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Sample records for atomic magnetometer based

  1. Machine Learning Based Localization and Classification with Atomic Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Cameron; Griffin, Lewis D.; Marmugi, Luca; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate identification of position, material, orientation, and shape of objects imaged by a Rb 85 atomic magnetometer performing electromagnetic induction imaging supported by machine learning. Machine learning maximizes the information extracted from the images created by the magnetometer, demonstrating the use of hidden data. Localization 2.6 times better than the spatial resolution of the imaging system and successful classification up to 97% are obtained. This circumvents the need of solving the inverse problem and demonstrates the extension of machine learning to diffusive systems, such as low-frequency electrodynamics in media. Automated collection of task-relevant information from quantum-based electromagnetic imaging will have a relevant impact from biomedicine to security.

  2. Dynamic analysis of atomic magnetometer and co-magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shihu, E-mail: 65980623@qq.com; Yu, Linke; Wang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Some unsteady-state solutions of Bloch equation which well-describe the behavior of a magnetometer are obtained. These solutions are in accord with the experimental result of alkali-metal magnetometer and co-magnetometer gyroscope. Many interesting phenomena can be also achieved via the solutions. First, the measuring direction of a magnetometer changes with the variation of external magnetic field along z axis. And it could be used for measuring high frequency magnetic field. Then it can be extended that the co-magnetometer without compensated field can get better performance than simple atomic magnetometer due to the effect of polarized noble gas. Finally, we discussed the limits (bandwidth and so on) of atomic magnetometer and co-magnetometer with the Bloch equation of spins. These phenomena, which have not been mentioned before, may contribute to the development of atomic magnetometer and co-magnetometer gyroscope.

  3. Atomic magnetometer for human magnetoencephalograpy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a high sensitivity (<5 fTesla/{radical}Hz), fiber-optically coupled magnetometer to detect magnetic fields produced by the human brain. This is the first demonstration of a noncryogenic sensor that could replace cryogenic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and is an important advance in realizing cost-effective MEG. Within the sensor, a rubidium vapor is optically pumped with 795 laser light while field-induced optical rotations are measured with 780 nm laser light. Both beams share a single optical axis to maximize simplicity and compactness. In collaboration with neuroscientists at The Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, NM, the evoked responses resulting from median nerve and auditory stimulation were recorded with the atomic magnetometer and a commercial SQUID-based MEG system with signals comparing favorably. Multi-sensor operation has been demonstrated with two AMs placed on opposite sides of the head. Straightforward miniaturization would enable high-density sensor arrays for whole-head magnetoencephalography.

  4. Laser pumping Cs atom magnetometer of theory research based on gradient tensor measuring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Zhang; Chong Kang; Wang Qingtao; Lei Cheng; Zheng Caiping, E-mail: zhangyang@hrbeu.edu.cn [College of Science, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2011-02-01

    At present, due to space exploration, military technology, geological exploration, magnetic navigation, medical diagnosis and biological magnetic fields study of the needs of research and development, the magnetometer is given strong driving force. In this paper, it will discuss the theoretical analysis and system design of laser pumping cesium magnetometer, cesium atomic energy level formed hyperfine structure with the I-J coupling, the hyperfine structure has been further split into Zeeman sublevels for the effects of magnetic field. To use laser pump and RF magnetic field make electrons transition in the hyperfine structure to produce the results of magneto-optical double resonance, and ultimately through the resonant frequency will be able to achieve accurate value of the external magnetic field. On this basis, we further have a discussion about magnetic gradient tensor measuring method. To a large extent, it increases the magnetic field measurement of information.

  5. Magnetoencephalography with a Cs-based high-sensitivity compact atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jingwei; Wan, Shuangai; Sun, Yifan; Dou, Rongshe; Guo, Yuhao; Wei, Kequan; He, Kaiyan; Qin, Jie; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, substantial progress has been made in developing a new generation of magnetoencephalography (MEG) with a spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF)-based atomic magnetometer (AM). An AM employs alkali atoms to detect weak magnetic fields. A compact AM array with high sensitivity is crucial to the design; however, most proposed compact AMs are potassium (K)- or rubidium (Rb)-based with single beam configurations. In the present study, a pump-probe two beam configuration with a Cesium (Cs)-based AM (Cs-AM) is introduced to detect human neuronal magnetic fields. The length of the vapor cell is 4 mm, which can fully satisfy the need of designing a compact sensor array. Compared with state-of-the-art compact AMs, our new Cs-AM has two advantages. First, it can be operated in a SERF regime, requiring much lower heating temperature, which benefits the sensor with a closer distance to scalp due to ease of thermal insulation and less electric heating noise interference. Second, the two-beam configuration in the design can achieve higher sensitivity. It is free of magnetic modulation, which is necessary in one-beam AMs; however, such modulation may cause other interference in multi-channel circumstances. In the frequency band between 10 Hz and 30 Hz, the noise level of the proposed Cs-AM is approximately 10 f T/Hz1/2, which is comparable with state-of-the-art K- or Rb-based compact AMs. The performance of the Cs-AM was verified by measuring human auditory evoked fields (AEFs) in reference to commercial superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) channels. By using a Cs-AM, we observed a clear peak in AEFs around 100 ms (M100) with a much larger amplitude compared with that of a SQUID, and the temporal profiles of the two devices were in good agreement. The results indicate the possibility of using the compact Cs-AM for MEG recordings, and the current Cs-AM has the potential to be designed for multi-sensor arrays and gradiometers for future neuroscience

  6. Frequency signal acquisition of scalar atomic magnetometer based on using TDC and FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Y. H.; Chen, Q. Y.; Zhang, Y. F.; Xia, M. Y.

    2017-09-01

    An improved equal precision frequency measurement method is presented for acquisition of frequency signal output from high sensitivity scalar atomic magnetometers. The frequency range to be measured is from 75 kHz to 350 kHz with a resolution better than 0.01 Hz, and the sampling rate should be at least 10 Hz. To meet the requirements on dynamic range, measurement accuracy and speed, at least eight significant digits must be kept. The TDC and FPGA are used to improve the traditional equal precision method. The FPGA acts as the controlling and computing centre, while the TDC measures the time deviation to eliminate the counting error of ±1 reference signal. A prototype frequency detector is fabricated and tested. The measured data show that the design is viable and further improvement is possible.

  7. Fetal MCG with Atomic Magnetometer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deland, Zack; Bulatowicz, Michael D.; Sulai, Ibrahim A.; Wahl, Colin P.; Wakai, Ronald T.; Walker, Thad G.

    2016-05-01

    We present results on the development of 87Rb atomic magnetometers for the detection of a fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG). Operating in the spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) regime, the magnetometers' sensitivities are reported at the 1 fT /√{ Hz } level. Environmental common-mode noise, including the field from the maternal heart, can be suppressed by operating the magnetometers in a gradiometric configuration. We report on schemes from implementing such gradiometers along with recent fMCG measurements. This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health.

  8. Nuclear-Spin Gyroscope Based on an Atomic Co-Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romalis, Michael; Komack, Tom; Ghost, Rajat

    2008-01-01

    An experimental nuclear-spin gyroscope is based on an alkali-metal/noblegas co-magnetometer, which automatically cancels the effects of magnetic fields. Whereas the performances of prior nuclear-spin gyroscopes are limited by sensitivity to magnetic fields, this gyroscope is insensitive to magnetic fields and to other external perturbations. In addition, relative to prior nuclear-spin gyroscopes, this one exhibits greater sensitivity to rotation. There is commercial interest in development of small, highly sensitive gyroscopes. The present experimental device could be a prototype for development of nuclear spin gyroscopes suitable for navigation. In comparison with fiber-optic gyroscopes, these gyroscopes would draw less power and would be smaller, lighter, more sensitive, and less costly.

  9. A Miniature Wide Band Atomic Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    current circuit is easiest to explain if we at first ignore the capacitors . The reference and the DAC output are combined by R401 and R402 to make...atomic magnetometer CSAC – Chip scale atomic clock DAC – Digital to Analog Converter DARPA – Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DBR...Transform FPGA – Field Programmable Gate Array GHz – Gigahertz MEMS – Micro-Electro Mechanical System MF – z-component Magnetic Quantum Number, MF MFTFM

  10. A phaseonium magnetometer: A new optical magnetometer based on index enhanced media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Marlan O.; Fleischauer, Michael; Graf, Martin

    1993-01-01

    An optical magnetometer based on quantum coherence and interference effects in atoms is proposed. The sensitivity of this device is potentially superior to the present state-of-the-art devices. Optimum operating conditions are derived, and a comparison to standard optical pumping magnetometers is made.

  11. Three axis vector atomic magnetometer utilizing polarimetric technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, Swarupananda, E-mail: spradhan@barc.gov.in, E-mail: pradhans75@gmail.com [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, India and Homi Bhabha National Institute, Department of Atomic Energy, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2016-09-15

    The three axis vector magnetic field measurement based on the interaction of a single elliptically polarized light beam with an atomic system is described. The magnetic field direction dependent atomic responses are extracted by the polarimetric detection in combination with laser frequency modulation and magnetic field modulation techniques. The magnetometer geometry offers additional critical requirements like compact size and large dynamic range for space application. Further, the three axis magnetic field is measured using only the reflected signal (one polarization component) from the polarimeter and thus can be easily expanded to make spatial array of detectors and/or high sensitivity field gradient measurement as required for biomedical application.

  12. The atomic magnetometer: A new era in biomagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakai, Ronald T., E-mail: rtwakai@wisc.edu [1005 Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research, 1111 Highland Avenue, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    The high cost and impracticality of SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) magnetometers has limited the expansion of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG), especially in countries where the cost of liquid helium is high. A recent breakthrough, however, has the potential to radically change this situation. In 2003, a group at Princeton University demonstrated an atomic magnetometer, known as the SERF (spin-exchange free relaxation) magnetometer, with unprecedented sensitivity. Since then, several research groups have utilized SERF magnetometers to record MEG, MCG, and fetal MCG signals. Despite some modest drawbacks, it now seems almost certain that SERF magnetometers can replace SQUIDs for many applications. With a price tag that is likely to be far less than that of SQUIDs, SERF magnetometers can propel the next wave of growth in biomagnetism.

  13. An Arduino-Based Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, Mike

    2017-01-01

    An Arduino-based system with a triple axis magnetometer chip may be used to plot both the strength and direction of the magnetic field of a magnet directly on a sheet of paper. Before taking measurements, it is necessary either to correct for or to eliminate soft and hard iron effects. The same sensor may be used to determine the presence of soft…

  14. Ultra-sensitive Magnetic Microscopy with an Atomic Magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-19

    The PowerPoint presentation focused on research goals, specific information about the atomic magnetometer, response and resolution factors of the SERF magnetometer, FC+AM systems, tests of field transfer and resolution on FC, gradient cancellation, testing of AM performance, ideas for a multi-channel AM, including preliminary sensitivity testing, and a description of a 6 channel DAQ system. A few ideas for future work ended the presentation.

  15. NQR detection of explosive simulants using RF atomic magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a highly selective spectroscopic method that can be used to detect and identify a number of chemicals of interest to the defense, national security, and law enforcement community. In the past, there have been several documented attempts to utilize NQR to detect nitrogen bearing explosives using induction sensors to detect the NQR RF signatures. We present here our work on the NQR detection of explosive simulants using optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers. RF atomic magnetometers can provide an order of magnitude (or more) improvement in sensitivity versus induction sensors and can enable mitigation of RF interference, which has classically has been a problem for conventional NQR using induction sensors. We present the theory of operation of optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers along with the result of laboratory work on the detection of explosive simulant material. An outline of ongoing work will also be presented along with a path for a fieldable detection system.

  16. Rb atomic magnetometer toward EDM experiment with laser cooled francium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Aiko; Asahi, Koichiro; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield. We prepared the cell coated with an anti-relaxation material and measured the relaxation time. A degauss of the shield was performed to eliminate the residual field. We will report the present status of the magnetometer. A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield

  17. Polarization enhanced Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance with an atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Michael W.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Espy, Michelle A.; Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) has been demonstrated for the detection of 14-N in explosive compounds. Application of a material specific radio-frequency (RF) pulse excites a response typically detected with a wire- wound antenna. NQR is non-contact and material specific, however fields produced by NQR are typically very weak, making demonstration of practical utility challenging. For certain materials, the NQR signal can be increased by transferring polarization from hydrogen nuclei to nitrogen nuclei using external magnetic fields. This polarization enhancement (PE) can enhance the NQR signal by an order of magnitude or more. Atomic magnetometers (AM) have been shown to improve detection sensitivity beyond a conventional antenna by a similar amount. AM sensors are immune to piezo-electric effects that hamper conventional NQR, and can be combined to form a gradiometer for effective RF noise cancellation. In principle, combining polarization enhancement with atomic magnetometer detection should yield improvement in signal-to-noise ratio that is the product of the two methods, 100-fold or more over conventional NQR. However both methods are even more exotic than traditional NQR, and have never been combined due to challenges in operating a large magnetic field and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensor in proximity. Here we present NQR with and without PE with an atomic magnetometer, demonstrating signal enhancement greater than 20-fold for ammonium nitrate. We also demonstrate PE for PETN using a traditional coil for detection with an enhancement factor of 10. Experimental methods and future applications are discussed.

