WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic mass measurements

  1. Atomic mass measurements of short-lived nuclides around the doubly-magic $^{208}$Pb

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, C; Beck, D; Blaum, K; Bollen, G; Herfurth, F; Kellerbauer, A G; Kluge, H -J; Lunney, D; Schwarz, S

    2008-01-01

    Accurate atomic mass measurements of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich nuclides around the doubly-magic $^{208}$Pb and of neutron-rich cesium isotopes were performed with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN. The masses of $^{145,147}$Cs, $^{181,183}$Tl, $^{186}$Tl$^{m}$, $^{187}$Tl, $^{196}$Tl$^{m}$, $^{205}$Tl, $^{197}$Pb$^{m}$, $^{208}$Pb, $^{190-197}$Bi, $^{209,215,216}$Bi, $^{203,205,229}$Fr, and $^{214,229,230}$Ra were determined. The obtained relative mass uncertainty in the range of $2 \\times 10^{-7}$ to $2 \\times 10^{-8}$ is not only required for safe identification of isomeric states but also allows mapping the detailed structure of the mass surface. A mass adjustment procedure was carried out and the results included into the Atomic Mass Evaluation. The resulting separation energies are discussed and the mass spectrometric and laser spectroscopic data are examined for possible correlations.

  2. Measurement of atomic number and mass attenuation coefficient in magnesium ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R H Kadam; S T Alone; G K Bichile; K M Jadhav

    2007-05-01

    Pure magnesium ferrite sample was prepared by standard ceramic technique and characterized by X-ray diffraction method. XRD pattern revealed that the sample possess single-phase cubic spinel structure. The linear attenuation coefficient (), mass attenuation coefficient (/ρ), total atomic cross-section (tot), total electronic cross-section (ele) and the effective atomic number (eff) were calculated for pure magnesium ferrite (MgFe2O4). The values of -ray mass attenuation coefficient were obtained using a NaI energy selective scintillation counter with radioactive -ray sources having energy 0.36, 0.511, 0.662, 1.17 and 1.28 MeV. The experimentally obtained values of /ρ and eff agreed fairly well with those obtained theoretically.

  3. Measurement of the charged pion mass using X-ray spectroscopy of exotic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Trassinelli, M; Borchert, G; Dax, A; Egger, J P; Gotta, D; Hennebach, M; Indelicato, P; Liu, Y -W; Manil, B; Nelms, N; Simons, L M; Wells, A

    2016-01-01

    The $5g-4f$ transitions in pionic nitrogen and muonic oxygen were measured simultaneously by using a gaseous nitrogen-oxygen mixture at 1.4\\,bar. Due to the precise knowledge of the muon mass the muonic line provides the energy calibration for the pionic transition. A value of (139.57077\\,$\\pm$\\,0.00018)\\,MeV/c$^{2}$ ($\\pm$\\,1.3ppm) is derived for the mass of the negatively charged pion, which is 4.2ppm larger than the present world average.

  4. Review of atomic mass formula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, Takahiro [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Advanced Research Center for Science and Engineering

    1997-07-01

    Wapstra and Audi`s Table is famous for evaluation of experimental data of atomic nuclear masses (1993/1995 version) which estimated about 2000 kinds of nuclei. The error of atomic mass of formula is 0.3 MeV-0.8 MeV. Four kinds of atomic mass formula: JM (Jaenecke and Masson), TUYY (Tachibana, Uno, Yamada and Yamada), FRDM (Moeller, Nix, Myers and Swiatecki) and ETFSI (Aboussir, Pearson, Dutta and Tondeur) and their properties (number of parameter and error etc.) were explained. An estimation method of theoretical error of mass formula was presented. It was estimated by the theoretical error of other surrounding nuclei. (S.Y.)

  5. Biomedical applications of accelerator mass spectrometry-isotope measurements at the level of the atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J; Garner, R C

    1999-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a nuclear physics technique developed about twenty years ago, that uses the high energy (several MeV) of a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to measure very small quantities of rare and long-lived isotopes. Elements that are of interest in biomedicine and environmental sciences can be measured, often to parts per quadrillion sensitivity, i.e. zeptomole to attomole levels (10(-21)-10(-18) mole) from milligram samples. This is several orders of magnitude lower than that achievable by conventional decay counting techniques, such as liquid scintillation counting (LSC). AMS was first applied to geochemical, climatological and archaeological areas, such as for radiocarbon dating (Shroud of Turin), but more recently this technology has been used for bioanalytical applications. In this sphere, most work has been conducted using aluminium, calcium and carbon isotopes. The latter is of special interest in drug metabolism studies, where a Phase 1 adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) study can be conducted using only 10 nanoCurie (37 Bq or ca. 0.9 microSv) amounts or less of 14C-labelled drugs. In the UK, these amounts of radioactivity are below those necessary to request specific regulatory approval from the Department of Health's Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee (ARSAC), thus saving on valuable development time and resources. In addition, the disposal of these amounts is much less an environmental issue than that associated with microCurie quantities, which are currently used. Also, AMS should bring an opportunity to conduct "first into man" studies without the need for widespread use of animals. Centre for Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CBAMS) Ltd. is the first fully commercial company in the world to offer analytical services using AMS. With its high throughput and relatively low costs per sample analysis, AMS should be of great benefit to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology

  6. First mass measurement at JYFLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokinen, A. [Department of Physics, PB 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Eronen, T. [Department of Physics, PB 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hager, U. [Department of Physics, PB 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hakala, J. [Department of Physics, PB 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Kolhinen, V. [Department of Physics, PB 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Kopecky, S. [Department of Physics, PB 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Rinta-Antila, S. [Department of Physics, PB 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Szerypo, J. [Department of Physics, PB 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, PB 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2004-12-27

    The first mass measurements at JYFLTRAP facility are reviewed. Those are also first ever direct mass measurements of the heaviest Zr-isotopes. Results are compared to atomic mass evaluation data and the recent calculations. The first TOF-resonances from high-precision trap and an implication to high-precision mass measurements are discussed.

  7. Measurement of the charged pion mass using a low-density target of light atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Trassinelli, M; Borchert, G; Dax, A; Egger, J -P; Gotta, D; Hennebach, M; Indelicato, P; Liu, Y -W; Manil, B; Nelms, N; Simons, L M; Wells, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a new evaluation of the negatively charged pion mass based on the simultaneous spec-troscopy of pionic nitrogen and muonic oxygen transitions using a gaseous target composed by a N 2 /O 2 mixture at 1.4 bar. We present the experimental setup and the methods for deriving the pion mass value from the spatial separation from the 5g -- 4 f $\\pi$N transition line and the 5g -- 4 f $\\mu$O transition line used as reference. Moreover, we discuss the importance to use dilute targets in order to minimize the influence of additional spectral lines from the presence of remaining electrons during the radiative emission. The occurrence of possible satellite lines is investigated via hypothesis testing methods using the Bayes factor.

  8. Measurement of the charged pion mass using a low-density target of light atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trassinelli M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new evaluation of the negatively charged pion mass based on the simultaneous spectroscopy of pionic nitrogen and muonic oxygen transitions using a gaseous target composed by a N2/O2 mixture at 1.4 bar. We present the experimental set-up and the methods for deriving the pion mass value from the spatial separation from the 5g − 4f πN transition line and the 5g − 4f μO transition line used as reference. Moreover, we discuss the importance to use dilute targets in order to minimize the influence of additional spectral lines from the presence of remaining electrons during the radiative emission. The occurrence of possible satellite lines is investigated via hypothesis testing methods using the Bayes factor.

  9. 同位素丰度绝对测量及相对原子质量测定中的不确定度评估%Uncertainty Analysis of Absolute Measurement of Isotopic Abundances and Relative Atomic Mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周涛; 王同兴

    2005-01-01

    The sources of uncertainty of relative atomic mass include measurement errors and isotopic fractionation of terrestrial samples. Measurement errors are composed of measurements of atomic masses and isotopic abundances, the later includes uncertainty of correction factor K and isotopic ratios of natural samples. Through differential of seven factors to gain their propagation factors, the uncertainty of correction factors K can be calculated. With the same differential calculation, the uncertainty of relative atomic mass can be obtained.

  10. Direct measurement of transition frequencies in isolated pHe+ atoms, and new CPT-violation limits on the antiproton charge and mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, M; Eades, J; Hayano, R S; Ishikawa, T; Pirkl, W; Widmann, E; Yamaguchi, H; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Horváth, D; Yamazaki, T

    2003-09-19

    A radio frequency quadrupole decelerator and achromatic momentum analyzer were used to decelerate antiprotons and produce p4He+ and p3He+ atoms in ultra-low-density targets, where collision-induced shifts of the atomic transition frequencies were negligible. The frequencies at near-vacuo conditions were measured by laser spectroscopy to fractional precisions of (6-19) x 10(-8). By comparing these with QED calculations and the antiproton cyclotron frequency, we set a new limit of 1 x 10(-8) on possible differences between the antiproton and proton charges and masses.

  11. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  12. Systematic effects in the measurement of the negatively charged pion mass using laser spectroscopy of pionic helium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Obreshkov, Boyan

    2016-01-01

    The collision-induced shift and broadening of selected dipole transition lines of pionic helium in gaseous helium at low temperatures up to $T=12$ K and pressure up to a few bar are calculated within variable phase function approach. We predict blue shift of the resonance frequencies of the $(n,l)=(16,15) \\rightarrow (16,14) $ and $(16,15) \\rightarrow (17,14)$ unfavored transitions and red shift for the favored transition $(17,16) \\rightarrow (16,15)$. The result may be helpful in reducing the systematic error in proposed future experiments for determination of the negatively charged pion mass from laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms.

  13. Scanning transmission ion microscopy mass measurements for quantitative trace element analysis within biological samples and validation using atomic force microscopy thickness measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devès, Guillaume; Cohen-Bouhacina, Touria; Ortega, Richard

    2004-10-01

    We used the nuclear microprobe techniques, micro-PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission), micro-RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) and scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) in order to perform the characterization of trace element content and spatial distribution within biological samples (dehydrated cultured cells, tissues). The normalization of PIXE results was usually expressed in terms of sample dry mass as determined by micro-RBS recorded simultaneously to micro-PIXE. However, the main limit of RBS mass measurement is the sample mass loss occurring during irradiation and which could be up to 30% of the initial sample mass. We present here a new methodology for PIXE normalization and quantitative analysis of trace element within biological samples based on dry mass measurement performed by mean of STIM. The validation of STIM cell mass measurements was obtained in comparison with AFM sample thickness measurements. Results indicated the reliability of STIM mass measurement performed on biological samples and suggested that STIM should be performed for PIXE normalization. Further information deriving from direct confrontation of AFM and STIM analysis could as well be obtained, like in situ measurements of cell specific gravity within cells compartment (nucleolus and cytoplasm).

  14. Scanning transmission ion microscopy mass measurements for quantitative trace element analysis within biological samples and validation using atomic force microscopy thickness measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deves, Guillaume [Laboratoire de chimie nucleaire analytique et bioenvironnementale, UMR 5084, CNRS-Universite de Bordeaux 1, BP 120 Chemin du solarium, F33175 Gradignan cedex (France)]. E-mail: deves@cenbg.in2p3.fr; Cohen-Bouhacina, Touria [Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, Universite de Bordeaux 1, 351, cours de la Liberation, F33405 Talence cedex (France); Ortega, Richard [Laboratoire de chimie nucleaire analytique et bioenvironnementale, UMR 5084, CNRS-Universite de Bordeaux 1, BP 120 Chemin du solarium, F33175 Gradignan cedex (France)

    2004-10-08

    We used the nuclear microprobe techniques, micro-PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission), micro-RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) and scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) in order to perform the characterization of trace element content and spatial distribution within biological samples (dehydrated cultured cells, tissues). The normalization of PIXE results was usually expressed in terms of sample dry mass as determined by micro-RBS recorded simultaneously to micro-PIXE. However, the main limit of RBS mass measurement is the sample mass loss occurring during irradiation and which could be up to 30% of the initial sample mass. We present here a new methodology for PIXE normalization and quantitative analysis of trace element within biological samples based on dry mass measurement performed by mean of STIM. The validation of STIM cell mass measurements was obtained in comparison with AFM sample thickness measurements. Results indicated the reliability of STIM mass measurement performed on biological samples and suggested that STIM should be performed for PIXE normalization. Further information deriving from direct confrontation of AFM and STIM analysis could as well be obtained, like in situ measurements of cell specific gravity within cells compartment (nucleolus and cytoplasm)

  15. Inertial measurement using atom interferometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA; Aiai; YANG; Jun; YAN; Shuhua; LUO; Yukun; HU; Qingqing; WEI; Chunhua; LI; Zehuan

    2015-01-01

    The recent advances of atom interferometer and its application in precision inertial measurement are review ed. The principle,characteristics and implementation of atom interferometer are introduced and it can be used to measure gravitational acceleration,gravity gradient and rotation for its high sensitivity. We also present the principle,structure and new progress of gravimeter,gravity gradiometer and gyroscope based on atom interferometer.

  16. Measuring Atomic and Molecular Species in the Upper Atmosphere up to 1000 km with the Free-Fall Mass Spectrometer and the Small Deflection Energy Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, F.; Nicholas, A.

    2007-05-01

    Atomic oxygen (O), the major constituent of the Earth's thermosphere above 200 km altitude is both a driver and a tracer of atmospheric motions in the thermosphere and plays a pivotal role in interactions with the ionosphere through ion-drag and chemical reactions. At altitudes above 400 to 500 km, the energies and composition may reveal interactions with the magnetosphere. In addition, satellites in low-Earth orbit require knowledge of O densities to address engineering issues in low-Earth-orbit missions. The major difficulties in O measurements involve ambiguities due to the recombination of O in the sensor surfaces to yield O2 which is then measured with a mass spectrometer; similar difficulties exist for atomic hydrogen H and nitrogen N. In this paper we describe the use of our new charged particle spectrometers to measure relative densities and energies of the neutral and ion constituents in the upper atmosphere and into the exosphere to about 1000 km altitude. Neutral atoms are ionized before striking internal surfaces and surface-accommodated atoms and molecules are discriminated from incident ones according to their energies. Our ion source sensitivity is about 1.3x10-4/s per microAmp electron beam current for a number density of 1/cm3. Thus, operating with 1 mA emission (about 0.2W cathode power), signals of 100/s with integration period of 1 second correspond to a neutral atom density of about 103/cm3 with 10% variance. At very high altitudes, the lowest densities occur with the coldest thermopause - a 750K thermopause having an O density of about 150/cm3 at 1000 km, much higher densities for H and He, and much lower for O2 and N2. Total power for the spectrometer suite is less than 0.5 W with a mass of about 0.5 kg, based on our current versions. We plan to propose development of the sensor suite for two missions; one at 400 km and one at 830 km.

  17. Atom interferometry in the presence of an external test mass

    CERN Document Server

    Dubetsky, B; Libby, S B; Berman, P R

    2016-01-01

    The influence of an external test mass on the phase of the signal of an atom interferometer is studied theoretically. Using traditional techniques in atom optics based on the density matrix equations in the Wigner representation, we are able to extract the various contributions to the phase of the signal associated with the classical motion of the atoms, the quantum correction to this motion resulting from atomic recoil that is produced when the atoms interact with Raman field pulses, and quantum corrections to the atomic motion that occur in the time between the Raman field pulses. By increasing the effective wave vector associated with the Raman field pulses using modified field parameters, we can increase the sensitivity of the signal to the point where the quantum corrections can be measured. The expressions that are derived can be evaluated numerically to isolate the contribution to the signal from an external test mass. The regions of validity of the exact and approximate expressions are determined.

  18. The 2012 Atomic Mass Evaluation and the Mass Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audi, G., E-mail: amdc.audi@gmail.com [CSNSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Wang, M. [CSNSM-Orsay, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou 730000 (China); MPI-K, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wapstra, A.H. [NIKHEF, 1009DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kondev, F.G. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); MacCormick, M. [IPN, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay cedex (France); Xu, X. [IMP, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2014-06-15

    The new evaluation of the Atomic Masses, Ame2012, has just been released. It represents a major step in the history of the 60 year old Atomic Mass Evaluation based on the method developed by Wapstra. This new publication includes all material available to date. Some of the policies and procedures used in our evaluation are reported, together with an illustration of one specially difficult case, the energy available for the {sup 102}Pd double-electron capture. The observation of the mass surface reveals many important new features. We illustrate this statement by the double magicity of {sup 270}Hs at N = 162 and Z = 108.

  19. Mass Customization Measurements Metrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kjeld; Brunø, Thomas Ditlev; Jørgensen, Kaj Asbjørn

    2014-01-01

    A recent survey has indicated that 17 % of companies have ceased mass customizing less than 1 year after initiating the effort. This paper presents measurement for a company’s mass customization performance, utilizing metrics within the three fundamental capabilities: robust process design, choice...... navigation, and solution space development. A mass customizer when assessing performance with these metrics can identify within which areas improvement would increase competitiveness the most and enable more efficient transition to mass customization....

  20. W mass measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Andari, Nansi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A first measurement of the W-boson mass at the LHC is presented based on about 4.6 fb^-1 of proton–proton collision data recorded in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector. The measured value is 80370±19 MeV, consistent with the Standard Model prediction, with the combined values measured at the LEP and Tevatron colliders, and with the world average. The ATLAS result equals in precision the previous best measurement of the W mass, performed by the CDF collaboration. The CMS results for the W-like measurement of the Z boson mass using dimuon events are also shown. An overview of the analyses is shown with a special emphasis on the evaluation of the experimental systematic uncertainties, as well as on the uncertainties due to the modelling of the vector boson production and decay.

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for F-35 (Fluorine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope F-35 (Fluorine, atomic number Z = 9, mass number A = 35).

  2. Mass Measurements of Proton-rich Nuclei with JYFLTRAP

    OpenAIRE

    Eronen, Tommi

    2011-01-01

    The Penning trap setup JYFLTRAP, connected to the IGISOL facility, has been extensively used for atomic mass measurements of exotic nuclei. On the proton rich side of the chart of nuclei mass measurements have mostly contributed to fundamental physics and nuclear astrophysics studies with about 100 atomic masses measured.

  3. Perturbations of the local gravity field due to mass distribution on precise measuring instruments: a numerical method applied to a cold atom gravimeter

    CERN Document Server

    D'Agostino, G; Landragin, A; Santos, F Pereira Dos

    2011-01-01

    We present a numerical method, based on a FEM simulation, for the determination of the gravitational field generated by massive objects, whatever geometry and space mass density they have. The method was applied for the determination of the self gravity effect of an absolute cold atom gravimeter which aims at a relative uncertainty of 10-9. The deduced bias, calculated with a perturbative treatment, is finally presented. The perturbation reaches (1.3 \\pm 0.1) \\times 10-9 of the Earth's gravitational field.

  4. Handbook of mass measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Frank E

    2002-01-01

    "How much does it weigh?" seems a simple question. To scientists and engineers, however, the answer is far from simple, and determining the answer demands consideration of an almost overwhelming number of factors.With an intriguing blend of history, fundamentals, and technical details, the Handbook of Mass Measurement sets forth the details of achieving the highest precision in mass measurements. It covers the whole field, from the development, calibration, and maintenance of mass standards to detailed accounts of weighing designs, balances, and uncertainty. It addresses the entire measurement process and provides in-depth examinations of the various factors that introduce error.Much of the material is the authors'' own work and some of it is published here for the first time. Jones and Schoonover are both highly regarded veterans of the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology. With this handbook, they have provided a service and resource vital to anyone involved not only in the determination of m...

  5. Precision position measurement of single atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziauddin; Rahmatullah; Almas Khan

    2012-01-01

    Atom localization in a five-level atomic system under the effect of three driving fields and one standing wave field is suggested.A spontaneously emitted photon from the proposed system is measured in a detector.Precision position measurement of an atom is controlled via phase and vacuum field detuning without considering the parity violation.

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ra-226 (Radium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ra-226 (Radium, atomic number Z = 88, mass number A = 226).

  7. Mass Distribution Measurement of 252Cf Spontaneous Fission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Shi-long; YANG; Yi; ZHANG; Chun-li; HAN; Hong-yin

    2015-01-01

    The E-v method of measuring the kinetic energy(E)and velocity(v)of outgoing fission products has been utilized,with the goal of measuring the mass resolution better than 1atomic mass units(amu),and could identify every mass for light fission products of unsymmetrical fission.This work measured mass yield distribution

  8. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  9. On the atomic masses (weights?) Of the elements

    OpenAIRE

    Kaptay G.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic masses (weights?) is an essential information for mining and metallurgy. The paper discusses four subjects around this problem. First, the classification of all the elements is suggested into 4 classes, based on their isotope features, determining the accuracy of their known atomic masses. As part of that, the class of elements is discussed with uncertain atomic weights in accordance with the 2009 IUPAC recommendations. A better (easier to use) format of atomic weights is present...

  10. Atomic-position Localization Via Dual Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Nha, H; Chang, J S; An, K; Nha, Hyunchul; Lee, Jai-Hyung; Chang, Joon-Sung; An, Kyungwon

    2002-01-01

    We study localization of atomic position when a three-level atom interacts with a quantized standing-wave field in the Ramsey interferometer setup. Both the field quadrature amplitude and the atomic internal state are measured to obtain the atomic position information. It is found that this dual measurement scheme produces an interference pattern superimposed on a diffraction-like pattern in the atomic position distribution, where the former pattern originates from the state-selective measurement and the latter from the field measurement. The present scheme results in a better resolution in the position localization than the field-alone measurement schemes. We also discuss the measurement-correlated mechanical action of the standing-wave field on the atom in the light of Popper's test.

  11. The W Boson Mass Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the W boson mass has been growing in importance as its precision has improved, along with the precision of other electroweak observables and the top quark mass. Over the last decade, the measurement of the W boson mass has been led at hadron colliders. Combined with the precise measurement of the top quark mass at hadron colliders, the W boson mass helped to pin down the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson through its induced radiative correction on the W boson mass. With the discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its mass, the electroweak sector of the Standard Model is over-constrained. Increasing the precision of the W boson mass probes new physics at the TeV-scale. We summarize an extensive Tevatron (1984–2011) program to measure the W boson mass at the CDF and Dø experiments. We highlight the recent Tevatron measurements and prospects for the final Tevatron measurements.

  12. The W Boson Mass Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.

    2016-10-01

    The measurement of the W boson mass has been growing in importance as its precision has improved, along with the precision of other electroweak observables and the top quark mass. Over the last decade, the measurement of the W boson mass has been led at hadron colliders. Combined with the precise measurement of the top quark mass at hadron colliders, the W boson mass helped to pin down the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson through its induced radiative correction on the W boson mass. With the discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its mass, the electroweak sector of the Standard Model is over-constrained. Increasing the precision of the W boson mass probes new physics at the TeV-scale. We summarize an extensive Tevatron (1984-2011) program to measure the W boson mass at the CDF and Dø experiments. We highlight the recent Tevatron measurements and prospects for the final Tevatron measurements.

  13. Atomic multiwave interferometer for Aharonov-Casher-phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min-Kang; Zhang, Ke; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Ke, Yi; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2016-02-01

    We present an atomic multiwave interferometer with magnetic sublevels to precisely determine the Aharonov-Casher (AC) geometric phase. Simulations show that this interferometer has sharper fringes than a normal two-wave interferometer, which means a higher phase resolution can be achieved. Moreover, atoms evolving in a single hyperfine structure state make the interferometer insensitive to the dc Stark phase shift. This dc Stark shift is one of the main noise sources in AC phase measurements. The constraint of the photon rest mass is also discussed when using this atomic interferometer to measure the Aharonov-Casher phase.

  14. Mass measurement of radioactive isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, H J; Scheidenberger, C

    2004-01-01

    The highest precision in mass measurements on short-lived radionuclides is obtained using trapping and cooling techniques. Here, the experimental storage ring (ESR) at GSI/Darmstadt and the tandem Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN play an important role. Status and recent results on mass measurements of radioactive nuclides with ESR and ISOLTRAP are summarized.

  15. Direct neutrino mass measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thümmler, T.

    2011-07-01

    The determination of the neutrino rest mass plays an important role at the intersections of cosmology, particle physics and astroparticle physics. This topic is currently being addressed by two complementary approaches in laboratory experiments. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments probe whether neutrinos are Majorana particles and determine an effective neutrino mass value. Single beta decay experiments such as KATRIN and MARE investigate the spectral shape of β-decay electrons close to their kinematic endpoint in order to determine the neutrino rest mass with a model-independent method. Owing to neutrino flavour mixing, the neutrino mass parameter appears as an average of all neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently the experiment in the most advanced status of commissioning. Applying an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source and an integrating high-resolution spectrometer of MAC-E filter type, it allows β-spectroscopy close to the T 2 end-point with unprecedented precision and will reach a sensitivity of 200 meV/ c 2 (90% C.L.) on the neutrino rest mass.

  16. Quantum measurements of atoms using cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Dada, Adetunmise C; Jones, Martin L; Kendon, Vivien M; Everitt, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    Generalized quantum measurements are an important extension of projective or von Neumann measurements, in that they can be used to describe any measurement that can be implemented on a quantum system. We describe how to realize two non-standard quantum measurements using cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). The first measurement optimally and unabmiguously distinguishes between two non-orthogonal quantum states. The second example is a measurement that demonstrates superadditive quantum coding gain. The experimental tools used are single-atom unitary operations effected by Ramsey pulses and two-atom Tavis-Cummings interactions. We show how the superadditive quantum coding gain is affected by errors in the field-ionisation detection of atoms, and that even with rather high levels of experimental imperfections, a reasonable amount of superadditivity can still be seen. To date, these types of measurement have only been realized on photons. It would be of great interest to have realizations using other physical ...

  17. Black-Hole Mass Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2004-01-01

    The applicability and apparent uncertainties of the techniques currently available for measuring or estimating black-hole masses in AGNs are briefly summarized.......The applicability and apparent uncertainties of the techniques currently available for measuring or estimating black-hole masses in AGNs are briefly summarized....

  18. Equilibrium vortex lattices of a binary rotating atomic Bose-Einstein condensate with unequal atomic masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Biao; Wang, Lin-Xue; Chen, Guang-Ping; Han, Wei; Zhang, Shou-Gang; Zhang, Xiao-Fei

    2016-10-01

    We perform a detailed numerical study of the equilibrium ground-state structures of a binary rotating Bose-Einstein condensate with unequal atomic masses. Our results show that the ground-state distribution and its related vortex configurations are complex events that differ markedly depending strongly on the strength of rotation frequency, as well as on the ratio of atomic masses. We also discuss the structures and radii of the clouds, the number and the size of the core region of the vortices, as a function of the rotation frequency, and of the ratio of atomic masses, and the analytical results agree well with our numerical simulations. This work may open an alternate way in the quantum control of the binary rotating quantum gases with unequal atomic masses.

  19. Precision mass measurements of radioactive nuclei at JYFLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Rahaman, S; Eronen, T; Hager, U; Hakala, J; Jokinen, A; Kankainen, A; Moore, I D; Pentillä, H; Rinta-Antila, S; Rissanen, J; Saastamoinen, A; Sonoda, T; Weber, C; Äystö, J

    2007-01-01

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer JYFLTRAP was used to measure the atomic masses of radioactive nuclei with an uncertainty better than 10 keV. The atomic masses of the neutron-deficient nuclei around the N = Z line were measured to improve the understanding of the rp-process path and the SbSnTe cycle. Furthermore, the masses of the neutron-rich gallium (Z = 31) to palladium (Z = 46) nuclei have been measured. The physics impacts on the nuclear structure and the r-process paths are reviewed. A better understanding of the nuclear deformation is presented by studying the pairing energy around A = 100.

  20. Determination of the Relative Atomic Masses of Metals by Liberation of Molecular Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghorne, W. Earle; Rous, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Students determine the relative atomic masses of calcium, magnesium, and aluminum by reaction with hydrochloric acid and measurement of the volume of hydrogen gas liberated. The experiment demonstrates stoichiometry and illustrates clearly that mass of the reagent is not the determinant of the amounts in chemical reactions. The experiment is…

  1. Toward the Atomic-Level Mass Analysis of Biomolecules by the Scanning Atom Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masahiro

    2016-12-22

    In 1994, a new type of atom probe instrument, named the scanning atom probe (SAP), was proposed. The unique feature of the SAP is the introduction of a small extraction electrode, which scans over a specimen surface and confines the high field, required for field evaporation of surface atoms in a small space, between the specimen and the electrode. Thus, the SAP does not require a sharp specimen tip. This indicates that the SAP can mass analyze the specimens which are difficult to form in a sharp tip, such as organic materials and biomolecules. Clean single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT), made by high-pressure carbon monoxide process are found to be the best substrates for biomolecules. Various amino acids and dipeptide biomolecules were successfully mass analyzed, revealing characteristic clusters formed by strongly bound atoms in the specimens. The mass analysis indicates that SAP analysis of biomolecules is not only qualitative, but also quantitative.

  2. Integrated MEMS mass sensor and atom source for a ``Fab on a Chip''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Stark, Thomas; Bishop, David

    2014-03-01

    ``Fab on a Chip'' is a new concept suggesting that the semiconductor fabrication facility can be integrated into a single silicon chip for nano-manufacturing. Such a chip contains various MEMS devices which can work together, operating in a similar way as a conventional fab does, to fabricate nano-structures. Here we present two crucial ``Fab on a chip'' components: the MEMS mass sensor and atomic evaporation source. The mass sensor is essentially a parallel plate capacitor with one suspended plate. When incident atoms deposit on the suspended plate, the mass change of the plate can be measured by detecting the resonant frequency shift. Using the mass sensor, a mass resolution of 3 fg is achieved. The MEMS evaporation source consists of a polysilicon plate suspended by two electrical leads with constrictions. By resistively heating the plate, this device works as a tunable atom flux source. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one can build a multi-element atom evaporator. The mass sensor and atom source are integrated so that the mass sensor is used to monitor and characterize the atomic flux. A material source and a sensor to monitor the fabrication are two integral components for our ``Fab on a Chip.''

  3. Atomic References for Measuring Small Accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan

    2009-01-01

    Accelerometer systems that would combine the best features of both conventional (e.g., mechanical) accelerometers and atom interferometer accelerometers (AIAs) have been proposed. These systems are intended mainly for use in scientific research aboard spacecraft but may also be useful on Earth in special military, geological, and civil-engineering applications. Conventional accelerometers can be sensitive, can have high dynamic range, and can have high frequency response, but they lack accuracy and long-term stability. AIAs have low frequency response, but they offer high sensitivity, and high accuracy for measuring small accelerations. In a system according to the proposal, a conventional accelerometer would be used to perform short-term measurements of higher-frequency components of acceleration, while an AIA would be used to provide consistent calibration of, and correction of errors in, the measurements of the conventional accelerometer in the lower-frequency range over the long term. A brief description of an AIA is prerequisite to a meaningful description of a system according to the proposal. An AIA includes a retroreflector next to one end of a cell that contains a cold cloud of atoms in an ultrahigh vacuum. The atoms in the cloud are in free fall. The retroreflector is mounted on the object, the acceleration of which is to be measured. Raman laser beams are directed through the cell from the end opposite the retroreflector, then pass back through the cell after striking the retroreflector. The Raman laser beams together with the cold atoms measure the relative acceleration, through the readout of the AIA, between the cold atoms and the retroreflector.

  4. Atomic physics precise measurements and ultracold matter

    CERN Document Server

    Inguscio, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atomic Physics provides an expert guide to two spectacular new landscapes in physics: precision measurements, which have been revolutionized by the advent of the optical frequency comb, and atomic physics, which has been revolutionized by laser cooling. These advances are not incremental but transformative: they have generated a consilience between atomic and many-body physics, precipitated an explosion of scientific and technological applications, opened new areas of research, and attracted a brilliant generation of younger scientists. The research is advancing so rapidly, the barrage of applications is so dazzling, that students can be bewildered. For both students and experienced scientists, this book provides an invaluable description of basic principles, experimental methods, and scientific applications.

  5. Continuous optical measurement of cold atomic spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory A.

    Quantum measurement is one of the most important features of quantum theory. Although mathematical predictions have been verified in great detail, practical implementation has lagged behind. Only recently have people begun to take advantage of quantum measurement properties to produce new technologies. This research helps fill that technological gap by experimental examination of a continuous, optical measurement for an ensemble of cold atomic spins. The essential physics reduces to the interaction between an atomic ensemble and a weak optical field, which has many well known results. While this work demonstrates many novel applications of the interaction, it also shows that the whole can be more than the sum of the individual parts. Starting with basic characterization of the measurement system using laser-cooled caesium atoms, the mean value of a spin component is obtained in real time. In essence, the angular momentum of the atomic spins creates a Faraday-like rotation in the polarization of a laser probe beam. With slight modifications, additional spin components are also observed, and are shown to be in good agreement with predictions. In measuring spin dynamics, it is important to account for effects of the probe on the spin states as well. Capitalizing on this as a resource, the probe-induced ac-Stark shift is used to transform a quasi-classical spin-coherent state into a highly quantum Schrodinger cat type of superposition between two spin states. Finally, this work combines all the previous results to demonstrate how a continuous measurement of the spin with a carefully crafted evolution created in part by the probe, allows for nearly real-time determination of the complete spin density matrix. In a single 1.5 millisecond run, a spin density matrix is determined with fidelities ranging from about 85% to 90% across a wide spectrum of test states.

  6. Direct measurement of intrinsic atomic scale magnetostriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffoni, M P; Pascarelli, S; Grössinger, R; Turtelli, R Sato; Bormio-Nunes, C; Pettifer, R F

    2008-10-03

    Using differential x-ray absorption spectroscopy (DiffXAS) we have measured and quantified the intrinsic, atomic-scale magnetostriction of Fe81Ga19. By exploiting the chemical selectivity of DiffXAS, the Fe and Ga local environments have been assessed individually. The enhanced magnetostriction induced by the addition of Ga to Fe was found to originate from the Ga environment, where lambda;{gamma,2}( approximately (3/2)lambda_{100}) is 390+/-40 ppm. In this environment, 001 Ga-Ga pair defects were found to exist, which mediate the magnetostriction by inducing large strains in the surrounding Ga-Fe bonds. For the first time, intrinsic, chemically selective magnetostrictive strain has been measured and quantified at the atomic level, allowing true comparison with theory.

  7. Mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) and measurement of x-ray energy spectra using based calcium phosphate biomaterials: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes Z, M. A.; Da Silva, T. A.; Nogueira, M. S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Goncalves Z, E., E-mail: madelon@cdtn.br [Pontifice Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Av. Dom Jose Gaspar 500, Belo Horizonte 30535-901, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    In dentistry, alveolar bone regeneration procedures using based calcium phosphate biomaterials have been shown effective. However,there are not reports in the literature of studies the interaction of low energy radiation in these biomaterials used as attenuator and not being then allowed a comparison between the theoretical values and experimental.The objective of this study was to determine the interaction of radiation parameters of four dental biomaterials - BioOss, Cerasorb M Dental, Straumann Boneceramic and Osteogen for diagnostic radiology qualities. As a material and methods, the composition of the biomaterials was determined by the analytical techniques. The samples with 0.181 cm to 0,297 cm thickness were experimentally used as attenuators for the measurement of the transmitted X-rays spectra in X-ray equipment with 50 to 90 kV range by spectrometric system comprising the Cd Te detector. After this procedure, the mass attenuation coefficient, the effective atomic number were determined and compared between all the specimens analyzed, using the program WinXCOM in the range of 10 to 200 keV. In all strains examined observed that the energy spectrum of x-rays transmitted through the BioOss has the mean energy slightly smaller than the others biomaterials for close thickness. The μ/ρ and Z{sub eff} of the biomaterials showed its dependence on photon energy and atomic number of the elements of the material analyzed. It is concluded according to the methodology employed in this study that the measurements of x-ray spectrum, μ/ρ and Z{sub eff} using biomaterials as attenuators confirmed that the thickness, density, composition of the samples, the incident photon energy are factors that determine the characteristics of radiation in a tissue or equivalent material. (Author)

  8. First mass measurements at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Bressieux, J

    2011-01-01

    The LHC opens new frontiers in heavy flavour physics through an unprecedented statistical reach for a variety of interesting states produced in pp collisions. The LHCb spectrometer provides a good mass resolution and is suitable for spectroscopy studies. We present first preliminary mass measurements of several $b$ hadrons and of the exotic $X(3872)$ meson, reconstructed in final states containing a $J/\\psi$ using the data collected in 2010 by the LHCb experiment. An important aspect of the analysis is the calibration of the momentum scale using $J/\\psi \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ decays, as well as the control of systematic uncertainties. While the already very competitive mass measurements for the $B^+$, $B^0$ and $B^0_s$ mesons receive similar contributions from systematic and statistical uncertainties, those of the $\\Lambda_b$, $B^+_c$ and $X(3872)$ particles are dominated by statistical uncertainties, and will therefore substantially improve with more data in the future.

  9. Containerless Atomic-Fluorescence Property Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, P.; Schiffman, R.; Walker, C.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes studies conducted to establish and verify use of laser-induced fluorescence in monitoring and controlling high-temperature containerless processes. Specimens levitated by gas jets or electromagnetic fields and heated by laser beams or electromagnetic induction while being irradiated and detected by fluorescence technique. Makes quantitative and qualitative comparisons among three new methods of temperature measurement; all rely on laser-induced fluorescence. One method gas-density thermometry with seed gas. Other two methods involve measurements of velocities of evaporating atoms or of population ratios of different electronic states.

  10. Effect of mass-velocity on liquid jet atomization in Mach 1 gasflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    Interacting two-phase flow in four differently sized pneumatic two-fluid atomizers was investigated to determine the effect of gas mass-velocity on the Sauter mean diameter of sprays produced by small diameter liquid jets breaking up in high velocity gas flow. Tests were conducted primarily in the acceleration-wave regime for liquid jet atomization, where it was found that the loss of droplets due to vaporization had a marked effect on drop size measurements. A scattered-light scanner, developed at NASA Lewis Research Center, was used to measure the Sauter mean diameter, D sub 32, which was correlated with nitrogen gas mass-velocity to give the following expression: D (sup -1)(sub 32) = 11.7(rho (sub n) V (sub n)) (sup 1.33). The exponent 1.33 for the gas mass-velocity is identical to that predicted by atomization theory for liquid jet breakup in the acceleration-wave regime.

  11. Comparison of serum calcium measurements with respect to five models of atomic absorption spectrometers using NBS-AACC calcium reference method and isotope-dilution mass spectrometry as the definitive method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, B E; Grisley, D W; Casella, J; Bailey, H

    1976-10-01

    Utilizing the recently described reference method for calcium (NBS-AACC) and the recently developed definitive (referee) NBS method for serum calcium measurement by isotopedilution mass spectrometry (IDMS), an evaluation of five recent-model atomic absorption spectrometers was carried out. Under optimal conditions of instrument operation using aqueous standards, significant differences were found during the comparative analyses of three lyophilized pool samples and one liquid serum pool sample. Use of the NBS-AACC serum calcium protocol did not guarantee analytic results within +/- 2% of the IDMS value. In four of eight comparisons, differences from IDMS greater than 2% were observed. Several variables were studied to account for these differences. It was shown that a serum matrix, when present in standards used to bracket the unknown sample, reduced differences between instruments in four of four instances and improved the accuracy of the results from a range of -1.1 to +3.5% to +0.1 to +1.0%. It is concluded that a serum sample with a verified IDMS calcium value is a valuable tool that establishes an accurate and stable reference point for serum calcium measurement. The use of transfer-of-NBS-technology multipliers is suggested. Regional quality control serum pools and clinical chemistry survey sample materials that have been analyzed for calcium concentration by the NBS-IDMS definitive method are examples of these multipliers.

  12. The Use of Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry to Introduce General Chemistry Students to Percent Mass and Atomic Mass Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfennig, Brian W.; Schaefer, Amy K.

    2011-01-01

    A general chemistry laboratory experiment is described that introduces students to instrumental analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), while simultaneously reinforcing the concepts of mass percent and the calculation of atomic mass. Working in small groups, students use the GC to separate and quantify the percent composition…

  13. Accurate mass measurements on neutron-deficient krypton isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, D; Äystö, J; Beck, D

    2006-01-01

    The masses of $^{72–78,80,82,86}$Kr were measured directly with the ISOLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. For all these nuclides, the measurements yielded mass uncertainties below 10 keV. The ISOLTRAP mass values for $^{72–75}$Kr being more precise than the previous results obtained by means of other techniques, and thus completely determine the new values in the Atomic-Mass Evaluation. Besides the interest of these masses for nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure studies, and Standard Model tests, these results constitute a valuable and accurate input to improve mass models. In this paper, we present the mass measurements and discuss the mass evaluation for these Kr isotopes.

  14. Accurate mass measurements on neutron-deficient krypton isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, D. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: rodriguez@lpccaen.in2p3.fr; Audi, G. [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, 91405 Orsay-Campus(France); Aystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, 40351 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Beck, D. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Blaum, K. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Bollen, G. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Herfurth, F. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Jokinen, A. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, 40351 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Kellerbauer, A. [CERN, Division EP, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kluge, H.-J. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kolhinen, V.S. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, 40351 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Oinonen, M. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Sauvan, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Schwarz, S. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2006-04-17

    The masses of {sup 72-78,80,82,86}Kr were measured directly with the ISOLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. For all these nuclides, the measurements yielded mass uncertainties below 10 keV. The ISOLTRAP mass values for {sup 72-75}Kr outweighed previous results obtained by means of other techniques, and thus completely determine the new values in the Atomic-Mass Evaluation. Besides the interest of these masses for nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure studies, and Standard Model tests, these results constitute a valuable and accurate input to improve mass models. In this paper, we present the mass measurements and discuss the mass evaluation for these Kr isotopes.

  15. Structure determination of adipokinetic hormones using fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry; An unknown adipokinetic hormone (AKH-III) from Locusta migratoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heerma, W.; Versluis, C.; Lankhof, H. (Utrecht University (Netherlands). Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Analytical Molecular Spectrometry); Oudejans, R.C.H.M.; Kooiman, F.P.; Beenakkers, A.M.T. (Utrecht University (Netherlands). Department of Experimental Zoology)

    1991-08-01

    Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry combined with various tandem mass spectrometric techniques and accurate mass measurement were used to elucidate the structure of an unknown biologically active peptide isolated from Locusa migratoria. (author). 23 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 schemes.

  16. Direct measurements of neutrino masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzschuh, E. [Zurich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

    1996-11-01

    The direct measurements have so far given no indication for a nonzero (positive) mass of any of the three known neutrinos. The experiments measuring the tau and the muon neutrino are good shape. The tritium experiments are in an unfortunate situation. It is unclear to me whether the problems are experimental or theoretical or a combination of both. The electronic final states distribution have been calculated, but the results have never been tested experimentally. The most important question to be answered is about the validity of the sudden approximation. (author) 9 figs., 2 tabs., 16 refs.

  17. The Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME2012): Status and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondev, F. G.; Audi, G.; Wang, M.; Xu, X.; Wapstra, A. H.; MacCormick, M.; Pfeiffer, B.

    2013-10-01

    The atomic mass is a fundamental property of the nucleus that has wide applications in natural sciences and technology. The new evaluated mass table, AME2012, has been recently published as a collaborative effort between scientists from China, Europe and USA, under the leadership of G. Audi. It represents a significant update of the previous AME2003 evaluation by considering a large number of precise experimental results obtained at existing Penning Trap and Storage Ring facilities, thus expending the region of experimentally known masses towards exotic neutron- and proton-rich nuclei. Since the presence of isomers plays an important role in determining the masses of many nuclei, a complementary database, NUBASE2012, that contains the isomer-level properties for all nuclei was also developed. This presentation will briefly review recent achievements of the collaboration, present on-going activities, and reflect on ideas for future developments and challenges in the field of evaluation of atomic masses. The work at ANL was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  18. Two old ways to measure the electron-neutrino mass

    CERN Document Server

    De Rújula, A

    2013-01-01

    Three decades ago, the measurement of the electron neutrino mass in atomic electron capture (EC) experiments was scrutinized in its two variants: single EC and neutrino-less double EC. For certain isotopes an atomic resonance enormously enhances the expected decay rates. The favoured technique, based on calorimeters as opposed to spectrometers, has the advantage of greatly simplifying the theoretical analysis of the data. After an initial surge of measurements, the EC approach did not seem to be competitive. But very recently, there has been great progress on micro-calorimeters and the measurement of atomic mass differences. Meanwhile, the beta-decay neutrino-mass limits have improved by a factor of 15, and the difficulty of the experiments by the cube of that figure. Can the "calorimetric" EC theory cope with this increased challenge? I answer this question affirmatively. In so doing I briefly review the subject and extensively address some persistent misunderstandings of the underlying quantum physics.

  19. Atomic Quadrupole Moment Measurement Using Dynamic Decoupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaniv, R; Akerman, N; Ozeri, R

    2016-04-01

    We present a method that uses dynamic decoupling of a multilevel quantum probe to distinguish small frequency shifts that depend on m_{j}^{2}, where m_{j}^{2} is the angular momentum of level |j⟩ along the quantization axis, from large noisy shifts that are linear in m_{j}, such as those due to magnetic field noise. Using this method we measured the electric-quadrupole moment of the 4D_{5/2} level in ^{88}Sr^{+} to be 2.973_{-0.033}^{+0.026}ea_{0}^{2}. Our measurement improves the uncertainty of this value by an order of magnitude and thus helps mitigate an important systematic uncertainty in ^{88}Sr^{+} based optical atomic clocks and verifies complicated many-body quantum calculations.

  20. Top Mass Measurement at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Duda, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Given the big cross section for \\ttbar production in proton-proton collisions at 14\\TeV, the LHC with its high luminosity will be, among others,a top factory, allowing a precision measurement of the top quark mass. Based on a detailed simulation of the CMS detector, the following top mass reconstruction accuracies are possible in the respective final states with the present knowledge of experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Delta m_t (di-leptonic, 1fbinv) = pm 1.5 (stat) pm 2.9 (syst.) GeVcc Delta m_t (semi-leptonic, 1fbinv) = pm 0.7 (stat) pm 1.9 (syst.) GeVcc Delta m_t (fully hadronic, 1fbinv) = pm 0.6(stat) pm 4.2 (syst.) GeVcc Delta m_t (di-leptonic}, 10 fbinv) = pm 0.5 (stat) pm 1.1 (syst.) GeVcc Delta m_t (semi-leptonic, 10 fbinv) = pm 0.2 (stat) pm 1.1 (syst.) GeVcc Delta m_t (JPsi, 20 fbinv) = pm 1.2 (stat) pm 1.5 (syst.) GeVcc A combined top mass accuracy of mathcal O (1GeVcc) for 10-20fbinv of well-understood CMS data will be feasible.

  1. A direct measurement of the baryonic mass function of galaxies & implications for the galactic baryon fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papastergis, Emmanouil; Cattaneo, Andrea; Huang, Shan; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2012-01-01

    We use both an HI-selected and an optically-selected galaxy sample to directly measure the abundance of galaxies as a function of their "baryonic" mass (stars + atomic gas). Stellar masses are calculated based on optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and atomic gas masses are calcula

  2. First Measurement of the Atomic Electric Dipole Moment of (225)Ra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, R H; Dietrich, M R; Kalita, M R; Lemke, N D; Bailey, K G; Bishof, M; Greene, J P; Holt, R J; Korsch, W; Lu, Z-T; Mueller, P; O'Connor, T P; Singh, J T

    2015-06-12

    The radioactive radium-225 ((225)Ra) atom is a favorable case to search for a permanent electric dipole moment. Because of its strong nuclear octupole deformation and large atomic mass, (225)Ra is particularly sensitive to interactions in the nuclear medium that violate both time-reversal symmetry and parity. We have developed a cold-atom technique to study the spin precession of (225)Ra atoms held in an optical dipole trap, and demonstrated the principle of this method by completing the first measurement of its atomic electric dipole moment, reaching an upper limit of |d((225)Ra)|<5.0×10(-22)  e cm (95% confidence).

  3. First Measurement of the Atomic Electric Dipole Moment of $^{225}$Ra

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, R H; Kalita, M R; Lemke, N D; Bailey, K G; Bishof, M N; Greene, J P; Holt, R J; Korsch, W; Lu, Z -T; Mueller, P; O'Connor, T P; Singh, J T

    2015-01-01

    The radioactive radium-225 ($^{225}$Ra) atom is a favorable case to search for a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM). Due to its strong nuclear octupole deformation and large atomic mass, $^{225}$Ra is particularly sensitive to interactions in the nuclear medium that violate both time-reversal symmetry and parity. We have developed a cold-atom technique to study the spin precession of $^{225}$Ra atoms held in an optical dipole trap, and demonstrated the principle of this method by completing the first measurement of its atomic EDM, reaching an upper limit of $|$$d$($^{225}$Ra)$|$ $<$ $5.0\\!\\times\\!10^{-22}$ $e \\cdot$cm (95$\\%$ confidence).

  4. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  5. A NEW GENERATION OF INSTRUMENTATION AND CAPABILITIES FOR ATOMIC MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ Atomic mass spectrometry,embodied usually as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) or glow-discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS),has become a widely accepted tool for trace and ultra-trace elemental analysis.ICPMS offers detection limits below 1 ppt in solution,a dynamic concentration levels,isotope-analysis and isotope-dilution capabilities,modest matrix interferences,understandable spectral interferences (isobaric overlaps),precision in range of 2—5%,and rapid measurements (typically 10 seconds per isotope).

  6. Fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometry: a mass spectral investigation of some of the insulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, M; Bordoli, R S; Elliott, G J; Tyler, A N; Bill, J C; Green, B N

    1984-04-01

    Mass measurements of the protonated molecules [M + H]+ of four insulins are presented. In addition, structurally significant fragment ions are observed in the mass spectrum and metastable scanning has been used to link these ions to the protonated molecule.

  7. Estimation of atomic masses of heavy and superheavy elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, Masahiro [Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    To estimate unknown atomic masses of heavy and superheavy elements, three kinds of formula: FRDM (finite range droplet model by Moeller et al.), TUYY (an empirical formula by Tachibana et al.) and our KUTY are explained. KUTY estimates the crude shell energies of spherical nucleus from sum of single-particle energies. Then, the refined shell energies in due consideration of paring and deformation are obtained by mixing with the functions of the crude shell energies. Experimental values of U and Fm isotopes were compared with estimation mass of KUTY and FRDM. In the field with experimental values of U isotopes, the value of KUTY and FRDM separated the same difference from the experimental value. The behavior of KUTY and FRDM for Fm isotopes were same as that of U, but ETFSI deviated a little from the experimental values. (S.Y.)

