equations enforce the conservation of current. Analysis shows that the electric field can take on whatever value is needed to ensure conservation of current. The properties of matter rearrange themselves to satisfy Maxwell's equations and conservation of current. Conservation of current is as universal as Maxwell's equations themselves. Yet equations of electrodynamics find little place in the literature of material physics, chemistry, or biochemistry. Kinetic models of chemistry and Markov treatments of atomic motion are ordinary differential eq...

  7. Generation of 99-mW continuous-wave 285-nm radiation for magneto-optical trapping of Mg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, D. N; Yu, P.; Balslev, S.;

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tunable intense narrow-band 285 nm light source based on frequency doubling of 570 nm light in BBO. At input powers of 840 mW (including 130 mW used for locking purposes) we generate 99 mW UV radiation with an intensity profile suitable for laser-cooling experiments. The light...... is used for laser cooling of neutral magnesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We capture about 5×106 atoms directly from a thermal beam and find that the major loss mechanism of the magnesium MOT is a near-resonant two-photon ionization process....

  8. Generation of 99-mW continuous-wave 285-nm radiation for magneto-optical trapping of Mg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Yu, Ping; Balslev, Søren;

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tunable intense narrow-band 285 nm light source based on frequency doubling of 570 nm light in BBO. At input powers of 840 mW (including 130 mW used for locking purposes) we generate 99 mW UV radiation with an intensity profile suitable for laser-cooling experiments. The light...... is used for laser cooling of neutral magnesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We capture about 5 x 10(6) atoms directly from a thermal beam and find that the major loss mechanism of the magnesium MOT is a near-resonant two-photon ionization process....

  9. Validity of actinometry to monitor oxygen atom concentration in microwave discharges created by surface wave in O2-N2 mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granier, A.; Chéreau, D.; Henda, K.; Safari, R.; Leprince, P.

    1994-01-01

    The validity of actinometry to monitor oxygen atom concentration in O2-N2 microwave discharges created by surface wave is investigated. The plasma is created with a gas flow in a quartz tube of inner diameter 16 mm at pressures in the Torr range. First, it is shown that the reliability of actinometry can be deduced from the longitudinal profile of the actinometry signal. Second, absolute concentrations of oxygen atoms are estimated from the experimental actinometry signal and agree satisfactorily with concentrations simultaneously measured by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) absorption downstream from the plasma. Moreover, upon varying the nitrogen percentage (0%-100%), it is evidenced that the actinometry signal is proportional to the concentration measured by VUV absorption. Furthermore, it is evidenced that the oxygen dissociation rate is only 2% in pure oxygen plasmas, while it reaches 15% (433 MHz) or 30% (2450 MHz) for mixtures containing more than 20% of nitrogen. This drastic increase in [O] upon the addition of N2 is extensively discussed and, finally, attributed to a decrease in the recombination frequency of oxygen atoms on the quartz wall, in the presence of nitrogen.

  10. Light-matter interaction physics and engineering at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Weiner, John

    2013-01-01

    This book draws together the essential elements of classical electrodynamics, surface wave physics, plasmonic materials, and circuit theory of electrical engineering to provide insight into the essential physics of nanoscale light-matter interaction and to provide design methodology for practical nanoscale plasmonic devices. A chapter on classical and quantal radiation also highlights the similarities (and differences) between the classical fields of Maxwell's equations and the wave functions of Schrodinger's equation. The aim of this chapter is to provide a semiclassical picture of atomic absorption and emission of radiation, lending credence and physical plausibility to the "rules" of standard wave-mechanical calculations.

  11. Volatile organo-selenium speciation in biological matter by solid phase microextraction-moderate temperature multicapillary gas chromatography with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, C.; Sanz Landaluze, J.; Ximenez-Embun, P.; Madrid-Albarran, Y.; Camara, C

    2004-01-16

    Microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES) in combination with multicapillary (MC) gas chromatography could be proven to be useful for element specific detection of volatile species. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) was used for preconcentration and sample-matrix separation. The fiber desorption unit as well as the heating control for the MC column were in-house developed and multicapillary column was operated at moderate temperatures (30-100 deg. C). The method was optimized for organo-selenium species (dimethylselenide (DMSe), diethylselenide (DEtSe) and dimethyldiselenide (DMDSe)), using a chemometric approach. Stationary phases for the separation column were optimized using a conventional GC and contrasted with the results obtained with the MC. Application was focussed on selenium accumulating biological matter, such as lupine, yeast, Indian mustard and garlic. These samples were grown in hydroponic solution containing inorganic selenium (Na{sub 2}SeO{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}). SPME sampling was carried out in fixed volume flow boxes in headspace above the living plants and in vials using treated samples. Results demonstrate inorganic selenium transformation into volatile organic species during metabolism. Separation is fast, a chromatogram can be obtained in less than 3 min and detection limits were at sub-ppb level for all investigated species. The system is independent from the use of a conventional gas chromatographic oven and can be used as a versatile alternative to highly cost intensive methods such as GC-ICP-MS.

  12. Bose-Einstein-condensed scalar field dark matter and the gravitational wave background from inflation: new cosmological constraints and its detectability by LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bohua; Rindler-Daller, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    We consider an alternative dark matter candidate, ultralight bosonic dark matter ($m>10^{-22}$eV) described by a complex scalar field (SFDM) with a global U(1) symmetry, for which the associated charge density is conserved after particle production during standard reheating (w=0). We allow for a repulsive self-interaction. In a Lambda-SFDM universe, SFDM starts relativistic, evolving from stiff (w=1) to radiationlike (w=1/3), before becoming nonrelativistic at late times (w=0). Thus, before the radiation-dominated era, there is an earlier era of stiff-SFDM-domination. Transitions between these eras, determined by SFDM particle mass $m$ and the quartic self-interaction coupling strength $\\lambda$, are thus constrained by cosmological observables, particularly N_{eff}, the effective number of neutrino species during BBN, and z_{eq}, the redshift of matter-radiation equality. Furthermore, since the stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB) from inflation is amplified during the stiff era, it can contribute...

  13. Thin films of soft matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2007-01-01

    A detailed overview and comprehensive analysis of the main theoretical and experimental advances on free surface thin film and jet flows of soft matter is given. At the theoretical front the book outlines the basic equations and boundary conditions and the derivation of low-dimensional models for the evolution of the free surface. Such models include long-wave expansions and equations of the boundary layer type and are analyzed via linear stability analysis, weakly nonlinear theories and strongly nonlinear analysis including construction of stationary periodic and solitary wave and similarity solutions. At the experimental front a variety of very recent experimental developments is outlined and the link between theory and experiments is illustrated. Such experiments include spreading drops and bubbles, imbibitions, singularity formation at interfaces and experimental characterization of thin films using atomic force microscopy, ellipsometry and contact angle measurements and analysis of patterns using Minkows...

  14. Atom-interferometry constraints on dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, Paul; Haslinger, Philipp; Simmons, Quinn; Müller, Holger; Khoury, Justin

    2015-01-01

    If dark energy---which drives the accelerated expansion of the universe---consists of a new light scalar field, it might be detectable as a "fifth force" between normal-matter objects, in potential conflict with precision tests of gravity. There has, however, been much theoretical progress in developing theories with screening mechanisms, which can evade detection by suppressing forces in regions of high density, such as the laboratory. One prominent example is the chameleon field. We reduce the effect of this screening mechanism by probing the chameleon with individual atoms rather than bulk matter. Using a cesium matter-wave interferometer near a spherical mass in an ultra-high vacuum chamber, we constrain a wide class of dynamical dark energy theories. Our experiment excludes a range of chameleon theories that reproduce the observed cosmic acceleration.

  15. Atoms Talking to SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, J E; Kim, Z; Wood, A K; Anderson, J R; Dragt, A J; Hafezi, M; Lobb, C J; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L; Taylor, J M; Vlahacos, C P; Wellstood, F C

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to couple trapped $^{87}$Rb atoms to a superconducting flux qubit through a magnetic dipole transition. We plan to trap atoms on the evanescent wave outside an ultrathin fiber to bring the atoms to less than 10 $\\mu$m above the surface of the superconductor. This hybrid setup lends itself to probing sources of decoherence in superconducting qubits. Our current plan has the intermediate goal of coupling the atoms to a superconducting LC resonator.