  18. Multi-flux-transformer MRI detection with an atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukov, Igor; Karaulanov, Todor

    2014-12-01

    Recently, anatomical ultra-low field (ULF) MRI has been demonstrated with an atomic magnetometer (AM). A flux-transformer (FT) has been used for decoupling MRI fields and gradients to avoid their negative effects on AM performance. The field of view (FOV) was limited because of the need to compromise between the size of the FT input coil and MRI sensitivity per voxel. Multi-channel acquisition is a well-known solution to increase FOV without significantly reducing sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate twofold FOV increase with the use of three FT input coils. We also show that it is possible to use a single atomic magnetometer and single acquisition channel to acquire three independent MRI signals by applying a frequency-encoding gradient along the direction of the detection array span. The approach can be generalized to more channels and can be critical for imaging applications of non-cryogenic ULF MRI where FOV needs to be large, including head, hand, spine, and whole-body imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, S., E-mail: spradhan@barc.gov.in, E-mail: pradhans75@gmail.com; Poornima,; Dasgupta, K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 85 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Department of Atomic Energy, Mumbai 85 (India); Mishra, S.; Behera, R. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 85 (India)

    2015-06-15

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  20. Improving Sensitivity and Bandwidth of an Atomic Magnetometer using Quantum Non-Demolition Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vishal; Vasilakis, Georgios; Romalis, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The fundamental sensitivity of an atomic magnetometer is limited by spin projection noise. In the case of uniform spin relaxation, it is well understood that it is not possible to improve the sensitivity using spin squeezing induced by quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement for measurement time scales longer than spin relaxation time [1, 2]. It is however possible to increase the bandwidth of the magnetometer using QND measurement. Here we experimentally demonstrate, in excellent agreement with the theory, an improvement in the bandwidth of our scalar alkali vapor atomic magnetometer using continuous QND measurement. We also investigate the possibility of improving sensitivity of our magnetometer in the special case in which the spin relaxation is time dependent. The case of time dependent spin relaxation naturally arises in high polarization regime in an alkali-alkali spin-exchange relaxation dominated atomic sample. [1] S. F. Huelga, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3865 -- 3868, 1997. [2] M. Auzinsh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 173002, 2004.

  1. Spaced-based search coil magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospodarsky, George B.

    2016-12-01

    Search coil magnetometers are one of the primary tools used to study the magnetic component of low-frequency electromagnetic waves in space. Their relatively small size, mass, and power consumption, coupled with a good frequency range and sensitivity, make them ideal for spaceflight applications. The basic design of a search coil magnetometer consists of many thousands of turns of wire wound on a high permeability core. When a time-varying magnetic field passes through the coil, a time-varying voltage is induced due to Faraday's law of magnetic induction. The output of the coil is usually attached to a preamplifier, which amplifies the induced voltage and conditions the signal for transmission to the main electronics (usually a low-frequency radio receiver). Search coil magnetometers are usually used in conjunction with electric field antenna to measure electromagnetic plasma waves in the frequency range of a few hertz to a few tens of kilohertzs. Search coil magnetometers are used to determine the properties of waves, such as comparing the relative electric and magnetic field amplitudes of the waves, or to investigate wave propagation parameters, such as Poynting flux and wave normal vectors. On a spinning spacecraft, they are also sometimes used to determine the background magnetic field. This paper presents some of the basic design criteria of search coil magnetometers and discusses design characteristics of sensors flown on a number of spacecraft.

  2. Differential Search Coils Based Magnetometers: Conditioning, Magnetic Sensitivity, Spatial Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timofeeva Maria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical and experimental comparison of optimized search coils based magnetometers, operating either in the Flux mode or in the classical Lenz-Faraday mode, is presented. The improvements provided by the Flux mode in terms of bandwidth and measuring range of the sensor are detailed. Theory, SPICE model and measurements are in good agreement. The spatial resolution of the sensor is studied which is an important parameter for applications in non destructive evaluation. A general expression of the magnetic sensitivity of search coils sensors is derived. Solutions are proposed to design magnetometers with reduced weight and volume without degrading the magnetic sensitivity. An original differential search coil based magnetometer, made of coupled coils, operating in flux mode and connected to a differential transimpedance amplifier is proposed. It is shown that this structure is better in terms of volume occupancy than magnetometers using two separated coils without any degradation in magnetic sensitivity. Experimental results are in good agreement with calculations.

  3. Measurement Sensitivity Improvement of All-Optical Atomic Spin Magnetometer by Suppressing Noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyuan Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantum manipulation technology and photoelectric detection technology have jointly facilitated the rapid development of ultra-sensitive atomic spin magnetometers. To improve the output signal and sensitivity of the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF atomic spin magnetometer, the noises influencing on the output signal and the sensitivity were analyzed, and the corresponding noise suppression methods were presented. The magnetic field noises, including the residual magnetic field noise and the light shift noise, were reduced to approximately zero by employing the magnetic field compensation method and by adjusting the frequency of the pump beam, respectively. With respect to the operation temperature, the simulation results showed that the temperature of the potassium atomic spin magnetometer realizing the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime was 180 °C. Moreover, the fluctuation noises of the frequency and the power were suppressed by using the frequency and the power stable systems. The experimental power stability results showed that the light intensity stability was enhanced 10%. Contrast experiments on the sensitivity were carried out to demonstrate the validity of the suppression methods. Finally, a sensitivity of 13 fT/Hz1/2 was successfully achieved by suppressing noises and optimizing parameters.

  4. Design and Analyses of a MEMS Based Resonant Magnetometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahai Ren

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel design of a MEMS torsional resonant magnetometer based on Lorentz force is presented and fabricated. The magnetometer consists of a silicon resonator, torsional beam, excitation coil, capacitance plates and glass substrate. Working in a resonant condition, the sensor’s vibration amplitude is converted into the sensing capacitance change, which reflects the outside magnetic flux-density. Based on the simulation, the key structure parameters are optimized and the air damping effect is estimated. The test results of the prototype are in accordance with the simulation results of the designed model. The resolution of the magnetometer can reach 30 nT. The test results indicate its sensitivity of more than 400 mV/μT when operating in a 10 Pa vacuum environment.

  5. Is light narrowing possible with dense-vapor paraffin coated cells for atomic magnetometers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Runqi; Balabas, Mikhail; Hovde, Chris; Li, Wenhao; Roig, Hector Masia; Wang, Tao; Wickenbrock, Arne; Zhivun, Elena; You, Zheng; Budker, Dmitry

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the operation of an all-optical rubidium-87 atomic magnetometer with amplitude-modulated light. To study the suppression of spin-exchange relaxation, three schemes of pumping were implemented with room-temperature and heated paraffin coated vacuum cells. Efficient pumping and accumulation of atoms in the F=2 ground state were obtained. However, the sought-for narrowing of the resonance lines has not been achieved. A theoretical analysis of the polarization degree is presented to illustrate the absence of light narrowing due to radiation trapping at high temperature.

  6. Swarm Optimization-Based Magnetometer Calibration for Personal Handheld Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser El-Sheimy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Inertial Navigation Systems (INS consist of accelerometers, gyroscopes and a processor that generates position and orientation solutions by integrating the specific forces and rotation rates. In addition to the accelerometers and gyroscopes, magnetometers can be used to derive the user heading based on Earth’s magnetic field. Unfortunately, the measurements of the magnetic field obtained with low cost sensors are usually corrupted by several errors, including manufacturing defects and external electro-magnetic fields. Consequently, proper calibration of the magnetometer is required to achieve high accuracy heading measurements. In this paper, a Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO-based calibration algorithm is presented to estimate the values of the bias and scale factor of low cost magnetometers. The main advantage of this technique is the use of the artificial intelligence which does not need any error modeling or awareness of the nonlinearity. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm can help in the development of Pedestrian Navigation Devices (PNDs when combined with inertial sensors and GPS/Wi-Fi for indoor navigation and Location Based Services (LBS applications.

  7. Space magnetometer based on an anisotropic magnetoresistive hybrid sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, P.; Whiteside, B. J.; Beek, T. J.; Fox, P.; Horbury, T. S.; Oddy, T. M.; Archer, M. O.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sanz-Hernández, D.; Sample, J. G.; Cupido, E.; O'Brien, H.; Carr, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the design and development of a low resource, dual sensor vector magnetometer for space science applications on very small spacecraft. It is based on a hybrid device combining an orthogonal triad of commercial anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensors with a totem pole H-Bridge drive on a ceramic substrate. The drive enables AMR operation in the more sensitive flipped mode and this is achieved without the need for current spike transmission down a sensor harness. The magnetometer has sensitivity of better than 3 nT in a 0-10 Hz band and a total mass of 104 g. Three instruments have been launched as part of the TRIO-CINEMA space weather mission, inter-calibration against the International Geomagnetic Reference Field model makes it possible to extract physical signals such as field-aligned current deflections of 20-60 nT within an approximately 45 000 nT ambient field.

  8. Space magnetometer based on an anisotropic magnetoresistive hybrid sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, P; Whiteside, B J; Beek, T J; Fox, P; Horbury, T S; Oddy, T M; Archer, M O; Eastwood, J P; Sanz-Hernández, D; Sample, J G; Cupido, E; O'Brien, H; Carr, C M

    2014-12-01

    We report on the design and development of a low resource, dual sensor vector magnetometer for space science applications on very small spacecraft. It is based on a hybrid device combining an orthogonal triad of commercial anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensors with a totem pole H-Bridge drive on a ceramic substrate. The drive enables AMR operation in the more sensitive flipped mode and this is achieved without the need for current spike transmission down a sensor harness. The magnetometer has sensitivity of better than 3 nT in a 0-10 Hz band and a total mass of 104 g. Three instruments have been launched as part of the TRIO-CINEMA space weather mission, inter-calibration against the International Geomagnetic Reference Field model makes it possible to extract physical signals such as field-aligned current deflections of 20-60 nT within an approximately 45,000 nT ambient field.

  9. Particle swarm optimization algorithm based low cost magnetometer calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A. S.; Siddharth, S., Syed, Z., El-Sheimy, N.

    2011-12-01

    Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) consist of accelerometers, gyroscopes and a microprocessor provide inertial digital data from which position and orientation is obtained by integrating the specific forces and rotation rates. In addition to the accelerometers and gyroscopes, magnetometers can be used to derive the absolute user heading based on Earth's magnetic field. Unfortunately, the measurements of the magnetic field obtained with low cost sensors are corrupted by several errors including manufacturing defects and external electro-magnetic fields. Consequently, proper calibration of the magnetometer is required to achieve high accuracy heading measurements. In this paper, a Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) based calibration algorithm is presented to estimate the values of the bias and scale factor of low cost magnetometer. The main advantage of this technique is the use of the artificial intelligence which does not need any error modeling or awareness of the nonlinearity. The estimated bias and scale factor errors from the proposed algorithm improve the heading accuracy and the results are also statistically significant. Also, it can help in the development of the Pedestrian Navigation Devices (PNDs) when combined with the INS and GPS/Wi-Fi especially in the indoor environments

  10. Magnetometer Based On Spin Wave Interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Balynsky, M; Chiang, H; Kozhevnikov, A; Filimonov, Y; Balandin, A A; Khitun, A

    2016-01-01

    We describe magnetic field sensor based on spin wave interferometer. Its sensing element consists of a magnetic cross junction with four micro-antennas fabricated at the edges. Two of these antennas are used for spin wave excitation and two others antennas are used for the detection of the inductive voltage produced by the interfering spin waves. Two waves propagating in the orthogonal arms of the cross may accumulate significantly different phase shifts depending on the magnitude and the direction of the external magnetic field. This phenomenon is utilized for magnetic field sensing. The sensitivity has maximum at the destructive interference condition, where a small change of the external magnetic field results in a drastic increase of the inductive voltage as well as the change of the output phase. We report experimental data obtained on a micrometer scale Y3Fe2(FeO4)3 cross structure. The change of the inductive voltage near the destructive interference point exceeds 40 dB per 1 Oe. At the same time, the ...