  8. Constraints on proton structure from precision atomic physics measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Brodsky, S J; Hiller, J R; Hwang, D S

    2004-01-01

    The ground-state hyperfine splittings in hydrogen and muonium are extremely well measured. The difference between them, after correcting for the different magnetic moments of the muon and proton and for reduced mass effects, is due solely to the structure of the proton - the large QED contributions for a pointlike nucleus essentially cancel. A major contribution to the rescaled hyperfine difference is proportional to the Zemach radius, a fundamental measure of the proton which can be computed as an integral over the product of the elastic electric and magnetic form factors of the proton. The remaining proton structure corrections, the polarization contribution from inelastic states in the spin-dependent virtual Compton amplitude and the proton size dependence of the relativistic recoil corrections, have small uncertainties. The resulting high precision determination of the Zemach radius (1.013 +/- 0.016) fm from atomic physics provides an important constraint on fits to accelerator measurements of the proton ...

  9. Influence of selective atomic measurement on the entanglement properties of a two-atom outside cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Dao-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Considering three two-level atoms initially in the W or Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state, one of the three atoms is put into an initially coherent light cavity and made to resonantly interact with the cavity. The two-atom entanglement evolution outside the cavity is investigated. The influences of state-selective measurement of the atom inside the cavity and strength of the light field on the two-atom entanglement evolution outside the cavity are discussed. The results obtained from the numerical method show that the two-atom entanglement outside the cavity is strengthened through state-selective measurement of the atom inside the cavity. In addition, the strength of the light field also influences the two-atom entanglement properties.

  10. Zero G Mass Measurement Device (ZGMMD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Zero Gravity Mass Measurement Device (ZGMMD) provides the ability to measure the mass of samples in a microgravity environment, like that found on the...

  11. Ub-library of Atomic Masses and Nuclear Ground States Deformations (CENPL.AMD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The atomic mass is one of basic data of a nuclear. There are the atomic masses in all nuclear reaction model formulas and motion equations. For any reaction calculations atomic masses are basic data for getting binding energies or Q-values. In some applications, it is important also to have atomic masses even for exotic nuclei quite far from the valley of stability. In addition, nuclear ground state deformations and abundance values are also requisite in the nuclear data calculations. For this purpose, A data file on atomic masses and nuclear ground states deformations (AMD) were constructed, which

  12. Constraints on proton structure from precision atomic physics measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S

    2004-08-10

    The ground-state hyperfine splittings in hydrogen and muonium are extremely well measured. The difference between them, after correcting for the different magnetic moments of the muon and proton and for reduced mass effects, is due solely to the structure of the proton - the large QED contributions for a pointlike nucleus essentially cancel. A major contribution to the rescaled hyperfine difference is proportional to the Zemach radius, a fundamental measure of the proton which can be computed as an integral over the product of the elastic electric and magnetic form factors of the proton. The remaining proton structure corrections, the polarization contribution from inelastic states in the spin-dependent virtual Compton amplitude and the proton size dependence of the relativistic recoil corrections, have small uncertainties. The resulting high precision determination of the Zemach radius (1.013 {+-} 0.016) fm from atomic physics provides an important constraint on fits to accelerator measurements of the proton electric and magnetic form factors. Conversely, the authors use the muonium data to extract an 'experimental' value for the QED corrections to the hyperfine splitting of hydrogenic atoms. There is a significant discrepancy between measurement and theory which is in the same direction as a corresponding discrepancy in positronium.

  13. The impact of atomic precision measurements in high energy physics

    OpenAIRE

    Casalbuoni, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    In this talk I discuss the relevance of atomic physics in understanding some important questions about elementary particle physics. A particular attention is devoted to atomic parity violation measurements which seem to suggest new physics beyond the Standard Model. Atomic physics might also be relevant in discovering possible violations of the CPT symmetry.

  14. Remote atomic information concentration without Bell-state measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Zhen-Zhen; Fang Mao-Fa

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme for information concentration of two remote two-level atoms in cavity QED. This scheme does not involve the Bell-state measurement. During the interaction between atom and cavity, the cavity frequency is large-detuned from the atomic transition frequency, thus the scheme is insensitive to both the cavity decay and the thermal field. This idea can directly be generalized in the case of multi-atom information concentration.

  15. Fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Breeman, R.B. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Schmitz, H.H.; Schwartz, S.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Positive ion fast atom bombardment (FAB) tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) using a double-focusing mass spectrometer with linked scanning at constant B/E and high-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) was used to differentiate 17 different cartenoids, including {beta}-apo-8{prime}- carotenal, astaxanthin, {alpha}-carotene, {beta}-carotene, {gamma}-carotene, {zeta}-carotene, canthaxanthin, {beta}-cryptoxanthin, isozeaxanthin bis (pelargonate), neoxanthin, neurosporene, nonaprene, lutein, lycopene, phytoene, phytofluene, and zeaxanthin. The carotenoids were either synthetic or isolated from plant tissues. The use of FAB ionization minimized degradation or rearrangement of the carotenoid structures due to the inherent thermal instability generally ascribed to these compounds. Instead of protonated molecules, both polar xanthophylls and nonpolar carotenes formed molecular ions, M{sup {center_dot}+}, during FAB ionization. Following collisionally activated dissociation, fragment ions of selected molecular ion precursors showed structural features indicative of the presence of hydroxyl groups, ring systems, ester groups, and aldehyde groups and the extent of aliphatic polyene conjugation. The fragmentation patterns observed in the mass spectra herein may be used as a reference for the structural determination of carotenoids isolated from plant and animal tissues. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Comment on "Atomic mass compilation 2012" by B. Pfeiffer, K. Venkataramaniah, U. Czok, C. Scheidenberger

    CERN Document Server

    Audi, Georges; Block, Michael; Bollen, Georg; Herfurth, Frank; Goriely, Stéphane; Hardy, John C; Kondev, Filip G; Kluge, Juergen H; Lunney, David; Pearson, Mike J; Savard, Guy; Sharma, Kumar; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Yuhu

    2014-01-01

    This "Comment" submitted to ADNDT on December 13, 2013 concerns a publication entitled "Atomic Mass Compilation 2012", which is due to appear in the March 2014 issue of the journal Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables (available online on September 6, 2013). We would like to make it clear that this paper is not endorsed by the Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME) international collaboration. The AME provides carefully recommended evaluated data, published periodically. The "Atomic Mass Compilation 2012" is not to be associated with the latest publication, AME2012, nor with any of the previously published mass evaluations that were developed under the leadership of Prof. A.H. Wapstra. We found the data presented in "Atomic Mass Compilation 2012" to be misleading and the approach implemented to be lacking in rigour since it does not allow to unambiguously trace the original published mass values. Furthermore, the method used in "Atomic Mass Compilation 2012" is not valid and leads to erroneous and contradictory outputs,...

  17. Analysis of polarizability measurements made with atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gregoire, Maxwell D; Trubko, Raisa; Cronin, Alexander D

    2016-01-01

    We present revised measurements of the static electric dipole polarizabilities of K, Rb, and Cs based on atom interferometer experiments presented in [Phys. Rev. A 2015, 92, 052513] but now re-analyzed with new calibrations for the magnitude and geometry of the applied electric field gradient. The resulting polarizability values did not change, but the uncertainties were significantly reduced. Then we interpret several measurements of alkali metal atomic polarizabilities in terms of atomic oscillator strengths $f_{ik}$, Einstein coefficients $A_{ik}$, state lifetimes $\\tau_{k}$, transition dipole matrix elements $D_{ik}$, line strengths $S_{ik}$, and van der Waals $C_6$ coefficients. Finally, we combine atom interferometer measurements of polarizabilities with independent measurements of lifetimes and $C_6$ values in order to quantify the residual contribution to polarizability due to all atomic transitions other than the principal $ns$-$np_J$ transitions for alkali metal atoms.

  18. Analysis of Polarizability Measurements Made with Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell D. Gregoire

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present revised measurements of the static electric dipole polarizabilities of K, Rb, and Cs based on atom interferometer experiments presented in [Phys. Rev. A 2015, 92, 052513] but now re-analyzed with new calibrations for the magnitude and geometry of the applied electric field gradient. The resulting polarizability values did not change, but the uncertainties were significantly reduced. Then, we interpret several measurements of alkali metal atomic polarizabilities in terms of atomic oscillator strengths fik, Einstein coefficients Aik, state lifetimes τk, transition dipole matrix elements Dik, line strengths Sik, and van der Waals C6 coefficients. Finally, we combine atom interferometer measurements of polarizabilities with independent measurements of lifetimes and C6 values in order to quantify the residual contribution to polarizability due to all atomic transitions other than the principal ns-npJ transitions for alkali metal atoms.

  19. The NIM Inertial Mass Measurement Project

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shisong; He, Qing; Li, Zhengkun; Zhao, Wei; Han, Bing; Lu, Yunfeng

    2014-01-01

    An inertial mass measurement project, which is expected to precisely measure the Planck constant, $h$, for possible comparisons with known gravitational mass measurement projects, e.g., the watt balance and the Avogadro project, is being carried out at the National Institute of Metrology, China. The principle, apparatus, and experimental investigations of the inertial mass measurement are presented. The prototype of the experiment and the Planck constant with relative uncertainty of several parts in $10^{4}$ have been achieved for principle testing.

  20. Zero G Mass Measurement Device (ZGMMD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Zero G Mass Measurement Device (ZGMMD) will provide the ability to quantify the mass of objects up to 2,000 grams, including live animal specimens in a zero G...

  1. Absolute isotopic composition and atomic weight of neodymium using thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Motian; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Jun; Lu, Hai; Fang, Xiang; Guo, Chunhua; Li, Qiuli; Li, Chaofeng

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic mixtures prepared gravimetrically from highly enriched isotopes of neodymium in the form of oxides of well-defined purity were used to calibrate a thermal ionization mass spectrometer. A new error analysis was applied to calculate the final uncertainty of the atomic weight value. Measurements on natural neodymium samples yielded an absolute isotopic composition of 27.153(19) atomic percent (at.%) 142Nd, 12.173(18) at.% 143Nd, 23.798(12) at.% 144Nd, 8.293(7) at.% 145Nd, 17.189(17) at.% 146Nd, 5.756(8) at.% 148Nd, and 5.638(9) at.% 150Nd, and the atomic weight of neodymium as 144.2415(13), with uncertainties given on the basis of 95% confidence limits. No isotopic fractionation was found in terrestrial neodymium materials.

  2. A Scheme of Interferometric Measurement of an Atomic Wave Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zheng-Dong; LIN Yu; ZENG Liang; PAN Qin-Min

    2000-01-01

    A new method to measure an atomic wave function is discussed. It effectively solves the problem of an initially random phase of a travelling-wave laser beam. The relationship between the measured data and the atomic wavefunction is presented, and the wave function's reconstruction procedure is also analyzed.PACS: 03.65. Bz, 03. 75. Dg

  3. Problems with Accurate Atomic Lfetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabert, E

    2009-02-19

    A number of recent atomic lifetime measurements on multiply charged ions have reported uncertainties lower than 1%. Such a level of accuracy challenges theory, which is a good thing. However, a few lessons learned from earlier precision lifetime measurements on atoms and singly charged ions suggest to remain cautious about the systematic errors of experimental techniques.

  4. Reexamining the roles of gravitational and inertial masses in gravimetry with atom interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unnikrishnan, C.S., E-mail: unni@tifr.res.in [Gravitation Group, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Gillies, G.T., E-mail: gtg@virginia.edu [School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4746 (United States)

    2012-12-03

    We reassess the true roles of the gravitational charge (mass) and the inertial mass in quantum phases acquired in matter-wave interferometry in a gravitational field. The insights gained allow us to address the question of whether gravimetry with atom interferometers is equivalent to a high precision measurement of the relative gravitational time dilation of two clocks separated in space. In particular we show that the gravitational phase is inversely related to the Compton frequency, invalidating the suggested equivalence to a Compton clock. Clarity of arguments is achieved by comparison to a charged matter-wave interferometer. Though quantum states have a similarity to oscillator clocks through the Planck–Einstein–de Broglie relations, it is shown clearly that the claim of greatly enhanced precision over real atomic clock comparison cannot be maintained.

  5. Atomic mass and double-β-decay Q value of 48Ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redshaw, Matthew; Bollen, Georg; Brodeur, Maxime; Bustabad, Scott; Lincoln, David L.; Novario, Samuel J.; Ringle, Ryan; Schwarz, Stefan

    2012-10-01

    The possibility of detecting neutrinoless double-β-decay (0νββ-decay) in experiments that are currently in operation or under development provides the exciting opportunity to determine the Dirac or Majorana nature of the neutrino and its absolute mass scale. An important datum for interpreting 0νββ-decay experimental results is the Q value of the decay. Using Penning trap mass spectrometry we have measured the atomic mass of 48Ca to be M[48Ca] = 47.952 522 76(21) u which, combined with the mass of 48Ti evaluated by Audi [Nucl. Phys. ANUPABL0375-947410.1016/j.nuclphysa.2003.11.003 729, 337 (2003)], provides a new determination of the 48Ca ββ-decay Q value: Qββ = 4262.96(84) keV.

  6. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, P. C.; Schiffman, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence techniques were developed for the containerless study of high temperature processes, material properties, levitation, and heating techniques for containerless earth-based experimentation. Experiments were performed in which fluorescence of atomic aluminum, mercury, or tungsten were studied. These experiments include measurements of: (1) Al atom evaporation from CW CO2 laser heated and aerodynamically levitated sapphire and alumina spheres, and self-supported sapphire filaments, (2) Al atom reaction with ambient oxygen in the wake of a levitated specimen, (3) Hg atom concentrations in the wake of levitated alumina and sapphire spheres, relative to the ambient Hg atom concentration, (4) Hg atom concentrations in supersonic levitation jets, and (5) metastable, electronically excited W atom concentrations produced by evaporation of an electrically heated tungsten filament.

  7. Selected top quark mass measurements at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Bouvier, Elvire

    2016-01-01

    Selected measurements of the top quark mass are presented, obtained from CMS data collected in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at center-of-mass energies of 7, 8, and 13 TeV. ``Standard'' techniques are employed in each decay channel of top quark pair events and their results are combined. The mass of the top quark is also measured using several ``alternative'' methods, including measurements from shapes of top quark decay distributions in single top quark and top quark pair events as well as pole mass measurements.

  8. High-accuracy mass measurements of neutron-rich Kr isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, P; Blaum, K; Carrel, F; George, S; Herfurth, F; Herlert, A; Kellerbauer, A G; Kluge, H J; Lunney, D; Schweikhard, L; Yazidjian, C

    2006-01-01

    The atomic masses of the neutron-rich krypton isotopes 84,86-95Kr have been determined with the tandem Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP with uncertainties ranging from 20 to 220 ppb. The masses of the short-lived isotopes 94Kr and 95Kr were measured for the first time. The masses of the radioactive nuclides 89Kr and 91Kr disagree by 4 and 6 standard deviations, respectively, from the present Atomic-Mass Evaluation database. The resulting modification of the mass surface with respect to the two-neutron separation energies as well as implications for mass models and stellar nucleosynthesis are discussed.

  9. Prospects for Precise Measurements with Echo Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Brynle; Beica, Hermina C; Vorozcovs, Andrejs; Pouliot, Alexander; Kumarakrishnan, A

    2016-01-01

    Echo atom interferometers have emerged as interesting alternatives to Raman interferometers for the realization of precise measurements of the gravitational acceleration $g$ and the determination of the atomic fine structure through measurements of the atomic recoil frequency $\\omega_q$. Here we review the development of different configurations of echo interferometers that are best suited to achieve these goals. We describe experiments that utilize near-resonant excitation of laser-cooled rubidium atoms by a sequence of standing wave pulses to measure $\\omega_q$ with a statistical uncertainty of 37 parts per billion (ppb) on a time scale of $\\sim 50$ ms and $g$ with a statistical precision of 75 ppb. Related coherent transient techniques that have achieved the most statistically precise measurements of atomic g-factor ratios are also outlined. We discuss the reduction of prominent systematic effects in these experiments using off-resonant excitation by low-cost, high-power lasers.

  10. Prospects for Precise Measurements with Echo Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brynle Barrett

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Echo atom interferometers have emerged as interesting alternatives to Raman interferometers for the realization of precise measurements of the gravitational acceleration g and the determination of the atomic fine structure through measurements of the atomic recoil frequency ω q . Here we review the development of different configurations of echo interferometers that are best suited to achieve these goals. We describe experiments that utilize near-resonant excitation of laser-cooled rubidium atoms by a sequence of standing wave pulses to measure ω q with a statistical uncertainty of 37 parts per billion (ppb on a time scale of ∼50 ms and g with a statistical precision of 75 ppb. Related coherent transient techniques that have achieved the most statistically precise measurements of atomic g-factor ratios are also outlined. We discuss the reduction of prominent systematic effects in these experiments using off-resonant excitation by low-cost, high-power lasers.

  11. Ultra-low Q values for neutrino mass measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Kopp, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    We investigate weak nuclear decays with extremely small kinetic energy release (Q value) and thus extremely good sensitivity to the absolute neutrino mass scale. In particular, we consider decays into excited daughter states, and we show that partial ionization of the parent atom can help to tune Q values to << 1 keV. We discuss several candidate isotopes undergoing beta+, beta-, bound state beta, or electron capture decay, and come to the conclusion that a neutrino mass measurement using low-Q decays might only be feasible if no ionization is required, and if future improvements in isotope production technology, nuclear mass spectroscopy, and atomic structure calculations are possible. Experiments using ions, however, are extremely challenging due to the large number of ions that must be stored. New precision data on nuclear excitation levels could help to identify further isotopes with low-Q decay modes and possibly less challenging requirements.

  12. Mass measurements with a Penning trap mass spectrometer at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Bollen, G; Audi, G; Beck, D; Herfurth, F; Kluge, H J; Kohl, A; Lunney, M D; Moore, R B; De Saint-Simon, M; Schark, E; Schwarz, S; Szerypo, J

    1998-01-01

    Penning trap mass measurements on radioactive isotopes are performed with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. In the last years the applicability of the spectrometer has been considerably extended. The most recent measurements were carried out on isotopes of rare earth elements and on isotopes with Z=80-85. An accuracy of $\\delta$ m/m approximately=1$\\cdot$10$^{-7}$was achieved. (19 refs).

  13. Top Quark Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne [DESY

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the top quark in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron proton antiproton collider, precise measurements of its mass are ongoing. Using data recorded by the D0 and CDF experiment, corresponding to up to the full Tevatron data sample, top quark mass measurements performed in different final states using various extraction techniques are presented in this article. The recent Tevatron top quark mass combination yields m_t=173.20 +-0.87 GeV. Furthermore, measurements of the top antitop quark mass difference from the Tevatron are discussed.

  14. Concept of effective atomic number and effective mass density in dual-energy X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnin, Anne, E-mail: annebonnin@free.fr [ESRF, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38073 Grenoble Cedex (France); LVA, Vibrations and Acoustic Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, Université de Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Duvauchelle, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.duvauchelle@insa-lyon.fr [LVA, Vibrations and Acoustic Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, Université de Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Kaftandjian, Valérie [LVA, Vibrations and Acoustic Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, Université de Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ponard, Pascal [Thales Electron Devices SAS, 2 Rue Marcel Dassault, BP23 78141 Vélizy, Villacoublay Cedex (France)

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on dual-energy X-ray computed tomography and especially the decomposition of the measured attenuation coefficient in a mass density and atomic number basis. In particular, the concept of effective atomic number is discussed. Although the atomic number is well defined for chemical elements, the definition of an effective atomic number for any compound is not an easy task. After reviewing different definitions available in literature, a definition related to the method of measurement and X-ray energy, is suggested. A new concept of effective mass density is then introduced in order to characterize material from dual-energy computed tomography. Finally, this new concept and definition are applied on a simulated case, focusing on explosives identification in luggage.

  15. Improved statistical determination of absolute neutrino masses via radiative emission of neutrino pairs from atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jue; Zhou, Shun

    2016-06-01

    The atomic transition from an excited state |e ⟩ to the ground state |g ⟩ by emitting a neutrino pair and a photon, i.e., |e ⟩→|g ⟩+|γ ⟩+|νi⟩+|ν¯j⟩ with i , j =1 , 2, 3, has been proposed by Yoshimura and his collaborators as an alternative way to determine the absolute scale m0 of neutrino masses. More recently, a statistical analysis of the fine structure of the photon spectrum from this atomic process has been performed [N. Song et al. Phys. Rev. D 93, 013020 (2016)] to quantitatively examine the experimental requirements for a realistic determination of absolute neutrino masses. In this paper, we show how to improve the statistical analysis and demonstrate that the previously required detection time can be reduced by one order of magnitude for the case of a 3 σ determination of m0˜0.01 eV with an accuracy better than 10%. Such an improvement is very encouraging for further investigations on measuring absolute neutrino masses through atomic processes.

  16. Evidence for a long-lived superheavy nucleus with atomic mass number A=292 and atomic number Z=~122 in natural Th

    CERN Document Server

    Marinov, A; Kolb, D; Pape, A; Kashiv, Y; Brandt, R; Gentry, R V; Miller, H W

    2008-01-01

    Evidence for the existence of a superheavy nucleus with atomic mass number A=292 and abundance (1-10)x10^(-12) relative to 232Th has been found in a study of natural Th using inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry. The measured mass matches the predictions [1,2] for the mass of an isotope with atomic number Z=122 or a nearby element. Its estimated half-life of t1/2 >= 10^8 y suggests that a long-lived isomeric state exists in this isotope. The possibility that it might belong to a new class of long-lived high spin super- and hyperdeformed isomeric states is discussed.[3-6

  17. [Measurement of trace elements in blood serum by atomic absorption spectroscopy with electrothermal atomization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogul'skiĭ, Iu V; Danil'chenko, S N; Lushpa, A P; Sukhodub, L F

    1997-09-01

    Describes a method for measuring trace elements Cr, Mn, Co, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mo in the blood serum using non-flame atomization (KAC 120.1 complex). Optimal conditions for preparing the samples were defined, temperature regimens for analysis of each element selected, and original software permitting automated assays created. The method permits analysis making use of the minimal samples: 0.1 ml per 10 parallel measurements, which is 100 times less than needed for atomic absorption spectroscopy with flame atomization of liquid samples. Metrological characteristics of the method are assessed.

  18. Direct mass measurements of neutron-deficient xenon isotopes using the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Dilling, J; Beck, D; Bollen, G; Herfurth, F; Kellerbauer, A G; Kluge, H J; Moore, R B; Scheidenberger, C; Schwarz, S; Sikler, G

    2004-01-01

    The masses of the noble-gas Xe isotopes with 114 $\\leq$ A $\\leq$ 123 have been directly measured for the first time. The experiments were carried out with the ISOLTRAP triple trap spectrometer at the online mass separator ISOLDE/CERN. A mass resolving power of the Penning trap spectrometer of $m/\\Delta m$ of close to a million was chosen resulting in an accuracy of $\\delta m \\leq 13$ keV for all investigated isotopes. Conflicts with existing, indirectly obtained, mass data by several standard deviations were found and are discussed. An atomic mass evaluation has been performed and the results are compared to information from laser spectroscopy experiments and to recent calculations employing an interacting boson model.

  19. Precision Mass Measurement of Argon Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Lunney, D

    2002-01-01

    % IS388\\\\ \\\\ A precision mass measurement of the neutron-deficient isotopes $^{32,33,34}$Ar is proposed. Mass values of these isotopes are of importance for: a) a stringent test of the Isobaric-Multiplet- Mass-Equation, b) a verification of the correctness of calculated charge-dependent corrections as used in super-allowed $\\beta$- decay studies aiming at a test of the CVC hypothesis, and c) the determination of the kinematics in electron-neutrino correlation experiments searching for scalar currents in weak interaction. The measurements will be carried out with the ISOLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer.

  20. Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms and measurement of the fine structure constant; Oscillations de Bloch d'atomes ultrafroids et mesure de la constante de structure fine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clade, P

    2005-10-15

    From a measurement of the recoil velocity of an atom absorbing a photon, it is possible to deduce a determination of the ratio h/m between the Planck constant and the mass of the atoms and then to deduce a value of the fine structure constant alpha. To do this measurement, we use the technique of Bloch oscillations, which allows us to transfer a large number of recoils to atoms. A velocity sensor, based on velocity selective Raman transition, enables us to measure the momentum transferred to the atoms. A measurement with a statistical uncertainty of 4.4 10{sup -9}, in conjunction with a careful study of systematic effects (5 10{sup -9}), has led us to a determination of alpha with an uncertainty of 6.7 10{sup -9}: {alpha}{sup -1}(Rb) = 137.03599878 (91). This uncertainty is similar to the uncertainty of the best determinations of alpha based on atom interferometry. (author)

  1. Top quark mass measurement at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; /Harvard U.

    2004-12-01

    The authors report on the latest experimental measurements of the top quark mass by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron. They present a new top mass measurement using the t{bar t} events collected by the D0 Collaboration in Run I between 1994 and 1996. This result is combined with previous measurements to yield a new world top mass average. They also describe several preliminary results using up to 193 pb{sup -1} of t{bar t} events produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV during the Run II of the Tevatron.

  2. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark mass is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model as well as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The CDF Collaboration has measured the top quark mass with high precision in all decay channels with complementary methods. A combination of the results from CDF gives a top quark mass of 170.5{+-}1.3(stat.){+-}1.8(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  3. Mass measurements of neutron-rich Rb and Sr isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Klawitter, R; Brodeur, M; Chowdhury, U; Chausdhuri, A; Fallis, J; Gallant, A T; Grossheim, A; Kwiatkowski, A A; Lascar, D; Leach, K G; Lennarz, A; Macdonald, T D; Pearkes, J; Seeraji, S; Simon, M C; Simon, V V; Schultz, B E; Dilling, J

    2015-01-01

    We report on the mass measurements of several neutron-rich $\\mathrm{Rb}$ and $\\mathrm{Sr}$ isotopes in the $A \\approx 100$ region with the TITAN Penning-trap mass spectrometer. Using highly charged ions in the charge state $q=10+$, the masses of $^{98,99}\\mathrm{Rb}$ and $^{98-100}\\mathrm{Sr}$ have been determined with a precision of $6 - 12\\ \\mathrm{keV}$, making their uncertainty negligible for r-process nucleosynthesis network calculations. The mass of $^{101}\\mathrm{Sr}$ has been determined directly for the first time with a precision eight times higher than the previous indirect measurement and a deviation of $3\\sigma$ when compared to the Atomic Mass Evaluation. We also confirm the mass of $^{100}\\mathrm{Rb}$ from a previous measurement. Furthermore, our data indicates the existance of a low-lying isomer with $80\\ \\mathrm{keV}$ excitation energy in $^{98}\\mathrm{Rb}$. We show that our updated mass values lead to minor changes in the r-process by calculating fractional abundances in the $A\\approx 100$ re...

  4. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadnik, Y V

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field $\\phi = \\phi_0 \\cos(m_\\phi t)$, can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the Standard Model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive new limits on the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to $2-3$ orders of magnitude.

  5. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field ϕ =ϕ0cos(mϕt ) , can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the standard model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive limits on the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  6. Anharmonicity of internal atomic oscillation and effective antineutrino mass evaluation from gaseous molecular tritium \\beta -decay

    CERN Document Server

    Lokhov, Alexey V

    2016-01-01

    Data analysis of the next generation effective antineutrino mass measurement experiment KATRIN requires reliable knowledge of systematic corrections. In particular, the width of the daughter molecular ion excitation spectrum rovibrational band should be known with a better then 1% precision. Very precise ab initio quantum calculations exist, and we compare them with the well known tritium molecule parameters within the framework of a phenomenological model. The rovibrational band width with accuracy of a few percent is interpreted as a result of the zero-point atomic oscillation in the harmonic potential. The Morse interatomic potential is used to investigate the impact of anharmonic atomic oscillations. The calculated corrections cannot account for the difference between the ab initio quantum calculations and the phenomenological model.

  7. Mass measurements on neutron-deficient Sr and neutron-rich Sn isotopes with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Sikler, G; Beck, D; Blaum, K; Bollen, G; Herfurth, F; Kellerbauer, A G; Kluge, H J; Lunney, M D; Oinonen, M; Scheidenberger, C; Schwarz, S; Szerypo, J

    2005-01-01

    The atomic masses of $^{76,77,80,81,86,88}$Sr and $^{124,129,130,131,132}$Sn were measured by means of the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN. $^{76}$Sr is now the heaviest N=Z nucleus for which the mass is measured to a precision better than 35 keV. For the tin isotopes in the close vicinity of the doubly magic nucleus $^{132}$Sn, mass uncertainties below 20 keV were achieved. An atomic mass evaluation was carried out taking other experimental mass values into account by performing a least-squares adjustment. Some discrepancies between older experimental values and the ones reported here emerged and were resolved. The results of the new adjustment and their impact will be presented.

  8. Mass measurements on neutron-deficient Sr and neutron-rich Sn isotopes with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikler, G. [MPI fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany) and TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada)]. E-mail: g.sikler@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Audi, G. [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, Batiment 108, 91405 Orsay-Campus (France); Beck, D. [GSI, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Blaum, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Bollen, G. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Herfurth, F. [GSI, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kellerbauer, A. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kluge, H.-J. [GSI, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lunney, D. [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, Batiment 108, 91405 Orsay-Campus (France); Oinonen, M. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Scheidenberger, C. [GSI, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Schwarz, S. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Szerypo, J. [LMU Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2005-12-26

    The atomic masses of {sup 76,77,80,81,86,88}Sr and {sup 124,129,130,131,132}Sn were measured by means of the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN. {sup 76}Sr is now the heaviest N=Z nucleus for which the mass is measured to a precision better than 35 keV. For the tin isotopes in the close vicinity of the doubly magic nucleus {sup 132}Sn, mass uncertainties below 20 keV were achieved. An atomic mass evaluation was carried out taking other experimental mass values into account by performing a least-squares adjustment. Some discrepancies between older experimental values and the ones reported here emerged and were resolved. The results of the new adjustment and their impact will be presented.

  9. Atom-interferometric measurement of Stark level splittings

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Limei; Zhang, Linjie; Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2015-01-01

    Multiple adiabatic/diabatic passages through avoided crossings in the Stark map of cesium Rydberg atoms are employed as beam splitters and recombiners in an atom-interferometric measurement of energy-level splittings. We subject cold cesium atoms to laser-excitation, electric-field and detection sequences that constitute an (internal-state) atom interferometer. For the read-out of the interferometer we utilize state-dependent collisions, which selectively remove atoms of one kind from the detected signal. We investigate the dependence of the interferometric signal on timing and field parameters, and find good agreement with time-dependent quantum simulations of the interferometer. Fourier analysis of the interferometric signals yield coherence frequencies that agree with corresponding energy-level differences in calculated Stark maps. The method enables spectroscopy of states that are inaccessible to direct laser-spectroscopic observation, due to selection rules, and has applications in field metrology.

  10. Direct measurement of desorption and diffusion energies of O and N atoms physisorbed on amorphous surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Minissale, Marco; Dulieu, François

    2016-01-01

    Physisorbed atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains play a central role in solid state astrochemistry. Their surface reactivity is one source of the observed molecular complexity in space. In experimental astrophysics, the high reactivity of atoms also constitutes an obstacle to measuring two of the fundamental properties in surface physics, namely desorption and diffusion energies, and so far direct measurements are non-existent for O and N atoms. We investigated the diffusion and desorption processes of O and N atoms on cold surfaces in order to give boundary conditions to astrochemical models. Here we propose a new technique for directly measuring the N- and O-atom mass signals. Including the experimental results in a simple model allows us to almost directly derive the desorption and diffusion barriers of N atoms on amorphous solid water ice (ASW) and O atoms on ASW and oxidized graphite. We find a strong constraint on the values of desorption and thermal diffusion energy barriers. The measured b...

  11. Measurement of the [tau]-lepton mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balest, R.; Daoudi, M.; Ford, W.T.; Johnson, D.R.; Lingel, K.; Lohner, M.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Besson, D.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser, B.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Honscheid, K.; Jones, C.D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Ogg, M.; O' Grady, C.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Sapper, M.; Selen, M.; Worden, H.; Worris, M.; Wuerthwein, F.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Stephens, R.; Yelton, J.; Cinabro, D.; Henderson, S.; Kinoshita, K.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Ball, S.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Savino; (CLEO Collaboration)

    1993-05-01

    Using data from the CLEO II detector at CESR, we measure the [tau]-lepton mass by exploiting the unique kinematics of events in which both [tau]'s decay hadronically. The result is [ital m][sub [tau

  12. Miniature Sensor for Aerosol Mass Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project seeks to develop a miniature sensor for mass measurement of size-classified aerosols. A cascade impactor will be used to classify aerosol sample...

  13. ISOLTRAP mass measurements of exotic nuclides at $\\delta$m/m=10$^{-8}$

    CERN Document Server

    Blaum, K; Beck, D; Bollen, G; Delahaye, P; George, S; Guénaut, C; Herfurth, S; Herlert, Alexander; Kellerbauer, A G; Kluge, H J; Lunney, M D; Mukherjee, M; Schwarz, S; Schweikhard, L; Yazidjian, C

    2005-01-01

    The ISOLTRAP experiment at the ISOLDE facility at CERN is a Penning trap mass spectrometer for on-line mass measurements on short-lived radionuclides. It allows the determination of atomic masses of exotic nuclides with a relative uncertainty of only 10$^{-8}$. The results provide important information for, for example, weak interaction studies and nuclear models. Recent ISOLTRAP investigations and applications of high-precision mass measurements are discussed.

  14. Cosmological and astrophysical neutrino mass measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abazajian, K.N.; Calabrese, E.; Cooray, A.;

    2011-01-01

    Cosmological and astrophysical measurements provide powerful constraints on neutrino masses complementary to those from accelerators and reactors. Here we provide a guide to these different probes, for each explaining its physical basis, underlying assumptions, current and future reach.......Cosmological and astrophysical measurements provide powerful constraints on neutrino masses complementary to those from accelerators and reactors. Here we provide a guide to these different probes, for each explaining its physical basis, underlying assumptions, current and future reach....

  15. Charged Kaon Mass Measurement using the Cherenkov Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Graf, N; Abrams, R J; Akgun, U; Aydin, G; Baker, W; Barnes, P D; Bergfeld, T; Beverly, L; Bujak, A; Carey, D; Dukes, C; Duru, F; Feldman, G J; Godley, A; Gülmez, E; Günaydın, Y O; Gustafson, H R; Gutay, L; Hartouni, E; Hanlet, P; Hansen, S; Heffner, M; Johnstone, C; Kaplan, D; Kamaev, O; Kilmer, J; Klay, J; Kostin, M; Lange, D; Ling, J; Longo, M J; Lu, L C; Materniak, C; Messier, M D; Meyer, H; Miller, D E; Mishra, S R; Nelson, K; Nigmanov, T; Norman, A; Onel, Y; Paley, J M; Park, H K; Penzo, A; Peterson, R J; Raja, R; Rajaram, D; Ratnikov, D; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H; Seun, S; Solomey, N; Soltz, R; Swallow, E; Schmitt, R; Subbarao, P; Torun, Y; Tope, T E; Wilson, K; Wright, D; Wu, K

    2009-01-01

    The two most recent and precise measurements of the charged kaon mass use X-rays from kaonic atoms and report uncertainties of 14 ppm and 22 ppm yet differ from each other by 122 ppm. We describe the possibility of an independent mass measurement using the measurement of Cherenkov light from a narrow-band beam of kaons, pions, and protons. This technique was demonstrated using data taken opportunistically by the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory which recorded beams of protons, kaons, and pions ranging in momentum from +37 GeV/c to +63 GeV/c. The measured value is 491.3 +/- 1.7 MeV/c^2, which is within 1.4 sigma of the world average. An improvement of two orders of magnitude in precision would make this technique useful for resolving the ambiguity in the X-ray data and may be achievable in a dedicated experiment.

  16. Measurements of atomic splittings in atomic hydrogen and the proton charge radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessels, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    The proton charge radius can be determined from precise measurements of atomic hydrogen spectroscopy. A review of the relevant measurements will be given, including an update on our measurement of the n=2 Lamb shift. The values obtained from hydrogen will be compared to those obtained from muonic hydrogen and from electron-proton elastic scattering measurements. This work is funded by NSERC, CRC and CFI.

  17. Measurement methods in atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Bruno; Canale, Claudio; Ricci, Davide; Braga, Pier Carlo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is introductory to the measurements: it explains different measurement techniques both for imaging and for force spectroscopy, on which most of the AFM experiments rely. It gives a general overview of the different techniques and of the output expected from the instrument; therefore it is, at a basic level, a good tool to properly start a new experiment. Concepts introduced in this chapter give the base for understanding the applications shown in the following chapters. Subheading 1 introduces the distinction between spectroscopy and imaging experiments and, within the last ones, between DC and AC mode. Subheading 2 is focused on DC mode (contact), explaining the topography and the lateral force channel. Subheading 3 introduces AC mode, both in noncontact and intermittent contact case. Phase imaging and force modulation are also discussed. Subheading 4 explains how the AFM can be used to measure local mechanical and adhesive properties of specimens by means of force spectroscopy technique. An overview on the state of the art and future trends in this field is also given.

  18. First direct mass measurements on nobelium and lawrencium with the Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dworschak, Michael Gerhard

    2009-12-08

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP at GSI Darmstadt was set up for high-precision mass measurements of heavy radionuclides produced in fusion evaporation reactions and separated from the primary beam by the velocity filter SHIP. It consists of a gas stopping cell for the deceleration of the high energetic reaction products, an RFQ cooler and buncher for cooling and accumulation of the ions, and a double Penning trap system to perform mass measurements. The mass is determined by measuring the cyclotron frequency of the ion of interest in a strong homogeneous magnetic field and comparing it to the frequency of a well-known reference ion. With this method relative uncertainties in the order of 10{sup -8} can be achieved. Recently, mass measurements of the three nobelium isotopes {sup 252-254}No (Z=102) and the lawrencium isotope {sup 255}Lr (Z=103) were performed successfully. These were the first direct mass measurements of transuranium elements ever per- formed. The production rate of the atoms of interest was about one per second or less. The results of the measurements on nobelium confirm the previous mass values which were deduced from Q{sub {alpha}} values. In the case of {sup 255}Lr the mass excess value, which was previously only estimated from systematic trends, was for the first time directly measured. These results mark the first step in the exploration of the region of transuranium elements which is planned at SHIPTRAP. The main objective is to fix the endpoints of {alpha} decay chains which are originating from superheavy elements close to the predicted island of stability. (orig.)

  19. Precision mass measurements at TITAN with radioactive ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, A.A., E-mail: aniak@triumf.ca [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Macdonald, T.D. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Andreoiu, C. [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 (Canada); Bale, J.C. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 (Canada); Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Chowdhury, U. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A.T. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Grossheim, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Lennarz, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Mané, E.; Pearson, M.R.; Schultz, B.E.; Simon, M.C. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Simon, V.V. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fakultät für Physik und Astronomie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität, 61920 Heidelberg (Germany); Dilling, J. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The TITAN facility is the sole online Penning trap mass spectrometer with charge breeding capabilities. • Use of highly charged exotic ions reduces the beam time requirements. • Threshold charge breeding was developed as a novel technique to separate isobaric species. • Recent mass measurements have been performed to investigate nuclear structure, tests of electroweak theory, and neutrino physics. -- Abstract: Measurements of the atomic mass further our understanding in many disciplines from metrology to physics beyond the standard model. The accuracy and precision of Penning trap mass spectrometry have been well demonstrated at TITAN, including measurements of neutron-rich calcium and potassium isotopes to investigate three-body forces in nuclear structure and within the island of inversion to study the mechanism of shell quenching and deformation. By charge breeding ions, TITAN has enhanced the precision of the measurement technique. The precision achieved in the measurement of the superallowed β-emitter {sup 74}Rb in the 8+ charge state rivaled earlier measurements with singly charged ions in a fraction of the time. By breeding {sup 78}Rb to the same charge state, the ground state could be easily distinguished from the isomer. Further developments led to threshold charge breeding, which permitted capturing and measuring isobarically and elementally pure ion samples in the Penning trap. This was demonstrated via the Q-value determination of {sup 71}Ge. An overview of the TITAN facility and recent results are presented herein.

  20. Surpassing the mass restriction of buffer gas cooling: Cooling of low mass ions by localized heavier atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sourav; Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    Cooling of trapped ions has resulted in fascinating science including the realization of some of the most accurate atomic clocks. It has also found widespread application, for example, in mass spectrometry and cold chemistry. Among the different methods for cooling ions, cooling by elastic collisions with ultracold neutral atoms is arguably the most generic. However, in spite of its widespread application, there is confusion with regards the collisional heating/cooling of light ions by heavier neutral atoms. We address the question experimentally and demonstrate, for the first time, cooling of light ions by co-trapped heavy atoms. We show that trapped 39 K+ ions are cooled by localized ultracold neutral 85 Rb atoms. The atom-ion mass ratio (= 2.18) is well beyond any theoretical predictions so far. We further argue that cooling of ions by localized cold atoms is possible for any mass ratio. The result opens up the possibility of reaching the elusive s-wave collision regime in atom-ion collisions. S.D. is supported by DST-INSPIRE Faculty Fellowship, India.

  1. The fission time scale measured with an atomic clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kravchuk, VL; Wilschut, HW; Hunyadi, M; Kopecky, S; Lohner, H; Rogachevskiy, A; Siemssen, RH; Krasznahorkay, A; Hamilton, JH; Ramayya, AV; Carter, HK

    2003-01-01

    We present a new direct method of measuring the fission absolute time scale using an atomic clock based on the lifetime of a vacancy in the atomic K-shell. We studied the reaction Ne-20 + Th-232 -> O-16 + U-236* at 30 MeV/u. The excitation energy of about 115 MeV in such a reaction is in the range w

  2. Measuring the atomic recoil frequency using a perturbative grating-echo atom interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, B; Beattie, S; Kumarakrishnan, A

    2012-01-01

    We describe progress toward a precise measurement of the recoil energy of an atom measured using a unique perturbative grating-echo atom interferometer (AI) that involves three standing-wave (sw) pulses. Experiments are performed using samples of laser-cooled rubidium atoms with temperatures <5 uK in a non-magnetic apparatus. The AI signal exhibits narrow fringes that revive periodically at the two-photon recoil frequency, omega_q, as a function of the third sw pulse time. Using this technique, we demonstrate a measurement of omega_q with a statistical uncertainty of 37 parts per 10^9 (ppb) on a time scale of ~45 ms in 14 hours. Further statistical improvements are anticipated by extending this time scale and narrowing the signal fringe width. However, the estimated systematic uncertainty is ~6 parts per 10^6 (ppm). We describe methods of reducing these systematic errors to competitive levels.

  3. Quantum Control nd Measurement of Spins in Cold Atomic Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    Spins are natural carriers of quantum information given their long coherence time and our ability to precisely control and measure them with magneto-optical fields. Spins in cold atomic gases provide a pristine environment for such quantum control and measurement, and thus this system can act as a test-bed for the development of quantum simulators. I will discuss the progress my group has made in collaboration with Prof. Jessen, University of Arizona, to develop the toolbox for this test-bed. Through its interactions with rf and microwave magnetic fields, whose waveforms are designed through optimal control techniques, we can implement arbitrary unitary control on the internal hyperfine spins of cesium atoms, a 16 dimensional Hilbert space (isomorphic to 4 qubits). Control of the collective spin of the ensemble of many atoms is performed via the mutual coupling of the atomic ensemble to a mode of the electromagnetic field that acts as a quantum data bus for entangling atoms with one another. Internal spin control can be used to enhance the entangling power of the atom-photon interface. Finally, both projective and weak-continuous measurements can be performed to tomograhically reconstruct quantum states and processes.

  4. Controlling residual hydrogen gas in mass spectra during pulsed laser atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, R Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Residual hydrogen (H2) gas in the analysis chamber of an atom probe instrument limits the ability to measure H concentration in metals and alloys. Measuring H concentration would permit quantification of important physical phenomena, such as hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, hydrogen trapping, and grain boundary segregation. Increased insight into the behavior of residual H2 gas on the specimen tip surface in atom probe instruments could help reduce these limitations. The influence of user-selected experimental parameters on the field adsorption and desorption of residual H2 gas on nominally pure copper (Cu) was studied during ultraviolet pulsed laser atom probe tomography. The results indicate that the total residual hydrogen concentration, HTOT, in the mass spectra exhibits a generally decreasing trend with increasing laser pulse energy and increasing laser pulse frequency. Second-order interaction effects are also important. The pulse energy has the greatest influence on the quantity HTOT, which is consistently less than 0.1 at.% at a value of 80 pJ.

  5. Ratio method of measuring W boson mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Feng [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in DØ experiment. Instead of extracting MW from the fitting of W → ev fast Monte Carlo simulations to W → ev data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W → ev data and Z → ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (MW/MZ). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W → ev and Z → ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb-1 DØ Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives MW = 80435 ± 43(stat) ± 26(sys) MeV.

  6. Testing substellar models with dynamical mass measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu M.C.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We have been using Keck laser guide star adaptive optics to monitor the orbits of ultracool binaries, providing dynamical masses at lower luminosities and temperatures than previously available and enabling strong tests of theoretical models. We have identified three specific problems with theory: (1 We find that model color–magnitude diagrams cannot be reliably used to infer masses as they do not accurately reproduce the colors of ultracool dwarfs of known mass. (2 Effective temperatures inferred from evolutionary model radii are typically inconsistent with temperatures derived from fitting atmospheric models to observed spectra by 100–300 K. (3 For the only known pair of field brown dwarfs with a precise mass (3% and age determination (≈25%, the measured luminosities are ~2–3× higher than predicted by model cooling rates (i.e., masses inferred from Lbol and age are 20–30% larger than measured. To make progress in understanding the observed discrepancies, more mass measurements spanning a wide range of luminosity, temperature, and age are needed, along with more accurate age determinations (e.g., via asteroseismology for primary stars with brown dwarf binary companions. Also, resolved optical and infrared spectroscopy are needed to measure lithium depletion and to characterize the atmospheres of binary components in order to better assess model deficiencies.

  7. The First Isochronous Mass Measurements at CSRe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TU Xiao-lin; XU Hu-shan; WANG Meng; XIA Jia-wen; MAO Rui-shi; YUAN You-jin; HU Zheng-guo; LIU Yong; ZHANG Hong-bin; ZANG Yong-dong; ZHAO Tie-cheng; ZHANG Xue-ying; FU Fen; YANG Jian-cheng; MAO Li-jun; XIAO Chen; XIAO Guo-qing; ZHAO Hong-wei; ZHAN Wen-long

    2009-01-01

    With the commissioning of the Cooler Storage Ring at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL-CSR),a pilot experiment operating the CSRe in isochronous mode to test the power of HIRFL-CSR for measuring the mass of the short-lived nucleus was performed in December of 2007.The fragments with A/q=2 of ~(36) Ar were injected into CSRe and their revolution frequencies were measured with a fast time pick-up detector with a thin foil in the circulating path of the ions.The preliminary result is presented.The result shows the potential of CSRe for mass measurements of short-lived nuclei.

  8. Measuring the running top-quark mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenfeld, U.; Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Uwer, P. [Berlin Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2009-06-15

    We present the first direct determination of the running top-quark mass based on the total cross section of top-quark pair-production as measured at the Tevatron. Our theory prediction for the cross section includes various next-to-next-to-leading order QCD contributions, in particular all logarithmically enhanced terms near threshold, the Coulomb corrections at two loops and all explicitly scale dependent terms at NNLO accuracy. The result allows for an exact and independent variation of the renormalization and factorization scales. For Tevatron and LHC we study its dependence on all scales, on the parton luminosity and on the top-quark mass using both the conventional pole mass definition as well as the running mass in the MS scheme. We extract for the top-quark an MS mass of m({mu}=m) =160.0{sup +3.3}{sub -3.2} GeV. (orig.)

  9. Atomic intercalation to measure adhesion of graphene on graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Sorescu, Dan C.; Jeon, Seokmin; Belianinov, Alexei; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-10-01

    The interest in mechanical properties of two-dimensional materials has emerged in light of new device concepts taking advantage of flexing, adhesion and friction. Here we demonstrate an effective method to measure adhesion of graphene atop highly ordered pyrolytic graphite, utilizing atomic-scale `blisters' created in the top layer by neon atom intercalates. Detailed analysis of scanning tunnelling microscopy images is used to reconstruct atomic positions and the strain map within the deformed graphene layer, and demonstrate the tip-induced subsurface translation of neon atoms. We invoke an analytical model, originally devised for graphene macroscopic deformations, to determine the graphite adhesion energy of 0.221+/-0.011 J m-2. This value is in excellent agreement with reported macroscopic values and our atomistic simulations. This implies mechanical properties of graphene scale down to a few-nanometre length. The simplicity of our method provides a unique opportunity to investigate the local variability of nanomechanical properties in layered materials.

  10. A method to measure the axion mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carboni, G.

    1981-05-01

    We have calculated the decay rate of the triplet state of positronium into axion + gamma, under the hypothesis that the axion mass is less than 1 MeV. The branching ratio is found to be ~3 × 10-8. We describe a possible experiment that could detect the axion and measure its mass. On leave from Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nuclear, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.

  11. Measurement of the W boson mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, Ernest; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U.; Ahsan, Mahsana; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-08-01

    The authors present a measurement of the W boson mass in W {yields} e{nu} decays using 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. With a sample of 499830 W {yields} e{nu} candidate events, they measure M{sub W} = 80.401 {+-} 0.043 GeV. This is the most precise measurement from a single experiment.

  12. Measurement of the W boson mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Backusmayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Devaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-10-02

    We present a measurement of the W boson mass in W-->e(nu) decays using 1 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. With a sample of 499830 W-->e(nu) candidate events, we measure M(W)=80.401+/-0.043 GeV. This is the most precise measurement from a single experiment.