  16. Radiation of Sound Waves Via Soliton Excitation of the Angarmonic Chain of Atoms in a Dislocation Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestrin, S. G.; Shchukina, E. V.

    2016-07-01

    It is demonstrated that propagation of the soliton described by the Boussinesq equation along a linear defect of the crystal structure leads to radiation of sound waves (analog of the Vavilov-Cherenkov effect). Radiation that has a continuous spectrum diverges conically from the dislocation line, and the apex angle of the cone is determined by the ratio of the sound speed in the crystal to the soliton speed. With increasing soliton speed, the maximum of the spectral flux density of sound energy is displaced toward higher frequencies. An analytical expression for energy losses is derived.

  17. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, UFC, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe 25030 Besançon Cedex (France)

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  18. Quantum metrology with cold atomic ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Morgan W.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantum metrology uses quantum features such as entanglement and squeezing to improve the sensitivity of quantum-limited measurements. Long established as a valuable technique in optical measurements such as gravitational-wave detection, quantum metrology is increasingly being applied to atomic instruments such as matter-wave interferometers, atomic clocks, and atomic magnetometers. Several of these new applications involve dual optical/atomic quantum systems, presenting both new challenges and new opportunities. Here we describe an optical magnetometry system that achieves both shot-noise-limited and projection-noise-limited performance, allowing study of optical magnetometry in a fully-quantum regime [1]. By near-resonant Faraday rotation probing, we demonstrate measurement-based spin squeezing in a magnetically-sensitive atomic ensemble [2-4]. The versatility of this system allows us also to design metrologically-relevant optical nonlinearities, and to perform quantum-noise-limited measurements with interacting photons. As a first interaction-based measurement [5], we implement a non-linear metrology scheme proposed by Boixo et al. with the surprising feature of precision scaling better than the 1/N “Heisenberg limit” [6].

  19. Understanding the Core-Halo Relation of Quantum Wave Dark Matter, $\\psi$DM, from 3D Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Woo, Tak-Pong; Wong, Shing-Kwong; Chiueh, Tzihong; Broadhurst, Tom; Hwang, W-Y Pauchy

    2014-01-01

    We examine the nonlinear structure of gravitationally collapsed objects that form in our simulations of wavelike cold dark matter ($\\psi$DM), described by the Schr\\"odinger-Poisson (SP) equation. A distinct gravitationally self-bound solitonic core is found at the center of every halo, with a profile quite different from cores modeled in the warm or self-interacting dark matter scenarios. Furthermore, we show that each solitonic core is surrounded by an extended halo composed of large fluctuating dark matter granules which modulate the halo density on a scale comparable to the diameter of the solitonic core. The scaling symmetry of the SP equation and the uncertainty principle tightly relate the core mass to the halo specific energy, which, in the context of cosmological structure formation, leads to a simple scaling between core mass ($M_c$) and halo mass ($M_h$), $M_c \\propto a^{-1/2} M_h^{1/3}$, where $a$ is the cosmic scale factor. We verify this scaling relation by (i) examining the internal structure of...

  20. Methods, systems, and apparatus for storage, transfer and/or control of information via matter wave dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard Hau, Lene (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Methods, systems and apparatus for generating atomic traps, and for storing, controlling and transferring information between first and second spatially separated phase-coherent objects, or using a single phase-coherent object. For plural objects, both phase-coherent objects have a macroscopic occupation of a particular quantum state by identical bosons or identical BCS-paired fermions. The information may be optical information, and the phase-coherent object(s) may be Bose-Einstein condensates, superfluids, or superconductors. The information is stored in the first phase-coherent object at a first storage time and recovered from the second phase-coherent object, or the same first phase-coherent object, at a second revival time. In one example, an integrated silicon wafer-based optical buffer includes an electrolytic atom source to provide the phase-coherent object(s), a nanoscale atomic trap for the phase-coherent object(s), and semiconductor-based optical sources to cool the phase-coherent object(s) and provide coupling fields for storage and transfer of optical information.

  1. Beyond quantum mechanics? Hunting the 'impossible' atoms (Pauli Exclusion Principle violation and spontaneous collapse of the wave function at test)

    CERN Document Server

    Piscicchia, K; Bartalucci, S; Bassi, A; Bertolucci, S; Berucci, C; Bragadireanu, A M; Cargnelli, M; Clozza, A; De Paolis, L; Di Matteo, S; Donadi, S; d'Uffizi, A; Egger, J-P; Guaraldo, C; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Laubenstein, M; Marton, J; Milotti, E; Pietreanu, D; Ponta, T; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Shi, H; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Sperandio, L; Doce, O Vazquez; Zmeskal, J

    2015-01-01

    The development of mathematically complete and consistent models solving the so-called "measurement problem", strongly renewed the interest of the scientific community for the foundations of quantum mechanics, among these the Dynamical Reduction Models posses the unique characteristic to be experimentally testable. In the first part of the paper an upper limit on the reduction rate parameter of such models will be obtained, based on the analysis of the X-ray spectrum emitted by an isolated slab of germanium and measured by the IGEX experiment. The second part of the paper is devoted to present the results of the VIP (Violation of the Pauli exclusion principle) experiment and to describe its recent upgrade. The VIP experiment established a limit on the probability that the Pauli Exclusion Principle (PEP) is violated by electrons, using the very clean method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper.

  2. Propagation and interaction of matter-wave solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates with time-dependent scattering length and varying potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Biao; Li Yuqi [Nonlinear Science Center, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Zhang Xiaofei; Liu, W M, E-mail: biaolee2000@yahoo.com.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-09-14

    We present two families of one-soliton solutions and three families of two-soliton solutions for a generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation, which is characterized by the time-dependent scattering length and varying potentials. Then, we investigate the propagation of one-soliton and interactions of two-soliton by some selected control functions. The results show that the intensities of one- and two-soliton first increase rapidly to a peak value, and then decay very slowly to the background value; thus, the lifetimes of both one-soliton and two-soliton in Bose-Einstein condensates can be extended largely at least to the order of the lifetime of a Bose-Einstein condensate in real experiments. Our results open up new ways of considerable experimental interest for the management of matter-wave solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates.

  3. Dark solitons in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates: from theory to experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frantzeskakis, D J, E-mail: dfrantz@phys.uoa.g [Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens 15784 (Greece)

    2010-05-28

    This review paper presents an overview of the theoretical and experimental progress on the study of matter-wave dark solitons in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates. Upon introducing the general framework, we discuss the statics and dynamics of single and multiple matter-wave dark solitons in the quasi one-dimensional setting, in higher dimensional settings, as well as in the dimensionality crossover regime. Special attention is paid to the connection between theoretical results, obtained by various analytical approaches, and relevant experimental observations. (topical review)

  4. The Atomic Origin of the Reflection Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytz, Kjell

    2016-12-01

    It will be demonstrated how the reflection law may be derived on an atomic basis using the plane wave approximation together with Huygens' principle. The model utilized is based on the electric dipole character of matter originating from its molecular constituents. This approach is not new but has, since it was first introduced by Ewald and Oseen in 1915, been applied and analyzed many times before. Here we develop the Ewald-Oseen model of reflection adapted for high school and early undergraduate students with a basic knowledge of microscopic material structure.

  5. Rydberg matter: properties and decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manykin, Edward A.; Ojovan, Michael I.; Poluektov, Pavel P.

    2006-03-01

    Rydberg matter is a condensed excited state made of highly excited atoms. State of art of research in the field of Rydberg matter is briefly reviewed. Special attention is focused on the contribution of Russian and Swedish scientists' groups to the analysis of this problem. Most attention is concentrated on physical principles of pseudopotential method and density functional theory used to describe the Rydberg matter. The description of Rydberg matter as an excited state becomes viable after the formal replacement of excited atoms by ground state pseudoatoms. This procedure has been used to find parameters of Rydberg matter made of highly excited cesium atoms. Theoretical estimations conform to experimental data available.

