WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic magnetometer based

  1. High contrast atomic magnetometer based on coherent population trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an experimental and theoretical investigation of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance excited on the D1 line of 87Rb atoms by bichromatic linearly polarized laser light. The experimental results show that a lin ‖ lin transition scheme is a promising alternative to the conventional circular—circular transition scheme for an atomic magnetometer. Compared with the circular light transition scheme, linear light accounts for high-contrast transmission resonances, which makes this excitation scheme promising for high-sensitivity magnetometers. We also use linear light and circular light to detect changes of a standard magnetic field, separately. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  2. Atomic magnetometer-based ultra-sensitive magnetic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Savukov, Igor

    2016-03-01

    An atomic magnetometer (AM) based on lasers and alkali-metal vapor cells is currently the most sensitive non-cryogenic magnetic-field sensor. Many applications in neuroscience and other fields require high resolution, high sensitivity magnetic microscopic measurements. In order to meet this need we combined a cm-size spin-exchange relaxation-free AM with a flux guide (FG) to produce an ultra-sensitive FG-AM magnetic microscope. The FG serves to transmit the target magnetic flux to the AM thus enhancing both the sensitivity and resolution for tiny magnetic objects. In this talk, we will describe a prototype FG-AM device and present experimental and numerical tests of its sensitivity and resolution. We also demonstrate that an optimized FG-AM achieves high resolution and high sensitivity sufficient to detect a magnetic field of a single neuron in a few seconds, which would be an important milestone in neuroscience. We anticipate that this unique device can be applied to the detection of a single neuron, the detection of magnetic nano-particles, which in turn are very important for detection of target molecules in national security and medical diagnostics, and non-destructive testing.

  3. A Subfemtotesla Atomic Magnetometer Based on Hybrid Optical Pumping of Potassium and Rubidium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Cai, Hongwei; Ding, Ming; Quan, Wei; Fang, Jiancheng

    2016-05-01

    Atomic magnetometers, based on detection of Larmor spin precession of optically pumped atoms, have been researched and applied extensively. Higher sensitivity and spatial resolution combined with no cryogenic cooling of atomic magnetometers would enable many applications with low cost, including the magnetoencephalography (MEG). Ultrahigh sensitivity atomic magnetometer is considered to be the main development direction for the future. Hybrid optical pumping has been proposed to improve the efficiency of nuclear polarization. But it can also be used for magnetic field measurement. This method can control absorption of optical pumping light, which is benefit for improving the uniformity of alkali metal atoms polarization and the sensitivity of atomic magnetometer. In addition, it allows optical pumping in the absence of quenching gas. We conduct experiments with a hybrid optically pumped atomic magnetometer using a cell containing potassium and rubidium. By adjusting the density ratio of alkali metal and the pumping laser conditions, we measured the magnetic field sensitivity better than 0.7 fT/sqrt(Hz).

  4. Atomic magnetometer for human magnetoencephalograpy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a high sensitivity (<5 fTesla/{radical}Hz), fiber-optically coupled magnetometer to detect magnetic fields produced by the human brain. This is the first demonstration of a noncryogenic sensor that could replace cryogenic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and is an important advance in realizing cost-effective MEG. Within the sensor, a rubidium vapor is optically pumped with 795 laser light while field-induced optical rotations are measured with 780 nm laser light. Both beams share a single optical axis to maximize simplicity and compactness. In collaboration with neuroscientists at The Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, NM, the evoked responses resulting from median nerve and auditory stimulation were recorded with the atomic magnetometer and a commercial SQUID-based MEG system with signals comparing favorably. Multi-sensor operation has been demonstrated with two AMs placed on opposite sides of the head. Straightforward miniaturization would enable high-density sensor arrays for whole-head magnetoencephalography.

  5. A High Sensitive Atomic Co-magnetometer for Rotation Rate Measurement Based on K-Rb-21Ne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Zou, Sheng; Quan, Wei; Lu, Yan; Ding, Ming; Fang, Jiancheng

    2016-05-01

    Atomic co-magnetometers use two spin ensembles occupying the same volume in glass vapor cells to suppress their sensitivity to magnetic field noise and leave them sensitive to rotation rate, anomalous fields, etc. Due to the small gyromagnetic ratio of the 21 Ne atom, an atomic co-magnetometer based on 21Ne is very suitable for rotation rate measurement. Thus, we focus on and report a co-magnetometer for rotation rate measurement based on K-Rb-21Ne. We have developed a rotating co-magnetometer which is calibrated by the rotation of the earth. All the optics in the co-magnetometer have been encased in a bell jar in which the air is pumped away to suppress the air density fluctuation noise. MnZn ferrite is also utilized in the inner most magnetic field shielding system to suppress the magnetic field noise. We have reached rotation rate sensitivity of 2.1 * 10-8 rad/ s / sqrt(Hz) or equivalent magnetic field noise level of 1.4 fT / sqrt(Hz) . The K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer has many potential applications for precision measurements, including spin dependent force detecting, Electric Dipole Moment measurement and fundamental symmetry test.

  6. CPT Magnetometer with Atomic Energy Level Modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Guo-Bin; DU Run-Chang; LIU Chao-Yang; GU Si-Hong

    2008-01-01

    We propose and experimentally investigate a coherent population trapping state based magnetometer prototype with87 Rb atoms.Through modulating Zeeman sublevels with an ac magnetic field,not only a phase sensitive detection scheme suitable for miniature magnetometer is realized,but also the detection resolution of magnetic field intensity could be improved by a factor of two.Our study result indicates that it is a promising low power consumption miniature sensitive low magnetic field sensor offering spatially resolved measurement at the sub-millimetre level.

  7. Laser pumping Cs atom magnetometer of theory research based on gradient tensor measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, due to space exploration, military technology, geological exploration, magnetic navigation, medical diagnosis and biological magnetic fields study of the needs of research and development, the magnetometer is given strong driving force. In this paper, it will discuss the theoretical analysis and system design of laser pumping cesium magnetometer, cesium atomic energy level formed hyperfine structure with the I-J coupling, the hyperfine structure has been further split into Zeeman sublevels for the effects of magnetic field. To use laser pump and RF magnetic field make electrons transition in the hyperfine structure to produce the results of magneto-optical double resonance, and ultimately through the resonant frequency will be able to achieve accurate value of the external magnetic field. On this basis, we further have a discussion about magnetic gradient tensor measuring method. To a large extent, it increases the magnetic field measurement of information.

  8. Optimization of buffer gas pressure for Rb atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang; Liu, Xiaohu; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong

    2015-08-01

    The optimization of buffer gas pressure is very important to improve the performance of the rubidium (Rb) atomic magnetometer. In this paper we briefly introduce the basic principle and the experimental method of the rubidium magnetometer based on Faraday rotation effect, and describe the factors affecting the magnetometer sensitivity, then analyze and summarize the mechanism of the influence of spin-exchange, spin-destruction collisions, radiation trapping and the spin diffusion on spin relaxation of Rb atoms. Based on this, the relationship between the rubidium magnetometer sensitivity, the spin relaxation rate and the gas chamber conditions (buffer gas pressure, the bubble radius, measuring temperature) is established. Doing calculations by the simulation software, how the magnetometer sensitivity and the relaxation rate vary with the gas chamber conditions can be seen; finally, the optimal values of the buffer gas pressure under certain gas chamber conditions are obtained. The work is significant for the engineering development of rubidium magnetometer.

  9. Fetal MCG with Atomic Magnetometer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deland, Zack; Bulatowicz, Michael D.; Sulai, Ibrahim A.; Wahl, Colin P.; Wakai, Ronald T.; Walker, Thad G.

    2016-05-01

    We present results on the development of 87Rb atomic magnetometers for the detection of a fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG). Operating in the spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) regime, the magnetometers' sensitivities are reported at the 1 fT /√{ Hz } level. Environmental common-mode noise, including the field from the maternal heart, can be suppressed by operating the magnetometers in a gradiometric configuration. We report on schemes from implementing such gradiometers along with recent fMCG measurements. This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health.

  10. Multichannel optical atomic magnetometer operating in unshielded environment

    CERN Document Server

    Bevilacqua, Giuseppe; Chessa, Piero; Dancheva, Yordanka

    2016-01-01

    A multi-channel atomic magnetometer operating in an unshielded environment is described and characterised. The magnetometer is based on D1 optical pumping and D2 polarimetry of Cs vapour contained in gas-buffered cells. Several technical implementations are described and discussed in detail. The demonstrated sensitivity of the setup is 100fT/Hz^1/2 when operating in the difference mode.

  11. Anatomical MRI with an atomic magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Savukov, I

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-low field (ULF) MRI is a promising method for inexpensive medical imaging with various additional advantages over conventional instruments such as low weight, low power, portability, absence of artifacts from metals, and high contrast. Anatomical ULF MRI has been successfully implemented with SQUIDs, but SQUIDs have the drawback of cryogen requirement. Atomic magnetometers have sensitivity comparable to SQUIDs and can be in principle used for ULF MRI to replace SQUIDs. Unfortunately some problems exist due to the sensitivity of atomic magnetometers to magnetic field and gradients. At low frequency, noise is also substantial and a shielded room is needed for improving sensitivity. In this paper, we show that at 85 kHz, the atomic magnetometer can be used to obtain anatomical images. This is the first demonstration of any use of atomic magnetometers for anatomical MRI. The demonstrated resolution is 1.1x1.4 mm2 in about six minutes of acquisition with SNR of 10. Some applications of the method are discuss...

  12. Electromagnetic induction imaging with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Cameron; Marmugi, Luca; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-03-01

    We report on a compact, tunable, and scalable to large arrays imaging device, based on a radio-frequency optically pumped atomic magnetometer operating in magnetic induction tomography modality. Imaging of conductive objects is performed at room temperature, in an unshielded environment and without background subtraction. Conductivity maps of target objects exhibit not only excellent performance in terms of shape reconstruction but also demonstrate detection of sub-millimetric cracks and penetration of conductive barriers. The results presented here demonstrate the potential of a future generation of imaging instruments, which combine magnetic induction tomography and the unmatched performance of atomic magnetometers.

  13. Electromagnetic induction imaging with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Deans, Cameron; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    We report on a compact, tunable, and scalable to large arrays imaging device, based on a radio-frequency optically pumped atomic magnetometer operating in magnetic induction tomography modality. Imaging of conductive objects is performed at room temperature, in an unshielded environment and without background subtraction. Conductivity maps of target objects exhibit not only excellent performance in terms of shape reconstruction but also demonstrate detection of sub-millimetric cracks and penetration of conductive barriers. The results presented here demonstrate the potential of a future generation of imaging instruments, which combine magnetic induction tomography and the unmatched performance of atomic magnetometers.

  14. Ultrasensitive magnetometer using a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgart, I; Retzker, A; Plenio, M B; Wunderlich, Ch

    2014-01-01

    Precision sensing, and in particular high precision magnetometry, is a central goal of research into quantum technologies. For magnetometers often trade-offs exist between sensitivity, spatial resolution, and frequency range. The precision, and thus the sensitivity of magnetometry scales as $1/\\sqrt {T_2}$ with the phase coherence time, $T_2$, of the sensing system playing the role of a key determinant. Adapting a dynamical decoupling scheme that allows for extending $T_2$ by orders of magnitude and merging it with a magnetic sensing protocol, we achieve a measurement sensitivity even for high frequency fields close to the standard quantum limit. Using a single atomic ion as a sensor, we experimentally attain a sensitivity of $4$ pT Hz$^{-1/2}$ for an alternating-current (AC) magnetic field near 14 MHz. Based on the principle demonstrated here, this unprecedented sensitivity combined with spatial resolution in the nanometer range and tuneability from direct-current to the gigahertz range could be used for mag...

  15. Electromagnetic Imaging with Atomic Magnetometers: A Novel Approach to Security and Surveillance

    CERN Document Server

    Hussain, Sarah; Deans, Cameron; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    We describe our research programme on the use of atomic magnetometers to detect conductive objects via electromagnetic induction. The extreme sensitivity of atomic magnetometers at low frequencies, up to seven orders of magnitude higher than a coil-based system, permits deep penetration through different media and barriers, and in various operative environments. This eliminates the limitations usually associated with electromagnetic detection.

  16. Electromagnetic imaging with atomic magnetometers: a novel approach to security and surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Sarah; Marmugi, Luca; Deans, Cameron; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-05-01

    We describe our research programme on the use of atomic magnetometers to detect conductive objects via electromagnetic induction. The extreme sensitivity of atomic magnetometers at low frequencies, up to seven orders of magnitude higher than a coil-based system, permits deep penetration through different media and barriers, and in various operative environments. This eliminates the limitations usually associated with electromagnetic detection.

  17. Electromagnetic induction imaging with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer

    OpenAIRE

    Deans, C.; Marmugi, L.; Hussain, S.; Renzoni, F.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a compact, tunable, and scalable to large arrays imaging device, based on a radio-frequency optically pumped atomic magnetometer operating in magnetic induction tomography modality. Imaging of conductive objects is performed at room temperature, in an unshielded environment and without background subtraction. Conductivity maps of target objects exhibit not only excellent performance in terms of shape reconstruction but also demonstrate detection of sub-millimetric cracks and pene...

  18. Three axis vector atomic magnetometer utilizing polarimetric technique

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Swarupananda

    2016-01-01

    The three axis magnetic field measurement based on the interaction of a single elliptically polarized light beam with an atomic system is described. The magnetic field direction dependent atomic responses are extracted by the polarimetric detection in combination with laser frequency modulation and magnetic field modulation techniques. The magnetometer offers additional critical requirements like compact size and large dynamic range for space application. Further, the three axis magnetic field is measured using only reflected signal from the polarimeter, thus can be easily expanded to make spatial array of detectors or / and high sensitivity field gradient measurement as required for biomedical application.

  19. A Compact, High Performance Atomic Magnetometer for Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Vishal K

    2013-01-01

    We present a highly sensitive room-temperature atomic magnetometer (AM), designed for use in biomedical applications. The magnetometer sensor head is only 2x2x5 cm^3 and it is constructed using readily available, low-cost optical components. The magnetic field resolution of the AM is <10 fT/sqrt(Hz), which is comparable to cryogenically cooled superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. We present side-by-side comparisons between our AM and a SQUID magnetometer, and show that equally high quality magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) recordings can be obtained using our AM.

  20. The atomic magnetometer: A new era in biomagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakai, Ronald T., E-mail: rtwakai@wisc.edu [1005 Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research, 1111 Highland Avenue, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    The high cost and impracticality of SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) magnetometers has limited the expansion of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG), especially in countries where the cost of liquid helium is high. A recent breakthrough, however, has the potential to radically change this situation. In 2003, a group at Princeton University demonstrated an atomic magnetometer, known as the SERF (spin-exchange free relaxation) magnetometer, with unprecedented sensitivity. Since then, several research groups have utilized SERF magnetometers to record MEG, MCG, and fetal MCG signals. Despite some modest drawbacks, it now seems almost certain that SERF magnetometers can replace SQUIDs for many applications. With a price tag that is likely to be far less than that of SQUIDs, SERF magnetometers can propel the next wave of growth in biomagnetism.

  1. Ultra-sensitive Magnetic Microscopy with an Atomic Magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-19

    The PowerPoint presentation focused on research goals, specific information about the atomic magnetometer, response and resolution factors of the SERF magnetometer, FC+AM systems, tests of field transfer and resolution on FC, gradient cancellation, testing of AM performance, ideas for a multi-channel AM, including preliminary sensitivity testing, and a description of a 6 channel DAQ system. A few ideas for future work ended the presentation.

  2. Spin Damping in an RF Atomic Magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Alem, Orang; Romalis, Mike V

    2012-01-01

    Under negative feedback, the quality factor Q of a radio-frequency magnetometer can be decreased by more than two orders of magnitude, so that any initial perturbation of the polarized spin system can be rapidly damped, preparing the magnetometer for detection of the desired signal. We find that noise is also suppressed under such spin-damping, with a characteristic spectral response corresponding to the type of noise; therefore magnetic, photon-shot, and spin-projection noise can be measured distinctly. While the suppression of resonant photon-shot noise implies the closed-loop production of polarization-squeezed light, the suppression of resonant spin-projection noise does not imply spin-squeezing, rather simply the broadening of the noise spectrum with Q. Furthermore, the application of spin-damping during phase-sensitive detection suppresses both signal and noise in such a way as to increase the sensitivity bandwidth. We demonstrate a three-fold increase in the magnetometer's bandwidth while maintaining 0...

  3. NQR detection of explosive simulants using RF atomic magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a highly selective spectroscopic method that can be used to detect and identify a number of chemicals of interest to the defense, national security, and law enforcement community. In the past, there have been several documented attempts to utilize NQR to detect nitrogen bearing explosives using induction sensors to detect the NQR RF signatures. We present here our work on the NQR detection of explosive simulants using optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers. RF atomic magnetometers can provide an order of magnitude (or more) improvement in sensitivity versus induction sensors and can enable mitigation of RF interference, which has classically has been a problem for conventional NQR using induction sensors. We present the theory of operation of optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers along with the result of laboratory work on the detection of explosive simulant material. An outline of ongoing work will also be presented along with a path for a fieldable detection system.

  4. Compact Atomic Magnetometer for Global Navigation (NAV-CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Larsen, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Northrop Grumman Navigation Systems Division is developing an atom-based magnetometer technology that has the potential for providing a global position reference independent of GPS. The NAV-CAM sensor is a direct outgrowth of the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyro under development by the same technical team. It will be the only known magnetic field sensor capable of providing all 3 axes of magnetic vector direction and magnitude simultaneously with a whole-field scalar measurement, all within a single multi-axis sensing element measuring 4mm cube or smaller, essentially eliminating many of the problems encountered when using physically separate sensors or sensing elements. According to information presented by Ariyur et al. at the 2010 American Control Conference [1], the anticipated accuracy of 10 pico-Tesla (pT) and precision of <0.5 pT of the NAV-CAM sensor will enable magnetic determination of position with 20 meter accuracy and 1 meter resolution.

  5. Mapping of Human Heart Beat Dynamics by Atomic Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, A.; Bison, G.; Wynands, R.

    2005-05-01

    Stimulated by recent progress in laser-based optical magnetometry and in developments of powerful signal denoising techniques we initiated the development of a low-cost laser-driven optically pumped magnetometer (OPM) for biomagnetic applications. The OPM uses optically pumped cesium atoms in glass cells of a few cm3. Its sensitivity (<70 fT in 1 Hz bandwidth), bandwidth (140 Hz), and spatial resolution (cm) were optimized for the two-dimensional mapping of the magnetic field produced above the chest by the beating human heart. Signal averaging using an electrocardiographic signal as a reference and gradiometric detection reduces residual noise significantly so that the dynamics of the heart field can be displayed a movie. We discuss the principle of the technique and give a status report on ongoing work towards the development of a multichannel device.

  6. Rb atomic magnetometer toward EDM experiment with laser cooled francium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Aiko; Asahi, Koichiro; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield. We prepared the cell coated with an anti-relaxation material and measured the relaxation time. A degauss of the shield was performed to eliminate the residual field. We will report the present status of the magnetometer. A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield

  7. Magnetic induction measurements using an all-optical $^{87}$Rb atomic magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Wickenbrock, Arne; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2013-01-01

    In this work we propose, and experimentally demonstrate, the use of a self-oscillating all-optical atomic magnetometer for magnetic induction measurements. Given the potential for miniaturization of atomic magnetometers, and their extreme sensitivity, the present work shows that atomic magnetometers may play a key role in the development of instrumentation for magnetic induction tomography.

  8. Human MCG measurements with a high-sensitivity potassium atomic magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measuring biomagnetic fields, such as magnetocardiograms (MCGs), is important for investigating biological functions. To address to this need, we developed an optically pumped atomic magnetometer. In this study, human MCGs were acquired using a potassium atomic magnetometer without any modulating systems. The sensitivity of the magnetometer is comparable to that of high-Tc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) and is sufficient for acquiring human MCGs. The activity of a human heart estimated from the MCG maps agrees well with that measured with SQUID magnetometers. Thus, our magnetometer produces reliable results, which demonstrate the potential of our atomic magnetometer for biomagnetic measurements. (paper)

  9. Integration of micro-fabricated atomic magnetometers on military systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Gregory; Mhaskar, Rahul; Prouty, Mark; Miller, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    A new generation of ultra-high sensitivity magnetic sensors based on innovative micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) are being developed and incorporated into military systems. Specifically, we are currently working to fully integrate the latest generation of MicroFabricated Atomic Magnetometers (MFAMs) developed by Geometrics on defense mobility systems such as unmanned systems, military vehicles and handheld units. Recent reductions in size, weight, and power of these sensors has enabled new deployment opportunities for improved sensitivity to targets of interest, but has also introduced new challenges associated with noise mitigation, mission configuration planning, and data processing. Our work is focused on overcoming the practical aspects of integrating these sensors with various military platforms. Implications associated with utilizing these combined sensor systems in working environments are addressed in order to optimize signal-to-noise ratios, detection probabilities, and false alarm mitigation. Specifically, we present collaborative work that bridges the gap between commercial specialists and operation platform integration organizations including magnetic signature characterization and mitigation as well as the development of simulation tools that consider a wide array of sensor, environmental, platform, and mission-level parameters. We discuss unique deployment concepts for explosive hazard target geolocation, and data processing. Applications include configurations for undersea and underground threat detection - particularly those associated with stationary or mobile explosives and compact metallic targets such as munitions, subsea threats, and other hazardous objects. We show the potential of current and future features of miniaturized magnetic sensors including very high magnetic field sensitivities, bandwidth selectivity, and array processing.

  10. Magnetic induction imaging with optical atomic magnetometers: towards applications to screening and surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmugi, Luca; Hussain, Sarah; Deans, Cameron; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2015-10-01

    We propose a new approach, based on optical atomic magnetometers and magnetic induction tomography (MIT), for remote and non-invasive detection of conductive targets. Atomic magnetometers overcome the main limitations of conventional MIT instrumentation, in particular their poor low-frequency sensitivity, their large size and their limited scalability. Moreover, atomic magnetometers have been proven to reach extremely high sensitivities, with an improvement of up to 7 orders of magnitude in the 50 MHz to DC band, with respect to a standard pick-up coil of the same size. In the present scheme, an oscillating magnetic field induces eddy currents in a conductive target and laser-pumped atomic magnetometers, either stand-alone or in an array, detect the response of the objects. A phase-sensitive detection scheme rejects the background, allowing remote detection of the secondary field and, thus, mapping of objects, hidden in cargos, underwater or underground. The potential for extreme sensitivity, miniaturization, dynamic range and array operation paves the way to a new generation of non-invasive, active detectors for surveillance, as well as for real-time cargo screening.

  11. The development of a multichannel atomic magnetometer array for fetal magnetocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Robert, IV

    Biomagnetic signals can provide important information about electrical processes in the human body. Because of the small signal sizes, magnetic detection is generally used where other detection methods are incomplete or insufficiently sensitive. One important example is fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG), where the detection of magnetic signals is currently the only available technique for certain clinical applications, such as the detection of cardiac arrhythmia. Until now, magnetometers based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), which can operate at sensitivities down to 1 fT Hz-1/2 have been the only option. The low Tc superconductors and associated cryogenics required for the most sensitive devices has led to interest in alternative technologies. In the last decade, atomic magnetometers operating in the spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) regime have demonstrated a higher sensitivity than SQUIDs while operating near room temperature. Though large SERF magnetometer arrays have not yet been built, smaller arrays should be sufficient for applications such as fMCG. In this thesis, we present the design and characterization of a portable four-channel SERF atomic magnetometer array with a 5-10 fT Hz-1/2 single channel baseline sensitivity. The magnetometer array has several design features intended to maximize its suitability for biomagnetic measurement, specifically fMCG, such as a compact modular design and large, flexible channel spacing from 5-15 cm. The modular design allows for easily adding units to the array and the independent positioning and orientation of each magnetometer, in principle allowing for non-planar array geometries. Using this array in a magnetically shielded room, we acquire adult magnetocadiograms and, for the first time with a SERF magnetometer, fMCG. We also investigate the use of different operational modes of the magnetometer to extend its functionality, specifically modulation methods for additional directional

  12. Ultra-sensitive atomic magnetometer for studying magnetization fields produced by hyperpolarized helium-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Xi-yuan; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi; Hu, Zhao-hui; Shan, Guang-cun; Quan, Wei; Fang, Jian-cheng

    2016-04-01

    An ingenious approach to acquire the absolute magnetization fields produced by polarized atoms has been presented in this paper. The method was based on detection of spin precession signal of the hyperpolarized helium-3 with ultra-sensitive atomic magnetometer of potassium by referring to time-domain analysis. At first, dynamic responses of the mixed spin ensembles in the presence of variant external magnetic fields have been analyzed by referring to the Bloch equation. Subsequently, the relevant equipment was established to achieve the functions of hyperpolarizing helium-3 and detecting the precession of spin-polarized noble gas. By analyzing the transient response of the magnetometer in time domain, we obtained the relevant damping ratio and natural frequency. When the value of damping ratio reached the maximum value of 0.0917, the combined atomic magnetometer was in equilibrium. We draw a conclusion from the steady response: the magnetization fields of the polarized electrons and the hyperpolarized nuclei were corresponding 16.12 nT and 90.74 nT. Under this situation, the nuclear magnetization field could offset disturbing magnetic fields perpendicular to the orientation of the electronic polarization, and it preserved the electronic spin staying in a stable axis. Therefore, the combined magnetometer was particularly attractive for inertial measurements.

  13. Rotation Measurement with a K-Rb-21Ne Atomic Spin Co-magnetometer Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Zou, Sheng; Duan, Lihong; Fang, Jiancheng

    2014-05-01

    Co-magnetometers based on K-3He and K-Rb-21Ne have been used to test of CPT symmetry. For the K- Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer, due to the gyroscopic effect of the 21Ne nuclear spin, it can also be used to sense small rotation. For inertial navigation application, 21Ne atoms, whose gyromagnetic ratio is an order of smaller than 3He, is better to be used to sense rotation. The spin projection noise of a K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer with measurement volume of 1cm3 could be on the order of 10-10 rad/s/Hz1/2. A K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer gyroscope has been designed. It is under constructing in our laboratory and the rotation of the earth should be measured by this apparatus. We also have made alkali vapor cells filled with K and Rb atoms, whose mole fraction ratio is controlled by analytical balance operated in the anaerobic glove box. This work was supported by Key Programs of National Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61227902 and 61374210.

  14. Eddy current imaging with an atomic radio-frequency magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Wickenbrock, Arne; Blanchard, John W; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    We use a radio-frequency $^{85}$Rb alkali-vapor cell magnetometer based on a paraffin-coated cell with long spin-coherence time and a small, low-inductance driving coil to create highly resolved conductivity maps of different objects. We resolve sub-mm features in conductive objects, we characterize the frequency response of our technique, and by operating at frequencies up to 250 kHz we are able to discriminate between differently conductive materials based on the induced response. The method is suited to cover a wide range of driving frequencies and can potentially be used for detecting non-metallic objects with low DC conductivity.

  15. Eddy current imaging with an atomic radio-frequency magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickenbrock, Arne; Leefer, Nathan; Blanchard, John W.; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    We use a radio-frequency 85Rb alkali-vapor cell magnetometer based on a paraffin-coated cell with long spin-coherence time and a small, low-inductance driving coil to create highly resolved conductivity maps of different objects. We resolve sub-mm features in conductive objects, we characterize the frequency response of our technique, and by operating at frequencies up to 250 kHz we are able to discriminate between differently conductive materials based on the induced response. The method is suited to cover a wide range of driving frequencies and can potentially be used for detecting non-metallic objects with low DC conductivity.

  16. Spin-Damping in an Ultra-Sensitive Tunable RF Atomic Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alem, Orang

    Optically pumped radio frequency (RF) atomic magnetometers have been shown to have an improved sensitivity over standard tuned coils for frequencies less than 50 MHz, making these RF magnetometers attractive for the detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals. In an atomic magnetometer a linearly polarized probe beam measures, through Faraday rotation, the transverse atomic magnetization induced by the resonant RF signal. The resonance, or Larmor, frequency of the magnetometer is easily tuned with a small magnetic field. We construct an atomic magnetometer based on a potassium vapor cell with a measured sensitivity of 0.22 +/- 0.02 fT/ Hz and a detection bandwidth of 334 +/- 11 Hz when tuned to 423 kHz, giving a Q of over 1200. While high Q magnetometers are sensitive to weak magnetic fields, they are also sensitive to magnetic transients, such as those associated with the excitation pulses needed for magnetic resonance. The ringing created by such transients can obscure the signal of interest. This is particularly detrimental for magnetic resonance signals that decay faster than the transverse relaxation rate. We demonstrate that by feeding back part of the optical signal to orthogonal electromagnetic coils, this unwanted ringing can be quickly damped out leaving the magnetometer ready for the detection of the signal. This negative feedback as applied to the K spins is called spin-damping and can be used to relax the K atoms faster by more than two orders of magnitude. Using spin-damping we reduce the dead-time before data acquisition from 0.8 to 0.2 ms in the detection of NQR signals from ammonium nitrate, one of the so-called fertilizer bomb explosives with an NQR frequency of 423 kHz. Furthermore, we discover that spin-damping can not only be used to suppress signals, it can also be used to suppress noise. We show that it can be used to suppress both environmental noise and more fundamental quantum

  17. An all-optical vector atomic magnetometer for fundamental physics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, David; Mateos, Ignacio; Zhivun, Elena; Patton, Brian; Fierlinger, Peter; Beck, Douglas; Budker, Dmitry

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a laboratory prototype of a compact all-optical vector magnetometer. Due to their high precision and absolute accuracy, atomic magnetometers are crucial sensors in fundamental physics experiments which require extremely stable magnetic fields (e.g., neutron EDM searches). This all-optical sensor will allow high-resolution measurements of the magnitude and direction of a magnetic field without perturbing the magnetic environment. Moreover, its absolute accuracy makes it calibration-free, an advantage in space applications (e.g., space-based gravitational-wave detection). Magnetometry in precision experiments or space applications also demands long-term stability and well-understood noise characteristics at frequencies below 10-4 Hz. We have characterized the low-frequency noise floor of this sensor and will discuss methods to improve its long-time performance.

  18. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, S., E-mail: spradhan@barc.gov.in, E-mail: pradhans75@gmail.com; Poornima,; Dasgupta, K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 85 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Department of Atomic Energy, Mumbai 85 (India); Mishra, S.; Behera, R. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 85 (India)

    2015-06-15

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  19. Ultra-high sensitivity magnetic field and magnetization measurements with an atomic magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Dang, H B; Romalis, M V

    2009-01-01

    We describe an ultra-sensitive atomic magnetometer using optically-pumped potassium atoms operating in spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) regime. We demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity of 160 aT/Hz$^{1/2}$ in a gradiometer arrangement with a measurement volume of 0.45 cm$^3$ and energy resolution per unit time of $44 \\hbar$. As an example of a new application enabled by such a magnetometer we describe measurements of weak remnant rock magnetization as a function of temperature with a sensitivity on the order of 10$^{-10}$ emu/cm$^3$/Hz$^{1/2}$ and temperatures up to 420$^\\circ$C.

  20. Effects of AC magnetic field on spin-exchange relaxation of atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jixi; Qian, Zheng; Fang, Jiancheng; Quan, Wei

    2016-03-01

    By operating at high alkali-metal densities and in low magnetic fields, the spin-exchange relaxation of atomic magnetometers can be eliminated, allowing construction of ultra-high sensitive spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometers. Significant AC magnetic fields are usually introduced in the magnetometer by the magnetic field modulation technique or the cell heater, whose effects on the spin-exchange relaxation have not been evaluated. In this paper, we study experimentally the spin-exchange relaxation rate as a function of the magnetic field frequency, the magnetic field amplitude and the spin-exchange rate in low magnetic fields. The experimental results indicate that for low atomic polarization the spin-exchange relaxation rate decays exponentially with the magnetic field frequency, and the reciprocal of the decay constant is proportional to the spin-exchange rate.

  1. Design and Analyses of a MEMS Based Resonant Magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dahai; Wu, Lingqi; Yan, Meizhi; Cui, Mingyang; You, Zheng; Hu, Muzhi

    2009-01-01

    A novel design of a MEMS torsional resonant magnetometer based on Lorentz force is presented and fabricated. The magnetometer consists of a silicon resonator, torsional beam, excitation coil, capacitance plates and glass substrate. Working in a resonant condition, the sensor's vibration amplitude is converted into the sensing capacitance change, which reflects the outside magnetic flux-density. Based on the simulation, the key structure parameters are optimized and the air damping effect is estimated. The test results of the prototype are in accordance with the simulation results of the designed model. The resolution of the magnetometer can reach 30 nT. The test results indicate its sensitivity of more than 400 mV/μT when operating in a 10 Pa vacuum environment. PMID:22399981

  2. Design and Analyses of a MEMS Based Resonant Magnetometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahai Ren

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel design of a MEMS torsional resonant magnetometer based on Lorentz force is presented and fabricated. The magnetometer consists of a silicon resonator, torsional beam, excitation coil, capacitance plates and glass substrate. Working in a resonant condition, the sensor’s vibration amplitude is converted into the sensing capacitance change, which reflects the outside magnetic flux-density. Based on the simulation, the key structure parameters are optimized and the air damping effect is estimated. The test results of the prototype are in accordance with the simulation results of the designed model. The resolution of the magnetometer can reach 30 nT. The test results indicate its sensitivity of more than 400 mV/μT when operating in a 10 Pa vacuum environment.

  3. Sub-picotesla Scalar Atomic Magnetometer with a Microfabricated Vapor Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Mhaskar, Rahul

    2016-05-01

    We explore the sensitivity limits of scalar atomic magnetometry with a micro-fabricated Cs vapor cell. The millimeter-scale cell is fabricated using silicon Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. The atomic spin procession is driven by an amplitude-modulated circularly polarized pump laser resonant with the D1 transition in Cs atoms. The precession is detected by an off-resonant linearly polarized probe laser using a balanced polarimeter setup. The probe light is spatially split into two beams to perform a gradiometer measurement. In a magnetic field of magnitude within the range of the earth magnetic field, we measure a sensitivity of less than 150 fT/ √Hz in the gradiometer mode, which shows that the magnetometer by itself can achieve sub-100 fT/ √Hz sensitivitiy. In addition to its high sensitivity, the magnetometer has a bandwidth of nearly 1 kHz due to the broad magnetic resonance inside the small cell. Our experiment suggests the feasibility of a portable, low-power and high-performance magnetometer, which can be operated in the earth's magnetic field. Such a device will greatly expand the range of applications for atomic magnetometers, such as the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance in an unshielded environment.

  4. Analytical investigation of the feasibility of sacrificial microchannel sealing for Chip-Scale Atomic Magnetometers

    OpenAIRE

    Tsujimoto, Kazuya; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Sugano, Koji; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; TABATA, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    An alkali metal vapor cell is a crucial component of the highly sensitive Chip Scale Atomic Magnetometers (CSAMs) that are increasingly deployed in a variety of electronic devices. Herein, we propose a novel microfabrication technique utilizing an array of microchannels at a bonded interface, to enable gas feedthrough for evacuation of unwanted gases from a vapor cell and subsequent introduction of an inert gas, followed by permanent sealing of the microchannels by reflow of a glass frit. The...

  5. Radio-frequency tunable atomic magnetometer for detection of solid-state NQR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.-K.; Sauer, K. L.; Seltzer, S. J.; Alem, O.; Romalis, M. V.

    2007-06-01

    We constructed a potassium atomic magnetometer which resonantly detects rf magnetic fields with subfemtotesla sensitivity. The resonance frequency is set by the Zeeman resonance of the potassium atoms in a static magnetic field applied to the magnetometer cell. Strong optical pumping of the potassium atoms into a stretched state reduces spin-exchange broadening of the Zeeman resonance, resulting in relatively small linewidth of about 200 Hz (half-width at half-maximum). The magnetometer was used to detect ^14N NQR signal from powdered ammonium nitrate at 423 kHz, with sensitivity an order of magnitude higher than with a conventional room temperature pickup coil with comparable geometry. The demonstrated sensitivity of 0.24 fT/Hz^1/2 can be improved by several means, including use of higher power lasers for pumping and probing. Our technique can potentially be used to develop a mobile, open-access NQR spectrometer for detection of nitrogen-containing solids of interest in security applications.

  6. Measurement Sensitivity Improvement of All-Optical Atomic Spin Magnetometer by Suppressing Noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiyuan; Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Quantum manipulation technology and photoelectric detection technology have jointly facilitated the rapid development of ultra-sensitive atomic spin magnetometers. To improve the output signal and sensitivity of the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) atomic spin magnetometer, the noises influencing on the output signal and the sensitivity were analyzed, and the corresponding noise suppression methods were presented. The magnetic field noises, including the residual magnetic field noise and the light shift noise, were reduced to approximately zero by employing the magnetic field compensation method and by adjusting the frequency of the pump beam, respectively. With respect to the operation temperature, the simulation results showed that the temperature of the potassium atomic spin magnetometer realizing the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime was 180 °C. Moreover, the fluctuation noises of the frequency and the power were suppressed by using the frequency and the power stable systems. The experimental power stability results showed that the light intensity stability was enhanced 10%. Contrast experiments on the sensitivity were carried out to demonstrate the validity of the suppression methods. Finally, a sensitivity of 13 fT/Hz1/2 was successfully achieved by suppressing noises and optimizing parameters. PMID:27322272

  7. Swarm Optimization-Based Magnetometer Calibration for Personal Handheld Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser El-Sheimy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Inertial Navigation Systems (INS consist of accelerometers, gyroscopes and a processor that generates position and orientation solutions by integrating the specific forces and rotation rates. In addition to the accelerometers and gyroscopes, magnetometers can be used to derive the user heading based on Earth’s magnetic field. Unfortunately, the measurements of the magnetic field obtained with low cost sensors are usually corrupted by several errors, including manufacturing defects and external electro-magnetic fields. Consequently, proper calibration of the magnetometer is required to achieve high accuracy heading measurements. In this paper, a Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO-based calibration algorithm is presented to estimate the values of the bias and scale factor of low cost magnetometers. The main advantage of this technique is the use of the artificial intelligence which does not need any error modeling or awareness of the nonlinearity. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm can help in the development of Pedestrian Navigation Devices (PNDs when combined with inertial sensors and GPS/Wi-Fi for indoor navigation and Location Based Services (LBS applications.

  8. Particle swarm optimization algorithm based low cost magnetometer calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A. S.; Siddharth, S., Syed, Z., El-Sheimy, N.

    2011-12-01

    Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) consist of accelerometers, gyroscopes and a microprocessor provide inertial digital data from which position and orientation is obtained by integrating the specific forces and rotation rates. In addition to the accelerometers and gyroscopes, magnetometers can be used to derive the absolute user heading based on Earth's magnetic field. Unfortunately, the measurements of the magnetic field obtained with low cost sensors are corrupted by several errors including manufacturing defects and external electro-magnetic fields. Consequently, proper calibration of the magnetometer is required to achieve high accuracy heading measurements. In this paper, a Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) based calibration algorithm is presented to estimate the values of the bias and scale factor of low cost magnetometer. The main advantage of this technique is the use of the artificial intelligence which does not need any error modeling or awareness of the nonlinearity. The estimated bias and scale factor errors from the proposed algorithm improve the heading accuracy and the results are also statistically significant. Also, it can help in the development of the Pedestrian Navigation Devices (PNDs) when combined with the INS and GPS/Wi-Fi especially in the indoor environments

  9. Poly-SiGe-based MEMS Xylophone Bar Magnetometer

    OpenAIRE

    Rochus, Véronique; Jansen, R.; Tilmans, H. A. C.; Rottenberg, X.; Chen, C.; Ranvier, S.; Lamy, Hervé; Rochus, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and preliminary characterization of highly sensitive MEMS-based Xylophone Bar Magnetometers (XBMs) realized in imec’s poly-SiGe MEMS technology. Key for our Lorentz force driven capacitively sensed resonant sensor are the combination of reasonably high Q-factor and conductivity of imec’s poly-SiGe, our optimized multiphysics sensor design targeting the maximization of the Q-factor in a wide temperature range as well as our proprietary monolithic abo...

  10. Development of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer using a K-Rb hybrid cell and its application to magnetocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Ito

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an optically pumped atomic magnetometer using a hybrid cell of K and Rb. The hybrid optical pumping technique can apply dense alkali-metal vapor to the sensor head and leads to high signal intensity. We use dense Rb vapor as probed atoms, and achieve a sensitivity of approximately 100 fTrms/Hz1/2 around 10 Hz. In this case, the sensitivity is limited by the system noise, and the magnetic linewidth is narrower than that for direct Rb optical pumping. We demonstrated magnetocardiography using the magnetometer and obtained clear human magnetocardiograms.

  11. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schönau, T.; Schmelz, M.; Stolz, R.; Anders, S.; Linzen, S.; Meyer, H.-G. [Department of Quantum Detection, Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena 07745 (Germany); Zakosarenko, V.; Meyer, M. [Supracon AG, An der Lehmgrube 11, Jena 07751 (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth’s magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  12. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönau, T.; Zakosarenko, V.; Schmelz, M.; Stolz, R.; Anders, S.; Linzen, S.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth's magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz1/2. The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  13. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth’s magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz1/2. The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration

  14. A self-sustaining atomic magnetometer with τ‑1 averaging property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Wang, S. G.; Feng, Y. Y.; Zhao, L.; Wang, L. J.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum measurement using coherent superposition of intrinsic atomic states has the advantage of being absolute measurement and can form metrological standards. One example is the absolute measurement of magnetic field by monitoring the Larmor precession of atomic spins whilst another being the Ramsey type atomic clock. Yet, in almost all coherent quantum measurement, the precision is limited by the coherence time beyond which, the uncertainty decreases only as τ‑1/2. Here we show that by non-destructively measuring the phase of the Larmor precession and regenerating the coherence via optical pumping, the self-sustaining Larmor precession signal can persist indefinitely. Consequently, the precision of the magnetometer increases with time following a much faster τ‑1 rule. A mean sensitivity of 240  from 1 Hz to 10 Hz is realized, being close to the shot noise level. This method of coherence regeneration may also find important applications in improving the performance of atomic clocks.

  15. A self-sustaining atomic magnetometer with τ−1 averaging property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Wang, S. G.; Feng, Y. Y.; Zhao, L.; Wang, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum measurement using coherent superposition of intrinsic atomic states has the advantage of being absolute measurement and can form metrological standards. One example is the absolute measurement of magnetic field by monitoring the Larmor precession of atomic spins whilst another being the Ramsey type atomic clock. Yet, in almost all coherent quantum measurement, the precision is limited by the coherence time beyond which, the uncertainty decreases only as τ−1/2. Here we show that by non-destructively measuring the phase of the Larmor precession and regenerating the coherence via optical pumping, the self-sustaining Larmor precession signal can persist indefinitely. Consequently, the precision of the magnetometer increases with time following a much faster τ−1 rule. A mean sensitivity of 240  from 1 Hz to 10 Hz is realized, being close to the shot noise level. This method of coherence regeneration may also find important applications in improving the performance of atomic clocks. PMID:27357490

  16. A self-sustaining atomic magnetometer with τ(-1) averaging property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C; Wang, S G; Feng, Y Y; Zhao, L; Wang, L J

    2016-01-01

    Quantum measurement using coherent superposition of intrinsic atomic states has the advantage of being absolute measurement and can form metrological standards. One example is the absolute measurement of magnetic field by monitoring the Larmor precession of atomic spins whilst another being the Ramsey type atomic clock. Yet, in almost all coherent quantum measurement, the precision is limited by the coherence time beyond which, the uncertainty decreases only as τ(-1/2). Here we show that by non-destructively measuring the phase of the Larmor precession and regenerating the coherence via optical pumping, the self-sustaining Larmor precession signal can persist indefinitely. Consequently, the precision of the magnetometer increases with time following a much faster τ(-1) rule. A mean sensitivity of 240  from 1 Hz to 10 Hz is realized, being close to the shot noise level. This method of coherence regeneration may also find important applications in improving the performance of atomic clocks. PMID:27357490

  17. Sacrificial Microchannel Sealing by Glass-Frit Reflow for Chip Scale Atomic Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Kazuya; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Sugano, Koji; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    A novel sealing technique using sacrificial microchannels was proposed for atmosphere control in a micromachined alkali gas-filled cell for a chip scale atomic magnetometer. The microchannels act as feedthrough connecting the cell to outside atmosphere during evacuation and gas-filling steps, and eventually they are sealed by glass-frit reflow. Si microchannel dedicated as a sacrificial microchannel was proposed and its feasibility was successfully demonstrated by experiments. The simulation results clarified the glass-frit reflow characteristics and its dependence on cross-sectional shape of the microchannel. Hermeticity of the proposed sealing technique of less than 10-12Pa·m3/s leak rate was verified by a high resolution helium leak test.

  18. Spatially resolved magneto-relaxation of magnetic nanoparticles detected by cesium atomic magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Biocompatible superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are finding many diagnostic and therapeutic applications in medical health care. In an external magnetic field, SPION samples align their magnetic moments by physical rotation, and a bulk magnetization is created. Once the magnetic field is switched off, the magnetization relaxes on characteristic time scales that range from nanoseconds to seconds. The relaxation parameters can be inferred from the time evolution of the magnetization measured via the decay of the associated field (magneto-relaxometry). When functionalized, the SPIONs can be made to bind to specific morphological structures. The relaxation signals will thus carry information on the specific particles' position and environment. We will report on first magneto-relaxometry measurements made by a Cs atomic magnetometer array operated in a second order gradiometer configuration used to construct two-dimensional relaxation maps. (author)

  19. Magnetic relaxometry with an atomic magnetometer and SQUID sensors on targeted cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Cort [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Adolphi, Natalie L. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Butler, Kimberly L.; Lovato, Debbie M.; Larson, Richard [Department of Pathology, University of New Mexico, Cancer Research and Treatment Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Schwindt, Peter D.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Flynn, Edward R., E-mail: seniorsci@comcast.net [Senior Scientific, LLC, 11109 Country Club NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Magnetic relaxometry methods have been shown to be very sensitive in detecting cancer cells and other targeted diseases. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors are one of the primary sensor systems used in this methodology because of their high sensitivity with demonstrated capabilities of detecting fewer than 100,000 magnetically-labeled cancer cells. The emerging technology of atomic magnetometers (AMs) represents a new detection method for magnetic relaxometry with high sensitivity and without the requirement for cryogens. We report here on a study of magnetic relaxometry using both AM and SQUID sensors to detect cancer cells that are coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles through antibody targeting. The AM studies conform closely to SQUID sensor results in the measurement of the magnetic decay characteristics following a magnetization pulse. The AM and SQUID sensor data are well described theoretically for superparamagnetic particles bound to cells and the results can be used to determine the number of cells in a cell culture or tumor. The observed fields and magnetic moments of cancer cells are linear with the number of cells over a very large range. The AM sensor demonstrates very high sensitivity for detecting magnetically labeled cells, does not require cryogenic cooling and is relatively inexpensive. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic relaxometry is used to study antibody targeted nanoparticles and cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atomic magnetometer and SQUID sensor performances are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High sensitivity of magnetic relaxometry for cancer cell detection is demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic relaxometry decay curves from cancer cells are fit by a log function.

  20. Magnetic relaxometry with an atomic magnetometer and SQUID sensors on targeted cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic relaxometry methods have been shown to be very sensitive in detecting cancer cells and other targeted diseases. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors are one of the primary sensor systems used in this methodology because of their high sensitivity with demonstrated capabilities of detecting fewer than 100,000 magnetically-labeled cancer cells. The emerging technology of atomic magnetometers (AMs) represents a new detection method for magnetic relaxometry with high sensitivity and without the requirement for cryogens. We report here on a study of magnetic relaxometry using both AM and SQUID sensors to detect cancer cells that are coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles through antibody targeting. The AM studies conform closely to SQUID sensor results in the measurement of the magnetic decay characteristics following a magnetization pulse. The AM and SQUID sensor data are well described theoretically for superparamagnetic particles bound to cells and the results can be used to determine the number of cells in a cell culture or tumor. The observed fields and magnetic moments of cancer cells are linear with the number of cells over a very large range. The AM sensor demonstrates very high sensitivity for detecting magnetically labeled cells, does not require cryogenic cooling and is relatively inexpensive. - Highlights: ► Magnetic relaxometry is used to study antibody targeted nanoparticles and cells. ► Atomic magnetometer and SQUID sensor performances are compared. ► High sensitivity of magnetic relaxometry for cancer cell detection is demonstrated. ► Magnetic relaxometry decay curves from cancer cells are fit by a log function.

  1. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kasper; Thomas, Rodrigo A; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette; Balabas, Mikhail V; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the frst detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the tempor...

  2. Apparatus for Measurement of the Electric Dipole Moment of the Neutron using a Cohabiting Atomic-Mercury Magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, C A; Chouder, M; Geltenbort, P; Green, K; Harris, P G; Heckel, B R; Iaydjiev, P; Ivanov, S N; Kilvington, I; Lamoreaux, S K; May, D J; Pendlebury, J M; Richardson, J D; Shiers, D B; Smith, K F; van der Grinten, M

    2013-01-01

    A description is presented of apparatus used to carry out an experimental search for an electric dipole moment of the neutron, at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble. The experiment incorporated a cohabiting atomic-mercury magnetometer in order to reduce spurious signals from magnetic field fluctuations. The result has been published in an earlier letter; here, the methods and equipment used are discussed in detail.

  3. Apparatus for measurement of the electric dipole moment of the neutron using a cohabiting atomic-mercury magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C. A.; Chibane, Y.; Chouder, M.; Geltenbort, P.; Green, K.; Harris, P. G.; Heckel, B. R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Ivanov, S. N.; Kilvington, I.; Lamoreaux, S. K.; May, D. J.; Pendlebury, J. M.; Richardson, J. D.; Shiers, D. B.; Smith, K. F.; van der Grinten, M.

    2014-02-01

    A description is presented of apparatus used to carry out an experimental search for an electric dipole moment of the neutron, at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble. The experiment incorporated a cohabiting atomic-mercury magnetometer in order to reduce spurious signals from magnetic field fluctuations. The result has been published in an earlier letter [1]; here, the methods and equipment used are discussed in detail.

  4. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M.; Balabas, Mikhail V.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D.; Stærkind, Hans C.; Müller, Jörg H.; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics. PMID:27417378

  5. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M.; Balabas, Mikhail V.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D.; Stærkind, Hans C.; Müller, Jörg H.; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics.

  6. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M; Balabas, Mikhail V; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D; Stærkind, Hans C; Müller, Jörg H; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics. PMID:27417378

  7. Self-generating magnetometer with laser pumping employment in “end resonance” wall coated vapor cell atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. A.; Ermak, S. V.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of two double resonance signals correlation investigation. These signals were observed synchronously in optically oriented Rb87 vapors with laser pumping in a dual scheme: low frequency Mx-magnetometer and microwave frequency discriminator. Analytical studies of the scalar and vector light shift components contribution to the frequency instability of the end resonance microwave transitions are presented. An experimental demonstration of the light shift components mutual compensation in optically pumped Rb87 atoms was provided. The results were processed in terms of Allan variance, which demonstrated an effect of decreasing frequency variation at averaging times more than 100 s for a joint scheme of the end resonance microwave transition and selfgenerating (Mx) magnetometer.