  11. A three-axis atomic magnetometer for temperature-dependence measurements of fields in a magnetically shielded environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenfeng; Liu, Gang; Li, Rujie; Quan, Wei; Jiang, Liwei; Duan, Lihong

    2017-09-01

    High performance spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) gyroscopes require stable and homogeneous magnetic fields. These fields are usually sensitive to temperature. In this paper, a three-axis atomic magnetometer to measure the temperature dependence of fields inside the magnetic shields for a SERF gyroscope prototype is constructed and tested. Based on a three-beam configuration, three-axis vector capability is obtained by a cross-modulation scheme of the magnetic field components along orthogonal axes and subsequent demodulation of the relevant probe signals. The relative temperature dependence of magnetic fields inside the prototype shields is measured to be 0.03 -0.12~K-1 . The results are useful for estimating the necessary precision of temperature control in both a SERF gyroscope and its fundamental physics applications.

  12. Poly-SiGe-based MEMS Xylophone Bar Magnetometer

    OpenAIRE

    Rochus, Véronique; Jansen, R.; Tilmans, H. A. C.; Rottenberg, X.; Chen, C.; Ranvier, S.; Lamy, Hervé; Rochus, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and preliminary characterization of highly sensitive MEMS-based Xylophone Bar Magnetometers (XBMs) realized in imec’s poly-SiGe MEMS technology. Key for our Lorentz force driven capacitively sensed resonant sensor are the combination of reasonably high Q-factor and conductivity of imec’s poly-SiGe, our optimized multiphysics sensor design targeting the maximization of the Q-factor in a wide temperature range as well as our proprietary monolithic abo...

  13. Development of Magnetometer Based on the Nonlinear Magneto-Optical Rotation Effect Toward the Measurement of the Electron Electric Dipole Moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Kawamura, H.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Asahi, K.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshimi, A.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    Toward an experimental search for an electron electric dipole moment by using laser cooled francium atoms, a development of a rubidium (Rb) atomic magnetometer based on a nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) effect is presented. In order to obtain a narrow linewidth of the NMOR spectrum, a wall relaxation time of a paraffin coated glass cell, which confined the Rb atom, was experimentally confirmed. A residual field inside a magnetic shield was also evaluated.

  14. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M.; Balabas, Mikhail V.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D.; Stærkind, Hans C.; Müller, Jörg H.; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics.

  15. A dead-zone free 4He atomic magnetometer with intensity-modulated linearly polarized light and a liquid crystal polarization rotator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.; Peng, X.; Lin, Z.; Guo, H.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical 4He atomic magnetometer experimental scheme based on an original Bell-Bloom configuration. A single intensity-modulated linearly polarized laser beam is used both for generating spin polarization within a single 4He vapor and probing the spin precessing under a static magnetic field. The transmitted light signal from the vapor is then phase-sensitively detected at the modulation frequency and its harmonics, which lead to the atomic magnetic resonance signals. Based on this structure, a liquid crystal is added in our magnetometer system and constitutes a polarization rotator. By controlling the voltage applied on the liquid crystal, the light linear polarization vector can be kept perpendicular with the ambient magnetic field direction, which in turn provides the maximum resonance signal amplitude. Moreover, the system exhibits a magnetic-field noise floor of about 2 pT / √{ Hz } , which is not degraded due to the presence of the liquid crystal and varying magnetic field direction. The experiment results prove that our method can eliminate the dead-zone effect, improve the system spatial isotropy, and thus be suitable in mobile applications.

  16. A dead-zone free ⁴He atomic magnetometer with intensity-modulated linearly polarized light and a liquid crystal polarization rotator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T; Peng, X; Lin, Z; Guo, H

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical (4)He atomic magnetometer experimental scheme based on an original Bell-Bloom configuration. A single intensity-modulated linearly polarized laser beam is used both for generating spin polarization within a single (4)He vapor and probing the spin precessing under a static magnetic field. The transmitted light signal from the vapor is then phase-sensitively detected at the modulation frequency and its harmonics, which lead to the atomic magnetic resonance signals. Based on this structure, a liquid crystal is added in our magnetometer system and constitutes a polarization rotator. By controlling the voltage applied on the liquid crystal, the light linear polarization vector can be kept perpendicular with the ambient magnetic field direction, which in turn provides the maximum resonance signal amplitude. Moreover, the system exhibits a magnetic-field noise floor of about 2pT/√Hz, which is not degraded due to the presence of the liquid crystal and varying magnetic field direction. The experiment results prove that our method can eliminate the dead-zone effect, improve the system spatial isotropy, and thus be suitable in mobile applications.

  17. An unshielded radio-frequency atomic magnetometer with sub-femtoTesla sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Keder

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a radio-frequency potassium-vapor magnetometer operating with sensitivities of 0.3 fT/ Hz at 0.5 MHz and 0.9 fT/ Hz at 1.31 MHz in the absence of radio-frequency and mu-metal or magnetic shielding. The use of spatially separated magnetometers, two voxels within the same cell, permits for the subtraction of common mode noise and the retention of a gradient signal, as from a local source. At 0.5 MHz the common mode noise was white and measured to be 3.4 fT/ Hz ; upon subtraction the noise returned to the values observed when the magnetometer was shielded. At 1.31 MHz, the common mode noise was from a nearby radio station and was reduced by a factor of 33 upon subtraction, limited only by the radio signal picked up by receiver electronics. Potential applications include in-the-field low-field magnetic resonance, such as the use of nuclear quadrupole resonance for the detection of explosives.

  18. Atomic Magnetometer Multisensor Array for rf Interference Mitigation and Unshielded Detection of Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Robert J.; Prescott, David W.; Matz, Peter; Sauer, Karen L.; Dural, Nezih; Romalis, Michael V.; Foley, Elizabeth L.; Kornack, Thomas W.; Monti, Mark; Okamitsu, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    An array of four 87Rb vector magnetometers is used to detect nuclear quadrupole resonance signals in an unshielded environment at 1 MHz. With a baseline of 25 cm, the length of the array, radio-frequency interference mitigation is also demonstrated; a radio-station signal is suppressed by a factor of 20 without degradation to the signal of interest. With these compact sensors, in which the probe beam passes through twice, the fundamental limit to detection sensitivity is found to be photon-shot noise. More passes of the probe beam overcome this limitation. With a sensor of similar effective volume, 0.25 cm3 , but 25 × more passes, the sensitivity is improved by an order of magnitude to 1.7 ±0.2 fT /√{Hz } .

  19. A magnetometer-free indoor human localization based on loosely coupled IMU/UWB fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zihajehzadeh, Shaghayegh; Yoon, Paul K; Park, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic distortions in indoor environment affects the accuracy of yaw angle estimation using magnetometer. Thus, the accuracy of indoor localization based on inertial-magnetic sensors will be affected as well. To address this issue, this paper proposes a magnetometer-free solution for indoor human localization and yaw angle estimation. The proposed algorithm fuses a wearable inertial sensor consisting of MEMS-based accelerometer and gyroscope with a portable ultra-wideband (UWB) localization system in a cascaded two-step filter consisting of a tilt Kalman filter and a localization Kalman filter. By benchmarking against an optical motion capture system, the experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can accurately track position and velocity as well as the yaw angle without using magnetometer.

  20. Development of a magnetometer-based search strategy for stopped monopoles at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    De Roeck, A.; Hirt, A M; Joergensen, M-D; Katre, A; Mermod, P; Milstead, D; Sloan, T

    2012-01-01

    If produced in high energy particle collisions at the LHC, magnetic monopoles could stop in material surrounding the interaction points. Obsolete parts of the beam pipe near the CMS interaction region, which were exposed to the products of pp and heavy ion collisions, were analysed using a SQUID-based magnetometer. The purpose of this work is to quantify the performance of the magnetometer in the context of a monopole search using a small set of samples of accelerator material ahead of the 2013 shutdown.

  1. Accelerometer and Magnetometer Based Gyroscope Emulation on Smart Sensor for a Virtual Reality Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baptiste Delporte

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose two methods based on quaternions to compute the angles of inclination and the angular velocity with 6 degrees of freedom using the measurements of a 3-axis accelerometer and a 3-axis magnetometer. Each method has singularities which occur during the computation of the orientation of the device in the 3-dimensional space. We propose solutions to avoid these singularities. Experimental results are given to compare our model with a real gyroscope.

  2. All optical vector magnetometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I research project will investigate a novel method of operating an atomic magnetometer to simultaneously measure total magnetic fields and vector magnetic...

  3. Robust Adaptive Filter for Small Satellite Attitude Estimation Based on Magnetometer and Gyro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhankui Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on magnetometer and gyro measurement, a sequential scheme is proposed to determine the orbit and attitude of small satellite simultaneously. In order to reduce the impact of orbital errors on attitude estimation, a robust adaptive Kalman filter is developed. It uses a scale factor and an adaptive factor, which are constructed by Huber function and innovation sequence, respectively, to adjust the covariance matrix of system state and observational noise, change the weights of predicted and measured parameters, get suitable Kalman filter gain and approximate optimal filtering results. Numerical simulations are carried out and the proposed filter is approved to be robust for the noise disturbance and parameter uncertainty and can provide higher accuracy attitude estimation.

  4. Wave Atom Based Watermarking

    OpenAIRE

    Bukhari, Ijaz; Nuhman-ul-Haq; Hyat, Khizar

    2013-01-01

    Watermarking helps in ensuring originality, ownership and copyrights of a digital image. This paper aims at embedding a Watermark in an image using Wave Atom Transform. Preference of Wave Atoms on other transformations has been due to its sparser expansion, adaptability to the direction of local pattern, and sharp frequency localization. In this scheme, we had tried to spread the watermark in an image so that the information at one place is very small and undetectable. In order to extract the...

  5. Microfabricated optically pumped magnetometer arrays for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, A. R.; Sheng, D.; Krzyzewski, S. P.; Geller, S.; Knappe, S.

    2017-02-01

    Optically-pumped magnetometers have demonstrated magnetic field measurements as precise as the best superconducting quantum interference device magnetometers. Our group develops miniature alkali atom-based magnetic sensors using microfabrication technology. Our sensors do not require cryogenic cooling, and can be positioned very close to the sample, making these sensors an attractive option for development in the medical community. We will present our latest chip-scale optically-pumped gradiometer developed for array applications to image magnetic fields from the brain noninvasively. These developments should lead to improved spatial resolution, and potentially sensitive measurements in unshielded environments.

  6. THOR Fluxgate Magnetometer (MAG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Rumi; Eastwood, Jonathan; Magnes, Werner; Carr, Christopher, M.; O'Brien, Helen, L.; Narita, Yasuhito; K, Chen, Christopher H.; Berghofer, Gerhard; Valavanoglou, Aris; Delva, Magda; Plaschke, Ferdinand; Cupido, Emanuele; Soucek, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The fluxgate Magnetometer (MAG) measures the background to low frequency magnetic field. The high sensitivity measurements of MAG enable to characterize the nature of turbulent fluctuations as well as the large-scale context. MAG will provide the reference system for determining anisotropy of field fluctuations, pitch-angle and gyro-phase of particles. The design of the magnetometer consists of two tri-axial sensors and the related magnetometer electronics; the electronics are hosted on printed circuit boards in the common electronics box of the fields and wave processor (FWP). A fully redundant two- sensor system mounted on a common boom and the new miniaturized low noise design based on MMS and Solar Orbiter instruments enable accurate measurement throughout the region of interest for THOR science. The usage of the common electronics hosted by FWP guarantees to fulfill the required timing accuracy with other fields measurements. These improvements are important to obtain precise measurements of magnetic field, which is essential to estimate basic plasma parameters and correctly identify the spatial and temporal scales of the turbulence. Furthermore, THOR MAG provides high quality data with sufficient overlap with the Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) in frequency space to obtain full coverage of the wave forms over all the frequencies necessary to obtain the full solar wind turbulence spectrum from MHD to kinetic range with sufficient accuracy. We discuss the role of MAG in THOR key science questions and present the new developments during Phase A such as the finalised instrument design, MAG relevant requirement, and new calibraion schemes.