  6. Atom Lithography with a Chromium Atomic Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; LI Tong-Bao

    2006-01-01

    @@ Direct write atom lithography is a new technique in which resonant light is used to pattern an atomic beam and the nanostructures are formed when the atoms deposit on the substrate. We design an experiment setup to fabricate chromium nanolines by depositing an atomic beam of 52 Cr through an off-resonant laser standing wave with the wavelength of 425.55 nm onto a silicon substrate. The resulting nanolines exhibit a period of 215 ± 3 nm with height of 1 nm.

  7. Binding Energy Calculation of Electrons in Statistical Potentials for Arbitrary Temperature and Matter Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunYongsheng; MengXujun

    1990-01-01

    Schroedinger's wave equation is solved in Thomas-Fermi potential including the self-interaction modification of elctrons for arbitrary matter density and temperature,In order to describe relativistic effects,the mass-velocity correction,the Darwin correction and the spin-orbit coupling terms are included in the wave equation.Calculations are presented for the Fe26 and Rb37 atoms at a few temperatures and matter densities.Comparisons of present results with other more accurate one[9] are given in Table.The data obtained by the present method are not bad.

  8. Identification and chemical characterization of particulate matter from wave soldering processes at a printed circuit board manufacturing company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szoboszlai, Z; Kertész, Zs; Szikszai, Z; Angyal, A; Furu, E; Török, Zs; Daróczi, L; Kiss, A Z

    2012-02-15

    In this case study, the elemental composition and mass size distribution of indoor aerosol particles were determined in a working environment where soldering of printed circuit boards (PCB) took place. Single particle analysis using ion and electron microscopy was carried out to obtain more detailed and reliable data about the origin of these particles. As a result, outdoor and indoor aerosol sources such as wave soldering, fluxing processes, workers' activity, mineral dust, biomass burning, fertilizing and other anthropogenic sources could be separated. With the help of scanning electron microscopy, characteristic particle types were identified. On the basis of the mass size distribution data, a stochastic lung deposition model was used to calculate the total and regional deposition efficiencies of the different types of particles within the human respiratory system. The information presented in this study aims to give insights into the detailed characteristics and the health impact of aerosol particles in a working environment where different kinds of soldering activity take place.

  9. Constraining the equation of state of nuclear matter with gravitational wave observations: tidal deformability and tidal disruption

    CERN Document Server

    Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    We study how to extract information on the neutron star equation of state from the gravitational wave signal emitted during the coalescence of a binary system composed by two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. We use Post-Newtonian templates which include the tidal deformability parameter and, when tidal disruption occurs before merger, a frequency cut-off. Assuming that this signal is detected by Advanced LIGO/Virgo or ET, we evaluate the uncertainties on these parameters using different data analysis strategies based on the Fisher matrix approach, and on recently obtained analytical fits of the relevant quantities. We find that the tidal deformability is more effective than the stellar compactness to discriminate among different possible equations of state.

  10. Study on the dynamic behavior of matters using laser-driven shock waves in the water confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hyeonju; Yoh, Jack J.

    2015-06-01

    The strain rates achievable in laser-driven shock experiments overlap with gas gun and can reach much higher values. The laser-based method also has advantages in terms of system size, cost, repeatability, and controllability. In this research, we aim to measure equation of state, Hugoniot elastic limit, strain rate, and compressive yield strength of target samples by making use of the velocity interferometer or the VISAR. High pressure shock wave is generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm wavelength with pulse energy up to 3 joules and 9 ns pulse duration. All the experiments are conducted in the water confinement to increase the peak stresses to an order of GPa. Furthermore, quantitative comparisons are made to the existing shock data in order to emphasize the novelty of the proposed setup which is relatively simple and reliable. Corresponding author.

  11. Solid-liquid interfacial free energy of ice Ih, ice Ic, and ice 0 within a mono-atomic model of water via the capillary wave method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Michael; Vorselaars, Bart; Allen, Michael P; Quigley, David

    2017-02-21

    We apply the capillary wave method, based on measurements of fluctuations in a ribbon-like interfacial geometry, to determine the solid-liquid interfacial free energy for both polytypes of ice I and the recently proposed ice 0 within a mono-atomic model of water. We discuss various choices for the molecular order parameter, which distinguishes solid from liquid, and demonstrate the influence of this choice on the interfacial stiffness. We quantify the influence of discretisation error when sampling the interfacial profile and the limits on accuracy imposed by the assumption of quasi one-dimensional geometry. The interfacial free energies of the two ice I polytypes are indistinguishable to within achievable statistical error and the small ambiguity which arises from the choice of order parameter. In the case of ice 0, we find that the large surface unit cell for low index interfaces constrains the width of the interfacial ribbon such that the accuracy of results is reduced. Nevertheless, we establish that the interfacial free energy of ice 0 at its melting temperature is similar to that of ice I under the same conditions. The rationality of a core-shell model for the nucleation of ice I within ice 0 is questioned within the context of our results.

  12. Solid-liquid interfacial free energy of ice Ih, ice Ic, and ice 0 within a mono-atomic model of water via the capillary wave method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Michael; Vorselaars, Bart; Allen, Michael P.; Quigley, David

    2017-02-01

    We apply the capillary wave method, based on measurements of fluctuations in a ribbon-like interfacial geometry, to determine the solid-liquid interfacial free energy for both polytypes of ice I and the recently proposed ice 0 within a mono-atomic model of water. We discuss various choices for the molecular order parameter, which distinguishes solid from liquid, and demonstrate the influence of this choice on the interfacial stiffness. We quantify the influence of discretisation error when sampling the interfacial profile and the limits on accuracy imposed by the assumption of quasi one-dimensional geometry. The interfacial free energies of the two ice I polytypes are indistinguishable to within achievable statistical error and the small ambiguity which arises from the choice of order parameter. In the case of ice 0, we find that the large surface unit cell for low index interfaces constrains the width of the interfacial ribbon such that the accuracy of results is reduced. Nevertheless, we establish that the interfacial free energy of ice 0 at its melting temperature is similar to that of ice I under the same conditions. The rationality of a core-shell model for the nucleation of ice I within ice 0 is questioned within the context of our results.

  13. Photoionization of hydrogen atom by coherent intense high-frequency short laser pulses: Direct propagation of electron wave packets on enormous spatial grids

    CERN Document Server

    Demekhin, Philipp V; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2013-01-01

    The time-dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation for the hydrogen atom and its interaction with coherent intense high-frequency short laser pulses is solved numerically exactly by employing the code implemented for the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method. Thereby, the wavefunction is followed in space and time for times longer than the pulse duration. Results are explicitly shown for 3 and 10 fs pulses. Particular attention is paid to identifying the effect of dynamic interference of photoelectrons emitted with the same kinetic energy at different times during the rising and falling sides of the pulse predicted in [\\emph{Ph.V. Demekhin and L.S. Cederbaum}, Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{108}, 253001 (2012)]. In order to be able to see the dynamic interference pattern in the computed electron spectra, the photoelectron wave packet has to be propagated over long distances. Clearly, complex absorption potentials often employed to compute spectra of emitted particles cannot be used to detect dy...

  14. Relic gravity waves and 7 keV dark matter from a GeV scale inflaton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.L. Bezrukov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the mechanism of generation of 7 keV sterile neutrino Dark Matter (DM in the model with light inflaton χ, which serves as a messenger of scale invariance breaking. In this model the inflaton, in addition to providing reheating to the Standard Model (SM particles, decays directly into sterile neutrinos. The latter are responsible for the active neutrino oscillations via seesaw type I mechanism. While the two sterile neutrinos may also produce the lepton asymmetry in the primordial plasma and hence explain the baryon asymmetry of the Universe, the third one being the lightest may be of 7 keV and serve as DM. For this mechanism to work, the mass of the inflaton is bound to be light (0.1–1 GeV and uniquely determines its properties, which allows to test the model. For particle physics experiments these are: inflaton lifetime (10−5–10−12 s, branching ratio of B-meson to kaon and inflaton (10−6–10−4 and inflaton branching ratios into light SM particles like it would be for the SM Higgs boson of the same mass. For cosmological experiments these are: spectral index of scalar perturbations (ns≃0.957–0.967, and amount of tensor perturbations produced at inflation (tensor-to-scalar ratio r≃0.15–0.005.