  8. Conductivity tomography based on pulsed eddy current with SQUID magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed eddy current (EC) techniques have the advantage of potentially covering a broader depth range than standard single frequency EC testing. We developed a novel pulsed EC technique using a liquid-nitrogen cooled SQUID magnetometer. For two reasons, SQUID magnetometers are particularly well suited as sensors: first they constitute an extremely sensitive magnetic field sensor, second they measure the field directly which decays more slowly than its time derivative picked up by induction coils. A square waveform transmitter signal was used, with alternating slopes in order to eliminate drift effect, and stacking synchronous to the power line frequency in order to improve signal-to-noise. The early time (high frequency) data of the recorded transient correspond to the upper layers of the conducting medium, while late time data or low frequencies deliver information on deep layers. Measurements of cracks at different depths in a stacked aluminum sample are presented. From the measured data, the apparent conductivity of the sample was calculated for each position and depth by applying a technique known from geophysical data interpretation. Thus, the position and depth of the crack was determined from the tomographic conductivity image of the sample

  9. An unshielded radio-frequency atomic magnetometer with sub-femtoTesla sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate a radio-frequency potassium-vapor magnetometer operating with sensitivities of 0.3 fT/√(Hz) at 0.5 MHz and 0.9 fT/√(Hz) at 1.31 MHz in the absence of radio-frequency and mu-metal or magnetic shielding. The use of spatially separated magnetometers, two voxels within the same cell, permits for the subtraction of common mode noise and the retention of a gradient signal, as from a local source. At 0.5 MHz the common mode noise was white and measured to be 3.4 fT/√(Hz); upon subtraction the noise returned to the values observed when the magnetometer was shielded. At 1.31 MHz, the common mode noise was from a nearby radio station and was reduced by a factor of 33 upon subtraction, limited only by the radio signal picked up by receiver electronics. Potential applications include in-the-field low-field magnetic resonance, such as the use of nuclear quadrupole resonance for the detection of explosives

  10. Development of a magnetometer-based search strategy for stopped monopoles at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    De Roeck, A.; Hirt, A M; Joergensen, M-D; Katre, A; Mermod, P; Milstead, D; Sloan, T

    2012-01-01

    If produced in high energy particle collisions at the LHC, magnetic monopoles could stop in material surrounding the interaction points. Obsolete parts of the beam pipe near the CMS interaction region, which were exposed to the products of pp and heavy ion collisions, were analysed using a SQUID-based magnetometer. The purpose of this work is to quantify the performance of the magnetometer in the context of a monopole search using a small set of samples of accelerator material ahead of the 2013 shutdown.

  11. Low frequency magnetic field suppression in an atomic spin co-magnetometer with a large electron magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiancheng; Chen, Yao; Zou, Sheng; Liu, Xuejing; Hu, Zhaohui; Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Ding, Ming

    2016-03-01

    In a K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer, the Rb electron magnetic field which is experienced by the nuclear spin is about 100 times larger than that of the K in a K-3He co-magnetometer. The large electron magnetic field which is neglected in the K-3He co-magnetometer coupled Bloch equations model is considered here in the K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer to study the low frequency magnetic field suppression effect. Theoretical analysis and experimental results shows that in the K-Rb-21Ne spin co-magnetometer, not only the nuclear spin but also the large electron spin magnetic field compensate the external magnetic field noise. By comparison, only the 3He nuclear spins mainly compensate the external magnetic field noise in a K-3He co-magnetometer. With this study, in addition to just increasing the magnetic field of the nuclear spins, we can suppress the magnetic field noise by increasing the density of the electron spin. We also studied how the magnetic field suppression effect relates to the scale factor of the K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer and we compared the scale factor with that of the K-3He co-magnetometer. Lastly, we show the sensitivity of our co-magnetometer. The magnetic field noise, the air density fluctuation noise and pumping power optimization are studied to improve the sensitivity of the co-magnetometer.

  12. Frequency modulation in nuclear magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A version of the frequency-modulation magnetometer based on a particular design of the field-modulation nuclear magnetometer is proposed. Disadvantages of field modulation and advantages of frequency modulation are pointed out

  13. Self-Oscillation-Based Frequency Tracking for the Drive and Detection of Resonance Magnetometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zheng; Ren, Dahai; You, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a drive and detection method for Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS)-based Lorentz-force resonance magnetometers. Based on the proposed MEMS magnetometer, a drive and detection method was developed by using self-oscillation to adjust the mismatch between the mechanical resonance frequency and the coil drive frequency as affected by temperature fluctuations and vibration amplitude changes. Not only was the signal-to-noise ratio enhanced by the proposed method compared to the traditional method, but the test system automatically reached resonance frequency very rapidly when powered on. Moreover, the linearity and the measurement range were improved by the magnetic feedback generated by the coil. Test results indicated that the sensitivity of the proposed magnetometer is 59.6 mV/μT and its noise level is 0.25 μT. When operating in ±65 μT, its nonlinearity is 2.5‰-only one-tenth of the former prototype. Its power consumption is only about 250 mW and its size is only 28 mm × 28 mm × 10 mm, or about one-eighth of the original sensor; further, unlike the former device, it can distinguish both positive and negative magnetic fields. The proposed method can also be applied in other MEMS sensors such as gyroscopes and micromirrors to enhance their frequency tracking ability. PMID:27213401

  14. Network analysis of geomagnetic substorms using the SuperMAG database of ground-based magnetometer stations

    CERN Document Server

    Dods, J; Gjerloev, J W

    2016-01-01

    The overall morphology and dynamics of magnetospheric substorms is well established in terms of the observed qualitative auroral features seen in ground-based magnetometers. This paper focuses on the quantitative characterization of substorm dynamics captured by ground-based magnetometer stations. We present the first analysis of substorms using dynamical networks obtained from the full available set of ground-based magnetometer observations in the Northern Hemisphere. The stations are connected in the network when the correlation between the vector magnetometer time series from pairs of stations within a running time window exceeds a threshold. Dimensionless parameters can then be obtained that characterize the network and by extension, the spatiotemporal dynamics of the substorm under observation. We analyze four isolated substorm test cases as well as a steady magnetic convection (SMC) event and a day in which no substorms occur. These test case substorms are found to give a consistent characteristic netwo...

  15. Precessing Ferromagnetic Needle Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson Kimball, Derek F.; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    A ferromagnetic needle is predicted to precess about the magnetic field axis at a Larmor frequency Ω under conditions where its intrinsic spin dominates over its rotational angular momentum, N ℏ≫I Ω (I is the moment of inertia of the needle about the precession axis and N is the number of polarized spins in the needle). In this regime the needle behaves as a gyroscope with spin N ℏ maintained along the easy axis of the needle by the crystalline and shape anisotropy. A precessing ferromagnetic needle is a correlated system of N spins which can be used to measure magnetic fields for long times. In principle, by taking advantage of rapid averaging of quantum uncertainty, the sensitivity of a precessing needle magnetometer can far surpass that of magnetometers based on spin precession of atoms in the gas phase. Under conditions where noise from coupling to the environment is subdominant, the scaling with measurement time t of the quantum- and detection-limited magnetometric sensitivity is t-3 /2. The phenomenon of ferromagnetic needle precession may be of particular interest for precision measurements testing fundamental physics.

  16. Geospace Science from Ground-based Magnetometer Arrays: Advances in Sensors, Data Collection, and Data Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ian; Chi, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Networks of ground-based magnetometers now provide the basis for the diagnosis of magnetic disturbances associated with solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling on a truly global scale. Advances in sensor and digitisation technologies offer increases in sensitivity in fluxgate, induction coil, and new micro-sensor technologies - including the promise of hybrid sensors. Similarly, advances in remote connectivity provide the capacity for truly real-time monitoring of global dynamics at cadences sufficient for monitoring and in many cases resolving system level spatio-temporal ambiguities especially in combination with conjugate satellite measurements. A wide variety of the plasmaphysical processes active in driving geospace dynamics can be monitored based on the response of the electrical current system, including those associated with changes in global convection, magnetospheric substorms and nightside tail flows, as well as due to solar wind changes in both dynamic pressure and in response to rotations of the direction of the IMF. Significantly, any changes to the dynamical system must be communicated by the propagation of long-period Alfven and/or compressional waves. These wave populations hence provide diagnostics for not only the energy transport by the wave fields themselves, but also provide a mechanism for diagnosing the structure of the background plasma medium through which the waves propagate. Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves are especially significant in offering a monitor for mass density profiles, often invisible to particle detectors because of their very low energy, through the application of a variety of magneto-seismology and cross-phase techniques. Renewed scientific interest in the plasma waves associated with near-Earth substorm dynamics, including magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at substorm onset and their relation to magnetotail flows, as well the importance of global scale ultra-low frequency waves for the energisation, transport

  17. Compact noise thermometer for mK-temperatures based on integrated SQUID magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the development and optimization of very compact noise thermometers for the temperature range of the PLTS-2000. They are based on the detection of the magnetic field fluctuations above the surface of a metal body by means of thin film SQUID magnetometers. The thermally driven Johnson noise currents inside a metal body produce fluctuating magnetic fields, which can be detected by highly sensitive low-Tc dc-SQUID magnetometers or gradiometers placed close to the metal surface. The fundamental fluctuation-dissipation theorem provides a direct relation between temperature and noise currents or field fluctuations to be measured: The power spectral density of the thermal magnetic flux density noise is strictly proportional to the temperature, provided the electrical conductivity does not change. Thus, the temperature of the metal body can be determined from the spectrum of the magnetic flux detected by the SQUID, making up a semi-primary thermometer. Since the spectrum of these fluctuations depends significantly on the configuration of pick-up coil and metal body, it must be optimized to achieve the largest noise signal (power) for a limited chip area. This has been done resulting in thin film miniature multi-loop SQUID gradiometers. We present measurements of the integrated magnetic field fluctuation thermometer characterizing its sensitivity and speed. (orig.)

  18. All optical vector magnetometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I research project will investigate a novel method of operating an atomic magnetometer to simultaneously measure total magnetic fields and vector...

  19. Evaluation of the Geomagnetic Field Models based on Magnetometer Measurements for Satellite's Attitude Determination System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilden, Demet; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Hajiyev, Chingiz

    2016-07-01

    Magnetometers are common attitude determination sensors for small satellites at low Earth orbit; therefore, magnetic field model of the Earth is necessary to estimate the satellite's attitude angles. Difference in the components of the magnetic field vectors -mostly used as unit vector. Therefore the angle between them (model and measurement data) affects the estimation accuracy of the satellite's attitude. In this study, geomagnetic field models are compared with satellite magnetic field observations in order to evaluate the models using the magnetometer results with high accuracy. For attitude determination system, IGRF model is used in most of the cases but the difference between the sensor and model increases when the geomagnetic activity occurs. Hence, several models including the empirical ones using the external variations in the Earth's geomagnetic field resulting from the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field are of great importance in determination of the satellite's attitude correctly. IGRF model describes the internal-part of the geomagnetic field, on the other hand candidate models to IGRF, such as recently developed POMME-6 model based on Champ data, CHAOS-5 (CHAmp, Oersted, Swarm), T89 (Tsyganenko's model), include simple parameterizations of external fields of magnetospheric sources in addition to the internal field especially for low Earth orbiting satellites. Those models can be evaluated to see noticeable difference on extraterrestrial field effects on satellite's attitude determination system changing with its height. The comparisons are made between the models and observations and between the models under various magnetospheric activities. In this study, we will present our preliminary results from the comparisons and discuss their implications from the satellite attitude perspective.

  20. Scalar magnetometers for space applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Fritz

    ratio is a basic atomic constant for the SI units of magnetic and electric current. The classical proton free precession, the Overhauser forced oscillation and a new field cycling Overhauser are presented. Alkali metal vapor magnetometers, although not absolute in the same sense as the classical proton......A survey of existing instrumentation and developments is presented emphasizing instrumentation for in-flight calibration of vector magnetometers on magnetic mapping missions. Proton free or forced precession magnetometers are at the focus as calibration references, because the proton gyromagnetic...... magnetometer, offer stability and resolution well suited for the calibration purposes. Recent developments are discussed. The metastable Helium magnetometer also offers quasi-absolute scalar measurements, and the use of semiconductor tuned lasers replacing an RF-excited Helium lamp holds great promise for...

  1. Magnetometers (citations from the Engineering Index data base). Report for 1970--Nov 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cited reports from a worldwide literature survey discuss the theory, design, performance, and calibration of various types of magnetometers. Only equipment studies are included; reports describing only applications or processing of data are generally excluded

  2. Optical Magnetometer Incorporating Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, Igor; Florescu, Lucia

    2007-01-01

    According to a proposal, photonic crystals would be used to greatly increase the sensitivities of optical magnetometers that are already regarded as ultrasensitive. The proposal applies, more specifically, to a state-of-the-art type of quantum coherent magnetometer that exploits the electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) method for determining a small change in a magnetic field indirectly via measurement of the shift, induced by that change, in the hyperfine levels of resonant atoms exposed to the field.

  3. Noise performance of superconductive magnetometers based on long Josephson tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio; Monaco, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    The low-current fluctuations at cryogenic temperatures together with the low dynamical resistance in the resonant states of Josephson tunnel junctions allow for the realization of superconducting oscillators up to the THz range with ultra-low spectral linewidth. By virtue of the Josephson frequency-voltage relationship, we show that the same properties can be exploited for the practical realization of magnetic flux-to-voltage transducers based on the flux-flow in long Josephson tunnel junctions whose intrinsic low-frequency voltage fluctuations at 4.2\\;K amount to few pV/H{{z}^{1/2}}, that is, too small to be measured by any present semiconductor electronics. Nevertheless, by using a double transformer SQUID amplifier we demonstrate that the (amplitude) voltage spectral density, S_{V}^{1/2}, of an all-niobium sensor does not exceed the level of 10\\;pV/H{{z}^{1/2}} and is not affected by 1/f excess noise at least down to few hertz. Such ultra-low white noise, corresponding to a magnetic field noise S_{B}^{1/2}\\leqslant 10\\;fT/H{{z}^{1/2}}, together with a highly linear and broadband voltage responsivity over a wide magnetic flux range, makes the flux-flow magnetometers potentially competitive with SQUID-based devices.

  4. Noise performance of superconductive magnetometers based on long Josephson tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low-current fluctuations at cryogenic temperatures together with the low dynamical resistance in the resonant states of Josephson tunnel junctions allow for the realization of superconducting oscillators up to the THz range with ultra-low spectral linewidth. By virtue of the Josephson frequency-voltage relationship, we show that the same properties can be exploited for the practical realization of magnetic flux-to-voltage transducers based on the flux–flow in long Josephson tunnel junctions whose intrinsic low-frequency voltage fluctuations at 4.2 K amount to few pV/Hz1/2, that is, too small to be measured by any present semiconductor electronics. Nevertheless, by using a double transformer SQUID amplifier we demonstrate that the (amplitude) voltage spectral density, SV1/2, of an all-niobium sensor does not exceed the level of 10 pV/Hz1/2 and is not affected by 1/f excess noise at least down to few hertz. Such ultra-low white noise, corresponding to a magnetic field noise SB1/2⩽10 fT/Hz1/2, together with a highly linear and broadband voltage responsivity over a wide magnetic flux range, makes the flux–flow magnetometers potentially competitive with SQUID-based devices. (paper)

  5. Analyzing multichannel magnetometer data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method based on lead field analysis is described for generating a unique set of current dipole sources which reproduce exactly the magnetic flux detected by an array of SQUID magnetometers. The dipole sources are located on a grid of points which have been selected considering all available information about the source. This information may include anatomical or structural data and/or current source distributions obtained from conventional inversion routines for the magnetometer data. The number of current dipole sources scales with the number of magnetometers in the array without involving a lengthy interation scheme. The technique is particularly appropriate for complex current sources which cannot be reconstructed by a small number of current dipoles. In addition, a figure of merit is defined for the reconstruction of a given current dipole distribution. This figure of merit is used to evaluate the performance of a variety of pick-up coil arrays. (orig.)

  6. Magnetometers (citations from the NTIS data base). Report for 1964--Nov 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cited reports discuss the theory, design, performance, and calibration of various types of magnetometers. Only equipment studies are included; reports describing only applications or processing of data are generally excluded. (This updated bibliography contains 173 abstracts, 11 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  7. EM induction investigation of the litosphere based on network magnetometer data in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Among other techniques, electromagnetic soundings provide a relevant contribution to the study of the deep interior of the Earth. They are based upon the determination of the impedance Z for frequencies down to 10-4 Hz and even less. Impedances are estimated from simultaneous variations of the horizontal magnetic and electric fields recorded at a station. We present here a new method for impedance derivation from a network of at least three 3-components magnetometers. Consider a network of three stations arranged in a triangular configuration with a separation distance allowing the description of magnetic variations associated to sources of regional or hemispheric extent. Assume further that the primary source field at the surface of Earth can be approximated as a superposition of independent plane waves. The magnetic data series will be analyzed using the method proposed by Pincon and Lefevre (1991, 1992), and by Pincon et al (2000). In this approach the determination of horizontal gradients of the magnetic field components is achieved by wave-vector identification. The resulting frequency wave vector spectrum of the magnetic field over the 3 stations network will be used to estimate the variation of the Earth inductive response as a function of frequency. In order to assess the performances with field data of the method, we use minute values from Earth geomagnetic observatories (INTERMAGNET data). Statistical post processing of the results obtained from data of three stations is also presented. We introduce results from study done for Europe. In the future works we plan to modify the method to consider the curvature of the surface and to apply more relevant statistical algorithms to process the obtained rare data.

  8. Evolution of the current system during solar wind pressure pulses based on aurora and magnetometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Kikuchi, Takashi; Ebihara, Yusuke; Yoshikawa, Akimasa; Imajo, Shun; Li, Wen; Utada, Hisashi

    2016-08-01

    We investigated evolution of ionospheric currents during sudden commencements using a ground magnetometer network in conjunction with an all-sky imager, which has the advantage of locating field-aligned currents much more accurately than ground magnetometers. Preliminary (PI) and main (MI) impulse currents showed two-cell patterns propagating antisunward, particularly during a southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Although this overall pattern is consistent with the Araki (solar wind sources of magnetospheric ultra-low-frequency waves. Geophysical monograph series, vol 81. AGU, Washington, DC, pp 183-200, 1994. doi: 10.1029/GM081p0183) model, we found several interesting features. The PI and MI currents in some events were highly asymmetric with respect to the noon-midnight meridian; the post-noon sector did not show any notable PI signal, but only had an MI starting earlier than the pre-noon MI. Not only equivalent currents but also aurora and equatorial magnetometer data supported the much weaker PI response. We suggest that interplanetary shocks impacting away from the subsolar point caused the asymmetric current pattern. Additionally, even when PI currents form in both pre- and post-noon sectors, they can initiate and disappear at different timings. The PI currents did not immediately disappear but coexisted with the MI currents for the first few minutes of the MI. During a southward IMF, the MI currents formed equatorward of a preexisting DP-2, indicating that the MI currents are a separate structure from a preexisting DP-2. In contrast, the MI currents under a northward IMF were essentially an intensification of a preexisting DP-2. The magnetometer and imager combination has been shown to be a powerful means for tracing evolution of ionospheric currents, and we showed various types of ionospheric responses under different upstream conditions.

  9. Optical Magnetometer Array for Fetal Magnetocardiography

    CERN Document Server

    Wyllie, Robert; Wakai, Ronald T; Walker, Thad G

    2012-01-01

    We describe an array of spin-exchange relaxation free optical magnetometers designed for detection of fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) signals. The individual magnetometers are configured with a small volume with intense optical pumping, surrounded by a large pump-free region. Spin-polarized atoms that diffuse out of the optical pumping region precess in the ambient magnetic field and are detected by a probe laser. Four such magnetometers, at the corners of a 7 cm square, are configured for gradiometry by feeding back the output of one magnetometer to a field coil to null uniform magnetic field noise at frequencies up to 200 Hz. Using this array, we present the first measurements of fMCG signals using an atomic magnetometer.

  10. A modular, extendible and field-tolerant multichannel vector magnetometer based on current sensor SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, J.-H.; Drung, D.; Burghoff, M.; Körber, R.

    2016-09-01

    We present the prototype module of our extendible and robust multichannel SQUID magnetometer system. A large multi-module arrangement can be implemented by using up to 7 modules. The system is intended for high-precision measurements of biomagnetism and spin precession. Further demanding applications are magnetorelaxometry and ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ULF NMR), where pulsed magnetic fields of up to 100 mT are typically applied. The system is operated inside the Berlin magnetically shielded room (BMSR-2) and equipped with 18 magnetometers consisting of niobium (Nb) wire-wound pick-up coils. A total of 16 small pick-up coils with 17.1 mm diameter form a regular grid with individual channels arranged to ensure system sensitivity covers all three orthogonal spatial directions. Two large hexagonal pick-up coils with an equivalent diameter of 74.5 mm sensitive in z-direction surround the grid at two different heights and are suitable for the detection of deep sources. Each pick-up coil is connected to the input of a thin-film Nb SQUID current sensor via a detachable superconducting contact. The SQUIDs are equipped with integrated input current limiters. Feedback into the pick-up coils is employed to minimise crosstalk between channels. The current sensor chip package includes a superconducting shield of Nb. The field distortion of the prototype and a multi-module arrangement was analysed by numerical simulation. The measured noise of the small magnetometers was between 0.6 and 1.5 fT {{Hz}}-1/2, and well below 1 fT {{Hz}}-1/2 for the large ones. Using a software gradiometer, we achieved a minimum noise level of 0.54 fT {{Hz}}-1/2. We performed ULF NMR experiments, verifying the system’s robustness against pulsed fields, and magnetoencephalographgy (MEG) on somatosensory evoked neuronal activity. The low noise performance of our 18-channel prototype enabled the detection of high-frequency components at around 1 kHz by MEG.

  11. A 3-Axis Miniature Magnetic Sensor Based on a Planar Fluxgate Magnetometer with an Orthogonal Fluxguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    A new class of tri-axial miniature magnetometer consisting of a planar fluxgate structure with an orthogonal ferromagnetic fluxguide centrally situated over the magnetic cores is presented. The magnetic sensor possesses a cruciform ferromagnetic core placed diagonally upon the square excitation coil under which two pairs of pick-up coils for in-plane field detection are allocated. Effective principles and analysis of the magnetometer for 3-D field vectors are described and verified by numerically electromagnetic simulation for the excitation and magnetization of the ferromagnetic cores. The sensor is operated by applying the second-harmonic detection technique that can verify V-B relationship and device responsivity. Experimental characterization of the miniature fluxgate device demonstrates satisfactory spatial magnetic field detection results in terms of responsivity and noise spectrum. As a result, at an excitation frequency of 50 kHz, a maximum in-plane responsivity of 122.4 V/T appears and a maximum out-of-plane responsivity of 11.6 V/T is obtained as well. The minimum field noise spectra are found to be 0.11 nT/√Hz and 6.29 nT/√Hz, respectively, in X- and Z-axis at 1 Hz under the same excitation frequency. Compared with the previous tri-axis fluxgate devices, this planar magnetic sensor with an orthogonal fluxguide provides beneficial enhancement in both sensory functionality and manufacturing simplicity. More importantly, this novel device concept is considered highly suitable for the extension to a silicon sensor made by the current CMOS-MEMS technologies, thus emphasizing its emerging applications of field detection in portable industrial electronics. PMID:26102496

  12. A 3-Axis Miniature Magnetic Sensor Based on a Planar Fluxgate Magnetometer with an Orthogonal Fluxguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Cheng Lu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new class of tri-axial miniature magnetometer consisting of a planar fluxgate structure with an orthogonal ferromagnetic fluxguide centrally situated over the magnetic cores is presented. The magnetic sensor possesses a cruciform ferromagnetic core placed diagonally upon the square excitation coil under which two pairs of pick-up coils for in-plane field detection are allocated. Effective principles and analysis of the magnetometer for 3-D field vectors are described and verified by numerically electromagnetic simulation for the excitation and magnetization of the ferromagnetic cores. The sensor is operated by applying the second-harmonic detection technique that can verify V-B relationship and device responsivity. Experimental characterization of the miniature fluxgate device demonstrates satisfactory spatial magnetic field detection results in terms of responsivity and noise spectrum. As a result, at an excitation frequency of 50 kHz, a maximum in-plane responsivity of 122.4 V/T appears and a maximum out-of-plane responsivity of 11.6 V/T is obtained as well. The minimum field noise spectra are found to be 0.11 nT/√Hz and 6.29 nT/√Hz, respectively, in X- and Z-axis at 1 Hz under the same excitation frequency. Compared with the previous tri-axis fluxgate devices, this planar magnetic sensor with an orthogonal fluxguide provides beneficial enhancement in both sensory functionality and manufacturing simplicity. More importantly, this novel device concept is considered highly suitable for the extension to a silicon sensor made by the current CMOS-MEMS technologies, thus emphasizing its emerging applications of field detection in portable industrial electronics.

  13. Reliability characteristics of microfabricated Rb mini-lamps for optical pumping in miniature atomic clocks and magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Vinu; Pétremand, Yves; de Rooij, Nico; Shea, Herbert

    2013-03-01

    With the rising need for microfabricated chip-scale atomic clocks to enable high precision timekeeping in portable applications, there has been active interest in developing miniature (pumping in double-resonance clocks. We reported in 2012 a first microfabricated chip-scale Rubidium dielectric barrier discharge lamp. The device's preliminary results indicated its high potential for optical pumping applications and wafer-scale batch fabrication. The chip-scale plasma light sources were observed to be robust with no obvious performance change after thousands of plasma ignitions, and with no electrode erosion from plasma discharges since the electrodes are external. However, as atomic clocks have strict lamp performance requirements including less than 0.1% sub-second optical power fluctuations, power consumption less than 20 mW and a device lifetime of at least several years, it is important to understand the long-term reliability of these Rb planar mini-lamps, and identify the operating conditions where these devices can be most reliable and stable. In this paper, we report on the reliability of such microfabricated lamps including a continuous several month run of the lamp where the optical power, electrical power consumption and temperature stability were continuously monitored. We also report on the effects of temperature, rf-power and the lamp-drive parasitics on the optical power stability and discuss steps that could be taken to further improve the device's performance and reliability.

  14. Digitalisation of Fluxgate Magnetometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Erik Bøje

    1999-01-01

    The classical instrument for measuring magnetic fields has for a long period been the analogue fluxgate magnetometer.Based on the sensor technology developed at the Department of Automation, Technical University of Denmark, this kind of instrument has involved into a high precision and reliable...... instrument.However, some problems are still present in the analogue electronics.In this thesis an instrument, based on digital signal processing, is presented. The instrument uses an early digitalisation of the fluxgate sensor signal and derives the magnetic field with mathematical algorithms implemented in...... solutions to some of the problems with this instrument are presented and a proposal for a future implementation is given....

  15. Optical vibrating-sample magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Michelena, M; López, E; Sanchez, M C; Aroca, C

    2000-01-01

    A highly sensitive method of detecting vibrations of a cantilever in atomic-force microscopy has been introduced as a detector in an alternating-gradient field magnetometer. Use of light is the success of this system as it is compatible with vacuum systems and closed-flux cryostats. The optical signal is electronically conditioned easily. Experimental results show that highly sensitive measurements can be achieved.

  16. Optical vibrating-sample magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly sensitive method of detecting vibrations of a cantilever in atomic-force microscopy has been introduced as a detector in an alternating-gradient field magnetometer. Use of light is the success of this system as it is compatible with vacuum systems and closed-flux cryostats. The optical signal is electronically conditioned easily. Experimental results show that highly sensitive measurements can be achieved

  17. Ground-based magnetometer arrays and geomagnetically induced currents in power grids: science and operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, A. W.; Beggan, C.; Kelly, G.

    2012-12-01

    Space weather impacts on worldwide technological infrastructures are likely to be at their greatest between 2012 and 2015, during the peak and early descending phase of the current solar cycle. Examples of infrastructures at risk include power grids, pipelines, railways, communications, satellite operations, high latitude air travel and global navigation satellite systems. For example, severe magnetic storms in March 1989 and October 2003, near the peaks of recent solar cycles, were particularly significant in causing problems for a wide variety of technologies. Further back in time, severe storms in September 1859 and May 1921 are known to have been a problem for the more rudimentary technologies of the time. In this talk we will review how magnetic observatory data can best contribute to ongoing efforts to develop new space weather data products, particularly in aiding the management of electrical power transmission networks. Examples of existing and perhaps some suggestions for new data products and services will be given. Throughout, the need for near to real time data will be emphasised. We will also emphasise the importance of developing regional magnetometer networks and promoting magnetic data sharing to help turn research into operations. Developing research consortia, for example as in the European EURISGIC GIC project (www.eurisgic.eu), where magnetic and other data, as well as expertise, is pooled and shared is also recommended and adds to our ability to monitor the dynamic state of magnetospheric and ionospheric currents. We will discuss how industry currently perceives the space weather hazard, using recent examples from the power industry, where the concerns are with the risk to high voltage transformers and the safe and uninterrupted distribution of electrical power. Industry measurements of geomagnetic induced currents (GIC) are also vital for the validation of scientific models of the flow of GIC in power systems. Examples of GIC data sources and

  18. Magnetometers. January 1970-August 1988 (Citations from the US Patent data base). Report for January 1970-August 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning magnetometer devices and equipment used in detection, control, and survey systems. The design, fabrication, and application of magnetometers utilizing thin-film, optical, nuclear, and electron-beam technologies are discussed. Applications include navigation systems, vehicle direction control, and natural resource exploration. (This updated bibliography contains 245 citations, 21 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  19. Tuned cavity magnetometer sensitivity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2009-09-01

    We have developed a high sensitivity (magnetometer that utilizes a novel optical (interferometric) detection technique. Further miniaturization and low-power operation are key advantages of this magnetometer, when compared to systems using SQUIDs which require liquid Helium temperatures and associated overhead to achieve similar sensitivity levels.

  20. A SQUID-based 3He Co-magnetometer Readout for the SNS nEDM Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Clayton, Steven

    2014-03-01

    A discovery of a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron would provide one of the most important low energy tests of the discrete symmetries beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. A new experimental neutron EDM search, to be conducted at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at ORNL, has been proposed to improve the present experimental limit of 10-26 e .cm by two orders of magnitude. The experiment is based on the magnetic-resonance technique in which polarized neutrons precess at the Larmor frequency when placed in a static magnetic field; a non-zero EDM would be evident as a difference in precession frequency when a strong electric field is applied parallel vs. anti-parallel to the magnetic field. In addition to its role as neutron spin-analyzer via the spin-dependent n+3He nuclear capture process, polarized helium-3 (which has negligible EDM) will serve as co-magnetometer to correct for drifts in the magnetic field. The helium-3 magnetization signal will be read out by superconducting gradiometers coupled to SQUIDs. We describe a proposed SQUID system suitable for the complex neutron EDM apparatus, and demonstrate that the field noise in the SQUID system, tested in an environment similar to the EDM apparatus, meets the nEDM requirement.

  1. Development of a SQUID-based 3He Co-magnetometer Readout for a Neutron Electric Dipole Moment Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Young Jin

    2012-01-01

    A discovery of a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron would provide one of the most important low energy tests of the discrete symmetries beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. A new search of neutron EDM, to be conducted at the spallation neutron source (SNS) at ORNL, is designed to improve the present experimental limit of ~10^-26 e-cm by two orders of magnitude. The experiment is based on the magnetic-resonance technique in which polarized neutrons precess at the Larmor frequency when placed in a static magnetic field; a non-zero EDM would be evident as a difference in precession frequency when a strong external electric field is applied parallel vs. anti-parallel to the magnetic field. In addition to its role as neutron spin-analyzer via the spin-dependent n+3He nuclear capture reaction, polarized helium-3 (which has negligible EDM) will serve as co-magnetometer to correct for drifts in the magnetic field. In one of the two methods that will be built into the apparatus, the helium...

  2. Digital Detection and feedback Fluxgate Magnetometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil-Henriksen, J.; Merayo, José M.G.; Nielsen, Otto V; Petersen, H.; Petersen, Jan Raagaard; Primdahl, Fritz

    1996-01-01

    A new full Earth's field dynamic feedback fluxgate magnetometer is described. It is based entirely on digital signal processing and digital feedback control, thereby replacing the classical second harmonic tuned analogue electronics by processor algorithms. Discrete mathematical cross...

  3. Daytime, low latitude, vertical ExB drift velocities, inferred from ground-based magnetometer observations in the Peruvian, Philippine and Indian longitude sectors under quiet and disturbed conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, D; Chau, J; Yumoto, K; Bhattacharya, A; Alex, S

    2006-01-01

    Daytime, low latitude, vertical ExB drift velocities, inferred from ground-based magnetometer observations in the Peruvian, Philippine and Indian longitude sectors under quiet and disturbed conditions

  4. Kinetic Inductance Magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Luomahaara, Juho; Grönberg, Leif; Hassel, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasensitive magnetic field detection is utilized in the fields of science, medicine and industry. We report on a novel magnetometer relying on the kinetic inductance of superconducting material. The kinetic inductance exhibits a non-linear response with respect to DC current, a fact that is exploited by applying magnetic flux through a superconducting loop to generate a shielding current and a change in the inductance of the loop. The magnetometer is arranged into a resonator, allowing readout through a transmission measurement that makes the device compatible with radio frequency multiplexing techniques. The device is fabricated using a single thin-film layer of NbN, simplifying the fabrication process compared to existing magnetometer technologies considerably. Our experimental data, supported by theory, demonstrates a magnetometer having potential to replace established technology in applications requiring ultra-high sensitivity.

  5. Magnetometer of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer that measures magnetic fields, between 2,500 gauss and 5,000 gauss, with an accuracy of a few parts per million. The circuit of the magnetometer, based on a marginal oscillator, permits a continuous tunning in the frequency range comprised between 10.0 MHz, with a signal to noise ratio of about 20. The radiofrequency amplifier is of the cascode type in integrated circuit and it operates with two 9V batteries. The modulation is at 35 Hz and it is provided by an external oscillator. The instrument is compact, inexpensive and easy to operate; it can also be used for didactic purposes to show the phenomenon of magnetic nuclear resonance and its main characteristics. (author)

  6. Development of a nuclear precession magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this thesis was to develop a proton precession magnetometer for geophysical prospecting and base stations. The proton procession magnetometer measures the total magnetic fields intensity. It operates on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance by determining the processing frequency of protons of a non viscous liquid in the terrestrial magnetic fields. The instrument was tested in field to evaluate signal/noise ratio, supportable gradient and battery consumption. Application test was carried out to take diurnal variation data and, reconnaissance and detail surveys data on an archaeological site in the Marajo Island-Pa. The test results were confronted with two commercial magnetometers-GP-70, McPhar e G-816, Geometric - and, with data from Observatorio Magnetico Ilha de Tatuoca as well. For all cases, the data comparison showed a good performance of the magnetometer tested. (author)

  7. Pulsed 3-Axis Vector SERF Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, Morgan; Romalis, Michael

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a 3-axis atomic vector magnetometer operating in the SERF regime, using a single beam path, and capable of operating in Earth's field using field feedback. It has similar sensitivity along all 3 axes that is fundamentally limited by photon and atom shot noise. The scheme uses a high intensity pump pulse to polarize Rb atoms in ~ 1 μs and a sequence of magnetic field pulses applied while the atoms are monitored during free precession. The sequence used provides minimal sensitivity to pulse errors, while also allowing unambiguous discrimination between external magnetic fields and misalignment between laser and magnetic coil axes.

  8. GOES Space Environment Monitor, Magnetometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Three orthogonal flux-gate magnetometer elements, (spinning twin fluxgate magnetometer prior to GOES-8) provide magnetic field measurements in three mutually...

  9. THOR Fluxgate Magnetometer (MAG)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nakamura, R.; Eastwood, J.; Magnes, W.; Valavanoglou, A.; Carr, C. M.; O’Brien, H. L.; Narita, Y.; Delva, M.; Chen, Ch. H. K.; Plaschke, F.; Souček, Jan

    Göttingen: European Geosciences Union, 2016. EGu2016-12336. ISSN 1607-7962. [EGU General Assembly 2016. 17.04.2016-22.04.2016, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Fluxgate Magnetometer (MAG) * THOR * plasma turbulence Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2016/EGU2016-12336.pdf

  10. The Magnetospheric Multiscale Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Anderson, B. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Bromund, K. R.; Dearborn, D.; Fischer, D.; Le, G.; Leinweber, H. K.; Leneman, D.; Magnes, W.; Means, J. D.; Moldwin, M. B.; Nakamura, R.; Pierce, D.; Plaschke, F.; Rowe, K. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, R. J.; Torbert, R.; Hagen, C.; Jernej, I.; Valavanoglou, A.; Richter, I.

    2016-03-01

    The success of the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission depends on the accurate measurement of the magnetic field on all four spacecraft. To ensure this success, two independently designed and built fluxgate magnetometers were developed, avoiding single-point failures. The magnetometers were dubbed the digital fluxgate (DFG), which uses an ASIC implementation and was supplied by the Space Research Institute of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the analogue magnetometer (AFG) with a more traditional circuit board design supplied by the University of California, Los Angeles. A stringent magnetic cleanliness program was executed under the supervision of the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory. To achieve mission objectives, the calibration determined on the ground will be refined in space to ensure all eight magnetometers are precisely inter-calibrated. Near real-time data plays a key role in the transmission of high-resolution observations stored on board so rapid processing of the low-resolution data is required. This article describes these instruments, the magnetic cleanliness program, and the instrument pre-launch calibrations, the planned in-flight calibration program, and the information flow that provides the data on the rapid time scale needed for mission success.

  11. Mapping plasma structures in the high-latitude ionosphere using beacon satellite, incoherent scatter radar and ground-based magnetometer observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Neubert

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In the autumn of the year 2000, four radio receivers capable of tracking various beacon satellites were set up along the southwestern coast of Greenland. They are used to reconstruct images of the ionospheric plasma density distribution via the tomographic method. In order to test and validate tomographic imaging under the highly variable conditions often prevailing in the high-latitude ionosphere, a time interval was selected when the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar conducted measurements of the ionospheric plasma density while the radio receivers tracked a number of beacon satellites. A comparison between two-dimensional images of the plasma density distribution obtained from the radar and the satellite receivers revealed generally good agreement between radar measurements and tomographic images. Observed discrepancies can be attributed to F region plasma patches moving through the field of view with a speed of several hundred meters per second, thereby smearing out the tomographic image. A notable mismatch occurred around local magnetic midnight when a magnetospheric substorm breakup occurred in the vicinity of southwest Greenland (identified from ground-based magnetometer observations. The breakup was associated with a sudden intensification of the westward auroral electrojet which was centered at about 69 and extended up to some 73 corrected geomagnetic latitude. Ground-based magnetometer data may thus have the potential of indicating when the tomographic method is at risk and may fail. We finally outline the application of tomographic imaging, when combined with magnetic field data, to estimate ionospheric Joule heating rates.

  12. Cryostats for SQUID magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non metallic and non magnetic cryostat, with a very low thermal budget and a container type autonomy was developed, to condition S.Q.U.I.D. magnetometers which maximum sensitivity reaches 10-14 Tesla Hertzsup(-1/2). This instrumentation puts in hand new concepts of composite materials, thermal shock and vibration resistant, multilayer thermal radiative insulation also to the prouve of vibrations with thermal equivalent emissivity lower than 10-3

  13. KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS BASED ON SW ATOM

    OpenAIRE

    Ladislav Burita; Pavel Gardavsky

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the knowledge systems developed by using the software AToM and the experience with their application for teaching and universities cooperation. The theoretical bases of the solution are Topic Maps; the software AToM is described and individual cases of the knowledge systems are introduced. The article reflects the years of experience in the cooperation of the knowledge systems development with the AION CS Company. Two examples are presented in detail: “Conferences” – know...

  14. Scalar Calibration of Vector Magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter; Primdahl, Fritz;

    2000-01-01

    The calibration parameters of a vector magnetometer are estimated only by the use of a scalar reference magnetometer. The method presented in this paper differs from those previously reported in its linearized parametrization. This allows the determination of three offsets or signals in the absence...

  15. Optically transduced MEMS magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Langlois, Eric

    2014-03-18

    MEMS magnetometers with optically transduced resonator displacement are described herein. Improved sensitivity, crosstalk reduction, and extended dynamic range may be achieved with devices including a deflectable resonator suspended from the support, a first grating extending from the support and disposed over the resonator, a pair of drive electrodes to drive an alternating current through the resonator, and a second grating in the resonator overlapping the first grating to form a multi-layer grating having apertures that vary dimensionally in response to deflection occurring as the resonator mechanically resonates in a plane parallel to the first grating in the presence of a magnetic field as a function of the Lorentz force resulting from the alternating current. A plurality of such multi-layer gratings may be disposed across a length of the resonator to provide greater dynamic range and/or accommodate fabrication tolerances.

  16. KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS BASED ON SW ATOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Burita

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the knowledge systems developed by using the software AToM and the experience with their application for teaching and universities cooperation. The theoretical bases of the solution are Topic Maps; the software AToM is described and individual cases of the knowledge systems are introduced. The article reflects the years of experience in the cooperation of the knowledge systems development with the AION CS Company. Two examples are presented in detail: “Conferences” – knowledge system used for education and “MilUNI” –system for military universities cooperation.

  17. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantsker, E [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO{sub 3}-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room.

  18. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO3-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room

  19. Miniature Laser Magnetometer (MLM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This 2009 NASA SBIR Phase 1 proposal for an innovative Miniature Laser Magnetometer (MLM) is a response to subtopic S1.06 Particles and Field Sensors and Instrument...

  20. Miniature Laser Magnetometer (MLM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This 2009 NASA SBIR Phase 2 proposal for an innovative Miniature Laser Magnetometer (MLM) is a response to subtopic S1.06 Particles and Field Sensors and Instrument...

  1. AC Zeeman potentials for atom chip-based ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancher, Charles; Pyle, Andrew; Ziltz, Austin; Aubin, Seth

    2015-05-01

    We present experimental and theoretical progress on using the AC Zeeman force produced by microwave magnetic near-fields from an atom chip to manipulate and eventually trap ultracold atoms. These AC Zeeman potentials are inherently spin-dependent and can be used to apply qualitatively different potentials to different spin states simultaneously. Furthermore, AC Zeeman traps are compatible with the large DC magnetic fields necessary for accessing Feshbach resonances. Applications include spin-dependent trapped atom interferometry and experiments in 1D many-body physics. Initial experiments and results are geared towards observing the bipolar detuning-dependent nature of the AC Zeeman force at 6.8 GHz with ultracold 87Rb atoms trapped in the vicinity of an atom chip. Experimental work is also underway towards working with potassium isotopes at frequencies of 1 GHz and below. Theoretical work is focused on atom chip designs for AC Zeeman traps produced by magnetic near-fields, while also incorporating the effect of the related electric near-fields. Electromagnetic simulations of atom chip circuits are used for mapping microwave propagation in on-chip transmission line structures, accounting for the skin effect, and guiding impedance matching.

  2. Super-light Magnetometers For Nanosatellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkman, R.; Korepanov, V.; Marussenkov, A.; Sukhynyuk, A.

    The modern tendency to decrease the weight and dimensions of the space vehicles, especially for scientific research, imply corresponding requirements to the scientific payload too. A correlation between metrological parameters (particularly sensitivity and own noise level) and mass, dimensions and power consumption of search-coil (SC) and flux gate (FG) magnetometers was studied. In this abstract both these prob- lems are considered. In order to decrease the SC weight it appeared to be necessary to derive the common equations, which describe minimum mass criterion for search- coil sensors in different frequency bands. The corresponding algorithm, based upon "generalized" SC parameters was introduced and a set of stable combinations, rela- tively independent on dimensions, number of turns and intended frequency band was developed. It was also revealed that the preamplifier connected to SC has to be charac- terized by extended set of 8 known noise parameters. As a result, the new approach of calculation and design of minimum-weight of SC magnetometers was proposed. All that allowed to manufacture first model of space qualified SC magnetometers with the following parameters: weight - 75 g, noise level density - 2 fT/sqrt(Hz) at 50 kHz. The most important problem for super-light FG magnetometers creation with low power consumption is to reduce the FG sensor (FGS) excitation power. Based on earlier de- veloped ferroresonance excitation mode a new study in this direction was made. The relations allowing to estimate the minimally possible FGS excitation power were de- rived, which allow for the given FGS dimensions and given mumetal saturation level to determine the required power. It was obtained that if we diminish the FGS volume in n^3 times, the possible power drop is only n times. Using new methodology a set of super-light FG magnetometers was manufactured with the sensor about 12 x 5 x 5 mm, consumed power about 2 mW and noise level density about 100 pT/sqrt(Hz) at

  3. Quantifying the spatio-temporal pattern of the ground impact of space weather events using dynamical networks formed from the SuperMAG database of ground based magnetometer stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dods, Joe; Chapman, Sandra; Gjerloev, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative understanding of the full spatial-temporal pattern of space weather is important in order to estimate the ground impact. Geomagnetic indices such as AE track the peak of a geomagnetic storm or substorm, but cannot capture the full spatial-temporal pattern. Observations by the ~100 ground based magnetometers in the northern hemisphere have the potential to capture the detailed evolution of a given space weather event. We present the first analysis of the full available set of ground based magnetometer observations of substorms using dynamical networks. SuperMAG offers a database containing ground station magnetometer data at a cadence of 1min from 100s stations situated across the globe. We use this data to form dynamic networks which capture spatial dynamics on timescales from the fast reconfiguration seen in the aurora, to that of the substorm cycle. Windowed linear cross-correlation between pairs of magnetometer time series along with a threshold is used to determine which stations are correlated and hence connected in the network. Variations in ground conductivity and differences in the response functions of magnetometers at individual stations are overcome by normalizing to long term averages of the cross-correlation. These results are tested against surrogate data in which phases have been randomised. The network is then a collection of connected points (ground stations); the structure of the network and its variation as a function of time quantify the detailed dynamical processes of the substorm. The network properties can be captured quantitatively in time dependent dimensionless network parameters and we will discuss their behaviour for examples of 'typical' substorms and storms. The network parameters provide a detailed benchmark to compare data with models of substorm dynamics, and can provide new insights on the similarities and differences between substorms and how they correlate with external driving and the internal state of the

  4. Digital Detection and feedback Fluxgate Magnetometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil-Henriksen, J.; Merayo, José M.G.; Nielsen, Otto V;

    1996-01-01

    A new full Earth's field dynamic feedback fluxgate magnetometer is described. It is based entirely on digital signal processing and digital feedback control, thereby replacing the classical second harmonic tuned analogue electronics by processor algorithms. Discrete mathematical cross......-correlation routines and substantial oversampling reduce the noise to 71 pT root-mean-square in a 0.25-10 Hz bandwidth for a full Earth's field range instrument....

  5. Laser threshold magnetometer reaching attotesla precision

    CERN Document Server

    Jeske, Jan; Greentree, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This provides the advantage over conventional NV-based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission, and are currently experimentally limited to few $\\rm{nT}/\\sqrt{\\rm{Hz}}$. By contrast we predict that an NV-based laser threshold magnetometer with a volume of 1mm$^3$ can achieve shot-noise li...

  6. Accelerator based atomic physics experiments: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Physics research with beams from accelerators has continued to expand and the number of papers and articles at meetings and in journals reflects a steadily increasing interest and an increasing support from various funding agencies. An attempt will be made to point out where interdisciplinary benefits have occurred, and where applications of the new results to engineering problems are expected. Drawing from material which will be discussed in the conference, a list of the most active areas of research is presented. Accelerator based atomic physics brings together techniques from many areas, including chemistry, astronomy and astrophysics, nuclear physics, solid state physics and engineering. An example is the use of crystal channeling to sort some of the phenomena of ordinary heavy ion stopping powers. This tool has helped us to reach a better understanding of stopping mechanisms with the result that now we have established a better base for predicting energy losses of heavy ions in various materials

  7. Development of NMOR magnetometer for spin-maser EDM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimi, A.; Nanao, T.; Inoue, T.; Furukawa, T.; Uchida, M.; Tsuchiya, M.; Hayashi, H.; Chikamori, M.; Asahi, K.

    We have been developing a high sensitivity atomic magnetometer for atomic EDM experiments using a lowfrequency nuclear spin maser. In the developed nuclear spin maser of 129Xe, suppression of drift and fluctuation in the magnetic field is one of the important issues. The magnetometer being developed for spin maser EDM experiments utilizes the nonlinear magneto optical rotation (NMOR) e_ect in Rb atomic vapor. The enhancement of the optical rotation in a small magnetic field relies on the long spin-coherence time of Rb atoms in a vapor cell. The NMOR spectrum was measured by using fabricated Rb cells coated with an anti-relaxation material. The NMOR spectrum dependence on laser frequency, cell coating, and laser beam diameter were investigated. The magnetic sensitivity at present is 0:2 μG/√Hz from observed NMOR and noise spectra.

  8. Microchip-Based Trapped-Atom Clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Vuletic, Vladan; Leroux, Ian D.; Schleier-Smith, Monika H.

    2011-01-01

    This is a chapter of a recently published book entitled Atom Chips, edited by Jakob Reichel and Vladan Vuletic. The contents of this chapter include: Basic Principles; Atomic-Fountain versus Trapped-Atom Clocks; Optical-Transition Clocks versus Microwave Clocks; Clocks with Magnetically Trapped Atoms--Fundamental Limits and Experimental Demonstrations; Readout in Trapped-Atom Clocks; and Spin Squeezing.

  9. The Swarm Absolute Scalar Magnetometers now operating in orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratter, Isabelle; Leger, Jean-Michel; Bertrand, François; Jager, Thomas; Hulot, Gauthier

    2014-05-01

    Swarm is one of the Earth Explorer Missions run by the European Space Agency. Its principal goal is to make the best ever survey of the Earth's magnetic field and ionosphere and to study how they vary over space and time. This will be achieved by a constellation of three identical satellites, launched on the 22nd of November 2013. In order to observe the magnetic field thoroughly, each satellite carries two magnetometers: a Vector Field Magnetometer coupled with a star tracker camera, to measure the direction of the magnetic field in space, and an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM), to measure its intensity. The ASM is the French contribution to the Swarm mission. This new generation instrument, based on the atomic spectroscopy of the helium 4 metastable state, was developed by CEA-Leti (1) in Grenoble with technical assistance and financing from CNES (2) and scientific support from IPGP (3). As the Swarm magnetic reference, the ASM scalar performances are crucial for the mission's success. Thanks to a new dedicated design, the ASM offers the best precision and absolute accuracy ever attained in space, with similar performances all along the orbit. The ASM will thus deliver high resolution scalar measurements at 1 Hz for the in-flight calibration of the vector field data over the 4 year mission. It can also be operated at a much higher sampling rate ("burst" mode at 250 Hz). In addition, on an experimental basis, this instrument also takes vector field measurements, which are being validated jointly by CEA-Leti and IPGP, with support from CNES. This poster presents the capabilities and working principle of this instrument as well as the results of the in-flight verifications carried out during the 3 first months in orbit, including the performances, the last status and future prospects. 1 CEA-Leti : French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission - Electronics and Information Technology Laboratory 2 CNES : Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales - French Space

  10. Development of a SQUID-based 3He Co-magnetometer Readout for a Neutron Electric Dipole Moment Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young Jin; Clayton, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    A discovery of a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron would provide one of the most important low energy tests of the discrete symmetries beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. A new search of neutron EDM, to be conducted at the spallation neutron source (SNS) at ORNL, is designed to improve the present experimental limit of ~10^-26 e-cm by two orders of magnitude. The experiment is based on the magnetic-resonance technique in which polarized neutrons precess at the L...

  11. Cryogenic High-Sensitivity Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Peter; Chui, Talso; Goodstein, David

    2005-01-01

    A proposed magnetometer for use in a cryogenic environment would be sensitive enough to measure a magnetic-flux density as small as a picogauss (10(exp -16) Tesla). In contrast, a typical conventional flux-gate magnetometer cannot measure a magnetic-flux density smaller that about 1 microgauss (10(exp -10) Tesla). One version of this device, for operation near the low end of the cryogenic temperature range, would include a piece of a paramagnetic material on a platform, the temperature of which would be controlled with a periodic variation. The variation in temperature would be measured by use of a conventional germanium resistance thermometer. A superconducting coil would be wound around the paramagnetic material and coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer.