  13. ANALYSIS OF UNCERTAINTY MEASUREMENT IN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEHA S.MAHAJAN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A spectrophotometer is a photometer that can measure intensity as a function of the light source wavelength. The important features of spectrophotometers are spectral bandwidth and linear range of absorption or reflectance measurement. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS is a very common technique for detecting chemical composition of elements in metal and its alloy. It is very reliable and simple to use. Quality of result (accuracy depends on the uncertainty of measurement value of the test. If uncertainty of measurement is more there may be doubt of about the final result. The final result of Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer gets affected by the number of parameters; we should take in to account will calculating the final result. This paper deal with the methodology of evaluating the uncertainty of measurement of chemical composition using AAS. The study is useful for quality of measurement equipment and testing process.

  14. Population and mass imbalance in atomic Fermi gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarsma, J E; Gubbels, K.B.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2010-01-01

    We develop an accurate theory of resonantly interacting Fermi mixtures with both spin and mass imbalance. We consider Fermi mixtures with arbitrary mass imbalances but focus, in particular, on the experimentally available Li6-K40 mixture. We determine the phase diagram of the mixture for different i

  15. Photon mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some thermoluminescent dosimetric compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shivalinge Gowda; S Krishnaveni; T Yashoda; T K Umesh; Ramakrishna Gowda

    2004-09-01

    Photon mass attenuation coefficients of some thermoluminescent dosimetric (TLD) compounds, such as LiF, CaCO3, CaSO4, CaSO4·2H2O, SrSO4, CdSO4, BaSO4, C4H6BaO4 and 3CdSO4·8H2O were determined at 279.2, 320.07, 514.0, 661.6, 1115.5, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV in a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up using a high resolution, hyper pure germanium detector. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to compute the effective atomic number and the electron density of TLD compounds. The interpolation of total attenuation cross-sections of photons of energy in elements of atomic number was performed using the logarithmic regression analysis of the data measured by the authors and reported earlier. The best-fit coefficients so obtained in the photon energy range of 279.2 to 320.07 keV, 514.0 to 661.6 keV and 1115.5 to 1332.5 keV by a piece-wise interpolation method were then used to find the effective atomic number and electron density of the compounds. These values are found to be in agreement with other available published values.

  16. Atom lasers: Production, properties and prospects for precision inertial measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robins, N.P., E-mail: nick.robins@anu.edu.au; Altin, P.A.; Debs, J.E.; Close, J.D.

    2013-08-20

    We review experimental progress on atom lasers out-coupled from Bose–Einstein condensates, and consider the properties of such beams in the context of precision inertial sensing. The atom laser is the matter-wave analogue of the optical laser. Both devices rely on Bose-enhanced scattering to produce a macroscopically populated trapped mode that is output-coupled to produce an intense beam. In both cases, the beams often display highly desirable properties such as low divergence, high spectral flux and a simple spatial mode that make them useful in practical applications, as well as the potential to perform measurements at or below the quantum projection noise limit. Both devices display similar second-order correlations that differ from thermal sources. Because of these properties, atom lasers are a promising source for application to precision inertial measurements.

  17. Precision measurement of $D$ meson mass differences

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    Using three- and four-body decays of $D$ mesons produced in semileptonic $b$-hadron decays, precision measurements of $D$ meson mass differences are made together with a measurement of the $D^{0}$ mass. The measurements are based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected in $pp$ collisions at 7~TeV. Using the decay $D^0 \\rightarrow K^{+} K^{-} K^{-} \\pi^{+}$, the $D^0$ mass is measured to be \\begin{alignat*}{3} M(D^0) \\phantom{ghd} &=&~1864.75 \\pm 0.15 \\,({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.11 \\,({\\rm syst}) \\, \\textrm{MeV}/c^2. \\end{alignat*} The mass differences \\begin{alignat*}{3} M(D^{+}) - M(D^{0}) &=& 4.76 \\pm 0.12 \\,({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.07 \\,({\\rm syst}) \\, \\textrm{MeV}/c^2, \\\\ M(D^{+}_s) - M(D^{+}) &=& \\phantom{00}98.68 \\pm 0.03 \\,({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.04 \\,({\\rm syst}) \\, \\textrm{MeV}/c^2 \\end{alignat*} are measured using the $D^0 \\rightarrow K^{+} K^{-} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-} \\pi^{+}$ modes.

  18. Precise atomic masses of neutron-rich Br and Rb nuclei close to the r-process path

    CERN Document Server

    Rahaman, S; Eronen, T; Hager, U; Hakala, J; Jokinen, A; Kankainen, A; Karvonen, P; Moore, I D; Pentillä, H; Rinta-Antila, S; Rissanen, J; Saastamoinen, A; Sonoda, T; Äystö, J

    2007-01-01

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer JYFLTRAP, coupled to the Ion-Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility at Jyvaskyla, was employed to measure the atomic masses of neutron rich 85 to 92Br and 94 to 97Rb isotopes with a typical accuracy less than 10 keV. Discrepancies with the older data are discussed. Comparison to different mass models is presented. Details of nuclear structure, shell and subshell closures are investigated by studying the two-neutron separation energy and the shell gap energy.

  19. Precise atomic masses of neutron-rich Br and Rb nuclei close to the r-process path

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahaman, S.; Hager, U.; Elomaa, V.V.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I.D.; Penttilae, H.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Sonoda, T.; Aeystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics (YFL) (Finland)

    2007-04-15

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer JYFLTRAP, coupled to the Ion-Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility at Jyvaeskylae, was employed to measure the atomic masses of neutron-rich {sup 85-92}Br and {sup 94-97}Rb isotopes with a typical accuracy less than 10keV. Discrepancies with the older data are discussed. Comparison to different mass models is presented. Details of nuclear structure, shell and subshell closures are investigated by studying the two-neutron separation energy and the shell gap energy. (orig.)

  20. Precision mass measurements of short-lived nuclides for nuclear structure studies at TITAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available TITAN (TRIUMF’s Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science at TRIUMF’s rare isotope beam facility ISAC is an advanced Penning trap based mass spectrometer dedicated to precise and accurate mass determinations. An overview of TITAN, the measurement technique and a highlight of recent mass measurements of the short-lived nuclides important to the nuclear structure program at TITAN are presented.

  1. Correlating Atom Probe Crystallographic Measurements with Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Andrew J; Babinsky, Katharina; Day, Alec C; Eder, K; Oakman, Connor J; Trimby, Patrick W; Primig, Sophie; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2017-03-14

    Correlative microscopy approaches offer synergistic solutions to many research problems. One such combination, that has been studied in limited detail, is the use of atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) on the same tip specimen. By combining these two powerful microscopy techniques, the microstructure of important engineering alloys can be studied in greater detail. For the first time, the accuracy of crystallographic measurements made using APT will be independently verified using TKD. Experimental data from two atom probe tips, one a nanocrystalline Al-0.5Ag alloy specimen collected on a straight flight-path atom probe and the other a high purity Mo specimen collected on a reflectron-fitted instrument, will be compared. We find that the average minimum misorientation angle, calculated from calibrated atom probe reconstructions with two different pole combinations, deviate 0.7° and 1.4°, respectively, from the TKD results. The type of atom probe and experimental conditions appear to have some impact on this accuracy and the reconstruction and measurement procedures are likely to contribute further to degradation in angular resolution. The challenges and implications of this correlative approach will also be discussed.

  2. Measurement of $b$-hadron masses

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Gracianiv Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of $b$-hadron masses are performed with the exclusive decay modes $B^+\\to J/\\psi K^+$, $B^0 \\to J/\\psi K^{*0}$, $B^0 \\to J/\\psi K^0_{\\rm S}$, $B_s^0 \\to J/\\psi\\phi$ and $\\Lambda^0_b\\to J/\\psi\\Lambda$ using an integrated luminosity of 35 pb$^{-1}$ collected in $pp$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV by the LHCb experiment. The momentum scale is calibrated with $J/\\psi \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decays and verified to be known to a relative precision of $2 \\times 10^{-4}$ using other two-body decays. The results are more precise than previous measurements, particularly in the case of the $B^0_s$ and $\\Lambda^0_b$ masses.

  3. Measuring Forces between Oxide Surfaces Using the Atomic Force Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Høj, Jakob Weiland

    1996-01-01

    The interactions between colloidal particles play a major role in processing of ceramics, especially in casting processes. With the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) it is possible to measure the inter-action force between a small oxide particle (a few micron) and a surface as function of surface...

  4. Measurement of strong interaction effects in antiprotonic helium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, J.D.; Gorringe, T.P.; Lowe, J.; Nelson, J.M.; Playfer, S.M.; Pyle, G.J.; Squier, G.T.A. (Birmingham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Baker, C.A.; Batty, C.J.; Clark, S.A.

    1984-09-27

    The strong interaction shift and width for the 2 p level and the width for the 3d level have been measured for antiprotonic helium atoms. The results are compared with optical model calculations. The possible existence of strongly bound antiproton states in nuclei is discussed.

  5. Photoassociative Cooling and Trapping of Center-of-Mass Motion of Atom-Pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Subrata; Deb, Bimalendu

    2015-01-01

    We show that it is possible to cool and trap the center-of-mass (COM) motion of atom-pairs by a lin$\\perp$lin Sisyphus-like method using counter-propagating photoassociation lasers. This method relies on the photoassociative coupling between an excited molecular bound state and a single-channel continuum of states of scattering between ground-state atoms. We demonstrate that one can generate molecular spin-dependent periodic potentials by this method for trapping the COM motion of pairs of ground-state atoms. We illustrate this with numerical calculations using fermionic $^{171}$Yb atoms as an example.

  6. Mass measurements based on nanomechanical devices: differential measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcamone, J; Rius, G; Llobet, J; Borrise, X; Perez-Murano, F [CNM-IMB (CSIC). Campus UAB. E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)], E-mail: francesc.perez@cnm.es, E-mail: julien.arcamone@cnm.es

    2008-03-15

    In the last few years, there has been a strong interest in implementing nano-mechanical devices as mass sensors. Regarding this application, an important question to address is to know to what extent the observed frequency shift is exclusively due to the targeted mass loading. For this purpose, we present a device, a polysilicon double cantilever, with an innovative design that allows the direct determination of the measurement uncertainty. Two almost identical nanomechanical resonators are simultaneously operated: one serves as sensor and the other as reference. In this way, rapid and reliable measurements in air are made possible. In first experimental measurements, some masses in the order of 300 fg, locally deposited by focused ion beam, have been measured with an uncertainty of 30 fg. These results are corroborated by the determination of the deposits size based on SEM images.

  7. Mass measurements and superallowed beta decay

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, J C; Towner, I S

    2005-01-01

    A recent Penning-trap measurement of the masses of 46V and 46Ti leads to a Qec value that disagrees significantly with the previously accepted value, and destroys overall consistency among the nine most precisely characterized T=1 superallowed beta emitters. This raises the possibility of a systematic discrepancy between Penning-trap measurements and the reaction-based measurements upon which the Qec values depended in the past. We carefully re-analyze (n,gamma) and (p,gamma) reaction measurements in the 24 \\leq A \\leq 28 mass region, and compare the results to very precise Penning-trap measurements of the stable nuclei 24Mg, 26Mg and 28Si. We thus determine upper limits to possible systematic effects in the reaction results, and go on to establish limits for the mass of radioactive 26Al, to which future on-line Penning-trap measurements can be compared. We stress the urgency of identifying or ruling-out possible systematic effects.

  8. W Boson Mass Measurement at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Physics Dept.

    2017-03-27

    This is the closeout report for the grant for experimental research at the energy frontier in high energy physics. The report describes the precise measurement of the W boson mass at the CDF experiment at Fermilab, with an uncertainty of ≈ 12 MeV, using the full dataset of ≈ 9 fb-1 collected by the experiment up to the shutdown of the Tevatron in 2011. In this analysis, the statistical and most of the experimental systematic uncertainties have been reduced by a factor of two compared to the previous measurement with 2.2 fb-1 of CDF data. This research has been the culmination of the PI's track record of producing world-leading measurements of the W boson mass from the Tevatron. The PI performed the first and only measurement to date of the W boson mass using high-rapidity leptons using the D0 endcap calorimeters in Run 1. He has led this measurement in Run 2 at CDF, publishing two world-leading measurements in 2007 and 2012 with total uncertainties of 48 MeV and 19 MeV respectively. The analysis of the final dataset is currently under internal review in CDF. Upon approval of the internal review, the result will be available for public release.

  9. Interpreting W mass measurements in the SMEFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørn, Mikkel; Trott, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of the W± mass (mW) provide an important consistency check of the Standard Model (SM) and constrain the possibility of physics beyond the SM. Precision measurements of mW at hadron colliders are inferred from kinematic distributions of transverse variables. We examine how this inference is modified when considering the presence of physics beyond the SM expressed in terms of local contact operators. We show that Tevatron measurements of mW using transverse variables are transparent and applicable as consistent constraints in the Standard Model Effective Field Theory (SMEFT) with small measurement bias. This means that the leading challenge to interpreting these measurements in the SMEFT is the pure theoretical uncertainty in how these measurements are mapped to Lagrangian parameters. We stress the need to avoid using naive combinations of Tevatron and LEPII measurements of mW without the introduction of any SMEFT theoretical error to avoid implicit UV assumptions.

  10. Plutonium measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAninch, J E; Hamilton, T F; Broan, T A; Jokela, T A; Knezovich, T J; Ognibene, T J; Proctor, I D; Roberts, M L; Southon, J R; Vogel, J S; Sideras-Haddad, E

    1999-10-26

    Mass spectrometric methods provide sensitive, routine, and cost-effective analyses of long-lived radionuclides. Here the authors report on the status of work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a capability for actinide measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to take advantage of the high potential of AMS for rejection of interferences. This work demonstrates that the LLNL AMS spectrometer is well-suited for providing high sensitivity, robust, high throughput measurements of plutonium concentrations and isotope ratios. Present backgrounds are {approximately}2 x 10{sup 7}atoms per sample for environmental samples prepared using standard alpha spectrometry protocols. Recent measurements of {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Pu activities and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu isotope ratios in IAEA reference materials agree well with IAEA reference values and with alpha spectrometry and recently published ICP-MS results. Ongoing upgrades of the AMS spectrometer are expected to reduce backgrounds below 1 x 10{sup 6} atoms per sample while allowing simplifications of the sample preparation chemistry. These simplifications will lead to lower per-sample costs, higher throughput, faster turn around and, ultimately, to larger and more robust data sets.

  11. Improvements to TITAN's mass measurement and decay spectroscopy capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascar, D.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Alanssari, M.; Chowdhury, U.; Even, J.; Finlay, A.; Gallant, A. T.; Good, M.; Klawitter, R.; Kootte, B.; Li, T.; Leach, K. G.; Lennarz, A.; Leistenschneider, E.; Mayer, A. J.; Schultz, B. E.; Schupp, R.; Short, D. A.; Andreoiu, C.; Dilling, J.; Gwinner, G.

    2016-06-01

    The study of nuclei farther from the valley of β -stability than ever before goes hand-in-hand with shorter-lived nuclei produced in smaller abundances than their less exotic counterparts. The measurement, to high precision, of nuclear masses therefore requires innovations in technique in order to keep up. TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) facility deploys three ion traps, with a fourth in the commissioning phase, to perform and support Penning trap mass spectrometry and in-trap decay spectroscopy on some of the shortest-lived nuclei ever studied. We report on recent advances and updates to the TITAN facility since the 2012 EMIS conference. TITAN's charge breeding capabilities have been improved and in-trap decay spectroscopy can be performed in TITAN's Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT). Higher charge states can improve the precision of mass measurements, reduce the beam-time requirements for a given measurement, improve beam purity, and open the door to access isotopes not available from the ISOL method via in-trap decay and recapture. This was recently demonstrated during TITAN's mass measurement of 30 Al. The EBIT's decay spectroscopy setup was commissioned with a successful branching ratio and half-life measurement of 124 Cs. Charge breeding in the EBIT increases the energy spread of the ion bunch sent to the Penning trap for mass measurement, so a new Cooler PEnning Trap (CPET), which aims to cool highly charged ions with an electron plasma, is undergoing offline commissioning. Already CPET has demonstrated the trapping and self-cooling of a room-temperature electron plasma that was stored for several minutes. A new detector has been installed inside the CPET magnetic field which will allow for in-magnet charged particle detection.

  12. A measurement of the tau mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R. D.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reβing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Cronström, H. I.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I.; Kostina, G.; Lubimov, V.; Murat, P.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Shibaev, V.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the DORIS II storage ring, a new measurement of the mass of the τ lepton has been obtained. An analysis of the tau pseudomass spectrum for decays of the type τ- → π-π-π+ντ finds mτ = 1776.3±2.4±1.4 MeV/ c2. This result also leads to an improvement of the upper limit on the ντ mass to mντ < 31 MeV/ c2 at the 95% confidence level.

  13. Interpreting $W$ mass measurements in the SMEFT

    CERN Document Server

    Bjørn, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the $W^\\pm$ mass ($m_W$) provide an important consistency check of the Standard Model (SM) and constrain the possibility of physics beyond the SM. Precision measurements of $m_W$ at hadron colliders are inferred from kinematic distributions of transverse variables. We examine how this inference is modified when considering the presence of physics beyond the SM expressed in terms of local contact operators. We show that Tevatron measurements of $m_W$ using transverse variables are transparent and applicable as consistent constraints in the Standard Model Effective Field theory (SMEFT) and find the extra error introduced in these measurements due to SMEFT higher dimensional operators to be subdominant to the current experimental systematic errors. This means that the leading challenge to interpreting these measurements in the SMEFT is the pure theoretical uncertainty in how these measurements are mapped to Lagrangian parameters. We stress the need to avoid using naive combinations of Tevatron an...

  14. The Scales of Time, Length, Mass, Energy, and Other Fundamental Physical Quantities in the Atomic World and the Use of Atomic Units in Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Boon K.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2011-01-01

    This article is divided into two parts. In the first part, the atomic unit (au) system is introduced and the scales of time, space (length), and speed, as well as those of mass and energy, in the atomic world are discussed. In the second part, the utility of atomic units in quantum mechanical and spectroscopic calculations is illustrated with…

  15. Reanalysing glacier mass balance measurement series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zemp

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glacier-wide mass balance has been measured for more than sixty years and is widely used as an indicator of climate change and to assess the glacier contribution to runoff and sea level rise. Until recently, comprehensive uncertainty assessments have rarely been carried out and mass balance data have often been applied using rough error estimation or without consideration of errors. In this study, we propose a framework for reanalysing glacier mass balance series that includes conceptual and statistical toolsets for assessment of random and systematic errors, as well as for validation and calibration (if necessary of the glaciological with the geodetic balance results. We demonstrate the usefulness and limitations of the proposed scheme, drawing on an analysis that comprises over 50 recording periods for a dozen glaciers, and we make recommendations to investigators and users of glacier mass balance data. Reanalysing glacier mass balance series needs to become a standard procedure for every monitoring programme to improve data quality, including reliable uncertainty estimates.

  16. Direct determination of the atomic mass difference of Re187 and Os187 for neutrino physics and cosmochronology

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenko, D A; Blaum, K; Block, M; Chenmarev, S; Doerr, A; Droese, C; Filianin, P E; Goncharov, M; Ramirez, E Minaya; Novikov, Yu N; Schweikhard, L; Simon, V V

    2016-01-01

    For the first time a direct determination of the atomic mass difference of 187Re and 187Os has been performed with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP applying the novel phase-imaging ion-cyclotron-resonance technique. The obtained value of 2492(30stat)(15sys) eV is in excellent agreement with the Q values determined indirectly with microcalorimetry and thus resolves a long-standing discrepancy with older proportional counter measurements. This is essential for the determination of the neutrino mass from the beta-decay of 187Re as planned in future microcalorimetric measurements. In addition, an accurate mass difference of 187Re and 187Os is also important for the assessment of 187Re for cosmochronology.

  17. Precision mass measurements utilizing beta endpoints

    CERN Document Server

    Moltz, D M; Kern, B D; Noma, H; Ritchie, B G; Toth, K S

    1981-01-01

    A technique for precise determination of beta endpoints with an intrinsic germanium detector has been developed. The energy calibration is derived from gamma -ray photopeak measurements. This analysis procedure has been checked with a /sup 27/Si source produced in a (p, n) reaction on a /sup 27/Al target and subsequently applied to mass separated samples of /sup 76/Rb, /sup 77/Rb and /sup 78/Rb. Results indicate errors <50 keV are obtainable. (29 refs).

  18. BRAMA, a Broad Range Atomic Mass Analyzer for the ISL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitschke, J.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    An alternative to conventional on-line isotope separators for use in radioactive beam facilities is described. It consists of an analyzer with a static magnetic field that is capable of separating a wide mixture of (radioactive) ions into mass bins ranging from 6 to 240 u. If incorporated into the ISL, BRAMA would make several low-energy radioactive beams available for experiments simultaneously, in addition to the beam that is being delivered to the post-accelerator. A preliminary ion-optical geometry is discussed.

  19. Improvements to TITAN's Mass Measurement and Decay Spectroscopy Capabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Lascar, D; Chowdhury, U; Finlay, A; Gallant, A T; Good, M; Klawitter, R; Kootte, B; Leach, K G; Lennarz, A; Leistenschneider, E; Schultz, B E; Schupp, R; Short, D A; Andreoiu, C; Dilling, J; Gwinner, G

    2015-01-01

    The study of nuclei farther from the valley of $\\beta$-stability goes hand-in-hand with shorter-lived nuclei produced in smaller abundances than their more stable counterparts. The measurement, to high precision, of nuclear masses therefore requires innovations in technique in order to keep up. TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) facility deploys three ion traps, with a fourth in the commissioning phase, to perform and support Penning trap mass spectrometry and in-trap decay spectroscopy on some of the shortest-lived nuclei ever studied. We report on recent advances and updates to the TITAN facility since the 2012 EMIS Conference. TITAN's charge breeding capabilities have been improved and in-trap decay spectroscopy can be performed in TITAN's electron beam ion trap (EBIT). Higher charge states can improve the precision of mass measurements, reduce the beam-time requirements for a given measurement, improve beam purity and opens the door to access, via in-trap decay and recapture, isotope...

  20. Ultra-sensitive atomic spin measurements with a nonlinear interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Sewell, R J; Behbood, N; Colangelo, G; Ciurana, F Martin; Mitchell, M W

    2013-01-01

    Quantum metrology studies and improves quantum-limited ultra-sensitive measurements. Both linear interferometers, e.g. gravitational wave observatories, and nonlinear interferometers, e.g. optical magnetometers, have been enhanced by quantum metrology. The sensitivities of nonlinear interferometers scale better with system size than even quantum-enhanced linear interferometers, so-called `super-Heisenberg scaling', but it is actively debated whether this scaling can lead to better absolute sensitivity. Here we demonstrate a nonlinear measurement that surpasses, through super-Heisenberg scaling, the best possible linear measurement of the same quantity. We use alignment-to-orientation conversion, a practical magnetometry technique, to make a quantum non-demolition measurement of the spin alignment of a sample of $^{87}$Rb atoms. We observe absolute sensitivity 9 dB beyond the best comparable linear measurement and measurement-induced spin squeezing. The results provide insight into ultra-sensitive magnetometer...

  1. Measurements of scattering processes in negative ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvale, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    This Technical Progress Report describes the progress made on the research objectives during the past twelve months. This research project is designed to provide measurements of various scattering processes which occur in H{sup {minus}} collisions with atomic (specifically, noble gas and atomic hydrogen) targets at intermediate energies. These processes include: elastic scattering,single- and double-electron detachment, and target excitation/ionization. For the elastic and target inelastic processes where H{sup {minus}} is scattered intact, the experimental technique of Ion Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (IELS) will be employed to identify the final target state(s). In most of the above processes, cross sections are unknown both experimentally and theoretically. The measurements in progress will provide either experimentally-determined cross sections or set upper limits to those cross sections. In either case, these measurements will be stringent tests of our understanding in energetic negative ion-atom collisions. This series of experiments required the construction of a new facility and the initial ion beam was accelerated through the apparatus in April 1991.

  2. Wide-band mass measurements with a multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Schury, P; Wada, M; Wollnik, H

    2013-01-01

    We characterize the mass bandwidth of the a multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph, showing both the functional and useful mass bandwidth. We then demonstrate the use of a multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph to perform mass measurements in mass bands much wider than the mass bandwidth.

  3. A direct measurement of the baryonic mass function of galaxies & implications for the galactic baryon fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Papastergis, Emmanouil; Huang, Shan; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2012-01-01

    We use both an HI-selected and an optically-selected galaxy sample to directly measure the abundance of galaxies as a function of their "baryonic" mass (stars + atomic gas). Stellar masses are calculated based on optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and atomic gas masses are calculated using atomic hydrogen (HI) emission line data from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. By using the technique of abundance matching, we combine the measured baryonic function (BMF) of galaxies with the dark matter halo mass function in a LCDM universe, in order to determine the galactic baryon fraction as a function of host halo mass. We find that the baryon fraction of low-mass halos is much smaller than the cosmic value, even when atomic gas is taken into account. We find that the galactic baryon deficit increases monotonically with decreasing halo mass, in contrast with previous studies which suggested an approximately constant baryon fraction at the low-mass end. We argue that the observed baryon...

  4. Measurement of b-hadron masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaij, R. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Abellan Beteta, C. [Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Adeva, B. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Adinolfi, M. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Adrover, C. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Affolder, A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Ajaltouni, Z. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Alexander, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alkhazov, G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI), Gatchina (Russian Federation); Alvarez Cartelle, P. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves, A.A. [Sezione INFN di Roma La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Amato, S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Amhis, Y. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Anderson, J. [Physik-Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Appleby, R.B. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Aquines Gutierrez, O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (MPIK), Heidelberg (Germany); Archilli, F. [Laboratori Nazionali dell' INFN di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Arrabito, L. [CC-IN2P3, CNRS/IN2P3, Lyon-Villeurbanne (France); and others

    2012-02-28

    Measurements of b-hadron masses are performed with the exclusive decay modes B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +}, B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup Low-Asterisk 0}, B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub S}{sup 0}, B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{phi} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{Lambda} using an integrated luminosity of 35 pb{sup -1} collected in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV by the LHCb experiment. The momentum scale is calibrated with J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays and verified to be known to a relative precision of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} using other two-body decays. The results are more precise than previous measurements, particularly in the case of the B{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} masses.

  5. Tailoring Thermal Conductivity of Single-stranded Carbon-chain Polymers through Atomic Mass Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Quanwen; Zeng, Lingping; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei

    2016-10-07

    Tailoring the thermal conductivity of polymers is central to enlarge their applications in the thermal management of flexible integrated circuits. Progress has been made over the past decade by fabricating materials with various nanostructures, but a clear relationship between various functional groups and thermal properties of polymers remains to be established. Here, we numerically study the thermal conductivity of single-stranded carbon-chain polymers with multiple substituents of hydrogen atoms through atomic mass modification. We find that their thermal conductivity can be tuned by atomic mass modifications as revealed through molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results suggest that heavy homogeneous substituents do not assist heat transport and trace amounts of heavy substituents can in fact hinder heat transport substantially. Our analysis indicates that carbon chain has the biggest contribution (over 80%) to the thermal conduction in single-stranded carbon-chain polymers. We further demonstrate that atomic mass modifications influence the phonon bands of bonding carbon atoms, and the discrepancies of phonon bands between carbon atoms are responsible for the remarkable drops in thermal conductivity and large thermal resistances in carbon chains. Our study provides fundamental insight into how to tailor the thermal conductivity of polymers through variable substituents.

  6. Synchronised Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Measurements across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemitz, Eiko

    2010-05-01

    Up to twelve Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMSs) were operated simultaneously at rural and background stations (EMEP and EUSAAR sites) across Europe. Measurements took place during three intensive periods, in collaboration between the European EUCAARI IP and the EMEP monitoring activities under the UNECE Convention for Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP) during three contrasting months (May 2008, Sep/Oct 2008, Feb/Mar 2009). These measurements were conducted, analysed and quality controlled carefully using a unified protocol, providing the largest spatial database of aerosol chemical composition measured with a unified online technique to date, and a unique snapshots of the European non-refractory submicron aerosol climatology. As campaign averages over all active monitoring sites, organics represent 28 to 43%, sulphate 18 to 25%, ammonium 13 to 15% and nitrate 15 to 36% of the resolved aerosol mass, with the highest relative nitrate contribution during the Feb/Mar campaign. The measurements demonstrate that in NW Europe (e.g. Ireland, UK, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland) the regional submicron aerosol tends to be neutralised and here nitrates make a major contribution to the aerosol mass. By contrast, periods with low nitrate and acidic aerosol were observed at sites in S and E Europe (e.g. Greece, Finland), presumably due to a combination of larger SO2 point sources in Easter Europe, smaller local NH3 sources and, in the case of Greece, higher temperatures. While at the more marine and remote sites (Ireland, Scotland, Finland) nitrate concentrations were dominated by episodic transport phenomena, at continental sites (Switzerland, Germany, Hungary) nitrate followed a clear diurnal cycle, reflecting the thermodynamic behaviour of ammonium nitrate. The datasets clearly shows spatially co-ordinated, large-scale pollution episodes of organics, sulphate and nitrate, the latter being most pronounced during the Feb/Mar campaign. At selected

  7. Impact of Planetary Gravitation on High Precision Neutral Atom Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharek, H.; Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Moebius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Park, J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Bzowski, M.; Schwadron, N.; McComas, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) have been extremely successful in providing very important information on physical processes inside and outside our heliosphere. For instance, recent IBEX observations provided new insights into the local interstellar environment and improved measurements of the interstellar He temperature, velocity, and direction of the interstellar flow vector. Since particle collisions are rare and radiation pressure is negligible for these neutrals, gravitational forces mainly determine the trajectories of neutral He atoms. Depending on the distance of an ENA to the source of a gravitational field and its relative speed and direction this can result in a significant deflection and acceleration. In this presentation we study the impact of the gravitational effects of the Earth, Moon, and Jupiter on ENA measurements performed in Earth orbit. We show that planetary gravitational effects do not significantly affect the interstellar neutral gas parameters obtained from IBEX observations. We further study the possibility whether the He focusing cone of the Sun or Jupiter could be measured by IBEX, and whether these cones could be used as an independent measure of the interstellar He temperature. These topics are of particular importance for future missions such as IMAP, which will provide ENA images for a broader energy range and with better sensitivity and resolution.

  8. Precision mass measurements of highly charged ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Bale, J. C.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Ettenauer, S.; Frekers, D.; Gallant, A. T.; Grossheim, A.; Lennarz, A.; Mane, E.; MacDonald, T. D.; Schultz, B. E.; Simon, M. C.; Simon, V. V.; Dilling, J.

    2012-10-01

    The reputation of Penning trap mass spectrometry for accuracy and precision was established with singly charged ions (SCI); however, the achievable precision and resolving power can be extended by using highly charged ions (HCI). The TITAN facility has demonstrated these enhancements for long-lived (T1/2>=50 ms) isobars and low-lying isomers, including ^71Ge^21+, ^74Rb^8+, ^78Rb^8+, and ^98Rb^15+. The Q-value of ^71Ge enters into the neutrino cross section, and the use of HCI reduced the resolving power required to distinguish the isobars from 3 x 10^5 to 20. The precision achieved in the measurement of ^74Rb^8+, a superallowed β-emitter and candidate to test the CVC hypothesis, rivaled earlier measurements with SCI in a fraction of the time. The 111.19(22) keV isomeric state in ^78Rb was resolved from the ground state. Mass measurements of neutron-rich Rb and Sr isotopes near A = 100 aid in determining the r-process pathway. Advanced ion manipulation techniques and recent results will be presented.

  9. Measurement of the W mass at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Przysiezniak, H

    2000-01-01

    The mass of the W boson is measured using W pair events collected with the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL detectors at LEP2. Three methods are used: the cross section method, the lepton energy spectrum method and the direct reconstruction method, where the latter is described more in detail. For data collected at E/sub cm/=161, 172 and 183 GeV, the following combined preliminary result is obtained: M/sub W//sup LEP/=80.37+or-0.08 GeV/c/sup 2/. (5 refs).

  10. PRECISION ELECTROWEAK MEASUREMENTS AND THE HIGGS MASS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MARCIANO, W.J.

    2004-08-02

    The utility of precision electroweak measurements for predicting the Standard Model Higgs mass via quantum loop effects is discussed. Current constraints from m{sub w} and sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w} (m{sub z}){sub {ovr MS}} imply a relatively light Higgs {approx}< 154 GeV which is consistent with Supersymmetry expectations. The existence of Supersymmetry is further suggested by a discrepancy between experiment and theory for the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Constraints from precision studies on other types of ''New Physics'' are also briefly described.

  11. Microwave field measurement via Rabi resonances in Cs atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Fuyu; Bai, Qingsong; Huang, Xianhe; Ma, Jie; Li, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    We present a technique for measuring microwave (MW) field based on Rabi resonances induced by the interaction of atoms with a phase-modulated MW field. A theoretical model of field measurement is used to calculate Rabi frequency. Single-peak feature of the measurement model makes the technique a valuable tool for simple and fast field measurement. As an example, we use the technique to determine the MW field strength inside a Cs vapor cell in the X-band rectangular cavity for applied power in the range of -21 dBm to 20 dBm. The results show that this proposed technique is capable for detecting the field over a broad dynamical range.

  12. Interlaboratory comparison of traceable atomic force microscope pitch measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixson, Ronald; Chernoff, Donald A.; Wang, Shihua; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Tan, Siew Leng; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Advanced Surface Microscopy (ASM), and the National Metrology Centre (NMC) of the Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR) in Singapore have completed a three-way interlaboratory comparison of traceable pitch measurements using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The specimen being used for this comparison is provided by ASM and consists of SiO2 lines having a 70 nm pitch patterned on a silicon substrate. NIST has a multifaceted program in atomic force microscope (AFM) dimensional metrology. One component of this effort is a custom in-house metrology AFM, called the calibrated AFM (C-AFM). The NIST C-AFM has displacement metrology for all three axes traceable to the 633 nm wavelength of the iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser - a recommended wavelength for realization of the SI (Système International d'Unités, or International System of Units) meter. NIST used the C-AFM to participate in this comparison. ASM used a commercially available AFM with an open-loop scanner, calibrated by a 144 nm pitch transfer standard. In a prior collaboration with Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German national metrology institute, ASM's transfer standard was calibrated using PTB's traceable optical diffractometry instrument. Thus, ASM's measurements are also traceable to the SI meter. NMC/A*STAR used a large scanning range metrological atomic force microscope (LRM-AFM). The LRM-AFM integrates an AFM scanning head into a nano-stage equipped with three built-in He-Ne laser interferometers so that its measurement related to the motion on all three axes is directly traceable to the SI meter. The measurements for this interlaboratory comparison have been completed and the results are in agreement within their expanded uncertainties and at the level of a few parts in 104.

  13. Investigation of the proton-neutron interaction by high-precision nuclear mass measurements

    CERN Multimedia

    Savreux, R P; Akkus, B

    2007-01-01

    We propose to measure the atomic masses of a series of short-lived nuclides, including $^{70}$Ni, $^{122-130}$Cd, $^{134}$Sn, $^{138,140}$Xe, $^{207-210}$Hg, and $^{223-225}$Rn, that contribute to the investigation of the proton-neutron interaction and its role in nuclear structure. The high-precision mass measurements are planned for the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP that reaches the required precision of 10 keV in the nuclear mass determination.

  14. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  15. Mass measurement of cooled neutron-deficient bismuth projectile fragments with time-resolved Schottky mass spectrometry at the FRS-ESR facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinov, Yu.A.; Geissel, H. [Giessen Univ. (Germany); Radon, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (DE)] [and others

    2005-06-01

    Masses of 582 neutron-deficient nuclides (30{<=}Z{<=}85) were measured with time-resolved Schottky mass spectrometry at the FRS-ESR facility at GSI, 117 were used for calibration. The masses of 71 nuclides were obtained for the first time. A typical mass accuracy of 30 {mu}u was achieved. These data have entered the latest atomic mass evaluation. The mass determination of about 140 additional nuclides was possible via known energies (Q-values) of {alpha}-, {beta}-, or proton decays. The obtained results are compared with the results of other measurements. (orig.)

  16. To quark mass measurements at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Florencia Canelli

    2003-10-15

    We present two new measurements of the top-quark mass. Using the same methodology applied in Run I, the CDF experiment uses 72 pb{sup -1} of Run II data to measure M{sub top} = 171.2 {+-} 13.4{sub stat} {+-} 99{sub syst} GeV/c{sup 2}. On the other hand, the D0 experiment, using 125 pb{sup -1} from Run I, and applying a new method that extracts information from data through a direct calculation of a probability for each event, obtains M{sub top} = 180.1 {+-} 3.6{sub stat} {+-} 4.0{sub syst} GeV/c{sup 2}.

  17. Atomic force microscope controlled topographical imaging and proximal probe thermal desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kjoller, Kevin; Hurst, Gregory B; Pelletier, Dale A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-21

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid atmospheric pressure atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system utilizing nanothermal analysis probes for thermal desorption surface sampling with subsequent atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed, and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to correlate topographic images of a surface with atomic force microscopy and a mass spectral chemical image of the same surface, utilizing the same probe without moving the sample from the system, was demonstrated. Co-registered mass spectral chemical images and atomic force microscopy topographical images were obtained from inked patterns on paper as well as from a living bacterial colony on an agar gel. Spatial resolution of the topography images based on pixel size (0.2 μm × 0.8 μm) was better than the resolution of the mass spectral images (2.5 μm × 2.0 μm), which were limited by current mass spectral data acquisition rate and system detection levels.

  18. Measuring the Earth's gravity field with cold atom interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Carraz, Olivier; Massotti, Luca; Haagmans, Roger; Silvestrin, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    The scope of the paper is to propose different concepts for future space gravity missions using Cold Atom Interferometers (CAI) for measuring the diagonal elements of the gravity gradient tensor, the spacecraft angular velocity and the spacecraft acceleration. The aim is to achieve better performance than previous space gravity missions due to a very low white noise spectral behaviour of the CAI instrument and a very high common mode rejection, with the ultimate goals of determining the fine structures of the gravity field with higher accuracy than GOCE and detecting time-variable signals in the gravity field.

  19. Measurement of the charged kaon mass with the MIPP RICH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, Nicholas J. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The currently accepted value of the charged kaon mass is 493.677 ± 0.013 MeV (26 ppm). It is a weighted average of six measurements, most of which use kaonic atom X-ray energy techniques. The two most recent and precise results dominate the average but differ by 122 ppm. Inconsistency in the data set needs to be resolved, preferably using independent techniques. One possibility uses the Cherenkov effect. A measurement of the charged kaon mass using this technique is presented. The data was taken with the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory using a tagged beam of protons, kaons, and pions ranging in momentum from 37 GeV/c to 63 GeV/c. The measured value is 491.3 ± 1.7 MeV. This is within 1.4σ of the current value. An improvement in precision by a factor of 35 would make this technique competitive for resolving the ambiguity in the X-ray data.

  20. Tailoring Thermal Conductivity of Single-stranded Carbon-chain Polymers through Atomic Mass Modification

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Quanwen; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the thermal conductivity of polymers is central to enlarge their applications in the thermal management of flexible integrated circuits. Progress has been made over the past decade by fabricating materials with various nanostructures, but a clear relationship between various functional groups and thermal properties of polymers remains to be established. Here, we numerically study the thermal conductivity of single-stranded carbon-chain polymers with multiple substituents of hydrogen atoms through atomic mass modification. We find that their thermal conductivity can be tuned by atomic mass modifications as revealed through molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results suggest that heavy homogeneous substituents do not assist heat transport and trace amounts of heavy substituents can in fact hinder heat transport substantially. Our analysis indicates that carbon chain has the biggest contribution (over 80%) to the thermal conduction in single-stranded carbon-chain polymers. We further demonst...

  1. Thermo-voltage measurements of atomic contacts at low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelet Ofarim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the development of a novel method to determine the thermopower of atomic-sized gold contacts at low temperature. For these measurements a mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ system is used and a laser source generates a temperature difference of a few kelvins across the junction to create a thermo-voltage. Since the temperature difference enters directly into the Seebeck coefficient S = −ΔV/ΔT, the determination of the temperature plays an important role. We present a method for the determination of the temperature difference using a combination of a finite element simulation, which reveals the temperature distribution of the sample, and the measurement of the resistance change due to laser heating of sensor leads on both sides next to the junction. Our results for the measured thermopower are in agreement with recent reports in the literature.

  2. Mass measurements on short-lived Cd and Ag nuclides at the online mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenfeldt, Martin

    2009-07-03

    In the present work, mass determinations of the eleven neutron-deficient nuclides {sup 99-109}Cd, of ten neutron-rich silver nuclides {sup 112,114-121,123}Ag, and seven neutron-rich cadmium nuclides {sup 114,120,122-124,126,128}Cd are reported. Due to the clean production of the neutron-deficient nuclides it was possible to reduce the experimental uncertainties down to 2 keV, whereas the measurements of neutron-rich nuclides were hampered by the presence of contaminations from more stable In and Cs nuclides. In the case of {sup 99}Cd and {sup 123}Ag the masses were determined for the first time and for the other nuclides the mass uncertainties could be reduced by up to a factor of 50 as in the case of {sup 100}Cd. In the case of a potential isomeric mixture as for {sup 115,117,119}Ag and {sup 123}Cd, where no assignment to either the ground state or the excited state was possible, the experimental results were adjusted accordingly. Afterwards all results were included in the framework of the atomic-mass evaluation and thus linked and compared with other experimental data. In the case of a potential isomeric mixture as for {sup 115,117,119}Ag and {sup 123}Cd, where no assignment to either the ground state or the excited state was possible, the experimental results were adjusted accordingly. Afterwards all results were included in the framework of the atomic-mass evaluation and thus linked and compared with other experimental data. In the case of the neutron-deficient Cd nuclides a conflict between the mass values obtained in the present work and those published by the JYFLTRAP group [EEH{sup +}] could be solved by performing an atomic-mass evaluation. Thus, it was revealed that reason for the conflict was a different value of the JYFLTRAP reference mass {sup 96}Mo. Furthermore, a reduction of the mass uncertainty and a slight increase of the mass of {sup 100}In were obtained. These mass measurements are an important step towards an understanding of the physics of

  3. The AME2016 atomic mass evaluation (II). Tables, graphs and references

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Audi, G.; Kondev, F. G.; Huang, W. J.; Naimi, S.; Xu, Xing

    2017-03-01

    This paper is the second part of the new evaluation of atomic masses, AME2016. Using least-squares adjustments to all evaluated and accepted experimental data, described in Part I, we derive tables with numerical values and graphs to replace those given in AME2012. The first table lists the recommended atomic mass values and their uncertainties. It is followed by a table of the influences of data on primary nuclides, a table of various reaction and decay energies, and finally, a series of graphs of separation and decay energies. The last section of this paper lists all references of the input data used in the AME2016 and the NUBASE2016 evaluations (first paper in this issue). AMDC: http://amdc.impcas.ac.cn/ Contents The AME2016 atomic mass evaluation (II). Tables, graphs and referencesAcrobat PDF (293 KB) Table I. The 2016 Atomic mass tableAcrobat PDF (273 KB) Table II. Influences on primary nuclidesAcrobat PDF (160 KB) Table III. Nuclear-reaction and separation energiesAcrobat PDF (517 KB) Graphs of separation and decay energiesAcrobat PDF (589 KB) References used in the AME2016 and the NUBASE2016 evaluationsAcrobat PDF (722 KB)

  4. The Atomic Mass Unit, the Avogadro Constant, and the Mole: A Way to Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Numerous articles have been published that address problems encountered in teaching basic concepts of chemistry such as the atomic mass unit, Avogadro's number, and the mole. The origin of these problems is found in the concept definitions. If these definitions are adjusted for teaching purposes, understanding could be improved. In the present…

  5. Measurement of the electron antineutrino mass from the beta spectrum of gaseous tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, D.A.

    1986-12-01

    A measurement has been made of the mass of the electron antineutrino using the beta spectrum from a source of gaseous molecular tritium, and an upper limit of 36 eV/c/sup 2/ has been set on this mass. This measurement is the first upper limit on neutrino mass that does not rely on assumptions about the atomic configuration after the beta decay, and it has significantly smaller systematic errors associated with it than do previous measurements. 130 refs., 83 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Time-of-Flight Mass Measurements and Their Importance for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoš, M.; Estrade, A.; Amthor, A. M.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Famiano, M.; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; Lorusso, G.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A.; Schatz, H.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.

    2009-03-01

    Atomic masses play an important role in nuclear astrophysics. The lack of experimental values for nuclides of interest has triggered a rapid development of new mass measurement devices around the world, including Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass measurements offering an access to the most exotic nuclides. Recently, the TOF-Brho technique that includes a position measurement for magnetic rigidity correction has been implemented at the NSCL. An experiment with a similar TOF-Brho technique is approved and planned at the next generation radioactive beam facility (RIBF) at RIKEN.

  7. Characterizing the atomic mass surface beyond the proton drip line via a-decay measurements of the s1/2 ground state of 165Re and the h11/2 isomer in 161Ta

    CERN Document Server

    O'Donnell, D; Scholey, C; Bianco, L; Capponi, L; Carroll, R J; Darby, I G; Donosa, L; Drummond, M; Ertugral, F; Greenlees, P T; Grahn, T; Hauschild, K; Herzan, A; Jakobsson, U; Jones, P; Joss, D T; Julin, R; Juutinen, S; Ketelhut, S; Labiche, M; Leino, M; Lopez-Martens, A; Mullholland, K; Nieminen, P; Peura, P; Rahkila, P; Rinta-Antila, S; Ruotsalainen, P; Sandzelius, M; Saren, J; Saygi, B; Simpson, J; Sorri, J; Thornthwaite, A; Uusitalo, J; 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.064315

    2012-01-01

    The a-decay chains originating from the s1/2 and h11/2 states in 173Au have been investigated following fusion-evaporation reactions. Four generations of a radioactivities have been correlated with 173Aum leading to a measurement of the a decay of 161Tam. It has been found that the known a decay of 161Ta, which was previously associated with the decay of the ground state, is in fact the decay of an isomeric state. This work also reports on the first observation of prompt g rays feeding the ground state of 173Au. This prompt radiation was used to aid the study of the a-decay chain originating from the s1/2 state in 173Au. Three generations of a decays have been correlated with this state leading to the observation of a previously unreported activity which is assigned as the decay of 165Reg. This work also reports the excitation energy of an a-decaying isomer in 161Ta and the Q-value of the decay of 161Tag.

  8. Accurate absolute measurement of trapped Cs atoms in a MOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talavera O, M.; Lopez R, M.; Carlos L, E. de [Division de Tiempo y Frecuencia, Centro Nacional de Metrologia, CENAM, km 4.5 Carretera a los Cues, El Marques, 76241 Queretaro (Mexico); Jimenez S, S. [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del lPN, Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente No. 2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, 76230 Queretaro (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    A Cs-133 Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) has been developed at the Time and Frequency Division of the Centro Nacional de Metrologia, CENAM, in Mexico. This MOT is part of a primary frequency standard based on ultra-cold Cs atoms, called CsF-1 clock, under development at CENAM. In this Cs MOT, we use the standard configuration ({sigma}{sup +} - {sigma}{sup -}) 4-horizontal 2-vertical laser beams 1.9 cm in diameter, with 5 mW each. We use a 852 nm, 5 mW, DBR laser as a master laser which is stabilized by saturation spectroscopy. Emission linewidth of the master laser is l MHz. In order to amplify the light of the master laser, a 50 mW, 852 nm AlGaAs laser is used as slave laser. This slave laser is stabilized by light injection technique. A 12 MHz red shift of the light is performed by two double passes through two Acusto-Optic Modulators (AOMs). The optical part of the CENAMs MOT is very robust against mechanical vibration, acoustic noise and temperature changes in our laboratory, because none of our diode lasers use an extended cavity to reduce the linewidth. In this paper, we report results of our MOT characterization as a function of several operation parameters such as the intensity of laser beams, the laser beam diameter, the red shift of light, and the gradient of the magnetic field. We also report accurate absolute measurement of the number of Cs atoms trapped in our Cs MOT. We found up to 6 x 10{sup 7} Cs atoms trapped in our MOT measured with an uncertainty no greater than 6.4%. (Author)

  9. Direct Measurement of the Mass Difference of Ho163 and Dy163 Solves the Q-Value Puzzle for the Neutrino Mass Determination

    CERN Document Server

    Eliseev, S; Block, M; Chenmarev, S; Dorrer, H; Duellmann, Ch E; Enss, C; Filianin, P E; Gastaldo, L; Goncharov, M; Koester, U; Lautenschlaeger, F; Novikov, Yu N; Rischka, A; Schuessler, R X; Schweikhard, L; Tuerler, A

    2016-01-01

    The atomic mass difference of 163Ho and 163Dy has been directly measured with the Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP applying the novel phase imaging ion cyclotron resonance technique. Our measurement has solved the long standing problem of large discrepancies in the Q value of the electron capture in 163Ho determined by different techniques. Our measured mass difference shifts the current Q value of 2555(16) eV evaluated in the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2012 [G. Audi et al., Chin. Phys. C 36, 1157 (2012)] by more than 7 sigma to 2833(30stat)(15sys) eV/c2. With the new mass difference it will be possible, e.g., to reach in the first phase of the ECHo experiment a statistical sensitivity to the neutrino mass below 10 eV, which will reduce its present upper limit by more than an order of magnitude.

  10. TOF-Bρ mass measurements of very exotic nuclides for astrophysical calculations at the NSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoš, M.; Estrade, A.; Amthor, M.; Aprahamian, A.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Galaviz, D.; Gade, A.; Gupta, S.; Lorusso, G.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Schatz, H.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic masses play a crucial role in many nuclear astrophysics calculations. The lack of experimental values for relevant exotic nuclides triggered a rapid development of new mass measurement devices around the world. The time-of-flight (TOF) mass measurements offer a complementary technique to the most precise one, Penning trap measurements (Blaum 2006 Phys. Rep. 425 1), the latter being limited by the rate and half-lives of the ions of interest. The NSCL facility provides a well-suited infrastructure for the TOF mass measurements of very exotic nuclei. At this facility, we have recently implemented a TOF-Bρ technique and performed mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclides in the Fe region, important for r-process calculations and for calculations of processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars.