  15. Resolution of the Abraham-Minkowski debate: Implications for the electromagnetic wave theory of light in matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, B. A.

    2011-06-01

    A century has now passed since the origins of the Abraham-Minkowski controversy pertaining to the correct form of optical momentum in media. Experiment and theory have been applied at both the classical and quantum levels in attempt to resolve the debate. The result of these efforts is the identification of Abraham's kinetic momentum as being responsible for the overall center of mass translations of a medium and Minkowski's canonical or wave momentum as being responsible for translations within or with respect to a medium. In spite of the recent theoretical developments, much confusion still exists regarding the appropriate theory required to predict experimental outcomes and to develop new applications. In this paper, the resolution of the longstanding Abraham-Minkowski controversy is reviewed. The resolution is presented using classical electromagnetic theory and logical interpretation of experiments disseminated over the previous century. Emphasis is placed on applied physics applications: modeling optical manipulation of cells and particles. Although the basic interpretation of optical momentum has been resolved, there is still some uncertainly regarding the complete form of the momentum continuity equation describing electromagnetics. Thus, while a complete picture of electrodynamics has still yet to be fully interpreted, this correspondence should help clarify the state-of-the-art view.

  16. Lorentz-covariant quantum 4-potential and orbital angular momentum for the transverse confinement of matter waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, R.; da Paz, I. G.

    2016-08-01

    In two recent papers exact Hermite-Gaussian solutions to relativistic wave equations were obtained for both electromagnetic and particle beams. The solutions for particle beams correspond to those of the Schrödinger equation in the nonrelativistic limit. Here, it will be shown that each beam particle has additional 4-momentum resulting from transverse localization compared to a free particle traveling in the same direction as the beam with the same speed. This will be referred to as the quantum 4-potential term since it will be shown to play an analogous role in relativistic Hamiltonian quantum mechanics as the Bohm potential in the nonrelativistic quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Low-order localization effects include orbital angular momentum, Gouy phase, and beam spreading. Toward a more systematic approach for calculating localization effects at all orders, it will be shown that both the electromagnetic and quantum 4-potentials couple into the canonical 4-momentum of a particle in a similar way. This offers the prospect that traditional methods used to calculate the affect of an electromagnetic field on a particle can now be adapted to take localization effects into account. The prospects for measuring higher order quantum 4-potential related effects experimentally are also discussed alongside some questions to challenge the quantum information and quantum field theorists.

  17. Goos-Hänchen shifts in spin-orbit-coupled cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lu; Qin, Jie-Li; Lan, Zhihao; Dong, Guangjiong; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-03-01

    We consider a matter wave packet of cold atom gas impinging upon a step potential created by an optical light field. In the presence of spin-orbit coupling, the atomic eigenstates contain two types of evanescent states, one of which is an ordinary evanescent state with a pure imaginary wave vector while the other possesses a complex wave vector and is recognized as an oscillating evanescent state. We show that the presence and interplay of these two types of evanescent states can give rise to two different mechanisms for total internal reflection, and thus lead to an unusual Goos-Hänchen (GH) effect. As a result, not only large positive but also large negative GH shifts can be observed in the reflected atomic beam. The dependence of the GH shift on the incident angle, energy, and height of the step potential is studied numerically.

  18. Evolved Models for Elementary Particles and Atoms Require Alternating Neutrino/Antineutrino Pairs Along Interlocked or Looped Strings. Traveling Waves, TW, and Standing Waves, SW, Alternate at Nodal Notches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Roger David; McLeod, David Matthew

    2009-05-01

    Our hydrogen atom interacts with a neutron star. Its stringy TW/SW electron is cut by a neutrino scissor that instantly becomes its end anti-node. The string has one extra neutrino in 100,000. Antimatter remains concealed. Our Dumbo Proton of a TW state is similarly cut. Inside the star, electron string/spring compresses 100,000 and 1836 times more, to proton's linear mass density. Electrostatics encourages that caboose, stringy electron, to couple with a cut proton. Linear charge densities neutralize while composite length contracts 20%. The writhing string evicts an antineutrino at closure on Pauli's authority, becoming Mickey Neutron, with looped quarks. Unstable Mickey Neutron has his ear notch forced into an ear notch of stable Dumbo Proton, achieving immortality in this deuteron marriage. Tritium is in a m'enage a trois. Alpha Nucleus has a # grid. Meta state Ne-20 predicts alpha eviction to O-16. Schr"odinger finally prevails, so string theory and Wave Mechanics can prosper.

  19. Wave chaotic experiments and models for complicated wave scattering systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jen-Hao

    Wave scattering in a complicated environment is a common challenge in many engineering fields because the complexity makes exact solutions impractical to find, and the sensitivity to detail in the short-wavelength limit makes a numerical solution relevant only to a specific realization. On the other hand, wave chaos offers a statistical approach to understand the properties of complicated wave systems through the use of random matrix theory (RMT). A bridge between the theory and practical applications is the random coupling model (RCM) which connects the universal features predicted by RMT and the specific details of a real wave scattering system. The RCM gives a complete model for many wave properties and is beneficial for many physical and engineering fields that involve complicated wave scattering systems. One major contribution of this dissertation is that I have utilized three microwave systems to thoroughly test the RCM in complicated wave systems with varied loss, including a cryogenic system with a superconducting microwave cavity for testing the extremely-low-loss case. I have also experimentally tested an extension of the RCM that includes short-orbit corrections. Another novel result is development of a complete model based on the RCM for the fading phenomenon extensively studied in the wireless communication fields. This fading model encompasses the traditional fading models as its high-loss limit case and further predicts the fading statistics in the low-loss limit. This model provides the first physical explanation for the fitting parameters used in fading models. I have also applied the RCM to additional experimental wave properties of a complicated wave system, such as the impedance matrix, the scattering matrix, the variance ratio, and the thermopower. These predictions are significant for nuclear scattering, atomic physics, quantum transport in condensed matter systems, electromagnetics, acoustics, geophysics, etc.

  20. A surface-patterned chip as a strong source of ultra-cold atoms for quantum technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Nshii, C C; Cotter, J P; Griffin, P F; Hinds, E A; Ironside, C N; See, P; Sinclair, A G; Riis, E; Arnold, A S

    2013-01-01

    Laser cooled atoms are central to modern precision measurements. They are also increasingly important as an enabling technology for experimental cavity quantum electrodynamics, quantum information processing and matter wave interferometry. Although significant progress has been made in miniaturising atomic metrological devices, these are limited in accuracy by their use of hot atomic ensembles and buffer gases. Advances have also been made in producing portable apparatus that benefit from the advantages of atoms in the microKelvin regime. However, simplifying atomic cooling and loading using microfabrication technology has proved difficult. In this letter we address this problem, realising an atom chip that enables the integration of laser cooling and trapping into a compact apparatus. Our source delivers ten thousand times more atoms than previous magneto-optical traps with microfabricated optics and, for the first time, can reach sub-Doppler temperatures. Moreover, the same chip design offers a simple way t...

  1. Effects of dark atom excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Cudell, Jean-René; Wallemacq, Quentin

    2014-01-01

    New stable quarks and charged leptons may exist and be hidden from detection, as they are bound by Coulomb interaction in neutral dark atoms of composite dark matter. This possibility leads to fundamentally new types of indirect effects related to the excitation of such dark atoms followed by their electromagnetic de-excitation. Stable -2 charged particles, bound to primordial helium in O-helium (OHe) atoms, represent the simplest model of dark atoms. Here we consider the structure of OHe atomic levels which is a necessary input for the indirect tests of such composite dark matter scenarios, and we give the spectrum of electromagnetic transitions from the levels excited in OHe collisions.