  12. Scalar Calibration of Vector Magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter; Primdahl, Fritz; Petersen, Jan Raagaard; Nielsen, Otto V

    2000-01-01

    uniquely the parameters for a given data set. Therefore, a magnetometer may be characterized inexpensively in the Earth's magnetic-field environment. This procedure has been used successfully in the pre-flight calibration of the state-of-the-art magnetometers on board the magnetic mapping satellites Orsted...... of a magnetic field, three scale factors for normalization of the axes and three non-orthogonality angles which build up an orthogonal system intrinsically in the sensor. The advantage of this method compared with others lies in its linear least squares estimator, which finds independently and...

  13. An atom laser based on Raman transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Moy, G M; Savage, C M

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we present an atom laser scheme using a Raman transition for the output coupling of atoms. A beam of thermal atoms (bosons) in a metastable atomic state |1> are pumped into a multimode atomic cavity. This cavity is coupled through spontaneous emission to a single mode of another cavity for the ground atomic state, |2>. Above a certain threshold pumping rate a large number of atoms, N2, builds up in this single quantum state and transitions to the ground state of the cavity become enhanced by a factor (N2+1). Atoms in this state are then coupled to the outside of the cavity with a Raman transition. This changes the internal state of the atom and imparts a momentum kick, allowing the atoms to leave the system.

  14. Shot-noise-limited magnetometer with sub-picotesla sensitivity at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a photon shot-noise-limited (SNL) optical magnetometer based on amplitude modulated optical rotation using a room-temperature 85Rb vapor in a cell with anti-relaxation coating. The instrument achieves a room-temperature sensitivity of 70 fT/√(Hz) at 7.6 μT. Experimental scaling of noise with optical power, in agreement with theoretical predictions, confirms the SNL behaviour from 5 μT to 75 μT. The combination of best-in-class sensitivity and SNL operation makes the system a promising candidate for application of squeezed light to a state-of-the-art atomic sensor

  15. High-resoution SQUID magnetometer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tsoy, G. M.; Janů, Zdeněk; Novák, Miloslav; Soukup, František; Tichý, Rudolf

    284-288, - (2000), s. 2122-2123. ISSN 0921-4526 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010832 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : magnetic susceptibility * SQUID * magnetometer Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.893, year: 2000

  16. The Chromosphere and Prominence Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wijn, Alfred; Bethge, Christian; McIntosh, Scott; Tomczyk, Steven; Burkepile, Joan

    2013-04-01

    The Chromosphere and Prominence Magnetometer (ChroMag) is a synoptic instrument with the goal of quantifying the intertwined dynamics and magnetism of the solar chromosphere and in prominences through imaging spectro-polarimetry of the full solar disk in a synoptic fashion. The picture of chromospheric magnetism and dynamics is rapidly developing, and a pressing need exists for breakthrough observations of chromospheric vector magnetic field measurements at the true lower boundary of the heliospheric system. ChroMag will provide measurements that will enable scientists to study and better understand the energetics of the solar atmosphere, how prominences are formed, how energy is stored in the magnetic field structure of the atmosphere and how it is released during space weather events like flares and coronal mass ejections. An essential part of the ChroMag program is a commitment to develop and provide community access to the `inversion' tools necessary to interpret the measurements and derive the magneto-hydrodynamic parameters of the plasma. Measurements of an instrument like ChroMag provide critical physical context for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) as well as ground-based observatories such as the future Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST). A prototype is currently under construction at the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, CO, USA. The heart of the ChroMag instrument is an electro-optically tunable wide-fielded narrow-band birefringent six-stage Lyot filter with a built-in polarimeter. We will present a progress update on the ChroMag design, and present results from the prototype instrument.

  17. Swarm Absolute Scalar Magnetometers first in-orbit results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratter, Isabelle; Léger, Jean-Michel; Bertrand, François; Jager, Thomas; Hulot, Gauthier; Brocco, Laura; Vigneron, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The ESA Swarm mission will provide the best ever survey of the Earth's magnetic field and its temporal evolution. This will be achieved by a constellation of three identical satellites, launched together on the 22nd of November 2013. In order to observe the magnetic field thoroughly, each satellite carries two magnetometers: a Vector Field Magnetometer (VFM) coupled with a star tracker camera, to measure the direction of the magnetic field in space, and an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM), to measure its intensity. The ASM is the French contribution to the Swarm mission. This new generation instrument was designed by CEA-Leti and developed in close partnership with CNES, with scientific support from IPGP. Its operating principle is based on the atomic spectroscopy of the helium 4 metastable state. It makes use of the Zeeman's effect to transduce the magnetic field into a frequency, the signal being amplified by optical pumping. The primary role of the ASM is to provide absolute measurements of the magnetic field's strength at 1 Hz, for the in-flight calibration of the VFM. As the Swarm magnetic reference, the ASM scalar performance is crucial for the mission's success. Thanks to its innovative design, the ASM offers the best precision, resolution and absolute accuracy ever attained in space, with similar performance all along the orbit. In addition, thanks to an original architecture, the ASM implements on an experimental basis a capacity for providing simultaneously vector measurements at 1 Hz. This new feature makes it the first instrument capable of delivering both scalar and vector measurements simultaneously at the same point. Swarm offers a unique opportunity to validate the ASM vector data in orbit by comparison with the VFM's. Furthermore, the ASM can provide scalar data at a much higher sampling rate, when run in "burst" mode at 250 Hz, with a 100 Hz measurement bandwidth. An analysis of the spectral content of the magnetic field above 1 Hz becomes thus

  18. Atomic Electronic Contract Protocol Based on Convertible Signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi-chun; WANG Li-na; ZHANG Huan-guo

    2005-01-01

    A new class of atomicity, namely contract atomicity is presented. A new technical strategy based on convertible signature and two-phase commitment is proposed for implementing atomicity of electronic contract protocol. A new atomic contract signing protocol is given out by using ElGamal-like convertible undeniable signature and commitment of conversion key, and another new atomic contract signing protocol is brought forward by using RSA-based convertible undeniable signature scheme and commitment of conversion key.These two new protocols are proved to be of atomicity, fairness, privacy, non-repudiation.

  19. Optical atomic magnetometry for magnetic induction tomography of the heart

    CERN Document Server

    Deans, Cameron; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of radio-frequency optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography measurements. We demonstrate the imaging of dummy targets of varying conductivities placed in the proximity of the sensor, in an unshielded environment at room-temperature and without background subtraction. The images produced by the system accurately reproduce the characteristics of the actual objects. Furthermore, we perform finite element simulations in order to assess the potential for measuring low-conductivity biological tissues with our system. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an instrument based on optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography imaging of biological samples, in particular for mapping anomalous conductivity in the heart.

  20. The chromosphere and prominence magnetometer

    OpenAIRE

    de Wijn, Alfred G.; Bethge, Christian; Tomczyk, Steven; McIntosh, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The Chromosphere and Prominence Magnetometer (ChroMag) is conceived with the goal of quantifying the intertwined dynamics and magnetism of the solar chromosphere and in prominences through imaging spectro-polarimetry of the full solar disk. The picture of chromospheric magnetism and dynamics is rapidly developing, and a pressing need exists for breakthrough observations of chromospheric vector magnetic field measurements at the true lower boundary of the heliospheric system. ChroMag will prov...

  1. Carbon based thirty six atom spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskoti, Charles R.; Zettl, Alex K.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Cote, Michel; Grossman, Jeffrey C.; Louie, Steven G.

    2005-09-06

    A solid phase or form of carbon is based on fullerenes with thirty six carbon atoms (C.sub.36). The C.sub.36 structure with D.sub.6h symmetry is one of the two most energetically favorable, and is conducive to forming a periodic system. The lowest energy crystal is a highly bonded network of hexagonal planes of C.sub.36 subunits with AB stacking. The C.sub.36 solid is not a purely van der Waals solid, but has covalent-like bonding, leading to a solid with enhanced structural rigidity. The solid C.sub.36 material is made by synthesizing and selecting out C.sub.36 fullerenes in relatively large quantities. A C.sub.36 rich fullerene soot is produced in a helium environment arc discharge chamber by operating at an optimum helium pressure (400 torr). The C.sub.36 is separated from the soot by a two step process. The soot is first treated with a first solvent, e.g. toluene, to remove the higher order fullerenes but leave the C.sub.36. The soot is then treated with a second solvent, e.g. pyridine, which is more polarizable than the first solvent used for the larger fullerenes. The second solvent extracts the C.sub.36 from the soot. Thin films and powders can then be produced from the extracted C.sub.36. Other materials are based on C.sub.36 fullerenes, providing for different properties.

  2. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Cell Shape Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adia-Nimuwa, Usienemfon; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Hartz, Steven; Xie, Kan; Ayres, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Stellation is a measure of cell physiology and pathology for several cell groups including neural, liver and pancreatic cells. In the present work, we compare the results of a conventional two-dimensional shape index study of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescent microscopy images with the results obtained using a new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index similar to sphericity index. The stellation of astrocytes is investigated on nanofibrillar scaffolds composed of electrospun polyamide nanofibers that has demonstrated promise for central nervous system (CNS) repair. Recent work by our group has given us the ability to clearly segment the cells from nanofibrillar scaffolds in AFM images. The clear-featured AFM images indicated that the astrocyte processes were longer than previously identified at 24h. It was furthermore shown that cell spreading could vary significantly as a function of environmental parameters, and that AFM images could record these variations. The new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index incorporates the new information: longer stellate processes and cell spreading. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  3. High Tc Josephson Junctions, SQUIDs and magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has recently been considerable progress in the state-of-the-art of high-Tc magnetometers based on dc SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices). This progress is due partly to the development of more manufacturable Josephson junctions, making SQUIDs easier to fabricate, and partly to the development of multiturn flux transformers that convert the high sensitivity of SQUIDs to magnetic flux to a correspondingly high sensitivity to magnetic field. Needless to say, today's high-Tc SQUIDs are still considerably less sensitive than their low-Tc counterparts, particularly at low frequencies (f) where their level of 1/f noise remains high. Nonetheless, the performance of the high-Tc devices has now reached the point where they are adequate for a number of the less demanding applications; furthermore, as we shall see, at least modest improvements in performance are expected in the near future. In this article, the author outlines these various developments. This is far from a comprehensive review of the field, however, and, apart from Sec. 2, he describes largely his own work. He begins in Sec. 2 with an overview of the various types of Josephson junctions that have been investigated, and in Sec. 3, he describes some of the SQUIDs that have been tested, and assess their performance. Section 4 discuss the development of the multilayer structures essential for an interconnect technology, and, in particular, for crossovers and vias. Section 5 shows how this technology enables one to fabricate multiturn flux transformers which, in turn, can be coupled to SQUIDs to make magnetometers. The performance and possible future improvements in these magnetometers are assessed, and some applications mentioned

  4. An automated and versatile ultra-low temperature SQUID magnetometer

    OpenAIRE

    Morello, A.; Angenent, W. G. J.; Frossati, G.; de Jongh, L.J.

    2004-01-01

    We present the design and construction of a SQUID-based magnetometer for operation down to temperatures T = 10 mK, while retaining the compatibility with the sample holders typically used in commercial SQUID magnetometers. The system is based on a dc-SQUID coupled to a second-order gradiometer. The sample is placed inside the plastic mixing chamber of a dilution refrigerator and is thermalized directly by the 3He flow. The movement though the pickup coils is obtained by lifting the whole dilu...

  5. An automated and versatile ultra-low temperature SQUID magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Morello, A; Frossati, G; De Jongh, L J

    2004-01-01

    We present the design and construction of a SQUID-based magnetometer for operation down to temperatures T = 10 mK, while retaining the compatibility with the sample holders typically used in commercial SQUID magnetometers. The system is based on a dc-SQUID coupled to a second-order gradiometer. The sample is placed inside the plastic mixing chamber of a dilution refrigerator and is thermalized directly by the 3He flow. The movement though the pickup coils is obtained by lifting the whole dilution refrigerator insert. A home-developed software provides full automation and an easy user interface.

  6. Magnetoresistive magnetometer for space science applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the in situ dc magnetic field on space science missions is most commonly achieved using instruments based on fluxgate sensors. Fluxgates are robust, reliable and have considerable space heritage; however, their mass and volume are not optimized for deployment on nano or picosats. We describe a new magnetometer design demonstrating science measurement capability featuring significantly lower mass, volume and to a lesser extent power than a typical fluxgate. The instrument employs a sensor based on anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) achieving a noise floor of less than 50 pT Hz−1/2 above 1 Hz on a 5 V bridge bias. The instrument range is scalable up to ±50 000 nT and the three-axis sensor mass and volume are less than 10 g and 10 cm3, respectively. The ability to switch the polarization of the sensor's easy axis and apply magnetic feedback is used to build a driven first harmonic closed loop system featuring improved linearity, gain stability and compensation of the sensor offset. A number of potential geospace applications based on the initial instrument results are discussed including attitude control systems and scientific measurement of waves and structures in the terrestrial magnetosphere. A flight version of the AMR magnetometer will fly on the TRIO-CINEMA mission due to be launched in 2012. (paper)

  7. An improved RF circuit for Overhauser magnetometer excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Di; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Fu, Haoyang

    2015-08-01

    Overhauser magnetometer is a high-precision device for magnetostatic field measurement, which can be used in a wide variety of purposes: UXO detection, pipeline mapping and other engineering and environmental applications. Traditional proton magnetometer adopts DC polarization, suffering from low polarization efficiency, high power consumption and low signal noise ratio (SNR). Compared with the traditional proton magnetometer, nitroxide free radicals are used for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). RF excitation is very important for electron resonance in nitrogen oxygen free radical solution, and it is primarily significant for the obtention of high SNR signal and high sensitive field observation. Therefore, RF excitation source plays a crucial role in the development of Overhauser magnetometer. In this paper, an improved design of a RF circuit is discussed. The new RF excitation circuit consists of two parts: Quartz crystal oscillator circuit and RF power amplifier circuit. Simulation and optimization designs for power amplifier circuit based on software ADS are presented. Finally we achieve a continuous and stable sine wave of 60MHz with 1-2.5 W output power, and the second harmonic suppression is close to -20dBc. The improved RF circuit has many merits such as small size, low-power consumption and high efficiency, and it can be applied to Overhauser magnetometer to obtain high sensitive field observation.

  8. An improved proton magnetometer for Earth's magnetic field observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chengyu; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Fu, Haoyang

    2015-09-01

    As a precision instrument to measure the earth magnetic field, proton magnetometer is widely used in different fields such as geological survey, buried objects detection and earth field variations. Due to poor signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the system, proton magnetometer suffers from low sensitivity which directly affects the performance. In order to increase the sensitivity, we present an improved proton magnetometer. First, the effect of matching resistance on Q value is discussed to enhance SNR, and high matching resistance has been chosen to improve the Q value of the resonant circuit. Second, noise induced by pre-amplifier is investigated in order to obtain low noise signal, and we adopt the JFET with noise figure less than 0.5dB as the pre-amplifier. Third, by using band-pass filter, low-noise output signal is obtained. Fourth, the method of period measurement based on CPLD is employed to measure frequency of the square wave shaped from the output sinusoidal signal. High precision temperature compensate crystal oscillator (TCXO) has been used to improve the frequency measurement accuracy. Last, experimental data is obtained through field measurements. By calculating the standard deviation, the sensitivity of the improved proton magnetometer is 0.15nT for Earth's magnetic field observation. Experimental results show that the new magnetometer is sensitive to earth field measurement.

  9. Recent Advances in Magnetoseismology Using Network Observations by Ground Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, P. J.; Russell, C. T.

    2011-12-01

    The rise of modern, synchronized networks of ground magnetometers in recent years has inspired and advanced research and development in magnetoseismology. Like the practice in other geophysical disciplines, magnetoseismology can infer the structure of the magnetosphere from the observations of normal-mode frequencies of the magnetic field. It can also time and locate impulsive events by measuring the signal arrival time at multiple ground stations. We highlight recent advances in using network observations by ground magnetometers for both types of magnetoseismic research. In the area of normal-mode magnetoseismology the increase in ground magnetometers has enabled ever more station pairs suitable for the gradient analysis. We demonstrate progress in automatic detection of field line resonance frequencies and the results that reveal longitudinal structure of the plasmasphere. As a relatively young research topic, travel-time magnetoseismology has shown its capability to time and locate sudden impulses and substorm onsets by using ground-based magnetometer observations. These initial successes in turn motivated detailed examination of MHD wave propagation in the magnetosphere. In the end we discuss how these magnetoseismic studies shed light on the regions in the world where future establishment of ground magnetometers is desirable.

  10. Performances of compact integrated superconducting magnetometers for biomagnetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, C.; Vettoliere, A.; Rombetto, S.; Nappi, C.; Russo, M.

    2008-10-01

    In the present paper, performances of compact fully integrated superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers, recently developed, have been investigated in view of their employment in large multichannel systems for biomagnetic imaging. The analysis has been focused on SQUID sensors having a pickup loop side length of 3 and 4 mm based on a design aimed to maximize the magnetic flux transferred from the detection coil to the SQUID in comparison with a magnetometer with 9 mm side length having a suitable sensitivity for biomagnetic applications. The performance study has been consisted in the computation of the magnetic responses to a current dipole which is the most fundamental approach used in biomagnetism. The results have shown that the dipole current sensitivity of 4 mm long side compact magnetometers is suitable for application in multichannel systems for magnetoencephalography and magnetocardiography.

  11. Composite Rolled Magnetometer and Instrument Boom Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Magnetometers are the most common instrument flown on NASA science missions and interference from onboard electronics requires that these instruments be deployed...

  12. A 2015 International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) candidate model based on Swarm’s experimental absolute magnetometer vector mode data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigneron, Pierre; Hulot, Gauthier; Olsen, Nils;

    2015-01-01

    Each of the three satellites of the European Space Agency Swarm mission carries an absolute scalar magnetometer (ASM) that provides the nominal 1-Hz scalar data of the mission for both science and calibration purposes. These ASM instruments, however, also deliver autonomous 1-Hz experimental vector...... data. Here, we report on how ASM-only scalar and vector data from the Alpha and Bravo satellites between November 29, 2013 (a week after launch) and September 25, 2014 (for on-time delivery of the model on October 1, 2014) could be used to build a very valuable candidate model for the 2015.......0 International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). A parent model was first computed, describing the geomagnetic field of internal origin up to degree and order 40 in a spherical harmonic representation and including a constant secular variation up to degree and order 8. This model was next simply forwarded to...

  13. Artificial atoms based on correlated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannhart, J.; Boschker, H.; Kopp, T.; Valentí, R.

    2016-08-01

    Low-dimensional electron systems fabricated from quantum matter have in recent years become available and are being explored with great intensity. This article gives an overview of the fundamental properties of such systems and summarizes the state of the field. We furthermore present and consider the concept of artificial atoms fabricated from quantum materials, anticipating remarkable scientific advances and possibly important applications of this new field of research. The surprising properties of these artificial atoms and of molecules or even of solids assembled from them are presented and discussed.

  14. Polarizable Atomic Multipole-based Molecular Mechanics for Organic Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Pengyu; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical potential based on permanent atomic multipoles and atomic induced dipoles is reported for alkanes, alcohols, amines, sulfides, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, amides, aromatics and other small organic molecules. Permanent atomic multipole moments through quadrupole moments have been derived from gas phase ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The van der Waals parameters are obtained by fitting to gas phase homodimer QM energies and structures, as well as experimental densities ...

  15. Integrating atom-based and residue-based scoring functions for protein–protein docking

    OpenAIRE

    Vreven, Thom; Hwang, Howook; Weng, Zhiping

    2011-01-01

    Most scoring functions for protein–protein docking algorithms are either atom-based or residue-based, with the former being able to produce higher quality structures and latter more tolerant to conformational changes upon binding. Earlier, we developed the ZRANK algorithm for reranking docking predictions, with a scoring function that contained only atom-based terms. Here we combine ZRANK's atom-based potentials with five residue-based potentials published by other labs, as well as an atom-ba...

  16. A Transportable Gravity Gradiometer Based on Atom Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Thompson, Robert J.; Kellogg, James R.; Aveline, David C.; Maleki, Lute; Kohel, James M.

    2010-01-01

    A transportable atom interferometer-based gravity gradiometer has been developed at JPL to carry out measurements of Earth's gravity field at ever finer spatial resolutions, and to facilitate high-resolution monitoring of temporal variations in the gravity field from ground- and flight-based platforms. Existing satellite-based gravity missions such as CHAMP and GRACE measure the gravity field via precise monitoring of the motion of the satellites; i.e. the satellites themselves function as test masses. JPL's quantum gravity gradiometer employs a quantum phase measurement technique, similar to that employed in atomic clocks, made possible by recent advances in laser cooling and manipulation of atoms. This measurement technique is based on atomwave interferometry, and individual laser-cooled atoms are used as drag-free test masses. The quantum gravity gradiometer employs two identical atom interferometers as precision accelerometers to measure the difference in gravitational acceleration between two points (Figure 1). By using the same lasers for the manipulation of atoms in both interferometers, the accelerometers have a common reference frame and non-inertial accelerations are effectively rejected as common mode noise in the differential measurement of the gravity gradient. As a result, the dual atom interferometer-based gravity gradiometer allows gravity measurements on a moving platform, while achieving the same long-term stability of the best atomic clocks. In the laboratory-based prototype (Figure 2), the cesium atoms used in each atom interferometer are initially collected and cooled in two separate magneto-optic traps (MOTs). Each MOT, consisting of three orthogonal pairs of counter-propagating laser beams centered on a quadrupole magnetic field, collects up to 10(exp 9) atoms. These atoms are then launched vertically as in an atom fountain by switching off the magnetic field and introducing a slight frequency shift between pairs of lasers to create a moving

  17. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  18. Following NMR magnetometer with digital indication in gausses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide-range following NMR magnetometer with digital indication of a measured field in gausses is described. The following NMR magnetometer consists of a NMR transducer, an autodine detector, a phase detector, an integrator, a modulator and a digital indication unit. The magnetic field following system is based on the production of a pulse signal with relative duration depending on the detuning value and sign. This signal is supplied to an integrator, which output signal controls the capacity of varicap being a part of an autodyne oscillatory circuit. A principal flowsheet of the NMR magnetometer is presented. The range of measured fields constituting 1-7 kGs when a proton transducer is used can be widened by means of using deuterium transducers. The range of the magnetic field following is greater than 10% of the measurement range. The following velocity is up to 500 Gs/min. A built-in digital frequency meter provides 6-digit indication of field indance in gausses for proton and deuterium transducers. The magnetometer can be used both autonomously and in combination with an EPR spectrometer

  19. Manipulating Neutral Atoms in Chip-Based Magnetic Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Kohel, James

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques for manipulating neutral atoms (more precisely, ultracold clouds of neutral atoms) in chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides have been demonstrated. Such traps and waveguides are promising components of future quantum sensors that would offer sensitivities much greater than those of conventional sensors. Potential applications include gyroscopy and basic research in physical phenomena that involve gravitational and/or electromagnetic fields. The developed techniques make it possible to control atoms with greater versatility and dexterity than were previously possible and, hence, can be expected to contribute to the value of chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides. The basic principle of these techniques is to control gradient magnetic fields with suitable timing so as to alter a trap to exert position-, velocity-, and/or time-dependent forces on atoms in the trap to obtain desired effects. The trap magnetic fields are generated by controlled electric currents flowing in both macroscopic off-chip electromagnet coils and microscopic wires on the surface of the chip. The methods are best explained in terms of examples. Rather than simply allowing atoms to expand freely into an atomic waveguide, one can give them a controllable push by switching on an externally generated or a chip-based gradient magnetic field. This push can increase the speed of the atoms, typically from about 5 to about 20 cm/s. Applying a non-linear magnetic-field gradient exerts different forces on atoms in different positions a phenomenon that one can exploit by introducing a delay between releasing atoms into the waveguide and turning on the magnetic field.

  20. On promotion of base technologies of atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the long term plan of atomic energy development and utilization decided in June, 1987 by the Atomic Energy Commission, it was recognized that hereafter, the opening-up of the new potential that atomic energy possesses should be aimed at, and the policy was shown so that the research and development hereafter place emphasis on the creative and innovative region which causes large technical innovation, by which the spreading effect to general science and technology can be expected, and the development of the base technologies that connect the basic research and project development is promoted. The trend of atomic energy development so far, the change of the situation surrounding atomic energy, the direction of technical development of atomic energy hereafter and the base technologies are discussed. The concept of the technical development of materilas, artificial intelligence, lasers, and the evaluation and reduction of radiation risks used for atomic energy is described. As the development plan of atomic energy base technologies, the subjects of technical development, the future image of technical development, the efficient promotion of the development and so on are shown. (Kato, I.)

  1. Free-Flying Magnetometer Data System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaes, B.; Javadi, H.; Spencer, H.

    2000-01-01

    Diode (LED) in the payload for turning FFM power on or off and placing the FFM in a test mode or flight mode. The IR links are also used to synchronize (zero) the clocks onboard all the FFMs through a reset pulse originating from the payload GPS receiver that is issued when the FFMs are in flight mode. The FPGA based data subsystem manages continuous data collection from the four ADC channels and sun sensors, formatting and storing the data to SRAM, and controlling downlink transmission. The transmitter is powered only after a 2547 frame SRAM buffer has been filled (approx. 5 minutes of data). The data is Viterbi encoded and sent to the S-band transmitter via a First-In-First-Out (FIFO) buffer who's output is clocked at 100 bits/second. After the 26-second transmission, the transmitter is turned off to reduce noise coupling to the sensitive magnetometer. The data subsystem control consists of a master state machine that performs data flow management and is interfaced through a prioritized interrupt scheme to state machines that service the ADC, sun sensors and transmitter FIFO. Continuous data collection prevents the missing of data during transmission and provides implicit time tagging of the data acquired by the ADC because of synchronization with the TCXO clock.

  2. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  3. Magnetometer Data recovered from 35mm film

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The L57 CDMP recovery project takes magnetometer data on 35mm film stored at the archive's climate controlled warehouse and digitizes them.

  4. Optically-Modulated Miniature Magnetometer (OMMM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Design, fabricate, and calibrate a compact helium magnetometer for high-accuracy measurements of Earth’s magnetic field Provide vector and scalar...

  5. Digitalization of highly precise fluxgate magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerman, Ales; Kuna, A.; Ripka, P.;

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the theory behind all three known ways of digitalizing the fluxgate magnetometers: analogue magnetometers with digitalized output using high resolution ADC, application of the delta-sigma modulation to the sensor feedback loop and fully digital signal detection. At present time...... application of the A-E modulation to the sensor feedback loop theoretically derives the main advantage of this method-increasing of the modulation order and shows its real potential compared to the analog magnetometer with consequential digitalization. The comparison is realized on the modular magnetometer...... projects. The main objective of the paper is then to discuss the potential, real advantages and weakness of each concept and to examine their convenience for future implementations....

  6. Elimination of flux-transformer crosstalk in multichannel SQUID magnetometers

    OpenAIRE

    Brake, ter, O.; Fleuren, F.H.; Ulfman, J.A.; Flokstra, J.

    1986-01-01

    Multichannel SQUID magnetometers are being developed for signal-field mapping in biomagnetic experiments. A problem that becomes more serious as the number of channels is increased is the crosstalk caused by the mutual inductances between the individual sensing coils. A simple and effective method for eliminating this crosstalk is presented in this Paper. The method is based on a rearrangement of the feedback loops which causes the flux-transformer circuits to become currentless. The feasibil...

  7. Elimination of flux-transformer crosstalk in multichannel SQUID magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Brake, H. J. M.; Fleuren, F. H.; Ulfrnan, J. A.; Flokstra, J.

    Multichannel SQUID magnetometers are being developed for signal-field mapping in biomagnetic experiments. A problem that becomes more serious as the number of channels is increased is the crosstalk caused by the mutual inductances between the individual sensing coils. A simple and effective method for eliminating this crosstalk is presented in this Paper. The method is based on a rearrangement of the feedback loops which causes the flux-transformer circuits to become currentless. The feasibility of the method is verified experimentally.

  8. Fluxgate Magnetometer Array for Geomagnetic Abnormal Phenomena Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaomei; Teng, Yuntian; Wang, Chen; Li, Qi; Fan, Xiaoyong

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a flexible observation mode for a geomagnetic abnormal phenomena tracking system. The instrument, based on ring core fluxgate magnetometer technology, improves the field environment performance. Using wireless technology provides on-the-spot mobile networking for the observational data, with efficient access to the earthquake precursor observation network. It provides a powerful detection method for earthquake short-term prediction through installat...

  9. Development of a Transportable Gravity Gradiometer Based on Atom Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, N.; Kohel, J. M.; Aveline, D. C.; Kellogg, J. R.; Thompson, R. J.; Maleki, L.

    2007-12-01

    JPL is developing a transportable gravity gradiometer based on light-pulse atom interferometers for NASA's Earth Science Technology Office's Instrument Incubator Program. The inertial sensors in this instrument employ a quantum interference measurement technique, analogous to the precise phase measurements in atomic clocks, which offers increased sensitivity and improved long-term stability over traditional mechanical devices. We report on the implementation of this technique in JPL's gravity gradiometer, and on the current performance of the mobile instrument. We also discuss the prospects for satellite-based gravity field mapping, including high-resolution monitoring of time-varying fields from a single satellite platform and multi-component measurements of the gravitational gradient tensor, using atom interferometer-based instruments.

  10. ATOM PROBE STUDY OF TITANIUM BASE ALLOYS : PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Menand, A.; Chambreland, S.; Martin, C

    1986-01-01

    Two different titanium base alloys, Ti46 Al54 and Ti88.8 Cu2.3, Al8.9, have been studied by atom probe microanalysis. A precipitate of Ti2 Al was analysed in the binary alloys. Micro-analysis of Ti Cu Al alloy revealed the presence of Copper enriched zones. The study has also exhibited a penetration of Hydrogen in the samples, probably due to preparation technique. The results demonstrate the feasibility of studies on titanium base alloys by mean of atom probe.

  11. Calibration of SQUID vector magnetometers in full tensor gradiometry systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffler, M.; Queitsch, M.; Stolz, R.; Chwala, A.; Krech, W.; Meyer, H.-G.; Kukowski, N.

    2014-08-01

    Measurement of magnetic vector or tensor quantities, namely of field or field gradient, delivers more details of the underlying geological setting in geomagnetic prospection than a scalar measurement of a single component or of the scalar total magnetic intensity. Currently, highest measurement resolutions are achievable with superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based systems. Due to technological limitations, it is necessary to suppress the parasitic magnetic field response from the SQUID gradiometer signals, which are a superposition of one tensor component and all three orthogonal magnetic field components. This in turn requires an accurate estimation of the local magnetic field. Such a measurement can itself be achieved via three additional orthogonal SQUID reference magnetometers. It is the calibration of such a SQUID reference vector magnetometer system that is the subject of this paper. A number of vector magnetometer calibration methods are described in the literature. We present two methods that we have implemented and compared, for their suitability of rapid data processing and integration into a full tensor magnetic gradiometry, SQUID-based, system. We conclude that the calibration routines must necessarily model fabrication misalignments, field offset and scale factors, and include comparison with a reference magnetic field. In order to enable fast processing on site, the software must be able to function as a stand-alone toolbox.

  12. Directly coupled YBCO dc SQUID magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YBa2Cu3O7-x magnetometers have been made on 10mmx10mm MgO substrates by directly coupling the magnetometer pick-up loop to a dc SQUID with narrow strip lines. The dc SQUIDs were made with YBa2Cu3O7-x step-edge Josephson junctions. The layout of the magnetometer pick-up loop was chosen as a compromise between maximizing the loop effective area and minimizing the loop inductance. The SQUID was designed to have LS∼100 pH in order to obtain βL=2I0LS/Φ0 approx.= 1 with the single-junction critical current I0∼10 μA. We have made magnetometers with white noise levels down to 55 fT Hz-1/2 and a 1/f knee at 1 Hz (ac biased). Noise measurements were made on a field-cooled magnetometer. The noise measured at 1 Hz when cooled in 'zero field' was 175 fT Hz-1/2. When cooled in magnetic fields of B = 50 μT and B = 100 μT we measured the noise at 1 Hz to be 430 fT Hz-12 and 1.3 pT Hz-1/2, respectively. (author)

  13. A new miniaturized atomic magnetic gradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Dong; Perry, Abigail; Krzyzewski, Sean; Geller, Shawn; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John

    2016-05-01

    We report the development of a new miniaturized magnetic gradiometer using alkali atoms. The gradiometer, with the length of 5 cm and cross section diameter of 11 mm, is made of two chip-scale atomic magnetometers placed on a printed optical bench with a defined separation. Both magnetometers work in the spin-exchange relaxation free regime, share the same beam for pumping and probing to reduce the common mode noises from the lasers, and atom temperature is independently controlled by heating beams at telecom wavelength. With 2 cm baseline, 1 mW pumping beam power, and less than 400 mW input heating beam power, we measure a noise level of 15 fT/ Hz1/2 from the subtraction of two magnetometer outputs, which corresponds to a gradient field sensitivity of 7.5 fT/ Hz1/2/cm. The maximum common mode magnetic field noise rejection is up to 1000 within the gradiometer bandwidth. This device is useful in many fields that require both sensitive gradient field information and high common mode noise cancellation. We are also developing a new hybrid system based on this device to improve its dynamical range.

  14. Plasmonic fiber-optic vector magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaochuan; Guo, Tuan; Zhang, Xuejun; Xu, Jian; Xie, Wenping; Nie, Ming; Wu, Qiang; Guan, Bai-Ou; Albert, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    A compact fiber-optic vector magnetometer based on directional scattering between polarized plasmon waves and ferro-magnetic nanoparticles is demonstrated. The sensor configuration reported in this work uses a short section of tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) coated with a nanometer scale gold film and packaged with a magnetic fluid (Fe3O4) inside a capillary. The transmission spectrum of the sensor provides a fine comb of narrowband resonances that overlap with a broader absorption of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The wavelength of the SPR attenuation in transmission shows high sensitivity to slight perturbations by magnetic fields, due to the strong directional scattering between the SPR attenuated cladding modes and the magnetic fluid near the fiber surface. Both the orientation (2 nm/deg) and the intensity (1.8 nm/mT) of magnetic fields can be determined unambiguously from the TFBG spectrum. Temperature cross sensitivity can be referenced out by monitoring the wavelength of the core mode resonance simultaneously.

  15. Silent Localization of Underwater Sensors Using Magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Callmer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensor localization is a central problem for sensor networks. If the sensor positions are uncertain, the target tracking ability of the sensor network is reduced. Sensor localization in underwater environments is traditionally addressed using acoustic range measurements involving known anchor or surface nodes. We explore the usage of triaxial magnetometers and a friendly vessel with known magnetic dipole to silently localize the sensors. The ferromagnetic field created by the dipole is measured by the magnetometers and is used to localize the sensors. The trajectory of the vessel and the sensor positions are estimated simultaneously using an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF. Simulations show that the sensors can be accurately positioned using magnetometers.

  16. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H∞ control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments

  17. Magnetometer-only attitude and angular velocity filtering estimation for attitude changing spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongliang; Xu, Shijie

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents an improved real-time sequential filter (IRTSF) for magnetometer-only attitude and angular velocity estimation of spacecraft during its attitude changing (including fast and large angular attitude maneuver, rapidly spinning or uncontrolled tumble). In this new magnetometer-only attitude determination technique, both attitude dynamics equation and first time derivative of measured magnetic field vector are directly leaded into filtering equations based on the traditional single vector attitude determination method of gyroless and real-time sequential filter (RTSF) of magnetometer-only attitude estimation. The process noise model of IRTSF includes attitude kinematics and dynamics equations, and its measurement model consists of magnetic field vector and its first time derivative. The observability of IRTSF for small or large angular velocity changing spacecraft is evaluated by an improved Lie-Differentiation, and the degrees of observability of IRTSF for different initial estimation errors are analyzed by the condition number and a solved covariance matrix. Numerical simulation results indicate that: (1) the attitude and angular velocity of spacecraft can be estimated with sufficient accuracy using IRTSF from magnetometer-only data; (2) compared with that of RTSF, the estimation accuracies and observability degrees of attitude and angular velocity using IRTSF from magnetometer-only data are both improved; and (3) universality: the IRTSF of magnetometer-only attitude and angular velocity estimation is observable for any different initial state estimation error vector.

  18. Mobile high-Tc DC SQUID magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By optimizing the designing, we made a small size and low noise high-Tc DC SQUID readout electronics with the modulation frequency of 80 kHz. The white flux noise was about 30 μPHI0/√Hz when Sumitomo high-Tc DC SQUID sensor was used. We also proved mobile high-Tc DC SQUID magnetometer was feasible. By using a special compensation method, the SQUID magnetometer could keep locking when it swung about 20 degree sign in the earth field. Using this system and eddy-current nondestructive evaluation method, we successfully detected the defect in ferromagnetic material

  19. Cassini magnetometer measurements in the Jovian environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, M. K.

    2001-05-01

    M. K. Dougherty, and the Cassini magnetometer team The recent Cassini flyby of Jupiter had the spacecraft flying along the dusk flank of the magnetosphere, a region which has only been visited very briefly before during the Ulysses outbound pass. The unique Cassini flyby resulted in the spacecraft making numerous entries into the magnetosheath region as well as into the magnetosphere itself. Initial results from the magnetometer instrument will be described including information concerning the solar wind IMF, the large amount of mirror mode activity measured within the magnetosheath and incursions into the magnetosphere proper.

  20. Thin layer and nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of this text, magnetometers with sensitive elements in the form of thin cylindrical ferromagnetic layers are described. These layers are anisotropic, uniaxial, C orientated and single domains. In the second part of the text, the principles of the nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer realized at the LETI are presented. This instrument is accurate, of high efficiency, and isotropic. Very small variations in magnetic field intensity (10-7 oersteds) can be detected with a 1Hz pass band at zero frequency

  1. Flux-gate magnetometer for Mars exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Zhu, G. W.; Yu, P.; Wang, J. D.; Yu, M. F.; Li, L.; Sun, Y. Q.; Chen, S. W.; Liao, H. Z.; Zhou, B.; Feng, Y. Y.

    2008-10-01

    A micro-satellite, Yinghuo-1, would be launched with Russian spacecraft, Phobos-Grunt in October, 2009 to investigate the space environment around Mars. YH-1 and Phobos-Grunt forms a two-point measurement configuration in the Martian space environment. YH-1 and Phobos-Grunt are equipped with similar magnetic field and plasma detecting payload on two spacecraft would give some coordinated exploration around Mars. YH-1 would orbit Mars with periapsis of 800 km above the Martian surface, and apoapsis about 80000km to the center of Mars. The orbit inclination is in the range of 0~7° to the Martian equator. A flux-gate type magnetometer, with two tri-axial sensors, is developed for YH-1 spacecraft. Two sensors are mounted on one-side of the deployable solar panel with a radial separation about 45cm to function as a gradiometer to minimize the affects of platform remanence. The dynamic range of the magnetometer is +/-256nT with a 16-bit ADC converter, and the noise level is better than 0.01nT/√Hz, to measure three-component magnetic field from DC to 10Hz. Flux-gate magnetometer would work together with the Plasma Package onboard of YH-1 to investigate the Martian bow shock, magnetosheath, magnetic pileup region (MPR). A detail description of the flux-gate magnetometer is presented in this paper, with test and calibration results.

  2. Calibration of a magnetometer in combination with inertial sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Kok, Manon; Hol, Jeroen; Schön, Thomas; Gustafsson, Fredrik; Luinge, Henk

    2012-01-01

    Measurements from magnetometers and inertial sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes) can be combined to give 3D orientation estimates. In order to obtain accurate orientation estimates it is imperative that the magnetometer and inertial sensor axes are aligned and that the magnetometer is properly calibrated for both sensor errors as well as presence of magnetic distortions. In this work we derive an easy-to-use calibration algorithm that can be used to calibrate a combination of a magnetomet...

  3. Modeling and optimizing of the random atomic spin gyroscope drift based on the atomic spin gyroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Wei; Lv, Lin, E-mail: lvlinlch1990@163.com; Liu, Baiqi [School of Instrument Science and Opto-Electronics Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-11-15

    In order to improve the atom spin gyroscope's operational accuracy and compensate the random error caused by the nonlinear and weak-stability characteristic of the random atomic spin gyroscope (ASG) drift, the hybrid random drift error model based on autoregressive (AR) and genetic programming (GP) + genetic algorithm (GA) technique is established. The time series of random ASG drift is taken as the study object. The time series of random ASG drift is acquired by analyzing and preprocessing the measured data of ASG. The linear section model is established based on AR technique. After that, the nonlinear section model is built based on GP technique and GA is used to optimize the coefficients of the mathematic expression acquired by GP in order to obtain a more accurate model. The simulation result indicates that this hybrid model can effectively reflect the characteristics of the ASG's random drift. The square error of the ASG's random drift is reduced by 92.40%. Comparing with the AR technique and the GP + GA technique, the random drift is reduced by 9.34% and 5.06%, respectively. The hybrid modeling method can effectively compensate the ASG's random drift and improve the stability of the system.

  4. Quantum storage based on collective excitations in atomic ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors reviews a new protocol of quantum memory based on the quasi-pin wave excitation of the Λ systems fixed the sites of lattice. This protocol tries to avoid the disadvantage of the quantum memory scheme based on free atom ensemble, the quantum decoherence induced by the quantum leakage of collective state. Especially, authors discover a universal dynamic symmetry hidden in various ensemble based quantum storage scheme. To understand the significance of this work exactly, authors also give a brief introduction to our systematical studies on collective symmetric excitons in quantum ensemble, which is the necessary to propose the present scheme for quantum memory. (author)

  5. Demonstration of Weak Measurement Based on Atomic Spontaneous Emission

    OpenAIRE

    Shomroni, Itay; Bechler, Orel; Rosenblum, Serge; Dayan, Barak

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new type of weak measurement based on the dynamics of spontaneous emission. The pointer in our scheme is given by the Lorentzian distribution characterizing atomic exponential decay via emission of a single photon. We thus introduce weak measurement, so far demonstrated nearly exclusively with laser beams and Gaussian statistics, into the quantum regime of single emitters and single quanta, enabling the exploitation of a wide class of sources that are abundant in nature. We d...

  6. Radiation tolerance of a spin-dependent tunnelling magnetometer for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To meet the increasing demand for miniaturized space instruments, efforts have been made to miniaturize traditional magnetometers, e.g. fluxgate and spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometers. These have, for different reasons, turned out to be difficult. New technologies are needed, and promising in this respect are tunnelling magnetoresistive (TMR) magnetometers, which are based on thin film technology. However, all new space devices first have to be qualified, particularly in terms of radiation resistance. A study on TMR magnetometers' vulnerability to radiation is crucial, considering the fact that they employ a dielectric barrier, which can be susceptible to charge trapping from ionizing radiation. Here, a TMR-based magnetometer, called the spin-dependent tunnelling magnetometer (SDTM), is presented. A magnetometer chip consisting of three Wheatstone bridges, with an angular pitch of 120°, was fabricated using microstructure technology. Each branch of the Wheatstone bridges consists of eight pairs of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) connected in series. Two such chips are used to measure the three-dimensional magnetic field vector. To investigate the SDTM's resistance to radiation, one branch of a Wheatstone bridge was irradiated with gamma rays from a Co60 source with a dose rate of 10.9 rad min−1 to a total dose of 100 krad. The TMR of the branch was monitored in situ, and the easy axis TMR loop and low-frequency noise characteristics of a single MTJ were acquired before and after irradiation with the total dose. It was concluded that radiation did not influence the MTJs in any noticeable way in terms of the TMR ratio, coercivity, magnetostatic coupling or low-frequency noise

  7. Ultrasensitive 3He magnetometer for measurements of high magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Nikiel, A.; Blümler, P.; Heil, W.; Hehn, M.; Karpuk, S.; Maul, A.; Otten, E.; Schreiber, L. M.; Terekhov, M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 3He magnetometer capable to measure high magnetic fields (B > 0.1 Tesla) with a relative accuracy of better than 10^-12. Our approach is based on the measurement of the free induction decay of gaseous, nuclear spin polarized 3He following a resonant radio frequency pulse excitation. The measurement sensitivity can be attributed to the long coherent spin precession time T2* being of order minutes which is achieved for spherical sample cells in the regime of motional narrowing whe...

  8. Propagation of interplanetary shock excited ultra low frequency (ULF) waves in magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere——Multi-spacecraft “Cluster” and ground-based magnetometer observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The ultra low frequency (ULF) wave in magnetosphere can act as an important means for solar wind energy inward transmission.This paper quantitatively analyzes the propagation process of the ULF wave triggered by the interplanetary shock propagating from inner magnetosphere equatorial plane along magnetic field lines to the top of the ionosphere and below ionosphere propagating process and establishes a relatively complete magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere propagation model which can be used to study the relationship between the amplitude of the ULF waves triggered by the interplanetary shock wave in magnetospheric space and the magnetic effect caused by the ULF waves.After a comparison with recent observations,we found that: in the event during November 7,2004 that an interplanetary shock wave interacted with the magnetosphere,Cluster satellites observed that electric field fluctuations and the band-pass filtered result of ground stations meridional component had similar characteristics.Comparing with the geomagnetic measurement near the footprints,we found that the electric field disturbance in the magnetosphere spread along the ground magnetic field lines in the form of the ULF waves and changed into geomagnetic disturbance.The result reveals that the ULF wave is in contact with the ground geomagnetic observation.The ULF waves couple with ionized components in ionosphere and spread to the ground in the form of electromagnetic waves.In this research,we believe that the magnetosphere,ionosphere and ground magnetic effects caused by interplanetary shock wave are the same physical phenomena responding in different locations.Based on the overall consideration of entire electromagnetic response to the interplanetary shock wave,we found that the correlation between CLUSTER multi-satellite observation and geomagnetic station observation is due to the ULF wave propagated in magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere system,and we quantitatively interpreted this response

  9. Predicting activity approach based on new atoms similarity kernel function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Atta, Ahmed H; Moussa, M I; Hassanien, Aboul Ella

    2015-07-01

    Drug design is a high cost and long term process. To reduce time and costs for drugs discoveries, new techniques are needed. Chemoinformatics field implements the informational techniques and computer science like machine learning and graph theory to discover the chemical compounds properties, such as toxicity or biological activity. This is done through analyzing their molecular structure (molecular graph). To overcome this problem there is an increasing need for algorithms to analyze and classify graph data to predict the activity of molecules. Kernels methods provide a powerful framework which combines machine learning with graph theory techniques. These kernels methods have led to impressive performance results in many several chemoinformatics problems like biological activity prediction. This paper presents a new approach based on kernel functions to solve activity prediction problem for chemical compounds. First we encode all atoms depending on their neighbors then we use these codes to find a relationship between those atoms each other. Then we use relation between different atoms to find similarity between chemical compounds. The proposed approach was compared with many other classification methods and the results show competitive accuracy with these methods. PMID:26117822

  10. Polarizable Atomic Multipole-based Molecular Mechanics for Organic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Pengyu; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W

    2011-10-11

    An empirical potential based on permanent atomic multipoles and atomic induced dipoles is reported for alkanes, alcohols, amines, sulfides, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, amides, aromatics and other small organic molecules. Permanent atomic multipole moments through quadrupole moments have been derived from gas phase ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The van der Waals parameters are obtained by fitting to gas phase homodimer QM energies and structures, as well as experimental densities and heats of vaporization of neat liquids. As a validation, the hydrogen bonding energies and structures of gas phase heterodimers with water are evaluated using the resulting potential. For 32 homo- and heterodimers, the association energy agrees with ab initio results to within 0.4 kcal/mol. The RMS deviation of hydrogen bond distance from QM optimized geometry is less than 0.06 Å. In addition, liquid self-diffusion and static dielectric constants computed from molecular dynamics simulation are consistent with experimental values. The force field is also used to compute the solvation free energy of 27 compounds not included in the parameterization process, with a RMS error of 0.69 kcal/mol. The results obtained in this study suggest the AMOEBA force field performs well across different environments and phases. The key algorithms involved in the electrostatic model and a protocol for developing parameters are detailed to facilitate extension to additional molecular systems. PMID:22022236

  11. Portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fan; Yang, Renfu; Nian, Feng; Zhang, Zhenwei; Cui, Yongshun; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Nuanrang; Feng, Keming

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping is designed and demonstrated. To achieve a portable prototype, in the system, a single transverse mode 795nm VCSEL modulated by a 3.4GHz RF source is used as a pump laser which generates coherent light fields. The pump beams pass through a vapor cell containing atom gas and buffer gas. This vapor cell is surrounded by a magnetic shield and placed inside a solenoid which applies a longitudinal magnetic field to lift the Zeeman energy levels' degeneracy and to separate the resonance signal, which has no first-order magnetic field dependence, from the field-dependent resonances. The electrical control system comprises two control loops. The first one locks the laser wavelength to the minimum of the absorption spectrum; the second one locks the modulation frequency and output standard frequency. Furthermore, we designed the micro physical package and realized the locking of a coherent population trapping atomic frequency standard portable prototype successfully. The short-term frequency stability of the whole system is measured to be 6×10-11 for averaging times of 1s, and reaches 5×10-12 at an averaging time of 1000s.

  12. A Web Server for MACCS Magnetometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretson, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG5-3719 was provided to Augsburg College to support the development of a web server for the Magnetometer Array for Cusp and Cleft Studies (MACCS), a two-dimensional array of fluxgate magnetometers located at cusp latitudes in Arctic Canada. MACCS was developed as part of the National Science Foundation's GEM (Geospace Environment Modeling) Program, which was designed in part to complement NASA's Global Geospace Science programs during the decade of the 1990s. This report describes the successful use of these grant funds to support a working web page that provides both daily plots and file access to any user accessing the worldwide web. The MACCS home page can be accessed at http://space.augsburg.edu/space/MaccsHome.html.

  13. Superconducting Nanobridge SQUID Magnetometer for Spin Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Antler, Natania

    2014-01-01

    As the cutting edge of science and technology pushes towards smaller length scales, sensing technologies with nanoscale precision become increasingly important. In this thesis I will discuss the optimization and application of a 3D nanobridge SQUID magnetometer for studying solid state spin systems, in particular for sensing impurity spins in diamond. Solid state spins have proposed applications in memory and computation for both classical and quantum computing. Isolated spins typically have ...

  14. An All-atom Structure-Based Potential for Proteins: Bridging Minimal Models with All-atom Empirical Forcefields

    OpenAIRE

    Whitford, Paul C.; Jeffrey K Noel; Gosavi, Shachi; Schug, Alexander; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y.; Onuchic, José N.

    2009-01-01

    Protein dynamics take place on many time and length scales. Coarse-grained structure-based (Gō) models utilize the funneled energy landscape theory of protein folding to provide an understanding of both long time and long length scale dynamics. All-atom empirical forcefields with explicit solvent can elucidate our understanding of short time dynamics with high energetic and structural resolution. Thus, structure-based models with atomic details included can be used to bridge our understanding...