  7. A rubidium Mx-magnetometer for measurements on solid state spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Daniel; Siegel, Steven; Grisanti, Emily; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2017-02-01

    The detection of environmental magnetic fields is well established by optically pumped atomic magnetometers. Another focus of magnetometry can be the research on magnetic or spin-active solid-state samples. Here we introduce a simple and compact design of a rubidium-based Mx magnetometer, which allows for hosting solid-state samples. The optical, mechanical, and electrical design is reported, as well as simple measurements which introduce the ground-state spin-relaxation time, the signal-to-noise ratio of a measurement, and subsequently the overall sensitivity of the magnetometer. The magnetometer is optimized for the most sensitive operation with respect to laser power and magnetic field excitation at the Larmor frequency.

  8. A rubidium Mx-magnetometer for measurements on solid state spins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Daniel; Siegel, Steven; Grisanti, Emily; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2017-02-01

    The detection of environmental magnetic fields is well established by optically pumped atomic magnetometers. Another focus of magnetometry can be the research on magnetic or spin-active solid-state samples. Here we introduce a simple and compact design of a rubidium-based Mx magnetometer, which allows for hosting solid-state samples. The optical, mechanical, and electrical design is reported, as well as simple measurements which introduce the ground-state spin-relaxation time, the signal-to-noise ratio of a measurement, and subsequently the overall sensitivity of the magnetometer. The magnetometer is optimized for the most sensitive operation with respect to laser power and magnetic field excitation at the Larmor frequency.

  9. A 3-Axis Miniature Magnetic Sensor Based on a Planar Fluxgate Magnetometer with an Orthogonal Fluxguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Cheng Lu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new class of tri-axial miniature magnetometer consisting of a planar fluxgate structure with an orthogonal ferromagnetic fluxguide centrally situated over the magnetic cores is presented. The magnetic sensor possesses a cruciform ferromagnetic core placed diagonally upon the square excitation coil under which two pairs of pick-up coils for in-plane field detection are allocated. Effective principles and analysis of the magnetometer for 3-D field vectors are described and verified by numerically electromagnetic simulation for the excitation and magnetization of the ferromagnetic cores. The sensor is operated by applying the second-harmonic detection technique that can verify V-B relationship and device responsivity. Experimental characterization of the miniature fluxgate device demonstrates satisfactory spatial magnetic field detection results in terms of responsivity and noise spectrum. As a result, at an excitation frequency of 50 kHz, a maximum in-plane responsivity of 122.4 V/T appears and a maximum out-of-plane responsivity of 11.6 V/T is obtained as well. The minimum field noise spectra are found to be 0.11 nT/√Hz and 6.29 nT/√Hz, respectively, in X- and Z-axis at 1 Hz under the same excitation frequency. Compared with the previous tri-axis fluxgate devices, this planar magnetic sensor with an orthogonal fluxguide provides beneficial enhancement in both sensory functionality and manufacturing simplicity. More importantly, this novel device concept is considered highly suitable for the extension to a silicon sensor made by the current CMOS-MEMS technologies, thus emphasizing its emerging applications of field detection in portable industrial electronics.

  10. Quantifying the spatio-temporal correlation during a substorm using dynamical networks formed from the SuperMAG database of ground based magnetometer stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dods, J.; Chapman, S. C.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Barnes, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The overall morphology and dynamics of magnetospheric substorms is well established in terms of observed qualitative auroral features and signatures seen in ground based magnetometers. The detailed evolution of a given substorm is captured by typically ~100 ground based magnetometer observations and this work seeks to synthesise all these observations in a quantitative manner. We present the first analysis of the full available set of ground based magnetometer observations of substorms using dynamical networks. SuperMAG offers a database containing ground station magnetometer data at a cadence of 1min from 100s stations situated across the globe. We use this data to form dynamic networks which capture spatial dynamics on timescales from the fast reconfiguration seen in the aurora, to that of the substorm cycle. Windowed linear cross-correlation between pairs of magnetometer time series along with a threshold is used to determine which stations are correlated and hence connected in the network. Variations in ground conductivity and differences in the response functions of magnetometers at individual stations are overcome by normalizing to long term averages of the cross-correlation. These results are tested against surrogate data in which phases have been randomised. The network is then a collection of connected points (ground stations); the structure of the network and its variation as a function of time quantify the detailed dynamical processes of the substorm. The network properties can be captured quantitatively in time dependent dimensionless network parameters and we will discuss their behaviour for examples of 'typical' substorms and storms. The network parameters provide a detailed benchmark to compare data with models of substorm dynamics, and can provide new insights on the similarities and differences between substorms and how they correlate with external driving and the internal state of the magnetosphere.

  11. Aristoteles magnetometer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward J.; Marquedant, Roy J.; Langel, Robert; Acuna, Mario

    1991-12-01

    A magnetometer system capable of meeting the stringent requirements of the Aristoteles mission is described. The system will comprise a three axis or Vector Flux gas Magnetometer (VFM) and a highly accurate resonance magnetometer, the Scalar Helium Magnetometer (SHM). Basic operational features of these instruments are described and their performance is related to the scientific objectives of the mission appropriate to the geomagnetic field measurements. The major requirements imposed on the spacecraft are summarized. Photographs and diagrams of both instruments are presented along with graphs of the sensitivity of the SHM to magnetic field orientation.

  12. Digital Detection and feedback Fluxgate Magnetometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil-Henriksen, J.; Merayo, José M.G.; Nielsen, Otto V

    1996-01-01

    A new full Earth's field dynamic feedback fluxgate magnetometer is described. It is based entirely on digital signal processing and digital feedback control, thereby replacing the classical second harmonic tuned analogue electronics by processor algorithms. Discrete mathematical cross...

  13. Daytime, low latitude, vertical ExB drift velocities, inferred from ground-based magnetometer observations in the Peruvian, Philippine and Indian longitude sectors under quiet and disturbed conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, D; Chau, J; Yumoto, K; Bhattacharya, A; Alex, S

    2006-01-01

    Daytime, low latitude, vertical ExB drift velocities, inferred from ground-based magnetometer observations in the Peruvian, Philippine and Indian longitude sectors under quiet and disturbed conditions

  14. Athermal fiber laser for the SWARM absolute scalar magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourcault, W.; Léger, J.-M.; Costes, V.; Fratter, I.; Mondin, L.

    2017-11-01

    The Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) developed by CEA-LETI/CNES is an optically pumped 4He magnetic field sensor based on the Zeeman effect and an electronic magnetic resonance whose effects are amplified by a laser pumping process [1-2]. Consequently, the role of the laser is to pump the 4He atoms at the D0 transition as well as to allow the magnetic resonance signal detection. The ASM will be the scalar magnetic reference instrument of the three ESA Swarm satellites to be launched in 2012 in order to carry out the best ever survey of the Earth magnetic field and its temporal evolution. The sensitivity and accuracy of this magnetometer based on 4He optical pumping depend directly on the characteristics of its light source, which is the key sub-system of the sensor. We describe in this paper the selected fiber laser architecture and its wavelength stabilization scheme. Its main performance in terms of spectral emission, optical power at 1083 nm and intensity noise characteristics in the frequency bands used for the operation of the magnetometer, are then presented. Environmental testing results (thermal vacuum cycling, vibrations, shocks and ageing) are also reported at the end of this paper.

  15. Validity and reliability of smartphone magnetometer-based goniometer evaluation of shoulder abduction--A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Linda B; Sumner, Sean; Duong, Tina; Yan, Posu; Bajcsy, Ruzena; Abresch, R Ted; de Bie, Evan; Han, Jay J

    2015-12-01

    Goniometers are commonly used by physical therapists to measure range-of-motion (ROM) in the musculoskeletal system. These measurements are used to assist in diagnosis and to help monitor treatment efficacy. With newly emerging technologies, smartphone-based applications are being explored for measuring joint angles and movement. This pilot study investigates the intra- and inter-rater reliability as well as concurrent validity of a newly-developed smartphone magnetometer-based goniometer (MG) application for measuring passive shoulder abduction in both sitting and supine positions, and compare against the traditional universal goniometer (UG). This is a comparative study with repeated measurement design. Three physical therapists utilized both the smartphone MG and a traditional UG to measure various angles of passive shoulder abduction in a healthy subject, whose shoulder was positioned in eight different positions with pre-determined degree of abduction while seated or supine. Each therapist was blinded to the measured angles. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs), Bland-Altman plotting methods, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical analyses. Both traditional UG and smartphone MG were reliable in repeated measures of standardized joint angle positions (average CCC > 0.997) with similar variability in both measurement tools (standard deviation (SD) ± 4°). Agreement between the UG and MG measurements was greater than 0.99 in all positions. Our results show that the smartphone MG has equivalent reliability compared to the traditional UG when measuring passive shoulder abduction ROM. With concordant measures and comparable reliability to the UG, the newly developed MG application shows potential as a useful tool to assess joint angles. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Hard and soft acids and bases: atoms and atomic ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, James L

    2008-07-07

    The structural origin of hard-soft behavior in atomic acids and bases has been explored using a simple orbital model. The Pearson principle of hard and soft acids and bases has been taken to be the defining statement about hard-soft behavior and as a definition of chemical hardness. There are a number of conditions that are imposed on any candidate structure and associated property by the Pearson principle, which have been exploited. The Pearson principle itself has been used to generate a thermodynamically based scale of relative hardness and softness for acids and bases (operational chemical hardness), and a modified Slater model has been used to discern the electronic origin of hard-soft behavior. Whereas chemical hardness is a chemical property of an acid or base and the operational chemical hardness is an experimental measure of it, the absolute hardness is a physical property of an atom or molecule. A critical examination of chemical hardness, which has been based on a more rigorous application of the Pearson principle and the availability of quantitative measures of chemical hardness, suggests that the origin of hard-soft behavior for both acids and bases resides in the relaxation of the electrons not undergoing transfer during the acid-base interaction. Furthermore, the results suggest that the absolute hardness should not be taken as synonymous with chemical hardness but that the relationship is somewhat more complex. Finally, this work provides additional groundwork for a better understanding of chemical hardness that will inform the understanding of hardness in molecules.

  17. TQUID Magnetometer and Artificial Neural Circuitry Based on a Topological Kondo Insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    samples are leached out in sodium hydroxide solution. The surfaces of these crystals were carefully etched using an equal mixture of hydrochloric acid...person or corporation; or convey any rights or permission to manufacture , use, or sell any patented invention that may relate to them. This report is the...detail. Crystals are grown using the aluminum flux method and selected based on size with extra aluminum etched off with hydrochloric acid. Two

  18. Microfabricated cells for chip-scale atomic clock based on coherent population trapping: Fabrication and investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Ermak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A universal method for fabrication of miniature cells for frequency standards and quantum magnetometers containing 87Rb atoms in the atmosphere of inert gas neon based on integrated technologies is considered. The results of experimental studies of coherent population trapping signals observed for a series of cells which provided recovery of vapors of an alkali metal from the rubidium dichromate salt with the help of laser radiation are presented. The coherent population trapping signals with a typical linewidth of 2–3 kHz and a signal-to-noise ratio of 1500 in the 1-Hz bandwidth were observed, which allows one to provide a relative frequency stability of atomic clock of 10−11 at 100 s.

  19. Solid-state magnetometer using electrically detected magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jander, A., E-mail: jander@eecs.oregonstate.ed [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Dhagat, P. [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    A silicon-based magnetometer utilizing spin-dependent recombination to electrically detect electron spin resonance is described. Electronic tracking of the resonant frequency provides an absolute, calibration-free measure of the magnetic field. The magnetometer can potentially be implemented entirely in conventional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit technology. Based on published results for spin-dependent recombination in semiconductor diodes, an estimate of the achievable sensitivity and power consumption of an integrated magnetometer is derived.

  20. GOES Space Environment Monitor, Magnetometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Three orthogonal flux-gate magnetometer elements, (spinning twin fluxgate magnetometer prior to GOES-8) provide magnetic field measurements in three mutually...

  1. In-orbit magnetometer bias and scale factor calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajiyev Chingiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetometers are widely used for LEO small satellites attitude determination and control system. In order to estimate satellite dynamics and control attitude accurately, scale factor and bias of magnetometer must be estimated. In this study a linear Kalman filter (LKF based algorithm for the estimation of magnetometer biases and scale factors is proposed. Proposed algorithms are simulated through attitude dynamics of a small satellite.