  2. EINSTEIN, SCHROEDINGER, AND ATOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider gravitation theory in multidimensional space. The model of the metric satisfying the basic requirements of quantum theory is proposed. It is shown that gravitational waves are described by the Liouville equation and the Schrodinger equation as well. The solutions of the Einstein equations describing the stationary states of arbitrary quantum and classical systems with central symmetry have been obtained. Einstein’s atom model has been developed, and proved that atoms and atomic nuclei can be represented as standing gravitational waves

  3. The synergetic modulation of the excitability of central gray matter by a neuropeptide: two protocols using excitation waves in chick retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera M.F. de Lima

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The isolated chick retina provides an in vitro tissue model, in which two protocols were developed to verify the efficacy of a peptide in the excitability control of the central gray matter. In the first, extra-cellular potassium homeostasis is challenged at long intervals and in the second, a wave is trapped in a ring of tissue causing the system to be under self-sustained challenge. Within the neuropil, the extra-cellular potassium transient observed in the first protocol was affected from the initial rising phase to the final concentration at the end of the five-minute pulse. There was no change in the concomitants of excitation waves elicited by the extra-cellular rise of potassium. However, there was an increase on the elicited waves latency and/or a rise in the threshold potassium concentration for these waves to appear. In the second protocol, the wave concomitants and the propagation velocity were affected by the peptide. The results suggest a synergetic action of the peptide on glial and synaptic membranes: by accelerating the glial Na/KATPase and changing the kinetics of the glial potassium channels, with glia tending to accumulate KCl. At the same time, there is an increase in potassium currents through nerve terminals.Retinas de pinto isoladas proporcionam um modelo de tecidos in vitro, para o qual dois protocolos foram desenvolvidos para verificar a eficácia de um peptídeo no controle da excitabilidade da matéria cinzenta central. No primeiro, a homeostase do potássio extra-celular é desafiada por intervalos longos (1 hora e no segundo, uma onda é capturada em um anel de tecido, de tal maneira que o sistema permaneça em estado de desafio auto-sustentado. Dentro da neuropil, o transiente de potássio extra-celular observado no primeiro protocolo foi afetado da fase de início de aumento à concentração final, ao final do pulso de cinco minutos. Não há mudanças nos parâmetros concomitantes das ondas de excitação geradas

  4. CORRIGENDUM: Atoms riding Rayleigh waves Atoms riding Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, G.; Echenique, P. M.; Toennies, J. P.; Traeger, F.

    2010-09-01

    In the original paper the affiliation list is incorrect. The correct address list is as follows: G Benedek1, 5, P M Echenique1, 2, J P Toennies3 and F Traeger4 1 Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizábal 4, 20018 Donostia—San Sebastián, Spain 2 Departamento de Física de Materiales and CFM (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Universidad del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, E-20018 San Sebastián/Donostia, Spain 3 Max Planck-Institut für Dynamik und Selbstorganisation, Bunsenstraße 10 D-37073 Göttingen, Germany 4 Fakultät für Chemie und Biochemie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum Universitätsstraße 150, 44801 Bochum, Germany 5 Permanent address: Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universitá di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano, Italy

  5. Universal diffraction of atoms and molecules from a quantum reflection grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bum Suk; Zhang, Weiqing; Schöllkopf, Wieland

    2016-03-01

    Since de Broglie's work on the wave nature of particles, various optical phenomena have been observed with matter waves of atoms and molecules. However, the analogy between classical and atom/molecule optics is not exact because of different dispersion relations. In addition, according to de Broglie's formula, different combinations of particle mass and velocity can give the same de Broglie wavelength. As a result, even for identical wavelengths, different molecular properties such as electric polarizabilities, Casimir-Polder forces, and dissociation energies modify (and potentially suppress) the resulting matter-wave optical phenomena such as diffraction intensities or interference effects. We report on the universal behavior observed in matter-wave diffraction of He atoms and He2 and D2 molecules from a ruled grating. Clear evidence for emerging beam resonances is observed in the diffraction patterns, which are quantitatively the same for all three particles and only depend on the de Broglie wavelength. A model, combining secondary scattering and quantum reflection, permits us to trace the observed universal behavior back to the peculiar principles of quantum reflection.

  6. Design for a compact CW atom laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Erik; Raithel, Georg

    2011-05-01

    We present a design for a compact continuous-wave atom laser on a chip. A 2D spiral-shaped quadrupole guide is formed by two 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm wires carrying 5 A each embedded in a Si wafer; a 1.5 mm × 0.5 mm wire on the bottom layer carries -10 A, producing a horizontal B-field that pushes the guiding channel center above the chip surface. The center-to-center separation between the top wires is varied from 1.6 mm at the start of the guide to 1 mm at the end, decreasing the guide height from ~ 500 μm to ~ 25 μm above the surface as the atoms travel the 70 cm-long guide. The magnetic gradient of the guiding channel gradually increases from ~ 100 G /cm to ~ 930 G /cm . These features result in continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling and progressive magnetic compression. Spin flip losses are mitigated by a solenoid sewn around the guide to produce a longitudinal B-field. 87Rb atoms are gravitationally loaded into the guide. A far off-resonant light shift barrier at the end of the guide traps the atoms and allows formation of a BEC. Tuning the barrier height to create a non-zero tunneling rate equal to the loading rate completes the implementation of a CW atom laser. Two options for atom interferometry are implemented on the first-generation chip (matter-wave Fabry-Perot interferometer and guide-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer). Current construction status and challenges will be discussed, along with preliminary results.

  7. Strong interaction physics from hadronic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, C. J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    1997-08-01

    Hadronic atoms provide a unique laboratory for studying strong interactions and nuclear medium effects at zero kinetic energy. Previous results from analyses of strong-interaction data consisting of level shifts, widths and yields in π-, K -, p¯ and ∑ - atoms are reviewed. Recent results from fits to comprehensive sets of data in terms of density-dependent optical potentials that respect the low-density limit, where the interaction tends to the free hadron nucleon value, are discussed. The importance of using realistic nuclear density distributions is highlighted. The introduction of density dependence in most cases significantly improves the fit to the data and leads to some novel results. For K - atoms, a substantial attraction of order 200 MeV in nuclear matter is suggested, with interesting repercussions for K¯ condensation and the evolution of strangeness in high-density stars. For p¯ atoms it is found that a reasonable p-wave strength can be accommodated in the fitted optical potential, in agreement with the energy dependence observed for some low-energy p¯N reactions. For ∑ - atoms, the fitted potential becomes repulsive inside the nucleus, implying that Σ hyperons generally do not bind in nuclei in agreement with recent measurements. This repulsion significantly affects calculated masses of neutron stars.

  8. Analysis of the near-resonant fluorescence spectra of a single rubidium atom localized in a three-dimensional optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Wookrae; Kim, Jung-Ryul; Lee, Yea-Lee; Ihm, Jisoon; An, Kyungwon

    2010-01-01

    Supplementary information is presented on the recent work by W. Kim et al. on the matter-wave-tunneling-induced broadening in the near-resonant spectra of a single rubidium atom localized in a three-dimensional optical lattice in a strong Lamb-Dicke regime.

  9. Biprism Electron Interferometry with a Single Atom Tip Source

    CERN Document Server

    Schütz, Georg; Pooch, Andreas; Meier, Simon; Schneeweiss, Philipp; Rauschenbeutel, Arno; Günther, Andreas; Chang, Wei-Tse; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Stibor, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Experiments with electron or ion matter waves require a coherent, monochromatic and long-term stable source with high brightness. These requirements are best fulfilled by single atom tip (SAT) field emitters. The performance of an iridium covered W(111) SAT is demonstrated and analyzed for electrons in a biprism interferometer. Furthermore we characterize the emission of the SAT in a separate field electron and field ion microscope and compare it with other emitter types. A new method is presented to fabricate the electrostatic charged biprism wire that separates and combines the matter wave. In contrast to other biprism interferometers the source and the biprism size are well defined within a few nanometers. The setup has direct applications in ion interferometry and Aharonov-Bohm physics.