  15. Sub-fT/Hz1/2 resolution and field-stable SQUID magnetometer based on low parasitic capacitance sub-micrometer cross-type Josephson tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the development of low parasitic capacitance sub-micrometer cross-type Josephson tunnel junctions for their use in highly sensitive and field-stable SQUID magnetometers. The potential of such junctions is shown on I-V characteristics as well as on Fraunhofer diffraction patterns. The evaluation of Fiske steps lead to a specific junction capacitance of about 62 fF/μm2 for a critical current density of about 1.7 kA/cm2. The avoidance of any idle-region - the undesired overlap between superconducting electrodes around the junction - due to a self-aligned junction definition process lead to highly sensitive SQUIDs; multiloop SQUID magnetometers exhibiting exceptionally low magnetic field noise levels as low as 0.3 fT/Hz1/2, as well as large usable voltage swings of more than 150 μVpp. Furthermore, junction dimensions in the sub-micrometer range allowed for very high tolerable background fields during cool-down of up to 6.5 mT. In operation mode, the SQUID magnetometers recovered completely from magnetization pulses of up to 76 mT. With respect to their easy and reliable usage as well as their high sensitivity, the presented SQUID sensors are adequate for many applications, like in geophysics, biomagnetism or low-field magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Nonclassically paired photons from sources based on cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głódź, Małgorzata; Janowicz, Maciej; Kowalski, Krzysztof; Szonert, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    In this short review some essentials concerning creation and testing of nonclassically correlated photons (biphotons) are given. In the introduction we remind the role which the experimentally produced entangled states have been playing for the foundations of the quantum physics, by witnessing against the model of local hidden variables. The well established sources of biphotons are based on spontaneous parametric down conversion in nonlinear crystals. A popular source with two BBO crystals is described, which generates pairs of photons nearly maximally entangled in polarization. Crystalbased sources rely on intrinsically broadband transitions, therefore thus produced biphotons are also broadband. Additional efforts (like applying optical cavities) are needed to reach narrowband biphotons which would comply with the requirements of some implementations in the quantum communication science. The topical issue of our article is a review of another, more recent approaches based on narrowband transitions between levels in cold atoms. Such method provides naturally narrowband biphotons. First, the principles are given of an atomic source of nonclassically paired photons, which is operated in a pulsed write-read mode. Such source is based on two separated in time Raman transitions triggered successively in two Λ-schemes. Next, cw-mode sources based (mainly) on spontaneous four wave mixing process (SFWM) are presented in a generic four-level scheme. Some underlying physics is sketched and profiles of biphoton correlation functions in the time domain are explained. Among other presented SFWM sources, one proves in testing high degree entanglement of generated biphotons, both in time-frequency and polarization (hyperentanglement).

  17. Atom Nanooptics Based on Photon Dots and Photon Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Balykin, V. I.; Klimov, V.V; Letokhov, V. S.

    2003-01-01

    New types of light fields localized in nanometer-sized regions of space were suggested and analyzed. The possibility of using these nanolocalized fields in atom optics for atom focusing and localization is discussed.

  18. On the control of magnetic perturbing field onboard landers: the Magnetometer Protection program for the ESA ExoMars/Humboldt MSMO magnetometer experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menvielle, M.; Primdahl, F.; Brauer, P.; Falkenberg, T. V.; Jensen, P. A.; Merayo, J. M.; Vennerstrom, S.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetic field observations at a planetary surface have a wide potential of scientific applications, ranging from processes in the dynamic interaction between the planet environment and the solar wind, to determining the structure and thermal evolution of the interior of the planet as well as characterizing its sub-surface. Magnetic fields are generated by electric currents in the planetary space environment, induced currents in the planetary interior and possibly remanent magnetism. In consequence, hardly any other single physical quantity can be used in such a variety of studies related to planetary research. The major difficulty in implementing a magnetometer experiment onboard a lander is to achieve at acceptable costs a good Magnetometer Protection, namely to control the perturbing magnetic field generated by the lander during operations at the planetary surface, so as to achieve the least magnetic contamination of the magnetometer data by lander generated magnetic perturbations, and thus the best possible magnetic signal to magnetic noise ratio, thus ensuring the best possible magnetometer experiment science return. The purpose of this talk is to show that simple and non-expensive solutions enable one to limit the intensity of lander generated perturbing magnetic fields to levels that are compliant with the science based measurement requirements. The presented solutions are based upon ‘best effort' to being critically concerned with magnetic noise reduction, with emphasis on good and simple engineering techniques enabling minimization of and control over the magnetic perturbations at the magnetometer sensor during the surface operations phase. The presentation deals with the case history of the ongoing preparation of the MSMO magnetometer experiment, which is part the Humboldt scientific payload in the frame of the ESA ExoMars mission. Experience from previous missions constitutes the background for the MSMO Magnetometer Protection strategy. DC and AC

  19. Atomic Structures of Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) and its Reduced Form with Bond Lengths Based on Additivity of Atomic Radii

    CERN Document Server

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown recently that chemical bond lengths, in general, like those in the components of nucleic acids, caffeine related compounds, all essential amino acids, methane, benzene, graphene and fullerene are sums of the radii of adjacent atoms constituting the bond. Earlier, the crystal ionic distances in all alkali halides and lengths of many partially ionic bonds were also accounted for by the additivity of ionic as well as covalent radii. Here, the atomic structures of riboflavin and its reduced form are presented based on the additivity of the same set of atomic radii as for other biological molecules.

  20. Miniaturized superconducting quantum interference magnetometers for high sensitivity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, C.; Vettoliere, A.; Russo, M.

    2007-09-01

    A miniaturized niobium based dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer for high magnetic field sensitivity applications has been developed. The sensing coil consists of an integrated square superconducting coil with a length of 3mm, involving a device area much smaller with respect to the standard SQUID magnetometers with a comparable magnetic field sensitivity; so it allows increasing the spatial resolution keeping the magnetic field sensitivity unaltered. Furthermore, a small pickup coil minimizes its antenna gain, reducing the radio frequency interference. At T =4.2K, the sensors have shown smooth and resonance free V-Φ characteristics and an intrinsic white magnetic field noise spectral density as low as 5.8fT /Hz1/2, measured in flux locked loop configuration. The good agreement with the theoretical predictions guarantees the reliability and the controllability of the sensors. Due to their compactness and good characteristic parameters, such sensors are suitable for large multichannel systems used in biomagnetic imaging.

  1. Atomic force microscope probe-based nanometric scribing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniaturization of machine components is recognized by many as a significant technological development for a vast spectrum of products. An atomic force microscope (AFM) probe that can exert forces onto a variety of engineering materials is used to perform mechanical scribing at the nanoscale. The success of nanomechanical machining at such fine scales is based on the understanding of microstructural machining mechanics. This paper investigates the cutting behaviour in the nanoscale of a chromium workpiece by using a retrofitted commercial AFM with an acoustic emission sensor, in order to scratch the surface and measure forces. The calibration procedure for acquiring the forces is discussed. The cutting force model, which incorporates the flow stress and friction coefficient in the nano-scale machining, is also presented

  2. Development of autonomous magnetometer rotorcraft for wide area assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelof Versteeg; Matt Anderson; Les Beard; Eric Corban; Darryl Curley; Jeff Gamey; Ross Johnson; Dwight Junkin; Mark McKay; Jared Salzmann; Mikhail Tchernychev; Suraj Unnikrishnan; Scott Vinson

    2010-04-01

    Large areas across the United States are potentially contaminated with UXO, with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with 1) near 100 % coverage and 2) near 100 % detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area assessment is a multi-level one, in which medium - altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry. Subsequent to this wide area assessment targeted surface investigations are performed using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be an effective tool for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 – 3 meters. These altitude requirements mean that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys (resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre). In addition, due to the low altitude there are substantial risks to pilots and equipment. Surface towed arrays provide high resolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. There is thus a need for other systems which can be used for effective data collection. An UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it reduces risk to operators, is lower in initial and Operational and Maintenance (O&M) costs (and can thus potentially be applied to smaller sites) and has the potential of being more effective in terms of detection and possibly characterization (through the use of

  3. Juno Magnetometer Observations in the Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E.; Oliversen, R. J.; Espley, J. R.; MacDowall, R. J.; Schnurr, R.; Sheppard, D.; Odom, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Joergensen, J. L.; Joergensen, P. S.; Merayo, J. M.; Denver, T.; Bloxham, J.; Smith, E. J.; Murphy, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Juno spacecraft enjoyed a close encounter with Earth on October 9, 2013, en route to Jupiter Orbit Insertion (JOI) on July 5, 2016. The Earth Flyby (EFB) provided a unique opportunity for the Juno particles and fields instruments to sample mission relevant environments and exercise operations anticipated for orbital operations at Jupiter, particularly the period of intense activity around perijove. The magnetic field investigation onboard Juno is equipped with two magnetometer sensor suites, located at 10 and 12 m from the spacecraft body at the end of one of the three solar panel wings. Each contains a vector fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) sensor and a pair of co-located non-magnetic star tracker camera heads which provide accurate attitude determination for the FGM sensors. This very capable magnetic observatory sampled the Earth's magnetic field at 64 vector samples/second throughout passage through the Earth's magnetosphere. We present observations of the Earth's magnetic field and magnetosphere obtained throughout the encounter and compare these observations with those of other Earth-orbiting assets, as available, and with particles and fields observations acquired by other Juno instruments operated during EFB.

  4. Laser-driven optically-pumped Cs magnetometer array for a nEDM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Standard Model of Particle Physics predicts a static electric dipole moment for the neutron (nEDM) breaking time reversal and parity symmetry. This prediction is several orders of magnitude below the current best experimental limit dn -26 ecm (90 % CL). We are currently setting up a new experiment at the new ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source at the Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland, with the ultimate goal to improve the sensitivity limit by almost two orders of magnitude. Besides passive and active compensation of external magnetic fields we will use an array of laser-driven optically-pumped atomic cesium magnetometers to control and monitor the stability and homogeneity of the magnetic field at the neutron precession chamber. A first array of eight cesium magnetometers was used to obtain the field distribution and stability over the neutron precession volume on a sub-pT level. The setup and first results are presented.

  5. Cesium magnetometers for the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the most important experiments in particle physics is the hunt for an EDM of a neutron. To achieve sensitivities to EDMs of a few times 10-28 e.cm, the magnetic field, including its spatial gradients, has to be precisely measured and controlled. To provide the required sensitivity of magnetic field measurements at the <100fT/√(Hz) level, a system of optically-pumped atomic Cs magnetometers has been developed at Fribourg University. The Cs sensor itself is a spherical, paraffin-coated and evacuated glass cell containing Cs vapour at room temperature. The present magnetometer system consists of 8 vacuum compatible and four vacuum and high voltage compatible sensors. The system is in constant evolution to adapt it to the operating environment of the nEDM experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institut. In this contribution, the current solutions and results of magnetic field measurements will be presented. (author)

  6. Cavity-based single atom preparation and high-fidelity hyperfine state readout

    OpenAIRE

    Gehr R.; Volz J.; Dubois G.; Steinmetz T.; Colombe Y.; Lev B.L.; Long R.; Esteve J.; Reichel J.

    2010-01-01

    We prepare and detect the hyperfine state of a single 87Rb atom coupled to a fiber-based high finesse cavity on an atom chip. The atom is extracted from a Bose-Einstein condensate and trapped at the maximum of the cavity field, resulting in a reproducibly strong atom-cavity coupling. We use the cavity reflection and transmission signal to infer the atomic hyperfine state with a fidelity exceeding 99.92% in a read-out time of 100 microseconds. The atom is still trapped after detection.

  7. Compact atomic clock prototype based on coherent population trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danet Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toward the next generations of compact atomic clocks, clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT offer a very interesting alternative. Thanks to CPT, a quantum interfering process, this technology has made a decisive step in the miniaturization direction. Fractional frequency stability of 1.5x10-10 at 1 s has been demonstrated in commercial devices of a few cm3. The laboratory prototype presented here intends to explore what could be the ultimate stability of a CPT based device. To do so, an original double-Λ optical scheme and a pulsed interrogation have been implemented in order to get a good compromise between contrast and linewidth. A study of two main sources of noise, the relative intensity and the local oscillator (LO noise, has been performed. By designing simple solutions, it led to a new fractional frequency limitation lower than 4x10-13 at 1 s integration. Such a performance proves that such a technology could rival with classical ones as double resonance clocks.

  8. Atomic structures of Zr-based metallic glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUI XiDong; LIU Xiongdun; GAO Rui; HOU HuaiYu; FANG HuaZhi; LIU ZiKui; CHEN GuoLiang

    2008-01-01

    The atomic structures of Zr-Ni and Zr-Ti-Al-Cu-Ni metallic glasses were investigated by using classical molecular dynamic (MD), reverse Monte Carlo (RMC), ab initio MD (AIMD) simulations and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. We focused on the short-range order (SRO) and medium-range order (MRO) in the glassy structure. It is shown that there are icosahedral, FCC- and BCC-type SROs in the Zr-based metallic glasses. A structural model, characterized by imperfect ordered packing (IOP), was proposed based on the MD simulation and confirmed by the HRTEM observation. Furthermore, the evolution from lOP to nanocrystal during the crystallization of metallic glasses was also ex-plored. It is found that the growth from IOP to nanocrystal proceeds through three distinct stages: the formation of quasi-ordered structure with one-dimensional (1 D) periodicity, then 2D periodicity, and finally the formation of 3D nanocrystals. It is also noted that these three growth steps are crosslinked.

  9. Atomic structures of Zr-based metallic glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The atomic structures of Zr-Ni and Zr-Ti-Al-Cu-Ni metallic glasses were investigated by using classical molecular dynamic (MD),reverse Monte Carlo (RMC),ab initio MD (AIMD) simulations and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. We focused on the short-range order (SRO) and medium-range order (MRO) in the glassy structure. It is shown that there are icosahedral,FCC-and BCC-type SROs in the Zr-based metallic glasses. A structural model,characterized by imperfect ordered packing (IOP),was proposed based on the MD simulation and confirmed by the HRTEM observation. Furthermore,the evolution from IOP to nanocrystal during the crystallization of metallic glasses was also ex-plored. It is found that the growth from IOP to nanocrystal proceeds through three distinct stages: the formation of quasi-ordered structure with one-dimensional (1D) periodicity,then 2D periodicity,and finally the formation of 3D nanocrystals. It is also noted that these three growth steps are crosslinked.

  10. Calibration of the Ørsted vector magnetometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Sabaka, T.J.;

    2003-01-01

    The vector fluxgate magnetometer of the Orsted satellite is routinely calibrated by comparing its output with measurements of the absolute magnetic intensity from the Overhauser instrument, which is the second magnetometer of the satellite. We describe the method used for and the result obtained in...

  11. Performance Improvement of Inertial Navigation System by Using Magnetometer with Vehicle Dynamic Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehee Won

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A navigation algorithm is proposed to increase the inertial navigation performance of a ground vehicle using magnetic measurements and dynamic constraints. The navigation solutions are estimated based on inertial measurements such as acceleration and angular velocity measurements. To improve the inertial navigation performance, a three-axis magnetometer is used to provide the heading angle, and nonholonomic constraints (NHCs are introduced to increase the correlation between the velocity and the attitude equation. The NHCs provide a velocity feedback to the attitude, which makes the navigation solution more robust. Additionally, an acceleration-based roll and pitch estimation is applied to decrease the drift when the acceleration is within certain boundaries. The magnetometer and NHCs are combined with an extended Kalman filter. An experimental test was conducted to verify the proposed method, and a comprehensive analysis of the performance in terms of the position, velocity, and attitude showed that the navigation performance could be improved by using the magnetometer and NHCs. Moreover, the proposed method could improve the estimation performance for the position, velocity, and attitude without any additional hardware except an inertial sensor and magnetometer. Therefore, this method would be effective for ground vehicles, indoor navigation, mobile robots, vehicle navigation in urban canyons, or navigation in any global navigation satellite system-denied environment.

  12. Ultrasensitive 3He magnetometer for measurements of high magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Nikiel, A; Heil, W; Hehn, M; Karpuk, S; Maul, A; Otten, E; Schreiber, L M; Terekhov, M

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 3He magnetometer capable to measure high magnetic fields (B > 0.1 Tesla) with a relative accuracy of better than 10^-12. Our approach is based on the measurement of the free induction decay of gaseous, nuclear spin polarized 3He following a resonant radio frequency pulse excitation. The measurement sensitivity can be attributed to the long coherent spin precession time T2* being of order minutes which is achieved for spherical sample cells in the regime of motional narrowing where the disturbing influence of field inhomogeneities is strongly suppressed. The 3He gas is spin polarized in-situ using a new, non-standard variant of the metastability exchange optical pumping. We show that miniaturization helps to increase T2* further and that the measurement sensitivity is not significantly affected by temporal field fluctuations of order 10^-4.

  13. Ultrasensitive 3He magnetometer for measurements of high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiel, Anna; Blümler, Peter; Heil, Werner; Hehn, Manfred; Karpuk, Sergej; Maul, Andreas; Otten, Ernst; Schreiber, Laura M.; Terekhov, Maxim

    2014-11-01

    We describe a 3He magnetometer capable to measure high magnetic fields ( B> 0.1 T) with a relative accuracy of better than 10-12. Our approach is based on the measurement of the free induction decay of gaseous, nuclear spin polarized 3He following a resonant radio frequency pulse excitation. The measurement sensitivity can be attributed to the long coherent spin precession time T2 ∗ being of order minutes which is achieved for spherical sample cells in the regime of "motional narrowing" where the disturbing influence of field inhomogeneities is strongly suppressed. The 3He gas is spin polarized in situ using a new, non-standard variant of the metastability exchange optical pumping. We show that miniaturization helps to increase T2 ∗ further and that the measurement sensitivity is not significantly affected by temporal field fluctuations of order 10-4.

  14. Atomic force microscopy-based shape analysis of heart mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become an important medical and biological tool for the noninvasive imaging of cells and biomaterials in medical, biological, and biophysical research. The major advantages of AFM over conventional optical and electron microscopes for bio-imaging include the facts that no special coating is required and that imaging can be done in all environments-air, vacuum, or aqueous conditions. In addition, it can also precisely determine pico-nano Newton force interactions between the probe tip and the sample surface from force-distance curve measurements.It is widely known that mitochondrial swelling is one of the most important indicators of the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. As mitochondrial swelling is an ultrastructural change, quantitative analysis of this change requires high-resolution microscopic methods such as AFM. Here, we describe the use of AFM-based shape analysis for the characterization of nanostructural changes in heart mitochondria resulting from myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25634291

  15. Knowledge Representation in KDD Based on Linguistic Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李德毅

    1997-01-01

    An important issue in Knowledge Discovery in Databases is to allo the discovered knowledge to be as close as possible to natural languages to satisfy user needs with tractability on one hand,and to offer KDD systems robustness on the other hand.At this junction,this paper describes a new concept of linguistic atoms with three digital characteristics:expected value Ex,entropy En,anddeviation D.The mathematical description has effectively integrated the fuzziness and randomness of linguistic terms in a unified way.Based on this model a method of knowledge representation in KDD is developed which bridges the gap between quantitative knowledge and qualitative knowledge.Mapping between quantitatives and qualitatives becomes much easier and interchangeable.In order to discover generalized knowledge from a database,one may use virtual linguistic terms and cloud transforms for the auto-generation of concept hierarchies to attributes.Predictive data mining with the cloud model is given for implementation.This further illustrates the advantages of this linguistic model in KDD.

  16. Magnetometer for Balloons and UAVs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR project will investigate a new, low-cost approach to atomic magnetometry that is suited for operation from UAVs and research balloons. Atomic...

  17. The AUTUMNX magnetometer meridian chain in Québec, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Martin; Schofield, Ian; Reiter, Kyle; Chi, Peter J.; Rowe, Kathryn M.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-01-01

    The AUTUMNX magnetometer array consists of 10 THEMIS-class ground-based magnetometers deployed to form a meridian chain on the eastern coast of Hudson Bay in eastern Canada, a second partial chain one hour of magnetic local time further east, and one magnetometer at an intermediate midlatitude site. These instruments, augmented by those of other arrays, permit good latitudinal coverage through the auroral zone on two meridians, some midlatitude coverage, and detection of magnetic field changes near the sensitive infrastructure of the Hydro-Québec power grid. Further, they offer the possibility for conjugate studies with Antarctica and the GOES East geosynchronous satellite, and complement the Chinese International Space Weather Meridian Circle Program. We examine current world distribution of magnetometers to show the need for AUTUMNX, and describe the instrumentation which allows near-real-time monitoring. We present magnetic inversion results for the disturbed day February 17, 2015, which showed classic signatures of the substorm current wedge, and developed into steady magnetospheric convection (SMC). For a separate event later that day, we examine a large and rapid magnetic field change event associated with an unusual near-Earth transient. We show GOES East conjugacy for these events.

  18. Spin Squeezing and Entanglement with Room Temperature Atoms for Quantum Sensing and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Heng

    magnetometer at room temperature is reported. Furthermore, using spin-squeezing of atomic ensemble, the sensitivity of magnetometer is improved. Deterministic continuous variable teleportation between two distant atomic ensembles is demonstrated. The fidelity of teleportating dynamically changing sequence of...... spin states surpasses a classical benchmark, demonstrating the true quantum teleportation....

  19. Atom-based coherent quantum-noise cancellation in optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Bariani, F; Singh, S; Vengalattore, M; Meystre, P

    2015-01-01

    We analyze a quantum force sensor that uses coherent quantum noise cancellation (CQNC) to beat the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL). This sensor, which allows for the continuous, broad-band detection of feeble forces, is a hybrid dual-cavity system comprised of a mesoscopic mechanical resonator optically coupled to an ensemble of ultracold atoms. In contrast to the stringent constraints on dissipation typically associated with purely optical schemes of CQNC, the dissipation rate of the mechanical resonator only needs to be matched to the decoherence rate of the atomic ensemble -- a condition that is experimentally achievable even for the technologically relevant regime of low frequency mechanical resonators with large quality factors. The modular nature of the system further allows the atomic ensemble to aid in the cooling of the mechanical resonator, thereby combining atom-mediated state preparation with sensing deep in the quantum regime.

  20. Atom devices based on single dopants in silicon nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jablonski Ryszard

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Silicon field-effect transistors have now reached gate lengths of only a few tens of nanometers, containing a countable number of dopants in the channel. Such technological trend brought us to a research stage on devices working with one or a few dopant atoms. In this work, we review our most recent studies on key atom devices with fundamental structures of silicon-on-insulator MOSFETs, such as single-dopant transistors, preliminary memory devices, single-electron turnstile devices and photonic devices, in which electron tunneling mediated by single dopant atoms is the essential transport mechanism. Furthermore, observation of individual dopant potential in the channel by Kelvin probe force microscopy is also presented. These results may pave the way for the development of a new device technology, i.e., single-dopant atom electronics.

  1. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz1/2, which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield

  2. Optimization of dc SQUID voltmeter and magnetometer circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the signal-to-noise ratio in a dc SQUID system as a function of source impedance, taking into account the effects of current and voltage noise sources in the SQUID. The optimization of both tuned and untuned volmeters and magnetometers is discussed and typical sensitivities are predicted using calculated noise spectra. The calculations are based on an ideal symmetric dc SQUID with β=2LI0/Phi0=1 and moderate noise rounding (GAMMA=2k/sub B/T/I0Phi0=0.05), where Phi0 is the flux quantum, T is the temperature, L is the SQUID inductance, and I0 is the critical current of each junction. The optimum noise temperatures of tuned and untuned voltmeters are found to be 2.8(ωL/R) T and 8(ωL/R) T (1+1.5α2 +0.7α4)/sup 1/2//α2 respectively, where ω/2π is the signal frequency, assumed to be much less than the Josephson frequency, and α is the coupling coefficient between the SQUID and its input coil. It is found that tuned and untuned magnetometers can be characterized by optimum effective signal energies given by (16k/sub B/TLB/α2R)[1+1l5α2 +0.7α2)/sup 1/2/+0.75α2] and 2k/sub B/T/sub i/R/sub i/B/ω2L/sub p/ respectively, where B is the bandwidth, R/sub i/ is the resistance representing the losses in the tuned circuit at temperture T/sub i/, and L/sub p/ is the inductance of the pickup coil

  3. Search Coil vs. Fluxgate Magnetometer Measurements at Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L.B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present magnetic field observations at interplanetary shocks comparing two different sample rates showing significantly different results. Fluxgate magnetometer measurements show relatively laminar supercritical shock transitions at roughly 11 samples/s. Search coil magnetometer measurements at 1875 samples/s, however, show large amplitude (dB/B as large as 2) fluctuations that are not resolved by the fluxgate magnetometer. We show that these fluctuations, identified as whistler mode waves, would produce a significant perturbation to the shock transition region changing the interpretation from laminar to turbulent. Thus, previous observations of supercritical interplanetary shocks classified as laminar may have been under sampled.

  4. Sensitivity and spatial resolution of square loop SQUID magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the flux threading the pick-up coil of a square SQUID magnetometer in the presence of a current dipole source. The result reproduces that of a circle coil magnetometer calculated by Wikswo [J.P. Wikswo, AIP Conf. Proc. 44 (1978) 145] with only small differences. However it has a simpler form so that it is possible to derive from it closed form expressions for the current dipole sensitivity and the spatial resolution. The results are useful to assess the overall performance of the device and allow the comparison of magnetometers with different detection coil size

  5. Self-Compensating Excitation of Fluxgate Sensors for Space Magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerman, Alec; Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter;

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents design and implementation of the new self-compensating excitation circuitry to the new generation of high-precise space vector magnetometers. The application starts with complex study including design of new robust model of the non-linear inductor leading to investigation...... of the most crucial points, continuous by design of the self-compensating excitation unit and concludes with unit complex testing and application to the magnetometer. The application of the self-compensation of the excitation decreases temperature drift of the magnetometer offset caused by the temperature...

  6. Analysing harmonic motions with an iPhone’s magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Ahmet; Kağan Temiz, Burak

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose an experiment for analysing harmonic motion using an iPhone’s (or iPad’s) magnetometer. This experiment consists of the detection of magnetic field variations obtained from an iPhone’s magnetometer sensor. A graph of harmonic motion is directly displayed on the iPhone’s screen using the Sensor Kinetics application. Data from this application was analysed with Eureqa software to establish the equation of the harmonic motion. Analyses show that the use of an iPhone’s magnetometer to analyse harmonic motion is a practical and effective method for small oscillations and frequencies less than 15–20 Hz.

  7. An atom counting and electrophilicity based QSTR approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Chattara; D R Roy; S Giri; S Mukherjee; V Subramanian; R Parthasarathi; P Bultinck; S Van Damme

    2007-09-01

    Quantitative-structure-toxicity-relationship (QSTR) models are developed for predicting the toxicity (pIGC50) of 252 aliphatic compounds on Tetrahymena pyriformis. The single parameter models with a simple molecular descriptor, the number of atoms in the molecule, provide reasonable results. Better QSTR models with two parameters result when global electrophilicity is used as the second descriptor. In order to tackle both charge- and frontier-controlled reactions the importance of the local electro (nucleo) philicities and atomic charges is also analysed.

  8. Holographic optical traps for atom-based topological Kondo devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccheri, F.; Bruce, G. D.; Trombettoni, A.; Cassettari, D.; Babujian, H.; Korepin, V. E.; Sodano, P.

    2016-07-01

    The topological Kondo (TK) model has been proposed in solid-state quantum devices as a way to realize non-Fermi liquid behaviors in a controllable setting. Another motivation behind the TK model proposal is the demand to demonstrate the quantum dynamical properties of Majorana fermions, which are at the heart of their potential use in topological quantum computation. Here we consider a junction of crossed Tonks–Girardeau gases arranged in a star-geometry (forming a Y-junction), and we perform a theoretical analysis of this system showing that it provides a physical realization of the TK model in the realm of cold atom systems. Using computer-generated holography, we experimentally implement a Y-junction suitable for atom trapping, with controllable and independent parameters. The junction and the transverse size of the atom waveguides are of the order of 5 μm, leading to favorable estimates for the Kondo temperature and for the coupling across the junction. Since our results show that all the required theoretical and experimental ingredients are available, this provides the demonstration of an ultracold atom device that may in principle exhibit the TK effect.

  9. Accelerometer for Space Applications Based on Light-Pulse Atom Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to build a compact, high-precision single-axis accelerometer based on atom interferometry that is applicable to operation in space environments. Based on...

  10. Automatic parameterization for magnetometer zero offset determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Pudney

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In-situ magnetic field measurements are of critical importance in understanding how the Sun creates and controls the heliosphere. To ensure the measurements are accurate, it is necessary to track the combined slowly-varying spacecraft magnetic field and magnetometer zero offset – the systematic error in the sensor measurements. For a 3-axis stabilised spacecraft, in-flight correction of zero offsets primarily relies on the use of Alfvénic rotations in the magnetic field. We present a method to automatically determine a key parameter related to the ambient compressional variance of the signal (which determines the selection criteria for identifying clear Alfvénic rotations. We apply our method to different solar wind conditions, performing a statistical analysis of the data periods required to achieve a 70% chance of calculating an offset using Helios datasets. We find that 70% of 40 min data periods in regions of fast solar wind possess sufficient rotational content to calculate an offset. To achieve the same 70% calculation probability in regions of slow solar wind requires data periods of 2 h duration. We also find that 40 min data periods at perihelion compared to 1 h and 40 min data periods at aphelion are required to achieve the same 70% calculation probability. We compare our method with previous work that uses a fixed parameter approach and demonstrate an improvement in the calculation probability of up to 10% at aphelion and 5% at perihelion.

  11. Automatic parameterization for magnetometer zero offset determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Pudney

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In-situ magnetic field measurements are of critical importance in understanding how the Sun creates and controls the heliosphere. To ensure the measurements are accurate, it is necessary to track the combined slowly varying spacecraft magnetic field and magnetometer zero offset – the systematic error in the sensor measurements. For a 3-axis stabilised spacecraft, in-flight correction of zero offsets primarily relies on the use of Alfvénic rotations in the magnetic field. We present a method to automatically determine a key parameter related to the ambient compressional variance of the signal (which determines the selection criteria for identifying clear Alfvénic rotations. We apply our method to different solar wind conditions, performing a statistical analysis of the data periods required to achieve a 70% chance of calculating an offset using Helios datasets. We find that 70% of 40 min data periods in regions of fast solar wind possess sufficient rotational content to calculate an offset. To achieve the same 70% calculation probability in regions of slow solar wind requires data periods of 2 h duration. We also find that 40 min data periods at perihelion compared to 1 h and 40 min data periods at aphelion are required to achieve the same 70% calculation probability. We compare our method with previous work that uses a fixed parameter approach and demonstrate an improvement in the calculation probability of up to 10% at aphelion and 5% at perihelion.

  12. The Search-Coil Magnetometer for MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Contel, O.; Leroy, P.; Roux, A.; Coillot, C.; Alison, D.; Bouabdellah, A.; Mirioni, L.; Meslier, L.; Galic, A.; Vassal, M. C.; Torbert, R. B.; Needell, J.; Rau, D.; Dors, I.; Ergun, R. E.; Westfall, J.; Summers, D.; Wallace, J.; Magnes, W.; Valavanoglou, A.; Olsson, G.; Chutter, M.; Macri, J.; Myers, S.; Turco, S.; Nolin, J.; Bodet, D.; Rowe, K.; Tanguy, M.; de la Porte, B.

    2016-03-01

    The tri-axial search-coil magnetometer (SCM) belongs to the FIELDS instrumentation suite on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission (Torbert et al. in Space Sci. Rev. (2014), this issue). It provides the three magnetic components of the waves from 1 Hz to 6 kHz in particular in the key regions of the Earth's magnetosphere namely the subsolar region and the magnetotail. Magnetospheric plasmas being collisionless, such a measurement is crucial as the electromagnetic waves are thought to provide a way to ensure the conversion from magnetic to thermal and kinetic energies allowing local or global reconfigurations of the Earth's magnetic field. The analog waveforms provided by the SCM are digitized and processed inside the digital signal processor (DSP), within the Central Electronics Box (CEB), together with the electric field data provided by the spin-plane double probe (SDP) and the axial double probe (ADP). On-board calibration signal provided by DSP allows the verification of the SCM transfer function once per orbit. Magnetic waveforms and on-board spectra computed by DSP are available at different time resolution depending on the selected mode. The SCM design is described in details as well as the different steps of the ground and in-flight calibrations.

  13. Calibrating the Prominence Magnetometer (ProMag)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lewis; Casini, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Prominence Magnetometer (ProMag) is a dual-channel, dual-beam, slit-scanning, full Stokes spectro-polarimeter designed by the High Altitude Observatory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HAO/NCAR) for the study of the magnetism of solar prominences and filaments. It was deployed in August 2009 at the 40 cm coronagraph of the Evans Solar Facility (ESF) of the National Solar Observatory on Sacramento Peak (NSO/SP). In its standard mode of operation it acquires spectro-polarimetric maps of solar targets simultaneously in the two chromospheric lines of He I at 587.6 nm and 1083.0 nm. Since August 2011 ProMag has operated in “patrol mode” with a dedicated observer. We aim to routinely measure the vector magnetic field in prominences. The electro-optic modulator and polarization analyzer are integrated into a single mechanical unit located at the coude feed of the telescope. This location was necessary for proper co-alignment of the dual beams, but complicates the precise polarimeter calibration necessary to achieve the sensitivity required for prominence measurements (calibration method for ProMag, using a polarizer and retarder at coronagraph prime focus. Calibrations are recorded before and after observations. We discuss the success of this method and its limitations.

  14. Self-Calibrating Vector Helium Magnetometer (SVHM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposal describes proposed development of a conceptual design for a Self-Calibrating Vector Helium Magnetometer (SVHM) for design and fabrication...

  15. Low-Fiend Vector Magnetometer (V-400-LF) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This 2010 NASA SBIR Phase 1 proposal for an innovative Low-Field Vector Magnetometer (V-400-LF) is a response to subtopic S1.06 Particles and Field Sensors and...

  16. Self-Calibrating Vector Helium Magnetometer (SVHM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase 2 SBIR proposal describes the design, fabrication and calibration of a brass-board Self-Calibrating Vector Helium Magnetometer (SVHM). The SVHM...

  17. High-Range Scalar Helium Magnetometer (HSHM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal describes development of a conceptual design for a High-range Scalar Helium Magnetometer (HSHM) for the field range +/-16 Gauss. The HSHM...

  18. Comparison of Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers as Space-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, John G.; Thorpe, James Ira

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nea...

  19. Fault Line Selection Method of Small Current to Ground System Based on Atomic Sparse Decomposition and Extreme Learning Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaowei Wang; Yanfang Wei; Zhihui Zeng; Yaxiao Hou; Jie Gao; Xiangxiang Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposed a fault line voting selection method based on atomic sparse decomposition (ASD) and extreme learning machine (ELM). Firstly, it adopted ASD algorithm to decompose zero sequence current of every feeder line at first two cycles and selected the first four atoms to construct main component atom library, fundamental atom library, and transient characteristic atom libraries 1 and 2, respectively. And it used information entropy theory to calculate the atom libraries; the measur...

  20. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio

  1. 基于滚动时域估计的飞行器姿态估计及三轴磁强计在线校正∗%Attitude estimation and three-axis magnetometer on-line calibration based on moving horizon estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵国荣; 黄婧丽; 苏艳琴; 孙聪

    2015-01-01

    According to the attitude estimation and three-axis magnetometer on-line calibration, a real time moving horizon estimation algorithm is presented in this paper. First, moving horizon estimation filter is designed since system constraints existing in most practical cases cannot be solved analytically in the framework of Kalman filter. Taking advantage of the optimal problem in dealing with constraints, the presented method converts the attitude estimation problem into an optimal one by which the quaternion normalization property can be solved analytically in smaller searching space with better efficiency and accuracy. Second, through a series of linearization of system equations, Gauss-Newton iterative method is applied in the horizon window composed of finite history information to obtain the best state estimation and meet the real time requirement at the same time. Once the newest best state estimation value is obtained, it will be sacked into the horizon window and the oldest one discarded. By this way, the filter is moving forward. Finally, based on the proposed method, the three-axis magnetometer parameter on-line calibration combined with attitude estimation is solved without adding any system state dimension, which can also make sure that the measurements with three-axis magnetometer are in the form of vector as its obvious benefits in the sense of ensuring information quantity. On considering the extreme environment such as great temperature gradient, mechanical pressure and complex electromagnetic fields, different from that of the off-line calibration, the calibration parameter is changed definitely. So the on-line calibration is necessary though neglected by most papers. Simulation results show that under the condition of small initial errors, the difference of accuracy among EKF, UKF and moving horizon estimation is small. But the computational burden of the last one is relatively large. The advantage of the described method is not so obvious in this

  2. Enrichment of true positives from structural alerts through the use of novel atomic fragment based descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, A.; Rydberg, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the discrimination rate for methods applying structural alerts and biotransformation rules in the prediction of toxicity and drug metabolism we have developed a set of novel fragment based atomic descriptors. These atomic descriptors encode the properties of the fragments separating an...

  3. Development of windows based application for the calculation of atomic hyperfine spectrum of odd isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windows based application has been developed for the calculation of atomic hyperfine spectrum of odd isotopes keeping in view of the needs of the atomic spectroscopists. The application can also calculate the hyperfine spectrum of another odd isotope if hyperfine structure constants of one isotope are known. Various features of the developed application are discussed. (author)

  4. An alternative approach to vector vibrating sample magnetometer detection coil setup

    OpenAIRE

    Samwel, E.O.; Bolhuis, T.; Lodder, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    Vector vibrating sample magnetometers (VSMs) can present problems with respect to angular dependent calibration and positional dependency when they are used for measurements on thin film samples, which have dimensions comparable to or larger than the sample–coil distances. The problems are due to the fact that in conventional VSMs the sample is rotating with respect to the coils, when performing angular dependent measurements. In this article a solution is presented based on a setup of VSM de...

  5. An efficient method for tracking a magnetic target using scalar magnetometer array

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Liming; Kang, Chong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zheng, Quan; Wang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The position of a magnetic target can be obtained through magnetic anomaly which is measured by a magnetic sensor. Comparing with vector magnetic sensor, the measurement value of the scalar magnetic sensor is almost not influenced by its orientation in measurement coordinate axes. Therefore, scalar magnetic sensors can be easily assembled into an array. Based on analysis of the total scalar magnetic anomaly measured by scalar magnetometer, we present an efficient method for tracking a magneti...

  6. Fluxgate magnetometer with rotational magnetization reversal excitation of the disc magnetic core

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlyk, Lyubomyr; Ubizskii, Sergii; Lozynskyy, Andriy; Savytskyy, Grygoriy

    2012-01-01

    A fluxgate magnetometer is described that is based on the magnetization reversal excitation of disc-shaped magnetic core by rotating magnetic field with magnitude enough to saturate it. The target field components are registered by means of the second harmonic of the current response signal. The model of response signal is developed and a sensor prototype was built and experimentally tested. The measured sensitivity dependences upon the excitation field amplitude at different frequencies c...

  7. Local atomic ordering in nickel based Ir and Rh alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental measurements of the diffuse X-ray scattering are performed on alloys of Ni with Rh and Ir. The atomic short range order (SRO) parameters αsub(i) are calculated from the measured intensity. The existence of SRO is established in the two systems. The values of α1 are observed to have anomalously large negative values for all the samples. The experimental data so obtained is interpreted theoretically by calculating the interaction energies on the basis of electronic theory of ordering. Theoretically calculated values of interaction energies are found to be in agreement with the experimentally determined type of order in these alloys. (author)

  8. A fast determination method for transverse relaxation of spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a fast and accurate determination method for transverse relaxation of the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer. This method is based on the measurement of magnetic resonance linewidth via a chirped magnetic field excitation and the amplitude spectrum analysis. Compared with the frequency sweeping via separate sinusoidal excitation, our method can realize linewidth determination within only few seconds and meanwhile obtain good frequency resolution. Therefore, it can avoid the drift error in long term measurement and improve the accuracy of the determination. As the magnetic resonance frequency of the SERF magnetometer is very low, we include the effect of the negative resonance frequency caused by the chirp and achieve the coefficient of determination of the fitting results better than 0.998 with 95% confidence bounds to the theoretical equation. The experimental results are in good agreement with our theoretical analysis

  9. Study of the operation temperature in the spin-exchange relaxation free magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiancheng; Li, Rujie; Duan, Lihong; Chen, Yao; Quan, Wei

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of the cell temperature on the sensitivity of the spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) magnetometer and analyze the possibility of operating at a low temperature. Utilizing a 25 × 25 × 25 mm3 Cs vapor cell with a heating temperature of 85 ∘C, which is almost half of the value of potassium, we obtain a linewidth of 1.37 Hz and achieve a magnetic field sensitivity of 55 fT/Hz1/2 in a single channel. Theoretical analysis shows that fundamental sensitivity limits of this device with an active volume of 1 cm3 could approach 1 fT/Hz1/2. Taking advantage of the higher saturated vapor pressure, SERF magnetometer based on Cs opens up the possibility for low cost and portable sensors and is particularly appropriate for lower temperature applications.

  10. Feasibility study of a sup 3 He-magnetometer for neutron electric dipole moment experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Borisov, Y; Leduc, M; Lobashev, V; Otten, E W; Sobolev, Y

    2000-01-01

    We report on a sup 3 He-magnetometer capable of detecting tiny magnetic field fluctuations of less than 10 sup - sup 1 sup 4 T in experiments for measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron. It is based on the Ramsey technique of separated oscillating fields and uses nuclear spin-polarized sup 3 He gas which is stored in two vessels of V approx =10 l in a sandwich-type arrangement around the storage bottle for ultra-cold neutrons (UCN). The gas is polarized by means of optical pumping in a separate, small discharge cell at pressures around 0.5 mbar and is then expanded into the actual magnetometer volume. To detect the polarization of sup 3 He gas at the end of the storage cycle the gas is pumped out by means of an oil-diffusion pump and compressed again into the discharge cell where optical detection of nuclear polarization is used.

  11. Study of the operation temperature in the spin-exchange relaxation free magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the influence of the cell temperature on the sensitivity of the spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) magnetometer and analyze the possibility of operating at a low temperature. Utilizing a 25 × 25 × 25 mm3 Cs vapor cell with a heating temperature of 85 ∘C, which is almost half of the value of potassium, we obtain a linewidth of 1.37 Hz and achieve a magnetic field sensitivity of 55 fT/Hz1/2 in a single channel. Theoretical analysis shows that fundamental sensitivity limits of this device with an active volume of 1 cm3 could approach 1 fT/Hz1/2. Taking advantage of the higher saturated vapor pressure, SERF magnetometer based on Cs opens up the possibility for low cost and portable sensors and is particularly appropriate for lower temperature applications

  12. Shot-noise-limited magnetometer with sub-pT sensitivity at room temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Gawlik, Wojciech; Mitchell, Morgan W

    2014-01-01

    We report a photon shot-noise-limited optical magnetometer based on amplitude modulated optical rotation using a room-temperature $^{85}$Rb vapor in a cell with anti-relaxation coating. We describe the optimization of detuning, pump power and probe power and demonstrate a sensitivity of $70$ fT/$\\sqrt{\\mathrm{Hz}}$ with operation from $5\\mu$T to $75\\mu$T, although with worsening sensitivity at high fields. We measure noise as a function of probe power, both with and without optical pumping, and from the observed noise scaling confirm the SNL performance of the magnetometer. The high sensitivity and large SNL range make the system attractive for sensitivity enhancement with squeezed light.

  13. Accelerometer for Space Applications Based on Light-Pulse Atom Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design a compact, high-precision, single-axis accelerometer based on atom interferometry that is applicable to operation in space environments. Our...

  14. Superconducting Quantum Interference Magnetometer for Large Multichannel Systems with Low Crosstalk Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettoliere, A.; Granata, C.; Ruggiero, B.; Russo, M.

    Magnetometers based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) are widely employed in high sensitivity magnetometry. In particular, new multichannel systems for biomagnetic applications require many sensors which are very close to each other giving the crosstalk disturbance between the neighboring channel. Here, we present experimental results about a fully integrated dc-SQUID magnetometer, based on niobium technology, having a suitable design which allows to reduce crosstalk due to both the feedback coil and wires. The crosstalk level measurements relative to a particular arrangement of sensors are reported. In such configuration, four magnetometers are placed over a square board 30 mm in side with a distance between their sensor centers of 14 mm. The measurements have been performed in a 4He cryostat at T = 4.2 K in a flux-locked loop configuration using a readout electronics with a direct coupled scheme. The experimental data have shown a substantial reduction of crosstalk among neighboring sensors with respect to a traditional feedback coil. Furthermore, the field noise measurements have ensured that the new pickup and feedback coils design does not introduce any noise level degradation.

  15. Determination of the plasmapause boundary using ground magnetometer field line resonances, satellite observations, and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesta, E.; Boudouridis, A.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Yizengaw, E.; Chi, P. J.; Moldwin, M.; Carranza, T.; Mann, I. R.; Johnston, W. R.; Wilson, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    The plasmapause boundary layer (PBL) separates the cold and dense plasmaspheric plasma from the more tenuous and hot plasma sheet plasma and organizes the spatial distribution of ULF and VLF waves that can contribute to acceleration or loss processes of radiation belt particles through wave-particle interactions. The PBL has been traditionally determined by in situ observations and can be given by empirical models. Recent work has shown that a mid-latitude chain of well-spaced ground magnetometers can also determine the PBL boundary location. Spectral properties, like the cross-phase reversal between two stations closely aligned in latitude, have been shown to indicate the presence of a sharp PBL. We show here an example of such a PBL identification during the moderate storm of Nov 9-12, 2006. We combine observations from the SAMBA (South American Meridional B-field Array), MEASURE (Magnetometers along the Eastern Atlantic Seaboard for Undergraduate Research and Education), McMAC (Mid-continent Magnetoseismic Chain), and CARISMA ground magnetometer chains covering L values from L=2 to L=5 to statistically determine how commonly the PBL is determined from ground magnetometers. In our initial study we examine observations from June to December, 2006. We compare our PBL determinations with the determination of the same boundary from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, based on the H+ density observations, which have been shown to accurately identify the PBL from a low-Earth orbiting satellite. We also compare our PBL identification with those determined from a global GPS TEC map and GPS TEC tomography technique used by a chain of ground GPS receivers. Finally, we compare our observations with results from the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model (DGCPM), as well as existing empirical models based on in situ observations.

  16. The optimal time-frequency atom search based on a modified ant colony algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jun-feng; LI Yan-jun; YU Rui-xing; ZHANG Ke

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,a new optimal time-frequency atom search method based on a modified ant colony algorithm is proposed to improve the precision of the traditional methods.First,the discretization formula of finite length time-frequency atom is inferred at length.Second; a modified ant colony algorithm in continuous space is proposed.Finally,the optimal timefrequency atom search algorithm based on the modified ant colony algorithm is described in detail and the simulation experiment is carried on.The result indicates that the developed algorithm is valid and stable,and the precision of the method is higher than that of the traditional method.

  17. Atom probe analysis of Sn in Zr-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have extensively used atom-probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) for microanalyses of a heat-treated Zircaloy-4 and Zr-Sn alloys containing 0.6 or 1.39 wt% Sn and clarified as to whether Sn is fully dissolved or not in the α-Zr matrix. It is found that Sn dissolves in the matrix of both Zircaloy-4 and Zr-0.6 wt% Sn alloy upon annealing at 723 K. For Zr-1.39 wt% Sn alloy, after annealing for more than 200 h, the symptom of phase separation has been found. The distribution of Sn in the matrix is changed from the α-quenched state, and local regions enriched with Sn are formed in the matrix. (orig.)

  18. A resonance ionization imaging detector based on cesium atomic vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel Cs resonance ionization imaging detector (RIID) has been developed and evaluated. The detector is capable of two-dimensional imaging with high spectral resolution, which is determined by the Doppler broadened atomic linewidth of Cs at given temperature. Ionization schemes of Cs have been investigated using dye and color center tunable lasers pumped by an excimer laser and by a Nd:YAG laser. It has been experimentally shown that the most efficient ionization scheme for Cs RIID should include a three-step excitation/ionization ladder, for example, with transitions at λ1=852.11 (852.113) nm, λ2=917.22 (917.2197) nm, and λ3=1064 nm. The imaging capabilities of the detector have been evaluated using a simpler two-step ionization scheme with wavelengths λ1=852.11 nm and λ2=508 nm

  19. A resonance ionization imaging detector based on cesium atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temirov, J. P.; Chigarev, N. V.; Matveev, O. I.; Omenetto, N.; Smith, B. W.; Winefordner, J. D.

    2004-05-01

    A novel Cs resonance ionization imaging detector (RIID) has been developed and evaluated. The detector is capable of two-dimensional imaging with high spectral resolution, which is determined by the Doppler broadened atomic linewidth of Cs at given temperature. Ionization schemes of Cs have been investigated using dye and color center tunable lasers pumped by an excimer laser and by a Nd:YAG laser. It has been experimentally shown that the most efficient ionization scheme for Cs RIID should include a three-step excitation/ionization ladder, for example, with transitions at λ1=852.11 (852.113) nm, λ2=917.22 (917.2197) nm, and λ3=1064 nm. The imaging capabilities of the detector have been evaluated using a simpler two-step ionization scheme with wavelengths λ1=852.11 nm and λ2=508 nm.

  20. Thermal properties of AlN-based atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Armijo, Julien; Bouchoule, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the thermal properties of atom chips consisting o high thermal conductivity Aluminum Nitride (AlN) substrates on which gold microwires are directly deposited. We have measured the heating of wires of several widths and with different thermal couplings to the copper mount holding the chip. The results are in good agreement with a theoretical model where the copper mount is treated as a heat sink and the thermal interface resistance between the wire and the substrate is vanishing. We give analytical formulas describing the different transient heating regimes and the steady state. We identify criteria to optimize the design of a chip as well as the maximal currents $I_c$ that can be fed in the wires. For a 600$\\mu$m thick-chip glued on a copper block with Epotek H77, we find $I_c=16$A for a 3$\\mu$m high, 200$\\mu$m wide-wire.

  1. Mercury Atomic Frequency Standards for Space Based Navigation and Timekeeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Burt, E. A.; Chung, S.; Hamell, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Tucker, B.; Cash, P.; Lutwak, R.

    2012-01-01

    A low power Mercury Atomic Frequency Standard (MAFS) has been developed and demonstrated on the path towards future space clock applications. A self contained mercury ion breadboard clock: emulating flight clock interfaces, steering a USO local oscillator, and consuming approx 40 Watts has been operating at JPL for more than a year. This complete, modular ion clock instrument demonstrates that key GNSS size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements can be achieved while still maintaining short and long term performance demonstrated in previous ground ion clocks. The MAFS breadboard serves as a flexible platform for optimizing further space clock development and guides engineering model design trades towards fabrication of an ion clock for space flight.

  2. Micromachined magnetometer-accelerometer for a navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ji-Man; Kim, Kyung S.; An, Seungdo; Park, HoJoon; Hahm, Ghun

    2002-11-01

    A new type of magnetometer-accelerometer is developed with a silicon micromachining. The operation principle of the sensor is based on the well known Lorentz force caused by the interaction of a current and an external magnetic field on a suspended conducting beam. To realize a new resonant micro sensor detecting both acceleration and the geomagnetic field simultaneously, a conducting line is formed on a spring part of a silicon accelerometer having two mass plates. And a new Samsung MEMS fabrication process is developed for this sensor. The process uses a silicon-on-glass (SOG) wafer, an inverted SOG wafer, and a gold-silicon eutectic bonding for the wafer-level hermetic packaging. To operate the sensor, an ac current of its mechanical resonant frequency is driven through the conducting line. Totally 1 mW is consumed in the current driving element. This newly developed sensor is enough for the 10 degree electronic display of the orientation angle and can be used in a portable navigator such as SmartPhones and PDAs that need a small, low cost and low power electronic compass.