  2. Mapping plasma structures in the high-latitude ionosphere using beacon satellite, incoherent scatter radar and ground-based magnetometer observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Neubert

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In the autumn of the year 2000, four radio receivers capable of tracking various beacon satellites were set up along the southwestern coast of Greenland. They are used to reconstruct images of the ionospheric plasma density distribution via the tomographic method. In order to test and validate tomographic imaging under the highly variable conditions often prevailing in the high-latitude ionosphere, a time interval was selected when the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar conducted measurements of the ionospheric plasma density while the radio receivers tracked a number of beacon satellites. A comparison between two-dimensional images of the plasma density distribution obtained from the radar and the satellite receivers revealed generally good agreement between radar measurements and tomographic images. Observed discrepancies can be attributed to F region plasma patches moving through the field of view with a speed of several hundred meters per second, thereby smearing out the tomographic image. A notable mismatch occurred around local magnetic midnight when a magnetospheric substorm breakup occurred in the vicinity of southwest Greenland (identified from ground-based magnetometer observations. The breakup was associated with a sudden intensification of the westward auroral electrojet which was centered at about 69 and extended up to some 73 corrected geomagnetic latitude. Ground-based magnetometer data may thus have the potential of indicating when the tomographic method is at risk and may fail. We finally outline the application of tomographic imaging, when combined with magnetic field data, to estimate ionospheric Joule heating rates.

  3. Automatic magnetometer calibration with small space coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahdan, Ahmed

    The use of a standalone Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has proved to be insufficient when navigating indoors or in urban canyons due to multipath or obstruction. Recent technological advances in low cost micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) -- based sensors (like accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers) enabled the development of sensor-based navigation systems. Although MEMS sensors are low-cost, lightweight, small size, and have low-power consumption, they have complex error characteristics. Accurate computation of the heading angle (azimuth) is one of the most important aspects of any navigation system. It can be computed either by gyroscopes or magnetometers. Gyroscopes are inertial sensors that can provide the angular rate from which the heading can be calculated, however, their outputs drift with time. Moreover, the accumulated errors due to mathematical integration, performed to obtain the heading angle, lead to large heading errors. On the other hand, magnetometers do not suffer from drift and the calculation of heading does not suffer from error accumulation. They can provide an absolute heading from the magnetic north by sensing the earth's magnetic field. However, magnetometer readings are usually affected by magnetic fields, other than the earth magnetic field, and by other error sources; therefore magnetometer calibration is required to use magnetometer as a reliable source of heading in navigation applications. In this thesis, a framework for fast magnetometer calibration is proposed. This framework requires little space coverage with no user involvement in the calibration process, and does not need specific movements to be performed. The proposed techniques are capable of performing both 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) calibration for magnetometers. They are developed to consider different scenarios suitable for different applications, and can benefit from natural device movements. Some applications involve tethering the

  4. Fast converging with high accuracy estimates of satellite attitude and orbit based on magnetometer augmented with gyro, star sensor and GPS via extended Kalman filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Mekky Ahmed Habib

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this work is to extend the work done in, Tamer (2009, to provide high accuracy satellite attitude and orbit estimates needed for imaging purposes and also before execution of spacecraft orbital maneuvers for the next Egyptian scientific satellite. The problem of coarse satellite attitude and orbit estimation based on magnetometer measurements has been treated in the literature. The current research expands the field of application from coarse and slow converging estimates to accurate and fast converging attitude and orbit estimates within 0.1°, and 10 m for attitude angles and spacecraft location respectively (1-σ. The magnetometer is used for both spacecraft attitude and orbit estimation, aided with gyro to provide angular velocity measurements, star sensor to provide attitude quaternion, and GPS receiver to provide spacecraft location. The spacecraft under consideration is subject to solar radiation pressure forces and moments, aerodynamics forces and moments, earth’s oblateness till the fourth order (i.e. J4, gravity gradient moments, and residual magnetic dipole moments. The estimation algorithm developed is powerful enough to converge quickly (actually within 10 s despite very large initial estimation errors with sufficiently high accuracy estimates.

  5. Low-noise YBa2Cu3O7-x single layer dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer based on bicrystal junctions with 30° misorientation angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, J.; Drung, D.; Ludwig, F.; Minotani, T.; Enpuku, K.

    1998-01-01

    We have fabricated and characterized a low-noise direct-coupled magnetometer based on a 100 pH YBa2Cu3O7-x dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) on a 10 mm×10 mm SrTiO3 bicrystal substrate with 30° misorientation angle. The thin films were deposited by hollow cathode discharge sputtering and patterned using conventional photolithography and Ar ion beam etching. The SQUID magnetometer was operated using direct-coupled flux-locked-loop electronics with bias reversal. The sensor had a usable voltage swing of 39 μV and a white magnetic field noise of 32 fTHz-1/2 with a 1/f corner at 2 Hz, including electronics and environmental noise. The voltage versus flux (V-Φ) characteristic showed a pronounced distortion on the negative slope. Numerical simulations were performed to explain the distorted V-Φ characteristic. Measurements of magnetocardiograms demonstrate the suitability of this sensor for biomagnetic applications.

  6. A Compact Microchip-Based Atomic Clock Based on Ultracold Trapped Rb Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Farkas, Daniel M; Anderson, Dana Z

    2009-01-01

    We propose a compact atomic clock based on ultracold Rb atoms that are magnetically trapped near the surface of an atom microchip. An interrogation scheme that combines electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) with Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields can achieve atomic shot-noise level performance of 10^{-13}/sqrt(tau) for 10^6 atoms. The EIT signal can be detected with a heterodyne technique that provides noiseless gain; with this technique the optical phase shift of a 100 pW probe beam can be detected at the photon shot-noise level. Numerical calculations of the density matrix equations are used to identify realistic operating parameters at which AC Stark shifts are eliminated. By considering fluctuations in these parameters, we estimate that AC Stark shifts can be canceled to a level better than 2*10^{-14}. An overview of the apparatus is presented with estimates of duty cycle and power consumption.

  7. Digitalization of highly precise fluxgate magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerman, Ales; Kuna, A.; Ripka, P.

    2005-01-01

    allowing configurations with modulator inside and outside the feedback loop. The last principle is demonstrated on the project of the fully digital fluxgate magnetometer based on the digital signal processor (DSP). The results of the presented projects are compared with recently published competitive...

  8. Absolute magnetometer based on the high-frequency modulation of the kinetic inductance of a superconducting thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayela, F.; Bret, J. L.; Chaussy, J.

    1995-07-01

    The high-frequency thermal modulation of a superconducting closed loop just below its critical temperature gives rise to a spectacular divergence of its kinetic inductance. It is shown that this periodic divergence due to that of the London penetration length λ permits very fine magnetic measurements. A superconducting magnetometer has been designed that can detect the absolute intensity of weak magnetic fields, with a noise level of 10-12 T/√Hz. This absolute level was reached by the double thermal modulation of a superconducting disk around its critical temperature and of a neighboring superconducting closed loop. As a consequence of the Meissner effect, the superconducting disk gives an estimation of the applied perpendicular magnetic field and removes any incertitude about the number of flux quantums inside the loop. Then, the modulation of the temperature of the loop increases the absolute sensitivity. The detection is performed by a very low-loss superconducting LC resonator set at the input of a cryogenic preamplifier. The thermal modulation is performed by pigtailed laser diodes. Practical limitations and further improvements are discussed.

  9. Scalar magnetometers for space applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Fritz

    magnetometer, offer stability and resolution well suited for the calibration purposes. Recent developments are discussed. The metastable Helium magnetometer also offers quasi-absolute scalar measurements, and the use of semiconductor tuned lasers replacing an RF-excited Helium lamp holds great promise...

  10. Calibration of Magnetometers with GNSS Receivers and Magnetometer-Aided GNSS Ambiguity Fixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Patrick

    2017-06-08

    Magnetometers provide compass information, and are widely used for navigation, orientation and alignment of objects. As magnetometers are affected by sensor biases and eventually by systematic distortions of the Earth magnetic field, a calibration is needed. In this paper, a method for calibration of magnetometers with three Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers is presented. We perform a least-squares estimation of the magnetic flux and sensor biases using GNSS-based attitude information. The attitude is obtained from the relative positions between the GNSS receivers in the North-East-Down coordinate frame and prior knowledge of these relative positions in the platform's coordinate frame. The relative positions and integer ambiguities of the periodic carrier phase measurements are determined with an integer least-squares estimation using an integer decorrelation and sequential tree search. Prior knowledge on the relative positions is used to increase the success rate of ambiguity fixing. We have validated the proposed method with low-cost magnetometers and GNSS receivers on a vehicle in a test drive. The calibration enabled a consistent heading determination with an accuracy of five degrees. This precise magnetometer-based attitude information allows an instantaneous GNSS integer ambiguity fixing.

  11. Nuclear quantum-assisted magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häberle, Thomas; Oeckinghaus, Thomas; Schmid-Lorch, Dominik; Pfender, Matthias; de Oliveira, Felipe Fávaro; Momenzadeh, Seyed Ali; Finkler, Amit; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic sensing and imaging instruments are important tools in biological and material sciences. There is an increasing demand for attaining higher sensitivity and spatial resolution, with implementations using a single qubit offering potential improvements in both directions. In this article we describe a scanning magnetometer based on the nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond as the sensor. By means of a quantum-assisted readout scheme together with advances in photon collection efficiency, our device exhibits an enhancement in signal to noise ratio of close to an order of magnitude compared to the standard fluorescence readout of the nitrogen-vacancy center. This is demonstrated by comparing non-assisted and assisted methods in a T1 relaxation time measurement.

  12. Westward moving dynamic substorm features observed with the IMAGE magnetometer network and other ground-based instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lühr

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the ground signatures of dynamic substorm features with particular emphasis on the event interpretation capabilities provided by the IMAGE magnetometer network. This array covers the high latitudes from the sub-auroral to the cusp/cleft region. An isolated substorm on 11 Oct. 1993 during the late evening hours exhibited many of well-known features such as the Harang discontinuity, westward travelling surge and poleward leap, but also discrete auroral forms, known as auroral streamers, appeared propagating westward along the centre of the electrojet. Besides the magnetic field measurements, there were auroral observations and plasma flow and conductivity measurements obtained by EISCAT. The data of all three sets of instruments are consistent with the notion of upward field-aligned currents associated with the moving auroral patches. A detailed analysis of the electrodynamic parameters in the ionosphere, however, reveals that they do not agree with the expectations resulting from commonly used simplifying approximations. For example, the westward moving auroral streamers which are associated with field-aligned current filaments, are not collocated with the centres of equivalent current vortices. Furthermore, there is a clear discrepancy between the measured plasma flow direction and the obtained equivalent current direction. All this suggests that steep conductivity gradients are associated with the transient auroral forms. Also self-induction effects in the ionosphere may play a role for the orientation of the plasma flows. This study stresses the importance of multi-instrument observation for a reliable interpretation of dynamic auroral processes.Keywords. Ionosphere (Auroral ionosphere; Electric fields and currents; Ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions.

  13. Westward moving dynamic substorm features observed with the IMAGE magnetometer network and other ground-based instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lühr

    Full Text Available We present the ground signatures of dynamic substorm features with particular emphasis on the event interpretation capabilities provided by the IMAGE magnetometer network. This array covers the high latitudes from the sub-auroral to the cusp/cleft region. An isolated substorm on 11 Oct. 1993 during the late evening hours exhibited many of well-known features such as the Harang discontinuity, westward travelling surge and poleward leap, but also discrete auroral forms, known as auroral streamers, appeared propagating westward along the centre of the electrojet. Besides the magnetic field measurements, there were auroral observations and plasma flow and conductivity measurements obtained by EISCAT. The data of all three sets of instruments are consistent with the notion of upward field-aligned currents associated with the moving auroral patches. A detailed analysis of the electrodynamic parameters in the ionosphere, however, reveals that they do not agree with the expectations resulting from commonly used simplifying approximations. For example, the westward moving auroral streamers which are associated with field-aligned current filaments, are not collocated with the centres of equivalent current vortices. Furthermore, there is a clear discrepancy between the measured plasma flow direction and the obtained equivalent current direction. All this suggests that steep conductivity gradients are associated with the transient auroral forms. Also self-induction effects in the ionosphere may play a role for the orientation of the plasma flows. This study stresses the importance of multi-instrument observation for a reliable interpretation of dynamic auroral processes.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Auroral ionosphere; Electric fields and currents; Ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions.