  10. Whispering gallery states of neutrons and anti-hydrogen atoms and their applications to fundamental and surface physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvizhevsky, Valery

    2013-03-01

    The `whispering gallery' effect has been known since ancient times for sound waves in air, later in water and more recently for a broad range of electromagnetic waves: radio, optics, Roentgen and so on. It is intensively used and explored due to its numerous crucial applications. It consists of wave localization near a curved reflecting surface and is expected for waves of various natures, for instance, for neutrons and (anti)atoms. For (anti)matter waves, it includes a new feature: a massive particle is settled in quantum states, with parameters depending on its mass. In this talk, we present the first observation of the quantum whispering-gallery effect for matter particles (cold neutrons) 1-2. This phenomenon provides an example of an exactly solvable problem analogous to the `quantum bouncer'; it is complementary to recently discovered gravitational quantum states of neutrons3. These two phenomena provide a direct demonstration of the weak equivalence principle for a massive particle in a quantum state. Deeply bound long-living states are weakly sensitive to surface potential; highly excited short-living states are very sensitive to the wall nuclear potential shape. Therefore, they are a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects. Analogous phenomena could be measured with atoms and anti-atoms 4-5.

  11. Underground atom gradiometer array for mass distribution monitoring and advanced geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuel, B.

    2015-12-01

    After more than 20 years of fundamental research, atom interferometers have reached sensitivity and accuracy levels competing with or beating inertial sensors based on different technologies. Atom interferometers offer interesting applications in geophysics (gravimetry, gradiometry, Earth rotation rate measurements), inertial sensing (submarine or aircraft autonomous positioning), metrology (new definition of the kilogram) and fundamental physics (tests of the standard model, tests of general relativity). Atom interferometers already contributed significantly to fundamental physics by, for example, providing stringent constraints on quantum-electrodynamics through measurements of the hyperfine structure constant, testing the Equivalence Principle with cold atoms, or providing new measurements for the Newtonian gravitational constant. Cold atom sensors have moreover been established as key instruments in metrology for the new definition of the kilogram or through international comparisons of gravimeters. The field of atom interferometry (AI) is now entering a new phase where very high sensitivity levels must be demonstrated, in order to enlarge the potential applications outside atomic physics laboratories. These applications range from gravitational wave (GW) detection in the [0.1-10 Hz] frequency band to next generation ground and space-based Earth gravity field studies to precision gyroscopes and accelerometers. The Matter-wave laser Interferometric Gravitation Antenna (MIGA) presented here is a large-scale matter-wave sensor which will open new applications in geoscience and fundamental physics. The MIGA consortium gathers 18 expert French laboratories and companies in atomic physics, metrology, optics, geosciences and gravitational physics, with the aim to build a large-scale underground atom-interferometer instrument by 2018 and operate it till at least 2023. In this paper, we present the main objectives of the project, the status of the construction of the

  12. Quantum wave packet revivals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinett, R.W

    2004-03-01

    The numerical prediction, theoretical analysis, and experimental verification of the phenomenon of wave packet revivals in quantum systems has flourished over the last decade and a half. Quantum revivals are characterized by initially localized quantum states which have a short-term, quasi-classical time evolution, which then can spread significantly over several orbits, only to reform later in the form of a quantum revival in which the spreading reverses itself, the wave packet relocalizes, and the semi-classical periodicity is once again evident. Relocalization of the initial wave packet into a number of smaller copies of the initial packet ('minipackets' or 'clones') is also possible, giving rise to fractional revivals. Systems exhibiting such behavior are a fundamental realization of time-dependent interference phenomena for bound states with quantized energies in quantum mechanics and are therefore of wide interest in the physics and chemistry communities. We review the theoretical machinery of quantum wave packet construction leading to the existence of revivals and fractional revivals, in systems with one (or more) quantum number(s), as well as discussing how information on the classical period and revival time is encoded in the energy eigenvalue spectrum. We discuss a number of one-dimensional model systems which exhibit revival behavior, including the infinite well, the quantum bouncer, and others, as well as several two-dimensional integrable quantum billiard systems. Finally, we briefly review the experimental evidence for wave packet revivals in atomic, molecular, and other systems, and related revival phenomena in condensed matter and optical systems.

  13. Quantum wave packet revivals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinett, R. W.

    2004-03-01

    The numerical prediction, theoretical analysis, and experimental verification of the phenomenon of wave packet revivals in quantum systems has flourished over the last decade and a half. Quantum revivals are characterized by initially localized quantum states which have a short-term, quasi-classical time evolution, which then can spread significantly over several orbits, only to reform later in the form of a quantum revival in which the spreading reverses itself, the wave packet relocalizes, and the semi-classical periodicity is once again evident. Relocalization of the initial wave packet into a number of smaller copies of the initial packet (‘minipackets’ or ‘clones’) is also possible, giving rise to fractional revivals. Systems exhibiting such behavior are a fundamental realization of time-dependent interference phenomena for bound states with quantized energies in quantum mechanics and are therefore of wide interest in the physics and chemistry communities. We review the theoretical machinery of quantum wave packet construction leading to the existence of revivals and fractional revivals, in systems with one (or more) quantum number(s), as well as discussing how information on the classical period and revival time is encoded in the energy eigenvalue spectrum. We discuss a number of one-dimensional model systems which exhibit revival behavior, including the infinite well, the quantum bouncer, and others, as well as several two-dimensional integrable quantum billiard systems. Finally, we briefly review the experimental evidence for wave packet revivals in atomic, molecular, and other systems, and related revival phenomena in condensed matter and optical systems.

  14. Wave Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Christov, Ivan C

    2012-01-01

    In classical continuum physics, a wave is a mechanical disturbance. Whether the disturbance is stationary or traveling and whether it is caused by the motion of atoms and molecules or the vibration of a lattice structure, a wave can be understood as a specific type of solution of an appropriate mathematical equation modeling the underlying physics. Typical models consist of partial differential equations that exhibit certain general properties, e.g., hyperbolicity. This, in turn, leads to the possibility of wave solutions. Various analytical techniques (integral transforms, complex variables, reduction to ordinary differential equations, etc.) are available to find wave solutions of linear partial differential equations. Furthermore, linear hyperbolic equations with higher-order derivatives provide the mathematical underpinning of the phenomenon of dispersion, i.e., the dependence of a wave's phase speed on its wavenumber. For systems of nonlinear first-order hyperbolic equations, there also exists a general ...

  15. Observation of correlated atom pairs in spontaneous four wave mixing of two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates; Observation de paires d'atomes correles au travers de la collision de deux condensats de Bose-Einstein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, A

    2007-11-15

    In this thesis, we report on the observation of pairs of correlated atoms produced in the collision of two Bose-Einstein condensates of metastable helium. Three laser beams perform a Raman transfer which extracts the condensate from the magnetic trap and separates it into two parts with opposite mean momenta. While the condensates propagate, elastic scattering of pairs of atoms occurs, whose momenta satisfy energy and momentum conservation laws. Metastable helium atoms large internal energy allows the use of a position-sensitive, single-atom detector which permits a three-dimensional reconstruction of the scattered atoms'momenta. The statistics of these momenta show correlations for atoms with opposite momenta. The measured correlation volume can be understood from the uncertainty-limited momentum spread of the colliding condensates. This interpretation is confirmed by the observation of the momentum correlation function for two atoms scattered in the same direction. This latter effect is a manifestation of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect for indistinguishable bosons. Such a correlated-atom-pair source is a first step towards experiments in which one would like to confirm the pairs'entanglement. (author)

  16. International journal of quantum chemistry. Quantum Chemistry Symposium Number 27: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Atomic, Molecular, and Condensed Matter Theory and Computational Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowdin, Per-Olov; Ohrn, N. Y.; Sabin, John R.; Zerner, Michael C.

    1993-03-01

    The topics covered at the 33rd annual Sanibel Symposium, organized by the faculty and staff of the Quantum Theory Project of the University of Florida, and held March 13 - 20, 1993, include advanced scientific computing, interaction of photons and matter, quantum molecular dynamics, electronic structure methods, polymeric systems, and quantum chemical methods for extended systems.