  3. Ultra-sensitive Magnetic Microscopy with an Optically Pumped Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Savukov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Optically pumped magnetometers (OPMs) based on lasers and alkali-metal vapor cells are currently the most sensitive non-cryogenic magnetic field sensors. Many applications in neuroscience and other fields require high-resolution, high-sensitivity magnetic microscopic measurements. In order to meet this demand we combined a cm-size spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) OPM and flux guides (FGs) to realize an ultra-sensitive FG-OPM magnetic microscope. The FGs serve to transmit the target magnetic flux to the OPM thus improving both the resolution and sensitivity to small magnetic objects. We investigated the performance of the FG-OPM device using experimental and numerical methods, and demonstrated that an optimized device can achieve a unique combination of high resolution (80 μm) and high sensitivity (8.1 pT/). In addition, we also performed numerical calculations of the magnetic field distribution in the FGs to estimate the magnetic noise originating from the domain fluctuations in the material of the FGs. We anticipate many applications of the FG-OPM device such as the detection of micro-biological magnetic fields; the detection of magnetic nano-particles; and non-destructive testing. From our theoretical estimate, an FG-OPM could detect the magnetic field of a single neuron, which would be an important milestone in neuroscience.

  4. Ultra-sensitive Magnetic Microscopy with an Optically Pumped Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Savukov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Optically pumped magnetometers (OPMs) based on lasers and alkali-metal vapor cells are currently the most sensitive non-cryogenic magnetic field sensors. Many applications in neuroscience and other fields require high-resolution, high-sensitivity magnetic microscopic measurements. In order to meet this demand we combined a cm-size spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) OPM and flux guides (FGs) to realize an ultra-sensitive FG-OPM magnetic microscope. The FGs serve to transmit the target magnetic flux to the OPM thus improving both the resolution and sensitivity to small magnetic objects. We investigated the performance of the FG-OPM device using experimental and numerical methods, and demonstrated that an optimized device can achieve a unique combination of high resolution (80 μm) and high sensitivity (8.1 pT/). In addition, we also performed numerical calculations of the magnetic field distribution in the FGs to estimate the magnetic noise originating from the domain fluctuations in the material of the FGs. We anticipate many applications of the FG-OPM device such as the detection of micro-biological magnetic fields; the detection of magnetic nano-particles; and non-destructive testing. From our theoretical estimate, an FG-OPM could detect the magnetic field of a single neuron, which would be an important milestone in neuroscience. PMID:27103463

  5. A Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Fan; Taylor, Stephen F; Turner, Richard W; Lev, Benjamin L

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity, high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented DC-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides a 100x improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity over previous atomic scanning probe magnetometers. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnet...

  6. Comparative Sensitivities of Gravitational Wave Detectors Based on Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.; Thorpe, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe. Whether this potential advantage outweighs the additional complexity associated with including atom interferometers will require further study.

  7. Quantum metrology with cold atomic ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Morgan W.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantum metrology uses quantum features such as entanglement and squeezing to improve the sensitivity of quantum-limited measurements. Long established as a valuable technique in optical measurements such as gravitational-wave detection, quantum metrology is increasingly being applied to atomic instruments such as matter-wave interferometers, atomic clocks, and atomic magnetometers. Several of these new applications involve dual optical/atomic quantum systems, presenting both new challenges and new opportunities. Here we describe an optical magnetometry system that achieves both shot-noise-limited and projection-noise-limited performance, allowing study of optical magnetometry in a fully-quantum regime [1]. By near-resonant Faraday rotation probing, we demonstrate measurement-based spin squeezing in a magnetically-sensitive atomic ensemble [2-4]. The versatility of this system allows us also to design metrologically-relevant optical nonlinearities, and to perform quantum-noise-limited measurements with interacting photons. As a first interaction-based measurement [5], we implement a non-linear metrology scheme proposed by Boixo et al. with the surprising feature of precision scaling better than the 1/N “Heisenberg limit” [6].

  8. Attitude Determination with Magnetometers and Accelerometers to Use in Satellite Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio Koiti Kuga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Attitude control of artificial satellites is dependent on information provided by its attitude determination process. This paper presents the implementation and tests of a fully self-contained algorithm for the attitude determination using magnetometers and accelerometers, for application on a satellite simulator based on frictionless air bearing tables. However, it is known that magnetometers and accelerometers need to be calibrated so as to allow that measurements are used to their ultimate accuracy. A calibration method is implemented which proves to be essential for improving attitude determination accuracy. For the stepwise real-time attitude determination, it was used the well-known QUEST algorithm which yields quick response with reduced computer resources. The algorithms are tested and qualified with actual data collected on the streets under controlled situations. For such street runaways, the experiment employs a solid-state magnetoresistive magnetometer and an IMU navigation block consisting of triads of accelerometers and gyros, with MEMS technology. A GPS receiver is used to record positional information. The collected measurements are processed through the developed algorithms, and comparisons are made for attitude determination using calibrated and noncalibrated data. The results show that the attitude accuracy reaches the requirements for real-time operation for satellite simulator platforms.

  9. Spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer with nearly parallel pump and probe beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaulanov, Todor; Savukov, Igor; Kim, Young Jin

    2016-05-01

    We constructed a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer with a small angle between the pump and probe beams facilitating a multi-channel design with a flat pancake cell. This configuration provides almost complete overlap of the beams in the cell, and prevents the pump beam from entering the probe detection channel. By coupling the lasers in multi-mode fibers, without an optical isolator or field modulation, we demonstrate a sensitivity of 10 f T/\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}} for frequencies between 10 Hz and 100 Hz. In addition to the experimental study of sensitivity, we present a theoretical analysis of SERF magnetometer response to magnetic fields for small-angle and parallel-beam configurations, and show that at optimal DC offset fields the magnetometer response is comparable to that in the orthogonal-beam configuration. Based on the analysis, we also derive fundamental and probe-limited sensitivities for the arbitrary non-orthogonal geometry. The expected practical and fundamental sensitivities are of the same order as those in the orthogonal geometry. We anticipate that our design will be useful for magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) applications.

  10. What is the appropriate coordinate system for magnetometer data when analyzing ionospheric currents?

    CERN Document Server

    Laundal, K M

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate which coordinate representation is most appropriate when analyzing ground magnetometer data in terms of ionospheric currents, in particular the westward electrojet. The $\\textit{AL}$ and the recently introduced $\\textit{SML}$ index are frequently used as monitors of the westward electrojet. Both indices are based on ground magnetometers at auroral latitudes. From these magnetometers, the largest perturbation in the southward direction is selected as the $\\textit{ AL/SML }$ index at 1 min cadence. The southward component is defined as antiparallel to the orientation of the horizontal part of the Earths' main field, $\\textbf{B}_{0, \\textit{H}}$. The implicit assumption when using these indices as a monitor of the westward electrojet is that the electrojet flows perpendicular to $\\textbf{B}_{0, \\textit{H}}$. However, $\\textbf{B}_{0, \\textit{H}}$ is, in general, not perpendicular to the westward direction in coordinate systems that take nondipole terms of the Earth's magnetic field in...

  11. An efficient method for tracking a magnetic target using scalar magnetometer array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Liming; Kang, Chong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zheng, Quan; Wang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The position of a magnetic target can be obtained through magnetic anomaly which is measured by a magnetic sensor. Comparing with vector magnetic sensor, the measurement value of the scalar magnetic sensor is almost not influenced by its orientation in measurement coordinate axes. Therefore, scalar magnetic sensors can be easily assembled into an array. Based on analysis of the total scalar magnetic anomaly measured by scalar magnetometer, we present an efficient method for tracking a magnetic target using scalar magnetometer array. In this method, we separate the position information and magnetic moment information of magnetic target by matrix transformation. Then, we can obtain the position of the magnetic target in real time by a scalar magnetometer array and a particle swarm optimization algorithm. In addition, the magnetic moment of the target can be estimated when the target's position had been calculated. The simulation shows that the position of the target can be calculated accurately and the relative error of the position is calculated magnetic moment of the target is close to the theoretical value. In addition, execution time of each calculation is <1 s. Thus, the position of the magnetic target can be obtained in real-time through this method. PMID:27186466

  12. An integrated DC SQUID magnetometer with variable additional positive feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An easily adjustable direct-coupled magnetometer is presented. A typical usable voltage swing of 30 mu V and noise levels of down to 1.13 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz have been achieved with additional positive feedback (APF). A compensation circuit integrated into the magnetometer chip allows the reduction of APF gain in three steps within a factor of 1.8, by simply adding one or two bond connections on the magnetometer chip. In this way the tolerance of the critical current I0 is enlarged from ±10% to ±27% at the traditional SQUID working point. If additionally the shunt resistors are trimmed by plasma etching the tolerance of I0 can be increased further to about ±55%. (author)

  13. Calibration of three-axis magnetometers with differential evolution algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of three-axis magnetometers is influenced by different scale and bias of each axis and nonorthogonality between axes. One limitation of traditional iteration methods is that initial parameters influence the calibration, thus leading to the local optimal or wrong results. In this paper, a new method is proposed to calibrate three-axis magnetometers. To employ this method, a nonmagnetic rotation platform, a proton magnetometer, a DM-050 three-axis magnetometer and the differential evolution (DE) algorithm are used. The performance of this calibration method is analyzed with simulation and experiment. In simulation, the calibration results of DE, unscented Kalman filter (UKF), recursive least squares (RLS) and genetic algorithm (GA) are compared. RMS error using DE is least, which is reduced from 81.233 nT to 1.567 nT. Experimental results show that comparing with UKF, RLS and GA, the DE algorithm has not only the least calibration error but also the best robustness. After calibration, RMS error is reduced from 68.914 nT to 2.919 nT. In addition, the DE algorithm is not sensitive to initial parameters, which is an important advantage compared with traditional iteration algorithms. The proposed algorithm can avoid the troublesome procedure to select suitable initial parameters, thus it can improve the calibration performance of three-axis magnetometers. - Highlights: • The calibration results and robustness of UKF, GA, RLS and DE algorithm are analyzed. Calibration error of DE is the least in simulation and experiment. • Comparing with traditional calibration algorithms, DE is not sensitive to initial parameters. • It can improve the calibration performance of three-axis magnetometers

  14. Initiating Heavy-atom Based Phasing by Multi-Dimensional Molecular Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu;

    2014-01-01

    in the determination of a membrane protein structure, the CopA Cu+-ATPase, when other methods had failed to resolve the heavy atom substructure. MRPM is particularly suited for proteins undergoing large conformational changes where multiple search models should be generated, and it enables the identification of weak......To obtain an electron-density map from a macromolecular crystal the phase-problem needs to be solved, which often involves the use of heavy-atom derivative crystals and concomitantly the determination of the heavy atom substructure. This is customarily done by direct methods or Patterson......-based approaches, which however may fail when only poorly diffracting derivative crystals are available, as often the case for e.g. membrane proteins. Here we present an approach for heavy atom site identification based on a Molecular Replacement Parameter Matrix (MRPM) search. It involves an n-dimensional search...

  15. Initiating Heavy-atom Based Phasing by Multi-Dimensional Molecular Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus Emanuel; Liu, Xiangyu;

    2014-01-01

    To obtain an electron-density map from a macromolecular crystal the phase-problem needs to be solved, which often involves the use of heavy-atom derivative crystals and concomitantly the determination of the heavy atom substructure. This is customarily done by direct methods or Patterson......-based approaches, which however may fail when only poorly diffracting derivative crystals are available, as often the case for e.g. membrane proteins. Here we present an approach for heavy atom site identification based on a Molecular Replacement Parameter Matrix (MRPM) search. It involves an n-dimensional search...... to test a wide spectrum of molecular replacement parameters, such as clusters of different conformations. The result is scored by the ability to identify heavy-atom positions, from anomalous difference Fourier maps, that allow meaningful phases to be determined. The strategy was successfully applied...

  16. Ørsted Pre-Flight Magnetometer Calibration Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risbo, T.; Brauer, Peter; Merayo, José M.G.;

    2003-01-01

    The compact spherical coil (CSC) vector-feedback magnetometer on the Danish circle dividersted geomagnetic mapping satellite underwent extensive calibrations and verifications prior to integration and launch. The theory of the 'thin shell' calibration procedure is introduced. Spherical harmonic...... modelling was developed and tested over several years and used for circle dividersted and other missions at test facilities in Europe, the United States and the Republic of South Africa. The verification of the test coil system using an Overhauser absolute scalar proton magnetometer is explained...

  17. Hydrogen internal friction and interaction of solute atoms in niobium- and vanadium-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer model has been proposed to be used to calculate the internal friction spectrum, caused by the ''diffusion under stress'' of hydrogen atoms in a solid solution with a b.c.c. lattice containing substitutional atoms. The model takes into account the long-range pair interaction of dissolved atoms. It is suggested that such interaction acts on diffusion by producing short-range order of mobile hydrogen atoms and by changing their energy. These changes occur in the tetrahedral (before the jump) as well as in the octahedral (at the saddle point of the diffusion barrier) interstitial sites and, therefore, produce local changes of the hydrogen diffusion activation energy (the activation energy of internal friction). The relaxation strength is calculated from the local fields of atomic displacements around every atom that participates in diffusion. The model has been used to study the nature of hydrogen relaxation in Ti- and Zr-containing Nb- and V-based alloys and to calculate the ''chemical'' interaction energy of the H(D)-Ti(Zr) pairs. It was shown that the hydrogen relaxation mechanism in Nb(V)-Ti(Zr)-H(D) alloys consists in diffusion under stress of hydrogen or deuterium atoms in the vicinity of single substitutional atoms at low concentration of substitutional atoms and high hydrogen or deuterium concentration, and in the vicinity of substitutional pairs - at high concentration of substitutional atoms and low hydrogen or deuterium concentration. The ''chemical'' interaction H(D)-Ti(Zr) in niobium and vanadium is stronger or is of the same order, as the strain-induced (elastic) interaction. (orig.)

  18. The Influence of Physical and Physiological Cues on Atomic Force Microscopy-Based Cell Stiffness Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Wei Chiou; Hsiu-Kuan Lin; Ming-Jer Tang; Hsi-Hui Lin; Ming-Long Yeh

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All...

  19. Global Location-Based Access to Web Applications Using Atom-Based Automatic Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kulwinder; Park, Dong-Won

    We propose an architecture which enables people to enquire about information available in directory services by voice using regular phones. We implement a Virtual User Agent (VUA) which mediates between the human user and a business directory service. The system enables the user to search for the nearest clinic, gas station by price, motel by price, food / coffee, banks/ATM etc. and fix an appointment, or automatically establish a call between the user and the business party if the user prefers. The user also has an option to receive appointment confirmation by phone, SMS, or e-mail. The VUA is accessible by a toll free DID (Direct Inward Dialing) number using a phone by anyone, anywhere, anytime. We use the Euclidean formula for distance measurement. Since, shorter geodesic distances (on the Earth’s surface) correspond to shorter Euclidean distances (measured by a straight line through the Earth). Our proposed architecture uses Atom XML syndication format protocol for data integration, VoiceXML for creating the voice user interface (VUI) and CCXML for controlling the call components. We also provide an efficient algorithm for parsing Atom feeds which provide data to the system. Moreover, we describe a cost-effective way for providing global access to the VUA based on Asterisk (an open source IP-PBX). We also provide some information on how our system can be integrated with GPS for locating the user coordinates and therefore efficiently and spontaneously enhancing the system response. Additionally, the system has a mechanism for validating the phone numbers in its database, and it updates the number and other information such as daily price of gas, motel etc. automatically using an Atom-based feed. Currently, the commercial directory services (Example 411) do not have facilities to update the listing in the database automatically, so that why callers most of the times get out-of-date phone numbers or other information. Our system can be integrated very easily

  20. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin||lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy E; Belcher, Nathan; Novikova, Irina

    2009-01-01

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin||lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D1 line of 87Rb with current modulation at the 87Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by proper choice of rf modulation power, and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2*10^{-11} tau^{-1/2} for observation times 1s

  1. Double tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometer based on an acousto-optic tunable filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jora, M. Z.; Nóbrega, J. A.; Rohwedder, J. J. R.; Pasquini, C.

    2015-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrometer based on a quartz acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) monochromator operating in the 271-453 nm range, is described. The instrument was tailored to study the formation and evolution of electrothermal atomic cloud induced either by one or two tungsten coils. The spectrometer also includes a fast response programmable photomultiplier module for data acquisition, and a power supply capable of driving two parallel tungsten coils independently. The atomization cell herein described was manufactured in PTFE and presents a new design with reduced size. Synchronization between the instant of power delivering to start the atomization process and the detection was achieved, allowing for monitoring the atomization and thermal events synchronously and in real time. Absorption signals can be sampled at a rate of a few milliseconds, compatible with the fast phenomena that occur with electrothermal metallic atomizers. The instrument performance was preliminarily evaluated by monitoring the absorption of radiation of atomic clouds produced by standard solutions containing chromium or lead. Its quantitative performance was evaluated by using Cr aqueous solutions, resulting in detection limits as low as 0.24 μg L- 1, and a relative standard deviation of 3%.

  2. High precision deflection measurement of microcantilever in an optical pickup head based atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Heon [Department of Mechanical Design Engineering, Andong National University, Andong 760-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    This paper presents the methodology to measure the precise deflection of microcantilever in an optical pickup head based atomic force microscopy. In this paper, three types of calibration methods have been proposed: full linearization, sectioned linearization, and the method based on astigmatism. In addition, the probe heads for easy calibration of optical pickup head and fast replacement of optical pickup head have been developed. The performances of each method have been compared through a set of experiments and constant height mode operation which was not possible in the optical pickup head based atomic force microscopy has been carried out successfully.

  3. Recent improvements of the Hg cohabiting magnetometer for the nEDM experiment at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Standard Model (SM) of Particle Physics predicts a static electric dipole moment for the neutron (nEDM), breaking time reversal and parity symmetry. This prediction is several orders of magnitude below the current best experimental limit dn -26ecm (90% CL). An experiment at the new ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Switzerland, aims at a factor five improved sensitivity. Ultimately, the collaboration pursues the goal to improve the sensitivity by another order of magnitude. The experiment employs Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields to detect a Larmor frequency shift for the UCN in a parallel and an anti-parallel configuration of a magnetic and an electric field. The transmission modulation of a circularly polarized light beam is used to detect the spin precession of a spin polarized ensemble of 199Hg atoms in the same volume as the UCN and thus to measure the applied magnetic field (∼1μT). Currently we reach a precision of 50 fT over 100 s. I present recently achieved improvements of this co-magnetometer and ideas how to further improve this magnetometer by using a laser as light source.

  4. Double tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometer based on an acousto-optic tunable filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atomic absorption spectrometer based on a quartz acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) monochromator operating in the 271–453 nm range, is described. The instrument was tailored to study the formation and evolution of electrothermal atomic cloud induced either by one or two tungsten coils. The spectrometer also includes a fast response programmable photomultiplier module for data acquisition, and a power supply capable of driving two parallel tungsten coils independently. The atomization cell herein described was manufactured in PTFE and presents a new design with reduced size. Synchronization between the instant of power delivering to start the atomization process and the detection was achieved, allowing for monitoring the atomization and thermal events synchronously and in real time. Absorption signals can be sampled at a rate of a few milliseconds, compatible with the fast phenomena that occur with electrothermal metallic atomizers. The instrument performance was preliminarily evaluated by monitoring the absorption of radiation of atomic clouds produced by standard solutions containing chromium or lead. Its quantitative performance was evaluated by using Cr aqueous solutions, resulting in detection limits as low as 0.24 μg L−1, and a relative standard deviation of 3%. - Highlights: • The use of an Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter (AOTF) as monochromator element in WC AAS is presented for the first time. • The system includes the possibility of using one or two parallel coils. • We propose a new atomization cell design, manufactured on PTFE with reduced size. • The temperature of the coils and the atomic clouds of Pb and Cr were observed synchronously with high temporal resolution

  5. Double tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometer based on an acousto-optic tunable filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jora, M.Z. [Chemistry Institute, State University of Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Nóbrega, J.A. [Chemistry Department, Federal University of São Carlos, 13565-905, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Rohwedder, J.J.R. [Chemistry Institute, State University of Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Pasquini, C., E-mail: manasses.jora@gmail.com [Chemistry Institute, State University of Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrometer based on a quartz acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) monochromator operating in the 271–453 nm range, is described. The instrument was tailored to study the formation and evolution of electrothermal atomic cloud induced either by one or two tungsten coils. The spectrometer also includes a fast response programmable photomultiplier module for data acquisition, and a power supply capable of driving two parallel tungsten coils independently. The atomization cell herein described was manufactured in PTFE and presents a new design with reduced size. Synchronization between the instant of power delivering to start the atomization process and the detection was achieved, allowing for monitoring the atomization and thermal events synchronously and in real time. Absorption signals can be sampled at a rate of a few milliseconds, compatible with the fast phenomena that occur with electrothermal metallic atomizers. The instrument performance was preliminarily evaluated by monitoring the absorption of radiation of atomic clouds produced by standard solutions containing chromium or lead. Its quantitative performance was evaluated by using Cr aqueous solutions, resulting in detection limits as low as 0.24 μg L{sup −1}, and a relative standard deviation of 3%. - Highlights: • The use of an Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter (AOTF) as monochromator element in WC AAS is presented for the first time. • The system includes the possibility of using one or two parallel coils. • We propose a new atomization cell design, manufactured on PTFE with reduced size. • The temperature of the coils and the atomic clouds of Pb and Cr were observed synchronously with high temporal resolution.

  6. Comparison of Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers as Space-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe.

  7. Nanophotonic quantum computer based on atomic quantum transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianov, S. N.; Moiseev, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a scheme of a quantum computer based on nanophotonic elements: two buses in the form of nanowaveguide resonators, two nanosized units of multiatom multiqubit quantum memory and a set of nanoprocessors in the form of photonic quantum transistors, each containing a pair of nanowaveguide ring resonators coupled via a quantum dot. The operation modes of nanoprocessor photonic quantum transistors are theoretically studied and the execution of main logical operations by means of them is demonstrated. We also discuss the prospects of the proposed nanophotonic quantum computer for operating in high-speed optical fibre networks.

  8. Small Fluxgate Magnetometers: Development and Future Trends in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Pérez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we give an overview of the research on fluxgate magnetometers carried out in Spain. In particular we focus in the development of the planar-type instruments. We summarize the fabrication processes and signal processing developments as well as their use in complex systems and space.

  9. Sensor noise in low-level flux-gate magnetometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scouten, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    The noise mechanism in a well-designed magnetometer is shown to be due to small-scale magnetic moments which are probably small volumes of the core material that are not oriented by the drive field. Design developments include the sense coil radius and the development of a drive waveform which yields considerably improved performance over the commonly used sine wave drive.

  10. Efficient polarization insensitive complex wavefront control using Huygens' metasurfaces based on dielectric resonant meta-atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Chong, Katie E; Staude, Isabelle; James, Anthony; Dominguez, Jason; Liu, Sheng; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Decker, Manuel; Neshev, Dragomir N; Brener, Igal; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-01-01

    Subwavelength-thin metasurfaces have shown great promises for the control of optical wavefronts, thus opening new pathways for the development of efficient flat optics. In particular, Huygens' metasurfaces based on all-dielectric resonant meta-atoms have already shown a huge potential for practical applications with their polarization insensitivity and high transmittance efficiency. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a polarization insensitive holographic Huygens' metasurface based on dielectric resonant meta-atoms capable of complex wavefront control at telecom wavelengths. Our metasurface produces a hologram image in the far-field with 82% transmittance efficiency and 40% imaging efficiency. Such efficient complex wavefront control shows that Huygens' metasurfaces based on resonant dielectric meta-atoms are a big step towards practical applications of metasurfaces in wavefront design related technologies, including computer-generated holograms, ultra-thin optics, security and data storage devices.

  11. Single-photon absorber based on strongly interacting Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Tresp, Christoph; Mirgorodskiy, Ivan; Gorniaczyk, Hannes; Paris-Mandoki, Asaf; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Removing exactly one photon from an arbitrary input pulse is an elementary operation in quantum optics and enables applications in quantum information processing and quantum simulation. Here we demonstrate a deterministic single-photon absorber based on the saturation of an optically thick free-space medium by a single photon due to Rydberg blockade. Single-photon subtraction adds a new component to the Rydberg quantum optics toolbox, which already contains photonic logic building-blocks such as single-photon sources, switches, transistors, and conditional $\\pi$-phase shifts. Our approach is scalable to multiple cascaded absorbers, essential for preparation of non-classical light states for quantum information and metrology applications, and, in combination with the single-photon transistor, high-fidelity number-resolved photon detection.

  12. Robust Face Recognition via Minimum Error Entropy-Based Atomic Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yulong; Tang, Yuan Yan; Li, Luoqing

    2015-12-01

    Representation-based classifiers (RCs) have attracted considerable attention in face recognition in recent years. However, most existing RCs use the mean square error (MSE) criterion as the cost function, which relies on the Gaussianity assumption of the error distribution and is sensitive to non-Gaussian noise. This may severely degrade the performance of MSE-based RCs in recognizing facial images with random occlusion and corruption. In this paper, we present a minimum error entropy-based atomic representation (MEEAR) framework for face recognition. Unlike existing MSE-based RCs, our framework is based on the minimum error entropy criterion, which is not dependent on the error distribution and shown to be more robust to noise. In particular, MEEAR can produce discriminative representation vector by minimizing the atomic norm regularized Renyi's entropy of the reconstruction error. The optimality conditions are provided for general atomic representation model. As a general framework, MEEAR can also be used as a platform to develop new classifiers. Two effective MEE-based RCs are proposed by defining appropriate atomic sets. The experimental results on popular face databases show that MEEAR can improve both the recognition accuracy and the reconstructed results compared with the state-of-the-art MSE-based RCs. PMID:26513784

  13. Comparison between the Juno Earth flyby magnetic measurements and the magnetometer package on the IRIS solar observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merayo, J. M.; Connerney, J. E.; Joergensen, J. L.; Dougherty, B.

    2013-12-01

    In October 2013 the NASA's Juno New Frontier spacecraft will perform an Earth Flyby Gravity Assist. During this flyby, Juno will reach an altitude of about 600 km and the magnetometer experiment will measure the magnetic field with very high precision. In June 2013 the NASA's IRIS solar observatory was successfully launched. IRIS uses a very fine guiding telescope in order to maintain a high pointing accuracy, assisted by a very high accuracy star tracker and a science grade vector magnetometer. IRIS was placed into a Sun-synchronous orbit at about 600 km altitude by a Pegasus rocket from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. This platform will also allow to performing measurements of the Earth's magnetic field with very high precision, since it carries similar instrumentation as on the Swarm satellites (star trackers and magnetometer). The data recorded by the Juno magnetic experiment and the IRIS magnetometer will bring a very exciting opportunity for comparing the two experiments as well as for determining current structures during the flyby.

  14. Development of Autonomous Magnetometer Rotorcraft For Wide Area Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark D. McKay; Matthew O. Anderson

    2011-08-01

    Large areas across the United States and internationally are potentially contaminated with unexploded ordinance (UXO), with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with (1) near 100% coverage and (2) near 100% detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area assessment is a multi-level one, in which medium - altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry. Subsequent to this wide area assessment targeted surface investigations are performed using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be an effective tool for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 to 3 meters. These altitude requirements mean that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys, resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre. In addition, due to the low altitude there are substantial risks to pilots and equipment. Surface towed arrays provide highresolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. Thus there is a need for other systems, which can be used for effective data collection. An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it reduces risk to operators, is lower in initial and Operational and Maintenance (O&M) costs (and can thus potentially be applied to smaller sites) and has the potential of being more effective in terms of detection and possibly

  15. Quantum well effect based on hybridization bandgap in deep subwavelength coupled meta-atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongqiang; Li, Yunhui; Wu, Qian; Jiang, Haitao; Zhang, Yewen; Chen, Hong

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, quantum well (QW) effect in a hybridization bandgap (HBG) structure via hiring deep subwavelength coupled meta-atoms is investigated. Subwavelength zero-index-metamaterial-based resonators acting as meta-atoms are side-coupled to a microstrip, forming the HBG structure. Both numerical and microwave experimental results confirm that, through properly hiring another set of meta-atoms, band mismatch between two HBGs can be introduced resulting in the HBG QW effect. Compared with the conventional QW structure based on Bragg interferences in photonic crystal, the device length of the proposed HBG QW structure can be reduced to only 1/4, demonstrating well the deep subwavelength property. Therefore, the above features make our design of HBG QW structures suitable to be utilized as multi-channel filters or multiplexers in microwave and optical communication system.

  16. Atomic-resolution single-spin magnetic resonance detection concept based on tunneling force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, A.; Ambal, K.; Boehme, C.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single-electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated qubit states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  17. Development of collisional data base for elementary processes of electron scattering by atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinković, Bratislav P., E-mail: bratislav.marinkovic@ipb.ac.rs [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering of Applied Studies, Vojvode Stepe 283, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Vujčić, Veljko [Astronomical Observatory Belgade, Volgina 7, 11050 Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Organizational Sciences, University of Belgrade, Jove Ilića 154, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Sushko, Gennady [MBN Research Center, Altenhöferallee 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vudragović, Dušan [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Marinković, Dara B. [Faculty of Organizational Sciences, University of Belgrade, Jove Ilića 154, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Đorđević, Stefan; Ivanović, Stefan; Nešić, Milutin [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering of Applied Studies, Vojvode Stepe 283, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Jevremović, Darko [Astronomical Observatory Belgade, Volgina 7, 11050 Belgrade (Serbia); Solov’yov, Andrey V. [MBN Research Center, Altenhöferallee 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Mason, Nigel J. [The Open University, Department of Physical Sciences, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    Highlights: • BEAMDB database maintaining electron/atom-molecule collisional data has been created. • The DB is MySQL, the web server is Nginx and Python application server is Gunicorn. • Only data that have been previously published and formally refereed are included. • Data protocol for exchanging and representing data is in the “xsams” xml format. • BEAMDB becomes a node within the VAMDC consortium and radiation damage RADAM basis. - Abstract: We present a progress report on the development of the Belgrade electron/molecule data base which is hosted by The Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade and The Astronomical Observatory Belgrade. The data base has been developed under the standards of Virtual Atomic Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) project which provides a common portal for several European data bases that maintain atomic and molecular data. The Belgrade data base (BEAMDB) covers collisional data of electron interactions with atoms and molecules in the form of differential (DCS) and integrated cross sections as well as energy loss spectra. The final goal of BEAMDB becoming both a node within the VAMDC consortium and within the radiation damage RADAM data base has been achieved.

  18. Development of collisional data base for elementary processes of electron scattering by atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • BEAMDB database maintaining electron/atom-molecule collisional data has been created. • The DB is MySQL, the web server is Nginx and Python application server is Gunicorn. • Only data that have been previously published and formally refereed are included. • Data protocol for exchanging and representing data is in the “xsams” xml format. • BEAMDB becomes a node within the VAMDC consortium and radiation damage RADAM basis. - Abstract: We present a progress report on the development of the Belgrade electron/molecule data base which is hosted by The Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade and The Astronomical Observatory Belgrade. The data base has been developed under the standards of Virtual Atomic Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) project which provides a common portal for several European data bases that maintain atomic and molecular data. The Belgrade data base (BEAMDB) covers collisional data of electron interactions with atoms and molecules in the form of differential (DCS) and integrated cross sections as well as energy loss spectra. The final goal of BEAMDB becoming both a node within the VAMDC consortium and within the radiation damage RADAM data base has been achieved

  19. Improvements of the Hg cohabiting magnetometer for the nEDM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Standard Model (SM) prediction for a static electric dipole moment for the neutron, breaking time reversal and parity symmetry is several orders of magnitude below the current best experimental limit dn -26 e.cm (90 % CL). An experiment at the new ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, aims at a factor five improved sensitivity. Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields is used to detect a Larmor frequency shift for the UCN in a parallel and an antiparallel configuration of magnetic and electric fields. To determine the applied magnetic field (∼1μT) we measure the spin precession frequency of a spin polarized ensemble of 199Hg atoms in the same volume as the UCN by optical means. Currently we reach a precision of 50 fT over 100 s sampling time. I will present ideas how to further improve this magnetometer by using a laser as a light source. (author)

  20. Determining the orthogonality error of coil systems by means of a scalar magnetometer: application to delta inclination–delta declination (dIdD) magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this note, a simple method is introduced for the determination of the pitch angle between two coil axes by means of a total field magnetometer. This method is applicable when the homogeneous volume inside the coils is large enough to accommodate the sensor of a total field magnetometer. The orthogonality of calibration coil systems used for calibration of vector magnetometers can be calibrated by this procedure. The method can be easily automated and applied for the calibration of delta inclination–delta declination (dIdD) magnetometers. (technical design note)

  1. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Meade River Quadrangle, Alaska. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results obtained from an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey over the Meade River map area of Alaska are presented. Based on the criteria outlined in the general section on interpretation, a total of eight uranium anomalies have been outlined on the interpretation map. Most of these are only weakly to moderately anomalous. Zones 3 and 7 are relatively better than the others though none of the anomalies are thought to be of any economic significance. No follow-up work is recommended

  2. Searches for Exotic Transient Signals with a Global Network of Optical Magnetometers for Exotic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pustelny, S

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we describe a novel scheme for searching for physics beyond the Standard Model. The idea is based on correlation of time-synchronized readouts of distant ($\\gtrsim$100~km) optical magnetometers. Such an approach limits hard-to-identify local transient noise, providing the system with unique capabilities of identification of global transient events. Careful analysis of the signal can reveal the nature of the events (e.g., its nonmagnetic origin), which opens avenues for new class of exotic-physics searches (searches for global transient exotic spin couplings) and tests of yet unverified theoretical models.

  3. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin parallel lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin parallel lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D1 line of 87Rb with the current modulation at the 87Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by the proper choice of rf modulation power and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2x10-11τ-1/2 for observation times 1 s≤τ≤20 s. This value is limited by large VCSEL phase noise and environmental temperature fluctuation. Further improvements in frequency stability should be possible with an apparatus designed as a dedicated lin parallel lin CPT resonance clock with environmental impacts minimized.

  4. Use of atomic force microscopy to quantify slip irreversibility in a nickel-base superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risbet, M.; Feaugas, X.; Guillemer-Neel, C.; Clavel, M

    2003-09-15

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study the evolution of surface deformation during cyclic loading in a nickel-base superalloy. Cyclic slip irreversibility has been investigated using quantitative evaluation of extrusion heights and inter-band spacing. This approach is applied to formulate a microscopic crack initiation law, compared to a classical Manson-Coffin relationship.

  5. Use of atomic force microscopy to quantify slip irreversibility in a nickel-base superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study the evolution of surface deformation during cyclic loading in a nickel-base superalloy. Cyclic slip irreversibility has been investigated using quantitative evaluation of extrusion heights and inter-band spacing. This approach is applied to formulate a microscopic crack initiation law, compared to a classical Manson-Coffin relationship

  6. Atomic Structures of the Molecular Components in DNA and RNA based on Bond Lengths as Sums of Atomic Radii

    CERN Document Server

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2007-01-01

    The interpretation by the author in recent years of bond lengths as sums of the relevant atomic or ionic radii has been extended here to the bonds in the skeletal structures of adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine, uracil, ribose, deoxyribose and phosphoric acid. On examining the bond length data in the literature, it has been found that the averages of the bond lengths are close to the sums of the corresponding atomic covalent radii of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen and phosphorus. Thus, the conventional molecular structures have been resolved here, for the first time, into probable atomic structures.

  7. Magnetic confinement of neutral atoms based on patterned vortex distributions in superconducting disks and rings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Chan, K S; Beian, M; Lim, M J; Dumke, R; 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.013404

    2012-01-01

    We propose and analyze neutral atom traps generated by vortices imprinted by magnetic field pulse sequences in type-II superconducting disks and rings. We compute the supercurrent distribution and magnetic field resulting from the vortices in the superconductor. Different patterns of vortices can be written by versatile loading field sequences. We discuss in detail procedures to generate quadrupole traps, self-sufficient traps and ring traps based on superconducting disks and rings. The ease of creating these traps and the low current noise in supercurrent carrying structures makes our approach attractive for designing atom chip interferometers and probes.

  8. Area-efficient nonvolatile carry chain based on pass-transistor/atom-switch hybrid logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xu; Tsuji, Yukihide; Sakamoto, Toshitsugu; Morioka, Ayuka; Miyamura, Makoto; Tada, Munehiro; Banno, Naoki; Okamoto, Koichiro; Iguchi, Noriyuki; Hada, Hiromitsu

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, an area-efficient nonvolatile carry chain combining look-up tables and a pass-transistor-logic-based adder is newly developed using complementary atom switches without additional CMOS circuits. A proposed tristate switch composed of three pairs of complementary atom switches selects one of “0”, “1”, and the “carry_in” signal as the input of a common multiplexer for both a look-up table and an adder. The developed nonvolatile carry chain achieves the reductions of 20% area, 17% delay, and 17% power consumption, respectively, in comparison with a conventional nonvolatile carry chain using dedicated CMOS gates.

  9. Stability limits of an optical frequency standard based on free Ca atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sherman, J A

    2011-01-01

    We have quantified a short term instability budget for an optical frequency standard based on cold, freely expanding calcium atoms. Such systems are the subject of renewed interest due to their high frequency stability and relative technical simplicity compared to trapped atom optical clocks. By filtering the clock laser light at 657 nm through a high finesse cavity, we observe a slight reduction in the optical Dick effect caused by aliased local oscillator noise. The ultimately limiting technical noise is measured using a technique that does not rely on a second clock or fs-comb.

  10. Atom-chip based quantum gravimetry for the precise determination of absolute local gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abend, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel technique for the precise measurement of absolute local gravity based on cold atom interferometry. Atom interferometry utilizes the interference of matter waves interrogated by laser light to read out inertial forces. Today's generation of these devices typically operate with test mass samples, that consists of ensembles of laser cooled atoms. Their performance is limited by the velocity spread and finite-size of the test masses that impose systematic uncertainties at the level of a few μGal. Rather than laser cooled atoms we employ quantum degenerate ensembles, so called Bose-Einstein condensates, as ultra-sensitive probes for gravity. These sources offer unique properties in temperature as well as in ensemble size that will allow to overcome the current limitations with the next generation of sensors. Furthermore, atom-chip technologies offer the possibility to generate Bose-Einstein condensates in a fast and reliable way. We show a lab-based prototype that uses the atom-chip itself to retro-reflect the interrogation laser and thus serving as inertial reference inside the vacuum. With this setup it is possible to demonstrate all necessary steps to measure gravity, including the preparation of the source, spanning an interferometer as well as the detection of the output signal, within an area of 1 cm3 right below the atom-chip and to analyze relevant systematic effects. In the framework of the center of excellence geoQ a next generation device is under construction at the Institut für Quantenoptik, that will allow for in-field measurements. This device will feature a state-of-the-art atom-chip source with a high-flux of ultra-cold atoms at a repetition rate of 1-2 Hz. In cooperation with the Müller group at the Institut für Erdmessung the sensor will be characterized in the laboratory first, to be ultimately employed in campaigns to measure the Fennoscandian uplift at the level of 1 μGal. The presented work is part of the center of

  11. Low Power, Self Calibrated Vector Magnetometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR project investigates a novel approach to vector magnetometry based on high precision measurements of the total magnetic field. The calibration is...

  12. Atomic Structures of Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) and its Reduced Form with Bond Lengths Based on Additivity of Atomic Radii

    OpenAIRE

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown recently that chemical bond lengths, in general, like those in the components of nucleic acids, caffeine related compounds, all essential amino acids, methane, benzene, graphene and fullerene are sums of the radii of adjacent atoms constituting the bond. Earlier, the crystal ionic distances in all alkali halides and lengths of many partially ionic bonds were also accounted for by the additivity of ionic as well as covalent radii. Here, the atomic structures of riboflavin and...

  13. Atomic Structures of the Molecular Components in DNA and RNA based on Bond Lengths as Sums of Atomic Radii

    OpenAIRE

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2007-01-01

    The interpretation by the author in recent years of bond lengths as sums of the relevant atomic or ionic radii has been extended here to the bonds in the skeletal structures of adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine, uracil, ribose, deoxyribose and phosphoric acid. On examining the bond length data in the literature, it has been found that the averages of the bond lengths are close to the sums of the corresponding atomic covalent radii of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen and phosphorus. Thus, ...

  14. Testing general relativity and alternative theories of gravity with space-based atomic clocks and atom interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Bondarescu Ruxandra; Schärer Andreas; Jetzer Philippe; Angélil Raymond; Saha Prasenjit; Lundgren Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft's reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gra...

  15. Condensate Splitting in an Asymmetric Double Well for Atom Chip Based Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the adiabatic splitting of a Bose-Einstein condensate of 87Rb atoms by an asymmetric double-well potential located above the edge of a perpendicularly magnetized TbGdFeCo film atom chip. By controlling the barrier height and double-well asymmetry, the sensitivity of the axial splitting process is investigated through observation of the fractional atom distribution between the left and right wells. This process constitutes a novel sensor for which we infer a single shot sensitivity to gravity fields of δg/g≅2x10-4. From a simple analytic model, we propose improvements to chip-based gravity detectors using this demonstrated methodology

  16. Towards a Re-definition of the Second Based on Optical Atomic Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    The rapid increase in accuracy and stability of optical atomic clocks compared to the caesium atomic clock as primary standard of time and frequency asks for a future re-definition of the second in the International System of Units (SI). The status of the optical clocks based on either single ions in radio-frequency traps or on neutral atoms stored in an optical lattice is described with special emphasis of the current work at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Besides the development and operation of different optical clocks with estimated fractional uncertainties in the 10^-18 range, the supporting work on ultra-stable lasers as core elements and the means to compare remote optical clocks via transportable standards, optical fibers, or transportable clocks is reported. Finally, the conditions, methods and next steps are discussed that are the prerequisites for a future re-definition of the second.

  17. Cavity-based quantum networks with single atoms and optical photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiserer, Andreas; Rempe, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    Distributed quantum networks will allow users to perform tasks and to interact in ways which are not possible with present-day technology. Their implementation is a key challenge for quantum science and requires the development of stationary quantum nodes that can send and receive as well as store and process quantum information locally. The nodes are connected by quantum channels for flying information carriers, i.e., photons. These channels serve both to directly exchange quantum information between nodes and to distribute entanglement over the whole network. In order to scale such networks to many particles and long distances, an efficient interface between the nodes and the channels is required. This article describes the cavity-based approach to this goal, with an emphasis on experimental systems in which single atoms are trapped in and coupled to optical resonators. Besides being conceptually appealing, this approach is promising for quantum networks on larger scales, as it gives access to long qubit coherence times and high light-matter coupling efficiencies. Thus, it allows one to generate entangled photons on the push of a button, to reversibly map the quantum state of a photon onto an atom, to transfer and teleport quantum states between remote atoms, to entangle distant atoms, to detect optical photons nondestructively, to perform entangling quantum gates between an atom and one or several photons, and even provides a route toward efficient heralded quantum memories for future repeaters. The presented general protocols and the identification of key parameters are applicable to other experimental systems.

  18. Construction of an AMR magnetometer for car detection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fúra, V.; Petrucha, V.; Platil, A.

    2016-03-01

    A new construction of magnetometer with commercially available AMR (anisotropic magnetoresistive) sensors intended for vehicle detection experiments is presented. Initial experiments with simple AMR gradiometer indicated viability of the approach in a real- world setup. For further experiments and acquisition of representative data, a new design of precise multi-channel magnetometer was developed. The design supports two models of commercial AMR sensors: the proven and reliable, but obsolete Honeywell HMC1021-series sensors and newly available Sensitec AFF755B sensors. In the comparison the two types are similar in most achieved parameters, except offset stability in flipped operation regime. Unfortunately, the new AFF755B sensors seem to have perhaps inferior coupling of the flipping (set/reset) coil to the ferromagnetic core that causes insufficient saturation of the AMR material. The issue is being solved by Sensitec, current deliverables of the AFF755B have “product sample” status (September 2015).

  19. Ionospheric travelling convection vortices observed by the Greenland magnetometer chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Stolle, Claudia; Friis-Christensen, Eigil;

    2013-01-01

    The Greenland magnetometer array continuously provides geomagnetic variometer data since the early eighties. With the polar cusp passing over it almost every day, the array is suitable to detect ionospheric traveling convection vortices (TCVs), which were rst detected by Friis-Christensen et al....... [1988]. A climatological assessment of their occurrence properties using Greenland data in 1996 has been presented by Clauer and Petrov [2002]. In our ongoing study, a detection algorithm for TCVs in Greenland magnetic data is being developed and the rst results of their climatological assessment are...... discussed. Specifically, three years of magnetometer data, from 1986 to 1988, collected at seven stations at the West coast of Greenland are analysed and TCV events are identied and isolated. The events are classied with respect to their intensity, duration and time of occurrence and they are correlated...

  20. Combined alternating gradient force magnetometer and susceptometer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, M; Ranchal, R; de Mendizábal Vázquez, I; Cobos, P; Aroca, C

    2015-01-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new system that combines the performances of two different types of magnetic characterization systems, Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometers (AGFM) and susceptometers. The flexibility of our system is demonstrated by its capability to be used as any of them, AGFM or susceptometer, without any modification in the experimental set-up because of the electronics we have developed. Our system has a limit of sensitivity lower than 5 × 10(-7) emu. Moreover, its main advantage is demonstrated by the possibility of measuring small quantities of materials under DC or AC magnetic fields that cannot properly be measured with a commercial vibrating sample magnetometers or AGFM. PMID:25638125

  1. Combined alternating gradient force magnetometer and susceptometer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new system that combines the performances of two different types of magnetic characterization systems, Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometers (AGFM) and susceptometers. The flexibility of our system is demonstrated by its capability to be used as any of them, AGFM or susceptometer, without any modification in the experimental set-up because of the electronics we have developed. Our system has a limit of sensitivity lower than 5 × 10−7 emu. Moreover, its main advantage is demonstrated by the possibility of measuring small quantities of materials under DC or AC magnetic fields that cannot properly be measured with a commercial vibrating sample magnetometers or AGFM

  2. Vector Cesium Magnetometer for the nEDM Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We use optical pumping combined with magnetic resonance in a Cesium vapor cell in order to measure the magnetic field. A Vector Cs Magnetometer uses multiple laser beams to follow the dynamics of the spin in 3D. The 3D signal is used to extract the Larmor frequency of the spins, and to extract the direction of the magnetic field through the path of the spins. The magnetometer was successfully tested in a proof of principle experiment. Its measured performance is ∼50 pT/Hz1/2 for the directions perpendicular to the magnetic field, and ∼500 fT/Hz1/2 for the direction parallel to the magnetic field. (author)

  3. Versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing magnetic properties of nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, J. F. D. F.; Bruno, A. C.; Louro, S. R. W. [Department of Physics, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 22451-900 (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    We constructed a versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing iron oxide nanoparticles. The magnetometer can be operated at room temperature or inside a cryocooler at temperatures as low as 6 K. The magnetometer’s sensor can be easily exchanged and different detection electronics can be used. We tested the assembly with a non-cryogenic commercial Hall sensor and a benchtop multimeter in a four-wire resistance measurement scheme. A magnetic moment sensitivity of 8.5 × 10{sup −8} Am{sup 2} was obtained with this configuration. To illustrate the capability of the assembly, we synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles coated with different amounts of a triblock copolymer, Pluronic F-127, and characterized their magnetic properties. We determined that the polymer coating does not affect the magnetization of the particles at room temperature and demonstrates that it is possible to estimate the average size of coating layers from measurements of the magnetic field of the sample.

  4. Versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing magnetic properties of nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We constructed a versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing iron oxide nanoparticles. The magnetometer can be operated at room temperature or inside a cryocooler at temperatures as low as 6 K. The magnetometer’s sensor can be easily exchanged and different detection electronics can be used. We tested the assembly with a non-cryogenic commercial Hall sensor and a benchtop multimeter in a four-wire resistance measurement scheme. A magnetic moment sensitivity of 8.5 × 10−8 Am2 was obtained with this configuration. To illustrate the capability of the assembly, we synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles coated with different amounts of a triblock copolymer, Pluronic F-127, and characterized their magnetic properties. We determined that the polymer coating does not affect the magnetization of the particles at room temperature and demonstrates that it is possible to estimate the average size of coating layers from measurements of the magnetic field of the sample

  5. Combined alternating gradient force magnetometer and susceptometer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, M.; Mendizábal Vázquez, I. de; Aroca, C. [Dpto. Física Aplicada, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ranchal, R. [Dpto. Física de Materiales, Facultad Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Cobos, P. [ISOM, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new system that combines the performances of two different types of magnetic characterization systems, Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometers (AGFM) and susceptometers. The flexibility of our system is demonstrated by its capability to be used as any of them, AGFM or susceptometer, without any modification in the experimental set-up because of the electronics we have developed. Our system has a limit of sensitivity lower than 5 × 10{sup −7} emu. Moreover, its main advantage is demonstrated by the possibility of measuring small quantities of materials under DC or AC magnetic fields that cannot properly be measured with a commercial vibrating sample magnetometers or AGFM.

  6. Designing coarse grained-and atom based-potentials for protein-protein docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobi Dror

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein docking is a challenging computational problem in functional genomics, particularly when one or both proteins undergo conformational change(s upon binding. The major challenge is to define a scoring function soft enough to tolerate these changes and specific enough to distinguish between near-native and "misdocked" conformations. Results Using a linear programming (LP technique, we developed two types of potentials: (i Side chain-based and (ii Heavy atom-based. To achieve this we considered a set of 161 transient complexes and generated a large set of putative docked structures (decoys, based on a shape complementarity criterion, for each complex. The demand on the potentials was to yield, for the native (correctly docked structure, a potential energy lower than those of any of the non-native (misdocked structures. We show that the heavy atom-based potentials were able to comply with this requirement but not the side chain-based one. Thus, despite the smaller number of parameters, the capability of heavy atom-based potentials to discriminate between native and "misdocked" conformations is improved relative to those of the side chain-based potentials. The performance of the atom-based potentials was evaluated by a jackknife test on a set of 50 complexes taken from the Zdock2.3 decoys set. Conclusions Our results show that, using the LP approach, we were able to train our potentials using a dataset of transient complexes only the newly developed potentials outperform three other known potentials in this test.

  7. Efficient polarization insensitive complex wavefront control using Huygens' metasurfaces based on dielectric resonant meta-atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Katie E.; Wang, Lei; Staude, Isabelle; James, Anthony; Dominguez, Jason; Liu, Sheng; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Decker, Manuel; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Brener, Igal; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2016-01-01

    Subwavelength-thin metasurfaces have shown great promises for the control of optical wavefronts, thus opening new pathways for the development of efficient flat optics. In particular, Huygens' metasurfaces based on all-dielectric resonant meta-atoms have already shown a huge potential for practical applications with their polarization insensitivity and high transmittance efficiency. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a polarization insensitive holographic Huygens' metasurface based on dielec...

  8. An Automated Home Made Low Cost Vibrating Sample Magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kundu, S

    2011-01-01

    The design and operation of a homemade low cost vibrating sample magnetometer is described here. The sensitivity of this instrument is better than 10-2 emu and found to be very efficient for the measurement of magnetization of most of the ferromagnetic and other magnetic materials as a function of temperature down to 77 K and magnetic field upto 800 Oe. Both M(H) and M(T) data acquisition are fully automated employing computer and Labview software

  9. Critical state analysis using continuous reading SQUID magnetometer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janů, Zdeněk; Švindrych, Zdeněk; Youssef, A.; Baničová, L.

    Rijeka : Intech, 2011 - (Luiz, A.), s. 261-276 ISBN 978-953-307-151-0 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0722 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : thin superconducting films * critical state * critical current density Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://www.intechopen.com/articles/show/title/critical-state-analysis-using-continuous-reading- squid -magnetometer

  10. General theory of detection of signal induced in vibrating magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assuming the point dipole approximation only and making use of the vectorial notation, signal (EMF) induced in a single-turn pick-up coil of the vibrating magnetometer are calculated for the case of any orientation of the coil, of vibration axis and of the magnetic moment of the sample. On the basis of formula obtained, three types of measurement geometries have been distinquished and for these the qualitative analysis is made. (author)

  11. J-MAG: Magnetometer science on the JUICE mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Michele

    2014-05-01

    The magnetometer instrument onboard JUICE is one of the core instruments on the payload and is critical for resolving some of the prime science objectives of the mission. The primary science objectives of JUICE which will be constrained by the magnetic field observations will be described. They include characterising ocean properties at Ganymede, Callisto and Europa, resolving the dynamo magnetic field at Ganymede as well as better understanding magnetospheric dynamics.