  14. SCALAR MULTI-PASS ATOMIC MAGNETOMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Signature// JOHN F. CARR, DR-4 Chief, Spectrum Warfare Division Sensors Directorate This report is published in...detector (PFD) part of a common phase- locked -loop chip, such as 4046. An advantage of this approach is that PFD measures the time between zero...emitter. In some configurations such as side- locked optical rotation probe beams, the increased power may be substantially negated by the added

  15. Optically transduced MEMS magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Langlois, Eric

    2014-03-18

    MEMS magnetometers with optically transduced resonator displacement are described herein. Improved sensitivity, crosstalk reduction, and extended dynamic range may be achieved with devices including a deflectable resonator suspended from the support, a first grating extending from the support and disposed over the resonator, a pair of drive electrodes to drive an alternating current through the resonator, and a second grating in the resonator overlapping the first grating to form a multi-layer grating having apertures that vary dimensionally in response to deflection occurring as the resonator mechanically resonates in a plane parallel to the first grating in the presence of a magnetic field as a function of the Lorentz force resulting from the alternating current. A plurality of such multi-layer gratings may be disposed across a length of the resonator to provide greater dynamic range and/or accommodate fabrication tolerances.

  16. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantsker, Eugene [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO3-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room.

  17. Scalar Calibration of Vector Magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter; Primdahl, Fritz

    2000-01-01

    The calibration parameters of a vector magnetometer are estimated only by the use of a scalar reference magnetometer. The method presented in this paper differs from those previously reported in its linearized parametrization. This allows the determination of three offsets or signals in the absence...... of a magnetic field, three scale factors for normalization of the axes and three non-orthogonality angles which build up an orthogonal system intrinsically in the sensor. The advantage of this method compared with others lies in its linear least squares estimator, which finds independently and uniquely...... the parameters for a given data set. Therefore, a magnetometer may be characterized inexpensively in the Earth's magnetic-field environment. This procedure has been used successfully in the pre-flight calibration of the state-of-the-art magnetometers on board the magnetic mapping satellites Orsted, Astrid-2...

  18. GALILEO MAGNETOMETER CRUISE EDR DATA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains data acquired by the Galileo Magnetometer during the Interplanetary Cruise to Jupiter. The data are at varying resolution depending on the...

  19. Miniature Laser Magnetometer (MLM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This 2009 NASA SBIR Phase 2 proposal for an innovative Miniature Laser Magnetometer (MLM) is a response to subtopic S1.06 Particles and Field Sensors and Instrument...

  20. Miniature Laser Magnetometer (MLM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This 2009 NASA SBIR Phase 1 proposal for an innovative Miniature Laser Magnetometer (MLM) is a response to subtopic S1.06 Particles and Field Sensors and Instrument...

  1. Quantifying the spatio-temporal pattern of the ground impact of space weather events using dynamical networks formed from the SuperMAG database of ground based magnetometer stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dods, Joe; Chapman, Sandra; Gjerloev, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative understanding of the full spatial-temporal pattern of space weather is important in order to estimate the ground impact. Geomagnetic indices such as AE track the peak of a geomagnetic storm or substorm, but cannot capture the full spatial-temporal pattern. Observations by the ~100 ground based magnetometers in the northern hemisphere have the potential to capture the detailed evolution of a given space weather event. We present the first analysis of the full available set of ground based magnetometer observations of substorms using dynamical networks. SuperMAG offers a database containing ground station magnetometer data at a cadence of 1min from 100s stations situated across the globe. We use this data to form dynamic networks which capture spatial dynamics on timescales from the fast reconfiguration seen in the aurora, to that of the substorm cycle. Windowed linear cross-correlation between pairs of magnetometer time series along with a threshold is used to determine which stations are correlated and hence connected in the network. Variations in ground conductivity and differences in the response functions of magnetometers at individual stations are overcome by normalizing to long term averages of the cross-correlation. These results are tested against surrogate data in which phases have been randomised. The network is then a collection of connected points (ground stations); the structure of the network and its variation as a function of time quantify the detailed dynamical processes of the substorm. The network properties can be captured quantitatively in time dependent dimensionless network parameters and we will discuss their behaviour for examples of 'typical' substorms and storms. The network parameters provide a detailed benchmark to compare data with models of substorm dynamics, and can provide new insights on the similarities and differences between substorms and how they correlate with external driving and the internal state of the

  2. Magnetogama: an open schematic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyudi; Khakhim, Nurul; Kuntoro, Tri; Mardiatno, Djati; Rakhman, Afif; Setyo Handaru, Anas; Akhmad Mufaqih, Adien; Marwan Irnaka, Theodosius

    2017-09-01

    Magnetogama is an open schematic hand-assembled fluxgate magnetometer. Compared to another magnetometer, Magnetogama has more benefit concerning its price and its ease of use. Practically Magnetogama can be utilized either in land or attached to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Magnetogama was designed to give open access to a cheap and accurate alternative to magnetometer sensor. Therefore it can be used as a standard design which is directly applicable to the low-budget company or education purposes. Schematic, code and several verification tests were presented in this article ensuring its reproducibility. Magnetogama has been tested with two kind of tests: a comparison with two nearest observatories at Learmonth (LRM) and Kakadu (KDU) and the response of magnetic substance.

  3. Spreadsheet-Based Program for Simulating Atomic Emission Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannigan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A simple Excel spreadsheet-based program for simulating atomic emission spectra from the properties of neutral atoms (e.g., energies and statistical weights of the electronic states, electronic partition functions, transition probabilities, etc.) is described. The contents of the spreadsheet (i.e., input parameters, formulas for calculating…

  4. A Transportable Gravity Gradiometer Based on Atom Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Thompson, Robert J.; Kellogg, James R.; Aveline, David C.; Maleki, Lute; Kohel, James M.

    2010-01-01

    A transportable atom interferometer-based gravity gradiometer has been developed at JPL to carry out measurements of Earth's gravity field at ever finer spatial resolutions, and to facilitate high-resolution monitoring of temporal variations in the gravity field from ground- and flight-based platforms. Existing satellite-based gravity missions such as CHAMP and GRACE measure the gravity field via precise monitoring of the motion of the satellites; i.e. the satellites themselves function as test masses. JPL's quantum gravity gradiometer employs a quantum phase measurement technique, similar to that employed in atomic clocks, made possible by recent advances in laser cooling and manipulation of atoms. This measurement technique is based on atomwave interferometry, and individual laser-cooled atoms are used as drag-free test masses. The quantum gravity gradiometer employs two identical atom interferometers as precision accelerometers to measure the difference in gravitational acceleration between two points (Figure 1). By using the same lasers for the manipulation of atoms in both interferometers, the accelerometers have a common reference frame and non-inertial accelerations are effectively rejected as common mode noise in the differential measurement of the gravity gradient. As a result, the dual atom interferometer-based gravity gradiometer allows gravity measurements on a moving platform, while achieving the same long-term stability of the best atomic clocks. In the laboratory-based prototype (Figure 2), the cesium atoms used in each atom interferometer are initially collected and cooled in two separate magneto-optic traps (MOTs). Each MOT, consisting of three orthogonal pairs of counter-propagating laser beams centered on a quadrupole magnetic field, collects up to 10(exp 9) atoms. These atoms are then launched vertically as in an atom fountain by switching off the magnetic field and introducing a slight frequency shift between pairs of lasers to create a moving

  5. Manipulating Neutral Atoms in Chip-Based Magnetic Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Kohel, James

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques for manipulating neutral atoms (more precisely, ultracold clouds of neutral atoms) in chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides have been demonstrated. Such traps and waveguides are promising components of future quantum sensors that would offer sensitivities much greater than those of conventional sensors. Potential applications include gyroscopy and basic research in physical phenomena that involve gravitational and/or electromagnetic fields. The developed techniques make it possible to control atoms with greater versatility and dexterity than were previously possible and, hence, can be expected to contribute to the value of chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides. The basic principle of these techniques is to control gradient magnetic fields with suitable timing so as to alter a trap to exert position-, velocity-, and/or time-dependent forces on atoms in the trap to obtain desired effects. The trap magnetic fields are generated by controlled electric currents flowing in both macroscopic off-chip electromagnet coils and microscopic wires on the surface of the chip. The methods are best explained in terms of examples. Rather than simply allowing atoms to expand freely into an atomic waveguide, one can give them a controllable push by switching on an externally generated or a chip-based gradient magnetic field. This push can increase the speed of the atoms, typically from about 5 to about 20 cm/s. Applying a non-linear magnetic-field gradient exerts different forces on atoms in different positions a phenomenon that one can exploit by introducing a delay between releasing atoms into the waveguide and turning on the magnetic field.

  6. A Lorentz force magnetometer based on a piezoelectric-on-silicon square-extensional mode micromechanical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S.; Lee, J. E.-Y.

    2017-06-01

    In this letter, we present a Lorentz force magnetic field sensor based on a thin-film piezoelectric-on-silicon (TPoS) CMOS-compatible resonator for the detection of an out-of-plane (perpendicular to the plane of fabrication) magnetic field. We here exploit the fundamental breathing mode of vibration in a suspended square plate, which is commonly referred to as the square-extensional (SE) mode. The symmetric stress profile of the SE mode avails stresses in the two orthogonal in-plane axes to be effectively coupled into a charge output through the piezoelectric transducers. This in turn enhances the output motional current from the device, which effectively determines the responsivity of the device. In this context, the responsivity has been defined as a ratio of output motional current to the external magnetic field, which has been further normalized against the input reference current of the device. The reported device has recorded a responsivity of 6950 ppm/T (μA/A.T) at a resonant frequency of 5.28 MHz and a reasonable mechanical quality (Q) factor of 1056 in air.

  7. A Nanofiber-Based Optical Conveyor Belt for Cold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Schneeweiss, Philipp; Mitsch, Rudolf; Reitz, Daniel; Vetsch, Eugen; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate optical transport of cold cesium atoms over millimeter-scale distances along an optical nanofiber. The atoms are trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by a two-color evanescent field surrounding the nanofiber, far red- and blue-detuned with respect to the atomic transition. The blue-detuned field is a propagating nanofiber-guided mode while the red-detuned field is a standing-wave mode which leads to the periodic axial confinement of the atoms. Here, this standing wave is used for transporting the atoms along the nanofiber by mutually detuning the two counter-propagating fields which form the standing wave. The performance and limitations of the nanofiber-based transport are evaluated and possible applications are discussed.

  8. Induction Magnetometers – Design Peculiarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy KOREPANOV

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Induction or search-coil magnetometers (IM are widely used in many branches of science and industry. The frequency range and dynamic range of IMs are probably the widest of all existing magnetometers: they are used for the measurement of magnetic field variations in the frequency band from ~10-4 till ~106 Hz with the intensities from fractions of femtotesla till tens of tesla. This explains the permanent interest to IM design and the attempts to construct the IMs with best possible parameters. The present paper deals with the peculiarities of IM design. An attempt to re-establish the correctness of priorities in the field is made and the approaches to the IM optimization and their quality estimation are described.

  9. Metamaterial perfect absorber based on artificial dielectric "atoms".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Bi, Ke; Li, Bo; Zhao, Qian; Zhou, Ji

    2016-09-05

    In this work, we numerically designed and then experimentally verified a metamaterial perfect absorber based on artificial dielectric "atoms". This metamaterial absorber is composed of dielectric ceramic material (SrTiO3) "atoms" embedded in a background matrix on a metal plate. The dielectric "atoms" couple strongly to the incident electric and magnetic fields at the Mie resonance mode, leading to the narrow perfect absorption band with simulated and experimental absorptivities of 99% and 98.5% at 8.96 GHz, respectively. The designed metamaterial perfect absorber is polarization insensitive and can operate in wide angle incidence.

  10. Rydberg-atom-based scheme of nonadiabatic geometric quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P. Z.; Cui, Xiao-Dan; Xu, G. F.; Sjöqvist, Erik; Tong, D. M.

    2017-11-01

    Nonadiabatic geometric quantum computation provides a means to perform fast and robust quantum gates. It has been implemented in various physical systems, such as trapped ions, nuclear magnetic resonance, and superconducting circuits. Another system being adequate for implementation of nonadiabatic geometric quantum computation may be Rydberg atoms, since their internal states have very long coherence time and the Rydberg-mediated interaction facilitates the implementation of a two-qubit gate. Here, we propose a scheme of nonadiabatic geometric quantum computation based on Rydberg atoms, which combines the robustness of nonadiabatic geometric gates with the merits of Rydberg atoms.