  17. Testing the Universality of Free Fall with a Dual-Species Atom Interferometer on Ste-Quest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutzik, Markus; Peters, Achim

    2014-01-01

    The Space-Time Explorer and Quantum Equivalence Space Test (STEQUEST) satellite mission is devoted to testing several aspects of General Relativity using an atomic clock and a differential dual-species atom interferometer in space. The latter aims at performing a quantum test of the Einstein equivalence principle in the perigee phase of a highly elliptical Earth orbit by probing the universality of free fall with coherent matter waves. In this paper, we give a brief summary on the mission and the prospects for the dual-species atom interferometer.

  18. Analysis of non-Markovian coupling of a lattice-trapped atom to free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Michael; Krinner, Ludwig; Pazmiño, Arturo; Schneble, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Behavior analogous to that of spontaneous emission in photonic band-gap materials has been predicted for an atom-optical system consisting of an atom confined in a well of a state-dependent optical lattice that is coupled to free space through an internal-state transition [de Vega et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 260404 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.260404]. Using the Weisskopf-Wigner approach and considering a one-dimensional geometry, we analyze the properties of this system in detail, including the evolution of the lattice-trapped population, the momentum distribution of emitted matter waves, and the detailed structure of an evanescent matter-wave state below the continuum boundary. We compare and contrast our findings for the transition from Markovian to non-Markovian behaviors to those previously obtained for three dimensions.

  19. Reexamining the roles of gravitational and inertial masses in gravimetry with atom interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unnikrishnan, C.S., E-mail: unni@tifr.res.in [Gravitation Group, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Gillies, G.T., E-mail: gtg@virginia.edu [School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4746 (United States)

    2012-12-03

    We reassess the true roles of the gravitational charge (mass) and the inertial mass in quantum phases acquired in matter-wave interferometry in a gravitational field. The insights gained allow us to address the question of whether gravimetry with atom interferometers is equivalent to a high precision measurement of the relative gravitational time dilation of two clocks separated in space. In particular we show that the gravitational phase is inversely related to the Compton frequency, invalidating the suggested equivalence to a Compton clock. Clarity of arguments is achieved by comparison to a charged matter-wave interferometer. Though quantum states have a similarity to oscillator clocks through the Planck–Einstein–de Broglie relations, it is shown clearly that the claim of greatly enhanced precision over real atomic clock comparison cannot be maintained.

  20. ASTROPHYSICS. Atom-interferometry constraints on dark energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, P; Jaffe, M; Haslinger, P; Simmons, Q; Müller, H; Khoury, J

    2015-08-21

    If dark energy, which drives the accelerated expansion of the universe, consists of a light scalar field, it might be detectable as a "fifth force" between normal-matter objects, in potential conflict with precision tests of gravity. Chameleon fields and other theories with screening mechanisms, however, can evade these tests by suppressing the forces in regions of high density, such as the laboratory. Using a cesium matter-wave interferometer near a spherical mass in an ultrahigh-vacuum chamber, we reduced the screening mechanism by probing the field with individual atoms rather than with bulk matter. We thereby constrained a wide class of dark energy theories, including a range of chameleon and other theories that reproduce the observed cosmic acceleration.

  1. An atom interferometer with a shaken optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Weidner, C A; Kosloff, Ronnie; Anderson, and Dana Z

    2016-01-01

    We introduce shaken lattice interferometry with atoms trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. The atoms undergo an interferometer sequence of splitting, propagation, reflection, and recombination by phase modulation of the lattice through a sequence of shaking functions. Each function in the sequence is determined by a learning procedure that is implemented with a genetic algorithm. Numerical simulations determine the momentum state of the atoms, which is experimentally accessible with time-of-flight imaging. The shaking function is then optimized to achieve the desired state transitions. The sensitivity of the interferometer to perturbations such as those introduced by inertial forces scales the same way as for conventional matter wave interferometers. The shaken lattice interferometer may be optimized to sense signals of interest while rejecting others, such as the measurement of an AC signal while rejecting a DC bias.

  2. Atom lasers: Production, properties and prospects for precision inertial measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robins, N.P., E-mail: nick.robins@anu.edu.au; Altin, P.A.; Debs, J.E.; Close, J.D.

    2013-08-20

    We review experimental progress on atom lasers out-coupled from Bose–Einstein condensates, and consider the properties of such beams in the context of precision inertial sensing. The atom laser is the matter-wave analogue of the optical laser. Both devices rely on Bose-enhanced scattering to produce a macroscopically populated trapped mode that is output-coupled to produce an intense beam. In both cases, the beams often display highly desirable properties such as low divergence, high spectral flux and a simple spatial mode that make them useful in practical applications, as well as the potential to perform measurements at or below the quantum projection noise limit. Both devices display similar second-order correlations that differ from thermal sources. Because of these properties, atom lasers are a promising source for application to precision inertial measurements.

  3. Semiclassical Formalism as Applied to the Computation of Resonant Energies and Associated Stationary State Wave Functions for the Interaction of the Fluorine Atom with the Hydrogen Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Carling Clay

    The semiclassical interpretation of the experimentally confirmed computational discovery of the resonances for the collinear interaction of the fluorine atom with the hydrogen molecule as action quantizing classical trajectories is extended to the J = 0 3D reaction in a successful attempt to recover the analogous quantum calculation of the resonance eigenvalues. Confirmation of the semiclassical analogues for both collinear and 3D reactions is then strengthened through a successful construction of stationary state wave functions when compared to the full quantum calculation, using a time-dependent approach to semiclassical dynamics requiring such action quantizing trajectories. Extension to future studies are initiated by constructing outgoing scattering states through a semiclassical adiabatic formalism with which the width of the resonance peaks may then be computed. Discoveries incidental to the major objectives required inspection to address the ambiguities associated with multiple semiclassical analogues and were satisfactorily resolved through linear stability analysis and computation of Lyaponov exponents for quasiperiodic trajectories. Successful generalizations for the quantization of the alternative analogues were developed with resultant unification of bound trajectory initial position loci on the V = E potential energy surface. In particular, two such independently discovered loci are demonstrated to be components of a continuous unified locus such that the point of unification corresponds to the onset of linear stability for both qualitative varieties. An additional complication encountered in the 3D studies for semiclassical quantization of the quasiperiodic trajectories is avoided by employment of a procedure developed for iteratively converging upon action quantizing energies requiring only arbitrary trajectories. The consistency of these studies with those of earlier workers is demonstrated by comparing the behavior expected for deviations from

  4. Volatile organo-selenium speciation in biological matter by solid phase microextraction–moderate temperature multicapillary gas chromatography with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry detection

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Christian; Sanz Landaluze, Jon; Ximenez Embun, Pilar; Madrid Albarrán, Yolanda; Cámara, Carmen

    2004-01-01

    Microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES) in combination with multicapillary (MC) gas chromatography could be proven to be useful for element specific detection of volatile species. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) was used for preconcentration and sample-matrix separation. The fiber desorption unit as well as the heating control for the MCcolumn were in-house developed and multicapillary column was operated at moderate temperatures (30–100 ◦C). The method was...

  5. Rigorous Comparison of Gravimetry Employing Atom Interferometers and the Measurement of Gravitational Time Dilation

    CERN Document Server

    Unnikrishnan, C S

    2011-01-01

    We present a gravitationally rigorous and clear answer, in the negative, to the question whether gravimetry with atom interferometers is equivalent to the the measurement of the relative gravitational time dilation of two clocks separated in space. Though matter and light waves, quantum states and oscillator clocks are quantum synonymous through the Planck-Einstein-de Broglie relations and the equivalence principle, there are crucial differences in the context of tests of gravitation theories.

  6. Fifty Years of Matter Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medicus, Heinrich A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the origin of de Broglie's concept and its influences on his contemporaries, notably on Einstein, Schrodinger, Elsasser, Davisson, and Thomson. Indicates that the theory served not only as the starting point of quantum mechanics, but also opened new experimental possibilities. Historical inaccuracies are corrected with new material…

  7. An undergraduate experiment demonstrating the physics of metamaterials with acoustic waves and soda cans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, James T.; Whitehouse, Christopher B.; Oulton, Rupert F.; Gennaro, Sylvain D.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel undergraduate research project that highlights the physics of metamaterials with acoustic waves and soda cans. We confirm the Helmholtz resonance nature of a single can by measuring its amplitude and phase response to a sound wave. Arranging multiple cans in arrays smaller than the wavelength, we then design an antenna that redirects sound into a preferred direction. The antenna can be thought of as a new resonator, composed of artificially engineered meta-atoms, similar to a metamaterial. These experiments are illustrative, tactile, and open ended so as to enable students to explore the physics of matter/wave interaction.