  12. A broadband two axis flux-gate magnetometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Palangio

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available A broadband two axis flux-gate magnetometer was developed to obtain high sensitivity in magnetotelluric measurements. In magnetotelluric sounding, natural low frequency electromagnetic fields are used to estimate the conductivity of the Earth's interior. Because variations in the natural magnetic field have small amplitude(10-100 pT in the frequency range 1 Hz to 100 Hz, highly sensitive magnetic sensors are required. In magnetotelluric measurements two long and heavy solenoids, which must be installed, in the field station, perpendicular to each other (north-south and east-west and levelled in the horizontal plane are used. The coil is a critical component in magnetotelluric measurements because very slight motions create noise voltages, particularly troublesome in wooded areas; generally the installation takes place in a shallow trench. Moreover the coil records the derivative of the variations rather than the magnetic field variations, consequently the transfer function (amplitude and phase of this sensor is not constant throughout the frequency range 0.001-100 Hz. The instrument, developed at L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory, has a flat response in both amplitude and phase in the frequency band DC-100 Hz, in addition it has low weight, low power, small volume and it is easier to install in the field than induction magnetometers. The sensivity of this magnetometer is 10 pT rms.

  13. A YBCO RF-SQUID magnetometer and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luwei, Zhou; Jingwu, Qiu; Xienfeng, Zhang; Zhiming, Tank; Yongjia, Qian

    1990-01-01

    An applicable RF-superconducting quantum interference detector (SQUID) magnetometer was made using a bulk sintered yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO). The temperature range of the magnetometer is 77 to 300 K and the field range 0 to 0.1T. At 77 K, the equivalent flux noise of the SQUID is 5 x 10 to minus 4 power theta sub o/square root of Hz at the frequency range of 20 to 200 Hz. The experiments show that the SQUID noise at low-frequency end is mainly from 1/f noise. A coil test shows that the magnetic moment sensitivity delta m is 10 to the minus 6th power emu. The RF-SQUID is shielded in a YBCO cylinder with a shielding ability B sub in/B sub ex of about 10 to the minus 6th power when external dc magnetic field is about a few Oe. The magnetometer is successfully used in characterizing superconducting thin films.

  14. AC Circuit Measurements with a Differential Hall Element Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Matthew W.; Nicks, B. Scott; Quintero, Pedro A.; Meisel, Mark W.

    2013-03-01

    As the biomedical field grows, there is an increasing need to quickly and efficiently characterize more samples at room temperature. An automated magnetometer was commissioned to do these room temperature magnetic characterizations. This magnetometer, which is inspired by a Differential Hall Element Magnetometer,[2] uses two commercially available Hall elements wired in series. One Hall element measures the external magnetic field of a 9 T superconducting magnet and the other measures the same external field plus the field due to the magnetization of the sample that sits on top of the Hall element. The difference between these two Hall elements is taken while a linear stepper motor sweeps through the external magnetic field. The linear motor and data acquisition are controlled by a LabVIEW program. Recently, the system was outfitted for AC circuit measurements and these data will be compared to DC circuit data. In addition, the lowest signal to noise ratio will be found in order to deduce the smallest amount of sample needed to register an accurate coercive field. Supported by the NSF via NHMFL REU (DMR-0654118), a single investigator grant (DMR-1202033 to MWM) and by the UF Undergraduate Scholars Program.

  15. In-Flight Calibration Processes for the MMS Fluxgate Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromund, K. R.; Leinweber, H. K.; Plaschke, F.; Strangeway, R. J.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Nakamura, R.; Anderson, B. J.; Russell, C. T.; Baumjohann, W.; Chutter, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Le, G.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, L.

    2015-12-01

    The calibration effort for the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) Analog Fluxgate (AFG) and Digital Fluxgate (DFG) magnetometers is a coordinated effort between three primary institutions: University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA); Space Research Institute, Graz, Austria (IWF); and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Since the successful deployment of all 8 magnetometers on 17 March 2015, the effort to confirm and update the ground calibrations has been underway during the MMS commissioning phase. The in-flight calibration processes evaluate twelve parameters that determine the alignment, orthogonalization, offsets, and gains for all 8 magnetometers using algorithms originally developed by UCLA and the Technical University of Braunschweig and tailored to MMS by IWF, UCLA, and GSFC. We focus on the processes run at GSFC to determine the eight parameters associated with spin tones and harmonics. We will also discuss the processing flow and interchange of parameters between GSFC, IWF, and UCLA. IWF determines the low range spin axis offsets using the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI). UCLA determines the absolute gains and sensor azimuth orientation using Earth field comparisons. We evaluate the performance achieved for MMS and give examples of the quality of the resulting calibrations.

  16. Detection Range of Airborne Magnetometers in Magnetic Anomaly Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjing Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Airborne magnetometers are utilized for the small-range search, precise positioning, and identification of the ferromagnetic properties of underwater targets. As an important performance parameter of sensors, the detection range of airborne magnetometers is commonly set as a fixed value in references regardless of the influences of environment noise, target magnetic properties, and platform features in a classical model to detect airborne magnetic anomalies. As a consequence, deviation in detection ability analysis is observed. In this study, a novel detection range model is proposed on the basis of classic detection range models of airborne magnetometers. In this model, probability distribution is applied, and the magnetic properties of targets and the environment noise properties of a moving submarine are considered. The detection range model is also constructed by considering the distribution of the moving submarine during detection. A cell-averaging greatest-of-constant false alarm rate test method is also used to calculate the detection range of the model at a desired false alarm rate. The detection range model is then used to establish typical submarine search probabilistic models. Results show that the model can be used to evaluate not only the effects of ambient magnetic noise but also the moving and geomagnetic features of the target and airborne detection platform. The model can also be utilized to display the actual operating range of sensor systems.

  17. Automated system for the calibration of magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrucha, Vojtech; Kaspar, Petr; Ripka, Pavel;

    2009-01-01

    one example. The new platform can also be used to evaluate the parameters of the compass in all possible variations in azimuth, pitch, and roll. The system is based on piezoelectric motors, which are placed on a platform made of aluminum, brass, plastic, and glass. Position sensing is accomplished...

  18. Low frequency gravitational wave detection with ground-based atom interferometer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaibi, W.; Geiger, R.; Canuel, B.; Bertoldi, A.; Landragin, A.; Bouyer, P.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new detection strategy for gravitational waves (GWs) below a few hertz based on a correlated array of atom interferometers (AIs). Our proposal allows us to reduce the Newtonian noise (NN), which limits all ground based GW detectors below a few hertz, including previous atom interferometry-based concepts. Using an array of long baseline AI gradiometers yields several estimations of the NN, whose effect can thus be reduced via statistical averaging. Considering the km baseline of current optical detectors, a NN rejection of a factor of 2 could be achieved and tested with existing AI array geometries. Exploiting the correlation properties of the gravity acceleration noise, we show that a tenfold or more NN rejection is possible with a dedicated configuration. Considering a conservative NN model and the current developments in cold atom technology, we show that strain sensitivities below 1 ×10-19/√{Hz } in the 0.3 -3 Hz frequency band can be within reach, with a peak sensitivity of 3 ×10-23/√{Hz } at 2 Hz . Our proposed configuration could extend the observation window of current detectors by a decade and fill the gap between ground-based and space-based instruments.

  19. Generating multi-atom entangled W states via light-matter interface based fusion mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xue-Ping; Yang, Ming; Ozaydin, Fatih; Song, Wei; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    W state is a key resource in quantum communication. Fusion technology has been proven to be a good candidate for preparing a large-size W state from two or more small-size W states in linear optical system. It is of great importance to study how to fuse W states via light-matter interface. Here we show that it is possible to prepare large-size W-state networks using a fusion mechanism in cavity QED system. The detuned interaction between three atoms and a vacuum cavity mode constitute the main fusion mechanism, based on which two or three small-size atomic W states can be fused into a larger-size W state. If no excitation is detected from those three atoms, the remaining atoms are still in the product of two or three new W states, which can be re-fused. The complicated Fredkin gate used in the previous fusion schemes is avoided here. W states of size 2 can be fused as well. The feasibility analysis shows that our fusion processes maybe implementable with the current technology. Our results demonstrate how the light-matter interaction based fusion mechanism can be realized, and may become the starting point for the fusion of multipartite entanglement in cavity QED system. PMID:26548649

  20. On the control of magnetic perturbing field onboard landers: the Magnetometer Protection program for the ESA ExoMars/Humboldt MSMO magnetometer experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menvielle, M.; Primdahl, Fritz; Brauer, Peter;

    to planetary research. The major difficulty in implementing a magnetometer experiment onboard a lander is to achieve at acceptable costs a good Magnetometer Protection, namely to control the perturbing magnetic field generated by the lander during operations at the planetary surfa ce, so as to achieve...

  1. Atomic orbital-based SOS-MP2 with tensor hypercontraction. I. GPU-based tensor construction and exploiting sparsity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chenchen; Martínez, Todd J.

    2016-05-01

    We present a tensor hypercontracted (THC) scaled opposite spin second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (SOS-MP2) method. By using THC, we reduce the formal scaling of SOS-MP2 with respect to molecular size from quartic to cubic. We achieve further efficiency by exploiting sparsity in the atomic orbitals and using graphical processing units (GPUs) to accelerate integral construction and matrix multiplication. The practical scaling of GPU-accelerated atomic orbital-based THC-SOS-MP2 calculations is found to be N2.6 for reference data sets of water clusters and alanine polypeptides containing up to 1600 basis functions. The errors in correlation energy with respect to density-fitting-SOS-MP2 are less than 0.5 kcal/mol for all systems tested (up to 162 atoms).

  2. Atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We will first present a development of the fundamental principles of atom interferometers. Next we will discuss a few of the various methods now available to split and recombine atomic De Broglie waves, with special emphasis on atom interferometers based on optical pulses. We will also be particularly concerned with high precision interferometers with long measurement times such those made with atomic fountains. The application of atom interferometry to the measurement of the acceleration due to gravity will be detailed. We will also develop the atom interferometry based on adiabatic transfer and we will apply it to the measurement of the photon recoil in the case of the Doppler shift of an atomic resonance caused by the momentum recoil from an absorbed photon. Finally the outlook of future developments will be given. (A.C.)

  3. netPICOMAG: a low-cost turn-key magnetometer for aurora detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, I.; Connors, M.

    2008-12-01

    Previous work on development of a compact, low-cost, fluxgate magnetometer, dubbed PICOMAG, yielded a 1-nanotesla resolution, 1-second cadence instrument, suitable for research or teaching solar/terrestrial physics. With a low-cost magnetic instrument and the wider availability of Internet connectivity in the auroral zone (of Canada for example), the potential exists to fill gaps in spatial coverage that still plague auroral geomagnetic research. Thus, the ability to widely distribute accurate, low cost magnetometers was the motivating factor to develop PICOMAG. NetPICOMAG was developed in the effort to refine PICOMAG into a turn-key magnetometer data collection system that is self contained, simple to install and requires zero-maintenance. Once the unit is placed in the ground and connected to the Internet, it locks onto a GPS time signal and begins to transmit magnetic field measurements back to a central data repository, where it is archived, processed and plotted for public viewing via the World Wide Web. It is envisaged (among many other uses) that science teachers can use real scientific data provided by netPICOMAG in teaching the interactions between the sun and the Earth's magnetic field, manifesting itself in the phenomenon known as the northern lights. As such, netPICOMAG can be aptly described and is being promoted as an aurora detector. The netPICOMAG unit is based around three spatially oriented Speake and Company FGM-3/3h series magnetic field sensors that each emit a pulse stream whose frequency is related to the magnetic field along these three axes, and is nearly linearly related to magnetic field perturbations relevant to auroral studies. The individual pulse frequencies are measured by two PIC18F252 programmable microcontrollers. The measurements are combined with a GPS timestamp from a Garmin GPS 18 LVC GPS receiver, and transmitted as plain text as UDP datagrams by a Rabbit Semiconductor RCM4010 8-bit, networked microcontroller module. The self

  4. Feasibility Study for an Autonomous UAV -Magnetometer System -- Final Report on SERDP SEED 1509:2206

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelof Versteeg; Mark McKay; Matt Anderson; Ross Johnson; Bob Selfridge; Jay Bennett

    2007-09-01

    Large areas across the United States are potentially contaminated with UXO, with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with 1) near 100 % coverage and 2) near 100 % detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area scanning is a multi-level one, in which medium altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry followed by surface investigations using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be effective for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 – 3 meters. These altitude requirements means that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys (resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre). Surface towed arrays provide high resolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. Thus, other systems are needed allowing for effective data collection. An UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it would be safer for the operators, cheaper in initial and O&M costs, and more effective in terms of site characterization. However, while UAV data acquisition from fixed wing platforms for large (> 200 feet) stand off distances is relatively straight forward, a host of challenges exist for low stand-off distance (~ 6 feet) UAV geophysical data acquisition. The objective of SERDP SEED 1509:2006 was to identify the primary challenges

  5. Development of atomic radical monitoring probe and its application to spatial distribution measurements of H and O atomic radical densities in radical-based plasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic radicals such as hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) play important roles in process plasmas. In a previous study, we developed a system for measuring the absolute density of H, O, nitrogen, and carbon atoms in plasmas using vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS) with a compact light source using an atmospheric pressure microplasma [microdischarge hollow cathode lamp (MHCL)]. In this study, we developed a monitoring probe for atomic radicals employing the VUVAS with the MHCL. The probe size was 2.7 mm in diameter. Using this probe, only a single port needs to be accessed for radical density measurements. We successfully measured the spatial distribution of the absolute densities of H and O atomic radicals in a radical-based plasma processing system by moving the probe along the radial direction of the chamber. This probe allows convenient analysis of atomic radical densities to be carried out for any type of process plasma at any time. We refer to this probe as a ubiquitous monitoring probe for atomic radicals.

  6. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Saz, J; Herrera, M; Delgado, F J; Duguay, S; Philippe, T; Gonzalez, M; Abell, J; Walters, R J; Molina, S I

    2016-07-29

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs. PMID:27306098

  7. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Saz, J.; Herrera, M.; Delgado, F. J.; Duguay, S.; Philippe, T.; Gonzalez, M.; Abell, J.; Walters, R. J.; Molina, S. I.

    2016-07-01

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs.

  8. Atomic Level Design Rule for Ta-based Resistive Switching devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seo Hyoung; Hong, S.; Lee, M.-J.; Kim, Y.-B.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Shibata, T.; Magyari-Kope, B.; Kaduk, J. A.; Eastman, J. A.; Kim, J.

    2013-03-01

    Understanding resistive switching phenomena is a prerequisite to realizing the next generation of information storage systems. Ta-based resistive switching devices have been extensively investigated due to their fast switching and reliable endurance among other materials. Despite extensive recent interests, there is still a lack of fundamental understanding of electronic structure and local structure of the Ta-based device. Here, we investigated Ta2O5 powder, Ta2O5-δ and TaOx thin films and devices using synchrotron x-ray studies at the Advanced Photon Source, combining resonant x-ray inelastic scattering (RIXS), extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) and density functional theory based ab initio calculations. We found that there are strong correlations between critical values of band gap energies and local atomic environments around Ta atoms. These studies can provide vast possibilities to create new materials based on atomic level design rather than the traditional trial-error methods. Work at the APS, Argonne is supported by a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  9. Fault Line Selection Method of Small Current to Ground System Based on Atomic Sparse Decomposition and Extreme Learning Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a fault line voting selection method based on atomic sparse decomposition (ASD and extreme learning machine (ELM. Firstly, it adopted ASD algorithm to decompose zero sequence current of every feeder line at first two cycles and selected the first four atoms to construct main component atom library, fundamental atom library, and transient characteristic atom libraries 1 and 2, respectively. And it used information entropy theory to calculate the atom libraries; the measure values of information entropy are got. It constructed four ELM networks to train and test atom sample and then obtained every network accuracy. At last, it combined the ELM network output and confidence degree to vote and then compared the vote number to achieve fault line selection (FLS. Simulation experiment illustrated that the method accuracy is 100%, it is not affected by fault distance and transition resistance, and it has strong ability of antinoise interference.

  10. Atom location using scanning transmission electron microscopy based on electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The technique of atom location by channelling enhanced microanalysis (ALCHEMI) using cross section data, measured as a function of electron beam orientation, has been widely implemented by many researchers. The accurate application of ALCHEMI, usually based on energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), requires knowledge, from first principles, of the relative delocalization of the inner-shell ionization interaction (see for example Oxley and Allen, 1998; Oxley et al., 1999). Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) also provides information about the location of atoms of different types within the crystal lattice. Unlike high angle annular dark field (HAADF), EELS provides a unique signal for each atom type. In conjunction with highly focused probes, allowing near atomic resolution, this makes possible, in principle, the application of ALCHEMI like techniques to STEM images to determine the distribution of impurities within the unit cell. The accurate interpretation of STEM results requires that both the inner-shell ionization interaction and resulting ionization cross section or image be correctly modelled. We present model calculations demonstrating the in principle application of ALCHEMI type techniques to STEM images pertinent to EELS. The inner-shell ionisation interaction is modelled using Hartree-Fock wave functions to describe the atomic bound states and Hartree-Slater wave functions to describe the continuum states. The wave function within the crystal is calculated using boundary conditions appropriate for a highly focussed probe (Rossouw and Allen, 2001) and STEM images or ionisation cross sections are simulated using an inelastic cross section formulation that correctly accounts for the contribution from both dynamical electrons and those dechannelled by absorptive scattering processes such as thermal diffuse scattering (TDS). Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy

  11. Comparing Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry Approaches to Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Thorpe, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Thoroughly studied classic space-based gravitational-wave missions concepts such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) are based on laser-interferometry techniques. Ongoing developments in atom-interferometry techniques have spurred recently proposed alternative mission concepts. These different approaches can be understood on a common footing. We present an comparative analysis of how each type of instrument responds to some of the noise sources which may limiting gravitational-wave mission concepts. Sensitivity to laser frequency instability is essentially the same for either approach. Spacecraft acceleration reference stability sensitivities are different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but acceleration noise requirements are nonetheless similar. Each approach has distinct additional measurement noise issues.

  12. Atomic force microscopy imaging to measure precipitate volume fraction in nickel-based superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nickel-based superalloys, quantitative analysis of scanning electron microscopy images fails in providing accurate microstructural data, whereas more efficient techniques are very time-consuming. As an alternative approach, the authors propose to perform quantitative analysis of atomic force microscopy images of polished/etched surfaces (quantitative microprofilometry). This permits the measurement of microstructural parameters and the depth of etching, which is the main source of measurement bias. Thus, nonbiased estimations can be obtained by extrapolation of the measurements up to zero etching depth. In this article, the authors used this approach to estimate the volume fraction of γ' precipitates in a nickel-based superalloy single crystal. Atomic force microscopy images of samples etched for different times show definition, homogeneity, and contrast high enough to perform image analysis. The result after extrapolation is in very good agreement with volume fraction values available from published reports

  13. Miniature Bose–Einstein condensate system design based on a transparent atom chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Jingfang; Xu, Xinping; Jiang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Haichao; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new miniature Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) system based on a transparent atom chip with a compact external coil structure. A standard six-beam macroscopic magneto-optical trap (MOT) is able to be created near the chip surface due to the chip’s transparency. A novel wire pattern consisting of a double-z wire and a z-shaped wire is designed on the transparent atom chip. With a vertical bias magnetic field, the double-z wire can create the quadrupole magnetic field of an intermediate chip MOT, which is suitable for transporting atoms from the macroscopic MOT to the chip z-wire trap efficiently. The compact external coil structure is designed with a rectangular frameless geometry consisting of only four coil pairs and its volume is less than 0.3 liters. The maximum system power consumption during the BEC generation procedure is about 45 W. The miniature system is evaluated, and about 3 × 106 atoms can be loaded into the chip z-wire trap. The miniature chip BEC system has the advantages of small volume and low power consumption, and it has great potential for practical applications of BEC.

  14. Low-voltage coherent electron imaging based on a single-atom electron

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Wei-Tse; Hsu, Wei-Hao; Chang, Mu-Tung; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2015-01-01

    It has been a general trend to develop low-voltage electron microscopes due to their high imaging contrast of the sample and low radiation damage. Atom-resolved transmission electron microscopes with voltages as low as 15-40 kV have been demonstrated. However, achieving atomic resolution at voltages lower than 10 kV is extremely difficult. An alternative approach is coherent imaging or phase retrieval imaging, which requires a sufficiently coherent source and an adequately small detection area on the sample as well as the detection of high-angle diffracted patterns with a sufficient resolution. In this work, we propose several transmission-type schemes to achieve coherent imaging of thin materials (less than 5 nm thick) with atomic resolution at voltages lower than 10 kV. Experimental schemes of both lens-less and lens-containing designs are presented and the advantages and challenges of these schemes are discussed. Preliminary results based on a highly coherent single-atom electron source are presented. The ...

  15. Measurement of 5-eV atomic oxygen using carbon-based films: preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    White, C de B; Roberts, G. T.; Chambers, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon-based sensors have been developed to measure the atmospheric neutral atomic oxygen (AO) flux experienced by spacecraft in low Earth orbit. Thin- and thick-film carbon sensor elements were deposited onto an alumina substrate between thick-film gold tracks and silver palladium solder pads. AO flux is deduced by measuring resistance changes as the carbon film erodes and applying a simple theory. A wide range of responses were observed that are dependent on the deposition process and post ...

  16. Atomic absorption determination of platinum and rhenium in deactivated catalysts based on γ-alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A flame atomic absorption method has been developed for the determination of Pt and Re in deactivated catalysts based on γ-Al2O3. Hydrofluoric acid is used for catalyst dissolution. The lower determination limits are 1 μg/ml for Pt and 5 μg/ml for Re, RSD are 0.01-0.15 and 0.03-0.25 respectively

  17. Experimental determination of conduction channels in atomic scale conductors based on shot noise measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Vardimon, Ran; Klionsky, Marina; Tal, Oren

    2013-01-01

    We present an experimental procedure for obtaining the conduction channels of low-dimensional conductors based on shot noise measurements. The transmission coefficient for each channel is determined numerically from the measured conductance and Fano factor. The channel analysis is demonstrated for atomic contacts of Ag, Au, Al and Pt, showing their channel evolution as a function of conductance and mechanical elongation. This approach can be readily applied to map the conduction channels in a...

  18. Athermalization in atomic force microscope based force spectroscopy using matched microstructure coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Torun, H.; Finkler, O.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a method for athermalization in atomic force microscope (AFM) based force spectroscopy applications using microstructures that thermomechanically match the AFM probes. The method uses a setup where the AFM probe is coupled with the matched structure and the displacements of both structures are read out simultaneously. The matched structure displaces with the AFM probe as temperature changes, thus the force applied to the sample can be kept constant without the need for a ...

  19. Atomic mercury flux monitoring using an optical parametric oscillator based lidar system

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Weibring, Petter; Edner, Hans; Svanberg, Sune

    2004-01-01

    A newly developed optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been applied to the monitoring of atomic mercury emissions at several chlor-alkali plants in Europe. The versatility of the system is illustrated by measured time series of mercury flux and movies of vertical and horizontal concentration distributions, which yield important input parameters for the environmental community. Long term measurements of the resonance absorption of mercury at...

  20. Radical zinc-atom-transfer-based carbozincation of haloalkynes with dialkylzincs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Chemla

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of alkylidenezinc carbenoids by 1,4-addition/carbozincation of dialkylzincs or alkyl iodides based on zinc atom radical transfer, in the presence of dimethylzinc with β-(propargyloxyenoates having pendant iodo- and bromoalkynes, is disclosed. Formation of the carbenoid intermediate is fully stereoselective at −30 °C and arises from a formal anti-selective carbozincation reaction. Upon warming, the zinc carbenoid is stereochemically labile and isomerizes to its more stable form.

  1. Atom-probe tomography of tribological boundary films resulting from boron-based oil additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Baik, Sung-Il; Bertolucci-Coelho, Leonardo; Mazzaferro, Lucca; Ramirez, Giovanni; Erdemir, Ali; Seidman, D K

    2016-01-15

    Correlative characterization using atom-probe tomography (APT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on a tribofilm formed during sliding frictional testing with a fully formulated engine oil, which also contains a boron-based additive. The tribofilm formed is ~15 nm thick and consists of oxides of iron and compounds of B, Ca, P, and S, which are present in the additive. This study provides strong evidence for boron being embedded in the tribofilm, which effectively reduces friction and wear losses.

  2. Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of atomic collisions based on branching classical trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The branching classical trajectory method for inelastic atomic collision processes is proposed. The approach is based on two features: (i) branching of a classical trajectory in a nonadiabatic region and (ii) the nonadiabatic transition probability formulas particularly adapted for a classical trajectory treatment. In addition to transition probabilities and inelastic cross sections, the proposed approach allows one to calculate incoming and outgoing currents. The method is applied to inelastic Na + H collisions providing the results in reasonable agreement with full quantum calculations.

  3. Low Frequency Gravitational Wave Detection With Ground Based Atom Interferometer Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Chaibi, W; Canuel, B; Bertoldi, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new detection strategy for gravitational waves (GWs) below few Hertz based on a correlated array of atom interferometers (AIs). Our proposal allows to reduce the Newtonian Noise (NN) which limits all ground based GW detectors below few Hertz, including previous atom interferometry-based concepts. Using an array of long baseline AI gradiometers yields several estimations of the NN, whose effect can thus be reduced via statistical averaging. Considering the km baseline of current optical detectors, a NN rejection of factor 2 could be achieved, and tested with existing AI array geometries. Exploiting the correlation properties of the gravity acceleration noise, we show that a 10-fold or more NN rejection is possible with a dedicated configuration. Considering a conservative NN model and the current developments in cold atom technology, we show that strain sensitivities below $1\\times 10^{-19}/ \\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ in the $ 0.3-3 \\ \\text{Hz}$ frequency band can be within reach, with a peak sensitivity o...

  4. SQUID-based measuring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program has been developed and initiated at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) for the utilization of SQUID sensors in various application areas. DC SQUID sensors based on Nb-AlOx-Nb Josephson junctions have been designed and developed in house along with associated flux-locked loop (FLL) electronics. A compact low field SQUID magnetometer insertible in a liquid helium storage dewar has also been developed in house and is in use. Efforts to build a high field SQUID magnetometer, SQUID-DAC system, are in progress. A planar gradiometric DC SQUID sensor for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) application to be used in relatively unshielded environment has been designed and developed. An easily portable NDE cryostat with a small lift-off distance, to be used in external locations has been designed and tested. The magnetic field produced by a given two-dimensional current density distribution is inverted using the Fourier transform technique. (author)

  5. Design and development of harmonic coil magnetometer for qualification of permanent magnet quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The drift tubes of Drift Tube Linac (DTL) houses Permanent Magnet Quadrupoles (PMQ) for transverse focusing of proton beam. The magnetic lenses in DTL of LEHIPA are arranged in FFDD lattice for proton beam focusing between 3 MeV to 20 MeV. Permanent magnet quadrupoles poses inherent limitation of inability of tuning the magnetic parameters during operations of the accelerator. The ∫G.dl shall be within 2.04 Tesla to 2.06 Tesla during operations. The PMQ design shall provide methods of tuning ∫G.dl during fabrication and assembly. This calls for magnetic qualifications at different stages of PMQ fabrication and subsequent assembly into the Drift Tubes. This paper describes in detail the design of this magnetometer and its usage in qualification of PMQs. Paper describes design of PCB based coils and error sensitivities in measurement. Mechanical design ensures repeatability of rotating coil shaft during integration with the magnetometer. Signal processing is done using fast digital integrators and data acquisition cards are used for logging, displaying and processing the data during measurements. Results of qualification of PMQs and Drift Tubes are described and compliance between design and measured values is discussed in detail

  6. A New Generation of the HTS Multilayer DC-SQUID Magnetometers and Gradiometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have optimized the preparation of submicrometer wide symmetric 200 bicrystal Josephson junctions on the basis of YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) films and integrated them in SQUID magnetometers and gradiometers with multilayer flux transformers. The achieved reduction of the curvature of the grain boundary leads to an improvement of the homogeneity of the current flow in the junction due to the d-wave symmetry of the order parameter in YBCO. The junctions have typical normal resistance Rn above 10 Ω and a IcRn product of about 0.4 mV at 77.4 K. The high resistance of the junctions has required an extensive use of low pass filters, rf-shields and microwave absorbers to protect the junctions from increased interference of high frequency electromagnetic fields. Integration of such junctions in SQUID magnetometers with a square 16-mm multilayer flux transformer allowed us for the first time to reach a field resolution of about 3.5 fT/√Hz at frequencies above 10 Hz and about 7 fT/√Hz at 1 Hz at an operation temperature of 77.4 K. SQUID gradiometers with a 10 mm base length of the planar multilayer flux transformer have achieved resolutions of about 15 fT/cm√Hz at frequencies above 10 Hz and about 30 fT/cm√Hz at 1 Hz and temperature 77.4 K

  7. Turnbuckle diamond anvil cell for high-pressure measurements in a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giriat, Gaétan; Wang, Weiwei; Attfield, J. Paul; Huxley, Andrew D.; Kamenev, Konstantin V.

    2010-07-01

    We have developed a miniature diamond anvil cell for magnetization measurements in a widely used magnetic property measurement system commercial magnetometer built around a superconducting quantum interference device. The design of the pressure cell is based on the turnbuckle principle in which force can be created and maintained by rotating the body of the device while restricting the counterthreaded end-nuts to translational movement. The load on the opposed diamond anvils and the sample between them is generated using a hydraulic press. The load is then locked by rotating the body of the cell with respect to the end-nuts. The dimensions of the pressure cell have been optimized by use of finite element analysis. The cell is approximately a cylinder 7 mm long and 7 mm in diameter and weighs only 1.5 g. Due to its small size the cell thermalizes rapidly. It is capable of achieving pressures in excess of 10 GPa while allowing measurements to be performed with the maximum sensitivity of the magnetometer. The performance of the pressure cell is illustrated by a high pressure magnetic study of Mn3[Cr(CN)6]2ṡxH2O Prussian blue analog up to 10.3 GPa.

  8. Asymptotics-based CI models for atoms:Properties, exact solution of a minimal model for Li to Ne, and application to atomic spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Friesecke, G.; Goddard, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Configuration-interaction (CI) models are approximations to the electronic Schrödinger equation which are widely used for numerical electronic structure calculations in quantum chemistry. Based on our recent closed-form asymptotic results for the full atomic Schrödinger equation in the limit of fixed electron number and large nuclear charge [SIAM J. Math. Anal., 41 (2009), pp. 631-664], we introduce a class of CI models for atoms which reproduce, at fixed finite model dimension, the correct S...

  9. Microsatellite Digital Magnetometer SMILE - Present State and Future Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyayev, Serhiy; Ivchenko, Nickolay

    2010-05-01

    The fluxgate magnetometers (FGM) are probably the most widespread instruments used onboard spacecrafts for both scientific and service purposes. The recent trend to decrease the weight and size of the spacecrafts requires creating as small as possible but enough sensitive FGM. A joint Swedish-Ukrainian team made the development of such a magnetometer and as the result the Small Magnetometer In Low mass Experiment (SMILE) - a digital fluxgate microsatellite magnetometer - was created [1]. Majority of electronic units of this FGM were combined in a digital integrated circuit - a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The FPGA provides full processing (determined by a digital correlation algorithm) of amplified and digitized fluxgate sensor output signals and provides both FGM output data and feedback signals. Such digital design makes the instrument very flexible, reduces power consumption and opens possibilities for customization of the operation modes. It allows miniaturizing the electronic unit and, together with the smallest in the world low noise three-component fluxgate sensor with the side dimension of 20 mm and weight about 20 grams only, the small but enough sensitive space qualified FGM is created. SMILE magnetometer was successfully flown onboard the NASA Cascades-2 sounding rocket, and is to fly in the LAPLander package onboard the ESA REXUS-8 student sounding rocket [2]. Unfortunately, such a design of electronic circuit does not allow us to realize all possibilities of the miniature sensor. The separate tests of the sensor with highest-class analog electronics showed that its noise level may be reduced to as low value as 10…15 picoTesla at 1 Hz. Also the use of volume compensation in the sensor provides high geometrical stability of the axes and improved performance compared to component compensated sensors. The measured parameters appear to be comparable or even better than these of best stationary FGM and, if realized in small enough volume and

  10. Nuclear-resonance magnetometer with flowing liquid for superstrong inhomogeneous fields measuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, V. V.; Dudkin, V. I.; Vologdin, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    Multichannel nuclear-resonance magnetometer for remote monitoring of induction and heterogeneity of a magnetic field in different areas inside and near a charged particle accelerator is considered. The maximal distance between the nuclear magnetic resonance signal detector and the magnetometer is 50 m. Measurement error is 0.5%, sensitivity of the magnetometer is 10-10 T/Hz1/2, measurement time of the magnetic field parameters in 24 control points is no more than 4 minutes.

  11. Testing General Relativity and Alternative Theories of Gravity with Space-based Atomic Clocks and Atom Interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Jetzer, Philippe; Angélil, Raymond; Saha, Prasenjit; Lundgren, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft's reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gravitational perturbations in Earth's gravitational field, potentially differentiating between different theories of gravity. This mission can measure multiple relativistic effects all during the course of a single experiment, and constrain the Parametrized Post-Newtonian Parameters around the Earth. A satellite carrying a clock of fractional timing inaccuracy of $\\Delta f/f \\sim 10^{-16}$ in an elliptic orbit around the Earth would constrain the PPN parameters $|\\beta -1|, |\\gamma-1| \\lesssim 10^{-6}$. We also briefly revi...

  12. Opportunity Science Using the Juno Magnetometer Investigation Star Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joergensen, J. L.; Connerney, J. E.; Bang, A. M.; Denver, T.; Oliversen, R. J.; Benn, M.; Lawton, P.

    2013-12-01

    The magnetometer experiment onboard Juno is equipped with four non-magnetic star tracker camera heads, two of which reside on each of the magnetometer sensor optical benches. These are located 10 and 12 m from the spacecraft body at the end of one of the three solar panel wings. The star tracker, collectively referred to as the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC), provides high accuracy attitude information for the magnetometer sensors throughout science operations. The star tracker camera heads are pointed +/- 13 deg off the spin vector, in the anti-sun direction, imaging a 13 x 20 deg field of view every ¼ second as Juno rotates at 1 or 2 rpm. The ASC is a fully autonomous star tracker, producing a time series of attitude quaternions for each camera head, utilizing a suite of internal support functions. These include imaging capabilities, autonomous object tracking, automatic dark-sky monitoring, and related capabilities; these internal functions may be accessed via telecommand. During Juno's cruise phase, this capability can be tapped to provide unique science and engineering data available along the Juno trajectory. We present a few examples of the JUNO ASC opportunity science here. As the Juno spacecraft approached the Earth-Moon system for the close encounter with the Earth on October 9, 2013, one of the ASC camera heads obtained imagery of the Earth-Moon system while the other three remained in full science (attitude determination) operation. This enabled the first movie of the Earth and Moon obtained by a spacecraft flying past the Earth in gravity assist. We also use the many artificial satellites in orbit about the Earth as calibration targets for the autonomous asteroid detection system inherent to the ASC autonomous star tracker. We shall also profile the zodiacal dust disk, using the interstellar image data, and present the outlook for small asteroid body detection and distribution being performed during Juno's passage from Earth flyby to Jovian orbit

  13. Testing general relativity and alternative theories of gravity with space-based atomic clocks and atom interferometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarescu Ruxandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft’s reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gravitational perturbations in Earth’s gravitational field, potentially differentiating between different theories of gravity. This mission can measure multiple relativistic effects all during the course of a single experiment, and constrain the Parametrized Post-Newtonian Parameters around the Earth. A satellite carrying a clock of fractional timing inaccuracy of Δ f / f ∼ 10−16 in an elliptic orbit around the Earth would constrain the PPN parameters |β − 1|, |γ − 1| ≲ 10−6. We also briefly review potential constraints by atom interferometers on scalar tensor theories and in particular on Chameleon and dilaton models.

  14. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  15. Atomic force microscopy-based repeated machining theory for nanochannels on silicon oxide surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z.Q., E-mail: wangzhiqian@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, CAS, Shenyang 110016 (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Jiao, N.D. [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, CAS, Shenyang 110016 (China); Tung, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Dong, Z.L. [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, CAS, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2011-02-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based repeated nanomachining of nanochannels on silicon oxide surfaces is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The relationships of the initial nanochannel depth vs. final nanochannel depth at a normal force are systematically studied. Using the derived theory and simulation results, the final nanochannel depth can be predicted easily. Meanwhile, if a nanochannel with an expected depth needs to be machined, a right normal force can be selected simply and easily in order to decrease the wear of the AFM tip. The theoretical analysis and simulation results can be effectively used for AFM-based fabrication of nanochannels.

  16. Atomic force microscopy-based repeated machining theory for nanochannels on silicon oxide surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based repeated nanomachining of nanochannels on silicon oxide surfaces is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The relationships of the initial nanochannel depth vs. final nanochannel depth at a normal force are systematically studied. Using the derived theory and simulation results, the final nanochannel depth can be predicted easily. Meanwhile, if a nanochannel with an expected depth needs to be machined, a right normal force can be selected simply and easily in order to decrease the wear of the AFM tip. The theoretical analysis and simulation results can be effectively used for AFM-based fabrication of nanochannels.

  17. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C.P.J. [University of California, Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science, Urey Hall, Mali Code 0339, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  18. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm−3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm−3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm−3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm−3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges. - Highlights: • We determine He metastable number densities for four plasma types • The highest number densities were observed in a dielectric barrier discharge • No helium metastable atoms were observed downstream from the exits of glow discharges

  19. A compact very low noise dc-SQUID magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have designed and fabricated a very low noise integrated dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer on a 4x4 mm2 chip. The white flux noise at 1 kHz is 6x10-7Φ0/√Hz. This corresponds to a flux density noise of 3.4 fT/√Hz and a coupled energy resolution of 32 h. The 1/f noise corner frequency is 10 Hz and the 1/f flux noise at 1 Hz is 2x10-6Φ0/√Hz. (orig.)

  20. Single-qubit gates based on targeted phase shifts in a 3D neutral atom array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Kumar, Aishwarya; Wu, Tsung-Yao; Weiss, David S

    2016-06-24

    Although the quality of individual quantum bits (qubits) and quantum gates has been steadily improving, the number of qubits in a single system has increased quite slowly. Here, we demonstrate arbitrary single-qubit gates based on targeted phase shifts, an approach that can be applied to atom, ion, or other atom-like systems. These gates are highly insensitive to addressing beam imperfections and have little cross-talk, allowing for a dramatic scaling up of qubit number. We have performed gates in series on 48 individually targeted sites in a 40% full 5 by 5 by 5 three-dimensional array created by an optical lattice. Using randomized benchmarking, we demonstrate an average gate fidelity of 0.9962(16), with an average cross-talk fidelity of 0.9979(2) (numbers in parentheses indicate the one standard deviation uncertainty in the final digits). PMID:27339984

  1. Review of chip-scale atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on chip-scale atomic clocks (CSACs) based on coherent population trapping (CPT) is reviewed. The background and the inspiration for the research are described, including the important schemes proposed to improve the CPT signal quality, the selection of atoms and buffer gases, and the development of micro-cell fabrication. With regard to the reliability, stability, and service life of the CSACs, the research regarding the sensitivity of the CPT resonance to temperature and laser power changes is also reviewed, as well as the CPT resonance's collision and light of frequency shifts. The first generation CSACs have already been developed but its characters are still far from our expectations. Our conclusion is that miniaturization and power reduction are the most important aspects calling for further research. (review)

  2. Tailored-waveguide based photonic chip for manipulating an array of single neutral atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Min; Zhou, Feng; Li, Xiao; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-05-01

    We propose a tailored-waveguide based photonic chip with the functions of trapping, coherently manipulating, detecting and individually addressing an array of single neutral atoms. Such photonic chip consists of an array of independent functional units spaced by a few micrometers, each of which is comprised of one silica-on-silicon optical waveguide and one phase Fresnel microlens etched in the middle of the output interface of the optical waveguide. We fabricated a number of photonic chips with 7 functional units and measured optical characteristics of these chips. We further propose feasible schemes to realize the functions of such photonic chip. The photonic chip is stable, scalable and can be combined with other integrated devices, such as atom chips, and can be used in the future hybrid quantum system and photonic quantum devices. PMID:27137532

  3. Double-negative acoustic metamaterial based on hollow steel tube meta-atom

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Huaijun; Ding, Changlin; Luo, Chunrong; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2012-01-01

    We presented an acoustic 'meta-atom' model of hollow steel tube (HST). The simulated and experimental results demonstrated that the resonant frequency is closely related to the length of the HST. Based on the HST model, we fabricated a two-dimensional (2D) acoustic metamaterial (AM) with negative effective mass density, which put up the transmission dip and accompanied inverse phase in experiment. By coupling the HST with split hollow sphere (SHS), another kind of 'meta-atom' with negative effective modulus in the layered sponge matrix, a three-dimensional (3D) AM was fabricated with simultaneously negative modulus and negative mass density. From the experiment, it is shown that the transmission peak similar to the electromagnetic metamaterials exhibited in the double-negative region of the AM. We also demonstrated that this kind of doble-negative AM can faithfully distinguish the acoustic sub-wavelength details ({\\lambda}/7) at the resonance frequency of 1630Hz.

  4. Development of an optical co-magnetometer for a neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Takamasa

    2014-09-01

    TRIUMF is now constructing a new facility that will produce high density ultracold neutrons (UCN). One of the important experiments for the new facility is the measurement of the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM), an experiment that exploits the fundamental symmetries of nature to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model. In order to improve the present world's best experimental result for the nEDM by more than an order of magnitude, it is indispensable to develop an extremely sensitive co-magnetometer, which measures the magnetic field inside the nEDM cell while the nEDM measurement is being conducted. For this purpose, our group is proposing to use a dual-species comagnetometer with 199Hg and 129Xe. In this method, polarized 199Hg and 129Xe atoms will be introduced into the nEDM cell at the same time as the neutrons, and the spin-precession frequencies of both species are measured simultaneously. The Xe and Hg atoms are probed continuously by observing the modulation of transmitted probe light, at 253.7 nm, for Hg, and emission in the near infrared (823 nm and 895 nm) for Xe by exciting a two-photon transition at 252.4 nm. This talk will present our progress on the development of the dual-species comagnetometer.

  5. Electrochemical cell for in situ electrodeposition of magnetic thin films in a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topolovec, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.topolovec@tugraz.at; Würschum, Roland, E-mail: wuerschum@tugraz.at [Institute of Materials Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Krenn, Heinz [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5, 8010 Graz (Austria)

    2015-06-15

    An electrochemical cell is designed and applied for in situ electrodeposition of magnetic thin films in a commercial SQUID magnetometer system. The cell is constructed in such a way that any parasitic contribution of the cell and of the substrate for electrodeposition to the magnetic moment of the deposited film is reduced to a minimum. A remanent minor contribution is readily taken into account by a proper analysis of the detected signal. Thus, a precise determination of the absolute magnetic moment of the electrodeposited magnetic film during its growth and dissolution is achieved. The feasibility of the cell design is demonstrated by performing Co electrodeposition using cyclic voltammetry. For an average Co film thickness of (35.6 ± 3.0) atomic layers, a magnetic moment per Co atom of (1.75 ± 0.11) μ{sub B} was estimated, in good agreement with the literature bulk value.

  6. Electrochemical cell for in situ electrodeposition of magnetic thin films in a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electrochemical cell is designed and applied for in situ electrodeposition of magnetic thin films in a commercial SQUID magnetometer system. The cell is constructed in such a way that any parasitic contribution of the cell and of the substrate for electrodeposition to the magnetic moment of the deposited film is reduced to a minimum. A remanent minor contribution is readily taken into account by a proper analysis of the detected signal. Thus, a precise determination of the absolute magnetic moment of the electrodeposited magnetic film during its growth and dissolution is achieved. The feasibility of the cell design is demonstrated by performing Co electrodeposition using cyclic voltammetry. For an average Co film thickness of (35.6 ± 3.0) atomic layers, a magnetic moment per Co atom of (1.75 ± 0.11) μB was estimated, in good agreement with the literature bulk value

  7. CalMagNet – an array of search coil magnetometers monitoring ultra low frequency activity in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dunson

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The California Magnetometer Network (CalMagNet consists of sixty-eight triaxial search-coil magnetometer systems measuring Ultra Low Frequency (ULF, 0.001–16 Hz, magnetic field fluctuations in California. CalMagNet provides data for comprehensive multi-point measurements of specific events in the Pc 1–Pc 5 range at mid-latitudes as well as a systematic, long-term study of ULF signals in active fault regions in California. Typical events include geomagnetic micropulsations and spectral resonant structures associated with the ionospheric Alfvén resonator. This paper provides a technical overview of the CalMagNet sensors and data processing systems. The network is composed of ten reference stations and fifty-eight local monitoring stations. The primary instruments at each site are three orthogonal induction coil magnetometers. A geophone monitors local site vibration. The systems are designed for future sensor expansion and include resources for monitoring four additional channels. Data is currently sampled at 32 samples per second with a 24-bit converter and time tagged with a GPS-based timing system. Several examples of representative magnetic fluctuations and signals as measured by the array are given.

  8. A LabVIEW software for Thellier paleointensity measurements with an automated three-component spinner magnetometer TSpin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Koji; Kono, Masaru

    2016-03-01

    The Thellier method is classical but is still regarded as the most reliable method for paleointensity determination. Recently, many types of additional protocols have been advocated to ensure reliability and make laboratory work more laborious and time-consuming. An automated system coupling a magnetometer and an electric furnace is now of prime importance to cope with the increasing demand. Here, we describe a graphics-based program for controlling a fully automatic system combining a spinner magnetometer and a thermal demagnetizer, and for acquiring and processing the magnetization data. A single fluxgate sensor, which can measure the vector magnetization by spinning and translating a standard-sized 1-in. specimen, was calibrated with a rotatable reference specimen that can make the magnetization parallel or perpendicular to the spinning axis. By placing a cooling chamber between the furnace and the sensor for the updated system, the specimen can be heated up more efficiently to ensure an identical thermal history for the double heatings of the Thellier method. The direction of the vector magnetization was precisely obtained as well as the intensity, the results being comparable with those from an ordinary spinner magnetometer. We present an application of the fully automatic system for a Thellier measurement on a recent lava flow, which took about 24 h for approximately ten-step double heatings without manual operation.

  9. Atomic scale properties of magnetic Mn-based alloys probed by Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mn-based alloys are characterized by a wealth of properties, which are of interest both from fundamental physics point of view and particularly attractive for different applications in modern technology: from magnetic storage to sensing and spin-based electronics. The possibility to tune their magnetic properties through post-growth thermal processes and/or stoichiometry engineering is highly important in order to target different applications (i.e. Mn$_{x}$Ga) or to increase their Curie temperature above room temperature (i.e. off-stoichiometric MnSi). In this project, the Mössbauer effect will be applied at $^{57}$Fe sites following implantation of radioactive $^{57}$Mn, to probe the micro-structure and magnetism of Mn-based alloys at the most atomic-scale. The proposed experimental plan is devoted to establish a direct correlation between the local structure and bulk magnetism (and other physical properties) of Mn-based alloys.

  10. An interatomic potential for saturated hydrocarbons based on the modified embedded-atom method

    CERN Document Server

    Nouranian, S; Gwaltney, S R; Baskes, M I; Horstemeyer, M F

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we developed an interatomic potential for saturated hydrocarbons using the modified embedded-atom method (MEAM), a semi-empirical many-body potential based on density functional theory and pair potentials. We parameterized the potential by fitting to a large experimental and first-principles (FP) database consisting of 1) bond distances, bond angles, and atomization energies at 0 K of a homologous series of alkanes and their select isomers from methane to n-octane, 2) the potential energy curves of H2, CH, and C2 diatomics, 3) the potential energy curves of hydrogen, methane, ethane, and propane dimers, i.e., (H2)2, (CH4)2, (C2H6)2, and (C3H8)2, respectively, and 5) pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) data of a dense high-pressure methane system with the density of 0.5534 g/cc. We compared the atomization energies and geometries of a range of linear alkanes, cycloalkanes, and free radicals calculated from the MEAM potential to those calculated by other commonly used potentials for hydrocarbons, i....

  11. Atomic-scale properties of Ni-based FCC ternary, and quaternary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to characterize some atomic-scale properties of Ni-based FCC multicomponent alloys. For this purpose, we use Monte Carlo method combined with density functional theory calculations to study short-range order (SRO), atomic displacements, electronic density of states, and magnetic moments in equimolar ternary NiCrCo, and quaternary NiCrCoFe alloys. According to our study, the salient features for the ternary alloy are a negative SRO parameter between Ni–Cr and a positive between Cr–Cr pairs as well as a weakly magnetic state. For the quaternary alloy we predict negative SRO parameter for Ni–Cr and Ni–Fe pairs and positive for Cr–Cr and Fe–Fe pairs. Atomic displacements for both ternary and quaternary alloys are negligible. In contrast to the ternary, the quaternary alloy shows a complex magnetic structure. The electronic structure of the ternary and quaternary alloys shows differences near the Fermi energy between a random solid solution and the predicted structure with SRO. Despite that, the calculated EXAFS spectra does not show enough contrast to discriminate between random and ordered structures. The predicted SRO has an impact on point-defect energetics, electron–phonon coupling and thermodynamic functions and thus, SRO should not be neglected when studying properties of these two alloys

  12. High-Tc SQUID magnetometer system with active cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, S.; Oyama, H.; Hayashi, A.; Washio, T.; Fujita, M.; Hirata, Y.

    2002-05-01

    Recent developments of high-Tc SQUIDs have enabled high sensitivity magnetometers to be used in wide range of places, such as laboratory and outdoor fields. At the early stage of developing multichannel system for measurement of magnetocardiogram (MCG) in clinical application, we have fabricated a single channel high-Tc SQUID magnetometer system. The system includes a direct-coupled SQUID with slot structure, a simple magnetically shielded room (MSR), and some active compensation electronics for the purpose of reducing various environmental field noises. A novel active noise cancellation was made by using a combination of a normal conducting detection coil that was horizontally wound in the middle height of the MSR, and two compensation coils that were wound at the top and bottom of the MSR. In addition, adaptive noise cancellation was supplemented by means of adaptive digital filter that was implemented in a digital signal processor. A total noise field attenuation of 50-60 dB was attained at 0.5-100 Hz. Low noise signals from the human heart were measured with a high-Tc SQUID in the noise reduced space in the MSR.

  13. High-resolution fully vectorial scanning Kerr magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flajšman, Lukáš; Urbánek, Michal; Křižáková, Viola; Vaňatka, Marek; Turčan, Igor; Šikola, Tomáš

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a high-resolution scanning magnetometer, which fully exploits the vectorial nature of the magneto-optical Kerr effect. The three-dimensional nature of magnetization is at the basis of many micromagnetic phenomena and from these data, we can fully characterize magnetization processes of nanostructures in static and dynamic regimes. Our scanning Kerr magnetometer uses a high numerical aperture microscope objective where the incident light beam can be deterministically deviated from the objective symmetry axis, therefore, both in-plane (via the longitudinal Kerr effect) and out-of-plane (via the polar Kerr effect) components of the magnetization vector may be detected. These components are then separated by exploiting the symmetries of the polar and longitudinal Kerr effects. From four consecutive measurements, we are able to directly obtain the three orthogonal components of the magnetization vector with a resolution of 600 nm. Performance of the apparatus is demonstrated by a measurement of 3D magnetization vector maps showing out-of-plane domains and in-plane domain walls in an yttrium-iron-garnet film and on a study of magnetization reversal in a 4-μm-wide magnetic disk. PMID:27250432

  14. Improved superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer for low cross talk operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, C.; Vettoliere, A.; Russo, M.