  11. An improved proton magnetometer for Earth's magnetic field observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chengyu; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Fu, Haoyang

    2015-09-01

    As a precision instrument to measure the earth magnetic field, proton magnetometer is widely used in different fields such as geological survey, buried objects detection and earth field variations. Due to poor signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the system, proton magnetometer suffers from low sensitivity which directly affects the performance. In order to increase the sensitivity, we present an improved proton magnetometer. First, the effect of matching resistance on Q value is discussed to enhance SNR, and high matching resistance has been chosen to improve the Q value of the resonant circuit. Second, noise induced by pre-amplifier is investigated in order to obtain low noise signal, and we adopt the JFET with noise figure less than 0.5dB as the pre-amplifier. Third, by using band-pass filter, low-noise output signal is obtained. Fourth, the method of period measurement based on CPLD is employed to measure frequency of the square wave shaped from the output sinusoidal signal. High precision temperature compensate crystal oscillator (TCXO) has been used to improve the frequency measurement accuracy. Last, experimental data is obtained through field measurements. By calculating the standard deviation, the sensitivity of the improved proton magnetometer is 0.15nT for Earth's magnetic field observation. Experimental results show that the new magnetometer is sensitive to earth field measurement.

  12. An improved RF circuit for Overhauser magnetometer excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Di; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Fu, Haoyang

    2015-08-01

    Overhauser magnetometer is a high-precision device for magnetostatic field measurement, which can be used in a wide variety of purposes: UXO detection, pipeline mapping and other engineering and environmental applications. Traditional proton magnetometer adopts DC polarization, suffering from low polarization efficiency, high power consumption and low signal noise ratio (SNR). Compared with the traditional proton magnetometer, nitroxide free radicals are used for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). RF excitation is very important for electron resonance in nitrogen oxygen free radical solution, and it is primarily significant for the obtention of high SNR signal and high sensitive field observation. Therefore, RF excitation source plays a crucial role in the development of Overhauser magnetometer. In this paper, an improved design of a RF circuit is discussed. The new RF excitation circuit consists of two parts: Quartz crystal oscillator circuit and RF power amplifier circuit. Simulation and optimization designs for power amplifier circuit based on software ADS are presented. Finally we achieve a continuous and stable sine wave of 60MHz with 1-2.5 W output power, and the second harmonic suppression is close to -20dBc. The improved RF circuit has many merits such as small size, low-power consumption and high efficiency, and it can be applied to Overhauser magnetometer to obtain high sensitive field observation.

  13. Development, construction and analysis of the "Ørsted" fluxgate magnetometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Otto V; Petersen, Jan Raagaard; Primdahl, Fritz

    1995-01-01

    The experiments and theoretical considerations leading to the construction of a high-performance three-axis fluxgate magnetometer are described. The magnetometer will be used (1996) in the Earth's field mapping satellite named "Ørsted". The fluxgate sensors are based on stress-annealed metallic g...

  14. Digitalisation of Fluxgate Magnetometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Erik Bøje

    1999-01-01

    instrument.However, some problems are still present in the analogue electronics.In this thesis an instrument, based on digital signal processing, is presented. The instrument uses an early digitalisation of the fluxgate sensor signal and derives the magnetic field with mathematical algorithms implemented...... in digital signal Processors. The basic properties behind the instrument are described and it is shown that the instrument works equally well as the analogue version. The first fully working instrument, based on digital signal processing for the Swedish micro-satellite Astrid-2, is described. Finally...

  15. Magnetometer with a miniature transducer and automatic scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnam, W. J. J.; Fales, C. L., Jr.; Breckenridge, R. A.; Pohm, A. V. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The magnetometer is based on the time variation of the magnetic permeability in the magnetic material of its transducer; however, its operation is substantially different from the ordinary flux-gate magnetometer. The transducer uses 0.05 mm diameter plated magnetic wire and is made flat enabling it to make measurements of transverse magnetic fields as close as 0.08 mm from the surface, and it has very good spatial resolution because of its small active region of approximately 0.64 mm by 0.76 mm. The magnetometer uses an inexpensive clip-on millimeter for driving and processing the electrical signals and readout. It also utilizes an automatic scanning technique which is made possible by a specially designed transducer holding mechanism that replaces the ink pen on an X-Y recorder.

  16. A 2015 International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) candidate model based on Swarm’s experimental absolute magnetometer vector mode data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigneron, Pierre; Hulot, Gauthier; Olsen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    Each of the three satellites of the European Space Agency Swarm mission carries an absolute scalar magnetometer (ASM) that provides the nominal 1-Hz scalar data of the mission for both science and calibration purposes. These ASM instruments, however, also deliver autonomous 1-Hz experimental vector...... geographical distribution of the selected data set (essentially due to a lack of availability of data at high northern latitude satisfying nighttime conditions at the end of the time period considered). These appear to be comparable to differences classically observed among IGRF candidate models...

  17. Atomic Action Refinement in Model Based Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bijl, H.M.; Rensink, Arend; Tretmans, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    In model based testing (MBT) test cases are derived from a specification of the system that we want to test. In general the specification is more abstract than the implementation. This may result in 1) test cases that are not executable, because their actions are too abstract (the implementation

  18. Digital Fluxgate Magnetometer for Detection of Microvibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menghui Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In engineering practice, instruments, such as accelerometer and laser interferometer, are widely used in vibration measurement of structural parts. A method for using a triaxial fluxgate magnetometer as a microvibration sensor to measure low-frequency pendulum microvibration (not translational vibration is proposed in this paper, so as to detect vibration from low-frequency vibration sources, such as large rotating machine, large engineering structure, earthquake, and microtremor. This method provides vibration detection based on the environmental magnetic field signal to avoid increased measurement difficulty and error due to different relative positions of permanent magnet and magnetometer on the device under test (DUT when using the original magnetic measurement method. After fixedly connecting the fluxgate probe with the DUT during the test, the angular displacement due to vibration can be deduced by measuring the geomagnetic field’s magnetic induction intensity change on the orthogonal three components during the vibration. The test shows that the microvibration sensor has angular resolution of over 0.05° and maximum measuring frequency of 64 Hz. As an exploring test aimed to detect the microvibration of earth-orbiting satellite in the in-orbit process, the simulation experiment successfully provides the real-time microvibration information for attitude and orbit control subsystem.

  19. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  20. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  1. Composite Rolled Magnetometer and Instrument Boom Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Magnetometers are the most common instrument flown on NASA science missions and interference from onboard electronics requires that these instruments be deployed...

  2. Preliminary Report: DESiGN and Test Result of KSR-3 Rocket Magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Min Kim

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The solar wind contributes to the formation of unique space environment called the Earth's magnetosphere by various interactions with the Earth's magnetic field. Thus the solar-terrestrial environment affects the Earth's magnetic field, which can be observed with an instrument for the magnetic field measurement, the magnetometer usually mounted on the rocket and the satellite and based on the ground observatory. The magnetometer is a useful instrument for the spacecraft attitude control as well as the Earth's magnetic field measurements for a scientific purpose. In this paper, we present the preliminary design and test results of the two onboard magnetometers of KARI's (Korea Aerospace Research Institute sounding rocket, KSR-3, which will be launched four times during the period of 2001-02. The KSR-3 magnetometers consist of the fluxgate magnetometer, MAG/AIM (Attitude Information Magnetometer for acquiring the rocket flight attitude information, and of the search-coil magnetometer, MAG/SIM (Scientific Investigation Magnetometer for the observation of the Earth's magnetic field fluctuations. With the MAG/AIM, the 3-axis attitude information can be acquired by the comparison of the resulting dc magnetic vector field with the IGRF (International Geomagnetic Reference Field. The Earth's magnetic field fluctuations ranging from 10 to 1,000 Hz can also be observed with the MAG/SIM measurement.

  3. Automated system for the calibration of magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrucha, Vojtech; Kaspar, Petr; Ripka, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    University. There are three axes of rotation in this design (compared to two axes in the previous version). The addition of the third axis allows us to calibrate more complex devices. An electronic compass based on a vector fluxgate magnetometer and micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometer...... is one example. The new platform can also be used to evaluate the parameters of the compass in all possible variations in azimuth, pitch, and roll. The system is based on piezoelectric motors, which are placed on a platform made of aluminum, brass, plastic, and glass. Position sensing is accomplished...... through custom-made optical incremental sensors. The system is controlled by a microcontroller, which executes commands from a computer. The properties of the system as well as calibration and measurement results will be presented. ©2009 American Institute of Physics...

  4. Modeling and optimizing of the random atomic spin gyroscope drift based on the atomic spin gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Wei; Lv, Lin; Liu, Baiqi

    2014-11-01

    In order to improve the atom spin gyroscope's operational accuracy and compensate the random error caused by the nonlinear and weak-stability characteristic of the random atomic spin gyroscope (ASG) drift, the hybrid random drift error model based on autoregressive (AR) and genetic programming (GP) + genetic algorithm (GA) technique is established. The time series of random ASG drift is taken as the study object. The time series of random ASG drift is acquired by analyzing and preprocessing the measured data of ASG. The linear section model is established based on AR technique. After that, the nonlinear section model is built based on GP technique and GA is used to optimize the coefficients of the mathematic expression acquired by GP in order to obtain a more accurate model. The simulation result indicates that this hybrid model can effectively reflect the characteristics of the ASG's random drift. The square error of the ASG's random drift is reduced by 92.40%. Comparing with the AR technique and the GP + GA technique, the random drift is reduced by 9.34% and 5.06%, respectively. The hybrid modeling method can effectively compensate the ASG's random drift and improve the stability of the system.

  5. Modeling and optimizing of the random atomic spin gyroscope drift based on the atomic spin gyroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Wei; Lv, Lin, E-mail: lvlinlch1990@163.com; Liu, Baiqi [School of Instrument Science and Opto-Electronics Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-11-15

    In order to improve the atom spin gyroscope's operational accuracy and compensate the random error caused by the nonlinear and weak-stability characteristic of the random atomic spin gyroscope (ASG) drift, the hybrid random drift error model based on autoregressive (AR) and genetic programming (GP) + genetic algorithm (GA) technique is established. The time series of random ASG drift is taken as the study object. The time series of random ASG drift is acquired by analyzing and preprocessing the measured data of ASG. The linear section model is established based on AR technique. After that, the nonlinear section model is built based on GP technique and GA is used to optimize the coefficients of the mathematic expression acquired by GP in order to obtain a more accurate model. The simulation result indicates that this hybrid model can effectively reflect the characteristics of the ASG's random drift. The square error of the ASG's random drift is reduced by 92.40%. Comparing with the AR technique and the GP + GA technique, the random drift is reduced by 9.34% and 5.06%, respectively. The hybrid modeling method can effectively compensate the ASG's random drift and improve the stability of the system.

  6. A ocean bottom vector magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaomei; Teng, Yuntian; Wang, Chen; Ma, Jiemei

    2017-04-01

    The new development instrument with a compact spherical coil system and Overhauser magnetometer for measuring the total strength of the magnetic field and the vectors of strength, Delta inclination - Delta declination, meanwhile we also use a triaxial fluxgate instrument of the traditional instrument for geomagnetic vector filed measurement. The advantages of this method are be calibrated by each other and get good performances with automatic operation, good stability and high resolution. Firstly, a brief description of the instrument measurement principles and the key technologies are given. The instrument used a spherical coil system with 34 coils to product the homogeneous volume inside the coils which is large enough to accommodate the sensor of Overhauser total field sensor; the rest of the footlocker-sized ocean-bottom vector magnetometer consists of equipment to run the sensors and records its data (batteries and a data logger), weight to sink it to the sea floor, a remote-controlled acoustic release and flotation to bring the instrument back to the surface. Finally, the accuracy of the instrument was tested in the Geomagnetic station, and the measurement accuracies of total strength and components were better than 0.2nT and 1nT respectively. The figure 1 shows the development instrument structure. it includes six thick glass spheres which protect the sensor, data logger and batteries from the pressures of the deep sea, meanwhile they also provide recycling positive buoyancy; To cushion the glass, the spheres then go inside yellow plastic "hardhats". The triaxial fluxgate is inside No.1 glass spheres, data logger and batteries are inside No.2 glass spheres, the new vector sensor is inside No.3 glass spheres, acoustic communication unit is inside No.4 glass spheres, No.5 and No.6 glass spheres are empty which only provide recycling positive buoyancy. The figure 2 shows the development instrument Physical photo.