  8. Generalized Two-State Theory for an Atom Laser with Nonlinear Couplings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Hui; TIAN Li-Jun

    2002-01-01

    We present a generalized two-state theory to investigate the quantum dynamics and statistics of an atom laser with nonlinear couplings. The rotating wave approximate Hamiltonian of the system is proved to be analytically solvable. The fraction of output atoms is then showed to exhibit an interesting collapse and revival phenomenon with respect to the evolution time, a sign of nonlinear couplings. Several nonclassical effects, such as sub-Poissonian distribution, quadrature squeezing effects, second-order cross-correlation and accompanied violation of Cauchy-Schwartz inequality are also revealed for the output matter wave. The initial global phase of the trapped condensate, in weak nonlinear coupling limits, is found to exert an interesting impact on the quantum statistical properties of the propagating atom laser beam.

  9. Chiral Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Srimoyee

    2016-01-01

    We study shock waves in relativistic chiral matter. We argue that the conventional Rankine- Hugoinot relations are modified due to the presence of chiral transport phenomena. We show that the entropy discontinuity in a weak shock wave is linearly proportional to the pressure discontinuity when the effect of chiral transport becomes sufficiently large. We also show that rarefaction shock waves, which do not exist in usual nonchiral fluids, can appear in chiral matter. These features are exemplified by shock propagation in dense neutrino matter in the hydrodynamic regime.

  10. Energy from the Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patricia L.

    This curriculum guide was written to supplement fifth and sixth grade science units on matter and energy. It was designed to provide more in-depth material on the atom. The first part, "Teacher Guide," contains background information, biographical sketches of persons in the history of nuclear energy, vocabulary, answer sheets, management sheets…

  11. Microstructure of Matter (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartz, Cifford E. [State University of New York

    1967-01-01

    Matter is made up of atoms: the atomic nucleus, protons and neutrons, and electrons. There are several other particles besides protons, neutrons, and electrons, and it has become customary to refer to these as elementary or fundamental particles. The particles make up the fine structure of matter with which this booklet deals. This field of science is often referred to as particle physics or high-energy physics because of the fact that particle beams of extremely high energy are needed in most of its pertinent experiments.

  12. Chaotic dynamics and fractal structures in experiments with cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Alvar; Georgeot, Bertrand; Guéry-Odelin, David; Wagemakers, Alexandre; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2017-01-01

    We use tools from nonlinear dynamics for the detailed analysis of cold-atom experiments. A powerful example is provided by the recent concept of basin entropy, which allows us to quantify the final-state unpredictability that results from the complexity of the phase-space geometry. We show here that this enables one to reliably infer the presence of fractal structures in phase space from direct measurements. We illustrate the method with numerical simulations in an experimental configuration made of two crossing laser guides that can be used as a matter-wave splitter.

  13. Indications of partial chiral symmetry restoration from pionic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    2002-01-01

    Extensive data on strong interaction effects in pionic atoms are analyzed with a density-dependent isovector scattering amplitude suggested recently by Weise to result from a density dependence of the pion decay constant. Most of the so-called 'missing s-wave repulsion' is removed when adopting this approach, thus indicating a partial chiral symmetry restoration in dense matter. The resulting potentials describe quite well also elastic scattering of 20 MeV pions on Ca. Further tests with elastic scattering are desirable.

  14. Linear atomic quantum coupler

    CERN Document Server

    El-Orany, Faisal A A

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we develop the notion of the linear atomic quantum coupler. This device consists of two modes propagating into two waveguides, each of them includes a localized and/or a trapped atom. These waveguides are placed close enough to allow exchanging energy between them via evanescent waves. Each mode interacts with the atom in the same waveguide in the standard way, i.e. as the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM), and with the atom-mode in the second waveguide via evanescent wave. We present the Hamiltonian for the system and deduce the exact form for the wavefunction. We investigate the atomic inversions and the second-order correlation function. In contrast to the conventional linear coupler, the atomic quantum coupler is able to generate nonclassical effects. The atomic inversions can exhibit long revival-collapse phenomenon as well as subsidiary revivals based on the competition among the switching mechanisms in the system. Finally, under certain conditions, the system can yield the results of the two-m...

  15. A Quantum Model of Atoms (the Energy Levels of Atoms).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafie, Francois

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the model for all atoms which was developed on the same basis as Bohr's model for the hydrogen atom. Calculates the radii and the energies of the orbits. Demonstrates how the model obeys the de Broglie's hypothesis that the moving electron exhibits both wave and particle properties. (Author/ASK)

  16. Dark matter searches

    CERN Document Server

    Baudis, Laura

    2015-01-01

    One of the major challenges of modern physics is to decipher the nature of dark matter. Astrophysical observations provide ample evidence for the existence of an invisible and dominant mass component in the observable universe, from the scales of galaxies up to the largest cosmological scales. The dark matter could be made of new, yet undiscovered elementary particles, with allowed masses and interaction strengths with normal matter spanning an enormous range. Axions, produced non-thermally in the early universe, and weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which froze out of thermal equilibrium with a relic density matching the observations, represent two well-motivated, generic classes of dark matter candidates. Dark matter axions could be detected by exploiting their predicted coupling to two photons, where the highest sensitivity is reached by experiments using a microwave cavity permeated by a strong magnetic field. WIMPs could be directly observed via scatters off atomic nuclei in underground, ultr...

  17. Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Einasto, Jaan

    2013-01-01

    I give a review of the development of the concept of dark matter. The dark matter story passed through several stages from a minor observational puzzle to a major challenge for theory of elementary particles. Modern data suggest that dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, and that it consists of some unknown non-baryonic particles. Dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, thus properties of dark matter particles determine the structure of the cosmic...

  18. Nonlinear dynamics in atom optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Wenyu; Dyrting, S.; Milburn, G.J. [Queensland Univ., St. Lucia, QLD (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    In this paper theoretical work on classical and quantum nonlinear dynamics of cold atoms is reported. The basic concepts in nonlinear dynamics are reviewed and then applied to the motion of atoms in time-dependent standing waves and to the atomic bouncer. The quantum dynamics for the cases of regular and chaotic classical dynamics is described. The effect of spontaneous emission and external noise is also discussed. 104 refs., 1 tab., 21 figs.

  19. ɛ -pseudoclassical model for quantum resonances in a cold dilute atomic gas periodically driven by finite-duration standing-wave laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, Benjamin T.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Gardiner, Simon A.; Astier, Hippolyte P. A. G.; Andersen, Mikkel F.; Daszuta, Boris

    2016-12-01

    Atom interferometers are a useful tool for precision measurements of fundamental physical phenomena, ranging from the local gravitational-field strength to the atomic fine-structure constant. In such experiments, it is desirable to implement a high-momentum-transfer "beam splitter," which may be achieved by inducing quantum resonance in a finite-temperature laser-driven atomic gas. We use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate these quantum resonances in the regime where the gas receives laser pulses of finite duration and derive an ɛ -classical model for the dynamics of the gas atoms which is capable of reproducing quantum resonant behavior for both zero-temperature and finite-temperature noninteracting gases. We show that this model agrees well with the fully quantum treatment of the system over a time scale set by the choice of experimental parameters. We also show that this model is capable of correctly treating the time-reversal mechanism necessary for implementing an interferometer with this physical configuration and that it explains an unexpected universality in the dynamics.

  20. Matter: the fundamental particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Landua, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    "The largest particle physics centre in the world is located in Europe. It straddles the Franco-Swiss border, near Geneva. At CERN - the European Organisation for Nuclear Research , which is focused on the science of nuclear matter rather than on the exploitation of atomic energy - there are over 6 500 scientists." (1 page)