    2006-05-01

    A fully integrated dc-SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) magnetometer based on niobium technology including a new feedback coil design is presented. With respect to a standard SQUID design, the new feedback coil design was optimized in order to reduce the mutual inductance between neighbors and to increase the coupling with the pickup coil of the SQUID itself. In such a way, it is possible to reduce cross talk due to both the feedback coil and wires. Experimental results for the characterization of the device and the cross talk measurements are reported. The measurements have been performed in liquid helium using a low noise readout electronics specifically designed for large multichannel SQUID-based instruments. The experimental data show a substantial reduction of cross talk between neighboring sensors with respect to a traditional feedback coil. Furthermore, the new feedback coil system does not introduce any noise degradation.

  15. The Polarizable Atomic Multipole-based AMOEBA Force Field for Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yue; Xia, Zhen; Zhang, Jiajing; Best, Robert; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W; Ren, Pengyu

    2013-01-01

    Development of the AMOEBA (Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Simulation) force field for proteins is presented. The current version (AMOEBA-2013) utilizes permanent electrostatic multipole moments through the quadrupole at each atom, and explicitly treats polarization effects in various chemical and physical environments. The atomic multipole electrostatic parameters for each amino acid residue type are derived from high-level gas phase quantum mechanical calculations via a consistent and extensible protocol. Molecular polarizability is modeled via a Thole-style damped interactive induction model based upon distributed atomic polarizabilities. Inter- and intramolecular polarization is treated in a consistent fashion via the Thole model. The intramolecular polarization model ensures transferability of electrostatic parameters among different conformations, as demonstrated by the agreement between QM and AMOEBA electrostatic potentials, and dipole moments of dipeptides. The backbone and side chain torsional parameters were determined by comparing to gas-phase QM (RI-TRIM MP2/CBS) conformational energies of dipeptides and to statistical distributions from the Protein Data Bank. Molecular dynamics simulations are reported for short peptides in explicit water to examine their conformational properties in solution. Overall the calculated conformational free energies and J-coupling constants are consistent with PDB statistics and experimental NMR results, respectively. In addition, the experimental crystal structures of a number of proteins are well maintained during molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. While further calculations are necessary to fully validate the force field, initial results suggest the AMOEBA polarizable multipole force field is able to describe the structure and energetics of peptides and proteins, in both gas-phase and solution environments. PMID:24163642

  16. Bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based atomic-scale mass sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Akbari, H. R.; Shaat, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The potentials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as mechanical resonators for atomic-scale mass sensing are presented. To this aim, a nonlocal continuum-based model is proposed to study the dynamic behavior of bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based mass nanosensors. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered as an elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam with von Kármán type geometric nonlinearity. Eringen's nonlocal elastic field theory is utilized to model the interatomic long-range interactions within the structure of the CNT. This developed model accounts for the arbitrary position of the deposited atomic-mass. The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes are determined based on an eigenvalue problem analysis. An atom of xenon (Xe) is first considered as a specific case where the results show that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the CNT are strongly dependent on the location of the deposited Xe and the nonlocal parameter of the CNT. It is also indicated that the first vibrational mode is the most sensitive when the mass is deposited at the middle of a single-walled carbon nanotube. However, when deposited in other locations, it is demonstrated that the second or third vibrational modes may be more sensitive. To investigate the sensitivity of bridged single-walled CNTs as mass sensors, different noble gases are considered, namely Xe, argon (Ar), and helium (He). It is shown that the sensitivity of the single-walled CNT to the Ar and He gases is much lower than the Xe gas due to the significant decrease in their masses. The derived model and performed analysis are so needed for mass sensing applications and particularly when the detected mass is randomly deposited.

  17. Graph of atomic orbitals and the molecular structure-descriptors based on it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREY A. TOROPOV

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The graph of atomic orbitals (GAO is a novel type of molecular graph, recently proposed by one of the authors. Various molecular structure-descriptors computed for GAO are compared with their analogs computed for ordinary molecular graphs. The quality of these structure-descriptors was tested for correlation with the normal boiling points of alkanes and cycloalkanes. In all the studied cases, the results based on GAO are similar to, and usually slightly better than, those obtained by means of ordinary molecular graps.

  18. Development and Testing of Atomic Beam-Based Plasma Edge Diagnostics in the CIEMAT Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the development of plasma edge diagnostic based on atomic beam techniques fir their application in the CIEMAT fusion devices is described. The characterisation of the beams in laboratory experiments at the CSIC, together with first results in the Torsatron TJ-II are reported. Two types of beam diagnostics have been developed: a thermal (effusive) Li and a supersonic, pulsed He beams. This work has been carried out in collaboration between the institutions mentioned above under partial financial support by EURATOM. (Author) 17 refs

  19. Development of novel and sensitive sensors based on microcantilever of atomic force microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Yan; WANG Kemin; JIN Rong

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the development of sensors based on microfabricated cantilevers of atomic force microscope (AFM) has attracted considerable attention from the designers of novel physical, chemical, and biological sensors. Many kinds of sensors have been developed taking the advantages of its high-resolution imaging, force measurement and force sensitivity, such as immunosensor and DNA biosensor and the sensors for detection of intermolecular interaction. This paper reviews the progress made in this field and discusses the signal transfer principles by which the design of the sensors is achieved.

  20. Atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation study of onion abaxial epidermis walls in aqueous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xiaoning; Kim, Seong H.; Tittmann, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    An atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation method was employed to study how the structure of cellulose microfibril packing and matrix polymers affect elastic modulus of fully hydrated primary plant cell walls. The isolated, single-layered abaxial epidermis cell wall of an onion bulb was used as a test system since the cellulose microfibril packing in this cell wall is known to vary systematically from inside to outside scales and the most abundant matrix polymer, pectin, can easily be altered through simple chemical treatments such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and calcium ions. Experimental results showed that the pectin network variation has significant impacts on the cell wall modulus, and not the cellulose microfibril packing.

  1. Atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation study of onion abaxial epidermis walls in aqueous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation method was employed to study how the structure of cellulose microfibril packing and matrix polymers affect elastic modulus of fully hydrated primary plant cell walls. The isolated, single-layered abaxial epidermis cell wall of an onion bulb was used as a test system since the cellulose microfibril packing in this cell wall is known to vary systematically from inside to outside scales and the most abundant matrix polymer, pectin, can easily be altered through simple chemical treatments such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and calcium ions. Experimental results showed that the pectin network variation has significant impacts on the cell wall modulus, and not the cellulose microfibril packing

  2. Atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation study of onion abaxial epidermis walls in aqueous environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xiaoning; Tittmann, Bernhard [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Kim, Seong H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    An atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation method was employed to study how the structure of cellulose microfibril packing and matrix polymers affect elastic modulus of fully hydrated primary plant cell walls. The isolated, single-layered abaxial epidermis cell wall of an onion bulb was used as a test system since the cellulose microfibril packing in this cell wall is known to vary systematically from inside to outside scales and the most abundant matrix polymer, pectin, can easily be altered through simple chemical treatments such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and calcium ions. Experimental results showed that the pectin network variation has significant impacts on the cell wall modulus, and not the cellulose microfibril packing.

  3. Atomically thin spherical shell-shaped superscatterers based on Bohr model

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Rujiang; Lin, Shisheng; Liu, Xu; Chen, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Graphene monolayers can be used for atomically thin three-dimensional shell-shaped superscatterer designs. Due to the excitation of the first-order resonance of transverse magnetic (TM) graphene plasmons, the scattering cross section of the bare subwavelength dielectric particle is enhanced significantly by five orders of magnitude. The superscattering phenomenon can be intuitively understood and interpreted with Bohr model. Besides, based on the analysis of Bohr model, it is shown that contrary to the TM case, superscattering is hard to occur by exciting the resonance of transverse electric (TE) graphene plasmons due to their poor field confinements.

  4. Amplified light storage with high fidelity based on electromagnetically induced transparency in rubidium atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Gang; Tang, Guoyu; Xue, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using slow and stored light based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), we theoretically realize the storage of optical pulses with enhanced efficiency and high fidelity in ensembles of warm atoms in 85Rb vapor cells. The enhancement of storage efficiency is achieved by introducing a pump field beyond three-level configuration to form a N-type scheme, which simultaneously inhibits the undesirable four-wave mixing effect while preserves its fidelity. It is shown that the typical storage efficiency can be improved from 29% to 53% with the application of pump field. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this efficiency decreases with storage time and increases over unity with optical depth.

  5. Wireless power transfer based on magnetic metamaterials consisting of assembled ultra-subwavelength meta-atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q.; Li, Y. H.; Gao, N.; Yang, F.; Chen, Y. Q.; Fang, K.; Zhang, Y. W.; Chen, H.

    2015-03-01

    In this letter, a potential way to transfer power wirelessly based on magnetic metamaterials (MMs) assembled by ultra-subwavelength meta-atoms is proposed. Frequency-domain simulation and experiments are performed for accurately obtaining effective permeability of magnetic metamaterials. The results demonstrate that MMs possess great power for enhancing the wireless power transfer efficiency between two non-resonant coils. Further investigations on the magnetic-field distribution demonstrate that a large-area flattened magnetic field in near range can be effectively realized, exhibiting great flexibility in assembling.

  6. Atomic-ensemble-based quantum repeater against general polarization and phase noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a quantum repeater architecture based on atomic ensembles, which is free of polarization and phase noise. With only simple optical elements, we can obtain the uncorrupted entanglement in the noisy channel. Even if the channel suffers from the general polarization and phase noise, the fidelity of transmitted qubits in our protocol can be stable and have no dependence on the noise parameter, which is a significant advantage compared with previous protocols. Moveover, we can even improve the fidelity by using time delayers. The proposed quantum repeater is feasible and useful in the long-distance quantum entanglement distribution and may be promising in other quantum-information applications.

  7. Time gap for temporal cloak based on spectral hole burning in atomic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabar, M. S. Abdul; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of creating a time gap in the slow light based on spectral hole burning in a four-level Doppler broadened sodium atomic system. A time gap is also observed between the slow and the fast light in the hole burning region and near the burnt hole region, respectively. A cloaking time gap is attained in microseconds and no distortion is observed in the transmitted pulse. The width of the time gap is observed to vary with the inverse Doppler effect in this system. Our results may provide a way to create multiple time gaps for a temporal cloak. Project supported by the Higher Education Commission (HEC) of Pakistan.

  8. Theoretical investigation of the hydrogen atom transfer in the hydrated A–T base pair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We study the hydrated A–T base pair with 2 and 4 water molecules. ► We consider the dynamics of hydrogen transfer in the hydrogen bridges. ► We compare this study with experimental data and simple schemes. - Abstract: The hydrated A–T base pair has been studied in order to understand the structural modifications and their electronic rearrangements induced by the movement of the hydrogen atoms in the H-bonds. The comparison of these results with that of the nonhydrated system can explain the role of the H-bonds of the water molecules in this system. Two naïve schemes have been considered, one where the hydrogen bonds of the water molecules are only indirectly involved in the hydrogen atoms transfer between the bases and another where the water molecules are directly involved in this transfer. The results support the idea that the real mechanisms are more complexes than these schemes. Some new stable structures of the A–T(H2O)2 and the A–T(H2O)4 systems have been found and the mechanisms of their generations have been analysed.

  9. The Phase Transformations and Magnetoresistive Properties of Diluted Film Solid Solutions Based on Fe and Ge Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Vlasenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the structure, phase composition and magnetoresistive properties of single- and three-layer films based on Fe and Ge were studied. It is established that in such films eutectic is formed based on diluted solid solutions of Ge atoms in -Fe layers and of Fe atoms in -Ge layers at the total concentration of Ge atoms from 3 to 20 at.% in the temperature range of 300-870 K. It is shown that magnetoresistive properties of the films with eutectic composition are not significantly different from the properties of -Fe films.

  10. Ag2S atomic switch-based 'tug of war' for decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, C; Hasegawa, T; Chikyow, T

    2016-08-01

    For a computing process such as making a decision, a software controlled chip of several transistors is necessary. Inspired by how a single cell amoeba decides its movements, the theoretical 'tug of war' computing model was proposed but not yet implemented in an analogue device suitable for integrated circuits. Based on this model, we now developed a new electronic element for decision making processes, which will have no need for prior programming. The devices are based on the growth and shrinkage of Ag filaments in α-Ag2+δS gap-type atomic switches. Here we present the adapted device design and the new materials. We demonstrate the basic 'tug of war' operation by IV-measurements and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observation. These devices could be the base for a CMOS-free new computer architecture. PMID:27188925

  11. Ag2S atomic switch-based `tug of war' for decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, C.; Hasegawa, T.; Chikyow, T.

    2016-07-01

    For a computing process such as making a decision, a software controlled chip of several transistors is necessary. Inspired by how a single cell amoeba decides its movements, the theoretical `tug of war' computing model was proposed but not yet implemented in an analogue device suitable for integrated circuits. Based on this model, we now developed a new electronic element for decision making processes, which will have no need for prior programming. The devices are based on the growth and shrinkage of Ag filaments in α-Ag2+δS gap-type atomic switches. Here we present the adapted device design and the new materials. We demonstrate the basic `tug of war' operation by IV-measurements and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observation. These devices could be the base for a CMOS-free new computer architecture.For a computing process such as making a decision, a software controlled chip of several transistors is necessary. Inspired by how a single cell amoeba decides its movements, the theoretical `tug of war' computing model was proposed but not yet implemented in an analogue device suitable for integrated circuits. Based on this model, we now developed a new electronic element for decision making processes, which will have no need for prior programming. The devices are based on the growth and shrinkage of Ag filaments in α-Ag2+δS gap-type atomic switches. Here we present the adapted device design and the new materials. We demonstrate the basic `tug of war' operation by IV-measurements and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observation. These devices could be the base for a CMOS-free new computer architecture. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00690f

  12. A 3 He-129 Xe co-magnetometer with 87 Rb magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limes, Mark; Sheng, Dong; Romalis, Mike

    2016-05-01

    We report progress on a 3 He-129 Xe co-magnetometer detected with a 87 Rb magnetometer. The noble-gas co-magnetometer is insensitive to any long-term bias field drifts, but the presence of hot Rb can cause instability in the ratio of 3 He-129 Xe precession frequencies. We use a sequence of Rb π pulses to suppress the instability due to Rb-noble gas interactions by a factor of 104 along all three spatial axes. For detection, our 87 Rb magnetometer operates using single-axis 87 Rb π pulses with σ+ /σ- pumping-this technique decouples the 87 Rb magnetometer from bias fields, and allows for SERF operation. We are presently investigating systematic effects due to combinations of several imperfections, such as longitudinal noble gas polarization, imperfect 87 Rb π pulses, and 87 Rb pump light shifts. Thus far, our 87 Rb magnetometer has a sensitivity of 40 fT/√{Hz}, and our 3 He-129 Xe co-magnetometer has achieved a single-shot precession frequency ratio error of 20 nHz and a long-term bias drift of 8 nHz at 7 h. We are developing the co-magnetometer for use as an NMR gyro, and to search for possible spin-gravity interactions. Supported by DARPA and NSF.

  13. An interatomic potential for saturated hydrocarbons based on the modified embedded-atom method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouranian, S; Tschopp, M A; Gwaltney, S R; Baskes, M I; Horstemeyer, M F

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we developed an interatomic potential for saturated hydrocarbons using the modified embedded-atom method (MEAM), a reactive semi-empirical many-body potential based on density functional theory and pair potentials. We parameterized the potential by fitting to a large experimental and first-principles (FP) database consisting of (1) bond distances, bond angles, and atomization energies at 0 K of a homologous series of alkanes and their select isomers from methane to n-octane, (2) the potential energy curves of H2, CH, and C2 diatomics, (3) the potential energy curves of hydrogen, methane, ethane, and propane dimers, i.e., (H2)2, (CH4)2, (C2H6)2, and (C3H8)2, respectively, and (4) pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) data of a dense high-pressure methane system with the density of 0.5534 g cc(-1). We compared the atomization energies and geometries of a range of linear alkanes, cycloalkanes, and free radicals calculated from the MEAM potential to those calculated by other commonly used reactive potentials for hydrocarbons, i.e., second-generation reactive empirical bond order (REBO) and reactive force field (ReaxFF). MEAM reproduced the experimental and/or FP data with accuracy comparable to or better than REBO or ReaxFF. The experimental PVT data for a relatively large series of methane, ethane, propane, and butane systems with different densities were predicted reasonably well by the MEAM potential. Although the MEAM formalism has been applied to atomic systems with predominantly metallic bonding in the past, the current work demonstrates the promising extension of the MEAM potential to covalently bonded molecular systems, specifically saturated hydrocarbons and saturated hydrocarbon-based polymers. The MEAM potential has already been parameterized for a large number of metallic unary, binary, ternary, carbide, nitride, and hydride systems, and extending it to saturated hydrocarbons provides a reliable and transferable potential for atomistic

  14. A knowledge-based structure-discriminating function that requires only main-chain atom coordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itoh Nobuya

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of knowledge-based potential function is a powerful method for protein structure evaluation. A variety of formulations that evaluate single or multiple structural features of proteins have been developed and studied. The performance of functions is often evaluated by discrimination ability using decoy structures of target proteins. A function that can evaluate coarse-grained structures is advantageous from many aspects, such as relatively easy generation and manipulation of model structures; however, the reduction of structural representation is often accompanied by degradation of the structure discrimination performance. Results We developed a knowledge-based pseudo-energy calculating function for protein structure discrimination. The function (Discriminating Function using Main-chain Atom Coordinates, DFMAC consists of six pseudo-energy calculation components that deal with different structural features. Only the main-chain atom coordinates of N, Cα, and C atoms for the respective amino acid residues are required as input data for structure evaluation. The 231 target structures in 12 different types of decoy sets were separated into 154 and 77 targets, and function training and the subsequent performance test were performed using the respective target sets. Fifty-nine (76.6% native and 68 (88.3% near-native (α RMSD targets in the test set were successfully identified. The average Cα RMSD of the test set resulted in 1.174 with the tuned parameters. The major part of the discrimination performance was supported by the orientation-dependent component. Conclusion Despite the reduced representation of input structures, DFMAC showed considerable structure discrimination ability. The function can be applied to the identification of near-native structures in structure prediction experiments.

  15. Correlation between fluxgate and SQUID magnetometer data sets for geomagnetic storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matladi Thabang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There has always been a need to monitor the near Earth's magnetic field, as this monitoring provides understanding and possible predictions of Space Weather events such as geomagnetic storms. Conventional magnetometers such as fluxgates have been used for decades for Space Weather research. The use of highly sensitive magnetometers such as Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs, promise to give more insight into Space Weather. SQUIDs are relatively recent types of magnetometers that exploit the superconductive effects of flux quantization and Josephson tunneling to measure magnetic flux. SQUIDs have a very broad bandwidth compared to most conventional magnetometers and can measure magnetic flux as low as a few femtotesla. Since SQUIDs have never been used in Space Weather research, unshielded, it is necessary to investigate if they can be reliable Space Weather instruments. The validation is performed by comparing the frequency content of the SQUID and fluxgate magnetometers, as reported by Phiri.

  16. Magnetometer for measuring the magnetic field integral of wiggler-magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly sensitive magnetometer is developed og the basis transformation into proportional electric signal of ponderomotive force which arises when placing the current-carrier conductor of constant current in magnetic field. Semiconductor piezoresistive converters are used as force sensors. The magnetometer voltage sensitivity of magnetic field integral is no less than 2.45x103 V/Tm, the threshold sensitivity is no more than 4x10-6 Tm. The working length of the magnetometer is 600 mm and the cross section of the current-carrying conductor is 0.8 mm. The magnetometer working current through the current-carrying conductor is 2-5 A, and the maximum output signal is 2 V. The magnetometer can be used for measuring the magnetic field integral in narrow gaps of periodical magnetic structures in elementary particle ecceleration technique

  17. Atomic data from plasma based measurements and compilations of transition probabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griesmann, U.; Bridges, J.M.; Roberts, J.R.; Wiese, W.L.; Fuhr, J.R. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    High efficiency electrical light sources used in lighting applications are based on electrical discharges in plasmas. The systematic search for improved lighting plasmas increasingly relies on plasma discharge modeling with computers and requires better and more comprehensive knowledge of basic atomic data such as radiative transition probabilities and collision cross sections. NIST has ongoing research programs aimed at the study of thermal equilibrium plasmas such as high pressure electric arcs and non-equilibrium plasmas in radio-frequency discharges and high current hallow cathode lamps. In emission experiments the authors have measured branching fractions and determined absolute transition probabilities for spectral lines in Ne I, Ne II, F I, O I and O II. Some measurements were aimed specifically at transitions where significant disagreement among advanced calculations exists. The experimental data thus serve as benchmarks for new critical data compilations at NIST which are largely based on comprehensive, sophisticated atomic structure calculations. Typical results of the recent measurements and of the new NIST data compilations will be shown.

  18. An improved quaternion Gauss–Newton algorithm for attitude determination using magnetometer and accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Fei

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available For the vector attitude determination, the traditional optimal algorithms which are based on quaternion estimator (QUEST measurement noise model are complicated for just two observations. In our application, the magnetometer and accelerometer are not two comparable kinds of sensors and both are not small field-of-view sensors as well. So in this paper a new unit measurement model is derived. According to the Wahba problem, the optimal weights for each measurement are obtained by the error variance researches. Then an improved quaternion Gauss–Newton method is presented and adopted to acquire attitude. Eventually, simulation results and experimental validation employed to test the proposed method demonstrate the usefulness of the improved algorithm.

  19. An improved quaternion Gauss-Newton algorithm for attitude determination using magnetometer and accelerometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Fei; Li Jie; Wang Haifu; Liu Chang

    2014-01-01

    For the vector attitude determination, the traditional optimal algorithms which are based on quaternion estimator (QUEST) measurement noise model are complicated for just two observa-tions. In our application, the magnetometer and accelerometer are not two comparable kinds of sen-sors and both are not small field-of-view sensors as well. So in this paper a new unit measurement model is derived. According to the Wahba problem, the optimal weights for each measurement are obtained by the error variance researches. Then an improved quaternion Gauss-Newton method is presented and adopted to acquire attitude. Eventually, simulation results and experimental valida-tion employed to test the proposed method demonstrate the usefulness of the improved algorithm.

  20. A ground-based radio frequency inductively coupled plasma apparatus for atomic oxygen simulation in low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongxian; Tian, Xiubo; Yang, Shiqin; Chu, Paul K

    2007-10-01

    A radio frequency (rf) inductively coupled plasma apparatus has been developed to simulate the atomic oxygen environment encountered in low Earth orbit (LEO). Basing on the novel design, the apparatus can achieve stable, long lasting operation, pure and high density oxygen plasma beam. Furthermore, the effective atomic oxygen flux can be regulated. The equivalent effective atomic oxygen flux may reach (2.289-2.984) x 10(16) at.cm(2) s at an oxygen pressure of 1.5 Pa and rf power of 400 W. The equivalent atomic oxygen flux is about 100 times than that in the LEO environment. The mass loss measured from the polyimide sample changes linearly with the exposure time, while the density of the eroded holes becomes smaller. The erosion mechanism of the polymeric materials by atomic oxygen is complex and involves initial reactions at the gas-surface interface as well as steady-state material removal. PMID:17979410

  1. Magnetometer-Augmented IMU Simulator: In-Depth Elaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Thomas; Lauffenburger, Jean-Philippe; Changey, Sébastien; Basset, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The location of objects is a growing research topic due, for instance, to the expansion of civil drones or intelligent vehicles. This expansion was made possible through the development of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), inexpensive and miniaturized inertial sensors. In this context, this article describes the development of a new simulator which generates sensor measurements, giving a specific input trajectory. This will allow the comparison of pose estimation algorithms. To develop this simulator, the measurement equations of every type of sensor have to be analytically determined. To achieve this objective, classical kinematic equations are used for the more common sensors, i.e., accelerometers and rate gyroscopes. As nowadays, the MEMS inertial measurement units (IMUs) are generally magnetometer-augmented, an absolute world magnetic model is implemented. After the determination of the perfect measurement (through the error-free sensor models), realistic error models are developed to simulate real IMU behavior. Finally, the developed simulator is subjected to different validation tests. PMID:25746095

  2. Designing and construction of a laboratory made vibrating sample magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the designing and construction of a vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). It consists of an electromagnet, a vibrator assembly, a set of pick-up coils and a signal detection circuit. The sample is vibrated perpendicular to the magnetic field provided by the electromagnet. For a magnetic sample, the vibration of the magnetic moment induced an emf in the pick-up coils placed on either side of the sample. The induced emf is proportional to the magnetization of the sample. The VSM constructed by us is capable of measuring magnetization down to 10/sup -5/ emu in applied magnetic fields upto 1 Tesla. Magnetization hysteresis curves of ferromagnets and colossal magnetoresistive compounds have been measured on our system. (author)

  3. Magnetometer-Augmented IMU Simulator: In-Depth Elaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brunner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The location of objects is a growing research topic due, for instance, to the expansion of civil drones or intelligent vehicles. This expansion was made possible through the development of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS, inexpensive and miniaturized inertial sensors. In this context, this article describes the development of a new simulator which generates sensor measurements, giving a specific input trajectory. This will allow the comparison of pose estimation algorithms. To develop this simulator, the measurement equations of every type of sensor have to be analytically determined. To achieve this objective, classical kinematic equations are used for the more common sensors, i.e., accelerometers and rate gyroscopes. As nowadays, the MEMS inertial measurement units (IMUs are generally magnetometer-augmented, an absolute world magnetic model is implemented. After the determination of the perfect measurement (through the error-free sensor models, realistic error models are developed to simulate real IMU behavior. Finally, the developed simulator is subjected to different validation tests.

  4. Construction and Operation of a Differential Hall Element Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Matthew W.; Javernick, Philip D.; Quintero, Pedro A.; Calm, Yitzi M.; Meisel, Mark W.

    2012-02-01

    A Differential Hall Element Magnetometer (DHEM) was constructed to measure the magnetic saturation and coercive fields of small samples consisting of magnetic nanoparticles that may have biomedical applications. The device consists of two matched Hall elements that can be moved through the room temperature bore of a 9 Tesla superconducting magnet. The Hall elements are wired in opposition such that a null response, to within a small offset, is measured in the absence of a sample that may be located on top of one unit. A LabVIEW program controls the current through the Hall elements and measures the net Hall voltage while simultaneously moving the probe through the magnetic field by regulating a linear stepper motor. Ultimately, the system will be tested to obtain a figure of merit using successively smaller samples. Details of the apparatus will be provided along with preliminary data.

  5. Reducing systematic errors in measurements made by a SQUID magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, L. F.; Kaptás, D.; Balogh, J.

    2014-11-01

    A simple method is described which reduces those systematic errors of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer that arise from possible radial displacements of the sample in the second-order gradiometer superconducting pickup coil. By rotating the sample rod (and hence the sample) around its axis into a position where the best fit is obtained to the output voltage of the SQUID as the sample is moved through the pickup coil, the accuracy of measuring magnetic moments can be increased significantly. In the cases of an examined Co1.9Fe1.1Si Heusler alloy, pure iron and nickel samples, the accuracy could be increased over the value given in the specification of the device. The suggested method is only meaningful if the measurement uncertainty is dominated by systematic errors - radial displacement in particular - and not by instrumental or environmental noise.

  6. The Global Network of Optical Magnetometers for Exotic physics (GNOME): A novel scheme to search for physics beyond the Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel experimental scheme enabling the investigation of transient exotic spin couplings is discussed. The scheme is based on synchronous measurements of optical-magnetometer signals from several devices operating in magnetically shielded environments in distant locations (>or similar 100 km). Although signatures of such exotic couplings may be present in the signal from a single magnetometer, it would be challenging to distinguish them from noise. By analyzing the correlation between signals from multiple, geographically separated magnetometers, it is not only possible to identify the exotic transient but also to investigate its nature. The ability of the network to probe presently unconstrained physics beyond the Standard Model is examined by considering the spin coupling to stable topological defects (e.g., domain walls) of axion-like fields. In the spirit of this research, a brief (∝2 hours) demonstration experiment involving two magnetometers located in Krakow and Berkeley (∝9000 km separation) is presented and discussion of the data-analysis approaches that may allow identification of transient signals is provided. The prospects of the network are outlined in the last part of the paper. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. The atomic and electronic structure of dislocations in Ga based nitride semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    BELABBAS, Imad; Ruterana, Pierre; Chen, Jun; NOUET, Gérard

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The atomic and electronic properties of dislocations in III-N semiconductor layers, especially GaN are presented. The atomic structure of the edge threading dislocation is now well established with three different cores (8 or full core, 5/7 or open core and 4 atom ring). The use of atomistic simulations has confirmed these atomic structures and has given a good understanding of the electronic structure of the screw dislocation. Partial dislocations which are mostly confin...

  8. [Comparison of cell elasticity analysis methods based on atomic force microscopy indentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Hao, Fengtao; Chen, Xiaohu; Yang, Zhouqi; Ding, Chong; Shang, Peng

    2014-10-01

    In order to investigate in greater detail the two methods based on Hertz model for analyzing force-distance curve obtained by atomic force microscopy, we acquired the force-distance curves of Hela and MCF-7 cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation in this study. After the determination of contact point, Young's modulus in different indentation depth were calculated with two analysis methods of "two point" and "slope fitting". The results showed that the Young's modulus of Hela cell was higher than that of MCF-7 cell,which is in accordance with the F-actin distribution of the two types of cell. We found that the Young's modulus of the cells was decreased with increasing indentation depth and the curve trends by "slope fitting". This indicated that the "slope fitting" method could reduce the error caused by the miscalculation of contact point. The purpose of this study was to provide a guidance for researcher to choose an appropriate method for analyzing AFM indentation force-distance curve. PMID:25764725

  9. Noncancer mortality based on the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb survivors registry over 30 years, 1968-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relation of radiation exposure with noncancer mortality was examined on 44,514 atomic bomb survivors (17,935 males, 26,579 females, and mean age 22.8±15.7 yrs at the time of bombing) registered at Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, based on mortality follow-up over 30 years, 1968-1997. Noncancer mortality was significantly related to radiation dose with relative risk of 1.06 at 1 Sv radiation dose, although weaker than the dose response in solid cancer mortality. The significant dose responses were observed especially in circulatory disease, stroke and urinary organ disease, and suggestive dose response in pneumonia. The temporal pattern in dose response by age at the time of bombing indicated that the relative risk of noncancer mortality was higher with follow-up period, which is contrary to a decreasing dose response in solid cancer mortality with follow-up period. The tendency was remarkable in those survivors younger at the time of bombing. These findings suggest that the significant radiation risk observed in noncancer mortality might increase as the proportion of younger survivors among atomic bomb survivors increases. (author)

  10. Proton exchange in acid–base complexes induced by reaction coordinates with heavy atom motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Proton exchange in acid–base complexes is studied. ► The structures, binding energies, and normal mode vibrations are calculated. ► Transition state structures of proton exchange mechanism are determined. ► In the complexes studied, the reaction coordinate involves heavy atom rocking. ► The reaction coordinate is not simply localized in the proton movements. - Abstract: We extend previous work on nitric acid–ammonia and nitric acid–alkylamine complexes to illustrate that proton exchange reaction coordinates involve the rocking motion of the base moiety in many double hydrogen-bonded gas phase strong acid–strong base complexes. The complexes studied involve the biologically and atmospherically relevant glycine, formic, acetic, propionic, and sulfuric acids with ammonia/alkylamine bases. In these complexes, the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies associated with the proton exchange transition states are −1. This contrasts with widely studied proton exchange reactions between symmetric carboxylic acid dimers or asymmetric DNA base pair and their analogs where the reaction coordinate is localized in proton motions and the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies for the transition states are >1100 cm−1. Calculations on complexes of these acids with water are performed for comparison. Variations of normal vibration modes along the reaction coordinate in the complexes are described.

  11. High-Sensitivity Low-Noise Miniature Fluxgate Magnetometers Using a Flip Chip Conceptual Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Cheng Lu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel class of miniature fluxgate magnetometers fabricated on a print circuit board (PCB substrate and electrically connected to each other similar to the current “flip chip” concept in semiconductor package. This sensor is soldered together by reversely flipping a 5 cm × 3 cm PCB substrate to the other identical one which includes dual magnetic cores, planar pick-up coils, and 3-D excitation coils constructed by planar Cu interconnections patterned on PCB substrates. Principles and analysis of the fluxgate sensor are introduced first, and followed by FEA electromagnetic modeling and simulation for the proposed sensor. Comprehensive characteristic experiments of the miniature fluxgate device exhibit favorable results in terms of sensitivity (or “responsivity” for magnetometers and field noise spectrum. The sensor is driven and characterized by employing the improved second-harmonic detection technique that enables linear V-B correlation and responsivity verification. In addition, the double magnitude of responsivity measured under very low frequency (1 Hz magnetic fields is experimentally demonstrated. As a result, the maximum responsivity of 593 V/T occurs at 50 kHz of excitation frequency with the second harmonic wave of excitation; however, the minimum magnetic field noise is found to be 0.05 nT/Hz1/2 at 1 Hz under the same excitation. In comparison with other miniature planar fluxgates published to date, the fluxgate magnetic sensor with flip chip configuration offers advances in both device functionality and fabrication simplicity. More importantly, the novel design can be further extended to a silicon-based micro-fluxgate chip manufactured by emerging CMOS-MEMS technologies, thus enriching its potential range of applications in modern engineering and the consumer electronics market.

  12. A large-scale view of Space Technology 5 magnetometer response to solar wind drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipp, D. J.; Kilcommons, L. M.; Gjerloev, J.; Redmon, R. J.; Slavin, J.; Le, G.

    2015-04-01

    In this data report we discuss reprocessing of the Space Technology 5 (ST5) magnetometer database for inclusion in NASA's Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb) virtual observatory. The mission consisted of three spacecraft flying in elliptical orbits, from 27 March to 27 June 2006. Reprocessing includes (1) transforming the data into the Modified Apex Coordinate System for projection to a common reference altitude of 110km, (2) correcting gain jumps, and (3) validating the results. We display the averaged magnetic perturbations as a keogram, which allows direct comparison of the full-mission data with the solar wind values and geomagnetic indices.With the data referenced to a common altitude, we find the following: (1) Magnetic perturbations that track the passage of corotating interaction regions and high-speed solar wind; (2) unexpectedly strong dayside perturbations during a solstice magnetospheric sawtooth oscillation interval characterized by a radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) component that may have enhanced the accompanying modest southward IMF; and (3) intervals of reduced magnetic perturbations or "calms," associated with periods of slow solar wind, interspersed among variable-length episodic enhancements. These calms aremost evidentwhen the IMF is northward or projectswith a northward component onto the geomagnetic dipole. The reprocessed ST5 data are in very good agreement with magnetic perturbations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft, which we also map to 110km. We briefly discuss the methods used to remap the ST5 data and the means of validating the results against DMSP. Our methods form the basis for future intermission comparisons of space-based magnetometer data.

  13. 3 He Co-magnetometer Readout for the SNS nEDM Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Clayton, Steven

    2014-09-01

    A search for a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron would provide one of the most important low energy tests of the discrete symmetries beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. A new experimental search of neutron EDM, to be conducted at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at ORNL, has been proposed with a goal of 100-fold improvement in the present experimental limit of 10-26e .cm The experiment is based on the magnetic-resonance technique in which polarized neutrons precess at the Larmor frequency when placed in a static magnetic field; a non-zero EDM would be evident as a difference in precession frequency when a strong electric field is applied parallel vs. anti-parallel to the magnetic field. In addition to its role as neutron spin-analyzer via the spin-dependent n+3He nuclear capture process, polarized helium-3 (which has negligible EDM) will serve as co-magnetometer to correct for drifts in the magnetic field. The helium-3 co-magnetometer will be directly read out by superconducting gradiometers coupled to SQUIDs. We describe a proposed SQUID system suitable for the complex neutron EDM apparatus, and demonstrate that the field noise in the SQUID system, tested in an environment similar to the EDM apparatus, meets the nEDM requirement. We also present a test of the compatibility of low-noise SQUID operation with other devices, potential sources of electromagnetic interference, which are necessarily operating during the EDM measurement period and effective ambient magnetic field noise cancellation with an implementation of reference channels.

  14. Geophysical Surveying of Shallow Magnetic Anomalies Using the iPhone Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdyke, P.; Dudley, C.; Louie, J. N.

    2012-12-01

    This investigation examined whether the 3-axis Hall-effect magnetometer in the Apple iPhone 3GS can function as an effective shallow magnetic survey instrument. The xSensor Pro app from Crossbow Systems allows recoding of all three sensor components along with the GPS location, at a frequency of 1.0, 4.0, 16.0, and 32.0 Hz. If the iPhone proves successful in collecting useful magnetic data, then geophysicists and especially educators would have a new tool for high-density geophysical mapping. No-contract iPhones that can connect with WiFi can be obtained for about $400, allowing deployment of large numbers of instruments. iPhones with the xSensor Pro app surveyed in parallel with an Overhauser GEM system magnetometer (1 nT sensitivity) to test this idea. Anderson Bay, located on the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation, provided a rural survey location free from cultural interference. xSensor Pro, logged each component's intensity and the GPS location at a frequency of four measurements per second. Two Overhauser units functioned as a base unit and a roving unit. The roving unit collected total field at set points located with a handheld GPS. Comparing the total field computed from the iPhone components against that collected by the Overhauser establishes the level of anomalies that the iPhone can detect. iPhone total-field measurements commonly vary by 200 nT from point to point, so a spatial-temporal average over 25 seconds produces a smoothed signal for comparison. Preliminary analysis of the iPhone results show that the data do not accurately correlate to the total field collected by the Overhauser for any anomaly of less than 200 nT.

  15. A high precision comparison of the gyromagnetic ratios of the 199Hg atom and the neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current experimental search for the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) uses a cohabiting magnetometer based upon measurements of the nuclear precession frequency of 199Hg atoms. This magnetometer reduces the systematic errors introduced into the measurement of the neutron EDM by changes in the magnetic field. In order to obtain a maximal reduction in the systematic errors, a precise value for the ratio of the neutron and 199Hg atom gyromagnetic ratios is required. This thesis describes a measurement of the ratio using a modified form of the neutron EDM apparatus. The result is found to be, γn/γ199Hg = -3.8425063 ± (0.5 x 10-6) ± (5.4 x 10-6) where the first error is due to statistics, and the second is due to systematics. Expressing this in terms of fractional errors we have: γn/γ199Hg = - 3.8425063 x (1 ± (1.3 x 10-7) ± (1.4 x 10-6)). This result represents a 15ppm shift in the value which may be derived from two previous experiments in the literature. The thesis also contains a review of the Rabi and Ramsey techniques of magnetic resonance. Some previously unpublished results are presented, including a derivation of a simple expression for the width of the Ramsey resonance lineshape, and the effect of having an oscillating magnetic field with a well defined initial phase. (author)

  16. Single atom measurement and atomic manipulation using atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper explains studies to measure atomic force as the force linking an atom and atom, using an atomic force microscope (AFM). First, it describes the principle and device configuration of AFM, and as an example of the atomic force measurement of Si atoms on the surface of Si(111)-(7x7), it describes the technique to measure atomic force using AFM, as well as the uncertainty of probe tip against atomic force. In addition, it describes the following items on the measurement results of chemical bonding force: (1) chemical bonding force vs physical force and chemical bonding force vs current on the surface of Si(111)-(7x7), (2) chemical bonding force and element dependence on the surface of Si/Sn(111)-(√3x√3), (3) atomic manipulation based on AMF, and (4) relationship between atomic manipulation and the size of chemical bonding force with a probe. (A.O.)

  17. Modeling an optical magnetometer with electronic circuits — analysis and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical magnetometers are currently able to achieve magnetometric sensitivities below 1 fT/Hz1/2. Although such sensitivities are typically obtained for ultra-low-field measurements, a group of optical magnetometers allows the detection of the fields in a much broader dynamic range without a significant compromise in the sensitivity. A particular example of such a device is the magnetometer exploiting amplitude-modulated nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. It enables measurement of a magnetic field via detection of a polarization state of light traversing a medium subjected to the field. In this paper, an electronic-circuit analogue of such the magnetometer is elaborated. Its operation is investigated with an electronic-circuit design software, which allows to study the ''magnetometer'' performance as a function of various parameters. The ability to automate operation of the magnetometer and automatically track ''magnetic field'' is demonstrated. The simulations are verified with experimental results obtained with the true magnetometer operating in one of the investigated arrangements.

  18. Passive microrheology of soft materials with atomic force microscopy: A wavelet-based spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Torres, C.; Streppa, L. [CNRS, UMR5672, Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d' Italie, Université de Lyon, 69007 Lyon (France); Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F. [CNRS, UMR5672, Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d' Italie, Université de Lyon, 69007 Lyon (France); CNRS, UMR5798, Laboratoire Ondes et Matière d' Aquitaine, Université de Bordeaux, 351 Cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence (France); Argoul, P. [Université Paris-Est, Ecole des Ponts ParisTech, SDOA, MAST, IFSTTAR, 14-20 Bd Newton, Cité Descartes, 77420 Champs sur Marne (France)

    2016-01-18

    Compared to active microrheology where a known force or modulation is periodically imposed to a soft material, passive microrheology relies on the spectral analysis of the spontaneous motion of tracers inherent or external to the material. Passive microrheology studies of soft or living materials with atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever tips are rather rare because, in the spectral densities, the rheological response of the materials is hardly distinguishable from other sources of random or periodic perturbations. To circumvent this difficulty, we propose here a wavelet-based decomposition of AFM cantilever tip fluctuations and we show that when applying this multi-scale method to soft polymer layers and to living myoblasts, the structural damping exponents of these soft materials can be retrieved.

  19. System design and new applications for atomic force microscope based on tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Liu, A. P.; Yang, X. H.

    2015-09-01

    The design of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with high resolution is introduced in this paper. Mainly, we have developed the system design of the apparatus based on tunneling. AFM.IPC-208B, this kind of apparatus combines scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) and AFM availability, and its lens body with original frame enhances the capability of the machine. In order to analyze the performance of AFM.IPC-208B, as a new tool in the field of Life Science, we make use of the system to study natural mica and molecular protein structures of Cattle-insulin and human antibody immunoglobulin G (IgG) coupled with staphylococcus protein A (SPA). As the results of new applications, the resolution of AFM.IPC-208B is proved to be 0.1 nm, and these nanometer measurement results provide much valuable information for the study of small molecular proteins and HIV experiments.

  20. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Nanorobotics Modelling, Simulation, Setup Building and Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Hui; Régnier, Stéphane; Sitti, Metin

    2012-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has been successfully used to perform nanorobotic manipulation operations on nanoscale entities such as particles, nanotubes, nanowires, nanocrystals, and DNA since 1990s. There have been many progress on modeling, imaging, teleoperated or automated control, human-machine interfacing, instrumentation, and applications of AFM based nanorobotic manipulation systems in literature. This book aims to include all of such state-of-the-art progress in an organized, structured, and detailed manner as a reference book and also potentially a textbook in nanorobotics and any other nanoscale dynamics, systems and controls related research and education. Clearly written and well-organized, this text introduces designs and prototypes of the nanorobotic systems in detail with innovative principles of three-dimensional manipulation force microscopy and parallel imaging/manipulation force microscopy.

  1. Controlling the Atomic Structure of Au30 Nanoclusters by a Ligand-Based Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Tatsuya; Liu, Chong; Zeng, Chenjie; Jin, Renxi; Chen, Yuxiang; Rosi, Nathaniel L; Jin, Rongchao

    2016-06-01

    We report the X-ray structure of a gold nanocluster with 30 gold atoms protected by 18 1-adamantanethiolate ligands (formulated as Au30 (S-Adm)18 ). This nanocluster exhibits a threefold rotationally symmetrical, hexagonal-close-packed (HCP) Au18 kernel protected by six dimeric Au2 (SR)3 staple motifs. This new structure is distinctly different from the previously reported Au30 S(S-(t) Bu)18 nanocluster protected by 18 tert-butylthiolate ligands and one sulfido ligand with a face-centered cubic (FCC) Au22 kernel. The Au30 (S-Adm)18 nanocluster has an anomalous solubility (it is only soluble in benzene but not in other common solvents). This work demonstrates a ligand-based strategy for controlling nanocluster structure and also provides a method for the discovery of possibly overlooked clusters because of their anomalous solubility. PMID:27099989

  2. Current status and perspectives in atomic force microscopy-based identification of cellular transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chenbo; Hu, Xiao; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the complex interplay between cells and their biomechanics and how the interplay is influenced by the extracellular microenvironment, as well as how the transforming potential of a tissue from a benign to a cancerous one is related to the dynamics of both the cell and its surroundings, holds promise for the development of targeted translational therapies. This review provides a comprehensive overview of atomic force microscopy-based technology and its applications for identification of cellular progression to a cancerous phenotype. The review also offers insights into the advancements that are required for the next user-controlled tool to allow for the identification of early cell transformation and thus potentially lead to improved therapeutic outcomes. PMID:27274238

  3. Passive microrheology of soft materials with atomic force microscopy: A wavelet-based spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared to active microrheology where a known force or modulation is periodically imposed to a soft material, passive microrheology relies on the spectral analysis of the spontaneous motion of tracers inherent or external to the material. Passive microrheology studies of soft or living materials with atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever tips are rather rare because, in the spectral densities, the rheological response of the materials is hardly distinguishable from other sources of random or periodic perturbations. To circumvent this difficulty, we propose here a wavelet-based decomposition of AFM cantilever tip fluctuations and we show that when applying this multi-scale method to soft polymer layers and to living myoblasts, the structural damping exponents of these soft materials can be retrieved

  4. Atomic phase diagram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shichun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-Cheng model, atomic phase diagram or electron density versus atomic radius diagram describing the interaction properties of atoms of different kinds in equilibrium state is developed. Atomic phase diagram is established based on the two-atoms model. Besides atomic radius, electron density and continuity condition for electron density on interfaces between atoms, the lever law of atomic phase diagram involving other physical parameters is taken into account, such as the binding energy, for the sake of simplicity.

  5. Developments in alkali-metal atomic magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Scott Jeffrey

    Alkali-metal magnetometers use the coherent precession of polarized atomic spins to detect and measure magnetic fields. Recent advances have enabled magnetometers to become competitive with SQUIDs as the most sensitive magnetic field detectors, and they now find use in a variety of areas ranging from medicine and NMR to explosives detection and fundamental physics research. In this thesis we discuss several developments in alkali-metal atomic magnetometry for both practical and fundamental applications. We present a new method of polarizing the alkali atoms by modulating the optical pumping rate at both the linear and quadratic Zeeman resonance frequencies. We demonstrate experimentally that this method enhances the sensitivity of a potassium magnetometer operating in the Earth's field by a factor of 4, and we calculate that it can reduce the orientation-dependent heading error to less than 0.1 nT. We discuss a radio-frequency magnetometer for detection of oscillating magnetic fields with sensitivity better than 0.2 fT/ Hz , which we apply to the observation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals from polarized water, as well as nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals from ammonium nitrate. We demonstrate that a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer can measure all three vector components of the magnetic field in an unshielded environment with comparable sensitivity to other devices. We find that octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) acts as an anti-relaxation coating for alkali atoms at temperatures below 170°C, allowing them to collide with a glass surface up to 2,000 times before depolarizing, and we present the first demonstration of high-temperature magnetometry with a coated cell. We also describe a reusable alkali vapor cell intended for the study of interactions between alkali atoms and surface coatings. Finally, we explore the use of a cesium-xenon SERF comagnetometer for a proposed measurement of the permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs

  6. SQUID magnetometer with YBa2Cu3O7 grain boundary step contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the assembly and characterisation of SQUID magnetometers consisting of a SQUID and a coupled superconducting flux antenna. Two concepts for coupling of the antenna were implemented: First, a directly coupled magnetometer in which the flux antenna is produced parallel to the SQUID, i.e. only a single YBCO layer is required; secondly, a flip-chip magnetometer where the flux antenna is produced on a different substrate and is coupled to the SQUID inductively. The SQUIDs were produced on the basis of grain boundary step contacts

  7. The mercury co-magnetometer in the nEDM-experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: An experiment searching for the neutron electric dipole moment is currently set up by an international collaboration at the new ultracold neutron source at the Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland. In order to control the magnetic field, an external field compensation system together with a 4-layer magnetic shield is used. Additionally, the magnetic field inside the storage chamber is measured by a mercury co-magnetometer. With the expected increase in sensitivity due to the increased UCN-densities, it has become essential to also improve the mercury co-magnetometer. The working principle and the planned improvements for the mercury co-magnetometer will be presented. (author)

  8. Micro-fabricated atomic magnetometer with hybrid vector-scalar operation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Measurement of magnetic fields provides valuable information about charged particles and plasma interactions in the solar system, and about planetary dynamics and...

  9. Integrated microchip incorporating atomic magnetometer and microfluidic channel for NMR and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Micah P.; Savukov, Igor M.; Budker, Dmitry; Shah, Vishal K.; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Michalak, David J.; Xu, Shoujun; Pines, Alexander

    2011-08-09

    An integral microfluidic device includes an alkali vapor cell and microfluidic channel, which can be used to detect magnetism for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Small magnetic fields in the vicinity of the vapor cell can be measured by optically polarizing and probing the spin precession in the small magnetic field. This can then be used to detect the magnetic field of in encoded analyte in the adjacent microfluidic channel. The magnetism in the microfluidic channel can be modulated by applying an appropriate series of radio or audio frequency pulses upstream from the microfluidic chip (the remote detection modality) to yield a sensitive means of detecting NMR and MRI.

  10. Atomic site location by channelling enhanced microanalysis (ALCHEMI) in γ'-strengthened Ni- and Pt-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The additions of alloying elements to Ni- and Pt-base alloys influence the microstructure and thereby the creep properties, whereas the mechanism is uncertain. Therefore atomic site location by channelling enhanced microanalysis (ALCHEMI) was used to determine the site partitioning of ternary and quaternary alloying elements in the L12-ordered γ'-phase. Two ternary Ni-Al alloys with Cr and Ti additions were investigated. The measured site partitioning showed that Cr and Ti atoms prefer the Al-sublattice sites. For a ternary Pt-Al-Cr alloy, it was found that Cr atoms occupy Al sites. The influence of Ni as a fourth alloying element in a Pt-Al-Cr-Ni alloy on the site partitioning was also investigated. The detected results give evidence that in the quaternary alloy Cr and Ni atoms prefer the Pt sublattice. First principles calculations were used to support the experimental data

  11. The Analysis of the Atomic Pair Distribution Function of Pmn-Based Nanopowders by X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemifard, M.; Khorrami, Gh. H.

    The three-dimensional atomic-scale structure around Mg, Nb, Ti and Zr atoms in a series ferroelectric material such as PMN, PZT, PMN-PZT and PMN-PT has been studied using X-ray diffraction (MoKα), Rietveld refinement and the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) technique. The structure and particle size of the powders was determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM observation. The studies show that the materials are disordered at nanometer length distances. The three-dimensional atomic ordering in PMN-based nanopowders may well be described by a cubic structure of the perovskite type, similar to that occurring in the bulk crystals. At the end, the analyzed data show that the sizes of ZrO6 octahedral are larger than TiO6 octahedral.