  11. TOF-Brho Mass Measurements of Very Exotic Nuclides for Astrophysical Calculations at the NSCL

    CERN Document Server

    Matos, M; Amthor, M; Aprahamian, A; Bazin, D; Becerril, A; Elliot, T; Galaviz, D; Gade, A; Gupta, S; Lorusso, G; Montes, F; Pereira, J; Portillo, M; Rogers, A M; Schatz, H; Shapira, D; Smith, E; Stolz, A; Wallace, M

    2008-01-01

    Atomic masses play a crucial role in many nuclear astrophysics calculations. The lack of experimental values for relevant exotic nuclides triggered a rapid development of new mass measurement devices around the world. The Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass measurements offer a complementary technique to the most precise one, Penning trap measurements, the latter being limited by the rate and half-lives of the ions of interest. The NSCL facility provides a well-suited infrastructure for TOF mass measurements of very exotic nuclei. At this facility, we have recently implemented a TOF-Brho technique and performed mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclides in the Fe region, important for r-process calculations and for calculations of processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars.

  12. Flow angle from intermediate mass fragment measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rami, F.; Crochet, P.; Dona, R.; De Schauenburg, B.; Wagner, P.; Alard, J.P.; Andronic, A.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.; Bendarag, A.; Berek, G.; Best, D.; Caplar, R.; Devismes, A.; Dupieux, P.; Dzelalija, M.; Eskef, M.; Fodor, Z.; Gobbi, A.; Grishkin, Y.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Hong, B.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Merlitz, H.; Mohren, S.; Moisa, D.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Plettner, C.; Reisdorf, W.; Schuell, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stockmeir, M.; Vasiliev, M.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Yushmanov, I.; Zhilin, A

    1999-02-15

    Directed sideward flow of light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments was measured in different symmetric reactions at bombarding energies from 90 to 800 A MeV. The flow parameter is found to increase with the charge of the detected fragment up to Z = 3-4 and then turns into saturation for heavier fragments. Guided by simple simulations of an anisotropic expanding thermal source, we show that the value at saturation can provide a good estimate of the flow angle, {theta}{sub flow}, in the participant region. It is found that {theta}{sub flow} depends strongly on the impact parameter. The excitation function of {theta}{sub flow} reveals striking deviations from the ideal hydrodynamical scaling. The data exhibit a steep rise of {theta}{sub flow} to a maximum at around 250 - 400 A MeV, followed by a moderate decrease as the bombarding energy increases further.

  13. "Pseudo-invariant Eigen-operator" Method for Deriving Energy-Gap of an Atom-Cavity Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian with Atomic Centre-of-Mass Motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi; TANG Xu-Bing

    2006-01-01

    Using the "Pseudo-invariant eigen-operator" method we find the energy-gap of the Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian model of an atom-cavity system. This model takes the atomic centre-of-mass motion into account. The supersymmetric structure is involved in the Hamiltonian of an atom-cavity system. By selecting suitable supersymmetric generators and using supersymmetric transformation the Hamiltonian is diagonalized and energy eigenvectors are obtained.

  14. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, A.

    This research follows a multifaceted approach, from theory to practice, to the investigation and development of novel helium plasmas, sample introduction systems, and diagnostic techniques for atomic and mass spectrometries. During the period January 1994 - December 1994, four major sets of challenging research programs were addressed that each included a number of discrete but complementary projects: (1) The first program is concerned with fundamental and analytical investigations of novel atmospheric-pressure helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPS) that are suitable for the atomization-excitation-ionization of elements, especially those possessing high excitation and ionization energies, for the purpose of enhancing sensitivity and selectivity of analytical measurements. (2) The second program includes simulation and computer modeling of He ICPS. The aim is to ease the hunt for new helium plasmas by predicting their structure and fundamental and analytical properties, without incurring the enormous cost for extensive experimental studies. (3) The third program involves spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of plasma discharges to instantly visualize their prevailing structures, to quantify key fundamental properties, and to verify predictions by mathematical models. (4) The fourth program entails investigation of new, low-cost sample introduction systems that consume micro- to nanoliter quantity of sample solution in plasma spectrometries. A portion of this research involves development and applications of novel diagnostic techniques suitable for probing key fundamental properties of aerosol prior to and after injection into high-temperature plasmas. These efforts, still in progress, collectively offer promise of solving singularly difficult analytical problems that either exist now or are likely to arise in the future in the various fields of energy generation, environmental pollution, material science, biomedicine and nutrition.

  15. Fat mass measured by DXA varies with scan velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, Eva; Petersen, Liselotte; Kreutzer, Martin

    2002-01-01

    To study the influence of scan velocities of DXA on the measured size of fat mass, lean body mass, bone mineral content and density, and total body weight.......To study the influence of scan velocities of DXA on the measured size of fat mass, lean body mass, bone mineral content and density, and total body weight....

  16. Bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based atomic-scale mass sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Akbari, H. R.; Shaat, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The potentials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as mechanical resonators for atomic-scale mass sensing are presented. To this aim, a nonlocal continuum-based model is proposed to study the dynamic behavior of bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based mass nanosensors. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered as an elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam with von Kármán type geometric nonlinearity. Eringen's nonlocal elastic field theory is utilized to model the interatomic long-range interactions within the structure of the CNT. This developed model accounts for the arbitrary position of the deposited atomic-mass. The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes are determined based on an eigenvalue problem analysis. An atom of xenon (Xe) is first considered as a specific case where the results show that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the CNT are strongly dependent on the location of the deposited Xe and the nonlocal parameter of the CNT. It is also indicated that the first vibrational mode is the most sensitive when the mass is deposited at the middle of a single-walled carbon nanotube. However, when deposited in other locations, it is demonstrated that the second or third vibrational modes may be more sensitive. To investigate the sensitivity of bridged single-walled CNTs as mass sensors, different noble gases are considered, namely Xe, argon (Ar), and helium (He). It is shown that the sensitivity of the single-walled CNT to the Ar and He gases is much lower than the Xe gas due to the significant decrease in their masses. The derived model and performed analysis are so needed for mass sensing applications and particularly when the detected mass is randomly deposited.

  17. Underground atom gradiometer array for mass distribution monitoring and advanced geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuel, B.

    2015-12-01

    After more than 20 years of fundamental research, atom interferometers have reached sensitivity and accuracy levels competing with or beating inertial sensors based on different technologies. Atom interferometers offer interesting applications in geophysics (gravimetry, gradiometry, Earth rotation rate measurements), inertial sensing (submarine or aircraft autonomous positioning), metrology (new definition of the kilogram) and fundamental physics (tests of the standard model, tests of general relativity). Atom interferometers already contributed significantly to fundamental physics by, for example, providing stringent constraints on quantum-electrodynamics through measurements of the hyperfine structure constant, testing the Equivalence Principle with cold atoms, or providing new measurements for the Newtonian gravitational constant. Cold atom sensors have moreover been established as key instruments in metrology for the new definition of the kilogram or through international comparisons of gravimeters. The field of atom interferometry (AI) is now entering a new phase where very high sensitivity levels must be demonstrated, in order to enlarge the potential applications outside atomic physics laboratories. These applications range from gravitational wave (GW) detection in the [0.1-10 Hz] frequency band to next generation ground and space-based Earth gravity field studies to precision gyroscopes and accelerometers. The Matter-wave laser Interferometric Gravitation Antenna (MIGA) presented here is a large-scale matter-wave sensor which will open new applications in geoscience and fundamental physics. The MIGA consortium gathers 18 expert French laboratories and companies in atomic physics, metrology, optics, geosciences and gravitational physics, with the aim to build a large-scale underground atom-interferometer instrument by 2018 and operate it till at least 2023. In this paper, we present the main objectives of the project, the status of the construction of the

  18. Gas chromatography of organic microcontaminants using atomic emission and mass spectrometric detection combined in one instrument (GC-AED/MS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, H.G.J.; Hankemeier, T.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1999-01-01

    This study describes the coupling of an atomic-emission detector and mass-spectrometric detector to a single gas chromatograph. Splitting of the column effluent enables simultaneous detection by atomic-emission detection (AED) and mass spectrometry (MS) and yields a powerful system for the target an

  19. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montaser, A.

    1992-01-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  20. On the determination of the pion effective mass in nuclei from pionic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    1998-07-01

    The binding energies of the deeply bound 1s and 2p states in pionic atoms of 207Pb, recently established experimentally in the 208Pb(d,3He) reaction, have been used by several groups to derive the pion effective mass in nuclear matter. We show that these binding energies are fully consistent with `normal' pionic atoms and that the real part of the pion-nucleus potential at the center of 207Pb is 28+/-3 MeV and not 20 MeV as suggested previously.

  1. Interfacial forces between silica surfaces measured by atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal particle stability and some other interfacial phenomena are governed by interfacial force interactions. The two well known forces are van der Waals force and electrostatic force, as documented by the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Moreover, advances in modern instrumentation and colloid science suggested that some short-ranged forces or structure forces are important for relevant colloidal systems. The interfacial and/or molecular forces can be measured as a resultant force as function of separation distance by atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloid probe. This article presents a discussion on AFM colloid probe measurement of silica particle and silica wafer surfaces in solutions with some technical notifications in measurement and data convolution mechanisms. The measured forces are then analyzed and discussed based on the 'constant charge' and 'constant potential' models of DLVO theory. The difference between the prediction of DLVO theory and the measured results indicates that there is a strong short-range structure force between the two hydrophilic surfaces, even at extremely low ionic concentration, such as Milli-Q water purity solution.

  2. Interfacial forces between silica surfaces measured by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal particle stability and some other interfacial phenomena are governed by interfacial force interactions. The two well known forces are van der Waals force and electrostatic force, as documented by the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Moreover, advances in modern instrumentation and colloid science suggested that some short-ranged forces or structure forces are important for relevant colloidal systems. The interfacial and/or molecular forces can be measured as a resultant force as function of separation distance by atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloid probe. This article presents a discussion on AFM colloid probe measurement of silica particle and silica wafer surfaces in solutions with some technical notifications in measurement and data convolution mechanisms. The measured forces are then analyzed and discussed based on the 'constant charge' and 'constant potential' models of DLVO theory. The difference between the prediction of DLVO theory and the measured results indicates that there is a strong short-range structure force between the two hydrophilic surfaces, even at extremely low ionic concentration, such as Milli-Q water purity solution.

  3. Overview of the JYFLTRAP mass measurements and high-precision -values for weak interaction studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Eronen; Jyfltrap

    2010-08-01

    The JYFLTRAP Penning trap set-up at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, is a Penning trap facility that has provided high-precision atomic mass values for short-lived nuclides since 2003. Until now, masses of more than 250 short-lived nuclides have been measured. Since JYFLTRAP is coupled to the chemically insensitive IGISOL mass separator, any element can be accessed. So far, a huge mass surface extending from magnesium ( = 12) to lead ( = 82) has been covered.

  4. Measurement of the top quark mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnes, Erich Ward [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the top quark mass mt using events recorded during a 125 pb-1 exposure of the D0 detector to √s=1.8 TeV $\\bar{p}$p collisions. Six events consistent with the hypothesis t$\\bar{t}$ → bW+, $\\bar{b}$W-measurement of mt based on these relative solution likelihoods gives mt2+, $\\bar{b}$W- → b$\\bar{l}$v, $\\bar{b}$q$\\bar{q}$ , and this, in combination with an estimate on the likelihood that each event is top, yields mt = 173.3 ± 5.6 (stat.) ± 6.2 (syst.) GeV/c2measurements gives mt = 173.1 ± 5.2 (stat.) ± 5.7 (syst.) GeV/c2

  5. The AME2012 atomic mass evaluation (Ⅰ).Evaluation of input data, adjustment procedures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.Audi; M.Wang; A.H.Wapstra; F.G.Kondev; M.MacCormick; X.Xu; B.Pfeiffer

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the first of two articles (Part Ⅰ and Part Ⅱ) that presents the results of the new atomic mass evaluation,AME2012.It includes complete information on the experimental input data (including not used and rejected ones),as well as details on the evaluation procedures used to derive the tables with recommended values given in the second part.This article describes the evaluation philosophy and procedures that were implemented in the selection of specific nuclear reaction,decay and mass-spectrometer results.These input values were entered in the least-squares adjustment procedure for determining the best values for the atomic masses and their uncertainties.Calculation procedures and particularities of the AME are then described.All accepted and rejected data,including outweighed ones,are presented in a tabular format and compared with the adjusted values (obtained using the adjustment procedure).Differences with the previous AME2003 evaluation are also discussed and specific information is presented for several cases that may be of interest to various AME users.The second AME2012 article,the last one in this issue,gives a table with recommended values of atomic masses,as well as tables and graphs of derived quantities,along with the list of references used in both this AME2012 evaluation and the NUBASE2012 one (the first paper in this issue).

  6. The AME2016 atomic mass evaluation (I). Evaluation of input data; and adjustment procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, W. J.; Audi, G.; Wang, Meng; Kondev, F. G.; Naimi, S.; Xu, Xing

    2017-03-01

    This paper is the first of two articles (Part I and Part II) that presents the results of the new atomic mass evaluation, Ame2016. It includes complete information on the experimental input data (also including unused and rejected ones), as well as details on the evaluation procedures used to derive the tables of recommended values given in the second part. This article describes the evaluation philosophy and procedures that were implemented in the selection of specific nuclear reaction, decay and mass-spectrometric results. These input values were entered in the least-squares adjustment for determining the best values for the atomic masses and their uncertainties. Details of the calculation and particularities of the Ame are then described. All accepted and rejected data, including outweighted ones, are presented in a tabular format and compared with the adjusted values obtained using the least-squares fit analysis. Differences with the previous Ame2012 evaluation are discussed and specific information is presented for several cases that may be of interest to Ame users. The second Ame2016 article gives a table with the recommended values of atomic masses, as well as tables and graphs of derived quantities, along with the list of references used in both the Ame2016 and the Nubase2016 evaluations (the first paper in this issue). Amdc: http://amdc.impcas.ac.cn/

  7. The AME2016 atomic mass evaluation (I). Evaluation of input data; and adjustment procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W. J.; Audi, G.; Wang, Meng; Kondev, F. G.; Naimi, S.; Xu, Xing

    2017-03-01

    This paper is the first of two articles (Part I and Part II) that presents the results of the new atomic mass evaluation, AME2016. It includes complete information on the experimental input data (also including unused and rejected ones), as well as details on the evaluation procedures used to derive the tables of recommended values given in the second part. This article describes the evaluation philosophy and procedures that were implemented in the selection of specific nuclear reaction, decay and mass-spectrometric results. These input values were entered in the least-squares adjustment for determining the best values for the atomic masses and their uncertainties. Details of the calculation and particularities of the AME are then described. All accepted and rejected data, including outweighted ones, are presented in a tabular format and compared with the adjusted values obtained using the least-squares fit analysis. Differences with the previous AME2012 evaluation are discussed and specific information is presented for several cases that may be of interest to AME users. The second AME2016 article gives a table with the recommended values of atomic masses, as well as tables and graphs of derived quantities, along with the list of references used in both the AME2016 and the NUBASE2016 evaluations (the first paper in this issue). AMDC: http://amdc.impcas.ac.cn/ Contents The AME2016 atomic mass evaluation (I). Evaluation of input data; and adjustment proceduresAcrobat PDF (1.2 MB) Table I. Input data compared with adjusted valuesAcrobat PDF (1.3 MB)

  8. Time-of-flight mass spectrographs—From ions to neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius, E.; Galvin, A. B.; Kistler, L. M.; Kucharek, H.; Popecki, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    After their introduction to space physics in the mid 1980s time-of-flight (TOF) spectrographs have become a main staple in spaceborne mass spectrometry. They have largely replaced magnetic spectrometers, except when extremely high mass resolution is required to identify complex molecules, for example, in the vicinity of comets or in planetary atmospheres. In combination with electrostatic analyzers and often solid state detectors, TOF spectrographs have become key instruments to diagnose space plasma velocity distributions, mass, and ionic charge composition. With a variety of implementation schemes that also include isochronous electric field configurations, TOF spectrographs can respond to diverse science requirements. This includes a wide range in mass resolution to allow the separation of medium heavy isotopes or to simply provide distributions of the major species, such as H, He, and O, to obtain information on source tracers or mass fluxes. With a top-hat analyzer at the front end, or in combination with deflectors for three-axis stabilized spacecraft, the distribution function of ions can be obtained with good time resolution. Most recently, the reach of TOF ion mass spectrographs has been extended to include energetic neutral atoms. After selecting the arrival direction with mechanical collimation, followed by conversion to ions, adapted TOF sensors form a new branch of the spectrograph family tree. We review the requirements, challenges, and implementation schemes for ion and neutral atom spectrographs, including potential directions for the future, while largely avoiding overlap with complementary contributions in this special issue.

  9. TOF Mass Measurements of Very Exotic Nuclides: an Input for Astrophysical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoš, M.; Estrade, A.; Amthor, M.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Galaviz, D.; Gade, A.; Lorusso, G.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Schatz, H.; Stolz, A.; Aprahamian, A.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Gupta, S.; Wallace, M.

    2007-10-01

    Atomic masses play a crucial role in many nuclear astrophysics calculations. Very exotic nuclei can be accessed by time-of- flight techniques at radioactive beam facilities. The NSCL facility provides a well-suited infrastructure for TOF mass measurements of very exotic nuclei. At this facility, we have recently implemented a TOF-Bρ technique and performed mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclides in the Fe region, important for calculations of the r-process and processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars. Description of the TOF technique, results and future plans related to nuclear astrophysics will be presented.

  10. Classical stochastic measurement trajectories: Bosonic atomic gases in an optical cavity and quantum measurement backaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark D.; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2014-08-01

    We formulate computationally efficient classical stochastic measurement trajectories for a multimode quantum system under continuous observation. Specifically, we consider the nonlinear dynamics of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate contained within an optical cavity subject to continuous monitoring of the light leaking out of the cavity. The classical trajectories encode within a classical phase-space representation a continuous quantum measurement process conditioned on a given detection record. We derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the quasiprobability distribution of the combined condensate-cavity system. We unravel the dynamics into stochastic classical trajectories that are conditioned on the quantum measurement process of the continuously monitored system. Since the dynamics of a continuously measured observable in a many-atom system can be closely approximated by classical dynamics, the method provides a numerically efficient and accurate approach to calculate the measurement record of a large multimode quantum system. Numerical simulations of the continuously monitored dynamics of a large atom cloud reveal considerably fluctuating phase profiles between different measurement trajectories, while ensemble averages exhibit local spatially varying phase decoherence. Individual measurement trajectories lead to spatial pattern formation and optomechanical motion that solely result from the measurement backaction. The backaction of the continuous quantum measurement process, conditioned on the detection record of the photons, spontaneously breaks the symmetry of the spatial profile of the condensate and can be tailored to selectively excite collective modes.

  11. Metallicity measurements using atomic lines in M and K dwarf stars

    CERN Document Server

    Woolf, V M; Woolf, Vincent M.; Wallerstein, George

    2004-01-01

    We report the first survey of chemical abundances in M and K dwarf stars using atomic absorption lines in high resolution spectra. We have measured Fe and Ti abundances in 35 M and K dwarf stars using equivalent widths measured from (lambda / Delta lambda) = 33,000 spectra. Our analysis takes advantage of recent improvements in model atmospheres of low-temperature dwarf stars. The stars have temperatures between 3300 and 4700 K, with most cooler than 4100 K. They cover an iron abundance range of -2.44 < [Fe/H] < +0.16. Our measurements show [Ti/Fe] decreasing with increasing [Fe/H], a trend similar to that measured for warmer stars where abundance analysis techniques have been tested more thoroughly. This study is a step toward the observational calibration of procedures to estimate the metallicity of low-mass dwarf stars using photometric and low-resolution spectral indices.

  12. The AME2016 atomic mass evaluation (II). Tables, graphs and references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Meng; Audi, G.; Kondev, F. G.; Huang, W. J.; Naimi, S.; Xu, Xing

    2017-03-01

    This paper is the second part of the new evaluation of atomic masses, Ame2016. Using least-squares adjustments to all evaluated and accepted experimental data, described in Part I, we derive tables with numerical values and graphs to replace those given in Ame2012. The first table lists the recommended atomic mass values and their uncertainties. It is followed by a table of the influences of data on primary nuclides, a table of various reaction and decay energies, and finally, a series of graphs of separation and decay energies. The last section of this paper lists all references of the input data used in the Ame2016 and the Nubase2016 evaluations (first paper in this issue). Amdc: http://amdc.impcas.ac.cn/

  13. ENAM'04 Fourth International Conference on Exotic Nuclei and Atomic Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, C. J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

    2005-01-01

    The conference can trace its origins to the 1950s and 1960s with the Atomic Mass and Fundamental Constants (AMCO) and the Nuclei Far From Stability (NFFS) series of conferences. Held jointly in 1992, the conferences officially merged in 1995 and the fourth conference was held at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, GA and was organized by the Physics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conference covered a broad list of topics consisting of a series of invited and contributed presentation highlighting recent research in the following fields: Atomic masses, nuclear moments, and nuclear radii; Forms of radioactivity; Nuclear structure, nuclei at the drip lines, cluster phenomena; Reactions with radioactive ion beams; Nuclear astrophysics; Fundamental symmetries and interactions; Heaviest elements and fission; Radioactive ion beam production and experimental developments; Applications of exotic nuclei

  14. Measurement of an atomic quadrupole moment using dynamic decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Shaniv, Ravid; Ozeri, Roee

    2016-05-01

    Some of the best clocks today are ion-based optical clocks. These clocks are referenced to a narrow optical transition in a trapped ion. An example for such a narrow transition is the electric quadrupole E 2 transition between states with identical parity. An important systematic shift of such a transition is the quadrupole shift resulting from the electric field gradient inherent to the ion trap. We present a new dynamic decoupling method that rejects magnetic field noise while measuring the small quadrupole shift of the optical clock transition. Using our sequence we measured the quadrupole moment of the 4D5/2 level in a trapped 88 Sr+ ion to be 2 .973-0 . 033 + 0 . 026 ea02 , where e is the electron charge and a0 is the Bohr radius. Our measurement improves the uncertainty of this value by an order of magnitude and thus helps mitigate an important systematic uncertainty in 88 Sr+ based optical atomic clocks and verifies complicated many-body quantum calculations.

  15. Uniform synthetic magnetic field and effective mass for cold atoms in a shaken optical lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sols, Fernando; Creffield, Charles E.; Pieplow, Gregor; Goldman, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    Cold atoms can be made to experience synthetic magnetic fields when placed in a suitably driven optical lattice. For coherent systems the switching protocol plays an essential role in determining the long time behavior. Relatively simple driving schemes may generate a uniform magnetic flux but an inhomogeneous effective mass. A two-stage split driving scheme can recover a uniform effective mass but at the price of rendering the magnetic field space dependent. We propose a four-stage split driving that generates uniform field and mass of arbitrary values for all driving amplitudes. Finally, we study a modified two-stage split driving approach that enables uniform field and mass for most of but not all values of the magnetic field. Work supported by MINECO (Spain) under Grant FIS2013-41716-P, by FRS-FNRS (Belgium), and by BSPO under PAI Project No. P7/18 DYGEST.

  16. Mass measurements on short-lived Cd and Ag nuclides at the online mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenfeldt, Martin

    2009-07-03

    In the present work, mass determinations of the eleven neutron-deficient nuclides {sup 99-109}Cd, of ten neutron-rich silver nuclides {sup 112,114-121,123}Ag, and seven neutron-rich cadmium nuclides {sup 114,120,122-124,126,128}Cd are reported. Due to the clean production of the neutron-deficient nuclides it was possible to reduce the experimental uncertainties down to 2 keV, whereas the measurements of neutron-rich nuclides were hampered by the presence of contaminations from more stable In and Cs nuclides. In the case of {sup 99}Cd and {sup 123}Ag the masses were determined for the first time and for the other nuclides the mass uncertainties could be reduced by up to a factor of 50 as in the case of {sup 100}Cd. In the case of a potential isomeric mixture as for {sup 115,117,119}Ag and {sup 123}Cd, where no assignment to either the ground state or the excited state was possible, the experimental results were adjusted accordingly. Afterwards all results were included in the framework of the atomic-mass evaluation and thus linked and compared with other experimental data. In the case of a potential isomeric mixture as for {sup 115,117,119}Ag and {sup 123}Cd, where no assignment to either the ground state or the excited state was possible, the experimental results were adjusted accordingly. Afterwards all results were included in the framework of the atomic-mass evaluation and thus linked and compared with other experimental data. In the case of the neutron-deficient Cd nuclides a conflict between the mass values obtained in the present work and those published by the JYFLTRAP group [EEH{sup +}] could be solved by performing an atomic-mass evaluation. Thus, it was revealed that reason for the conflict was a different value of the JYFLTRAP reference mass {sup 96}Mo. Furthermore, a reduction of the mass uncertainty and a slight increase of the mass of {sup 100}In were obtained. These mass measurements are an important step towards an understanding of the physics of

  17. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T., E-mail: tomomi.fujita@riken.jp [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Shimoda, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan); Collaboration: OROCHI Collaboration

    2015-11-15

    A new laser spectroscopic method named “OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)” has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with {sup 84−87}Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  18. Co-registered Topographical, Band Excitation Nanomechanical, and Mass Spectral Imaging Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Tai, Tamin; Bocharova, Vera; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Belianinov, Alex; Kertesz, Vilmos; Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2015-04-28

    The advancement of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform demonstrating the co-registered topographical, band excitation nanomechanical, and mass spectral imaging of a surface using a single instrument is reported. The mass spectrometry-based chemical imaging component of the system utilized nanothermal analysis probes for pyrolytic surface sampling followed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of the gas-phase species produced with subsequent mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and operation are discussed, and the multimodal imaging capability and utility are demonstrated using a phase-separated polystyrene/poly(2-vinylpyridine) polymer blend thin film. The topography and band excitation images showed that the valley and plateau regions of the thin film surface were comprised primarily of one of the two polymers in the blend with the mass spectral chemical image used to definitively identify the polymers at the different locations. Data point pixel size for the topography (390 nm × 390 nm), band excitation (781 nm × 781 nm), and mass spectrometry (690 nm × 500 nm) images was comparable and submicrometer in all three cases, but the data voxel size for each of the three images was dramatically different. The topography image was uniquely a surface measurement, whereas the band excitation image included information from an estimated 20 nm deep into the sample and the mass spectral image from 110 to 140 nm in depth. Because of this dramatic sampling depth variance, some differences in the band excitation and mass spectrometry chemical images were observed and were interpreted to indicate the presence of a buried interface in the sample. The spatial resolution of the chemical image was estimated to be between 1.5 and 2.6 μm, based on the ability to distinguish surface features in that image that were also observed in the other images.

  19. Atomic fountain of laser-cooled Yb atoms for precision measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, Kanhaiya; Singh, Alok K; Natarajan, Vasant

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate launching of laser-cooled Yb atoms in a cold atomic fountain. Atoms in a collimated thermal beam are first cooled and captured in a magneto-optic trap (MOT) operating on the strongly-allowed ${^1S}_0 \\rightarrow {^1P}_1$ transition at 399~nm (blue line). They are then transferred to a MOT on the weakly-allowed ${^1S}_0 \\rightarrow {^3P}_1$ transition at 556~nm (green line). Cold atoms from the green MOT are launched against gravity at a velocity of around 2.5~m/s using a pair of green beams. We trap more than $10^7$ atoms in the blue MOT and transfer up to 70\\% into the green MOT. The temperature for the odd isotope, $^{171}$Yb, is $\\sim$1~mK in the blue MOT, and reduces by a factor of 40 in the green MOT.

  20. Measurement of Black Hole Mass Radio-Loud Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cheng-Yue Su; Z.-F. Chen; R.-L. He; C.-H. Zhang; T.-T. Wang

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we construct a sample of 1585 radio-loud quasars to measure their black hole masses using broad emission lines. We compare our black hole masses with the virial black hole masses measured by Shen et al. (2010).We find that there is a large deviation between them if our black hole mass is measured from the CIV broad emission line. Whereas, if our black hole mass is measured from broad emission line of Mg II or H, both the values are consistent.

  1. Towards precise top mass measurement at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kawabata, Sayaka

    2015-01-01

    The top quark mass plays an important role in a variety of discussions both within and beyond the Standard Model. However, a precise determination of a theoretically well-defined top quark mass is still missing. Towards a precise determination of a theoretically well-defined top quark mass at the LHC, we propose a method which uses lepton energy distribution and has a boost-invariant nature. We investigate its experimental viability by performing a simulation analysis for ttbar production process and lepton+jets decay channel at the leading order. We estimate several major uncertainties in the top mass determination with this method and they amount to 1.7 GeV with an integrated luminosity of 100 fb^{-1} at sqrt{s}=14 TeV. The uncertainties should be reduced by considering the next-to-leading order corrections to the method.

  2. Measurement of the temperature of atomic ensembles via \\emph{which-way} information

    CERN Document Server

    León-Montiel, R de J

    2011-01-01

    We unveil the relationship existing between the temperature of an atomic ensemble of three-level atoms in a $\\Lambda$-configuration, and the width of the emission cone of Stokes photons that are spontaneously emitted when atoms are excited by an optical beam. This relationship, which is based on the amount of \\emph{which-way} information available about where the Stokes photon originated during the interaction, allow us to put forward a new scheme to determine the temperature of atomic clouds by measuring the width of the emission cone. Unlike the commonly used time-of-flight measurements, with this new technique, the atomic cloud is not destroyed during each measurement.

  3. Universal charge-mass relation: From black holes to atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar, E-mail: shaharhod@gmail.co [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer 40250 (Israel); The Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem 91010 (Israel)

    2010-10-04

    The cosmic censorship hypothesis, introduced by Penrose forty years ago, is one of the corner stones of general relativity. This conjecture asserts that spacetime singularities that arise in gravitational collapse are always hidden inside of black holes. The elimination of a black-hole horizon is ruled out by this principle because that would expose naked singularities to distant observers. We test the consistency of this prediction in a gedanken experiment in which a charged object is swallowed by a charged black hole. We find that the validity of the cosmic censorship conjecture requires the existence of a charge-mass bound of the form q{<=}{mu}{sup 2/3}E{sub c}{sup -1/3}, where q and {mu} are the charge and mass of the physical system respectively, and E{sub c} is the critical electric field for pair-production. Applying this bound to charged atomic nuclei, one finds an upper limit on the number Z of protons in a nucleus of given mass number A: Z{<=}Z{sup *}={alpha}{sup -1/3}A{sup 2/3}, where {alpha}=e{sup 2}/h is the fine structure constant. We test the validity of this novel bound against the (Z,A)-relation of atomic nuclei as deduced from the Weizsaecker semi-empirical mass formula.

  4. Measuring masses of large biomolecules and bioparticles using mass spectrometric techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wen-Ping; Chou, Szu-Wei; Patil, Avinash A

    2014-07-21

    Large biomolecules and bioparticles play a vital role in biology, chemistry, biomedical science and physics. Mass is a critical parameter for the characterization of large biomolecules and bioparticles. To achieve mass analysis, choosing a suitable ion source is the first step and the instruments for detecting ions, mass analyzers and detectors should also be considered. Abundant mass spectrometric techniques have been proposed to determine the masses of large biomolecules and bioparticles and these techniques can be divided into two categories. The first category measures the mass (or size) of intact particles, including single particle quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry, cell mass spectrometry, charge detection mass spectrometry and differential mobility mass analysis; the second category aims to measure the mass and tandem mass of biomolecular ions, including quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry, time-of-flight mass spectrometry, quadrupole orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry and orbitrap mass spectrometry. Moreover, algorithms for the mass and stoichiometry assignment of electrospray mass spectra are developed to obtain accurate structure information and subunit combinations.

  5. Measurements of Scattering Processes in Negative Ion- Atom Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvale, T. J.

    2000-12-22

    The main research activity is to study various scattering processes which occur in H{sup -} collisions with atomic (specifically, noble gas and atomic hydrogen) targets in the intermediate energy region. These processes include: elastic scattering, single- and double-electron detachment, and target excitation/ionization.

  6. Light-shift measurement and suppression in atomic spin gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wan, Shuangai; Chen, Yao; Li, Rujie

    2012-11-01

    We present a method to determine and suppress the light shift in an atomic spin gyroscope. This method doesn't require additional drive source or frequency modulation, and it is based on the dynamics of an atomic spin gyroscope to determine a clean curve as a function of the frequency of the pump beam that predicts the zero light shift. We experimentally validate the method in a Cs-(129)Xe atomic spin gyroscope and verify the results through numerical simulations. This method can also be applied to an atomic spin magnetometer based on the spin-exchange relaxation-free exchange that experiences light shift. The method is useful for atomic spin devices because it can improve long-term performance and reduce the influence of the laser.

  7. Measuring the weak value of momentum in a double slit atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, J.; Edmunds, P. D.; Barker, P. F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the development of an experiment to measure the weak value of the transverse momentum operator (local momentum [1]) of cold atoms passing through a matter- wave interferometer. The results will be used to reconstruct the atom's average trajectories. We describe our progress towards this goal using laser cooled argon atoms.

  8. Influence of the atomic mass of the background gas on laser ablation plume propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, Salvatore; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, James G.

    2008-01-01

    A combination of time-of-flight ion probe measurements and gas dynamical modeling has been used to investigate the propagation of a laser ablation plume in gases of different atomic/molecular weight. The pressure variation of the ion time-of-flight was found to be well described by the gas...... dynamical model of Predtechensky and Mayorov (Appl. Supercond. 1:2011, 1993). In particular, the model describes how the pressure required to stop the plume in a given distance depends on the atomic/molecular weight of the gas, which is a feature that cannot be explained by standard point...

  9. Selected Topics from Top Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard [Michigan State U.

    2016-12-07

    The most recent results of the top-quark mass measurements at the Tevatron at Fermilab are presented. Data were collected in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV by the CDF and D0 experiments. Top quark mass measurements in the lepton+jets, dilepton and alljet final states as well as their combination and the extraction of the mass from the cross-section measurement are presented.

  10. Mass measurements and nuclear physics - recent results from ISOLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herfurth, F [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Ames, F [Sektion Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Audi, G [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, 91405 Orsay-Campus (France); Beck, D [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Blaum, K [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Bollen, G [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Kellerbauer, A [Sektion Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kluge, H-J [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kuckein, M [Sektion Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lunney, D [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, 91405 Orsay-Campus (France); Moore, R B [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal (Quebec) H3A 2T8 (Canada); Oinonen, M [Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, PO Box 9, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Rodriguez, D [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Sauvan, E [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Scheidenberger, C [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Schwarz, S [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Sikler, G [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Weber, C [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2003-03-14

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP is a facility for high-precision mass measurements of short-lived radioactive nuclei installed at ISOLDE/CERN in Geneva. More than 200 masses have been measured with relative uncertainties of 1 x 10{sup -7} or even close to 1 x 10{sup -8} in special cases. This publication gives an overview of the measurements performed with ISOLTRAP and discusses some results.

  11. Measurement of Velocity Distribution in Atomic Beam by Diode Laser with Narrow Line width

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jingbiao; WANG Fengzhi; YANG Donghai; WANG YiQiu

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, by using the detecting laser beam interacts with the atomic beam at a sharp angle and the Doppler frequency shift effect, the velocity distribution in cesium atomic beam is measured with a diode laser of narrow linewidth of 1 MHz. The effects of the atomic natural line width and cycling transition detecting factor on the measured results have been analyzed. Finally, the measured results have been compared with the theoretical calculation.

  12. Realization of Arbitrary Positive-Operator-Value Measurement of Single Atomic Qubit via Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yang; WU Wei; WU Chun-Wang; DAI Hong-Yi; LI Cheng-Zu

    2008-01-01

    @@ Positive-operator-value measurement (POVM) is the most general class of quantum measurement.We propose a scheme to deterministically implement arbitrary POVMs of single atomic qubit via cavity QED catalysed by only one ancilla atomic qubit.By appropriately entangling two atomic qubits and sequentially measuring the ancilla qubit, any POVM can be implemented step by step.As an application of our scheme, the realization of a specific POVM for optimal unambiguous discrimination (OUD) between two nonorthogonal states is given.

  13. An improved $\\pi$K atom lifetime measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Yazkov, V

    2016-01-01

    This note describes details of analysis of data samples collected by DIRAC experiment on a Pt target in 2007 and Ni targets in 2008–2010 in order to estimate the lifetime of πK atoms. Experimental results consist of eight distinct data samples: both charge combinations ( π + K − and K + π − atoms) obtained in different experimental conditions corresponding to each year of data taking. Estimations of systematic errors are presented. Taking into account both statistical and systematic uncertainties, the lifetime of πK atoms is estimated by the maximum likelihood method. The above sample comprises the total statistics, available for the analysis, thus the improvement over the previous estimation [1,3] of the πK atom lifetime is achieved.

  14. A new method of alpha ray measurement using a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Iwata, Y; Inoue, Y.; Minowa, M.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new method of alpha($\\alpha$)-ray measurement that detects helium atoms with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer(QMS). A demonstration is undertaken with a plastic-covered $^{241}$Am $\\alpha$-emitting source to detect $\\alpha$-rays stopped in the capsule. We successfully detect helium atoms that diffuse out of the capsule by accumulating them for one to 20 hours in a closed chamber. The detected amount is found to be proportional to the accumulation time. Our method is applicable to p...

  15. Building a multi-walled carbon nanotube-based mass sensor with the atomic force microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Kuhle, A.; Marie, Rodolphe Charly Willy;

    2005-01-01

    We report an approach for building a mass sensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). We propose a method with a great potential for the positioning of MWCNTs based on self-assembly onto patterned hydrophilic areas. For the experiments ultra flat mica substrates covered with gold...... are used. The gold substrate is first covered with hydrophobic thiol molecules: octadecanthiol. The octadecanthiol molecules are then selectively removed from small areas by nanoshaving the gold substrate with the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) operating in contact mode. Hydrophilic thiols (2...

  16. Comparative mass spectrometric analyses of Photofrin oligomers by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, UV and IR matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and laser desorption/jet-cooling photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, M M; Tabei, K; Tsao, R; Pastel, M J; Pandey, R K; Berkenkamp, S; Hillenkamp, F; de Vries, M S

    1999-06-01

    Photofrin (porfimer sodium) is a porphyrin derivative used in the treatment of a variety of cancers by photodynamic therapy. This oligomer complex and a variety of porphyrin monomers, dimers and trimers were analyzed with five different mass spectral ionization techniques: fast atom bombardment, UV and IR matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, electrospray ionization, and laser desorption/jet-cooling photoionization. All five approaches resulted in very similar oligomer distributions with an average oligomer length of 2.7 +/- 0.1 porphyrin units. In addition to the Photofrin analysis, this study provides a side-by-side comparison of the spectra for the five different mass spectrometric techniques.

  17. The mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters: a measurable quantity

    CERN Document Server

    De Boni, Cristiano; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Giocoli, Carlo; Baldi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility of measuring the mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters by using dense galaxy redshift surveys of their outer regions. By approximating the accretion with the infall of a spherical shell, the mass accretion rate only depends on the mass profile of the cluster in a thin shell at radii larger than $R_{200}$. This approximation is rather crude in hierarchical clustering scenarios, where both smooth accretion and aggregation of smaller dark matter haloes contribute to the mass accretion of clusters. Nevertheless, in the redshift range $z=[0,1]$, our prescription returns an average mass accretion rate within $20 \\%$ of the average rate derived with the more realistic merger trees of dark matter haloes extracted from $N$-body simulations. The mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters has been the topic of numerous detailed numerical and theoretical investigations, but so far it has remained inaccessible to measurements in the real Universe. Our result suggests that measuring the mass accreti...

  18. Alternate technique for simultaneous measurement of photoionization cross-section of isotopes by TOF mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Amin, N.; Hussain, S.; Rafiq, M.; Mahmood, S.; Baig, M.A. [Quaid-i-Azam Univ., Dept. of Physics, Atomic and Molecular Physics Lab., Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2006-05-15

    New measurements of photoionization cross-sections of the lithium isotopes are reported employing a Time of Flight -TOF- mass spectrometer in conjunction with an atomic beam apparatus. Using a two-step selective photoionization and saturation technique, we have simultaneously measured the photoionization cross-section of the 2p excited state of both the isotopes Li{sup 6} and Li{sup 7} as 15 {+-} 2.5 Mb and 18 {+-} 2.5 Mb where the corresponding number densities have been determined as N{sub 0} {approx} 5.3*10{sup 10} atoms/cm{sup 3} and N{sub 0} {approx} 6.2*10{sup 11} atoms/cm{sup 3} respectively. (authors)

  19. CryoMPET: the Cryogenic Upgrade to TITAN's Mass Measurement Penning Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistenschneider, Erich; Titan Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Atomic masses are key tools to understand the nature of nuclear forces. With the availability of beams of very exotic species, mass spectroscopy techniques have become more challenging. They need to be faster, more efficient, and still have to provide high enough precision to be of scientific value. The TITAN facility at TRIUMF has been performing precision mass measurements of radioactive nuclei for almost a decade. Its main equipment, the Measurement Penning Trap (MPET), employs the Time-of-Flight Ion Cyclotron Resonance technique to probe atomic masses of ions living as short as 10ms. A powerful way to increase the precision of such technique is to charge-breed the inspected ion, which, in order to prevent charge state decay through a typical measurement cycle, requires trap's vacuum level to be in the order of 1E-11 Torr. Otherwise, the ion's charge state will most likely decay via electron recapture from the trap's background gas. MPET is being redesigned to perform mass measurements of ions at charge states over +20. It will be integrated into a new cryogenic vacuum system and should be ready for commissioning in 2017. We will present the details of TITAN's new CryoMPET upgrade including its design concept and the status of its development.

  20. Time-of-Flight Mass Measurements of Neutron Rich Nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrade, A.; Matos, M.; Amthor, A. M.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Lorusso, G.; Rogers, A.; Schatz, H.; Bazin, D.; Gade, A.; Portillo, M.; Stolz, A.; Galaviz, D.; Pereira, J.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Wallace, M.

    2008-10-01

    Nuclear masses of neutron rich isotopes in the region of Z ˜ 20-30 have been measured using the time-of-flight technique at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). The masses of 5 isotopes have been measured for the first time, and the precision of several other masses has been improved. The time-of-flight technique has shown the potential to access nuclear masses very far from stability when applied at radioactive beam facilities like the NSCL. Such measurements are important for understanding nuclear structure far from the valley of β-stability, and provide valuable information for astrophysical model calculations of processes involving very unstable nuclides.

  1. White Paper: Measuring the Neutrino Mass Hierarchy

    CERN Document Server

    Cahn, R N; Freedman, S J; Haxton, W C; Kadel, R W; Kolomensky, Yu G; Luk, K B; McDonald, P; Gann, G D Orebi; Poon, A W P

    2013-01-01

    This white paper is a condensation of a report by a committee appointed jointly by the Nuclear Science and Physics Divisions at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The goal of this study was to identify the most promising technique(s) for resolving the neutrino mass hierarchy. For the most part, we have relied on calculations and simulations presented by the proponents of the various experiments. We have included evaluations of the opportunities and challenges for these experiments based on what is available already in the literature.

  2. [Atomic force microscopy fishing of gp120 on immobilized aptamer and its mass spectrometry identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukharina, N S; Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Frantsuzov, P A; Andreeva, E Yu; Kaysheva, A L; Izotov, A A; Pavlova, T I; Ziborov, V S; Radko, S P; Archakov, A I

    2015-01-01

    A method of atomic force microscopy-based fishing (AFM fishing) has been developed for protein detection in the analyte solution using a chip with an immobilized aptamer. This method is based on the biospecific fishing of a target protein from a bulk solution onto the small AFM chip area with the immobilized aptamer to this protein used as the molecular probe. Such aptamer-based approach allows to increase an AFM image contrast compared to the antibody-based approach. Mass spectrometry analysis used after the biospecific fishing to identify the target protein on the AFM chip has proved complex formation. Use of the AFM chip with the immobilized aptamer avoids interference of the antibody and target protein peaks in a mass spectrum.

  3. Measuring atomic NOON-states and using them to make precision measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hallwood, David W; Cooper, Jessica J; Dunningham, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    A scheme for creating NOON-states of the quasi-momentum of ultra-cold atoms has recently been proposed [New J. Phys. 8, 180 (2006)]. This was achieved by trapping the atoms in an optical lattice in a ring configuration and rotating the potential at a rate equal to half a quantum of angular momentum . In this paper we present a scheme for confirming that a NOON-state has indeed been created. This is achieved by spectroscopically mapping out the anti-crossing between the ground and first excited levels by modulating the rate at which the potential is rotated. Finally we show how the NOON-state can be used to make precision measurements of rotation.

  4. Measuring atomic NOON-states and using them to make precision measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallwood, David W; Stokes, Adam; Cooper, Jessica J; Dunningham, Jacob [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: dwhallwood@googlemail.com

    2009-10-15

    A scheme for creating NOON-states of the quasi-momentum of ultra-cold atoms has recently been proposed (2006 New J. Phys. 8 180). This was achieved by trapping the atoms in an optical lattice in a ring configuration and rotating the potential at a rate equal to half a quantum of angular momentum. In this paper, we present a scheme for confirming that a NOON-state has indeed been created. This is achieved by spectroscopically mapping out the anti-crossing between the ground and first excited levels by modulating the rate at which the potential is rotated. Finally, we show how the NOON-state can be used to make precision measurements of rotation.

  5. Results of the First TOF Mass Measurements at NSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, M.; Estrade, A.; Amthor, M.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Galaviz, D.; Gade, A.; Lorusso, G.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A.; Schatz, H.; Stolz, A.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Wallace, M.

    2008-04-01

    Time-of-Flight mass measurements technique, recently developed at the NSCL, MSU, was used to measure masses of exotic neutron-rich nuclides in the Fe region, important for r-process calculations as well as for calculations of processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars. Results from the experiment will be presented and discussed.

  6. Finding the Density of Objects without Measuring Mass and Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumba, Frackson; Tsige, Mesfin

    2007-01-01

    A simple method based on the moment of forces and Archimedes' principle is described for finding density without measuring the mass and volume of an object. The method involves balancing two unknown objects of masses M[subscript 1] and M[subscript 2] on each side of a pivot on a metre rule and measuring their corresponding moment arms. The object…

  7. Velocity distribution measurements in atomic beams generated using laser induced back-ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Denning, A; Lee, S; Ammonson, M; Bergeson, S D

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of calcium atoms in an atomic beam generated using a dual-stage laser back-ablation apparatus. Distributions are measured using a velocity selective Doppler time-of-flight technique. They are Boltzmann-like with rms velocities corresponding to temperatures above the melting point for calcium. Contrary to a recent report in the literature, this method does not generate a sub-thermal atomic beam.

  8. High mass-resolution electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core-excited organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tokushima, T; Senba, Y; Yoshida, H; Hiraya, A

    2001-01-01

    Total electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core excited organic molecules have been carried out with high mass resolution by using multimode (reflectron/linear) time-of-flight mass analyzer. From the ion correlation spectra of core excited CH sub 3 OH and CD sub 3 OH, the reaction pathway to form H sub 3 sup + (D sub 3 sup +) is identified as the elimination of three H (D) atoms from the methyl group, not as the inter-group (-CH sub 3 and -OH) interactions. In a PEPIPICO spectrum of acetylacetone (CH sub 3 COCH sub 2 COCH sub 3) measured by using a reflectron TOF, correlations between ions up to mass number 70 with one-mass resolution was recorded.

  9. Precision Mass Measurements beyond $^{132}$Sn: Anomalous behaviour of odd-even staggering of binding energies

    CERN Document Server

    Hakala, J; Gorelov, D; Eronen, T; Jokinen, A; Kankainen, A; Kolhinen, V S; Kortelainen, M; Moore, I D; Penttilä, H; Rinta-Antila, S; Rissanen, J; Saastamoinen, A; Sonnenschein, V; Äystö, J

    2012-01-01

    Atomic masses of the neutron-rich isotopes $^{121-128}$Cd, $^{129,131}$In, $^{130-135}$Sn, $^{131-136}$Sb, and $^{132-140}$Te have been measured with high precision (10 ppb) using the Penning trap mass spectrometer JYFLTRAP. Among these, the masses of four r-process nuclei $^{135}$Sn, $^{136}$Sb, and $^{139,140}$Te were measured for the first time. The data reveals a strong $N$=82 shell gap at $Z$=50 but indicates the importance of correlations for $Z>50$. An empirical neutron pairing gap expressed as the odd-even staggering of isotopic masses shows a strong quenching across $N$=82 for Sn, with the $Z$-dependence that is unexplainable by the current theoretical models.

  10. Mass Measurements Demonstrate a Strong N =28 Shell Gap in Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Meisel, Z; Ahn, S; Browne, J; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Carpino, J F; Chung, H; Cyburt, R H; Estradé, A; Famiano, M; Gade, A; Langer, C; Matoš, M; Mittig, W; Montes, F; Morrissey, D J; Pereira, J; Schatz, H; Schatz, J; Scott, M; Shapira, D; Smith, K; Stevens, J; Tan, W; Tarasov, O; Towers, S; Wimmer, K; Winkelbauer, J R; Yurkon, J; Zegers, R G T

    2015-01-01

    We present results from recent time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. We report the first mass measurements of 48Ar and 49Ar and find atomic mass excesses of -22.28(31) MeV and -17.8(1.1) MeV, respectively. These masses provide strong evidence for the closed shell nature of neutron number N=28 in argon, which is therefore the lowest even-Z element exhibiting the N=28 closed shell. The resulting trend in binding-energy differences, which probes the strength of the N=28 shell, compares favorably with shellmodel calculations in the sd-pf shell using SDPF-U and SDPF-MU Hamiltonians.