  12. A photon-photon quantum gate based on a single atom in an optical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Bastian; Welte, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-08-11

    That two photons pass each other undisturbed in free space is ideal for the faithful transmission of information, but prohibits an interaction between the photons. Such an interaction is, however, required for a plethora of applications in optical quantum information processing. The long-standing challenge here is to realize a deterministic photon-photon gate, that is, a mutually controlled logic operation on the quantum states of the photons. This requires an interaction so strong that each of the two photons can shift the other's phase by π radians. For polarization qubits, this amounts to the conditional flipping of one photon's polarization to an orthogonal state. So far, only probabilistic gates based on linear optics and photon detectors have been realized, because "no known or foreseen material has an optical nonlinearity strong enough to implement this conditional phase shift''. Meanwhile, tremendous progress in the development of quantum-nonlinear systems has opened up new possibilities for single-photon experiments. Platforms range from Rydberg blockade in atomic ensembles to single-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics. Applications such as single-photon switches and transistors, two-photon gateways, nondestructive photon detectors, photon routers and nonlinear phase shifters have been demonstrated, but none of them with the ideal information carriers: optical qubits in discriminable modes. Here we use the strong light-matter coupling provided by a single atom in a high-finesse optical resonator to realize the Duan-Kimble protocol of a universal controlled phase flip (π phase shift) photon-photon quantum gate. We achieve an average gate fidelity of (76.2 ± 3.6) per cent and specifically demonstrate the capability of conditional polarization flipping as well as entanglement generation between independent input photons. This photon-photon quantum gate is a universal quantum logic element, and therefore could perform most existing two-photon operations

  13. The influence of physical and physiological cues on atomic force microscopy-based cell stiffness assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chiou

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All of these cues show a significant influence on the cell elasticity assessment. Sharp AFM tips create a two-fold increase in the value of the effective Young's modulus (E(eff relative to that of the blunt tips. Higher indenting force at the same loading rate generates higher estimated cell elasticity. Increasing the operation temperature of the AFM leads to decreases in the cell stiffness because the structure of actin filaments becomes disorganized. The physiological cues include the presence of fetal bovine serum or extracellular matrix-coated surfaces, the culture passage number, and the culture density. Both fetal bovine serum and the extracellular matrix are critical for cells to maintain the integrity of actin filaments and consequently exhibit higher elasticity. Unlike primary cells, mouse kidney progenitor cells can be passaged and maintain their morphology and elasticity for a very long period without a senescence phenotype. Finally, cell elasticity increases with increasing culture density only in MDCK epithelial cells. In summary, for researchers who use AFM to assess cell elasticity, our results provide basic and significant information about the suitable selection of physical and physiological cues.

  14. The Polarizable Atomic Multipole-based AMOEBA Force Field for Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yue; Xia, Zhen; Zhang, Jiajing; Best, Robert; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W.; Ren, Pengyu

    2013-01-01

    Development of the AMOEBA (Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Simulation) force field for proteins is presented. The current version (AMOEBA-2013) utilizes permanent electrostatic multipole moments through the quadrupole at each atom, and explicitly treats polarization effects in various chemical and physical environments. The atomic multipole electrostatic parameters for each amino acid residue type are derived from high-level gas phase quantum mechanical calculations via...

  15. Protein microarrays based on polymer brushes prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbey, Raphael; Kauffmann, Ekkehard; Ehrat, Markus; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2010-12-13

    Polymer brushes represent an interesting platform for the development of high-capacity protein binding surfaces. Whereas the protein binding properties of polymer brushes have been investigated before, this manuscript evaluates the feasibility of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) and PGMA-co-poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PGMA-co-PDEAEMA) (co)polymer brushes grown via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) as protein reactive substrates in a commercially available microarray system using tantalum-pentoxide-coated optical waveguide-based chips. The performance of the polymer-brush-based protein microarray chips is assessed using commercially available dodecylphosphate (DDP)-modified chips as the benchmark. In contrast to the 2D planar, DDP-coated chips, the polymer-brush-covered chips represent a 3D sampling volume. This was reflected in the results of protein immobilization studies, which indicated that the polymer-brush-based coatings had a higher protein binding capacity as compared to the reference substrates. The protein binding capacity of the polymer-brush-based coatings was found to increase with increasing brush thickness and could also be enhanced by copolymerization of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA), which catalyzes epoxide ring-opening of the glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) units. The performance of the polymer-brush-based microarray chips was evaluated in two proof-of-concept microarray experiments, which involved the detection of biotin-streptavidin binding as well as a model TNFα reverse assay. These experiments revealed that the use of polymer-brush-modified microarray chips resulted not only in the highest absolute fluorescence readouts, reflecting the 3D nature and enhanced sampling volume provided by the brush coating, but also in significantly enhanced signal-to-noise ratios. These characteristics make the proposed polymer brushes an attractive alternative to commercially available, 2D microarray

  16. Proposal of flexible atomic and molecular process management for Monte Carlo impurity transport code based on object oriented method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo simulation code on impurity transport has been developed by several groups to be utilized mainly for fusion related edge plasmas. State of impurity particle is determined by atomic and molecular processes such as ionization, charge exchange in plasma. A lot of atomic and molecular processes have been considered because the edge plasma has not only impurity atoms, but also impurity molecules mainly related to chemical erosion of carbon materials, and their cross sections have been given experimentally and theoretically. We need to reveal which process is essential in a given edge plasma condition. Monte Carlo simulation code, which takes such various atomic and molecular processes into account, is necessary to investigate the behavior of impurity particle in plasmas. Usually, the impurity transport simulation code has been intended for some specific atomic and molecular processes so that the introduction of a new process forces complicated programming work. In order to evaluate various proposed atomic and molecular processes, a flexible management of atomic and molecular reaction should be established. We have developed the impurity transport simulation code based on object-oriented method. By employing object-oriented programming, we can handle each particle as 'object', which enfolds data and procedure function itself. A user (notice, not programmer) can define property of each particle species and the related atomic and molecular processes and then each 'object' is defined by analyzing this information. According to the relation among plasma particle species, objects are connected with each other and change their state by themselves. Dynamic allocation of these objects to program memory is employed to adapt for arbitrary number of species and atomic/molecular reactions. Thus we can treat arbitrary species and process starting from, for instance, methane and acetylene. Such a software procedure would be useful also for industrial application plasmas

  17. Design and Fabrication of a Chip-based Continuous-wave Atom Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Power, E. P.; George, L; Vanderelzen, B.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Murphy, R; Yalisove, S. M.; Raithel, G.

    2012-01-01

    We present a design for a continuous-wave (CW) atom laser on a chip and describe the process used to fabricate the device. Our design aims to integrate quadrupole magnetic guiding of ground state Rb atoms with continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling to create a continuous Bose-Einstein condensate; out-coupled atoms from the condensate should realize a CW atom laser. We choose a geometry with three wires embedded in a spiral pattern in a silicon subtrate. The guide features an integr...

  18. Pharmacophore Modeling, Atom based 3D-QSAR and Docking Studies of Chalcone derivatives as Tubulin inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Naresh Kandakatla; Geetha Ramakrishnan; J. Karthikeyan; Rajasekhar Chekkara

    2014-01-01

    Tubulin is attractive target for anticancer drug design and their inhibitors are useful in treatment of various cancers. Pharmacophore and Atom based QSAR studies were carried out for series of Chalcone derivatives. Pharmacophore model was developed using 38 compounds, having pIC50 ranging 4.003 to 6.552. The best Pharmacophoric hypothesis AHHRR.10 (one H-acceptor, two hydrophobic groups, two aromatic rings) had survival score of 4.824. Atom based 3D QSAR was built for the best hypothesis w...

  19. Characterization of atomic-level structure in Fe-based amorphous and nanocrystalline alloy by experimental and modeling methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babilas, Rafał, E-mail: rafal.babilas@polsl.pl

    2015-09-15

    The atomic structure of Fe{sub 70}Nb{sub 10}B{sub 20} alloy in “as-cast” state and after annealing was investigated using high-energy X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The HRTEM observations allowed to indicate some medium-range order (MRO) regions about 2 nm in size and formation of some kinds of short-range order (SRO) structures represented by atomic clusters with diameter ca. 0.5 nm. The Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method basing on the results of XRD measurements was used in modeling the atomic structure of Fe-based alloy. The structural model was described by peak values of partial pair correlation functions and coordination numbers determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy investigations. The three-dimensional configuration box of atoms was obtained from the RMC simulation and the representative Fe-centered clusters were taken from the calculated structure. According to the Gonser et al. approach, the measured spectra of alloy studied were decomposed into 5 subspectra representing average Fe–Fe coordination numbers. Basing on the results of disaccommodation of magnetic permeability, which is sensitive to the short order of the random packing of atoms, it was stated that an occurrence of free volume is not detected after nanocrystallization process. - Highlights: • Atomic cluster model of amorphous structure was proposed for studied glassy alloy. • Short range order (ca. 0.5 nm) regions interpreted as clusters were identified by HREM. • Clusters correspond to coordination numbers (N = 4,6,8,9) calculated by using Gonser approach. • Medium-range order (ca. 2 nm) could be referred to few atomic clusters. • SRO regions are able to grow up as nuclei of crystalline bcc Fe and iron borides. • Crystalline particles have spherical morphology with an average diameter of 20 nm.

  20. Characterization of atomic-level structure in Fe-based amorphous and nanocrystalline alloy by experimental and modeling methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic structure of Fe70Nb10B20 alloy in “as-cast” state and after annealing was investigated using high-energy X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The HRTEM observations allowed to indicate some medium-range order (MRO) regions about 2 nm in size and formation of some kinds of short-range order (SRO) structures represented by atomic clusters with diameter ca. 0.5 nm. The Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method basing on the results of XRD measurements was used in modeling the atomic structure of Fe-based alloy. The structural model was described by peak values of partial pair correlation functions and coordination numbers determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy investigations. The three-dimensional configuration box of atoms was obtained from the RMC simulation and the representative Fe-centered clusters were taken from the calculated structure. According to the Gonser et al. approach, the measured spectra of alloy studied were decomposed into 5 subspectra representing average Fe–Fe coordination numbers. Basing on the results of disaccommodation of magnetic permeability, which is sensitive to the short order of the random packing of atoms, it was stated that an occurrence of free volume is not detected after nanocrystallization process. - Highlights: • Atomic cluster model of amorphous structure was proposed for studied glassy alloy. • Short range order (ca. 0.5 nm) regions interpreted as clusters were identified by HREM. • Clusters correspond to coordination numbers (N = 4,6,8,9) calculated by using Gonser approach. • Medium-range order (ca. 2 nm) could be referred to few atomic clusters. • SRO regions are able to grow up as nuclei of crystalline bcc Fe and iron borides. • Crystalline particles have spherical morphology with an average diameter of 20 nm

  1. CLUSTER STAFF search coils magnetometer calibration - comparisons with FGM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Piberne, R.; de Conchy, Y.; Lacombe, C.; Bouzid, V.; Grison, B.; Alison, D.; Canu, P.

    2013-12-01

    The main part of Cluster Spatio Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations (STAFF) experiment consists of triaxial search coils allowing the measurements of the three magnetic components of the waves from 0.1 Hz up to 4 kHz. Two sets of data are produced, one by a module to filter and transmit the corresponding waveform up to either 10 or 180 Hz (STAFF-SC) and the second by an onboard Spectrum Analyser (STAFF-SA) to compute the elements of the spectral matrix for five components of the waves, 3 × B and 2 × E (from EFW experiment) in the frequency range 8 Hz to 4 kHz. In order to understand the way the output signal of the search coils are calibrated, the transfer functions of the different parts of the instrument are described as well as the way to transform telemetry data into physical units, across various coordinate systems from the spinning sensors to a fixed and known frame. The instrument sensitivity is discussed. Cross-calibration inside STAFF (SC and SA) is presented. Results of cross-calibration between the STAFF search coils and the Cluster Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM) data are discussed. It is shown that these cross-calibrations lead to an agreement between both data sets at low frequency within a 2% error. By means of statistics done over 10 yr, it is shown that the functionalities and characteristics of both instruments have not changed during this period.

  2. CLUSTER-STAFF search coil magnetometer calibration - comparisons with FGM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Piberne, R.; de Conchy, Y.; Lacombe, C.; Bouzid, V.; Grison, B.; Alison, D.; Canu, P.

    2014-09-01

    The main part of the Cluster Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations (STAFF) experiment consists of triaxial search coils allowing the measurements of the three magnetic components of the waves from 0.1 Hz up to 4 kHz. Two sets of data are produced, one by a module to filter and transmit the corresponding waveform up to either 10 or 180 Hz (STAFF-SC), and the second by the onboard Spectrum Analyser (STAFF-SA) to compute the elements of the spectral matrix for five components of the waves, 3 × B and 2 × E (from the EFW experiment), in the frequency range 8 Hz to 4 kHz. In order to understand the way the output signals of the search coils are calibrated, the transfer functions of the different parts of the instrument are described as well as the way to transform telemetry data into physical units across various coordinate systems from the spinning sensors to a fixed and known frame. The instrument sensitivity is discussed. Cross-calibration inside STAFF (SC and SA) is presented. Results of cross-calibration between the STAFF search coils and the Cluster Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) data are discussed. It is shown that these cross-calibrations lead to an agreement between both data sets at low frequency within a 2% error. By means of statistics done over 10 yr, it is shown that the functionalities and characteristics of both instruments have not changed during this period.

  3. Octupole Focusing Relativistic Self-Magnetometer Electric Storage Ring "Bottle"

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A method proposed for measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of a charged fundamental particle such as the proton, is to measure the spin precession caused by a radial electric bend field $E_r$, acting on the EDMs of frozen spin polarized protons circulating in an all-electric storage ring. The dominant systematic error limiting such a measurement comes from spurious spin precession caused by unintentional and unknown average radial magnetic field $B_r$ acting on the (vastly larger) magnetic dipole moments (MDM) of the protons. Along with taking extreme magnetic shielding measures, the best protection against this systematic error is to use the storage ring itself, as a "self-magnetometer"; the exact magnetic field average $\\langle B_r\\rangle$ that produces systematic EDM error, is nulled to exquisite precision by orbit position control. By using octupole rather than quadrupole focusing the restoring force can be vanishingly small for small amplitude vertical betatron-like motion yet strong enough at larg...

  4. Reducing systematic errors in measurements made by a SQUID magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method is described which reduces those systematic errors of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer that arise from possible radial displacements of the sample in the second-order gradiometer superconducting pickup coil. By rotating the sample rod (and hence the sample) around its axis into a position where the best fit is obtained to the output voltage of the SQUID as the sample is moved through the pickup coil, the accuracy of measuring magnetic moments can be increased significantly. In the cases of an examined Co1.9Fe1.1Si Heusler alloy, pure iron and nickel samples, the accuracy could be increased over the value given in the specification of the device. The suggested method is only meaningful if the measurement uncertainty is dominated by systematic errors – radial displacement in particular – and not by instrumental or environmental noise. - Highlights: • A simple method is described which reduces systematic errors of a SQUID. • The errors arise from a radial displacement of the sample in the gradiometer coil. • The procedure is to rotate the sample rod (with the sample) around its axis. • The best fit to the SQUID voltage has to be attained moving the sample through the coil. • The accuracy of measuring magnetic moment can be increased significantly

  5. Motion analysis of sun salutation using magnetometer and accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omkar S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sun salutation is a part of yoga. It consists of a sequence of postures done with synchronized breathing. The practice of few cycles of sun salutation is known to help in maintaining good health and vigor. The practice of sun salutation does not need any extra gadgets. Also it is very much aerobic and invigorates the body and the mind. sun salutation, which comprises 10 postures, involves most of the joints of the body. Understanding the transition phase during motion is a challenging task, and thus, new convenient methods need to be employed. Aims: The purpose of this study was to get an insight into the motion analysis of sun salutation during the transition from each of the 10 postures. Materials and Methods: A device MicroStrain sensor 3DM-GX1, which is a combination of magnetometers, accelerometers, and gyroscopes was used to measure the inclination and the acceleration of the body along the three axes. The acceleration obtained was then separated into gravitational and kinematic components. Results and Conclusions: The value of the gravitational component helps us to understand the position of the body and the kinematic component helps us to analyze the grace of the motion.

  6. Lunar magnetic anomalies detected by the Apollo subsatellite magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, L. L.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Russell, C. T.; Wilhelms, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Properties of lunar crustal magnetization thus far deduced from Apollo subsatellite magnetometer data are reviewed using two of the most accurate available magnetic anomaly maps, one covering a portion of the lunar near side and the other a part of the far side. The largest single anomaly found within the region of coverage on the near-side map correlates exactly with a conspicuous light-colored marking in western Oceanus Procellarum called Reiner Gamma. This feature is interpreted as an unusual deposit of ejecta from secondary craters of the large nearby primary impact crater Cavalerius. The mean altitude of the far-side anomaly gap is much higher than that of the near side map and the surface geology is more complex; individual anomaly sources have therefore not yet been identified. The mechanism of magnetization and the origin of the magnetizing field remain unresolved, but the uniformity with which the Reiner Gamma deposit is apparently magnetized, and the north-south depletion of magnetization intensity across a substantial portion of the far side, seem to require the existence of an ambient field, perhaps of global or larger extent.

  7. Reducing systematic errors in measurements made by a SQUID magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiss, L.F., E-mail: kissl@szfki.hu; Kaptás, D.; Balogh, J.

    2014-11-15

    A simple method is described which reduces those systematic errors of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer that arise from possible radial displacements of the sample in the second-order gradiometer superconducting pickup coil. By rotating the sample rod (and hence the sample) around its axis into a position where the best fit is obtained to the output voltage of the SQUID as the sample is moved through the pickup coil, the accuracy of measuring magnetic moments can be increased significantly. In the cases of an examined Co{sub 1.9}Fe{sub 1.1}Si Heusler alloy, pure iron and nickel samples, the accuracy could be increased over the value given in the specification of the device. The suggested method is only meaningful if the measurement uncertainty is dominated by systematic errors – radial displacement in particular – and not by instrumental or environmental noise. - Highlights: • A simple method is described which reduces systematic errors of a SQUID. • The errors arise from a radial displacement of the sample in the gradiometer coil. • The procedure is to rotate the sample rod (with the sample) around its axis. • The best fit to the SQUID voltage has to be attained moving the sample through the coil. • The accuracy of measuring magnetic moment can be increased significantly.

  8. Rad-Hard Sigma-Delta 3-channel ADC for Fluxgate Magnetometers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project aims to develop a multi-channel analog to digital converter (ADC) required for a fluxgate magnetometer (EPD) employed on NASA's planetary...

  9. Elemental Analysis of Nanomaterial Using Photon-Atom Interaction Based EDXRF Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Presence of trace amount of foreign impurities (both metallic and non-metallic in standard salts used for sample preparation and during the synthesis process can alter the physical and chemical behavior of the pure and doped nano-materials. Therefore, it becomes important to determine concentration of various elements present in synthesized nano-material sample. In present work, the elemental and compositional analysis of nano-materials synthesized using various methods has been performed using photon-atom interaction based energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF technique. This technique due to its multielement analytical capability, lower detection limit, capability to analyze metals and non-metals alike and almost no sample preparation requirements can be utilized for analysis of nano-materials. The EDXRF spectrometer involves a 2.4 kW Mo anode x-ray tube (Pananalytic, Netherland equipped with selective absorbers as an excitation source and an LEGe detector (FWHM = 150 eV at 5.895 keV, Canberra, US coupled with PC based multichannel analyzer used to collect the fluorescentx-ray spectra. The analytical results showed good agreements with the expected values calculated on the basis of the precursor used in preparation of nano-materials.

  10. Controllable functionalization and wettability transition of graphene-based films by an atomic oxygen strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Though chemical modification of graphene based on Hummers method has been most widely used to tailor its properties and interfacial characteristics, a method which could achieve definitive and controllable groups and properties is still highly required. Here, we demonstrate a high-vacuum oxidation strategy by atomic oxygen (AO) and investigate the AO induced functionalization and wettability transition in films made from basal-defect- and oxide-free graphene dispersions. These graphene-based films are neither graphene nor graphite, but graphene blocks constituted by numerous randomly stacked graphene flakes. It is found that AO induced functionalization of these films through the formation of epoxy groups, sp3 configuration, ether, and double and triple C–O groups. The films turn to be hydrophilic after exposed to AO. The contact angle increases with AO exposure time. This phenomenon is attributed to the lower surface roughness induced by collision and/or edge erosion of energetic ions to the film surface and is further explained by the Wenzel model. The demonstrated strategy can overcome limitations of Hummers method, provide possibility to gain functionalization and wettability transition in liquid-phase exfoliated basal-defect- and oxide-free graphene in the dry environment, and may extend the study and application of this material in spacecraft in low earth orbit

  11. UTC(OP) based on LNE-SYRTE atomic fountain primary frequency standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovera, G. D.; Bize, S.; Chupin, B.; Guéna, J.; Laurent, Ph; Rosenbusch, P.; Uhrich, P.; Abgrall, M.

    2016-06-01

    UTC(OP), the French national realization of the international coordinated universal time, was redesigned and rebuilt. The first step was the implementation in October 2012 of a new algorithm based on a H-maser and on atomic fountain data. Thanks to the new implementation, the stability of UTC(OP) was dramatically improved and UTC(OP) competes with the best time scales available today. Then the hardware generation and distribution of the UTC(OP) physical signals were replaced. Part of the new hardware is composed of commercial devices, but the key elements were specifically developed. One of them is a special switch that allows the UTC(OP) signals to be derived from one of two time scales, based on two different H-masers, which are generated simultaneously. This insures the continuity of the UTC(OP) signal even when a change of the reference H-maser is required. With the new hardware implementation, UTC(OP) is made available through three coherent signals: 100 MHz, 10 MHz and 1 PPS. For more than 3 years, UTC(OP) remained well below 10 ns close to UTC, with a difference even less than 5 ns if we except a short period around MJD 56650.

  12. On new definitions of SI base units. Why is the "atomic" kilogram preferable

    CERN Document Server

    Bronnikov, K A; Kalinin, M I; Khruschov, V V; Kononogov, S A; Melnikov, V N

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the role of fundamental constants and measurement data for the Planck, Avogadro and Boltzmann constants and the elementary electric charge in connection with the planned transition to new definitions of four base SI units (the kilogram, mole, ampere and kelvin) in terms of fixed values of these constants. It is proposed to choose a new definition of any base SI unit in terms of a particular fundamental physical constant using a number of criteria, or principles, such as succession relative to the current SI, a sufficient stability of the new unit standards, and concordance between physical dimensions of the unit and the corresponding fundamental constant. It is argued that a redefinition of the kilogram and mole by fixing the values of the atomic mass unit and the Avogadro constant satisfies all these criteria and bears some more advantages against the version with fixed Planck constant: a well founded approach to definition of the ampere and the opportunity to preserve the current relationship bet...

  13. Integration of a MEMS Inertial Measuring Unit with a MEMS Magnetometer for 3D Orientation Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Junping; Malureanu, Christian; Andersen, Niels Lervad

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for combining the measurements of a MEMS Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and a MEMS magnetometer. The measurements are done using a special designed and customized miniature detecting system for 3D orientation estimation, and position tracking......This paper presents an algorithm for combining the measurements of a MEMS Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and a MEMS magnetometer. The measurements are done using a special designed and customized miniature detecting system for 3D orientation estimation, and position tracking...

  14. Anomalous magnetisation and minor hysteresis loops in CeRu2 : a vibrating sample magnetometer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of isothermal magnetisation-hysteresis and minor hysteresis loops on pure and Nd-doped CeRu2 samples employing Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) are reported. The observed anomalous magnetisation behaviour in the present study agrees with the results reported by Ray et al using SQUID magnetometer. Our study shows that the effect of field sweep-rate on the magnetic response is sample-dependent. (author)

  15. Noise characterization of highly sensitive SQUID magnetometer systems in unshielded environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure the noise performance of highly sensitive SQUID magnetometer systems directly is nearly impossible due to superimposed external noise. In magnetically unshielded environments in particular one needs sophisticated methods in order to get an estimate of the intrinsic noise. We compare different approaches to estimate the noise of our latest SQUID magnetometer systems in the Earth’s magnetic field and compare the results with measurements in magnetic (and superconductive) shielding. (paper)

  16. Design and Fabrication of a Chip-based Continuous-wave Atom Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Power, E P; Vanderelzen, B; Herrera-Fierro, P; Murphy, R; Yalisove, S M; Raithel, G

    2012-01-01

    We present a design for a continuous-wave (CW) atom laser on a chip and describe the process used to fabricate the device. Our design aims to integrate quadrupole magnetic guiding of ground state Rb atoms with continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling to create a continuous Bose-Einstein condensate; out-coupled atoms from the condensate should realize a CW atom laser. We choose a geometry with three wires embedded in a spiral pattern in a silicon subtrate. The guide features an integrated solenoid to mitigate spin-flip losses and provide a tailored longitudinal magnetic field. Our design also includes multiple options for atom interferometry: accomodations are in place for laser-generated atom Fabry-Perot and Mach-Zehnder interferometers, and a pair of atomic beam X-splitters is incorporated for an all-magnetic atom Mach-Zehnder setup. We demonstrate the techniques necessary to fabricate our device using existing micro- and nano-scale fabrication equipment, and discuss future options for modified desi...

  17. Nanoscale phosphorous atom arrays created using STM for the fabricaton of a silicon-based quantum computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, J. L.; Schofield, S. R.; Simmons, M. Y.; Clark, Robert G.; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Curson, N. J.; Kane, Bruce E.; McAlpine, N. S.; Hawley, Marilyn E.; Brown, Geoffrey W.

    2001-11-01

    Quantum computers offer the promise of formidable computational power for certain tasks. Of the various possible physical implementations of such a device, silicon based architectures are attractive for their scalability and ease of integration with existing silicon technology. These designs use either the electron or nuclear spin state of single donor atoms to store quantum information. Here we describe a strategy to fabricate an array of single phosphorus atoms in silicon for the construction of such a silicon based quantum computer. We demonstrate the controlled placement of single phosphorus bearing molecules on a silicon surface. This has been achieved by patterning a hydrogen mono-layer resist with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip and exposing the patterned surface to phosphine (PH3) molecules. We also describe preliminary studies into a process to incorporate these surface phosphorus atoms into the silicon crystal at the array sites.

  18. Research and development for construction of 'computational infrastructure in atomic energy research field' based on grid computing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Computational Science and e-Systems of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (CCSE/JAEA) has started a program to construct an international computational infrastructure in atomic energy research field called the AEGIS (Atomic Energy Grid InfraStructure) in April, 2006. The development is based on numerous experiences and technologies acquired from the development of the STA (Seamless Thinking Aid) and the ITBL (Information Technology Based Laboratory) infrastructure software. In this paper, we will introduce two key achievements prior to the AEGIS program: 'Interoperable system between UNICORE in Germany and ITBL' which achieves international sharing of computational resources, and the 'STARPC Plus' which can construct a compact grid system. (author)

  19. Study on Droplet Size and Velocity Distributions of a Pressure Swirl Atomizer Based on the Maximum Entropy Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A predictive model for droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer has been proposed based on the maximum entropy formalism (MEF. The constraint conditions of the MEF model include the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy. The effects of liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio on the droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer are investigated. Results show that model based on maximum entropy formalism works well to predict droplet size and velocity distributions under different spray conditions. Liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio have different effects on droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer.

  20. Testing the three axis magnetometer and gradiometer MOURA and data comparison on San Pablo de los Montes Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belen Fernandez, Ana; Sanz, Ruy; Covisa, Pablo; Tordesillas, Jose Manuel; Diaz-Michelena, Marina

    2013-04-01

    A magnetometer and gradiometer named MOURA has been developed with the objective to measure the magnetic field on Mars in the frame of Mars MetNet Precursor Mission (MMPM) [1]. MOURA is a compact, miniaturized, intelligent and low cost instrument, based on two sets of triaxial magnetometers separated one centimeter from each other to do gradiometry studies. It has a resolution of 2.2 nT, and a field range of + 65μT, which can be extended to +130 μT when sensors are saturated. [2] These sensor heads are Anisotropic MagnetoResistances (AMR) Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) by Honeywell, specifically HMC1043, which has been selected due to their relative low consumption, weight and size, factors very important for the mission with very limited mass and power budget (shared 150 g for three full payloads). Also, this technology has been previously successfully employed on board Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) to perform geomagnetic surveys in extreme conditions areas [3], and in several space missions for different applications. [4] After the development of the MOURA Engineering Qualification Model (EQM) in November 2011, an exhaustive set of tests have been performed to validate and fully characterize the instrument. Compensation equations have been derived for the temperature corrections in the operation range (between -135 °C and 30 °C) in controlled environments. These compensation equations have been applied to field data, which have shown to follow the daily Earth's magnetic field variations as registered by San Pablo Geomagnetic Observatory (IAGA code: SPT) (available at www.ign.es and www.intermagnet.org) with deviations lower than 40 nT. These deviations were attributed to several error factors as the different locations between MOURA and SPT and other possible different geomagnetic conditions. Due to the above, a measurement campaign on SPT installations are been done. The main objective is to compare MOURA measurements on a relevant environment, with data

  1. Prospecting For Magnetite Ore Deposits With A Innovative Sensor's of Unique Fundamentally New Magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelianenko, T. I.; Tachaytdinov, R. S.; Sarichev, V. F.; Kotov, B. V.; Susoeva, G. N.

    After careful study of principles and abilities of all existing magnetmeters of all three revolutions in magnetic prospecting we have come to the conclusion that they cannot solve local guestions of the magnetic prospecting or determine centre coordinates of magnetite ore body before drilling Electromagnetism lows and achievents magnetprospectings and radioelectronics of all 20th century serve as a theoretical base of the "locator". While creating this cardinally new magnetmeter , we borrowed different things from radio-prospectors, magnetprospectors, wireless operators and combined all of them while creating the "locators''. The "locators' construction is bas ed on the "magnetic intensification" principle ,owing to which this "locators" are characterised by hight sensitiveness and ability to determine centers of even little commercial magnetite ore deposits with relatively weak magnetic anomalies. The main advantage of the "locators" over existing ones is that it can solve local questions determine centre coordinates. A remarkably simple locator construction determine direction of the on-surface measurings towards the ore body centre and gives approximate prognosis resourses before/withour/ drilling. The "locators" were worked out for the first time in history , they have 2 licences. The fundamental design and drawbacks of the existing magnetometers have been inherited from the original magnetometre dating back two or three hundred years. The developers of the existing magnetometres have all gone along the same well- beaten track of replacing the primitive sensor in the form of a piece of ore hung on a string at first by an arrow sensor and later by magnetically oriented protons and quanta, with amplification of the sensors' OUTPUT signal. Furthermore, all the existing magnetometres are imperfect in that they, lacking the directivity of the ground-level magnetic measurements, only record the overall magnetic vector field generated by all the ore bodies around the

  2. Fabrication of large scale nanostructures based on a modified atomic force microscope nanomechanical machining system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z J; Yan, Y D; Zhao, X S; Gao, D W; Wei, Y Y; Wang, J H

    2011-12-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomechanical machining has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for fabricating complex 2D∕3D nanostructures. But the machining scale is very small, which holds back this technique severely. How to enlarge the machining scale is always a major concern for the researches. In the present study, a modified AFM tip-based nanomechanical machining system is established through combination of a high precision X-Y stage with the moving range of 100 mm × 100 mm and a commercial AFM in order to enlarge the machining scale. It is found that the tracing property of the AFM system is feasible for large scale machining by controlling the constant normal load. Effects of the machining parameters including the machining direction and the tip geometry on the uniform machined depth with a large scale are evaluated. Consequently, a new tip trace and an increasing load scheme are presented to achieve a uniform machined depth. Finally, a polymer nanoline array with the dimensions of 1 mm × 0.7 mm, the line density of 1000 lines/mm and the average machined depth of 150 nm, and a 20 × 20 polymer square holes array with the scale of 380 μm × 380 μm and the average machined depth of 250 nm are machined successfully. The uniform of the machined depths for all the nanostructures is acceptable. Therefore, it is verified that the AFM tip-based nanomechanical machining method can be used to machine millimeter scale nanostructures. PMID:22225244

  3. Atomic oxygen interaction with spacecraft materials: Relationship between orbital and ground-based testing for materials certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jon B.; Koontz, Steven L.; Lan, Esther H.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of atomic oxygen on boron nitride (BN), silicon nitride (Si3N4), Intelsat 6 solar cell interconnects, organic polymers, and MoS2 and WS2 dry lubricant, were studied in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) flight experiments and in a ground based simulation facility. Both the inflight and ground based experiments employed in situ electrical resistance measurements to detect penetration of atomic oxygen through materials and Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) analysis to measure chemical composition changes. Results are given. The ground based results on the materials studied to date show good qualitative correlation with the LEO flight results, thus validating the simulation fidelity of the ground based facility in terms of reproducing LEO flight results. In addition it was demonstrated that ground based simulation is capable of performing more detailed experiments than orbital exposures can presently perform. This allows the development of a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in the LEO environment degradation of materials.

  4. A phase-locked laser system based on modulation technique for atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Wei; Song, Ningfang; Xu, Xiaobin; Lu, Xiangxiang

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a Raman laser system based on phase modulation technology and phase feedback control. The two laser beams with frequency difference of 6.835 GHz are modulated using electro-optic and acousto-optic modulators, respectively. Parasitic frequency components produced by the electro-optic modulator are filtered using a Fabry-Perot Etalon. A straightforward phase feedback system restrains the phase noise induced by environmental perturbations. The phase noise of the laser system stays below -125 rad2/Hz at frequency offset higher than 500 kHz. Overall phase noise of the laser system is evaluated by calculating the contribution of the phase noise to the sensitivity limit of a gravimeter. The results reveal that the sensitivity limited by the phase noise of our laser system is lower than that of a state-of-art optical phase-lock loop scheme when a gravimeter operates at short pulse duration, which makes the laser system a promising option for our future application of atom interferometer.

  5. Terahertz response of fractal meta-atoms based on concentric rectangular square resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Zhenyu, E-mail: zyzhao@shnu.edu.cn; Shi, Wangzhou [Department of Physics, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Peng, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2015-11-21

    We investigate the terahertz electromagnetic responses of fractal meta-atoms (MAs) induced by different mode coupling mechanisms. Two types of MAs based on concentric rectangular square (CRS) resonators are presented: independent CRS (I-CRS) and junctional-CRS (J-CRS). In I-CRS, each resonator works as an independent dipole so as to result in the multiple resonance modes when the fractal level is above 1. In J-CRS, however, the generated layer is rotated by π/2 radius to the adjacent CRS in one MA. The multiple resonance modes are coupled into a single mode resonance. The fractal level increasing induces resonance modes redshift in I-CRS while blueshift in J-CRS. When the fractal level is below 4, the mode Q factor of J-CRS is in between the two modes of I-CRS; when the fractal level is 4 or above, the mode Q factor of J-CRS exceeds the two modes of I-CRS. Furthermore, the modulation depth (MD) decreases in I-CRS while it increases in J-CRS with the increase in fractal levels. The surface currents analysis reveals that the capacitive coupling of modes in I-CRS results in the modes redshift, while the conductive coupling of modes in J-CRS induces the mode blueshift. A high Q mode with large MD can be achieved via conductive coupling between the resonators of different scales in a fractal MA.

  6. Implementation of condition-based maintenance at the Japan Atomic Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condition-Based Maintenance (CBM) techniques have been successfully used in on a variety of equipments in US nuclear power plants for the past twenty years. These techniques have had the benefit of improving overall plant reliability and availability while at the same time reducing maintenance costs by as much as fifty percent. The typical pay-back period for the implementation of CBM is less than one year. Emergency diesel engines are one specific piece of equipment for which CBM has been particularly successful in US nuclear power plants. The Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) began to implement CBM for rotating components three years ago and, also has recently begun to apply DG diagnostic techniques at three nuclear power plants with the technical support by MPR associates, Inc. The application of CBM to Japanese nuclear power plants is similar to US nuclear power plants but differences in the regulatory structure and current maintenance practices in Japan results in some unique challenges. This paper provides a description of the CBM methods used for diesel engines in nuclear standby service, a summary of the experience with these methods at US nuclear power plants, and experience with the application of these methods to JAPC nuclear power plants. (author)

  7. Erosion of Carbon-based spacecraft structures in LEO by Atomic Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1998-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is constantly generated on the topside of the atmosphere by ionizing radiation. The ionizing solar radiation, UV and particles, will on impact dissociate molecular oxygen to atomic oxygen. However, due to the ratio between the UV and the particle flux from the sun, and due to...... comparable cross sections for the reactions, the UV generation largely dominates. Atomic oxygen is very reactive, and will enter into chemical reactions with most materials. This is especially true for earth orbiting spacecraft structures, as the orbital velocity corresponds to a kinetic energy released at...

  8. Trends in Ground-State Entropies for Transition Metal Based Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mader, Elizabeth A.; Manner, Virginia W.; Markle, Todd F.; Wu, Adam; Franz, James A.; Mayer, James M.

    2009-03-10

    Reported herein are thermochemical studies of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions involving transition metal H-atom donors MIILH and oxyl radicals. [FeII(H2bip)3]2+, [FeII(H2bim)3]2+, [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ and RuII(acac)2(py-imH) [H2bip = 2,2’-bi-1,4,5,6-tetrahydro¬pyrimidine, H2bim = 2,2’-bi-imidazoline, acac = 2,4-pentandionato, py-imH = 2-(2’-pyridyl)¬imidazole)] each react with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl) or tBu3PhO• (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) to give the deprotonated, oxidized metal complex MIIIL, and TEMPOH or tBu3PhOH. Solution equilibrium measurements for the reactions of Co and Fe complexes with TEMPO show a large, negative ground-state entropy for hydrogen atom transfer: ΔSºHAT = -30 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for the two iron complexes and -41 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for [CoII(H2bim)3]2+. The ΔSºHAT for TEMPO + RuII(acac)2(py-imH) is much closer to zero, 4.9 ± 1.1 cal mol-1 K-1. Calorimetric measurements quantitatively confirm the enthalpy of reaction for [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ + TEMPO, thus also confirming ΔSºHAT. Calorimetry on TEMPOH + tBu3PhO• gives ΔHºHAT = 11.2 ± 0.5 kcal mol-1 which matches the enthalpy predicted from the difference in literature solution BDEs. An evaluation of the literature BDEs of both TEMPOH and tBu3PhOH is briefly presented and new estimates are included on the relative enthalpy of solvation for tBu3PhO• vs. tBu3PhOH. The primary contributor to the large magnitude of the ground-state entropy |ΔSºHAT| for the metal complexes is vibrational entropy, ΔSºvib. The common assumption that ΔSºHAT ≈ 0 for HAT reactions, developed for organic and small gas phase molecules, does not hold for transition metal based HAT reactions. The trend in magnitude of |ΔSºHAT| for reactions with TEMPO, RuII(acac)2(py-imH) << [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ = [FeII(H2bim)3]2+ < [CoII(H2bim)3]2+, is surprisingly well predicted by the trends for electron transfer half-reaction entropies, ΔSºET, in aprotic solvents. ΔSºET and

  9. Toward a QFT-based theory of atomic and molecular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucar, Gustavo A

    2014-03-14

    The search for a QED-based (and then QFT-based) formalism that brings solid grounds to the whole area of relativistic quantum chemistry was just implicit in the first decades of the quantum theory. During the last few years it was shown that it is still unclear how to derive a well-defined N-electron relativistic Hamiltonian, and also the way negative-energy states may contribute to electron correlation. Furthermore, the relationship among electron correlation and radiative QED corrections is even more difficult to guess. These are few of the fundamental problems that need to be solved before such a program of research is finished within the wavefunction approach to quantum physics. The polarization propagator formalism was developed as an alternative approach to study atomic and molecular properties within both regimes, relativistic and nonrelativistic. In this article we expose how far away one can go today working with polarization propagators, until including QED (and afterwards QFT) effects. We will uncover its deepest formal origin, the path integral formalism, which explains why polarization propagators can be written formally the same in both regimes. This will also explain why the NR limit is obtained scaling the velocity of light to infinity. We shall introduce a few basic aspects of elementary propagators to show what they have in common with polarization propagators. Then we shall remark on the most important news that appears with the latter ones. Within the relativistic regime the contributions of negative energy orbitals to electron correlation are straightforwardly included. New insights on the relationship between spin and time-reversal operators are also given, together with an ansatz on how to consider both, QED and electron correlation effects on the same grounds. We focus here on the treatment of NMR spectroscopic parameters within such a formalism, that is still not broadly used by the quantum chemistry community. Most of the other response

  10. Electrodynamics of an omega-band as deduced from optical and magnetometer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vanhamäki

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate an omega-band event that took place above northern Scandinavia around 02:00–02:30 UT on 9 March 1999. In our analysis we use ground based magnetometer, optical and riometer measurements together with satellite based optical images. The optical and riometer data are used to estimate the ionospheric Hall and Pedersen conductances, while ionospheric equivalent currents are obtained from the magnetometer measurements. These data sets are used as input in a local KRM calculation, which gives the ionospheric potential electric field as output, thus giving us a complete picture of the ionospheric electrodynamic state during the omega-band event.

    The overall structure of the electric field and field-aligned current (FAC provided by the local KRM method are in good agreement with previous studies. Also the E×B drift velocity calculated from the local KRM solution is in good qualitative agreement with the plasma velocity measured by the Finnish CUTLASS radar, giving further support for the new local KRM method. The high-resolution conductance estimates allow us to discern the detailed structure of the omega-band current system. The highest Hall and Pedersen conductances, ~50 and ~25 S, respectively, are found at the edges of the bright auroral tongue. Inside the tongue, conductances are somewhat smaller, but still significantly higher than typical background values. The electric field shows a converging pattern around the tongues, and the field strength drops from ~40 mV/m found at optically dark regions to ~10 mV/m inside the areas of enhanced conductivity. Downward FAC flow in the dark regions, while upward currents flow inside the auroral tongue. Additionally, sharp conductance gradients at the edge of an auroral tongue are associated with narrow strips of intense FACs, so that a strip of downward current flows at the eastern (leading edge and a similar strip of upward current is present at the

  11. Initiating heavy-atom-based phasing by multi-dimensional molecular replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu;

    2016-01-01

    -dimensional search to test a wide spectrum of molecular-replacement parameters, such as different data sets and search models with different conformations. Results are scored by the ability to identify heavy-atom positions from anomalous difference Fourier maps. The strategy was successfully applied...... in the determination of a membrane-protein structure, the copper-transporting P-type ATPase CopA, when other methods had failed to determine the heavy-atom substructure. MRPM is well suited to proteins undergoing large conformational changes where multiple search models should be considered, and it enables......To obtain an electron-density map from a macromolecular crystal the phase problem needs to be solved, which often involves the use of heavy-atom derivative crystals and concomitant heavy-atom substructure determination. This is typically performed by dual-space methods, direct methods or Patterson...

  12. Heuristic Algorithm for Interpretation of Non-Atomic Categorical Attributes in Similarity-based Fuzzy Databases - Scalability Evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Hossain, M Shahriar

    2011-01-01

    In this work we are analyzing scalability of the heuristic algorithm we used in the past to discover knowledge from multi-valued symbolic attributes in fuzzy databases. The non-atomic descriptors, characterizing a single attribute of a database record, are commonly used in fuzzy databases to reflect uncertainty about the recorded observation. In this paper, we present implementation details and scalability tests of the algorithm, which we developed to precisely interpret such non-atomic values and to transfer (i.e. defuzzify) the fuzzy tuples to the forms acceptable for many regular (i.e. atomic values based) data mining algorithms. Important advantages of our approach are: (1) its linear scalability, and (2) its unique capability of incorporating background knowledge, implicitly stored in the fuzzy database models in the form of fuzzy similarity hierarchy, into the interpretation/defuzzification process.

  13. Arsenic speciation analysis based on selective hydride generation and atomic fluorescence detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marschner, Karel; Rychlovský, P.; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    Praha, 2014. s. 107-107. ISBN 978-80-905704-1-2. [European Symposium on Atomic Spectrometry ESAS 2014 & Czech-Slovak Spectroscopic Conference /15./. 16.03.2014-21.03.2014, Praha] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200311202 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : arsenic speciation analysis * hydride generation * atomic fluorescence spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  14. Atom laser based on four-wave mixing with Bose-Einstein condensates in nonlinear lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasak, T.; Konotop, V. V.; Trippenbach, M.

    2013-12-01

    Optical lattices are typically used to modify the dispersion relation of the matter wave, in particular, to ensure resonant conditions for multiwave interactions. Here we propose an alternative mechanism of wave interactions. It can be implemented using a nonlinear lattice and modifies the momentum conservation law of the interacting atoms, leaving the energy conservation unchanged. We propose to apply this phenomenon to construct an atom laser via a resonant four-wave mixing process.

  15. Investigating the importance of Delaunay-based definition of atomic interactions in scoring of protein-protein docking results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Rahim; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Mirzaie, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    The approaches taken to represent and describe structural features of the macromolecules are of major importance when developing computational methods for studying and predicting their structures and interactions. This study attempts to explore the significance of Delaunay tessellation for the definition of atomic interactions by evaluating its impact on the performance of scoring protein-protein docking prediction. Two sets of knowledge-based scoring potentials are extracted from a training dataset of native protein-protein complexes. The potential of the first set is derived using atomic interactions extracted from Delaunay tessellated structures. The potential of the second set is calculated conventionally, that is, using atom pairs whose interactions were determined by their separation distances. The scoring potentials were tested against two different docking decoy sets and their performances were compared. The results show that, if properly optimized, the Delaunay-based scoring potentials can achieve higher success rate than the usual scoring potentials. These results and the results of a previous study on the use of Delaunay-based potentials in protein fold recognition, all point to the fact that Delaunay tessellation of protein structure can provide a more realistic definition of atomic interaction, and therefore, if appropriately utilized, may be able to improve the accuracy of pair potentials. PMID:27060891

  16. Determination of solute site occupancies within γ' precipitates in nickel-base superalloys via orientation-specific atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, S; Rojhirunsakool, T; Nandwana, P; Tiley, J; Banerjee, R

    2015-12-01

    The analytical limitations in atom probe tomography such as resolving a desired set of atomic planes, for solving complex materials science problems, have been overcome by employing a well-developed unique and reproducible crystallographic technique, involving synergetic coupling of orientation microscopy with atom probe tomography. The crystallographic information in atom probe reconstructions has been utilized to determine the solute site occupancies in Ni-Al-Cr based superalloys accurately. The structural information in atom probe reveals that both Al and Cr occupy the same sub-lattice within the L12-ordered γ' precipitates to form Ni3(Al,Cr) precipitates in a Ni-14Al-7Cr (at%) alloy. Interestingly, the addition of Co, which is a solid solution strengthener, to a Ni-14Al-7Cr alloy results in the partial reversal of Al site occupancy within γ' precipitates to form (Ni,Al)3(Al,Cr,Co) precipitates. This unique evidence of reversal of Al site occupancy, resulting from the introduction of other solutes within the ordered structures, gives insights into the relative energetics of different sub-lattice sites when occupied by different solutes. PMID:25952611

  17. Atom-chip based quantum gravimetry with Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abend, Sven; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Rasel, Ernst M.; Gebbe, Martina; Muentinga, Hauke; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Quantus Team

    2015-05-01

    Today's generation of inertial sensitive atom interferometers typically operate with sources of laser cooled atoms and thus their performance is limited by velocity spread and finite-size effects that impose systematic uncertainties. Ultra-cold sources such as a BEC or even delta-kick cooled atomic ensembles with extremely narrow velocity dispersion are able to overcome these limitations and are crucial for obtaining high-fidelity beam splitters. Atom-chip technologies offer the possibility to generate a BEC and perform delta-kick cooling in a fast and reliable away. We show a combination of such an ensemble generated in a miniaturized atom-chip setup with the application of low-loss Bragg beam splitting to perform inertial sensitive measurements. A specialty of this setup is the retro-reflection of the beam splitting light field from the atom-chip itself, serving as inertial reference in vacuum. This allows for a compact realization of a quantum gravimeter determining the local gravitational acceleration to the scale of local variations limited by seismic noise. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50 1131-1137 (QUANTUS-III).

  18. Neutral atom traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  19. Low-frequency noise in high-{Tc} superconductor Josephson junctions, SQUIDs, and magnetometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklich, A.H.

    1994-05-01

    Design and performance of high-T{sub c} dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUEDs), junctions that comprise them, and magnetometers made from them are described, with attention to sources of 1/f noise. Biepitaxial junctions are found to have large levels of critical current fluctuations which make them unsuitable for low-noise SQUIDS; this suggests a poorly connected interface at the grain boundary junction. SQUIDs from bicrystal junctions have levels of critical current noise controllable using bias current reversal techniques which leave the noise white down to frequencies of a few Hz. A SQUID with an energy resolution of 1.5{times}10{sup {minus}30} J Hz{sup {minus}1} at 1 Hz is reported. Magnetometers in which a (9 mm){sup 2} pickup loop is directly coupled to a SQUID body have achieved field resolutions of 93 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} down to frequencies below I Hz, improving to 39 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz with the addition of a 50mm-diameter single-turn flux transformer. Poor coupling to pickup loop makes it difficult to satisfy competing goals of high field resolution and small detector size necessary for multichannel biomagnetic imaging. Improved coupling is demonstrated by the use of multiturn-input-coil flux transformers, and a resolution of 35 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} in the white noise region is reported with a (10 mm){sup 2} pickup loop. However, additional 1/f noise from processed multilayer structures in the transformer limits the resolution at 1 Hz to 114 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2}. High-T{sub c} SQUIDs exhibit additional 1/f noise when cooled in a nonzero static magnetic field because of additional flux vortices trapped in the film, with the noise power at 1 Hz typically increasing by a factor of 10--20 in a field of 0.05mT (0.5 G). Finally, a SQUID-based voltmeter with a resolution of 9.2 pV.Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 10 Hz (24 pV Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz) is described.

  20. Low-Frequency Noise in High-T Superconductor Josephson Junctions, Squids, and Magnetometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklich, Andrew Hostetler

    The design and performance of high-T_ {rm c} dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), the junctions that comprise them, and magnetometers made from them are described, with special attention paid to sources of 1/f noise. Biepitaxial junctions are found to have large levels of critical current fluctuations which make them unsuitable for low-noise SQUIDs. This noise suggests a poorly connected interface at the grain boundary junction. SQUIDs from bicrystal junctions, in contrast, have levels of critical current noise that are controllable using bias current reversal techniques which leave the noise white down to frequencies of a few Hz. A SQUID with an energy resolution of 1.5times 10^{-30} J Hz^ {-1} at 1 Hz is reported. Magnetometers in which a (9 mm)^2 pickup loop is directly coupled to a SQUID body have achieved field resolutions of 93 fT Hz^{-1/2} down to frequencies below 1 Hz, improving to 39 fT Hz^{-1/2} at 1 Hz with the addition of a 50 mm-diameter single-turn flux transformer. Although the performance of these devices is sufficient for single -channel biomagnetometry or geophysical studies, their relatively poor coupling to the pickup loop makes it difficult to satisfy the competing goals of high field resolution and small detector size necessary for multichannel biomagnetic imaging. Improved coupling is demonstrated by the use of multiturn-input-coil flux transformers, and a resolution of 35 fT Hz^{-1/2} in the white noise region is reported with a (10 mm) ^2 pickup loop. However, additional 1/f noise from the processed multilayer structures in the transformer limits the resolution at 1 Hz to 114 fT Hz^ {-1/2}. High-T_{ rm c} SQUIDs are shown to exhibit additional 1/f noise when they are cooled in a nonzero static magnetic field because of the additional flux vortices trapped in the film, with the noise power at 1 Hz typically increasing by a factor of 10-20 in a field of 0.05 mT (0.5 G). Finally, a SQUID-based voltmeter with a resolution