  11. Towards direct mass measurements of nobelium at SHIPTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Blaum, K.; Eliseev, S.; Herfurth, S.; Hebberger, F.P.; Hofmann, S.; Kluge, H.J.; Maero, G.; Martin, A.; Mazzocco, M.; Mukherjee, M.; Quint, W.; Rahaman, S.; Rauth, C.; Scheidenberger, C.; Vorobjev, G.; Weber, C. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Blaum, K.; Ferrer, R.; Weber, C. [Johannes-Gutenberg-Univ., Institut fur Physik, Mainz (Germany); Chaudhuri, A.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Univ., Institut fur Physik, Greifswald (Germany); Eliseev, S.; Vorobjev, G. [Saint Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Di, Z.; Plab, W.R.; Scheidenberger, C. [Justus-Liebig-Univ., Physikalisches Institut, Gieben (Germany); Habs, D.; Neumayr, J.B.; Thirolf, P.G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Munchen, Dept. fur Physik, Garching (Germany); Kluge, H.J. [Ruprecht-Karls-Univ., Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Rodruguez, D. [IN2P3, LPC-ENSICAEN, 14 - Caen (France)

    2007-10-15

    The Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP allows precision mass measurements of rare isotopes produced in fusion-evaporation reactions. In the first period of operation the masses of more than 50 neutron-deficient radionuclides have been measured. In this paper the perspectives for direct mass measurements of rare isotopes around nobelium are discussed and the achievable precision is addressed. The temporal stability of the magnetic field, an important issue for the long measurement times resulting from the low production rates, was investigated and the time-dependent uncertainty due to magnetic field fluctuations was determined. Based on the present performance direct mass measurements of nobelium isotopes are already feasible. With several technical improvements heavier elements between Z=102-105 will be in reach. (authors)

  12. Atomic force microscopy fishing and mass spectrometry identification of gp120 on immobilized aptamers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov YD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuri D Ivanov,1 Natalia S Bukharina,1 Tatyana O Pleshakova,1 Pavel A Frantsuzov,1 Elena Yu Andreeva,1 Anna L Kaysheva,1,2 Victor G Zgoda,1 Alexander A Izotov,1 Tatyana I Pavlova,1 Vadim S Ziborov,1 Sergey P Radko,1 Sergei A Moshkovskii,1 Alexander I Archakov1 1Department of Personalized Medicine, Orekhovich Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, Russia; 2PostgenTech Ltd., Moscow, Russia Abstract: Atomic force microscopy (AFM was applied to carry out direct and label-free detection of gp120 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein as a target protein. This approach was based on the AFM fishing of gp120 from the analyte solution using anti-gp120 aptamers immobilized on the AFM chip to count gp120/aptamer complexes that were formed on the chip surface. The comparison of image contrasts of fished gp120 against the background of immobilized aptamers and anti-gp120 antibodies on the AFM images was conducted. It was shown that an image contrast of the protein/aptamer complexes was two-fold higher than the contrast of the protein/antibody complexes. Mass spectrometry identification provided an additional confirmation of the target protein presence on the AFM chips after biospecific fishing to avoid any artifacts. Keywords: gp120 HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, aptamer, atomic force microscopy, mass spectrometry

  13. High-Precision Mass Measurements of Exotic Nuclei with the Triple-Trap Mass Spectrometer Isoltrap

    CERN Multimedia

    Blaum, K; Zuber, K T; Stanja, J

    2002-01-01

    The masses of close to 200 short-lived nuclides have already been measured with the mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP with a relative precision between 1$\\times$10$^{-7}$ and 1$\\times$10^{-8}$. The installatin of a radio-frequency quadrupole trap increased the overall efficiency by two orders of magnitude which is at present about 1%. In a recent upgrade, we installed a carbon cluster laser ion source, which will allow us to use carbon clusters as mass references for absolute mass measurements. Due to these improvements and the high reliability of ISOLTRAP we are now able to perform accurate high-precision mass measurements all over the nuclear chart. We propose therefore mass measurements on light, medium and heavy nuclides on both sides of the valley of stability in the coming four years. ISOLTRAP is presently the only instrument capable of the high precision required for many of the proposed studies.

  14. Spatially resolved atomic and molecular emission from the very low-mass star IRS54

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, R Garcia; Weigelt, G; Nisini, B; Antoniucci, S

    2013-01-01

    Molecular outflows from very low-mass stars (VLMSs) and brown dwarfs (BDs) have been studied very little, and only a few objects have been directly imaged. Using VLT SINFONI K-band observations, we spatially resolved, for the first time, the H2 emission around IRS54, a ~0.1-0.2 Msun Class I source. The molecular emission shows a complex structure delineating a large outflow cavity and an asymmetric molecular jet. In addition, new [FeII] VLT ISAAC observations at 1.644um allowed us to discover the atomic jet counterpart which extends down to the central source. The outflow structure is similar to those found in low-mass Class I young stellar objects (YSOs) and Classical TTauri stars (CTTSs). However, its Lacc/Lbol ratio is very high (~80%), and the derived mass accretion rate is about one order of magnitude higher than in objects with similar mass, pointing to the young nature of the investigated source.

  15. European scientists produce - and measure - atoms of antihydrogen

    CERN Multimedia

    Koppel, N

    2002-01-01

    "Scientists working on an experiment called ATRAP at the European Particle Physics Laboratory, or CERN, said Tuesday that they were able to register the creation of antihydrogen atoms at the moment when they were destroyed again. The results are to be published in the journal Physical Review Letters" (1 page).

  16. Atom-Probe Measurements of Meteoritic Nanodiamonds and Terrestrial Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. B.; Isheim, D.; Floss, C.; Daulton, T. L.; Seidman, D. N.; Heck, P. R.; Davis, A. M.; Pellin, M. J.; Savina, M. R.; Hiller, J.; Mane, A.; Elam, J. W.; Stephan, T.

    2013-09-01

    We present new data from the novel application of atom-probe tomography to the study of nanodiamonds from the meteorite Allende. The mean meteoritic ^12C/^13C peak ratio is higher than that of our standards, but there are instrumental artifacts.

  17. Recent Top quark properties measurements (excluding mass and asymmetrie)

    CERN Document Server

    Homann, Michael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In this talk the newest results of top quark properties (excluding mass and asymmetry) measurements from LHC and Tevatron collaborations are presented. Measurement of spin correlation and top polarization give information about the production of top quarks whereas W-Boson helicity measurements and measurements of anomalous couplings give information about the decay mechanisms of top quarks.

  18. Alternative methods for top quark mass measurements at the CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The top quark mass is a fundamental parameter of the standard model and together with the W boson mass and the Higgs boson mass it provides a strong self-consistency check of the electroweak theory. Recently several new measurements of the top quark mass using alternative observables and reconstruction methods are performed by the CMS collaborations at the CERN LHC. Alternative methods can give a insight by providing different systematic sensitivities while standard ones are currently limited by jet energy uncertainties. We introduce various results from new methods including the one using a charmed meson, which are found to be consistent with what is obtained in standard measurements.

  19. A pilot experiment for mass measurement at CSRe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TU Xiao-Lin; XU Hu-Shan; XIA Jia-Wen; WANG Meng; MAO Rui-Shi; YUAN You-Jin; HU Zheng-Guo; LIU Yong; ZHANG Hong-Bin; ZANG Yong-Dong; ZHAO Tie-Cheng; ZHANG Xue-Ying; FU Fen; YANG Jian-Cheng; MAO Li-Jun; XIAO Chen; XIAO Guo-Qing; ZHAO Hong-Wei; ZHAN Wen-Long

    2009-01-01

    A pilot experiment of mass measurement was performed at CSRe with the method of isochronous mass spectrometry. The secondary fragments produced via RIBLL2 with the primary beam of 400 MeV/u 36Ar delivered by CSRm were injected into CSRe. The revolution periods of the stored ions, which depend on the mass-to-charge ratios of the stored ions, were measured with a time-of-flight detector system. The results show that the mass resolution around 8×10-6 for Δm/m is achieved.

  20. Measurement of Spatial Distribution of Cold Atoms in An Integrating Sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xucheng; Xiao, Ling; Meng, Yanling; Liu, Liang; Wang, Yuzhu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present an experiment to measure the spatial distribution of cold atoms in a ceramic integrating sphere. An quadrupole field is applied after the atoms are cooled by diffuse light produced in the ceramic integrating sphere, thus the shift of atomic magnetic sub-levels are position-dependent. We move the anti-Helmholtz coil horizontally while keeping the probe laser beam resonant with the cold atoms at the zero magnetic field. The absorption of the probe beam gives the number of cold atoms at different position. The results show that at the center of the integrating sphere, less atoms exist due to the leakage of diffuse light into the hole connecting to the vacuum pump. The method we developed in this paper is useful to detect cold atoms in a region where imaging is not possible.

  1. Measurement of Spatial Distribution of Cold Atoms in an Integrating Sphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xu-Cheng; CHENG Hua-Dong; XIAO Ling; ZHENG Ben-Chang; MENG Yan-Ling; LIU Liang; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    We present an experiment on the measurement of the spatial distribution of cold atoms in a ceramic cell. The atoms are first cooled by diffusing light produced by multiple scattering of laser light at the inner surface of the cell. An inhomogeneous magnetic field is applied after the atoms are cooled by using a pair of anti-Helmholtz coils, and thus the shift of atomic magnetic sub-levels is position-dependent. We move the anti-Helmholtz coils point by point while keeping the probe laser beam resonant with the cold atoms at zero magnetic field. The number of cold atoms at different positions can be extracted by detecting the absorption to the probe beam. The density of the cold atoms in the cell is measured in two dimensions perpendicular and parallel to the tube connecting to the vacuum system, respectively. The results show that at the center of the cell, fewer atoms exist due to the leakage of diffuse light into the hole connecting to the vacuum pump. The method we developed is used to detect cold atoms in a region where imaging is impossible.%We present an experiment on the measurement of the spatial distribution of cold atoms in a ceramic cell.The atoms are first cooled by diffusing light produced by multiple scattering of laser light at the inner surface of the cell.An inhomogeneous magnetic field is applied after the atoms are cooled by using a pair of anti-Helmholtz coils,and thus the shift of atomic magnetic sub-levels is position-dependent.We move the anti-Helmholtz coils point by point while keeping the probe laser beam resonant with the cold atoms at zero magnetic field.The number of cold atoms at different positions can be extracted by detecting the absorption to the probe beam.The density of the cold atoms in the cell is measured in two dimensions perpendicular and parallel to the tube connecting to the vacuum system,respectively.The results show that at the center of the cell,fewer atoms exist due to the leakage of diffuse light into the hole

  2. Top-quark mass measurements using jet rates at LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moch S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new method to measure the top-quark mass in hadronic collisions[1]. The method uses the sensitivity of the tt¯+1$tar t + 1$-jet production on the top-quark mass. In detail we study the ℛ distribution defined as the tt¯+1$tar t + 1$-jet normalized cross section differential in the invariant mass of the total system and calculated at NLO accuracy. We prove that the ℛ distribution has a high sensitivity to the top-quark mass. Furthermore we investigate and quantify the impact of the dominant theoretical and experimental uncertainties. The results obtained show, that the method has the potential to be competitive in precision with established approaches and allows a complementary measurement of the top-quark mass at hadron colliders. We emphasize that in the proposed method the mass parameter is uniquely defined through one-loop renormalization.

  3. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17)/cu cm. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  4. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  5. Mass Measurement of Very Short Half-Lived Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    Duma, M; Iacob, V E; Thibault, C

    2002-01-01

    The MISTRAL (Mass measurements at ISolde with a Transmission RAdiofrequency spectrometer on-Line) experiment exploits a rapid measurement technique to make accurate mass determinations of very short-lived nuclei. The physics goals are to elucidate new nuclear structure effects and constrain nuclear mass models in regions of interest to nuclear astrophysics.\\\\ \\\\The spectrometer, installed in May 97, performed as promised in the proposal with mass resolution exceeding 100,000. In its first experiment in July 1998, neutron-rich Na isotopes having half-lives as short as 31 ms were measured. A second experiment in November 1998 enabled us to improve the measurement precision of the isotopes $^{26-30}$Na to about 20 keV. The measurement program continues as experiment IS 373.

  6. Measurements of the top quark mass at ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Mirman, Nathan Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    We present recent measurements of the top quark mass by the ATLAS and CMS experiments in the t-tbar lepton+jets, all-hadronic, and dilepton channels. In addition, we present a measurement utilizing a topology enriched in t-channel single top events. The analyses include observables whose sensitivity to the top mass is calibrated using Monte Carlo simulation before they are utilized to extract the value of mt in data. The measurements outlined here enter into recent combinations by ATLAS and CMS that yield a sub-GeV precision on the top mass.

  7. From direct to absolute mass measurements a study of the accuracy of ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerbauer, A G; Bollen, G; Herfurth, F; Kluge, H J; Kuckein, M; Sauvan, E; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L

    2003-01-01

    For a detailed study of the accuracy of the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP all expected sources of uncertainty were investigated with respect to their contributions to the uncertainty of the final result. In the course of these investigations, cross-reference measurements with singly charged carbon clusters $^{12}$C$^{+}_{n}$ were carried out. The carbon cluster ions were produced by use of laser-induced desorption, fragmentation, and ionization of C$_{60}$ fullerenes and injected into and stored in the Penning trap system. The comparison of the cyclotron frequencies of different carbon clusters has provided detailed insight into the residual systematic uncertainty of \\acro{ISOLTRAP} and yielded a value of $8 \\cdot 10^{-9}$. This also represents the current limit of mass accuracy of the apparatus. Since the unified atomic mass unit is defined as 1/12 of the mass of the $^{12}$C atom, it will be possible to carry out absolute mass measurements with \\acro{ISOLTRAP} in the future.\\\\[1\\baselineskip] PACS...

  8. Toward a Fieldable Atomic Mass Spectrometer for Safeguards Applications: Sample Preparation and Ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Jones, Sarah MH; Manard, Benjamin T.

    2014-10-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) long-term research and development plan calls for the development of new methods to detect misuse at nuclear fuel cycle facilities such as reprocessing and enrichment plants. At enrichment plants, for example, the IAEA’s contemporary safeguards approaches are based on a combination of routine and random inspections that include collection of UF6 samples from in-process material and selected cylinders for subsequent analyses. These analyses include destructive analysis (DA) in a laboratory (typically by mass spectrometry [MS]) for isotopic characterization, and environmental sampling (ES) for subsequent laboratory elemental and isotopic analysis (also both typically by MS). One area of new method development includes moving this kind of isotope ratio analytical capability for DA and ES activities into the field. Some of the reasons for these developments include timeliness of results, avoidance of hazardous material shipments, and guidance for additional sample collecting. However, this capability does not already exist for several reasons, such as that most lab-based chemical and instrumental methods rely on laboratory infrastructure (highly trained staff, power, space, hazardous material handling, etc.) and require significant amounts of consumables (power, compressed gases, etc.). In addition, there are no currently available, fieldable instruments for atomic or isotope ratio analysis. To address these issues, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and collaborator, Clemson University, are studying key areas that limit the fieldability of isotope ratio mass spectrometry for atomic ions: sample preparation and ionization, and reducing the physical size of a fieldable mass spectrometer. PNNL is seeking simple and robust techniques that could be effectively used by inspectors who may have no expertise in analytical MS. In this report, we present and describe the preliminary findings for three candidate

  9. Ion heating during geomagnetic storms measured using energetic neutral atom imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesee, Amy; Elfritz, Justin; Katus, Roxanne; Scime, Earl

    2015-11-01

    Energy from the solar wind is deposited into the magnetosphere during geomagnetic storms. Much of this energy is deposited into the plasma sheet, driving phenomena that leads to heating. The plasma sheet ions are then injected to the inner magnetosphere, driving the ring current. While ions can undergo adiabatic heating during typical drift motion, collisional and wave-particle interactions can also lead to ion heating. A technique to measure ion temperatures using energetic neutral atom (ENA) data has been developed using ENA data from the Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission global maps of ion temperature during the evolution of geomagnetic storms are made. These maps exhibit the location and characteristics of regions of ion heating and during which storm phase they occur. Superposed epoch analyses of such maps have demonstrated typical characteristics of ion heating during storms driven by coronal mass ejections as compared to those driven by high speed solar wind streams. The temperatures have been used to establish boundary conditions for modeling of the inner magnetosphere. We will give an overview of recent studies using TWINS ion temperature maps. Work supported by NNX10AN08A and AGS-1113478.

  10. Mass Measurements on Short-Lived Nuclides with ISOLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollen, G. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (United States); Ames, F. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Audi, G. [Universite Paris-Sud, CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS (France); Beck, D.; Dilling, J. [GSI (Germany); Engels, O. [LMU (Germany); Henry, S. [Universite Paris-Sud, CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS (France); Herfurth, F.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kohl, A.; Lamour, E. [GSI (Germany); Lunney, D. [Universite Paris-Sud, CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS (France); Moore, R. B. [LMU (Germany); Oinonen, M. [CERN, EP Division (Switzerland); Scheidenberger, C. [GSI (Germany); Schwarz, S. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (United States); Sikler, G. [GSI (Germany); Szerypo, J. [JYFL (Finland); Weber, C. [GSI (Germany)

    2001-01-15

    Penning trap mass spectrometry has reached a state that allows its application to very short-lived nuclides available from various sources of radioactive beams. Mass values with outstanding accuracy are achieved even far from stability. This paper illustrates the state of the art by summarizing the status of the ISOLTRAP experiment at ISOLDE/CERN. Furthermore, results of mass measurements on unstable rare earth isotopes will be given.

  11. The Kilogram and Measurements of Mass and Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Z J; Yaniv, S L

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the facilities, measurement capabilities, and ongoing research activities in the areas of mass and force at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The first section of the paper is devoted to mass metrology and starts with a brief historical perspective on the developments that led to the current definition of the kilogram. An overview of mass measurement procedures is given with a brief discussion of current research on alternative materials for mass standards and surface profiles of the U.S. national prototype kilograms. A brief outlook into the future possible redefinition of the unit of mass based on fundamental principles is included. The second part of this paper focuses on the unit of force and describes the realization of the unit, measurement procedures, uncertainty in the realized force, facilities, and current efforts aimed at the realization of small forces.

  12. Precision mass measurements on neutron-rich Zn isotopes and their consequences on the astrophysical r-process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baruah, Sudarshan

    2008-07-15

    The rapid neutron-capture or the r-process is responsible for the origin of about half of the neutron-rich atomic nuclei in the universe heavier than iron. For the calculation of the abundances of those nuclei, atomic masses are required as one of the input parameters with very high precision. In the present work, the masses of the neutron rich Zn isotopes (A=71 to 81) lying in the r-process path have been measured in the ISOLTRAP experiment at ISOLDE/CERN. The mass of {sup 81}Zn has been measured directly for the rst time. The half-lives of the nuclides ranged from 46.5 h ({sup 72}Zn) down to 290 ms ({sup 81}Zn). In case of all the nuclides, the relative mass uncertainty ({delta}m=m) achieved was in the order of 10{sup -8} corresponding to a 100-fold improvement in precision over previous measurements. (orig.)

  13. Inertial rotation measurement with atomic spins: From angular momentum conservation to quantum phase theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Yuan, H.; Tang, Z.; Quan, W.; Fang, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Rotation measurement in an inertial frame is an important technology for modern advanced navigation systems and fundamental physics research. Inertial rotation measurement with atomic spin has demonstrated potential in both high-precision applications and small-volume low-cost devices. After rapid development in the last few decades, atomic spin gyroscopes are considered a promising competitor to current conventional gyroscopes—from rate-grade to strategic-grade applications. Although it has been more than a century since the discovery of the relationship between atomic spin and mechanical rotation by Einstein [Naturwissenschaften, 3(19) (1915)], research on the coupling between spin and rotation is still a focus point. The semi-classical Larmor precession model is usually adopted to describe atomic spin gyroscope measurement principles. More recently, the geometric phase theory has provided a different view of the rotation measurement mechanism via atomic spin. The theory has been used to describe a gyroscope based on the nuclear spin ensembles in diamond. A comprehensive understanding of inertial rotation measurement principles based on atomic spin would be helpful for future applications. This work reviews different atomic spin gyroscopes and their rotation measurement principles with a historical overlook. In addition, the spin-rotation coupling mechanism in the context of the quantum phase theory is presented. The geometric phase is assumed to be the origin of the measurable rotation signal from atomic spins. In conclusion, with a complete understanding of inertial rotation measurements using atomic spin and advances in techniques, wide application of high-performance atomic spin gyroscopes is expected in the near future.

  14. Scheme for teleportation of an unknown atomic state without the Bell-state measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Liu; Guo, Guang-Can

    2004-11-01

    We propose a scheme for teleporting an unknown atomic state in cavity QED. Our scheme does not involve the Bell-state measurement. During the interaction between atom and cavity, the cavity is only virtually excited and thus the scheme is insensitive to the cavity field states and cavity decay. The idea can also be used in the case of teleporting an unknown atomic entangled state.

  15. Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, 10-Earth Mass Planet and Its Host Star

    CERN Document Server

    Muraki, Y; Bennett, D P; Suzuki, D; Monard, L A G; Street, R; Jorgensen, U G; Kundurthy, P; Skowron, J; Becker, A C; Albrow, M D; Fouque, P; Heyrovsky, D; Barry, R K; Beaulieu, J -P; Wellnitz, D D; Bond, I A; Sumi, T; Dong, S; Gaudi, B S; Bramich, D M; Dominik, M; Abe, F; Botzler, C S; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Hayashi, F; Hearnshaw, J B; Hosaka, S; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A V; Kilmartin, P M; Lin, W; Ling, C H; Makita, S; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Nishimoto, K; Ohnishi, K; Perrott, Y C; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sweatman, W L; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Christie, G W; DePoy, D L; Gorbikov, E; Gould, A; Kaspi, S; Lee, C -U; Mallia, F; Maoz, D; McCormick, J; Moorhouse, D; Natusch, T; Park, B -G; Pogge, R W; Polishook, D; Shporer, A; Thornley, G; Yee, J C; Allan, A; Browne, P; Horne, K; Kains, N; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Batista, V; Bennett, C S; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cassan, A; Cole, A; Corrales, R; Coutures, Ch; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Greenhill, J; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Martin, R; Menzies, J; Sahu, K C; Waldman, I; Zub, A Williams M; Bourhrous, H; Matsuoka, Y; Nagayama, T; Oi, N; Randriamanakoto, Z; Bozza, V; Burgdorf, M J; Novati, S Calchi; Dreizler, S; Finet, F; Glitrup, M; Harpsoe, K; Hinse, T C; Hundertmark, M; Liebig, C; Maier, G; Mancini, L; Mathiasen, M; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Surdej, J; Southworth, J; Wambsganss, J; Zimmer, F; Udalski, A; Poleski, R; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, made with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of m_p = 10.4 +- 1.7 Earth masses and orbits a star of mass M_* = 0.56 +- 0.09 Solar masses at a semi-major axis of a = 3.2 (+1.9 -0.5) AU and an orbital period of P = 7.6 (+7.7 -1.5} yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are enabled by the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect, which is seen primarily in the light curve distortion due to the orbital motion of the Earth. But, the analysis also demonstrates the capability to measure microlensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a "failed" gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the preval...

  16. Top Quark Mass Measurement from Dilepton Events at CDF II

    CERN Document Server

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; D'onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J; Di Turo, P; Dorr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; García, J E; Garcia Sciverez, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D A; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Yu; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimarães da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P F; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Mäki, T; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Papikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Van Remortel, N; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Sjölin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Söderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Saint-Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A W; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobuev, I P; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-01-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass using events collected by the CDF II Detector from ppbar collisions at \\sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We calculate a likelihood function for the top mass in events that are consistent with ttbar->bbar l^- \

  17. Measurement of the W boson mass at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A measurement of the mass of the $W$ boson is presented based on proton–proton collision data recorded in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, and corresponding to 4.6 fb$^{−1}$ of integrated luminosity.

  18. Towards an extension of 1905 relativistic dynamics with a variable rest mass measuring potential energy

    CERN Document Server

    Hidalgo-Gato, Rafael A Valls

    2012-01-01

    From a rigorous historic analysis of 1686 I. Newton and 1905 A. Einstein works where the last derived the universal mass-energy relationship, it is concluded that rest mass measures potential energy. From the same formula used to obtain that relation, it is derived the ratio Total Energy/Potential Energy is equal to the gamma relativistic factor. It is derived a formula for the variation of a body rest mass with its position in a gravity field, explaining with it the behavior of an atomic clock. It is revised the bodies free fall in a gravitational field, finding that a constant total mass is equal to the gravitational mass, while the variable rest mass is equal to the inertial mass, maintaining all an identical behavior independent of their masses. A revision of the E\\"otv\\"os experiment concludes that it is unable to detect the found difference between inertial and gravitational mass. Applying the extended 1905 relativistic dynamics to Mercury, its perihelion shift is determined; it is concluded with the co...

  19. Atomic mass dependence of hadron production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Li-Hua; LIU Na; DUAN Chun-Gui

    2013-01-01

    Hadron production in lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering is studied in a quark energy loss model.The leading-order computations for hadron multiplicity ratios are presented and compared with the selected HERMES pions production data with the quark hadronization occurring outside the nucleus by means of the hadron formation time.It is found that the obtained energy loss per unit length is 0.440±0.013 GeV/fm for an outgoing quark by the global fit.It is confirmed that the atomic mass number dependence of hadron attenuation is theoretically and experimentally in good agreement with the A2/3 power law for quark hadronization occurring outside the nucleus.

  20. Determination of mercury in hair: Comparison between gold amalgamation-atomic absorption spectrometry and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanico, Francesco; Forte, Giovanni; Majorani, Costanza; Senofonte, Oreste; Petrucci, Francesco; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Alimonti, Alessandro

    2016-09-29

    Mercury is a heavy metal that causes serious health problems in exposed subjects. The most toxic form, i.e., methylmercury (MeHg), is mostly excreted through human hair. Numerous analytical methods are available for total Hg analysis in human hair, including cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal decomposition amalgamation atomic absorption spectrometry (TDA-AAS). The aim of the study was to compare the TDA-AAS with the ICP-MS in the Hg quantification in human hair. After the washing procedure to minimize the external contamination, from each hair sample two aliquots were taken; the first was used for direct analysis of Hg by TDA-AAS and the second was digested for Hg determination by the ICP-MS. Results indicated that the two data sets were fully comparable (median; TDA-AAS, 475ngg(-1); ICP-MS, 437ngg(-1)) and were not statistically different (Mann-Whitney test; p=0.44). The two techniques presented results with a good coefficient of correlation (r=0.94) despite different operative ranges and method limits. Both techniques satisfied internal performance requirements and the parameters for method validation resulting sensitive, precise and reliable. Finally, the use of the TDA-AAS can be considered instead of the ICP-MS in hair analysis in order to reduce sample manipulation with minor risk of contamination, less time consuming due to the absence of the digestion step and cheaper analyses.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of gravity acceleration and gravity gradient with an atom interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrentino, F.; Lien, Y.-H.; Rosi, G.; Tino, G. M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, Universita di Firenze, INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bertoldi, A. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, F-91127 Palaiseau cedex (France); Bodart, Q. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, Universita di Firenze, INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); European Space Agency, Research and Scientific Support Department, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Cacciapuoti, L. [European Space Agency, Research and Scientific Support Department, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Angelis, M. de [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' CNR, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Prevedelli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126, Bologna (Italy)

    2012-09-10

    We demonstrate a method to measure the gravitational acceleration with a dual cloud atom interferometer; the use of simultaneous atom interferometers reduces the effect of seismic noise on the gravity measurement. At the same time, the apparatus is capable of accurate measurements of the vertical gravity gradient. The ability to determine the gravity acceleration and gravity gradient simultaneously and with the same instrument opens interesting perspectives in geophysical applications.

  2. Selenosugar determination in porcine liver using multidimensional HPLC with atomic and molecular mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; Pergantis, Spiros A

    2009-01-01

    A methodology based on liquid chromatography coupled online with atomic and molecular mass spectrometry was developed for identifying trace amounts of the selenosugar methyl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-1-seleno-β-D-galactopyranoside (SeGalNAc) in porcine liver, obtained from an animal that had not received selenium supplementation. Sample preparation was especially critical for the identification of SeGalNAc by molecular mass spectrometry. This involved liver extraction using a Tris buffer, followed by sequential centrifugations. The resulting cytosolic fraction was pre-concentrated and the low molecular weight selenium (LMWSe) fraction obtained from a size exclusion column was collected, concentrated, and subsequently analyzed using a tandem dual-column HPLC-ICP-MS system which consisted of strong cation exchange (SCX) and reversed phase (RP) columns coupled in tandem. Hepatocytosolic SeGalNAc was tentatively identified by retention time matching and spiking. Its identity was further confirmed by using the same type of chromatography on-line with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry operated in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Four SRM transitions, characteristic of SeGalNAc, were monitored and their intensity ratios determined in order to confirm SeGalNAc identification. Instrument limits of detection for SeGalNAc by SCX-RP HPLC-ICP-MS and SCX-RP HPLC-APCI-MS/MS were 3.4 and 2.9 μg Se L(-1), respectively. Selenium mass balance analysis revealed that trace amounts of SeGalNAc, 2.16±0.94 μg Se kg(-1) liver (wet weight) were present in the liver cytosol, corresponding to 0.4% of the total Se content in the porcine liver.

  3. Measurement of boron isotopes by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The isobaric interference for boron isotopic measurement by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry (NTIMS) has been studied. The result shows that the CNO- is not only from the organic material, but also from nitrate in loading reagent in NTIMS. Monitoring the mass 43 ion intensity and 43/42 ratio of blank are also necessary for the boron isotopic measurement by NTIMS, other than is only boron content.

  4. Back action evading quantum measurement of motion in a negative mass reference frame

    CERN Document Server

    Møller, Christoffer B; Vasilakis, Georgios; Zeuthen, Emil; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Jensen, Kasper; Schliesser, Albert; Hammerer, Klemens; Polzik, Eugene S

    2016-01-01

    Quantum mechanics dictates that a measurement without perturbation is not possible. A textbook example is the observation of the position of an object, which imposes a random back action perturbation on the momentum. This randomness translates with time into position uncertainty, thus leading to the well known uncertainty on the measurement of motion. Here we demonstrate that the back action on an oscillator measured in a reference frame of another oscillator with an effective negative mass can be evaded in both position and momentum variables simultaneously. The mechanical oscillator is a millimeter-sized membrane and the reference negative mass oscillator is the collective spin of an atomic ensemble precessing in a magnetic field. Laser light transmitted through the hybrid system of these two disparate oscillators serves as the meter. We first observe the quantum measurement back action on each oscillator. We then demonstrate that back action at the single noise photon level is efficiently suppressed or enh...

  5. Development of atomic-beam resonance method to measure the nuclear moments of unstable nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, T., E-mail: sugimoto@ribf.riken.jp [SPring-8 (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Kawamura, H.; Murata, J. [Rikkyo University, Department of Physics (Japan); Nagae, D.; Shimada, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Ueno, H.; Yoshimi, A. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    We have been working on the development of a new technique of atomic-beam resonance method to measure the nuclear moments of unstable nuclei. In the present study, an ion-guiding system to be used as an atomic-beam source have been developed.

  6. Precise measurements of the $W$ mass at the Tevatron and indirect constraints on the Higgs mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes de Sa, Rafael

    2012-04-01

    I describe the latest D0 and CDF W boson mass measurements. The D0 measurement is performed with 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity in the electron decay channel with a data set of 1.68 x 10{sup 8} W candidates. The value of the W boson mass measured by D0 is M{sub W} = 80.375 {+-} 0.023 GeV when combined with the previously analyzed 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The CDF measurement uses 2.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity in both electron and muon decay channels with a total of 1.1 x 10{sup 8} W candidates. The value of the W boson mass measured by CDF is M{sub W} = 80.387 {+-} 0.019 GeV. I report the combination of these two measurements with previous Tevatron measurements and with the LEP measurements of the W boson mass. The new world average is M{sub W} = 80.385 {+-} 0.015GeV. I discuss the implications of the new measurement to the indirect measurement of the Standard Model Higgs boson mass.

  7. Faithfully probabilistic teleportation of an unknown atomic state and cavity field state with a single measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhen-Biao; Wu Huai-Zhi; Su Wan-Jun; Zhong Zhi-Rong; Zheng Shi-Biao

    2007-01-01

    This paper shows that, based on the single-photon JC model depicting the resonant interaction of a two-level atom with a single cavity mode, an unknown atomic state and cavity photon superposition state can be faithfully teleported with only a single measurement. The scheme is probabilistic, its success lies on the event that the sender atom (or the medi-atom, for teleportation of cavity field state) is detected in the higher state. The scheme is in contrast to the previous ones of using a maximally two-particle entangled state as quantum channel.

  8. Numeral series hidden in the distribution of atomic mass of amino acids to codon domains in the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlin, Åsa

    2015-03-21

    The distribution of codons in the nearly universal genetic code is a long discussed issue. At the atomic level, the numeral series 2x(2) (x=5-0) lies behind electron shells and orbitals. Numeral series appear in formulas for spectral lines of hydrogen. The question here was if some similar scheme could be found in the genetic code. A table of 24 codons was constructed (synonyms counted as one) for 20 amino acids, four of which have two different codons. An atomic mass analysis was performed, built on common isotopes. It was found that a numeral series 5 to 0 with exponent 2/3 times 10(2) revealed detailed congruency with codon-grouped amino acid side-chains, simultaneously with the division on atom kinds, further with main 3rd base groups, backbone chains and with codon-grouped amino acids in relation to their origin from glycolysis or the citrate cycle. Hence, it is proposed that this series in a dynamic way may have guided the selection of amino acids into codon domains. Series with simpler exponents also showed noteworthy correlations with the atomic mass distribution on main codon domains; especially the 2x(2)-series times a factor 16 appeared as a conceivable underlying level, both for the atomic mass and charge distribution. Furthermore, it was found that atomic mass transformations between numeral systems, possibly interpretable as dimension degree steps, connected the atomic mass of codon bases with codon-grouped amino acids and with the exponent 2/3-series in several astonishing ways. Thus, it is suggested that they may be part of a deeper reference system.

  9. Human MCG measurements with a high-sensitivity potassium atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, K; Ito, Y; Kobayashi, T

    2012-06-01

    Measuring biomagnetic fields, such as magnetocardiograms (MCGs), is important for investigating biological functions. To address to this need, we developed an optically pumped atomic magnetometer. In this study, human MCGs were acquired using a potassium atomic magnetometer without any modulating systems. The sensitivity of the magnetometer is comparable to that of high-T(c) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) and is sufficient for acquiring human MCGs. The activity of a human heart estimated from the MCG maps agrees well with that measured with SQUID magnetometers. Thus, our magnetometer produces reliable results, which demonstrate the potential of our atomic magnetometer for biomagnetic measurements.

  10. A top quark mass measurement using a matrix element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linacre, Jacob Thomas [St. John' s College, Annapolis, MD (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the mass of the top quark is presented, using top-antitop pair (t$\\bar{t}$) candidate events for the lepton+jets decay channel. The measurement makes use of Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collision data at centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, collected at the CDF detector. The top quark mass is measured by employing an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal (t$\\bar{t}$) and background (W+jets) matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterised jet-to-parton mapping functions. The likelihood function is maximised with respect to the top quark mass, the fraction of signal events, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction (ΔJES) provides an in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using 578 lepton+jets candidate events corresponding to 3.2 fb -1 of integrated luminosity, the top quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat+ΔJES) ±1.3 (syst) GeV=c2, one of the most precise single measurements to date.

  11. The Black Hole Mass Function from Gravitational Wave Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Kovetz, Ely D; Breysse, Patrick C; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We examine how future gravitational-wave measurements from merging black holes (BHs) can be used to infer the shape of the black-hole mass function, with important implications for the study of star formation and evolution and the properties of binary BHs. We model the mass function as a power law, inherited from the stellar initial mass function, and introduce lower and upper mass cutoff parameterizations in order to probe the minimum and maximum BH masses allowed by stellar evolution, respectively. We initially focus on the heavier BH in each binary, to minimize model dependence. Taking into account the experimental noise, the mass measurement errors and the uncertainty in the redshift-dependence of the merger rate, we show that the mass function parameters, as well as the total rate of merger events, can be measured to <10% accuracy within a few years of advanced LIGO observations at its design sensitivity. This can be used to address important open questions such as the upper limit on the stellar mass ...

  12. A Critical Assessment of Stellar Mass Measurement Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mobasher, Bahram; Ferguson, Henry C; Acquaviva, Viviana; Barro, Guillermo; Finkelstein, Steven L; Fontana, Adriano; Gruetzbauch, Ruth; Johnson, Seth; Lu, Yu; Papovich, Casey J; Pforr, Janine; Salvato, Mara; Somerville, Rachel S; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn; Ashby, Matthew L N; Bell, Eric; Conselice, Christopher J; Dickinson, Mark E; Faber, Sandra M; Fazio, Giovanni; Finlator, Kristian; Galametz, Audrey; Gawiser, Eric; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grazian, Andrea; Grogin, Norman A; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M; Koo, David C; Newman, Jeffrey A; Reddy, Naveen; Santini, Paola; Wechsler, Risa H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we perform a comprehensive study of the main sources of random and systematic errors in stellar mass measurement for galaxies using their Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). We use mock galaxy catalogs with simulated multi-waveband photometry (from U-band to mid-infrared) and known redshift, stellar mass, age and extinction for individual galaxies. Given different parameters affecting stellar mass measurement (photometric S/N ratios, SED fitting errors, systematic effects, the inherent degeneracies and correlated errors), we formulated different simulated galaxy catalogs to quantify these effects individually. We studied the sensitivity of stellar mass estimates to the codes/methods used, population synthesis models, star formation histories, nebular emission line contributions, photometric uncertainties, extinction and age. For each simulated galaxy, the difference between the input stellar masses and those estimated using different simulation catalogs, $\\Delta\\log(M)$, was calculated and use...

  13. The mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters: a measurable quantity

    CERN Document Server

    De Boni, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    We are interested in investigating the growth of structures at the nonlinear scales of galaxy clusters from an observational perspective: we explore the possibility of measuring the mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters from their mass profile beyond the virial radius. We derive the accretion rate from the mass of a spherical shell whose infall velocity is extracted from $N$-body simulations. In the redshift range $z=[0,2]$, our prescription returns an average mass accretion rate within $20-40 \\%$ of the average rate derived from the merger trees of dark matter haloes extracted from $N$-body simulations. Our result suggests that measuring the mean mass accretion rate of a sample of galaxy clusters is actually feasible, thus providing a new potential observational test of the cosmological and structure formation models.

  14. Mass Measurements with the Canadian Penning Trap at CARIBU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orford, Rodney

    2017-01-01

    Roughly half of the elements heavier than iron are thought to be produced through the astrophysical r process of nucleosynthesis. Despite its large influence in explaining the observed abundance of heavy elements, much of the r process is still poorly understood. A more thorough library of nuclear data of neutron-rich nuclei is needed to improve the accuracy and progression of r-process calculations. In particular, accurate mass measurements are in demand due to the strong coupling between mass and other nuclear properties such as β-decay and neutron-capture rates. For nearly three decades, direct mass measurements conducted by Penning trap mass spectrometers have proven to be an accurate method of determining masses to a precision suitable for r-process calculations (Δm / m Science User Facility.

  15. Measurement of the mass difference between t and t quarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rubbo, F; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P

    2011-04-15

    We present a direct measurement of the mass difference between t and t quarks using tt candidate events in the lepton+jets channel, collected with the CDF II detector at Fermilab's 1.96 TeV Tevatron pp Collider. We make an event by event estimate of the mass difference to construct templates for top quark pair signal events and background events. The resulting mass difference distribution of data is compared to templates of signals and background using a maximum likelihood fit. From a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6  fb(-1), we measure a mass difference, ΔM(top) = M(t) - M(t) = -3.3 ± 1.4(stat) ± 1.0(syst)  GeV/c2, approximately 2 standard deviations away from the CPT hypothesis of zero mass difference.

  16. Measurement of the Higgs boson mass with the ATLAS detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garay Walls F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A summary of the latest results on the combined measurement of the Higgs boson mass in the H → ZZ* → 4l and the H → γγ decay channels with the ATLAS detector is presented. The analysis uses 25 fb−1 of pp collision data recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at centre-of-mass energies of 7TeV and 8 TeV during 2011 and 2012. The combined measured value of the Higgs boson mass is mH = 125.36 ± 0.37 (stat ± 0.18 (syst GeV.

  17. Precision measurement of a particle mass at the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milstene, C.; /Fermilab; Freitas, A.; /Zurich U.; Schmitt, M.; /Northwestern U.; Sopczak, A.; /Lancaster U.

    2007-06-01

    Precision measurement of the stop mass at the ILC is done in a method based on cross-sections measurements at two different center-of-mass energies. This allows to minimize both the statistical and systematic errors. In the framework of the MSSM, a light stop, compatible with electro-weak baryogenesis, is studied in its decay into a charm jet and neutralino, the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP), as a candidate of dark matter. This takes place for a small stop-neutralino mass difference.

  18. Stability enhancement by joint phase measurements in a single cold atomic fountain

    CERN Document Server

    Meunier, M; Geiger, R; Guerlin, C; Alzar, C L Garrido; Landragin, A

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of joint interrogation in a single atom interferometer which overcomes the dead time between consecutive measurements in standard cold atomic fountains. The joint operation enables for a faster averaging of the Dick effect associated with the local oscillator noise in clocks and with vibration noise in cold atom inertial sensors. Such an operation allows achieving the lowest stability limit due to atom shot noise. We demonstrate a multiple joint operation in which up to five clouds of atoms are interrogated simultaneously in a single setup. The essential feature of multiple joint operation, demonstrated here for a micro-wave Ramsey interrogation, can be generalized to go beyond the current stability limit associated with dead times in present-day cold atom interferometer inertial sensors.

  19. Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, 10-Earth Mass Planet and Its Host Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Richard K.; Muraki, Y.; Han, C.; Bennett, D. P.; Gaudi, B. S.

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, made with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of mp = 10.4 +/- M(Earth) and orbits a star of Mstar = 0.56 +/- 0.09 M(Sun) at a semi-major axis of a = 3.2 + 1.9/-0.5 AU, and an orbital period of 7.6 +7.7/-1.5 yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are due to the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect. This measurement was primarily due to the orbital motion of the Earth, but the analysis also demonstrates the capability measure micro lensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a failed gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the prevalence and masses of such planets

  20. Measurement of the W boson mass with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Balli, Fabrice; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A precise measurement of the mass of the W boson mass represents an important milestone to test the overall consistency of the Standard Model. Since the discovery of a Higgs Boson, the W boson mass is predicted to 7 MeV precision, while the world average of all measurements is 15 MeV, making the improved measurement an important goal. The ATLAS experiment at the LHC represents an ideal laboratory for such a precise measurement. Large samples of many millions of leptonic decays of W and Z bosons were collected with efficient single lepton triggers in the 7 TeV data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6/fb. With these samples the detector and physics modelling has been studied in great detail to enable a systematic uncertainty on the measurement that approaches the statistical power of the data of 7 MeV per decay channel as far as possible.

  1. Precise measurement of the {Sigma}{sup 0} mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M.H.; Hartouni, E.P.; Kreisler, M.N.; Uribe, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Church, M.D.; Gottschalk, E.E.; Knapp, B.C.; Stern, B.J.; Wiencke, L.R. [Columbia University, Nevis Laboratories, Irvington, New York 10533 (United States); Christian, D.C.; Gutierrez, G.; Wehmann, A. [Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Avilez, C.; Felix, J.; Moreno, G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Forbush, M.; Huson, F.R.; White, J.T. [Department of Physics, Texas AM University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    1997-09-01

    We have obtained precise measurements of the {Sigma}{sup 0} mass and the {Sigma}{sup 0}-{Lambda}{sup 0} mass difference from a fit to the {Lambda}{sup 0}{gamma} invariant mass distribution of 3327 {Sigma}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{Lambda}{sup 0}+{gamma} decays. Our measurements yield M{sub {Sigma}{sup 0}}=1192.65{plus_minus}0.020{plus_minus}0.014 MeV/c{sup 2} and M{sub {Sigma}{sup 0}}{minus}M{sub {Lambda}{sup 0}}=76.966{plus_minus}0.020{plus_minus}0.013 MeV/c{sup 2}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic in that order. This represents a significant improvement over all previous determinations and is the first direct measurement of the {Sigma}{sup 0} mass itself. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Measuring Neutron Star Mass and Radius with Three Mass-Radius Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C M; Kojima, Y; Chang, H K; Xu, R X; Li, X D; Zhang, B; Kiziltan, B

    2006-01-01

    We propose to determine the mass and the radius of a neutron star (NS) using three measurable mass-radius relationships, namely the ``apparent'' radius inferred from neutron star thermal emission, the gravitational redshift inferred from the absorption lines, as well as the averaged stellar mass density inferred from the orbital Keplerian frequency derived from the kilohertz quasi periodic oscillation (kHz QPO) data. We apply the method to constrain the NS mass and the radius of the X-ray sources, 1E 1207.4-5209, Aql X-1 and EXO 0748-676.

  3. Munition Mass Properties Measurement Procedures Using a Spin Balance Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-09

    POI and CG offset unbalance, Torsion Pendulum Oscillation to measure MOI, and Static Measurement of CG offset moment. The WSMR measuring machine is...invalid. The same is true if the order is reversed when taking tare readings after measuring the payload properties. (2) The machine/interface...Radius of gyration. D.3 The Torsion Pendulum method is the method used in most commercial mass properties machines. This method suspends or

  4. Direct mass measurements of cadmium and palladium isotopes and their double-beta transition $Q$-values

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, C; Blaum, K; Block, M; Düllmann, Ch E; Eberhardt, K; Eibach, M; Eliseev, S; Nagy, Sz; Nörtershäuser, W; Renisch, D

    2012-01-01

    The $Q$-value of the double-electron capture in $^{108}$Cd has been determined to be (272.04 $\\pm$ 0.55) keV in a direct measurement with the double-Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP. Based on this result a resonant enhancement of the decay rate of $^{108}$Cd is excluded. We have confirmed the double-beta transition $Q$-values of $^{106}$Cd and $^{110}$Pd recently measured with the Penning-trap mass spectrometers SHIPTRAP and ISOLTRAP, respectively. Furthermore, the atomic masses of the involved nuclides ($^{106, 108, 110}$Cd, $^{106, 108, 110}$Pd) have been directly linked to the atomic mass standard.

  5. Sub-Doppler temperature measurements of laser-cooled atoms using optical nanofibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Laura; Deasy, Kieran; Daly, Mark J.; Morrissey, Michael J.; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the average temperature of a cloud of cold 85Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap using an optical nanofibre. A periodic spatial variation is applied to the magnetic fields generated by the trapping coils and this causes the trap centre to oscillate, which, in turn, causes the cloud of cold atoms to oscillate. The optical nanofibre is used to collect the fluorescence emitted by the cold atoms, and the frequency response between the motion of the centre of the oscillating trap and the cloud of atoms is determined. This allows us to make measurements of cloud temperature both above and below the Doppler limit, thereby paving the way for nanofibres to be integrated with ultracold atoms for hybrid quantum devices.

  6. First Ramsey-type mass measurements with ISOLTRAP and design studies of the new PENTATRAP project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Sebastian

    2009-07-09

    The application of Penning traps for mass spectrometry has led to a major step in the mass precision. Consequently, atomic masses became more and more important as input parameters in different research fields. This exploitation is still ongoing in line with a steady development of Penning trap mass spectrometers to even higher accuracies. Penning trap mass spectrometry is based on the determination of the free cyclotron frequency {nu}{sub c}=qB/(2{pi}m) of an ion confined in a homogeneous magnetic field B. In principle two different measurement techniques are available: By applying the destructive time-of-flight detection method (TOF-ICR) the trap content is lost after the measurement. Since it is a fast measurement method it is usually used for mass determinations of short-lived radionuclides, whereas a relative mass uncertainty {delta}m/m of a few parts in 10{sup -9} is routinely reached even for nuclides with half-lives well below 500 ms. This has been achieved by the implementation of the Ramsey method in Penning trap mass spectrometry within this work. By contrast the non-destructive Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance detection method (FT-ICR) determines the frequency of the image current introduced in the trap electrodes by the ion motion. Thus, the ion remains in the trap and can be used for further measurement cycles. This method is often applied for measurements of stable nuclides reaching a relative mass uncertainty of less than {delta}m/m=10{sup -11}. One part of this thesis was the application of time-separated oscillatory fields, called Ramsey method, for resonant ion motion excitation in order to improve the time-of-flight detection method. It was used to measure the nuclides {sup 26,27}Al and {sup 38,39}Ca with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. The mass values have been included in the ''Atomic Mass Evaluation'' (AME). Furthermore, the nuclides {sup 26}Al and {sup 38}Ca serve as input parameters for stringent

  7. Measurements of the τ mass and the mass difference of the τ+ and τ- at BABAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Ongmongkolku, P.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.

    2009-11-01

    We present the result from a precision measurement of the mass of the τ lepton, Mτ, based on 423fb-1 of data recorded at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, we determine the mass to be 1776.68±0.12(stat)±0.41(syst)MeV. We also measure the mass difference between the τ+ and τ-, and obtain (Mτ+-Mτ-)/MAVGτ=(-3.4±1.3(stat)±0.3(syst))×10-4, where MAVGτ is the average value of Mτ+ and Mτ-.

  8. A Fiber Optic Catalytic Sensor for Neutral Atom Measurements in Oxygen Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Vesel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The presented sensor for neutral oxygen atom measurement in oxygen plasma is a catalytic probe which uses fiber optics and infrared detection system to measure the gray body radiation of the catalyst. The density of neutral atoms can be determined from the temperature curve of the probe, because the catalyst is heated predominantly by the dissipation of energy caused by the heterogeneous surface recombination of neutral atoms. The advantages of this sensor are that it is simple, reliable, easy to use, noninvasive, quantitative and can be used in plasma discharge regions. By using different catalyst materials the sensor can also be applied for detection of neutral atoms in other plasmas. Sensor design, operation, example measurements and new measurement procedure for systematic characterization are presented.

  9. Measurement of the Aharonov-Casher geometric phase with a separated-arm atom interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Gillot, Jonathan; Gauguet, Alexandre; Vigué, Jacques; Büchner, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, we report a measurement of the Aharonov-Casher (AC) geometric phase with our lithium atom interferometer. The AC phase appears when a particle carrying a magnetic dipole propagates in a transverse electric field. The first measurement of the AC phase was done with a neutron interferometer in 1989 by A. Cimmino \\textit{et al.} (Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{63}, 380, 1989) and all the following experiments were done with Ramsey or Ramsey-Bord\\'e interferometers with molecules or atoms. In our experiment, we use lithium atoms pumped in a single hyperfine-Zeeman sublevel and we measure the AC-phase by applying opposite electric fields on the two interferometer arms. Our measurements are in good agreement with the expected theoretical values and they prove that this phase is independent of the atom velocity.

  10. Measurement of the Aharonov-Casher geometric phase with a separated-arm atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillot, Jonathan; Lepoutre, Steven; Gauguet, Alexandre; Vigué, Jacques; Büchner, Matthias

    2014-06-01

    In this letter, we report a measurement of the Aharonov-Casher (AC) geometric phase with our lithium atom interferometer. The AC phase appears when a particle carrying a magnetic dipole propagates in a transverse electric field. The first measurement of the AC phase was done with a neutron interferometer in 1989 by Cimmino et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 380 (1989)] and all the following experiments were done with Ramsey or Ramsey-Bordé interferometers with molecules or atoms. In our experiment, we use lithium atoms pumped in a single hyperfine-Zeeman sublevel and we measure the AC-phase by applying opposite electric fields on the two interferometer arms. Our measurements are in good agreement with the expected theoretical values and they also provide a further test of the independence of the AC phase with the atom velocity.

  11. Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten P.

    Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope......Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope...

  12. The electron mass from $g$-factor measurements on hydrogen-like carbon $^{12}$C$^{5+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, Florian; Kracke, Anke; Werth, Günter; Quint, Wolfgang; Blaum, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The electron mass in atomic mass units has been determined with a relative uncertainty of $2.8\\cdot 10^{-11}$, which represents a 13-fold improvement of the 2010 CODATA value. The underlying measurement principle combines a high-precision measurement of the Larmor-to-cyclotron frequency ratio on a single hydrogen-like carbon ion in a Penning trap with a corresponding very accurate $g$-factor calculation. Here, we present the measurement results in detail, including a comprehensive discussion of the systematic shifts and their uncertainties. A special focus is set on the various sources of phase jitters, which are essential for the understanding of the applied line-shape model for the $g$-factor resonance.

  13. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, F.; H. Liu; Xu, P.; X. Tian; Y. Wang; Ren, J; Haibin Wu; Hong Chang

    2014-01-01

    We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90$\\mu K$ in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques use...

  14. Production and measurement of Bose-Einstein condensate of 87Rb atomic gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The research platform for Bose-Einstein condensate in 87Rb atomic gas, which is composed of a double MOT configuration and a QUIC trap, was reported. The properties of the condensate were measured both in time-of-flight and in tight confinement by the absorption imaging method. The measurements agreed with the criterions of Bose-Einstein condensation phase transition. About 2×105 atoms were pure condensed.

  15. Production and measurement of Bose-Einstein condensate of 87Rb atomic gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The research platform for Bose-Einstein condensate in 87 Rb atomic gas,which is composed of a double MOT configuration and a QUIC trap,was reported.The properties of the condensate were measured both in time-of-flight and in tight confinement by the absorption imaging method.The measurements agreed with the criterions of Bose-Einstein condensation phase transition.About 2×10 5 atoms were pure condensed.

  16. Optical measurement of a micro coriolis mass flow sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kristiansen, L.; Mehendale, A.; Brouwer, D.M.; Zwikker, J.M.; Klein, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    Haneveld [1,2] demonstrated a micro Coriolis mass flow sensor, operating in the measurement range of 0 to 1 g/hr achieving a resolution in the order of 10 mg/hr using a laser vibrometer. Equipped with an integrated capacitive [3] readout the measurement uncertainty amounted to 2% of the full scale r

  17. Body mass index and blood pressure measurement during pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, Jennifer L

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The accurate measurement of blood pressure requires the use of a large cuff in subjects with a high mid-arm circumference (MAC). This prospective study examined the need for a large cuff during pregnancy and its correlation with maternal obesity. METHODS: Maternal body mass index (BMI), fat mass, and MAC were measured. RESULTS: Of 179 women studied, 15.6% were obese. With a BMI of level 1 obesity, 44% needed a large cuff and with a BMI of level 2 obesity 100% needed a large cuff. CONCLUSION: All women booking for antenatal care should have their MAC measured to avoid the overdiagnosis of pregnancy hypertension.

  18. High sensitivity probe absorption technique for time-of-flight measurements on cold atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mohapatra; C S Unnikrishnan

    2006-06-01

    We report on a phase-sensitive probe absorption technique with high sensitivity, capable of detecting a few hundred ultra-cold atoms in flight in an observation time of a few milliseconds. The large signal-to-noise ratio achieved is sufficient for reliable measurements on low intensity beams of cold atoms. We demonstrate the high sensitivity and figure of merit of the simple method by measuring the time-of-flight of atoms moving upwards from a magneto-optical trap released in the gravitational field.

  19. Measurement of Wigner function via atomic beam deflection in Raman- Nath regime

    CERN Document Server

    Khosa, A H; Khosa, Ashfaq Hussain

    2002-01-01

    We propose a method for the reconstruction of photon statistics and hence the Wigner function of a quantized cavity field. The method is based on the measurement of momentum distribution of two level atoms after atom- field interaction in Raman-Nath regime. We reconstruct the photon statistics of the cavity field both the cases of resonant and off- resonant atom field interaction.. For the measurement of Wigner function we propose to displace the photon statistics of the cavity field. We successfully reconstruct the Wigner function of the Schrodinger-cat state in a straightforward manner by employing the proposed method without much mathematical manipulation of the experimental data.

  20. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gobbi, B.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kunori, S.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.

    1999-09-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass using six candidate events for the process pp¯-->tt¯+X-->l+νbl-ν¯b¯+X, observed in the D0 experiment at the Fermilab pp¯ collider. Using maximum likelihood fits to the dynamics of the decays, we measure a mass for the top quark of mt=168.4+/-12.3(stat)+/-3.6(syst) Gev. We combine this result with our previous measurement in the tt¯-->l+jets channel to obtain mt=172.1+/-7.1 GeV as the best value of the mass of the top quark measured by D0.

  1. Escape dynamics in collinear atomic-like three mass point systems

    CERN Document Server

    Pasca, Daniel; Stoica, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    The present paper studies the escape mechanism in collinear three point mass systems with small-range-repulsive/large-range-attractive pairwise-interaction. Specifically, we focus on systems with non-negative total energy. We show that on the zero energy level set, most of the orbits lead to binary escape configurations and the set of initial conditions leading to escape configurations where all three separations infinitely increase as $t \\to \\infty 1$ has zero Lebesgue measure. We also give numerical evidence of the existence of a periodic orbit for the case when the two outer masses are equal. For positive energies, we prove that the set of initial conditions leading to escape configurations where all three separations infinitely increase as $t \\to \\infty$ has positive Lebesgue measure. Keywords: linear three point

  2. M(H) dependence and size distribution of SPIONs measured by atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, Simone; Grujic, Zoran D; Dolgovskiy, Vladimir; Weis, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the quasistatic recording of the magnetic excitation function M(H) of superparamagnetic iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle (SPION) suspensions by an atomic magnetometer allows a precise determination of the sample's iron mass content mFe and the particle size distribution.

  3. Developing an "atomic clock" for fission lifetime measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilschut, H.W.E.M.; Kravchuk, V.

    2004-01-01

    The relevance of measuring fission lifetimes of hot nuclei is briefly discussed. It is shown that K X-ray emission prior to fission can be used to measure fission lifetimes. The preparation of the K-shell hole, the simultaneous nuclear excitation, and the analysis of the X-ray spectra is described.

  4. Mass measurements on radioactive isotopes using the ISOLTRAP spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Dilling, J; Kluge, H J; Kohl, A; Lamour, E; Marx, G; Schwarz, S C; Bollen, G; Kellerbauer, A G; Moore, R B; Henry, S

    2000-01-01

    ISOLTRAP is a Penning trap mass spectrometer installed at the on line isotope separator ISOLDE at CERN. Direct measurements of the masses of short lived radio isotopes are performed using the existing triple trap system. This consists of three electromagnetic traps in tandem: a Paul trap to accumulate and bunch the 60 keV dc beam, a Penning trap for cooling and isobar separation, and a precision Penning trap for the determination of the masses by cyclotron resonance. Measurements of masses of unknown mercury isotopes and in the vicinity of doubly magic /sup 208/Pb are presented, all with an accuracy of delta m/m approximately=1*10/sup -7/. Developments to replace the Paul trap by a radiofrequency quadrupole ion guide system to increase the collection efficiency are presently under way and the status is presented. (10 refs).

  5. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Aguiló, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benítez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Böhnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clement, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A I; Kharzheev, Yu M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kühl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G L; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Lévêque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; McCarthy, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nöding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Pérez, E; Peters, K; Petroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F K; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A F S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, A D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sen-Gupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V I; Skubic, P L; Slattery, P F; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; vanden Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; Van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A H; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J R; Von Törne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; al, et

    2007-01-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel based on approximately 370/pb of data collected by the D0 experiment during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We employ two different methods to extract the top quark mass. We show that both methods yield consistent results using ensemble tests of events generated with the D0 Monte Carlo simulation. We combine the results from the two methods to obtain a top quark mass m_t = 178.1 +/- 8.2 GeV. The statistical uncertainty is 6.7 GeV and the systematic uncertainty is 4.8 GeV.

  6. New mass measurements of neutron rich nuclides at the NSCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrade, Alfredo; Matos, Milan; Amthor, Matthew; Bazin, Daniel; Becerril, Ana; Elliot, Thom; Gade, Alexandra; Galaviz, Daniel; Lorusso, Giuseppe; Pereira, Jorge; Portillo, Mauricio; Rogers, Andrew; Schatz, Hendrik; Shapira, Dan; Smith, Ed; Stolz, Andreas; Wallace, Mark

    2007-10-01

    A mass measurement of exotic isotopes in the region of 68Fe has been performed at the NSCL using the time-of-flight technique recently established. Experimental knowledge of the mass of very neutron rich nuclides is an important input for astrophysical applications, such as nucleosynthesis during the r-process and the evolution of matter in the crust of an accreting neutron star, where present calculations are mostly limited to using theoretical mass extrapolations. We present the details of the experimental set up, as well as preliminary results.

  7. Direct mass measurements beyond the proton drip-line

    CERN Document Server

    Rauth, C; Blaum, K; Block, M; Chaudhuri, A; Eliseev, S; Ferrer, R; Habs, D; Herfurth, F; Hessberger, F P; Hofmann, S; Kluge, H J; Maero, G; Martin, A; Marx, G; Mukherjee, M; Neumayr, J B; Plass, W R; Quint, W; Rahaman, S; Rodríguez, D; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L; Thirolf, P G; Vorobjev, G; Weber, C; Di, Z

    2007-01-01

    First on-line mass measurements were performed at the SHIPTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer. The masses of 18 neutron-deficient isotopes in the terbium-to-thulium region produced in fusion-evaporation reactions were determined with relative uncertainties of about $7\\cdot 10^{-8}$, nine of them for the first time. Four nuclides ($^{144, 145}$Ho and $^{147, 148}$Tm) were found to be proton-unbound. The implication of the results on the location of the proton drip-line is discussed by analyzing the one-proton separation energies.

  8. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Farnsworth, Paul B., E-mail: paul_farnsworth@byu.edu [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s {sup 3}S{sub 1} metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} and 0.011 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} and 0.97 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges. - Highlights: • We determine He metastable number densities for four plasma types • The highest number densities were observed in a dielectric barrier discharge • No helium metastable atoms were observed downstream from the exits of glow discharges.

  9. Antiproton–to–electron mass ratio determined by two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sótér A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA collaboration of CERN has recently carried out two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms. Three transition frequencies were determined with fractional precisions of 2.3–5 parts in 109. By comparing the results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as 1836.1526736(23.

  10. Dependence of the atomic energy levels on a superstrong magnetic field with account of a finite nucleus radius and mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godunov, S. I.; Vysotsky, M. I.

    2013-06-01

    The influence of the finiteness of the proton radius and mass on the energies of a hydrogen atom and hydrogenlike ions in a superstrong magnetic field is studied. The finiteness of the nucleus size pushes the ground energy level up leading to a nontrivial dependence of the value of the critical nucleus charge on the external magnetic field.

  11. Mass Measurements of Isolated Objects from Space-based Microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, A; Udalski, A; Han, C; Shvartzvald, Y; Ranc, C; Jorgensen, U G; Poleski, R; Bozza, V; Beichman, C; Bryden, G; Carey, S; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, C B; Pogge, R W; Porritt, I; Wibking, B; Yee, J C; Pawlak, M; Szymanski, M K; Skowron, J; Mroz, P; Kozlowski, S; Wyrzykowski, L; Pietrukowicz, P; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Ulaczyk, K; Choi, J Y; Park, H; Jung, Y K; Shin, I -G; Albrow, M D; Park, B -G; Kim, S -L; Lee, C -U; Kim, D -J; Lee, Y; Friedmann, M; Kaspi, S; Maoz, D; Hundertmark, M; Street, R A; Tsapras, Y; Bramich, D M; Cassan, A; Dominik, M; Bachelet, E; Dong, Subo; Jaimes, R Figuera; Horne, K; Mao, S; Menzies, J; Schmidt, R; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Wambsganss, J; Skottfelt, J; Andersen, M I; Burgdorf, M J; Ciceri, S; D'Ago, G; Evans, D F; Gu, S -H; Hinse, T C; Kerins, E; Korhonen, H; Kuffmeier, M; Mancini, L; Peixinho, N; popovas, A; Rabus, M; Rahvar, S; Rasmussen, R T; Scarpetta, G; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; von Essen, C; Wang, Y -B; Wertz, O

    2015-01-01

    We report on the mass and distance measurements of two single-lens events from the 2015 \\emph{Spitzer} microlensing campaign. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measurements, we find that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-1268 is a $47\\pm7$ $M_{\\rm J}$ brown dwarf at $5.4\\pm1.0$ kpc, and that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-0763 is a $0.50\\pm0.04$ $M_\\odot$ star at $6.9\\pm1.0$ kpc. We show that the probability to definitively measure the mass of isolated microlenses, including isolated stellar mass black holes and free floating planets, is dramatically increased once simultaneous ground- and space-based observations are conducted.

  12. New precision mass measurements of neutron-rich calcium and potassium isotopes and three-nucleon forces

    CERN Document Server

    Gallant, A T; Brunner, T; Chowdhury, U; Ettenauer, S; Lennarz, A; Robertson, D; Simon, V V; Chaudhuri, A; Holt, J D; Kwiatkowski, A A; Mané, E; Menéndez, J; Schultz, B E; Simon, M C; Andreoiu, C; Delheij, P; Pearson, M R; Savajols, H; Schwenk, A; Dilling, J

    2012-01-01

    We present precision Penning-trap mass measurements of neutron-rich calcium and potassium isotopes in the vicinity of neutron number N=32. Using the TITAN system the mass of $^{51}$K was measured for the first time, and the precision of the $^{51,52}$Ca mass values were improved significantly. The new mass values show a dramatic increase of the binding energy compared to those reported in the atomic mass evaluation. In particular, $^{52}$Ca is more bound by 1.74 MeV, and the behavior with neutron number deviates substantially from the tabulated values. An increased binding was predicted recently based on calculations that include three-nucleon (3N) forces. We present a comparison to improved calculations, which agree remarkably with the evolution of masses with neutron number, making neutron-rich calcium isotopes an exciting region to probe 3N forces at neutron-rich extremes.

  13. Rare-RI ring for mass measurements at RIBF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Akira [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan)

    2014-05-02

    The rare-RI (radioactive isotope) ring at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory is described. The main purpose of the rare-RI ring is to measure the mass of short-lived rare RI. In the rare-RI ring, the mass is determined by measuring the revolution time of each nucleus based on isochronous mass spectrometry. The rare-RI ring consists of six magnetic sectors, and each sector consists of four dipole magnets. To precisely optimize the isochronous conditions of the circulating particles for large acceptance, we install 10 trim coils to half of the dipole magnets. Individual injection system enables efficient injection of the produced rare RI into the ring one by one. With facilitating efficient extraction of the circulating particles, time-of-flight measurements can be performed to the each rare RI. Construction of the rare-RI ring was begun in the middle of the fiscal year 2012, and the ring is expected to be fully functional by 2015, when we can start the mass measurements for unknown masses.

  14. A precise mass measurement of the intermediate-mass binary pulsar PSR J1802-2124

    CERN Document Server

    Ferdman, Robert D; Kramer, Michael; McLaughlin, Maura A; Lorimer, Duncan R; Nice, David J; Manchester, Richard N; Hobbs, George; Lyne, Andrew G; Camilo, Fernando; Possenti, Andrea; Demorest, Paul B; Cognard, Ismael; Desvignes, Gregory; Theureau, Gilles; Faulkner, Andrew; Backer, Donald C

    2010-01-01

    PSR J1802-2124 is a 12.6-ms pulsar in a 16.8-hour binary orbit with a relatively massive white dwarf (WD) companion. These properties make it a member of the intermediate-mass class of binary pulsar (IMBP) systems. We have been timing this pulsar since its discovery in 2002. Concentrated observations at the Green Bank Telescope, augmented with data from the Parkes and Nancay observatories, have allowed us to determine the general relativistic Shapiro delay. This has yielded pulsar and white dwarf mass measurements of 1.24(11) and 0.78(4) solar masses (68% confidence), respectively. The low mass of the pulsar, the high mass of the WD companion, the short orbital period, and the pulsar spin period may be explained by the system having gone through a common-envelope phase in its evolution. We argue that selection effects may contribute to the relatively small number of known IMBPs.

  15. Precision X-ray measurements on kaonic atoms at LNF

    CERN Document Server

    Marton, J

    2007-01-01

    After the successfully performed DEAR experiment at DAFNE - resulting in the most precise data on the hadronic shift and width in kaonic hydrogen up-to-now - the next step will be the measurement at the percent level using new X-ray detectors. These detectors (silicon drift detectors) are developed within the SIDDHARTA project. The asynchronous background will be suppressed using the time correlation between the kaon and the X-ray by 2-3 orders of magnitude. These measurements will lead to precise values of the isospin-dependent antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths, thus opening a new insight in the low-energy kaon nucleon interaction.

  16. Precision X-ray measurements on kaonic atoms at LNF

    OpenAIRE

    Marton, J.

    2007-01-01

    After the successfully performed DEAR experiment at DAFNE - resulting in the most precise data on the hadronic shift and width in kaonic hydrogen up-to-now - the next step will be the measurement at the percent level using new X-ray detectors. These detectors (silicon drift detectors) are developed within the SIDDHARTA project. The asynchronous background will be suppressed using the time correlation between the kaon and the X-ray by 2-3 orders of magnitude. These measurements will lead to pr...

  17. Observation and mass measurement of the baryon Xib-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carrillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-08-03

    We report the observation and measurement of the mass of the bottom, strange baryon Xi(b)- through the decay chain Xi(b)- -->J/psiXi-, where J/psi-->mu+mu-, Xi- -->Lambdapi-, and Lambda-->ppi-. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 6.6 x 10(-15), or 7.7 Gaussian standard deviations. The Xi(b)- mass is measured to be 5792.9+/-2.5(stat) +/- 1.7(syst) MeV/c2.

  18. Recent results from the MISTRAL mass measurement program at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Lunney, M D; Audi, G; Bollen, G; Borcea, C; Doubre, H; Gaulard, C; Henry, S; De Saint-Simon, M; Thibault, C; Toader, C F; Vieira, N

    2001-01-01

    The MISTRAL experiment (Mass measurements at ISOLDE with a Transmission and Radiofrequency spectrometer on-Line), conceived for very short-lived nuclides, has reached the end of its commissioning phase. Installed in 1997, results have been obtained consistent with all aspects of the projected spectrometer performance: nuclides with half-lives as short as 30 ms have been measured and accuracies of $\\pm$0.4 have been achieved, despite the presence of a systematic shift and difficulties with isobaric contamination. Masses of several nuclides, including $^{25-26}\\!$Ne and $^{32}$Mg that forms the famous island of inversion around N=20, have been significantly improved.

  19. Observation and Mass Measurement of the Baryon $\\Xi^-_b$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carrillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca-Almenar, C; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Da Ronco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dorr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; García, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimarães da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Mäki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martinez-Ballarin, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtälä, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Söderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Saint-Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; Van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobuev, I P; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-01-01

    We report the observation and measurement of the mass of the bottom, strange baryon $\\Xi^-_b$ through the decay chain $\\Xi^-_b \\to J/\\psi \\Xi^-$, where $J/\\psi \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$, $\\Xi^- \\to \\Lambda \\pi^-$, and $\\Lambda \\to p \\pi^-$. Evidence for observation is based on a signal whose probability of arising from the estimated background is $6.6 \\times 10^{-15}$, or 7.7 Gaussian standard deviations. The $\\Xi^-_b$ mass is measured to be $5792.9\\pm 2.5$ (stat.) $\\pm 1.7$ (syst.) MeV/$c^2$.

  20. A Precision Measurement of the Lambda_c Baryon Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De, R; Sangro; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai, F; Tehrani; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S W; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-01-01

    The $\\Lambda_c^+$ baryon mass is measured using $\\Lambda_c^+\\to\\Lambda K^0_S K^+$ and $\\Lambda_c^+\\to\\Sigma^0 K^0_S K^+$ decays reconstructed in 232 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ storage ring. The $\\Lambda_c^+$ mass is measured to be $2286.46\\pm0.14\\mathrm{MeV}/c^2$. The dominant systematic uncertainties arise from the amount of material in the tracking volume and from the magnetic field strength.

  1. Comparison of selenium determination in liver samples by atomic absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksa, Irina Rudik; Buckley, Carol L; Carpenter, Nancy P; Poppenga, Robert H

    2005-07-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element that is often deficient in the natural diets of domestic animal species. The measurement of Se in whole blood or liver is the most accurate way to assess Se status for diagnostic purposes. This study was conducted to compare hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy (HG-AAS) with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the detection and quantification of Se in liver samples. Sample digestion was accomplished with magnesium nitrate and nitric acid for HG-AAS and ICP-MS, respectively. The ICP-MS detection was optimized for 82Se with yttrium used as the internal standard and resulted in a method detection limit of 0.12 microg/g. Selenium was quantified by both methods in 310 samples from a variety of species that were submitted to the Toxicology Laboratory at New Bolton Center (Kennett Square, PA) for routine diagnostic testing. Paired measurements for each sample were evaluated by a mean difference plot method. Limits of agreement were used to describe the maximum differences likely to occur between the 2 methods. Results suggest that under the specified conditions ICP-MS can be reliably used in place of AAS for quantitation of tissue Se at or below 2 microg/g to differentiate between adequate and deficient liver Se concentrations.

  2. Precision mass measurements of neutron-rich yttrium and niobium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hager, U. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 (Finland)], E-mail: ulrike.hager@phys.jyu.fi; Jokinen, A.; Elomaa, V.-V.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Kankainen, A.; Rahaman, S.; Rissanen, J.; Moore, I.D.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Saastamoinen, A.; Sonoda, T.; Aystoe, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 (Finland)

    2007-09-01

    The atomic masses of neutron-rich {sup 95-101}Y and {sup 101-107}Nb produced in proton-induced fission of uranium were determined using the JYFLTRAP double Penning trap setup. Accuracies of better than 10 keV could be reached for most nuclides. The masses of {sup 106,107}Nb were measured for the first time. The energies of the isomeric states in {sup 96}Y and {sup 100}Y were measured as 1541(10) keV and 145(15) keV. The niobium isotopes appear to be systematically less bound than the values given in the latest Atomic Mass Evaluation. The new data lie in a region of the nuclear chart characterised by the transition from spherical to strongly deformed shapes. These structural changes are explored by studying different systematic trends. The data are also compared to several model predictions to test their ability to reproduce the structural changes along the isotopic chains of yttrium and niobium.

  3. Measuring consistent masses for 25 Milky Way globular clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmig, Brian; Seth, Anil; Ivans, Inese I.; Anderton, Tim; Gregersen, Dylan [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Utah, SLC, UT 84112 (United States); Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We present central velocity dispersions, masses, mass-to-light ratios (M/Ls ), and rotation strengths for 25 Galactic globular clusters (GCs). We derive radial velocities of 1951 stars in 12 GCs from single order spectra taken with Hectochelle on the MMT telescope. To this sample we add an analysis of available archival data of individual stars. For the full set of data we fit King models to derive consistent dynamical parameters for the clusters. We find good agreement between single-mass King models and the observed radial dispersion profiles. The large, uniform sample of dynamical masses we derive enables us to examine trends of M/L with cluster mass and metallicity. The overall values of M/L and the trends with mass and metallicity are consistent with existing measurements from a large sample of M31 clusters. This includes a clear trend of increasing M/L with cluster mass and lower than expected M/Ls for the metal-rich clusters. We find no clear trend of increasing rotation with increasing cluster metallicity suggested in previous work.

  4. Local gravity measurement with the combination of atom interferometry and Bloch oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Charrière, Renée; Zahzam, Nassim; Bidel, Yannick; Bresson, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    We present a local measurement of gravity combining Bloch oscillations and atom interferometry. With a falling distance of 0.8 mm, we achieve a sensitivity of 2x10-7 g with an integration time of 300 s. No bias associated with the Bloch oscillations has been measured. A contrast decay with Bloch oscillations has been observed and attributed to the spatial quality of the laser beams. A simple experimental configuration has been adopted where a single retro-reflected laser beam is performing atoms launch, stimulated Raman transitions and Bloch oscillations. The combination of Bloch oscillations and atom interferometry can thus be realized with an apparatus no more complex than a standard atomic gravimeter.

  5. Conditions for Statistical Determination of the Neutrino Mass Spectrum in Radiative Emission of Neutrino Pairs in Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Ningqiang; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gonzalez-Garcia, M C; Conde, A Peralta; Taron, Josep

    2015-01-01

    The photon spectrum in macrocoherent atomic de-excitation via radiative emission of neutrino pairs (RENP) has been proposed as a sensitive probe of the neutrino mass spectrum, capable of competing with conventional neutrino experiments. In this paper we revisit this intriguing technique in order to quantify the requirements for statistical determination of some of the properties of the neutrino spectrum, in particular the neutrino mass scale and the mass ordering. Our results are sobering. We find that, even under ideal conditions, the determination of neutrino parameters needs experimental live times of the order of days to years for several laser frequencies, assuming a target of volume of order 100 cm3 containing about 10^21 atoms per cubic centimeter in a totally coherent state with maximum value of the electric field in the target. Such conditions seem to be, as of today, way beyond the reach of our current technology.

  6. A Critical Assessment of Stellar Mass Measurement Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobasher, Bahram; Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Acquaviva, Viviana; Barro, Guillermo; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Fontana, Adriano; Gruetzbauch, Ruth; Johnson, Seth; Lu, Yu; Papovich, Casey J.; Pforr, Janine; Salvato, Mara; Somerville, Rachel S.; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Bell, Eric; Conselice, Christopher J.; Dickinson, Mark E.; Faber, Sandra M.; Fazio, Giovanni; Finlator, Kristian; Galametz, Audrey; Gawiser, Eric; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grazian, Andrea; Grogin, Norman A.; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Koo, David C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Reddy, Naveen; Santini, Paola; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2015-07-01

    This is the second paper in a series aimed at investigating the main sources of uncertainty in measuring the observable parameters in galaxies from their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In the first paper we presented a detailed account of the photometric redshift measurements and an error analysis of this process. In this paper we perform a comprehensive study of the main sources of random and systematic error in stellar mass estimates for galaxies, and their relative contributions to the associated error budget. Since there is no prior knowledge of the stellar mass of galaxies (unlike their photometric redshifts), we use mock galaxy catalogs with simulated multi-waveband photometry and known redshift, stellar mass, age and extinction for individual galaxies. The multi-waveband photometry for the simulated galaxies were generated in 13 filters spanning from U-band to mid-infrared wavelengths. Given different parameters affecting stellar mass measurement (photometric signal-to-noise ratios (S/N), SED fitting errors and systematic effects), the inherent degeneracies and correlated errors, we formulated different simulated galaxy catalogs to quantify these effects individually. For comparison, we also generated catalogs based on observed photometric data of real galaxies in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South field, spanning the same passbands. The simulated and observed catalogs were provided to a number of teams within the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey collaboration to estimate the stellar masses for individual galaxies. A total of 11 teams participated, with different combinations of stellar mass measurement codes/methods, population synthesis models, star formation histories, extinction and age. For each simulated galaxy, the differences between the input stellar masses, Minput, and those estimated by each team, Mest, is defined as {{Δ }}{log}(M)\\equiv {log}({M}{estimated})-{log}({M}{input}), and used to

  7. Measurement of the mass difference between top and antitop quarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-03-01

    We present a measurement of the mass difference between top (t) and antitop (t¯) quarks using tt¯ candidate events reconstructed in the final state with one lepton and multiple jets. We use the full data set of Tevatron s=1.96TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7fb-1. We estimate event by event the mass difference to construct templates for top pair signal events and background events. The resulting mass difference distribution in data compared to signal and background templates using a likelihood fit yields ΔMtop=Mt-Mt¯=-1.95±1.11(stat)±0.59(syst)GeV/c2 and is in agreement with the standard model prediction of no mass difference.

  8. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Ntampaka, M; Sutherland, D J; Fromenteau, S; Poczos, B; Schneider, J

    2015-01-01

    We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers and show that a modern machine learning (ML) algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create two mock catalogs from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL1 simulation, one with perfect galaxy cluster membership information and the other where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line of sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. Assuming perfect membership knowledge, this unrealistic case produces a wide fractional mass error distribution, with width = 0.87. Interlopers introduce additional scatter, significantly widening the error distribution further (width = 2.13). We employ the Support Distribution Machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to...

  9. Measurement of the W boson mass with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of the W-boson mass is presented based on 4.6 fb^-1 of proton–proton collision data recorded in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The selected data sample consists of 7.8x10^6 candidates in the W -> mu nu channel and 5.9x10^6 candidates in the W -> e nu channel. The W-boson mass is determined using template fits to the charged lepton transverse momentum distributions, and to the charged lepton and E_T^miss transverse mass distribution. Special emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the experimental systematic uncertainties, as well as on the uncertainties due to the modeling of the vector boson production and decay. The final result is compared to the current world average and interpreted in the context of the global electroweak fit.

  10. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  11. Top quark mass measurements at and above threshold at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Seidel, Katja; Tesar, Michal; Poss, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of the expected precision of the top quark mass determination, measured at a linear $e^+e^-$ collider based on CLIC technology. GEANT4-based detector simulation and full event reconstruction including realistic physics and beam-induced background levels are used. Two different techniques to measure the top mass are studied: The direct reconstruction of the invariant mass of the top quark decay products and the measurement of the mass together with the strong coupling constant in a threshold scan, in both cases including first studies of expected systematic uncertainties. For the direct reconstruction, experimental uncertainties around 100 MeV are achieved, which are at present not matched by a theoretical understanding on a similar level. With a threshold scan, total uncertainties of around 100 MeV are achieved, including theoretical uncertainties in a well-defined top mass scheme. For the threshold scan, the precision at ILC is also studied to provide a comparison of the two linear collide...

  12. Information and backaction due to phase contrast imaging measurements of cold atomic gases: beyond Gaussian states

    CERN Document Server

    Ilo-Okeke, Ebubechukwu O

    2016-01-01

    We further examine a theory of phase contrast imaging (PCI) of cold atomic gases, first introduced by us in Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 112}, 233602 (2014). We model the PCI measurement by directly calculating the entangled state between the light and the atoms due to the ac Stark shift, which induces a conditional phase shift on the light depending upon the atomic state. By interfering the light that passes through the BEC with the original light, one can obtain information of the atomic state at a single shot level. We derive an exact expression for a measurement operator that embodies the information obtained from PCI, as well as the back-action on the atomic state. By the use of exact expressions for the measurement process, we go beyond the continuous variables approximation such that the non-Gaussian regime can be accessed for both the measured state and the post-measurement state. Features such as the photon probability density, signal, signal variance, Fisher information, error of the measurement, and the b...

  13. A new data evaluation approach for mass measurements of exotic nuclei performed with isochronous mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diwisch, M.; Fabian, B.; Kuzminchuk, N. [Justus Liebig University Giessen (Germany); Knoebel, R.; Geissel, H.; Plass, W.R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Boutin, D.; Brandau, C.; Chen, L. [Justus Liebig University Giessen (Germany); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Patyk, Z. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warszawa (Poland); Weick, H.; Beckert, K.; Bosch, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dolinskii, A.; Klepper, O.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, S.A.; Litvinov, Yu.A.; Mazzocco, M.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Winkler, M. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Cullen, I.J.; Liu, Z.; Walker, P.M. [University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Hausmann, M.; Montes, F. [Michigan State University, East Lansing (United States); Musumarra, A. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN Catania (Italy); Nakajima, S.; Suzuki, T.; Yamaguchi, T. [Saitama University, Saitama (Japan); Ohtsubo, T. [Niigata University, Niigata (Japan); Ozawa, A. [University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Sun, B. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Winckler, N. [Max Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) and Schottky Mass Spectrometry (SMS) are powerful tools to measure masses of rare exotic nuclei in a storage ring. While the SMS method provides very high accuracies it does not give access to rare isotopes with lifetimes in the sub second range because beam cooling has to be performed for a few seconds before the measurements start. As a complementary method IMS can be used without beam cooling to reach isotopes with lifetimes of only a few 10 μs. As a drawback of the IMS method one cannot achieve the high mass accuracy of the SMS method until now. For the data evaluation of the SMS data a correlation matrix method has been successfully applied in the past. In order to improve the accuracy of the IMS measurements the same method will now be used, which will allow to combine and to correlate data from different IMS measurements with each other. Applying this method to the analysis of previous experiments with uranium fission fragments at the FRS-ESR facility at GSI and to future experiments, will increase the accuracy of the IMS method and may lead to new mass values with reasonable accuracies for very rare and important nuclei for nuclear astrophysics such as {sup 130}Cd, which were not accessible before.

  14. Determination of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering lengths from measurement of $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ atom lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva, B; Benayoun, M; Benelli, A; Berka, Z; Brekhovskikh, V; Caragheorgheopol, G; Cechak, T; Chiba, M; Chliapnikov, P V; Ciocarlan, C; Constantinescu, S; Costantini, S; Curceanu, C; Doskarova, P; Dreossi, D; Drijard, D; Dudarev, A; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Fungueiriño Pazos, J L; Gallas Torreira, M; Gerndt, J; Gianotti, P; Goldin, D; Gomez, F; Gorin, A; Gorchakov, O; Guaraldo, C; Gugiu, M; Hansroul, M; Hons, Z; Hosek, R; Iliescu, M; Karpukhin, V; Kluson, J; Kobayashi, M; Kokkas, P; Komarov, V; Kruglov, V; Kruglova, L; Kulikov, A; Kuptsov, A; Kuroda, K I; Lamberto, A; Lanaro, A; Lapshin, V; Lednicky, R; Leruste, P; Levi Sandri, P; Lopez Aguera, A; Lucherini, V; Maki, T; Manuilov, I; Marin, J; Narjoux, J L; Nemenov, L; Nikitin, M; Nunez Pardo, T; Okada, K; Olchevskii, V; Pazos, A; Pentia, M; Penzo, A; Perreau, J M; Plo, M; Ponta, T; Rappazzo, G F; Riazantsev, A; Rodriguez, J M; Rodriguez Fernandez, A; Romero Vidal, A; Ronjin, V.M.; Rykalin, V; Saborido, J; Santamarina, C; Schacher, J; Schuetz, C; Sidorov, A; Smolik, J; Takeutchi, F; Tarasov, A; Tauscher, L; Tobar, M J; Trojek, T; Trusov, S; Utkin, V; Vazquez Doce, O; Vlachos, S; Voskresenskaya, O; Vrba, T; Willmott, C; Yazkov, V; Yoshimura, Y; Zhabitsky, M; Zrelov, P

    2011-01-01

    The DIRAC experiment at CERN has achieved a sizeable production of $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ atoms and has significantly improved the precision on its lifetime determination. From a sample of 21227 atomic pairs, a 4% measurement of the S-wave $\\pi\\pi$ scattering length difference $|a_0-a_2| = (.0.2533^{+0.0080}_{-0.0078}|_\\mathrm{stat}.{}^{+0.0078}_{-0.0073}|_\\mathrm{syst})M_{\\pi^+}^{-1}$ has been attained, providing an important test of Chiral Perturbation Theory.

  15. Measuring neutrino masses with a future galaxy survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2012-01-01

    that the minimum mass sum of sum m_nu ~ 0.06 eV in the normal hierarchy can be detected at 1.5 sigma to 2.5 sigma significance, depending on the model complexity, using a combination of galaxy and cosmic shear power spectrum measurements in conjunction with CMB temperature and polarisation observations from Planck....... With better knowledge of the galaxy bias, the significance of the detection could potentially reach 5.4 sigma. Interestingly, neither Planck+shear nor Planck+galaxy alone can achieve this level of sensitivity; it is the combined effect of galaxy and cosmic shear power spectrum measurements that breaks...... the persistent degeneracies between the neutrino mass, the physical matter density, and the Hubble parameter. Notwithstanding this remarkable sensitivity to sum m_nu, Euclid-like shear and galaxy data will not be sensitive to the exact mass spectrum of the neutrino sector; no significant bias (sigma...

  16. A New Top Mass Measurement in The Dilepton Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trovato, Marco; /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U.

    2008-01-01

    The top quark discovery completed the present picture of the fundamental constituents of the nature. Since then, the Collider Detector at Fermilab and D0 Collaborations have been spending great efforts to measure its properties better. About 30 times larger than the second heaviest quark, the mass of the top has been measured with increased statistic and more and more sophisticated techniques in order to reduce as much as possible its uncertainty. This is because the top is expected to play a fundamental role in the Standard Model. The value of its mass sets boundaries on the mass of the unobserved Higgs boson, and perhaps more appealing, studies of its properties might lead to the discovery of new physics.

  17. CLASSIFYING BENIGN AND MALIGNANT MASSES USING STATISTICAL MEASURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Surendiran

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the primary and most common disease found in women which causes second highest rate of death after lung cancer. The digital mammogram is the X-ray of breast captured for the analysis, interpretation and diagnosis. According to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS benign and malignant can be differentiated using its shape, size and density, which is how radiologist visualize the mammograms. According to BIRADS mass shape characteristics, benign masses tend to have round, oval, lobular in shape and malignant masses are lobular or irregular in shape. Measuring regular and irregular shapes mathematically is found to be a difficult task, since there is no single measure to differentiate various shapes. In this paper, the malignant and benign masses present in mammogram are classified using Hue, Saturation and Value (HSV weight function based statistical measures. The weight function is robust against noise and captures the degree of gray content of the pixel. The statistical measures use gray weight value instead of gray pixel value to effectively discriminate masses. The 233 mammograms from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM benchmark dataset have been used. The PASW data mining modeler has been used for constructing Neural Network for identifying importance of statistical measures. Based on the obtained important statistical measure, the C5.0 tree has been constructed with 60-40 data split. The experimental results are found to be encouraging. Also, the results will agree to the standard specified by the American College of Radiology-BIRADS Systems.

  18. Mass measurements on radioactive isotopes with a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bollen, G; Audi, G; Beck, D; Herfurth, F; Kluge, H J; Kohl, A; Lunney, M D; Moore, R B; De Saint-Simon, M; Schark, E; Schwarz, S; Szerypo, R B

    1999-01-01

    Penning trap mass measurements on short-lived isotopes are performed with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at the radioactive beam facility ISOLDE/CERN. In the last years the applicability of the spectrometer has been considerably extended by the installation of an RFQ trap ion beam buncher and a new cooler Penning trap, which is operated as an isobar separator. These improvements allowed for the first time measurements on isotopes of rare earth elements and on isotopes with Z=80-85. In all cases an accuracy of $\\delta$m/m approximately =1$\\cdot$10$^{-7}$was achieved. (20 refs).

  19. Fluorescence (TALIF) measurement of atomic hydrogen concentration in a coplanar surface dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrkvičková, M.; Ráheľ, J.; Dvořák, P.; Trunec, D.; Morávek, T.

    2016-10-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved measurements of atomic hydrogen concentration above the dielectric of coplanar barrier discharge are presented for atmospheric pressure in 2.2% H2/Ar. The measurements were carried out in the afterglow phase by means of two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). The difficulties of employing the TALIF technique in close proximity to the dielectric surface wall were successfully addressed by taking measurements on a suitable convexly curved dielectric barrier, and by proper mathematical treatment of parasitic signals from laser-surface interactions. It was found that the maximum atomic hydrogen concentration is situated closest to the dielectric wall from which it gradually decays. The maximum absolute concentration was more than 1022 m-3. In the afterglow phase, the concentration of atomic hydrogen above the dielectric surface stays constant for a considerable time (10 μs-1 ms), with longer times for areas situated farther from the dielectric surface. The existence of such a temporal plateau was explained by the presented 1D model: the recombination losses of atomic hydrogen farther from the dielectric surface are compensated by the diffusion of atomic hydrogen from regions close to the dielectric surface. The fact that a temporal plateau exists even closest to the dielectric surface suggests that the dielectric surface acts as a source of atomic hydrogen in the afterglow phase.

  20. Improving Sensitivity and Bandwidth of an Atomic Magnetometer using Quantum Non-Demolition Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vishal; Vasilakis, Georgios; Romalis, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The fundamental sensitivity of an atomic magnetometer is limited by spin projection noise. In the case of uniform spin relaxation, it is well understood that it is not possible to improve the sensitivity using spin squeezing induced by quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement for measurement time scales longer than spin relaxation time [1, 2]. It is however possible to increase the bandwidth of the magnetometer using QND measurement. Here we experimentally demonstrate, in excellent agreement with the theory, an improvement in the bandwidth of our scalar alkali vapor atomic magnetometer using continuous QND measurement. We also investigate the possibility of improving sensitivity of our magnetometer in the special case in which the spin relaxation is time dependent. The case of time dependent spin relaxation naturally arises in high polarization regime in an alkali-alkali spin-exchange relaxation dominated atomic sample. [1] S. F. Huelga, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3865 -- 3868, 1997. [2] M. Auzinsh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 173002, 2004.

  1. A NEW MEASUREMENT OF THE W BOSON MASS FROM CDF

    CERN Multimedia

    Ashutosh Kotwal

    CDF has measured the W boson mass using approx. 200pb-1 of data collected at  s = 1.96 TeV. The preliminary result mW = 80.413 ± 0.034(stat) ± 0.034(syst) GeV supports and strengthens the hypothesis of a light Higgs boson, based on the global electroweak fit in the standard model framework. The total measurement uncertainty of 48 MeV makes this result the most precise single measurement of the W boson mass to date. The mass of the W boson is a very interesting quantity. Experimentally, it can be measured precisely because of the two-body decay of the W boson into a charged lepton and a neutrino. Theoretically, it receives self-energy corrections due to vacuum fluctuations involving virtual particles. Thus the W boson mass probes the particle spectrum in nature, including those particles that have yet to be observed directly. The hypothetical particle of most immediate interest is the Higgs boson, representing the quantum of the Higgs field that spontaneously acquires a vacuu...

  2. Measuring the top quark mass in the channel: A study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajwant Kaur; Suman B Beri; J M Kohli

    2001-10-01

    We describe a simple method to measure the top quark mass in the $t\\overline{t}$→ WbW$\\overline{b}$→ channel that may be useful in Run II of DØ detector. The method is validated by applying it to the Run Ib data.

  3. Mass flowmeter for measuring by the CT method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besseling, Johannes Henricus; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2006-01-01

    A mass flowmeter of the thermal type provided with a flow sensor with a flow tube through which a fluid can flow during operation, with a temperature sensor in an upstream position (A) and a heater (H) in a downstream position (B), and power control means and temperature measuring means for keeping

  4. Precise Measurement of Separation Between Two Spherical Source Masses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈德才; 罗俊; 胡忠坤; 赵亮

    2004-01-01

    A driving gauge method is performed to determine the separation between two spherical source masses in the measurement of Newtonian gravitational constant G. The experimental result shows that the uncertainty of determining the separation is about 0.35μm, which would contribute an uncertainty of 7.3ppm to the value of G.

  5. Applicability of hydraulic dynamometer for measuring load mass on forwarders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandur Zdravko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, with the start of wood biomass production from wood residues, the need for determining the quantity of extracted wood residuals on a landing site has appeared. The beginning of intensive usage of wood residues for wood biomass starts in lowland forest where all wood residues are extracted with forwarders. There are several ways to determine load mass on a forwarder, first and probably most accurate is the use of load cells which are installed between forwarder undercarriage and loading space. In Croatia, as far as it is known, there is no forwarder with such equipment, although manufacturers offer the installation of such equipment when buying a new forwarder. The second option is using a portable measuring platform (axle scale which was already used for research of axle loads of trucks and forwarders. The data obtained with the measuring platform are very accurate, while its deficiency is relatively great mass, large dimensions and high price. The third option is determining mass by using hydraulic dynamometer which is installed on crane between the rotator and the telescopic boom. The production and installation of such a system is very simple, and with the price it can easily compete with previously described measuring systems. The main deficiency of this system is its unsatisfying accuracy. The results of assortment mass measuring with hydraulic dynamometer installed on a hydraulic crane and discussion on factors influencing obtained results will be presented in this paper.

  6. Concurrence Measurement for the Two-Qubit Optical and Atomic States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Concurrence provides us an effective approach to quantify entanglement, which is quite important in quantum information processing applications. In the paper, we mainly review some direct concurrence measurement protocols of the two-qubit optical or atomic system. We first introduce the concept of concurrence for a two-qubit system. Second, we explain the approaches of the concurrence measurement in both a linear and a nonlinear optical system. Third, we introduce some protocols for measuring the concurrence of the atomic entanglement system.

  7. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a Strontium atomic beam

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, F; Xu, P; Tian, X; Wang, Y; Ren, J; Wu, Haibin; Chang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    We measure precisely the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam with a velocity selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. By using the ultrastable laser system and narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms, the resolution of the velocity measured can be reached 0.13m/s, corresponding to 90$\\mu K$ in energy unit. The experimental results are agreement very well with a theoretical calculation. With the spectroscopic techniques, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of $^{88}$Sr is measured by an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, which is given by 434 829 121 318(10)kHz.

  8. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie; Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm- 3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm- 3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges.

  9. Can the masses of isolated planetary-mass gravitational lenses be measured by terrestrial parallax?

    CERN Document Server

    Freeman, M; Abe, F; Albrow, M D; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Bray, J C; Cherrie, J M; Christie, G W; Dionnet, Z; Gould, A; Han, C; Heyrovsky, D; McCormick, J M; Moorhouse, D M; Muraki, Y; Natusch, T; Rattenbury, N J; Skowron, J; Sumi, T; Suzuki, D; Tan, T -G; Tristram, P J; Yock, P C M

    2014-01-01

    Recently Sumi et al. (2011) reported evidence for a large population of planetary-mass objects (PMOs) that are either unbound or orbit host stars in orbits > 10 AU. Their result was deduced from the statistical distribution of durations of gravitational microlensing events observed by the MOA collaboration during 2006 and 2007. Here we study the feasibility of measuring the mass of an individual PMO through microlensing by examining a particular event, MOA-2011-BLG-274. This event was unusual as the duration was short, the magnification high, the source-size effect large and the angular Einstein radius small. Also, it was intensively monitored from widely separated locations under clear skies at low air masses. Choi et al. (2012) concluded that the lens of the event may have been a PMO but they did not attempt a measurement of its mass. We report here a re-analysis of the event using re-reduced data. We confirm the results of Choi et al. and attempt a measurement of the mass and distance of the lens using the...

  10. Refining Mass Measurements of Kepler Planets with Keck/HIRES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Howard T.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Howard, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    We present improved radial velocity mass measurements from Keck/HIRES for exoplanets detected by NASA’s Kepler Mission. Since Kepler’s launch 6 years ago, ~30 planetary systems have been monitored with radial velocities, resulting in measured masses for many planets between 1.0 and 4.0 Earth radii. The resulting planet masses have been used to determine the transition between planets with a rocky interior and those with a lower density interior which requiring significant H/He atmospheres. We provide updated masses and densities for those planets published in Marcy et al (2014) based on two additional observing seasons with HIRES of the Kepler field. These radial velocities also reveal non-transiting planets in systems with previously found transiting planets. One such system has a non-transiting planet with a period between two transiting planets, providing a constraint on the co-planarity of the system. Finally, we provide an updated mass-radius relation, showing the distinction between planets that must have a substantial iron-silicate interior, and those requiring significant contributions from volatiles such as hydrogen and helium.

  11. Precision top-quark mass measurement at CDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-10-12

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron √s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb(-1). Using a sample of tt¯ candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, M(top)=172.85±0.71(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV/c(2).

  12. Precision Top-Quark Mass Measurements at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-07-01

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1}. Using a sample of t{bar t} candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, mtop = 172.85 {+-} 0.71 (stat) {+-} 0.85 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  13. A precise measurement of the top quark mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, Brian N. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2007-04-01

    We present a measurement of the mass of the top quark using data from proton-antiproton collisions recorded at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. Events are selected from the single lepton plus jets final state (t$\\bar{t}$ → W+bW-$\\bar{b}$ → ℓvbq$\\bar{q}$'$\\bar{b}$). The top quark mass is extracted using a calculation of the probability density for a t$\\bar{t}$ final state to resemble a data event. This probability density is a function of both top quark mass and energy scale of calorimeter jets, constrained in situ with the hadronic W boson mass. Using 167 events observed in 955 pb-1 integrated luminosity, we achieve the single most precise measurement of top quark mass to date of 170.8 ± 2.2 (stat.) ± 1.4 (syst.) GeV/c2, where the quoted statistical uncertainty includes uncertainty from the determination of the jet energy scale.

  14. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntampaka, M.; Trac, H.; Sutherland, D. J.; Fromenteau, S.; Póczos, B.; Schneider, J.

    2016-11-01

    We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers and show that a modern machine learning algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create two mock catalogs from Multidark’s publicly available N-body MDPL1 simulation, one with perfect galaxy cluster membership information and the other where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power-law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. Assuming perfect membership knowledge, this unrealistic case produces a wide fractional mass error distribution, with a width of {{Δ }}ε ≈ 0.87. Interlopers introduce additional scatter, significantly widening the error distribution further ({{Δ }}ε ≈ 2.13). We employ the support distribution machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement ({{Δ }}ε ≈ 0.67) for the contaminated case. Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even the scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  15. (U) An Analytic Examination of Piezoelectric Ejecta Mass Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tregillis, Ian Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Ongoing efforts to validate a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) based ejecta source model [1, 2, 3] in LANL ASC codes use ejecta areal masses derived from piezoelectric sensor data [4, 5, 6]. However, the standard technique for inferring masses from sensor voltages implicitly assumes instantaneous ejecta creation [7], which is not a feature of the RMI source model. To investigate the impact of this discrepancy, we define separate “areal mass functions” (AMFs) at the source and sensor in terms of typically unknown distribution functions for the ejecta particles, and derive an analytic relationship between them. Then, for the case of single-shock ejection into vacuum, we use the AMFs to compare the analytic (or “true”) accumulated mass at the sensor with the value that would be inferred from piezoelectric voltage measurements. We confirm the inferred mass is correct when creation is instantaneous, and furthermore prove that when creation is not instantaneous, the inferred values will always overestimate the true mass. Finally, we derive an upper bound for the error imposed on a perfect system by the assumption of instantaneous ejecta creation. When applied to shots in the published literature, this bound is frequently less than several percent. Errors exceeding 15% may require velocities or timescales at odds with experimental observations.

  16. Measuring the mass of solar system planets using pulsar timing

    CERN Document Server

    Champion, D J; Manchester, R N; Edwards, R T; Backer, D C; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Coles, W; Demorest, P B; Ferdman, R D; Folkner, W M; Hotan, A W; Kramer, M; Lommen, A N; Nice, D J; Purver, M B; Sarkissian, J M; Stairs, I H; van Straten, W; Verbiest, J P W; Yardley, D R B

    2010-01-01

    High-precision pulsar timing relies on a solar-system ephemeris in order to convert times of arrival (TOAs) of pulses measured at an observatory to the solar system barycenter. Any error in the conversion to the barycentric TOAs leads to a systematic variation in the observed timing residuals; specifically, an incorrect planetary mass leads to a predominantly sinusoidal variation having a period and phase associated with the planet's orbital motion about the Sun. By using an array of pulsars (PSRs J0437-4715, J1744-1134, J1857+0943, J1909-3744), the masses of the planetary systems from Mercury to Saturn have been determined. These masses are consistent with the best-known masses determined by spacecraft observations, with the mass of the Jovian system, 9.547921(2)E-4 Msun, being significantly more accurate than the mass determined from the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft, and consistent with but less accurate than the value from the Galileo spacecraft. While spacecraft are likely to produce the most accurate m...

  17. (U) An Analytic Study of Piezoelectric Ejecta Mass Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tregillis, Ian Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-16

    We consider the piezoelectric measurement of the areal mass of an ejecta cloud, for the specific case where ejecta are created by a single shock at the free surface and fly ballistically through vacuum to the sensor. To do so, we define time- and velocity-dependent ejecta “areal mass functions” at the source and sensor in terms of typically unknown distribution functions for the ejecta particles. Next, we derive an equation governing the relationship between the areal mass function at the source (which resides in the rest frame of the free surface) and at the sensor (which resides in the laboratory frame). We also derive expressions for the analytic (“true”) accumulated ejecta mass at the sensor and the measured (“inferred”) value obtained via the standard method for analyzing piezoelectric voltage traces. This approach enables us to derive an exact expression for the error imposed upon a piezoelectric ejecta mass measurement (in a perfect system) by the assumption of instantaneous creation. We verify that when the ejecta are created instantaneously (i.e., when the time dependence is a delta function), the piezoelectric inference method exactly reproduces the correct result. When creation is not instantaneous, the standard piezo analysis will always overestimate the true mass. However, the error is generally quite small (less than several percent) for most reasonable velocity and time dependences. In some cases, errors exceeding 10-15% may require velocity distributions or ejecta production timescales inconsistent with experimental observations. These results are demonstrated rigorously with numerous analytic test problems.

  18. Measurements of the tau Mass and Mass Difference of the tau^+ and tau^- at BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30

    The authors present the result of a precision measurement of the mass of the {tau} lepton, M{sub {tau}}, based on 423 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, they determine the mass to be 1776.68 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.41(syst) MeV. They also measure the mass difference between the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -}, and obtain (M{sub {tau}{sup +}} - M{sub {tau}{sup -}})/M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} = (-3.4 {+-} 1.3(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, where M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} is the average value of M{sub {tau}{sup +}} and M{sub {tau}{sup -}}.

  19. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick David [US Geological Survey, Storrs, CT (United States); Singha, Kamini [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Johnson, Timothy C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haggerty, Roy [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Binley, Andrew [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Lane, John W. [US Geological Survey, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2014-11-25

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  20. Mass Measurements of Isolated Objects from Space-based Microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Calchi Novati, S.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Ranc, C.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Poleski, R.; Bozza, V.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Porritt, I.; Wibking, B.; Yee, J. C.; SPITZER Team; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Group; Choi, J.-Y.; Park, H.; Jung, Y. K.; Shin, I.-G.; Albrow, M. D.; Park, B.-G.; Kim, S.-L.; Lee, C.-U.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, D.-J.; Lee, Y.; KMTNET Group; Friedmann, M.; Kaspi, S.; Maoz, D.; WISE Group; Hundertmark, M.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Dominik, M.; Bachelet, E.; Dong, Subo; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Mao, S.; Menzies, J.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Wambsganss, J.; RoboNeT Team; Skottfelt, J.; Andersen, M. I.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Gu, S.-H.; Hinse, T. C.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Peixinho, N.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Tronsgaard, R.; Scarpetta, G.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; von Essen, C.; Wang, Y.-B.; Wertz, O.; MiNDSTEP Group

    2016-07-01

    We report on the mass and distance measurements of two single-lens events from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measurements, we find that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-1268 is very likely a brown dwarf (BD). Assuming that the source star lies behind the same amount of dust as the Bulge red clump, we find the lens is a 45 ± 7 {M}{{J}} BD at 5.9 ± 1.0 kpc. The lens of of the second event, OGLE-2015-BLG-0763, is a 0.50 ± 0.04 {M}⊙ star at 6.9 ± 1.0 kpc. We show that the probability to definitively measure the mass of isolated microlenses is dramatically increased once simultaneous ground- and space-based observations are conducted.

  1. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalev, Andrew N

    2003-11-01

    The authors describe a measurement of the top quark mass using events with two charged leptons collected by the CDF II Detector from p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The posterior probability distribution of the top quark pole mass is calculated using the differential cross-section for the t{bar t} production and decay expressed with respect to observed leptons and jets momenta. The presence of background events in the collected sample is modeled using calculations of the differential cross-sections for major background processes. This measurement represents the first application of this method to events with two charged leptons. In a data sample with integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1}, they observe 33 candidate events and measure M{sub top} = 165.2 {+-} 61.{sub stat} {+-} 3.4{sub syst} GeV/c{sup 2}.

  2. Mercury mass measurement in fluorescent lamps via neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viererbl, L.; Vinš, M.; Lahodová, Z.; Fuksa, A.; Kučera, J.; Koleška, M.; Voljanskij, A.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury is an essential component of fluorescent lamps. Not all fluorescent lamps are recycled, resulting in contamination of the environment with toxic mercury, making measurement of the mercury mass used in fluorescent lamps important. Mercury mass measurement of lamps via instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) was tested under various conditions in the LVR-15 research reactor. Fluorescent lamps were irradiated in different positions in vertical irradiation channels and a horizontal channel in neutron fields with total fluence rates from 3×108 cm-2 s-1 to 1014 cm-2 s-1. The 202Hg(n,γ)203Hg nuclear reaction was used for mercury mass evaluation. Activities of 203Hg and others induced radionuclides were measured via gamma spectrometry with an HPGe detector at various times after irradiation. Standards containing an Hg2Cl2 compound were used to determine mercury mass. Problems arise from the presence of elements with a large effective cross section in luminescent material (europium, antimony and gadolinium) and glass (boron). The paper describes optimization of the NAA procedure in the LVR-15 research reactor with particular attention to influence of neutron self-absorption in fluorescent lamps.

  3. Measuring neutrino mass with radioactive ions in a storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Lindroos, Mats; Orme, Christopher; Schwetz, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We propose a method to measure the neutrino mass kinematically using beams of ions which undergo beta decay. The idea is to tune the ion beam momentum so that in most decays, the electron is forward moving with respect to the beam, and only in decays near the endpoint is the electron moving backwards. Then, by counting the backward moving electrons one can observe the effect of neutrino mass on the beta spectrum close to the endpoint. In order to reach sensitivities for $m_\

  4. On uplimit of accurate measurement of tau mass

    CERN Document Server

    Mo, X H

    2016-01-01

    Tau lepton as one of three elementary leptons in nature, the measurement of its mass has ever been performed since its discovery. The present relative accuracy is already at the level of better than 10 to minus 4 and more effects are still made in order to increase the accuracy further. However, the analysis of available techniques for and expectable luminosity from e+e- collider indicates that the precision uplimit of tau mass is almost reached, which means that brand new approaches should be looked for if the great improvement is yearned for.

  5. Measurement of the hyperfine splitting of {sup 133}Cs atoms in superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, K., E-mail: kimamura@riken.jp [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Yang, X. F. [Peking University, School of Physics (China); Mitsuya, Y. [Meiji University, Department of Physics (Japan); Fujita, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Hayasaka, M. [Tokyo Gakugei University, Department of Physics (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Odashima, H. [Meiji University, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    We have been developing a new nuclear laser spectroscopy method named “OROCHI” (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher). OROCHI utilizes superfluid helium (He II) not only as an efficient stopping medium of highly energetic ions but also as a host matrix of in-situ atomic laser spectroscopy. Using these characteristic of He II, we produce atomic spin polarization and measure Zeeman and hyperfine structure (HFS) splitting using laser-RF (radio frequency) / MW (microwave) double resonance method. From the measured energy splittings, we can deduce nuclear spins and moments. So far, we have conducted a series of experiments using both stable ({sup 85,87}Rb, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 197}Au, {sup 107,109}Ag) and unstable isotopes ({sup 84,86}Rb) to confirm the feasibility of OROCHI method, especially observing Zeeman resonance and determining nuclear spins. The measurement of HFS splitting of atoms introduced into He II is indispensable to clarify the nuclear properties by deducing nuclear moments as well as the study of nuclear spins. For this purpose, we perform a precision measurement of HFS of {sup 133}Cs atoms immersed in He II using laser ablation technique. In this paper, we describe the result of the experiment.

  6. The measurement of angular differential cross sections at the SSL Atomic Scattering Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    The design of the SSL Atomic Scattering Facility (ASF) located at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center as well as some of the initial experiments to be performed with it, are covered. The goal is to develop an apparatus capable of measuring angular differential cross sections (ADCS) for the scattering of 2 to 14 eV atomic oxygen from various gaseous targets. At present little is known about atomic oxygen scattering with kinetic energies of a few eV. This apparatus is designed to increase the understanding of collisions in this energy region. Atomic oxygen scattering processes are of vital interest to NASA because the space shuttle as well as other low earth orbit satellites will be subjected to a flux of 5 eV atomic oxygen on the ram surfaces while in orbit. The primary experiments will involve the measurements of ADCS for atomic oxygen scattering from gaseous targets (in particular, molecular nitrogen). These, as well as the related initial experiments involving thermal He scattering from N2 and O2 targets will be described.

  7. Approximate and Conditional Teleportation of an Unknown Atomic-Entangled State Without Bell-State Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chang-Yong; LI Shao-Hua

    2007-01-01

    A scheme for approximately and conditionally teleporting an unknown atomic-entangled state in cavity QED is proposed.It is the novel extension of the scheme of [Phys.Rev.A 69 (2004) 064302],where the state to be teleported is an unknown atomic state and where only a time point of system evolution and the corresponding fidelity implementing the teleportation are given.In fact,there exists multi-time points and the corresponding fidclities,which are shown in this paper and then are used to realize the approximate and conditional teleportation of the unknown atomic-entangled state.Naturally,our scheme does not involve the Bell-state measurement or an additional atom,which is required in the Bell-state measurement,only requiring one single-mode cavity.The scheme may be generalized to not only the teleportation of the cavity-mode-entangled-state by means of a single atom but also the teleportation of the unknown trapped-ion-entangled-state in a linear ion trap and the teleportation of the multi-atomic entangled states included in generalized GHZ states.

  8. Fluoride sample matrices and reaction cells — new capabilities for isotope measurements in accelerator mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliades J.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Two new techniques, which extend the range of elements that can be analyzed by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS, and which increase its isobar selection capabilities, have been recently introduced. The first consists of embedding the sample material in a fluoride matrix (e.g. PbF2, which facilitates the production, in the ion source, of fluoride molecular anions that include the isotope of interest. In addition to forming anions with large electron binding energies and thereby increasing the range of analysable elements, in many cases by selection of a molecular form with a particular number of fluorine atoms, some isobar discrimination can be obtained. The second technique, for the significant reduction of atomic isobar interferences, is used following mass selection of the rare isotope. It consists of the deceleration, cooling and reaction of the rare mass beam with a gas, selected so that unwanted isobars are greatly attenuated in comparison with the isotope of interest. Proof of principle measurements for the analysis of 36C1 and 41Ca have provided encouraging results and work is proceeding on the integration of these techniques in a new AMS system planned for installation in late 2012 at the University of Ottawa.

  9. Measurement noise 100 times lower than the quantum-projection limit using entangled atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosten, Onur; Engelsen, Nils J; Krishnakumar, Rajiv; Kasevich, Mark A

    2016-01-28

    Quantum metrology uses quantum entanglement--correlations in the properties of microscopic systems--to improve the statistical precision of physical measurements. When measuring a signal, such as the phase shift of a light beam or an atomic state, a prominent limitation to achievable precision arises from the noise associated with the counting of uncorrelated probe particles. This noise, commonly referred to as shot noise or projection noise, gives rise to the standard quantum limit (SQL) to phase resolution. However, it can be mitigated down to the fundamental Heisenberg limit by entangling the probe particles. Despite considerable experimental progress in a variety of physical systems, a question that persists is whether these methods can achieve performance levels that compare favourably with optimized conventional (non-entangled) systems. Here we demonstrate an approach that achieves unprecedented levels of metrological improvement using half a million (87)Rb atoms in their 'clock' states. The ensemble is 20.1 ± 0.3 decibels (100-fold) spin-squeezed via an optical-cavity-based measurement. We directly resolve small microwave-induced rotations 18.5 ± 0.3 decibels (70-fold) beyond the SQL. The single-shot phase resolution of 147 microradians achieved by the apparatus is better than that achieved by the best engineered cold atom sensors despite lower atom numbers. We infer entanglement of more than 680 ± 35 particles in the atomic ensemble. Applications include atomic clocks, inertial sensors, and fundamental physics experiments such as tests of general relativity or searches for electron electric dipole moment. To this end, we demonstrate an atomic clock measurement with a quantum enhancement of 10.5 ± 0.3 decibels (11-fold), limited by the phase noise of our microwave source.

  10. The Correlation of the N{sub A} Measurements by Counting {sup 28}Si Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mana, G., E-mail: g.mana@inrim.it; Massa, E.; Sasso, C. P. [INRIM—Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Str. delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Stock, M. [BIPM—Bureau International des Poids et Mesures BIPM, Pavillon de Breteuil, 92312 Sèvres Cedex (France); Fujii, K.; Kuramoto, N.; Mizushima, S.; Narukawa, T. [NMIJ—National Metrology Institute of Japan, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8563 (Japan); Borys, M.; Busch, I.; Nicolaus, A.; Pramann, A. [PTB—Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    An additional value of the Avogadro constant was obtained by counting the atoms in isotopically enriched Si spheres. With respect to the previous determination, the spheres were etched and repolished to eliminate metal contaminations and to improve the roundness. In addition, all the input quantities—molar mass, lattice parameter, mass, and volume—were remeasured aiming at a smaller uncertainty. In order to make the values given in Andreas et al. [Metrologia 48, S1 (2011)] and Azuma et al. [Metrologia 52, 360 (2015)] usable for a least squares adjustment, we report about the estimate of their correlation.

  11. Comment on “Atomic mass compilation 2012” by B. Pfeiffer, K. Venkataramaniah, U. Czok, C. Scheidenberger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audi, G., E-mail: amdc.audi@gmail.com [CSNSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Sud, Bât. 108, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Block, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bollen, G. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Goriely, S. [Institut d’Astronomie et d’Astrophysique, CP-226, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Hardy, J.C. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Herfurth, F. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kondev, F.G. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Kluge, H.-J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Lunney, D. [CSNSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Sud, Bât. 108, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Pearson, J.M. [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Savard, G. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Sharma, K.S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); and others

    2015-05-15

    In order to avoid errors and confusion that may arise from the recent publication of a paper entitled “Atomic Mass Compilation 2012”, we explain the important difference between a compilation and an evaluation; the former is a necessary but insufficient condition for the latter. The simple list of averaged mass values offered by the “Atomic Mass Compilation” uses none of the numerous links and correlations present in the large body of input data that are carefully maintained within the “Atomic Mass Evaluation”. As such, the mere compilation can only produce results of inferior accuracy. Illustrative examples are given.

  12. First online multireflection time-of-flight mass measurements of isobar chains produced by fusion-evaporation reactions: Toward identification of superheavy elements via mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schury, P.; Wada, M.; Ito, Y.; Kaji, D.; Arai, F.; MacCormick, M.; Murray, I.; Haba, H.; Jeong, S.; Kimura, S.; Koura, H.; Miyatake, H.; Morimoto, K.; Morita, K.; Ozawa, A.; Rosenbusch, M.; Reponen, M.; Söderström, P.-A.; Takamine, A.; Tanaka, T.; Wollnik, H.

    2017-01-01

    Using a multireflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph located after a gas cell coupled with the gas-filled recoil ion separator GARIS-II, the masses of several α -decaying heavy nuclei were directly and precisely measured. The nuclei were produced via fusion-evaporation reactions and separated from projectilelike and targetlike particles using GARIS-II before being stopped in a helium-filled gas cell. Time-of-flight spectra for three isobar chains, 204Fr-204Rn-204At-204Po , 205Fr-205Rn-205At-205Po-205Bi , and 206Fr-206Rn-206At , were observed. Precision atomic mass values were determined for Fr-206204, Rn,205204, and At,205204. Identifications of 205Bi, Po,205204, 206Rn, and 206At were made with N ≲10 detected ions, representing the next step toward use of mass spectrometry to identify exceedingly low-yield species such as superheavy element ions.

  13. Use of O2 airglow for calibrating direct atomic oxygen measurements from sounding rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Witt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge about the distribution of atomic oxygen is crucial for many studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Direct measurements of atomic oxygen by the resonance fluorescence technique at 130 nm have been made from many sounding rocket payloads in the past. This measurement technique yields atomic oxygen profiles with good sensitivity and altitude resolution. However, accuracy is a problem as calibration and aerodynamics make the quantitative analysis challenging. Most often, accuracies better than a factor 2 are not to be expected from direct atomic oxygen measurements. As an example, we present results from the NLTE (Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium sounding rocket campaign at Esrange, Sweden, in 1998, with simultaneous O2 airglow and O resonance fluorescence measurements. O number densities are found to be consistent with the nightglow analysis, but only within the uncertainty limits of the resonance fluorescence technique. Based on these results, we here describe how better atomic oxygen number densities can be obtained by calibrating direct techniques with complementary airglow photometer measurements and detailed aerodynamic analysis. Night-time direct O measurements can be complemented by photometric detection of the O2 (b1∑g+−X3∑g- Atmospheric Band at 762 nm, while during daytime the O2 (a1Δg−X3∑g- Infrared Atmospheric Band at 1.27 μm can be used. The combination of a photometer and a rather simple resonance fluorescence probe can provide atomic oxygen profiles with both good accuracy and good height resolution.

  14. Titan's Topside Ionospheric Composition: Cassini Plasma Spectrometer Ion Mass Spectrometer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, Edward; Hartle, Richard; Ali, Ashraf; Cooper, John; Lipatov, Alexander; Simpson, David; Sarantos, Menelaos; Chornay, Dennis; Smith, Todd

    2017-01-01

    We present ion composition measurements of Titan's topside ionosphere using both T9 and T15 Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) measurements. The IMS is able to make measurements of Titan's ionosphere due to ionospheric outflows as originally reported for the T9 flyby. This allows one to take advantage of the unique capabilities of the CAPS IMS which measures both the mass-per-charge (M/Q) of the ions and the fragments of the ions produced inside the sensor such as carbon, nitrogen and oxygen fragments. Specific attention will be given to such ions as NH4 +, N +, O +, CH4 +, CxHy +, and HCNH + ions as examples. The CAPS IMS uses a time-of-flight (TOF) technique which accelerates ions up to 14.6 kV, so they can pass through ultra-thin carbon foils. Neutral fragments are used to measure the ion M/Q and positive fragments to measure the atomic components. We preliminarily find, by using IMS measurements of T9 and T15 ionospheric outflows, evidence for methane group ions, nitrogen ions, ammonium ions, water group ions and CnHm + ions with n = 2, 3, and 4 within Titan's topside ionosphere. E.C. Sittler acknowledges support at Goddard Space Flight Center by the CAPS Cassini Project from JPL funds under contract # NAS703001TONMO711123/1405851.

  15. Magnetometer suitable for Earth field measurement based on transient atomic response

    CERN Document Server

    Lenci, L; Valente, P; Failache, H; Lezama, A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of a simple atomic magnetometer using $^{87}$Rb vapor suitable for Earth magnetic field monitoring. The magnetometer is based on time-domain determination of the transient precession frequency of the atomic alignment around the measured field. A sensitivity of 1.5 nT/$\\sqrt{Hz}$ is demonstrated on the measurement of the Earth magnetic field in the laboratory. We discuss the different parameters determining the magnetometer precision and accuracy and predict a sensitivity of 30 pT/$\\sqrt{Hz}$

  16. STS-46 plasma composition measurements using the EOIM-3 mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunton, Donald E.; Trzcinski, Edmund; Gosselin, Roger; Koontz, Steven; Leger, Lubert; Visentine, James T.

    1995-01-01

    One of the active instruments incorporated into the Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials - 3 experiment was a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The primary objectives for this instrument, which was built by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and was a veteran of the STS-4 flight in 1982, were to quantify the flux of atomic oxygen striking the test surfaces in the EOIM-3 payload and to detect surface reaction products from the materials in the carousel. Other speakers in this session have covered the results of these experiments. Prior to the 40-hour-long dedicated EOIM-3 mission segment at the end of the STS-46 flight, the authors used the mass spectrometer to make measurements of ion and neutral gas composition in the shuttle environment. About 25 hours of data were collected during a variety of mission events, including Eureca deployment at high altitude and many tethered satellite system operations.

  17. Uncertainties and re-analysis of glacier mass balance measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zemp

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Glacier-wide mass balance has been measured for more than sixty years and is widely used as an indicator of climate change and to assess the glacier contribution to runoff and sea level rise. Until present, comprehensive uncertainty assessments have rarely been carried out and mass balance data have often been applied using rough error estimation or without error considerations. In this study, we propose a framework for re-analyzing glacier mass balance series including conceptual and statistical toolsets for assessment of random and systematic errors as well as for validation and calibration (if necessary of the glaciological with the geodetic balance results. We demonstrate the usefulness and limitations of the proposed scheme drawing on an analysis that comprises over 50 recording periods for a dozen glaciers and we make recommendations to investigators and users of glacier mass balance data. Reanalysis of glacier mass balance series needs to become a standard procedure for every monitoring programme to improve data quality and provide thorough uncertainty estimates.

  18. Comparisons between different techniques for measuring mass segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    We examine the performance of four different methods which are used to measure mass segregation in star-forming regions: the radial variation of the mass function $\\mathcal{M}_{\\rm MF}$; the minimum spanning tree-based $\\Lambda_{\\rm MSR}$ method; the local surface density $\\Sigma_{\\rm LDR}$ method; and the $\\Omega_{\\rm GSR}$ technique, which isolates groups of stars and determines whether the most massive star in each group is more centrally concentrated than the average star. All four methods have been proposed in the literature as techniques for quantifying mass segregation, yet they routinely produce contradictory results as they do not all measure the same thing. We apply each method to synthetic star-forming regions to determine when and why they have shortcomings. When a star-forming region is smooth and centrally concentrated, all four methods correctly identify mass segregation when it is present. However, if the region is spatially substructured, the $\\Omega_{\\rm GSR}$ method fails because it arbitra...

  19. Measurement of the mass difference between top and antitop quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2012-06-01

    A measurement of the mass difference between the top and the antitop quark (Delta m(t) = m(t) - m(anti-t)) is performed using events with a muon or an electron and at least four jets in the final state. The analysis is based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.96 +/- 0.11 inverse femtobarns, and yields the value of Delta m(t) = -0.44 +/- 0.46 (stat) +/- 0.27 (syst) GeV. This result is consistent with equality of particle and antiparticle masses required by CPT invariance, and provides a significantly improved precision relative to existing measurements.

  20. Measurement of Top Mass and Properties with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    The extraordinary success of the LHC in delivering proton-proton collisions with large integrated luminosity allows the study of top-quark-enriched data samples with unprecedented statistics. This opens new possibilities for the assessment and further refinements of detector performance, and of data analysis tools. At the same time, different aspects of top-quark event modeling, as implemented in Monte Carlo simulations, can be tested and confronted with data with impressive precision. As an example, the description of the extra QCD radiation accompanying the top-anti-top system can be refined based on measurements. In this context, the experimental challenges and recent results on precision top-quark physics measurements within the ATLAS experiment are summarized and reviewed. In particular, the recent ATLAS top-quark mass result, obtained using a three dimensional template method, which allows the simultaneous determination of the top-quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a ...

  1. Measurement of the mass difference between top and antitop quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Cerny, Karel; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Silva Do Amaral, Sheila Mara; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Siguang; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Dzelalija, Mile; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Karim, Mehdi; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brun, Hugues; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tosi, Silvano; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Lanske, Dankfried; Lingemann, Joschka; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Davids, Martina; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Linn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Rennefeld, Jörg; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Fischer, David; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schmanau, Mike; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Krajczar, Krisztian; Radics, Balint; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Nespolo, Massimo; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Taroni, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Visca, Lorenzo; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Jo, Hyun Yong; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Seo, Eunsung; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Musella, Pasquale; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Popov, Andrey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Soares, Mara Senghi; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; D'Enterria, David; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Nguyen, Matthew; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stoye, Markus; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Chen, Zhiling; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Dünser, Marc; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Aguilo, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Go, Apollo; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Singh, Anil; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Cankocak, Kerem; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Whyntie, Tom; Barrett, Matthew; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Mall, Orpheus; Miceli, Tia; Nelson, Randy; Pellett, Dave; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Andreev, Valeri; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Tucker, Jordan; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Mangano, Boris; Muelmenstaedt, Johannes; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pieri, Marco; Ranieri, Riccardo; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Timciuc, Vladlen; Traczyk, Piotr; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Agostino, Lorenzo; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hahn, Alan; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kilminster, Benjamin; Klima, Boaz; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lueking, Lee; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Evdokimov, Olga; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Chung, Kwangzoo; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Lae, Chung Khim; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Radicci, Valeria; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Peterman, Alison; Rossato, Kenneth; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Lee, Yen-Jie; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Cushman, Priscilla; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Haupt, Jason; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Jindal, Pratima; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Warchol, Jadwiga; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Ziegler, Jill; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Killewald, Phillip; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Winer, Brian L; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Laird, Edward; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Cuplov, Vesna; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Gotra, Yury; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Korjenevski, Sergey; Miner, Daniel Carl; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hits, Dmitry; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Richards, Alan; Robles, Jorge; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Roh, Youn; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    A measurement of the mass difference between the top and the antitop quark (Delta m(t) = m(t) - m(anti-t)) is performed using events with a muon or an electron and at least four jets in the final state. The analysis is based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.96 +/- 0.11 inverse femtobarns, and yields the value of Delta m(t) = -0.44 +/- 0.46 (stat) +/- 0.27 (syst) GeV. This result is consistent with equality of particle and antiparticle masses required by CPT invariance, and provides a significantly improved precision relative to existing measurements.

  2. A Precision Measurement of the Lambda_c Baryon Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-07-06

    The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon mass is measured using {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} decays reconstructed in 232 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} mass is measured to be 2286.46 {+-} 0.14 MeV/c{sup 2}. The dominant systematic uncertainties arise from the amount of material in the tracking volume and from the magnetic field strength.

  3. High-precision mass measurements of {sup 25}Al and {sup 30}P at JYFLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canete, L.; Kankainen, A.; Eronen, T.; Gorelov, D.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V.S.; Koponen, J.; Moore, I.D.; Reinikainen, J.; Rinta-Antila, S. [University of Jyvaskylae (Finland)

    2016-05-15

    The masses of the astrophysically relevant nuclei {sup 25}Al and {sup 30}P have been measured with a Penning trap for the first time. The mass-excess values for {sup 25}Al (Δ=-8915.962(63) keV) and {sup 30}P (Δ=-20200.854(64) keV) obtained with the JYFLTRAP double Penning trap mass spectrometer are in good agreement with the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2012 values but ∼5-10 times more precise. A high precision is required for calculating resonant proton-capture rates of astrophysically important reactions {sup 25}Al(p,γ){sup 26}Si and {sup 30}P(p,γ){sup 31}S. In this work, Q{sub (p,γ)}=5513.99(13) keV and Q{sub (p,γ)}=6130.64(24) keV were obtained for {sup 25}Al and {sup 30}P, respectively. The effect of the more precise values on the resonant proton-capture rates has been studied. In addition to nuclear astrophysics, the measured Q{sub EC} value of {sup 25}Al, 4276.805(45) keV, is relevant for studies of T=1/2 mirror beta decays which have a potential to be used to test the Conserved Vector Current hypothesis. (orig.)

  4. TOF-B{rho} mass measurements of neutron rich nuclei at the NSCL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Sebastian; Galaviz, Daniel; Pereira, Jorge [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) (United States); Estrade, Alfredo; Becerril, Ana D.; Elliot, Thom J.; Lorusso, Giuseppe; Rogers, Andrew; Schatz, Hendrik [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Matos, Milan [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Amthor, Mathew A. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, Bd Henri Becquerel, Caen 5 (France); Bazin, Daniel; Gade, Alexandra; Portillo, Mauricio; Stolz, Andreas [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Shapira, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Edward [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Wallace, Mark S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear masses of exotic nuclei far from stability are important key parameters for the understanding of the nuclear structure and several questions in nuclear astrophysics. Particularly the description of astrophysical processes, such as nucleosynthesis during the r-process or the evolution of matter in the crust of accreting neutron stars, is limited by the use of theoretical mass models. The experimental access to the mass of atoms is based on different techniques. Beside the measurements of nuclear decays and nuclear reaction studies, Penning trap facilities and time-of-flight (TOF) experiments allow the determination of masses. The latter two are somewhat complementary methods in respect of precision and accessibility of exotic nuclei. The time-of-flight-B{rho} (TOF-B{rho}) method has shown the potential to access nuclides very far from stability at several radioactive beam facilities. Here the setup of the TOF-B{rho} experiment at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at the Michigan State University is presented. The results of the first experiment in the region of neutron-rich isotopes as well as upcoming measurements are discussed.

  5. On-line analysis of penicillin blood levels in the live rat by combined microdialysis/fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Caprioli, R.M.; Lin, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    The combination of microdialysis and fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry has been used to follow the pharmacokinetics of penicillin G directly in the blood-stream of a live rat. After the intramuscular injection of the antibiotic, the blood dialysate was allowed to flow into the mass spectrometer via the continuous-flow/fast-atom bombardment interface. Tandem mass spectrometry provided the means for isolating and recording the ion fragments produced from the drug as the dialysate was expo...

  6. MASS MEASUREMENTS OF ISOLATED OBJECTS FROM SPACE-BASED MICROLENSING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei; Novati, S. Calchi; Gould, A.

    2016-01-01

    lies behind the same amount of dust as the Bulge red clump, we find the lens is a 45 ± 7 {M}{{J}} BD at 5.9 ± 1.0 kpc. The lens of of the second event, OGLE-2015-BLG-0763, is a 0.50 ± 0.04 {M}⊙ star at 6.9 ± 1.0 kpc. We show that the probability to definitively measure the mass of isolated microlenses...

  7. Measurement method for the nuclear anapole moment of laser trapped alkali atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, E; Sprouse, G D; Orozco, L A; De Mille, D P

    2004-01-01

    Weak interactions within a nucleus generate a nuclear spin dependent parity violating electromagnetic moment; the anapole moment. In heavy nuclei, the anapole moment is the dominant contribution to spin-dependent atomic parity violation. We analyze a method to measure the nuclear anapole moment through the electric dipole transition it induces between hyperfine states of the ground level. The method requires tight confinement of the atoms to position them at the anti-node of a standing wave driving the anapole-induced E1 transiton. We explore the necessary limits in the number of atoms, excitation fields, trap type, interrogation method, and systematic tests necessary for such measurements in francium, the heaviest alkali.

  8. Radionuclide measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry at Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.; Zabel, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    Over the past years, Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TAMS) has become established as an important method for radionuclide analysis. In the Arizona system the accelerator is operated at a thermal voltage of 1.8MV for C-14 analysis, and 1.6 to 2MV for Be-10. Samples are inserted into a cesium sputter ion source in solid form. Negative ions sputtered from the target are accelerated to about 25kV, and the injection magnet selects ions of a particular mass. Ions of the 3+ charge state, having an energy of about 9MeV are selected by an electrostatic deflector, surviving ions pass through two magnets, where only ions of the desired mass-energy product are selected. The final detector is a combination ionization chamber to measure energy loss (and hence, Z), and a silicon surface-barrier detector which measures residual energy. After counting the trace iosotope for a fixed time, the injected ions are switched to the major isotope used for normalization. These ions are deflected into a Faraday cup after the first high-energy magnet. Repeated measurements of the isotope ratio of both sample and standards results in a measurement of the concentration of the radionuclide. Recent improvements in sample preparation for C-14 make preparation of high-beam current graphite targets directly from CO2 feasible. Except for some measurements of standards and backgrounds for Be-10 measurements to date have been on C-14. Although most results have been in archaeology and quaternary geology, studies have been expanded to include cosmogenic C-14 in meteorites. The data obtained so far tend to confirm the antiquity of Antarctic meteorites from the Allan Hills site. Data on three samples of Yamato meteorites gave terrestrial ages of between about 3 and 22 thousand years.

  9. Measuring peptide mass spectrum correlation using the quantum Grover algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Keng Wah

    2007-03-01

    We investigated the use of the quantum Grover algorithm in the mass-spectrometry-based protein identification process. The approach coded the mass spectra on a quantum register and uses the Grover search algorithm for searching multiple solutions to find matches from a database. Measurement of the fidelity between the input and final states was used to quantify the similarity between the experimental and theoretical spectra. The optimal number of iteration is proven to be pi/4sqrt[N/k] , where k refers to the number of marked states. We found that one iteration is sufficient for the search if we let more that 62% of the N states be marked states. By measuring the fidelity after only one iteration of Grover search, we discovered that it resembles that of the correlation-based measurement used in the existing protein identification software. We concluded that the quantum Grover algorithm can be adapted for a correlation-based mass spectra database search, provided that decoherence can be kept to a minimum.

  10. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  11. Initial measurements with the SUERC accelerator mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Stewart E-mail: toodeep@suerc.gla.ac.uk; Xu, Sheng; Schnabel, Christoph; Dougans, Andrew; Tait, Andrew; Kitchen, Richard; Klody, George; Loger, Roger; Pollock, Tom; Schroeder, James; Sundquist, Mark

    2004-08-01

    {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 129}I test measurements have been made with a new Pelletron-based accelerator mass spectrometer operating at up to 5.2 MV. All ion detection was with a versatile gas ionization detector. Low-background radiocarbon measurements with 2% scatter of identical samples was performed with both spectrometer ion sources. {sup 10}Be/Be backgrounds of 3 x 10{sup -15} were achieved using a gas cell adjoining the detector for {sup 10}B suppression. High sample-throughput Cl AMS with {sup 36}Cl/Cl backgrounds of 4 x 10{sup -15} was accomplished.

  12. Thermodynamic Activity Measurements with Knudsen Cell Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copland, Evan H.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2001-01-01

    Coupling the Knudsen effusion method with mass spectrometry has proven to be one of the most useful experimental techniques for studying the equilibrium between condensed phases and complex vapors. The Knudsen effusion method involves placing a condensed sample in a Knudsen cell, a small "enclosure", that is uniformly heated and held until equilibrium is attained between the condensed and vapor phases. The vapor is continuously sampled by effusion through a small orifice in the cell. A molecular beam is formed from the effusing vapor and directed into a mass spectrometer for identification and pressure measurement of the species in the vapor phase. Knudsen cell mass spectrometry (KCMS) has been used for nearly fifty years now and continues to be a leading technique for obtaining thermodynamic data. Indeed, much of the well-established vapor specie data in the JANAF tables has been obtained from this technique. This is due to the extreme versatility of the technique. All classes of materials can be studied and all constituents of the vapor phase can be measured over a wide range of pressures (approximately 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -11) bar) and temperatures (500-2800 K). The ability to selectively measure different vapor species makes KCMS a very powerful tool for the measurement of component activities in metallic and ceramic solutions. Today several groups are applying KCMS to measure thermodynamic functions in multicomponent metallic and ceramic systems. Thermodynamic functions, especially component activities, are extremely important in the development of CALPHAD (Calculation of Phase Diagrams) type thermodynamic descriptions. These descriptions, in turn, are useful for modeling materials processing and predicting reactions such as oxide formation and fiber/matrix interactions. The leading experimental methods for measuring activities are the Galvanic cell or electro-motive force (EMF) technique and the KCMS technique. Each has specific advantages, depending on

  13. Developments for the HITRAP cooler trap and mass measurements around A = 96 at SHIPTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koszudowski, Stephen

    2009-07-08

    The HITRAP (Highly charged Ions Trap) facility is currently being set up and commissioned at GSI in Darmstadt. It will provide bunches of 10{sup 5} heavy highly-charged ions, for example hydrogen-like uranium (U{sup 91+}), to high-precision atomic physics experiments. The ions are produced by the GSI accelerator complex and decelerated to 4 MeV/u in the Experimental Storage Ring. Then the ions are decelerated by a two-step linear decelerator down to 6 keV/u. The first deceleration step down to 500 keV/u was successfully commissioned. The decelerated ions are injected into a Penning trap (the Cooler Trap), where they are cooled to 4 K by electron and resistive cooling. Resonant circuits for non-destructive detection and the resistive cooling of the trapped particles were designed and tested. The time control of the trap-cycle (trapping, cooling, extraction) with a time resolution of 25 ns was implemented into the control system CS. CS is also used at the mass measurement Penning trap SHIPTRAP, where the new time control is successfully operated. SHIPTRAP measures radioactive ions stemming from fusion evaporation reactions at the velocity filter SHIP. The masses of 9 nuclides ({sup 93,94,95}Technetium, {sup 94,96}Ruthenium, {sup 95,96,97,98}Rhodium) near the line of stability were precisely measured and compared with the Atomic Mass Evaluation. The detection of isomeric states with the present SHIPTRAP set-up was studied. (orig.)

  14. First Run II Measurement of the W Boson Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez-Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca-Almenar, C; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; García, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimarães da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Mäki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martinez-Ballarin, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtälä, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Söderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Saint-Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; Van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobuev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2007-01-01

    We describe a measurement of the W boson mass mW using 200/pb of root-s = 1.96 TeV p-pbar collision data taken with the CDF II detector. With a sample of 63,964 W -> e nu candidates and 51,128 W -> mu nu candidates, we measure mW = [80.413 +- 0.034 (stat) +- 0.034 (sys) = 80.413 +- 0.048] GeV/c^2. This is the single most precise mW measurement to date. When combined with other measured electroweak parameters, this result further constrains the properties of unobserved particles coupling to W and Z bosons.

  15. First Run II Measurement of the W Boson Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Abulencia, A.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Amerio, S.; /Padua U.; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U. /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    We describe a measurement of the W boson mass m{sub W} using 200 pb{sup -1} of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collision data taken with the CDF II detector. With a sample of 63,964 W {yields} e{nu} candidates and 51,128 W {yields} {mu}{nu} candidates, we measure m{sub W} = [80.413 {+-} 0.034(stat.) {+-} 0.034 (sys.) = 80.413 {+-} 0.048] GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the single most precise m{sub W} measurement to date. When combined with other measured electroweak parameters, this result further constrains the properties of new unobserved particles coupling to W and Z bosons.

  16. Mass measurement of 56Sc reveals a small A=56 odd-even mass staggering, implying a cooler accreted neutron star crust

    CERN Document Server

    Meisel, Z; Ahn, S; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Browne, J; Carpino, J F; Chung, H; Cole, A L; Cyburt, R H; Estradé, A; Famiano, M; Gade, A; Langer, C; Matoš, M; Mittig, W; Montes, F; Morrissey, D J; Pereira, J; Schatz, H; Schatz, J; Scott, M; Shapira, D; Smith, K; Stevens, J; Tan, W; Tarasov, O; Towers, S; Wimmer, K; Winkelbauer, J R; Yurkon, J; Zegers, R G T

    2015-01-01

    We present the mass excesses of 52-57Sc, obtained from recent time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The masses of 56Sc and 57Sc were determined for the first time with atomic mass excesses of -24.85(59)(+0 -54) MeV and -21.0(1.3) MeV, respectively, where the asymmetric uncertainty for 56Sc was included due to possible contamination from a long-lived isomer. The 56Sc mass indicates a small odd-even mass staggering in the A = 56 mass-chain towards the neutron drip line, significantly deviating from trends predicted by the global FRDM mass model and favoring trends predicted by the UNEDF0 and UNEDF1 density functional calculations. Together with new shell-model calculations of the electron-capture strength function of 56Sc, our results strongly reduce uncertainties in model calculations of the heating and cooling at the 56Ti electron-capture layer in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars. We found that, in contrast to prev...

  17. Efficient mass-selective three-photon ionization of zirconium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Ralph H.

    1994-01-01

    In an AVLIS process, .sup.91 Zr is selectively removed from natural zirconium by a three-step photoionization wherein Zr atoms are irradiated by a laser beam having a wavelength .lambda..sub.1, selectively raising .sup.91 Zr atoms to an odd-parity E.sub.1 energy level in the range of 16000-19000 cm.sup.-1, are irradiated by a laser beam having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 to raise the atoms from an E.sub.l level to an even-parity E.sub.2 energy level in the range of 35000-37000 cm.sup.-1 and are irradiated by a laser beam having a wavelength .lambda..sub.3 to cause a resonant transition of atoms from an E.sub.2 level to an autoionizing level above 53506 cm.sup.-1. .lambda..sub.3 wavelengths of 5607, 6511 or 5756 .ANG. will excite a zirconium atom from an E.sub.2 energy state of 36344 cm.sup.-1 to an autoionizing level; a .lambda..sub.3 wavelength of 5666 .ANG. will cause an autoionizing transition from an E.sub.2 level of 36068 cm.sup.-1 ; and a .lambda. .sub.3 wavelength of 5662 .ANG. will cause an ionizing resonance of an atom at an E.sub.2 level of 35904 cm.sup.-1.

  18. Simultaneous measurement of the concentrations of soot particles and gas species in light hydrocarbon flames using mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingxun; Liu, Fang; Wang, Dezheng; Wang, Tiefeng

    2014-10-01

    Besides gas species concentrations, soot volume fractions are also important data in the study of flames. This work describes the simultaneous measurement of the concentrations of soot and gas species in light hydrocarbon flames by in situ sampling and mass spectrometry (MS).The reaction medium was frozen by sampling into a very low-pressure tube, and the soot selectivity (proportion of carbon atoms in the reactant converted to soot) was determined from the C and H mass balances using the measured concentrations of the gas species and the mass of soot present per unit gas volume. The H/C ratio of the soot was measured by a thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry combination. The soot volume fraction was calculated from the soot selectivity and density of the soot. The soot selectivity measured by this reduced pressure sampling mass spectrometry (RPSMS) method was verified by measurements using the gravimetric sampling technique where the mass of soot collected in a volume of gas was weighed by a high precision balance. For most of the measurements, the uncertainty in the soot volume fraction was ±5%, but this would be larger when the soot volume fractions are less than 1 ppm. For demonstration, the RPSMS method was used to study a methane fuel-rich flame where the soot volume fractions were 1-5 ppm. The simultaneous measurement of concentrations of soot and gas species is useful for the quantitative study of flames.

  19. A New Computerised Advanced Theory of Mind Measure for Children with Asperger Syndrome: The ATOMIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Renae B.; Sofronoff, Kate

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the ability of children with Asperger Syndrome (AS) to attribute mental states to characters in a new computerised, advanced theory of mind measure: The Animated Theory of Mind Inventory for Children (ATOMIC). Results showed that children with AS matched on IQ, verbal comprehension, age and gender performed equivalently on…

  20. An exacting transition probability measurement - a direct test of atomic many-body theories

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, T; Yum, D; Rebhi, R; Mukherjee, M

    2016-01-01

    A new protocol for measuring the branching fraction of hydrogenic atoms with only statistically limited uncertainty is proposed and demonstrated for the decay of the P$_{3/2}$ level of the barium ion, with precision below $0.5\\%$. Heavy hydrogenic atoms like the barium ion are test beds for fundamental physics such as atomic parity violation and they also hold the key to understanding nucleo-synthesis in stars. To draw definitive conclusion about possible physics beyond the standard model by measuring atomic parity violation in the barium ion it is necessary to measure the dipole transition probabilities of low-lying excited states with precision better than $1\\%$. Furthermore, enhancing our understanding of the $\\it{barium-puzzle}$ in barium stars requires branching fraction data for proper modelling of nucleo-synthesis. Our measurements are the first to provide a direct test of quantum many-body calculations on the barium ion with precision below one percent and more importantly with no known systematic unc...

  1. Laboratory Measurements of Charge Transfer on Atomic Hydrogen at Thermal Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havener, C. C.; Vane, C. R.; Krause, H. F.; Stancil, P. C.; Mroczkowski, T.; Savin, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    We describe our ongoing program to measure velocity dependent charge transfer (CT) cross sections for selected ions on atomic hydrogen using the ion-aloin merged-beams apparatus at Oak Ridge Natioiial Laboralory. Our focus is on those ions for which CT plays an important role in determining the ionization structure, line emis sion, and thermal structure of observed cosmic photoionized plasmas.

  2. Complex decay patterns in atomic core photoionization disentangled by ion-recoil measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemin, Renaud; Bomme, Cedric; Marin, Thierry; Journel, Loic; Marchenko, Tatiana; Kushawaha, Rajesh K.; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris 06, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, FR-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonement (UMR7614), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, FR-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Trcera, Nicolas [Synchrotron SOLEIL, l' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, FR-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-12-15

    Following core 1s ionization and resonant excitation of argon atoms, we measure the recoil energy of the ions due to momentum conservation during the emission of Auger electrons. We show that such ion momentum spectroscopy can be used to disentangle to some degree complex decay patterns, involving both radiative and nonradiative decays.

  3. Towards a precise measurement of atomic parity violation in a single Ra+ ion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunez Portela, M.; van den Berg, J. E.; Bekker, H.; Giri, G.S.; Hoekstra, S.; Jungmann, K.; Mohanty, A.; Onderwater, G.J.C.; Santra, B.; Schlesser, S.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Versolato, O.O.; Wansbeek, L.W.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H.W.

    2013-01-01

    A single trapped Ra+(Z= 88) ion provides a very promising route towards a most precise measurement of Atomic Parity Violation (APV), since APV effects grow faster than Z 3. This experiment promises the best determination of the electroweak coupling constant at the lowest accessible energies. Such a

  4. Prospects for Measuring Supermassive Black Hole Masses with TMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Tuan; Wright, Shelley A.; Barth, Aaron J.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Simard, Luc; Larkin, James E.; Moore, Anna M.; Wang, Lianqi; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2014-07-01

    The next generation of giant-segmented mirror telescopes will enable us to observe galactic nuclei at much higher angular resolution and sensitivity than ever before. These capabilities will introduce a revolutionary shift in our understanding of the origin and evolution of supermassive black holes by enabling more precise black hole mass measurements in a mass range that is unreachable today. We present simulations and predictions of the observations of nuclei that will be made with the Thirty Meter Telescope and the adaptive optics assisted integral- field spectrograph IRIS, which is capable of diffraction-limited spectroscopy from Z band (0.9 μm) to K band (2.2 μm). These simulations, for the first time, use realistic values for the sky, telescope, adaptive optics system, and instrument to determine the expected signal-to-noise ratio of a range of possible targets spanning intermediate mass black holes of ˜10^4 M⊙ to the most massive black holes known today of >10^10 M⊙. I will present simulations across a spectrum of black hole masses and galaxy types to show the ability of IRIS and TMT to quantitatively explore the demographics of black holes in the universe. I will discuss how these observations will enable our study of the origin of the MBH - galaxy velocity dispersion and MBH - galaxy luminosity relationships, and the evolution of black holes through cosmic time.

  5. Measurement of the He-McKellar-Wilkens Topological Phase by Atom Interferometry and Test of Its Independence with Atom Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillot, J.; Lepoutre, S.; Gauguet, A.; Büchner, M.; Vigué, J.

    2013-07-01

    In this Letter, we report a measurement of the He-McKellar-Wilkens (HMW) topological phase by atom interferometry. The experiment is done with our lithium atom interferometer, and in order to suppress the stray effects present in our first experiment, we use optical pumping of the Li7 atoms in their F=2, mF=+2 (or -2) ground state sublevel. In these conditions, the measured phase shift is the sum of the HMW phase and of the Aharonov-Casher phase, which are separated due to their different mF dependence. The HMW phase has been measured for different lithium beam velocities and the results are in very good agreement with a phase independent of the atom velocity, as expected for a topological phase.

  6. Precision measurement of the {Sigma}{sup 0} hyperon mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M.H.L.S.; Hartouni, E.P.; Kreisler, M.N. [and others

    1998-02-17

    The research that is described in this paper is part of a program to study strong interaction mechanisms in proton proton collisions. The program consists of two experiments: Brookhaven E766 in which we studied the reactions pp {yields} p+ all charged particles with 27.5 GeV/c incident protons and Fermilab E690 in which we studied the reactions pp {yields} p+ all charged particles with 800 GeV/c incident protons. In these experiments, we employed state-of-the-art data acquisition sys- tems and acquired large samples of data: at Brookhaven we amassed 300 million high multiplicity events and at Fermilab, 5.5 billion events. Our uncertainty in the {Sigma}{sup 0} mass is more than 7 times smaller than the best previous result and was based on 16 times the statistics. Likewise, the {Sigma}{sup 0} - {Lambda}{sup 0} mass difference is more than 14 times more accurate than the previous best result. Finally, we note that this measurement is the first direct measurement of the {Sigma}{sup 0} mass.

  7. Note: Directly measuring the direct digital synthesizer frequency chirp-rate for an atom interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Juan-Juan; Zhou, Min-Kang, E-mail: zkhu@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: zmk@hust.edu.cn; Zhang, Qiao-Zhen; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun, E-mail: zkhu@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: zmk@hust.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luo Yu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-09-15

    During gravity measurements with Raman type atom interferometry, the frequency of the laser used to drive Raman transition is scanned by chirping the frequency of a direct digital synthesizer (DDS), and the local gravity is determined by precisely measuring the chip rate α of DDS. We present an effective method that can directly evaluate the frequency chirp rate stability of our DDS. By mixing a pair of synchronous linear sweeping signals, the chirp rate fluctuation is precisely measured with a frequency counter. The measurement result shows that the relative α instability can reach 5.7 × 10{sup −11} in 1 s, which is neglectable in a 10{sup −9} g level atom interferometry gravimeter.

  8. A note on black-hole physics, cosmic censorship, and the charge-mass relation of atomic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-02-01

    Arguing from the cosmic censorship principle, one of the fundamental cornerstones of black-hole physics, we have recently suggested the existence of a universal upper bound relating the maximal electric charge of a weakly self-gravitating system to its total mass: Z(A)≤slant {Z}*(A)\\equiv {α }-1/3{A}2/3, where Z is the number of protons in the system, A is the total baryon (mass) number, and α ={e}2/{{\\hslash }}c is the dimensionless fine-structure constant. In order to test the validity of this suggested bound, we here explore the Z(A) functional relation of atomic nuclei as deduced from the Weizsäcker semi-empirical mass formula. It is shown that all atomic nuclei, including the meta-stable maximally charged ones, conform to the suggested charge-mass upper bound. Our results support the validity of the cosmic censorship conjecture in black-hole physics.

  9. Atomic Interference Method for Direct Measurement of the Wigner Function of aCavity Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Biao

    2001-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the reconstruction of a cavity field state. In the scheme the cavity field is first displaced by a microwave source, and then is placed in front of one slit of the two-slit apparatus. Ground state atoms pass through the apparatus, hitting upon the screen far away from the two-slit apparatus. The atom-field interaction is dispersive. The contrast of interference fringes is directly related to the Wigner function for the field state. The scheme can be easily generalized to measure the Wigner function of an entangled state of two spatially separated single-mode cavities.

  10. Derivation of Inter-Atomic Force Constants of Cu2O from Diffuse Neutron Scattering Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Makhsun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Neutron scattering intensity from Cu2O compound has been measured at 10 K and 295 K with High Resolution Powder Diffractometer at JRR-3 JAEA. The oscillatory diffuse scattering related to correlations among thermal displacements of atoms was observed at 295 K. The correlation parameters were determined from the observed diffuse scattering intensity at 10 and 295 K. The force constants between the neighboring atoms in Cu2O were estimated from the correlation parameters and compared to those of Ag2O

  11. The Potential of Continuous, Local Atomic Clock Measurements for Earthquake Prediction and Volcanology

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarescu, Mihai; Jetzer, Philippe; Lundgren, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Modern optical atomic clocks along with the optical fiber technology currently being developed can measure the geoid, which is the equipotential surface that extends the mean sea level on continents, to a precision that competes with existing technology. In this proceeding, we point out that atomic clocks have the potential to not only map the sea level surface on continents, but also look at variations of the geoid as a function of time with unprecedented timing resolution. The local time series of the geoid has a plethora of applications. These include potential improvement in the predictions of earthquakes and volcanoes, and closer monitoring of ground uplift in areas where hydraulic fracturing is performed.

  12. Error sources in atomic force microscopy for dimensional measurements: Taxonomy and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinello, F.; Voltan, A.; Savio, E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aimed at identifying the error sources that occur in dimensional measurements performed using atomic force microscopy. In particular, a set of characterization techniques for errors quantification is presented. The discussion on error sources is organized in four main categories......: scanning system, tip-surface interaction, environment, and data processing. The discussed errors include scaling effects, squareness errors, hysteresis, creep, tip convolution, and thermal drift. A mathematical model of the measurement system is eventually described, as a reference basis for errors...

  13. Sensitive measurement of forces at the micron scale using Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carusotto, I; Pitaevskii, L; Stringari, S; Modugno, G; Inguscio, M

    2005-08-26

    We show that Bloch oscillations of ultracold fermionic atoms in the periodic potential of an optical lattice can be used for a sensitive measurement of forces at the micrometer length scale, e.g., in the vicinity of a dielectric surface. In particular, the proposed approach allows us to perform a local and direct measurement of the Casimir-Polder force which is, for realistic experimental parameters, as large as 10(-4) gravity.

  14. Measuring Neutrino Mass with Radioactive Ions in a Storage Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroos, Mats; McElrath, Bob; Orme, Christopher; Schwetz, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    A method to measure the neutrino mass kinematically using beams of ions which undergo beta decay is proposed. The idea is to tune the ion beam momentum so that in most decays, the electron is forward moving with respect to the beam, and only in decays near the endpoint is the electron moving backwards. By counting the backward moving electrons one can observe the effect of neutrino mass on the beta spectrum close to the endpoint. In order to reach sensitivities for mν<0.2 eV, it is necessary to control the ion momentum with a precision better than δp/p<10-5, identify suitable nuclei with low Q-values (in the few to ten keV range), and one must be able to observe at least O(1018) decays.

  15. Top mass measurements at the Tevatron run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velev, Gueorgui V.; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    The latest top quark mass measurements by the CDF and D0 experiments are presented here. The mass has been determined in the dilepton (t{bar t} {yields} e{mu}, ee, {mu}{mu} + jets + E{sub T}) and lepton plus jets (t{bar t} {yields} e or {mu} + jets + E{sub T}) final states. The most accurate single result from lepton plus jets channel is 173.5{sub -3.6}{sup +3.7}(stat. + Jet Energy Scale Systematic) {+-} 1.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, which is better than the combined CDF and D0 Run I average. A preliminary and unofficial average of the best experimental Run II results gives M{sub top} = 172.7 {+-} 3.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  16. Thermally induced filter bias in TEOM mass measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, S.J.; Tuchman, D.P.; Vinson, R.P. [NIOSH, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). US Dept. of Health

    2007-07-01

    Researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) have long used stationary tapered element oscillating microbalances (TEOMs) in laboratory settings. Current NIOSH research is focused on adapting TEOM technology as a wearable personal dust monitor (PDM) for coal mining occupations. The present research investigated bias caused by thermal effects on filter assemblies. New filters used in the PDM for 8 It tests show an average positive bias of 25.5 {mu}g., while similar tests of equivalent filters used in two 1400A model TEOMs show an average positive bias of 34.3 {mu}g. The derived bias values allow correction of previously collected biased data. Also, pre-heating the filters for 24 h at 46 degrees C shows significant bias reduction, with PDM pre-heated filters subsequently averaging -3.3 {mu}g and 1400A TEOM filters averaging 5.9 {mu}g. On a single-point comparison to gravimetric sampling, a 25.5 {mu}g bias is only significant at low mass loadings. At 2.5 mg, this bias represents a negligible 1% of the mass measurement. If ordinary linear regression is used, the bias is still insignificant. However, if the more valid weighted linear regression is used, it gives more weight to the smaller dependent variable values, which are more impacted by the bias. Consequently, what is 1% bias on a single high-mass value can translate into a larger bias percentage at high-mass values when performing a weighted regression on data that include a large number of low-mass values.

  17. Quantum noise limited interferometric measurement of atomic noise: towards spin squeezing on the Cs clock transition

    CERN Document Server

    Oblak, D; Tittel, W; Vershovski, A K; Sørensen, J L; Petrov, P G; Alzar, C L G; Polzik, E S; Oblak, Daniel; Mikkelsen, Jens K.; Tittel, Wolfgang; Vershovski, Anton K.; Sorensen, Jens L.; Petrov, Plamen G.; Alzar, Carlos L. Garrido; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally a nondestructive interferometric measurement of the state population of an ensemble of laser cooled and trapped atoms. This study is a step towards generation of (quasi-) spin squeezing of cold atoms targeted at the improvement of the Caesium clock performance beyond the limit set by the quantum projection noise of atoms. We propose a protocol for the sequence of operations required to generate and utilize spin squeezing for the improved microwave clock performance via a quantum nondemolition measurement (qnd) on the probe light. We calculate the phase shift and the quantum noise of a near resonant optical probe pulse propagating through a cloud of cold 133Cs atoms. We analyze the figure of merit for a qnd measurement of the collective quasi-spin and show that it can be expressed simply as a product of the ensemble optical depth and the probability of the spontaneous emission caused by the off-resonant probe light. In the experimental part we report on the preli...

  18. Chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS for ambient measurements of ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Benson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS for fast response, in-situ measurements for gas phase ammonia. Protonated ethanol ions were used as the ion-molecule reaction reagent. The CIMS sensitivity was estimated to be between 4–25 Hz/pptv with 30% uncertainty. The instrument background was below 1 ppbv and at lowest was 300 pptv. The uncertainty associated with the instrumental background was less than 30 pptv under the optimized experimental conditions. The time response was less than 30 s, and the detection limit was approximately 60 pptv. This CIMS was used to measure the ambient NH3 in Kent, Ohio, for several weeks throughout three seasons. The measured ammonia mixing ratios were usually at the sub-ppbv level, and higher during the spring (200±120 pptv than in the winter (60±75 pptv and fall (150±80 pptv.

  19. Mass composition measurements at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Bueno, L.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is the largest ultra-high energy cosmic ray experiment built so far. It is a hybrid detector, since it measures both the fluorescence light emitted while the air showers develop in the atmosphere and the particles reaching the ground. We present the results related to the mass composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays as obtained from both types of measurements. The depth at which the maximum of the electromagnetic development takes place and its fluctuations are the most sensitive parameters to infer the nature of the cosmic rays. In addition, we present the latest muon measurements that can be used to test and constrain models of hadronic interactions at energies larger than those reached at LHC.

  20. Direct mass measurements of Cd isotopes show strong shell gap at N=82

    CERN Document Server

    Knöbel, R; Bosch, F; Boutin, D; Chen, L; Dimopoulou, C; Dolinskii, A; Franczak, B; Franzke, B; Geissel, H; Hausmann, M; Kozhuharov, C; Kurcewicz, J; Litvinova, S A; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Matoš, M; Mazzocco, M; Münzenberg, G; Nakajima, S; Nociforo, C; Nolden, F; Ohtsubo, T; Ozawa, A; Patyk, Z; Plaß, W R; Scheidenberger, C; Stadlmann, J; Steck, M; Sun, B; Suzuki, T; Walker, P; Weick, H; Wu, M -R; Winkler, M; Yamaguchi, T

    2015-01-01

    A $^{238}$U projectile beam was used to create cadmium isotopes via abrasion-fission at 410 MeV/u in a beryllium target at the entrance of the in-flight separator FRS at GSI. The fission fragments were separated with the FRS and injected into the isochronous storage ring ESR for mass measurements. The Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) was performed under two different experimental conditions, with and without B$\\rho$-tagging at the dispersive central focal plane of the FRS. In the experiment with B$\\rho$-tagging the magnetic rigidity of the injected fragments was determined by an accuracy of $2\\times 10^{-4}$. A new method of data analysis, using a correlation matrix for the combined data set from both experiments, has provided mass values for 25 different isotopes for the first time. The high selectivity and sensitivity of the experiment and analysis has given access even to rare isotopes detected with a few atoms per week. In this letter we present for the $^{129,130,131}$Cd isotopes mass values directly ...

  1. First Online Mass Measurements of Isobar Chains via Multi-Reflection Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrograph Coupled with GARIS-II

    CERN Document Server

    Schury, P; Ito, Y; Kaji, D; Soderstrom, P-A; Takamine, A; Arai, F; Haba, H; Jeong, S; Kimura, S; Koura, H; Miyatake, H; Morimoto, K; Morita, K; Ozawa, A; Reponen, M; Sonoda, T; Tanaka, T; Wollnik, H

    2015-01-01

    Using a mulit-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph (MRTOF-MS) located after a gas cell coupled with the gas-filled recoil ion separator GARIS-II, the masses of several heavy nuclei have been directly and precisely measured. The nuclei were produced via fusion-evaporation reactions and separated from projectile-like and target-like particles using GARIS-II before being stopped in a helium-filled gas cell. Time-of-flight spectra for three isobar chains, 205Fr-205Rn-205At-205Po, 206Fr-206Rn-206At and 201Rn-201At-201Po-201Bi, were observed. Precision atomic mass values were determined for 205,206Fr, 201At, and 201Po.

  2. Single-reference high-precision mass measurement with a multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Y; Wada, M; Naimi, S; Sonoda, T; Mita, H; Arai, F; Takamine, A; Okada, K; Ozawa, A; Wollnik, H

    2013-01-01

    A multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph, competitive with Penning trap mass spectrometers, has been built at RIKEN. We have performed a first online mass measurement, using 8Li+ (T1/2 = 838 ms). A new analysis method has been realized, with which, using only 12C+ references, the mass excess of 8Li was accurately determined to be 20947.6(15)(34) keV (dm/m = 6.6 x 10-7). The speed, precision and accuracy of this first online measurement exemplifies the potential for using this new type of mass spectrograph for precision measurements of short-lived nuclei.

  3. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, F.; Liu, H.; Xu, P.; Tian, X.; Wang, Y.; Ren, J.; Wu, Haibin; Chang, Hong

    2014-02-01

    We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90 μK in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques used here, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of 88Sr is measured using an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, and is given as 434 829 121 318(10) kHz.

  4. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90 μK in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques used here, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of 88Sr is measured using an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, and is given as 434 829 121 318(10 kHz.

  5. Cavity-assisted measurement and coherent control of collective atomic spin oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Kohler, Jonathan; Schreppler, Sydney; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate continuous measurement and coherent control of the collective spin of an atomic ensemble undergoing Larmor precession in a high-finesse optical cavity. The coupling of the precessing spin oscillator to the cavity field yields phenomena similar to those observed in cavity optomechanics, including cavity amplification, damping, and optical spring shifts. These effects arise from autonomous optical feedback onto the atomic spin dynamics, conditioned by the cavity spectrum. We use this feedback to stabilize the spin in either its high- or low-energy state, where it achieves a steady-state temperature in equilibrium with measurement back-action. We measure the effective spin temperature from the asymmetry between the Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands and show that, for sufficiently large Larmor frequency, such a feedback-stabilized spin ensemble remains in a nearly pure quantum state, in spite of continuous interaction with the probe field.

  6. An Atom Trap Trace Analysis System for Measuring Krypton Contamination in Xenon Dark Matter Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Elena; Loose, Andre; Goetzke, Luke W; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) system to measure Kr in Xe at the part per trillion (ppt) level, a prerequisite for the sensitivity achievable with liquid xenon dark matter detectors beyond the current generation. Since Ar and Kr have similar laser cooling wavelengths, the apparatus has been tested with Ar to avoid contamination prior to measuring Xe samples. A radio-frequency (RF) plasma discharge generates a beam of metastable Ar which is optically collimated, slowed, and trapped using standard magneto-optical techniques. We detect the fluorescence of single trapped $^{40}$Ar atoms with a signal to noise ratio of 5. The measured system efficiency of $3 \\times 10^{-9}$ for Ar corresponds to an expected Kr in Xe sensitivity at the ppt level.

  7. Measurement of the mass of the $\\Lambda_{b}$ baryon

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Palla, Fabrizio; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Wildish, T; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    In a data sample of four million hadronic \\Z\\ decays collected with the ALEPH detector at LEP, four $\\Lambda_b$ baryon candidates are exclusively reconstructed in the $\\Lambda_b \\rightarrow \\Lambda_c^+ \\pi^-$ channel, with the $\\Lambda_c^+$ decaying into $pK^-\\pi^+$, $p\\bar{K^0}$, or $\\Lambda\\pi^+\\pi^+\\pi^-$. The probability of the observed signal to be due to a background fluctuation is estimated to be $4.2 \\times 10^{-4}$. The mass of the $\\Lambda_b$ is measured to be $5614 \\pm 21 \\, (stat.) \\pm 4 \\, (syst.)~\\mevcc$. %$5614\\pm 21\\,(stat.) \\pm 4\\,(syst.) \\mevcc$.

  8. Precision measurement of the {Sigma}{sup 0} hyperon mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M.H.; Hartouni, E.P.; Kreisler, M.N.; Uribe, J.; Church, M.D.; Gottschalk, E.E.; Knapp, B.C.; Stern, B.J.; Wiencke, L.R.; Christian, D.C.; Gutierrez, G.; Wehmann, A.; Avilez, C.; Felix, J.; Moreno, G.; Forbush, M.; Huson, F.R.; White, J.T. [BNL E766 Collaboration (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Using pp{r_arrow}p+ all charged particles at 800 GeV/c and 27.5 GeV/c incident protons at Fermilah and Brookhaven, respectively, the mass of the {Sigma}{sup 0} hyperon has been measured with an uncertainty of 7 times smaller than the best previous result. This result, M{sub {Sigma}{sup 0}}=1192.65{plus_minus}0.020{plus_minus}0.014 MeV/c{sup 2} is based on 16 times the statistics of previous results. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Ground-state atomic polarization relaxation-time measurement of Rb filled hypocycloidal core-shaped Kagome HC-PCF

    CERN Document Server

    Bradley, T D; McFerran, J J; Jouin, J; Debord, B; Alharbi, M; Thomas, P; Gerome, F; Benabid, F

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of ground state atomic polarization relaxation tile of Rb vapor confined in five different hypocycloidal core shape Kagome hollow core photonic crystal fibers made with uncoated silica glass. We are able to distinguish between wall-collision and transit-time effects in optical waveguide and deduce the contribution of the atom's dwell time at the core wall surface. In contrast with convetional macroscopic atomic cell configuration, and in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, the measured relaxation times were found to be at least one order of magnitude longer than the limit set by the atom-wall collisional relaxation from thermal atoms. This extended relaxation time is explained by the combination of a stronger contribution of the slow atoms in the atomic polarization build-up, and of the relatively significant contribution of dwell time to the relaxation process of the ground state polarization.

  10. Schwinger's Measurement Algebra, Preons and the Lepton Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannen, Carl

    2006-04-01

    In the 1950s and 1960s, Julian Schwinger developed an elegant general scheme for quantum kinematics and dynamics appropriate to systems with a finite number of dynamical variables, now knowns as ``Schwinger's Measurement Algebra'' (SMA). The SMA has seen little use, largely because it is non relativistic in that it does not allow for particle creation. In this paper, we apply the SMA to the problem of modeling tightly bound subparticles (preons) of the leptons and quarks. We discuss the structure of the ideals of Clifford algebras and, applying this to the elementary fermions, derive a preon substructure for the quarks and leptons. We show that matrices of SMA type elements can be used to model the quarks and leptons under the assumption that the preons are of such high energy that they cannot be created in normal interactions. This gives a definition of the SMA for the composite particle in terms of the SMA of its constituents. We solve the resulting matrix equation for the quarks and leptons. We show that the mass operator for the charged leptons is related to the democratic mass matrix used in the Koide mass formula.

  11. Thermospheric mass density measurement from precise orbit ephemeris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junyu Chen; Jizhang Sang

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric drag,which can be inferred from orbit information of low-Earth orbiting (LEO)satellites,provides a direct means of measuring mass density.The temporal resolution of derived mass density could be in the range from minutes to days,depending on the precision of the satellite orbit data.This paper presents two methods potentially being able to estimate thermosphere mass density from precise obit ephemeris with high temporal resolution.One method is based on the drag perturbation equation of the semi-major axis and the temporal resolution of retrieved density could be 150 s for CHAMP satellite.Another method generates corrections to densities computed from a baseline density model through a Kalman filter orbit drag coefficient determination (KFOD) process and the temporal resolution of derived density could be as high as 30 s for CHAMP satellite.The densities estimated from these two methods are compared with densities obtained from accelerometer data of CHAMP satellite.When the accelerometer data based densities are used as reference values,the mean relative accuracy of the densities derived from precision orbit data using the two methods is within approximately 10%.An application of the derived densities shows that the derived densities can reduce orbit predication errors.

  12. Production of intense beams of mass-selected water cluster ions and theoretical study of atom-water interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Z P; Reinhard, P -G; Suraud, E; Bruny, G; Montano, C; Feil, S; Eden, S; Abdoul-Carime, H; Farizon, B; Farizon, M; Ouaskit, S; Maerk, T D

    2009-01-01

    The influences of water molecules surrounding biological molecules during irradiation with heavy particles (atoms,ions) are currently a major subject in radiation science on a molecular level. In order to elucidate the underlying complex reaction mechanisms we have initiated a joint experimental and theoretical investigation with the aim to make direct comparisons between experimental and theoretical results. As a first step, studies of collisions of a water molecule with a neutral projectile (C atom) at high velocities (> 0.1 a.u.), and with a charged projectile (proton) at low velocities (< 0.1 a.u.) have been studied within the microscopic framework. In particular, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) was applied to the valence electrons and coupled non-adiabatically to Molecular dynamics (MD) for ionic cores. Complementary experimental developments have been carried out to study projectile interactions with accelerated (< 10 keV) and mass-selected cluster ions. The first size distributio...

  13. Simultaneous measurement of denitrification and nitrogen fixation using isotope pairing with membrane inlet mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, S; Gardner, W S; Kana, T

    2001-03-01

    A method for estimating denitrification and nitrogen fixation simultaneously in coastal sediments was developed. An isotope-pairing technique was applied to dissolved gas measurements with a membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS). The relative fluxes of three N(2) gas species ((28)N(2), (29)N(2), and (30)N(2)) were monitored during incubation experiments after the addition of (15)NO(3)(-). Formulas were developed to estimate the production (denitrification) and consumption (N(2) fixation) of N(2) gas from the fluxes of the different isotopic forms of N(2). Proportions of the three isotopic forms produced from (15)NO(3)(-) and (14)NO(3)(-) agreed with expectations in a sediment slurry incubation experiment designed to optimize conditions for denitrification. Nitrogen fixation rates from an algal mat measured with intact sediment cores ranged from 32 to 390 microg-atoms of N m(-2) h(-1). They were enhanced by light and organic matter enrichment. In this environment of high nitrogen fixation, low N(2) production rates due to denitrification could be separated from high N(2) consumption rates due to nitrogen fixation. Denitrification and nitrogen fixation rates were estimated in April 2000 on sediments from a Texas sea grass bed (Laguna Madre). Denitrification rates (average, 20 microg-atoms of N m(-2) h(-1)) were lower than nitrogen fixation rates (average, 60 microg-atoms of N m(-2) h(-1)). The developed method benefits from simple and accurate dissolved-gas measurement by the MIMS system. By adding the N(2) isotope capability, it was possible to do isotope-pairing experiments with the MIMS system.

  14. Extracting Information from the Atom-Laser Wave Function UsingInterferometric Measurement with a Laser Standing-Wave Grating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘正东; 武强; 曾亮; 林宇; 朱诗尧

    2001-01-01

    The reconstruction of the atom-laser wave function is performed using an interferometric measurement with a standing-wave grating, and the results of this scheme are studied. The relations between the measurement data and the atomic wave function are also presented. This scheme is quite applicable and effectively avoids the initial random phase problem of the method that employs the laser running wave. The information which is encoded in the atom-laser wave is extracted.

  15. Probing three-dimensional surface force fields with atomic resolution: Measurement strategies, limitations, and artifact reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Z. Baykara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM is being increasingly used to measure the interaction force between an atomically sharp probe tip and surfaces of interest, as a function of the three spatial dimensions, with picometer and piconewton accuracy. Since the results of such measurements may be affected by piezo nonlinearities, thermal and electronic drift, tip asymmetries, and elastic deformation of the tip apex, these effects need to be considered during image interpretation.In this paper, we analyze their impact on the acquired data, compare different methods to record atomic-resolution surface force fields, and determine the approaches that suffer the least from the associated artifacts. The related discussion underscores the idea that since force fields recorded by using NC-AFM always reflect the properties of both the sample and the probe tip, efforts to reduce unwanted effects of the tip on recorded data are indispensable for the extraction of detailed information about the atomic-scale properties of the surface.

  16. Peak Bone Mass Measurement in Iranian Healthy Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Larijani

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoporosis is a disabling disease characterized by compromised bone strength, which predisposes a patient to increased risk of fracture. The aim of this study was evaluation the pattern of bone mass in Iranian healthy population. Methods: The study was performed between December 2000 and May 2001 on one thousand three healthy Iranian sub¬jects who currently live in Tehran. They were selected randomly by cluster random sampling among men and women of 10-76 yr from 50 clusters. The volunteer people were referred to the Bone Mineral Density BMD unit of EMRC. The partici¬pants were recalled for three times and the response rate was 83%. BMD was measured by DXA using Lunar DPX-MD device. Results: Females achieved maximum lumbar BMD up to 25-35. Femur BMD maximized in 30 to 35 and after 45 the inten¬sity of bone loss increased. Female peak bone mass in lumbar region was 1.19 ± 0.12 g/cm2and in femur was 1.02±0.12 g/cm2. Male peak bone mass in lumbar region occurred between ages 25-40 yr, Male's femur BMD maximized in 20-30. In male peak lumbar bone mass was 1.22±0.16 g/cm2 and femur was 1.08±0.15 g/cm2. Osteopenia was recog¬nized in 50% and 48.8% of women above 50 in spine and total femur, respectively, however these percentages were 37.1% and 34.8% among male subjects. Conclusion: Iranian BMD values sufficiently different from other countries to warrant a separate reference sample with which to compare individuals for the purpose of diagnosing osteoporosis and osteopenia according to the WHO criteria.

  17. [Mass spectrometry assay for denitrifying enzyme activity measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-li; Wu, Zhi-jie; Song, Yu-chao

    2010-07-01

    Nitrification inhibitors exert inhibition function in soil nitrification process (NH4(+)-N to NO3(-)-N) and are widely applied in order to improve N fertilizer use efficiency. Before the new nitrification inhibitor is used, its effects on denitrification process must be investigated and denitrifying enzyme activity (DEA) is an effective indicator to show this process. In the present paper, a mass spectrometery (MS) method was taken to measure the denitrifying enzyme activity in the new nitrification inhibitor 3, 4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) incubation system. The results showed that the method measured the concentration of N2O in the incubation system accurately and the concentration measured by MS had marked correlation with that measured by gas chromatogram (GC) (MS(N2O) = -0.45 + 1.03GC(N2O, R2 = 0.995). At the same time, enrichment of 15 N2O and 15 N2 was measured to discriminate the nitrate reductase and N2O reductase. Differed with traditional method, the enzymatic inhibitor-acetylene was not appended. The results showed that DMPP had no influence on the denitrifying enzyme activity and indicated that the denitrification process was not influenced by DMPP.

  18. Data correlation in on-line solid-phase extraction-gas chromatography-atomic emission/mass spectrometric detection of unknown microcontaminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hankemeier, Th.; Rozenbrand, J.; Abhadur, M.; Vreuls, J.J.; Brinkman, U.A.Th.

    1998-01-01

    A procedure is described for the (non-target) screening of hetero-atom-containing compounds in tap and waste water by correlating data obtained by gas chromatography (GC) using atomic emission (AED) and mass selective (MS) detection. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was coupled on-line to both GC system

  19. Precision Measurement of the Mass of the $\\tau$ Lepton

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Braun, S; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feng, C Q; Fu, C D; Fuks, O; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, T; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, L; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Kloss, B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leyhe, M; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, Q J; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, H L; Lu, J G; Lu, X R; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Moeini, H; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Q., N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C B; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2014-01-01

    An energy scan near the $\\tau$ pair production threshold has been performed using the BESIII detector. About $24$ pb$^{-1}$ of data, distributed over four scan points, was collected. This analysis is based on $\\tau$ pair decays to $ee$, $e\\mu$, $eh$, $\\mu\\mu$, $\\mu h$, $hh$, $e\\rho$, $\\mu\\rho$ and $\\pi\\rho$ final states, where $h$ denotes a charged $\\pi$ or $K$. The mass of the $\\tau$ lepton is measured from a maximum likelihood fit to the $\\tau$ pair production cross section data to be $m_{\\tau} = (1776.91\\pm0.12 ^{+0.10}_{-0.13}$) MeV/$c^2$, which is currently the most precise value in a single measurement.

  20. Systematic measurements of opacity dependence on temperature, density, and atomic number at stellar interior conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, James; Nagayama, T.; Loisel, G. P.; Rochau, G. A.; Blancard, C.; Colgan, J.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Fontes, C. J.; Golovkin, I.; Hansen, S. B.; Iglesias, C. A.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Mancini, R. C.; Nahar, S. N.; Orban, C.; Pradhan, A. K.; Sherrill, M.; Wilson, B. G.; Pain, J. C.; Gilleron, F.

    2016-10-01

    Model predictions for iron opacity are notably different from measurements performed at conditions similar to the boundary between the solar radiation and convection zone. New measurements at the Sandia Z facility with chromium, iron, and nickel are providing a systematic study of how opacity changes with temperature, density, and atomic number. These measurements help further evaluate possibilities for experiment errors and help constrain hypotheses for opacity model refinements. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. A precision analysis and determination of the technical requirements of an atom interferometer for gravity measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-ying WANG; Tao CHEN; Xiao-long WANG; Zhang ZHANG; Yun-fei XU; Qiang LIN

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the wave-front curvature of Raman pulses on the measurement precision of gravitational acceleration in atom interferometry is analysed by the method of a transmission matrix. It is shown that the measurement precision of gravitational acceleration is largely dependent on the spot size of the Raman pulse, the temporal interval between Raman pulses and the optical path difference of the two counter-propagating Raman pulses. Moreover, the influence of Doppler frequency shift on the precision is discussed. In order to get a certain measurement precision, the requirement for the accuracy of frequency scanning of the Raman pulse to compensate for the Doppler frequency shift is obtained.

  2. A comparison of ion and atom behavior in the first stage of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer vacuum interface: Evidence of the effect of an ambipolar electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnsworth, Paul B. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)], E-mail: paul_farnsworth@byu.edu; Spencer, Ross L.; Radicic, W. Neil; Taylor, Nicholas; Macedone, Jeffrey; Ma Haibin [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Velocities of argon atoms and calcium ions were measured in the first vacuum stage of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer using high-resolution laser-excited fluorescence spectroscopy. The calcium ions reached terminal velocities in the supersonic expansion that were consistently 5-6% higher than those of argon atoms, despite minimal differences in the masses of the two species. A computational model of the expansion was developed that shows the development of an ambipolar electric field along the expansion axis. With reasonable assumptions about electron temperatures in the expansion, the model accounts for the differences between the terminal velocities of the neutral argon atoms and the singly-charged calcium ions.

  3. Study of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers of bismuth-ground granulated blast furnace slag concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Sukhpal

    2016-05-01

    Five samples of Bismuth-Ground granulated blast furnace slag (Bi-GGBFS) concretes were prepared using composition (0.6 cement + x Bi2O3 + (0.4-x) GGBFS, x = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25) by keeping constant water (W) cement (C) ratio. Mass attenuation coefficients (μm) of these prepared samples were calculated using a computer program winXCOM at different gamma ray energies, whereas effective atomic numbers (Zeff) is calculated using mathematical formulas. The radiation shielding properties of Bi-GGBFS concrete has been compared with standard radiation shielding concretes.

  4. Towards a precise measurement of atomic parity violation in a single Ra{sup +} ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez Portela, M., E-mail: nunez@kvi.nl; Berg, J. E. van den; Bekker, H.; Boell, O.; Dijck, E. A.; Giri, G. S.; Hoekstra, S.; Jungmann, K.; Mohanty, A.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Santra, B.; Schlesser, S.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; Versolato, O. O.; Wansbeek, L. W.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) (Netherlands)

    2013-03-15

    A single trapped Ra{sup + } (Z = 88) ion provides a very promising route towards a most precise measurement of Atomic Parity Violation (APV), since APV effects grow faster than Z{sup 3}. This experiment promises the best determination of the electroweak coupling constant at the lowest accessible energies. Such a measurement provides a sensitive test of the Standard Model in particle physics. At the present stage of the experiment, we focus on trapping and laser cooling stable Ba{sup + } ions as a precursor for radioactive Ra{sup + }. Online laser spectroscopy of the isotopes {sup 209 - 214}Ra{sup + } in a linear Paul trap has provided information on transition wavelengths, fine and hyperfine structures and excited state lifetimes as test of atomic structure calculations. Additionaly, a single trapped Ra{sup + } ion could function as a very stable clock.

  5. Regarding the detectability and measurement of coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review I discuss the problems associated with the detection and measurement of coronal mass ejections (CMEs. CMEs are important phenomena both scientifically, as they play a crucial role in the evolution of the solar corona, and technologically, as their impact with the Earth leads to severe space weather activity in the form of magnetic storms. I focus on the observation of CMEs using visible white light imagers (coronagraphs and heliospheric imagers, as they may be regarded as the binding agents between different datasets and different models that are used to reconstruct them. Our ability to accurately measure CMEs observed by these imagers is hampered by many factors, from instrumental to geometrical to physical. Following a brief review of the history of CME observation and measurement, I explore the impediments to our ability to measure them and describe possible means for which we may be able to mitigate those impediments. I conclude with a discussion of the claim that we have reached the limit of the information that we can extract from the current generation of white light imagers, and discuss possible ways forward regarding future instrument capabilities.

  6. Mass measurements of very neutron-deficient Mo and Tc isotopes and their impact on rp process nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Haettner, E; Audi, G; Blaum, K; Block, M; Eliseev, S; Fleckenstein, T; Herfurth, F; Heßberger, F P; Hofmann, S; Ketelaer, J; Ketter, J; Kluge, H -J; Marx, G; Mazzocco, M; Novikov, Yu N; Plaß, W R; Rahaman, S; Rauscher, T; Rodríguez, D; Schatz, H; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L; Sun, B; Thirolf, P G; Vorobjev, G; Wang, M; Weber, C; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.122501

    2011-01-01

    The masses of ten proton-rich nuclides, including the N=Z+1 nuclides 85-Mo and 87-Tc, were measured with the Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP. Compared to the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2003 a systematic shift of the mass surface by up to 1.6 MeV is observed causing significant abundance changes of the ashes of astrophysical X-ray bursts. Surprisingly low alpha-separation energies for neutron-deficient Mo and Tc are found, making the formation of a ZrNb cycle in the rp process possible. Such a cycle would impose an upper temperature limit for the synthesis of elements beyond Nb in the rp process.

  7. Rigorous Comparison of Gravimetry Employing Atom Interferometers and the Measurement of Gravitational Time Dilation

    CERN Document Server

    Unnikrishnan, C S

    2011-01-01

    We present a gravitationally rigorous and clear answer, in the negative, to the question whether gravimetry with atom interferometers is equivalent to the the measurement of the relative gravitational time dilation of two clocks separated in space. Though matter and light waves, quantum states and oscillator clocks are quantum synonymous through the Planck-Einstein-de Broglie relations and the equivalence principle, there are crucial differences in the context of tests of gravitation theories.

  8. Excitations of optically driven atomic condensate in a cavity: theory of photodetection measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E.; Öztop, Barış; Bordyuh, Mykola; Türeci, Hakan E.

    2011-01-01

    This content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details: IP Address: 212.175.32.130 This content was downloaded on 22/04/2014 at 11:58 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Excitations of optically driven atomic condensate in a cavity: theory of photodetection measurements View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPsc...

  9. Entanglement swapping without joint measurement via a Λ-type atom interacting with bimodal cavity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xiu; Li Hong-Cai; Yang Rong-Can; Huang Zhi-Ping

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme for realizing entanglement swapping in cavity QED. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of a two-mode cavity field with a A-type three-level atom. In contrast with the previously proposed schemes, the present scheme is ascendant, since the fidelity is 1.0 and the joint measurement isn't needed. And the scheme is experimentally feasible based on the current cavity QED technique.

  10. Scheme for teleportation of entangled states without Bell-state measurement by using one atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang Wenchao; Zhang Lei; Zhang Aiping [Faculty of Science, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an 710055 (China); Dong Shihai, E-mail: qwcqj@163.com [Departamento de Fisica, Esc. Sup de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edificio 9, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico, DF 07738 (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    We propose a scheme for approximately and conditionally teleporting an entanglement of zero- and one-photon states from a cavity with left- and right-polarized modes to another similar one, with a fidelity exceeding 99%. Instead of using the Bell-state measurement, only one atom is used in our scheme. The time spent, the success probability and the feasibility of the proposed scheme are also discussed.

  11. Real time drift measurement for colloidal probe atomic force microscope: a visual sensing approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuliang, E-mail: wangyuliang@buaa.edu.cn; Bi, Shusheng [Robotics Institute, School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, Huimin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Rd., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Drift has long been an issue in atomic force microscope (AFM) systems and limits their ability to make long time period measurements. In this study, a new method is proposed to directly measure and compensate for the drift between AFM cantilevers and sample surfaces in AFM systems. This was achieved by simultaneously measuring z positions for beads at the end of an AFM colloidal probe and on sample surface through an off-focus image processing based visual sensing method. The working principle and system configuration are presented. Experiments were conducted to validate the real time drift measurement and compensation. The implication of the proposed method for regular AFM measurements is discussed. We believe that this technique provides a practical and efficient approach for AFM experiments requiring long time period measurement.

  12. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research an Oxford Instruments Company, Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States)

    2015-06-22

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  13. Accurate measurement of the sticking time and sticking probability of Rb atoms on a polydimethylsiloxane coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atutov, S. N., E-mail: atutovsn@mail.ru; Plekhanov, A. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    We present the results of a systematic study of Knudsen’s flow of Rb atoms in cylindrical capillary cells coated with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) compound. The purpose of the investigation is to determine the characterization of the coating in terms of the sticking probability and sticking time of Rb on the two types of coating of high and medium viscosities. We report the measurement of the sticking probability of a Rb atom to the coating equal to 4.3 × 10{sup −5}, which corresponds to the number of bounces 2.3 × 10{sup 4} at room temperature. These parameters are the same for the two kinds of PDMS used. We find that at room temperature, the respective sticking times for high-viscosity and medium-viscosity PDMS are 22 ± 3 μs and 49 ± 6 μs. These sticking times are about million times larger than the sticking time derived from the surface Rb atom adsorption energy and temperature of the coating. A tentative explanation of this surprising result is proposed based on the bulk diffusion of the atoms that collide with the surface and penetrate inside the coating. The results can be important in many resonance cell experiments, such as the efficient magnetooptical trapping of rare elements or radioactive isotopes and in experiments on the light-induced drift effect.

  14. Scale Factor Measurements for a Gyroscope Based on an Expanding Cloud of Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, Gregory; Pelle, Bruno; Riedl, Stefan; Kitching, John; Donley, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    We present an atom interferometer that can simultaneously measure two-axis rotations and one-axis accelerations with a single cloud of atoms in an active evacuated volume of about 1 cm3. This is accomplished by extending the point-source interferometry technique (Dickerson et al. PRL, 111, 083001, 2013) to a compact regime. In this technique, the cloud of atoms is imaged after the interferometer sequence. Rotations cause spatial fringes to appear across the cloud. To realize a gyroscope with this method, it is necessary to know how the wave-vector of the spatial fringes, k, is related to the rotation rate, Ω. If the cloud is initially infinitesimally small, it can be shown that k = FΩ with a scale factor F determined by the time between interferometer pulses, the total free expansion time, and the wavelength of the interrogating laser. However, the point-source approximation is not appropriate in our case because the final size of the cloud in our experiment is between 1.4 and 5 times its initial size. We show experimentally that in this finite expansion regime the phase gradient is still well described by k = FΩ , but the scale factor F depends on the initial distribution of the atoms. We also present modeling that explains this dependence.

  15. Measurements of the Diameter and Velocity Distributions of Atomized Tablet-Coating Solutions for Pharmaceutical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterday, Kathryn; Aliseda, Alberto; Lasheras, Juan

    2009-11-01

    The atomization of colloidal suspensions is of particular interest to the manufacturing of tablets and pills used as drug delivery systems by the pharmaceutical industry. At various stages in the manufacturing process, the tablets are coated with a spray of droplets produced by co-axial atomizers. The mechanisms of droplet size and spray formation in these types of atomizers are dominated by Kelvin-Helmholtz and Raleigh-Taylor instabilities for both low[1] and high[2] Ohnesorge numbers. We present detailed phase Doppler measurements of the Sauter Mean Diameter of the droplets produced by co-axial spray atomizers using water-based colloidal suspensions with solid concentrations ranging from fifteen to twenty percent and acetone-based colloidal suspensions with solid concentrations ranging from five to ten percent. Our results compare favorably with predictions by Aliseda's model. This suggests that the final size distribution is mainly determined by the instabilities caused by the sudden acceleration of the liquid interface. [1]Varga, C. M., et al. (2003) J. Fluid Mech. 497:405-434 [2]Aliseda, A. et al. (2008). J. Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 34(2), 161-175.

  16. Laser Measurements of the H Atom + Ozone Rate Constant at Atmospheric Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Peng, J.; Reppert, K. J.; Callahan, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The exothermic H + O3 reaction produces OH(v) Meinel band emissions, used to derive mesospheric H concentrations and chemical heating rates. We have remeasured its rate constant to reduce resulting uncertainties and the measurement extend to lower mesospheric temperatures using modern laser techniques. H atoms are produced by pulsed ultraviolet laser trace photolysis of O3, followed by reaction of O(D) with added H2. A second, delayed, frequency-mixed dye laser measures the reaction decay rate with the remaining ozone by laser induced fluorescence. We monitor either the H atom decay by 2 photon excitation at 205 nm and detection of red fluorescence, or the OH(v=9) product time evolution with excitation of the B-X (0,9) band at 237 nm and emission in blue B-A bands. By cooling the enclosed low pressure flow cell we obtained measurements from 146-305 K. Small kinetic modeling corrections are made for secondary regeneration of H atoms. The results fully confirm the current NASA JPL recommendation for this rate constant, and establish its extrapolation down to the lower temperatures of the mesosphere. This work was supported by the NSF Aeronomy Program and an NSF Physics summer REU student grant.

  17. Single Ra{sup +} ion spectroscopy - towards a measurement of atomic parity violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez Portela, Mayerlin; Mohanti, A.; Dijck, E.A.; Bekker, H.; Boell, O.; Berg, J. van den; Giri, G.S.; Jungmann, K.; Onderwater, C.J.G.; Santra, B.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Versolato, O.O.; Wansbeek, L.W.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H.W. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    The sensitivity of the Atomic Parity Violation (APV) signal grows faster than the third power of the atomic number Z. Ra{sup +} (Z=88) is heaviest alkaline earth ion available. A single trapped Ra{sup +} ion opens a very promising path for a measurement atomic parity violation. One of the experimental challenges is the localization of the ion within a fraction of an optical wavelength. For this the current experiments are focused on trapping and laser cooling of Ba{sup +} ions as a precursor for Ra{sup +}. Ba{sup +} ions are trapped and laser cooled in a precision hyperbolic Paul trap. Work towards single Ba{sup +} ion localization and detection is in progress. Recently the hyperfine structure of the 6d{sub 2}D{sub 3/2} states and the isotope shift of the 6d{sub 2}D{sub 3/2}-7p{sub 2}P{sub 1/2} transition in the isotopes {sup 209-214}Ra{sup +} has been measured in online laser spectroscopy experiments at the KVI AGOR/TRIμP facility. These results are essential for the interpretation of an APV measurement in Ra{sup +}.

  18. A Measurement of Atomic X-ray Yields in Exotic Atoms and Implications for an Antideuteron-Based Dark Matter Search

    CERN Document Server

    Aramaki, T; Craig, W W; Fabris, L; Gahbauer, F; Hailey, C J; Koglin, J E; Madden, N; Mori, K; Yu, H T; Ziock, K P

    2013-01-01

    The General AntiParticle Spectrometer (GAPS) is a novel approach for indirect dark matter searches that exploits cosmic antideuterons. GAPS utilizes a distinctive detection method using atomic X-rays and charged particles from the exotic atom as well as the timing, stopping range and dE/dX energy deposit of the incoming particle, which provides excellent antideuteron identification. Prior to the future balloon experiment, an accelerator test was conducted in 2004 and 2005 at KEK, Japan, in order to precisely measure the X-ray yields of antiprotonic exotic atoms formed with different target materials. The X-ray yields of the exotic atoms with Al and S targets were obtained as $\\sim$ 75%, which are higher than were previously assumed in. A simple, but comprehensive cascade model has been developed not only to evaluate the measurement results but also to predict the X-ray yields of the exotic atoms formed with any materials in the GAPS instrument. The cascade model is extendable to any kind of exotic atom (any n...

  19. Mass predictions of atomic nuclei in the infinite nuclear matter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, R. C.; Satpathy, L.

    2012-07-01

    We present here the mass excesses, binding energies, one- and two-neutron, one- and two-proton and α-particle separation energies of 6727 nuclei in the ranges 4≤Z≤120 and 8≤A≤303 calculated in the infinite nuclear matter model. Compared to our predictions of 1999 mass table, the present ones are obtained using larger data base of 2003 mass table of Wapstra and Audi and resorting to higher accuracy in the solutions of the η-differential equations of the INM model. The local energy η's supposed to carry signature of the characteristic properties of nuclei are found to possess the predictive capability. In fact η-systematics reveal new magic numbers in the drip-line regions giving rise to new islands of stability supported by relativistic mean field theoretic calculations. This is a manifestation of a new phenomenon where shell-effect overcomes the instability due to repulsive components of the nucleon-nucleon force broadening the stability peninsula. The two-neutron separation energy-systematics derived from the present mass predictions reveal a general new feature for the existence of islands of inversion in the exotic neutron-rich regions of nuclear landscape, apart from supporting the presently known islands around 31Na and 62Ti. The five global parameters representing the properties of infinite nuclear matter, the surface, the Coulomb and the pairing terms are retained as per our 1999 mass table. The root-mean-square deviation of the present mass-fit to 2198 known masses is 342 keV, while the mean deviation is 1.3 keV, reminiscent of no left-over systematic effects. This is a substantive improvement over our 1999 mass table having rms deviation of 401 keV and mean deviation of 9 keV for 1884 data nuclei.

  20. Mass measurements on neutron-deficient nuclides at SHIPTRAP and commissioning of a cryogenic narrow-band FT-ICR mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer Garcia, R.

    2007-07-01

    The dissertation presented here deals with high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometry on short-lived radionuclides. Owed to the ability of revealing all nucleonic interactions, mass measurements far off the line of {beta}-stability are expected to bring new insight to the current knowledge of nuclear properties and serve to test the predictive power of mass models and formulas. In nuclear astrophysics, atomic masses are fundamental parameters for the understanding of the synthesis of nuclei in the stellar environments. This thesis presents ten mass values of radionuclides around A=90 interspersed in the predicted rp-process pathway. Six of them have been experimentally determined for the first time. The measurements have been carried out at the Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP using the destructive time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance (TOF-ICR) detection technique. Given the limited performance of the TOF-ICR detection when trying to investigate heavy/superheavy species with small production cross sections ({sigma} <1 {mu}b), a new detection system is found to be necessary. Thus, the second part of this thesis deals with the commissioning of a cryogenic double-Penning trap system for the application of a highly-sensitive, narrow-band Fourier-transform ion-cyclotron-resonance (FT-ICR) detection technique. With the non-destructive FT-ICR detection method a single singly-charged trapped ion will provide the required information to determine its mass. First off-line tests of a new detector system based on a channeltron with an attached conversion dynode, of a cryogenic pumping barrier, to guarantee ultra-high vacuum conditions during mass determination, and of the detection electronics for the required single-ion sensitivity are reported. (orig.)

  1. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained. PMID:27587276

  2. Using Energy Peaks to Measure New Particle Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Kim, Doojin

    2014-01-01

    We discussed in arXiv:1209.0772 that the laboratory frame distribution of the energy of a massless particle from a two-body decay at a hadron collider has a peak whose location is identical to the value of this daughter's (fixed) energy in the rest frame of the corresponding mother particle. For that result to hold we assumed that the mother is unpolarized and has a generic boost distribution in the laboratory frame. In this work we discuss how this observation can be applied for determination of masses of new particles, without requiring a full reconstruction of their decay chains or information about the rest of the event. We focus on a two-step cascade decay of a massive particle that has one invisible particle in the final state: C -> Bb -> Aab, where C, B and A are new particles of which A is invisible and a, b are visible particles. Combining the measurements of the peaks of energy distributions of a and b with that of the edge in their invariant mass distribution, we demonstrate that it is in principle...

  3. A Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer for ambient measurements of Ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Benson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS for fast response, in-situ measurements of gas phase ammonia (NH3. The NH3 background level detected with the CIMS ranged between 0.3–1 ppbv, with an uncertainty of 30 pptv under optimized conditions. The instrument sensitivity varied from 4–25 Hz/pptv for >1 MHz of reagent ion signals (protonated ethanol ions, with a 30% uncertainty estimated based on variability in calibration signals. The CIMS detection limit for NH3 was ~60 pptv at a 1 min integration time (3 sigma. The CIMS time response was <30 s. This new NH3-CIMS has been used for ambient measurements in Kent, Ohio, for several weeks throughout three seasons. The measured NH3 mixing ratios were usually at the sub-ppbv level and higher in spring (200 ± 120 pptv than in winter (60 ± 75 pptv and fall (150 ± 80 pptv. High emissions of SO2 from power plants in this region, and thus possible high acidity of aerosol particles, may explain these low NH3 mixing ratios in general.

  4. Top-quark mass measurements: review and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Cortiana, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle known and its mass ($m_{\\rm top}$) is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model (SM). The