  7. [Measurement of atomic number of alkali vapor and pressure of buffer gas based on atomic absorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui-jie; Quan, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivitymagnetic measurementscanbe achieved by utilizing atomic spinmanipulation in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) regime, which uses an alkali cell as a sensing element. The atomic number density of the alkali vapor and the pressure of the buffer gasare among the most important parameters of the cell andrequire accurate measurement. A method has been proposed and developedto measure the atomic number density and the pressure based on absorption spectroscopy, by sweeping the absorption line and fittingthe experiment data with a Lorentzian profile to obtainboth parameters. Due to Doppler broadening and pressure broadening, which is mainly dominated by the temperature of the cell and the pressure of buffer gas respectively, this work demonstrates a simulation of the errorbetween the peaks of the Lorentzian profile and the Voigt profile caused by bothfactors. The results indicates that the Doppler broadening contribution is insignificant with an error less than 0.015% at 313-513 K for a 4He density of 2 amg, and an error of 0.1% in the presence of 0.6-5 amg at 393 K. We conclude that the Doppler broadening could be ignored under above conditions, and that the Lorentzianprofile is suitably applied to fit the absorption spectrumobtainingboth parameters simultaneously. In addition we discuss the resolution and the instability due to thelight source, wavelength and the temperature of the cell. We find that the cell temperature, whose uncertainty is two orders of magnitude larger than the instability of the light source and the wavelength, is one of the main factors which contributes to the error.

  8. Simulations of Ground and Space-Based Oxygen Atom Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, T. K.; Cline, J. A.; Braunstein, M.

    2002-01-01

    Fast, pulsed atomic oxygen sources are a key tool in ground-based investigations of spacecraft contamination and surface erosion effects. These technically challenging ground-based studies provide a before and after picture of materials under low-earth-orbit (LEO) conditions. It would be of great interest to track in real time the pulsed flux from the source to the surface sample target and beyond in order to characterize the population of atoms and molecules that actually impact the surface and those that make it downstream to any coincident detectors. We have performed simulations in order to provide such detailed descriptions of these ground-based measurements and to provide an assessment of their correspondence to the actual LEO environment. Where possible we also make comparisons to measured fluxes and erosion yields. To perform the calculations we use a detailed description of a measurement beam and surface geometry based on the W, pulsed apparatus at Montana State University. In this system, a short pulse (on the order of 10 microseconds) of an O/O2 beam impacts a flat sample about 40 cm downstream and slightly displaced &om the beam s central axis. Past this target, at the end of the beam axis is a quadrupole mass spectrometer that measures the relative in situ flux of 0102 to give an overall normalized erosion yield. In our simulations we use the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, and track individual atoms within the atomic oxygen pulse. DSMC techniques are typically used to model rarefied (few collision) gas-flows which occur at altitudes above approximately 110 kilometers. These techniques are well suited for the conditions here, and multi-collision effects that can only be treated by this or a similar technique are included. This simulation includes collisions with the surface and among gas atoms that have scattered from the surface. The simulation also includes descriptions of the velocity spread and spatial profiles of the O/O2 beam

  9. Heisenberg-limited atom clocks based on entangled qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, E M; Kómár, P; Bishof, M; Jiang, L; Sørensen, A S; Ye, J; Lukin, M D

    2014-05-16

    We present a quantum-enhanced atomic clock protocol based on groups of sequentially larger Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states that achieves the best clock stability allowed by quantum theory up to a logarithmic correction. Importantly the protocol is designed to work under realistic conditions where the drift of the phase of the laser interrogating the atoms is the main source of decoherence. The simultaneous interrogation of the laser phase with a cascade of GHZ states realizes an incoherent version of the phase estimation algorithm that enables Heisenberg-limited operation while extending the coherent interrogation time beyond the laser noise limit. We compare and merge the new protocol with existing state of the art interrogation schemes, and identify the precise conditions under which entanglement provides an advantage for clock stabilization: it allows a significant gain in the stability for short averaging time.

  10. Magnetometer Data recovered from 35mm film

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The L57 CDMP recovery project takes magnetometer data on 35mm film stored at the archive's climate controlled warehouse and digitizes them.

  11. GALILEO MAGNETOMETER CRUISE DATA (RTN COORDINATES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains data acquired by the Galileo Magnetometer during the Interplanetary Cruise to Jupiter. The data are at varying resolution depending on the...

  12. Optically-Modulated Miniature Magnetometer (OMMM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Design, fabricate, and calibrate a compact helium magnetometer for high-accuracy measurements of Earth’s magnetic field Provide vector and scalar measurements...

  13. ICE MAGNETOMETER DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — These data were obtained from the JPL magnetometer experiment on ICE (Principal Investigator: E.J. Smith produces three, high-accuracy, triaxial measurements per...

  14. Cryogenic pulsed inductive microwave magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, A. B.; Nibarger, J. P.; Lopusnik, R.; Silva, T. J.; Celinski, Z.

    2003-05-01

    A cryogenic pulsed inductive microwave magnetometer is used to characterize the switching dynamics in thin-film magnetic materials at low temperatures and microwave frequencies. The system is contained inside a 20-cm-diam ultrahigh vacuum chamber and cooled by a cryopump that allows measurements between 20 and 350 K. A temperature controller regulates the sample temperature using two silicon diodes as sensors. Applied magnetic fields of up to 36 kA/m (450 Oe) are generated by a four-pole, water-cooled electromagnet with independent control of each axis. Magnetic switching in the sample is driven by high-speed current step pulses in a coplanar waveguide structure with the sample placed in a flip-chip configuration. A 20 GHz sampling oscilloscope is used to record the dynamics of the magnetic reorientation. The switching dynamics are given for a 10-nm-thick Ni-Fe film at 30 K in response to a 1 kA/m field step.

  15. All-optical, Three-axis Fiber Laser Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    force acting on a current carrying bridge in the presence of a magnetic field, which drives its oscillation measured with a fiber laser strain sensor... strain between two cores as a function of rotation for difference inclinations and (b) reported inclination vs. actual inclination for a bend angle of...such as those based on SQUIDS, giant magnetoresistance (GMR), scalar resonance magnetometers, and flux-gates; however, a fiber optic sensor enables

  16. Quantum assisted enhancement of optical magnetometer with squeezed vacuum in hot Rb vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy; Horrom, Travis; Singh, Robinjeet

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate enhancement to the sensitivity of an optical magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical Faraday effect in ^87Rb vapor with the use of squeezed vacuum. We generate quantum squeezed vacuum states via the polarization self-rotation effect in hot ^87Rb vapor exhibiting noise spectrum suppression ranging from frequencies of a few hundred Hz to several MHz. Injection of such squeezed states into a magneto-optical magnetometer provides broad band noise suppression of close to 2 dB. We study various parameters of the magnetometer such as Rb cell temperature, pump power, and the noise spectrum of the probe signal to identify the most favorable conditions for quantum enhanced magnetometry. Our experimental arrangement offers potential quantum improvement to the most sensitive magnetometers at frequencies down to hundreds of Hz, which can be useful for biological, geophysical, medical, or military sensing applications.

  17. Hansteen's magnetometer and the origin of the magnetic crusade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enebakk, Vidar

    2014-12-01

    In the early nineteenth century, Norwegian mathematician and astronomer Christopher Hansteen (1784-1873) contributed significantly to international collaboration in the study of terrestrial magnetism. In particular, Hansteen was influential in the origin and orientation of the magnetic lobby in Britain, a campaign which resulted in a global network of fixed geomagnetic observatories. In retrospect, however, his contribution was diminished, because his four-pole theory in Untersuchungen der Magnetismus der Erde (1819) was ultimately refuted by Carl Friedrich Gauss in Allgemeine Theorie des Erdmagnetismus (1839). Yet Hansteen's main contribution was practical rather than theoretical. His major impact was related to the circulation of his instruments and techniques. From the mid-1820s, 'Hansteen's magnetometer' was distributed all over the British Isles and throughout the international scientific community devoted to studying terrestrial magnetism. Thus in the decades before the magnetic crusade, Hansteen had established an international system of observation, standardization and representation based on measurements with his small and portable magnetometers.

  18. Searching for axion stars and Q-balls with a terrestrial magnetometer network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson Kimball, D. F. [Cal State, East Bay; Budker, D. [UC, Berkeley; Eby, J. [Fermilab; Pospelov, M. [Perimeter Inst. Theor. Phys.; Pustelny, S. [Jagiellonian U.; Scholtes, T. [Fribourg U.; Stadnik, Y. V. [Helmholtz Inst., Mainz; Weis, A. [Fribourg U.; Wickenbrock, A. [Mainz U.

    2017-10-11

    Light (pseudo-)scalar fields are promising candidates to be the dark matter in the Universe. Under certain initial conditions in the early Universe and/or with certain types of self-interactions, they can form compact dark-matter objects such as axion stars or Q-balls. Direct encounters with such objects can be searched for by using a global network of atomic magnetometers. It is shown that for a range of masses and radii not ruled out by existing observations, the terrestrial encounter rate with axion stars or Q-balls can be sufficiently high (at least once per year) for a detection. Furthermore, it is shown that a global network of atomic magnetometers is sufficiently sensitive to pseudoscalar couplings to atomic spins so that a transit through an axion star or Q-ball could be detected over a broad range of unexplored parameter space.

  19. Light-shift measurement and suppression in atomic spin gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wan, Shuangai; Chen, Yao; Li, Rujie

    2012-11-01

    We present a method to determine and suppress the light shift in an atomic spin gyroscope. This method doesn't require additional drive source or frequency modulation, and it is based on the dynamics of an atomic spin gyroscope to determine a clean curve as a function of the frequency of the pump beam that predicts the zero light shift. We experimentally validate the method in a Cs-(129)Xe atomic spin gyroscope and verify the results through numerical simulations. This method can also be applied to an atomic spin magnetometer based on the spin-exchange relaxation-free exchange that experiences light shift. The method is useful for atomic spin devices because it can improve long-term performance and reduce the influence of the laser.

  20. The Upgraded CARISMA Magnetometer Array in the THEMIS Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, I. R.; Milling, D. K.; Rae, I. J.; Ozeke, L. G.; Kale, A.; Kale, Z. C.; Murphy, K. R.; Parent, A.; Usanova, M.; Pahud, D. M.; Lee, E.-A.; Amalraj, V.; Wallis, D. D.; Angelopoulos, V.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Russell, C. T.; Auster, H.-U.; Singer, H. J.

    2008-12-01

    This review describes the infrastructure and capabilities of the expanded and upgraded Canadian Array for Realtime InvestigationS of Magnetic Activity (CARISMA) magnetometer array in the era of the THEMIS mission. Formerly operated as the Canadian Auroral Network for the OPEN Program Unified Study (CANOPUS) magnetometer array until 2003, CARISMA capabilities have been extended with the deployment of additional fluxgate magnetometer stations (to a total of 28), the upgrading of the fluxgate magnetometer cadence to a standard data product of 1 sample/s (raw sampled 8 samples/s data stream available on request), and the deployment of a new network of 8 pairs of induction coils (100 samples per second). CARISMA data, GPS-timed and backed up at remote field stations, is collected using Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) satellite internet in real-time providing a real-time monitor for magnetic activity on a continent-wide scale. Operating under the magnetic footprint of the THEMIS probes, data from 5 CARISMA stations at 29-30 samples/s also forms part of the formal THEMIS ground-based observatory (GBO) data-stream. In addition to technical details, in this review we also outline some of the scientific capabilities of the CARISMA array for addressing all three of the scientific objectives of the THEMIS mission, namely: 1. Onset and evolution of the macroscale substorm instability, 2. Production of storm-time MeV electrons, and 3. Control of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling by the bow shock, magnetosheath, and magnetopause. We further discuss some of the compelling questions related to these three THEMIS mission science objectives which can be addressed with CARISMA.

  1. Noise characterization for the FID signal from proton precession magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Dong, H.; Liu, Z.; Ge, J.; Bai, B.; Zhang, C.

    2017-07-01

    Proton precession magnetometer is a high-precision device for weak magnetostatic field measurement. The measurement accuracy depends on the frequency measurement of free induction decay (FID) signal, while the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is an important factor affecting the results. Many signal processing methods have been proposed to improve the SNR of FID signal. However, the theoretical analysis of different types of noises for FID signal has not be conducted yet. In addition, the relationship between the frequency measurement accuracy and SNR has not been explicitly established and quantified. This paper first proposes a background noise model based on the extracted features from the FID signal. With this model, background noises, such as white noise, narrow-band noise, and phase noise etc., can be calculated and estimated. Secondly, the relationship between the frequency measurement accuracy and SNR is identified. We also built a prototype proton magnetometer for field tests and validation purpose. Experiments were conducted to investigate this relation through simulation. Different values for frequency accuracy were obtained with different SNRs from the acquired FID signals from field tests. The consistence between the measurement and computational results is observed. When SNR is larger than 30 dB, the absolute frequency accuracy becomes constant which is about 0.04 Hz. With the stability taken into account, the accuracy can be better even when the SNR is higher than 30 dB. This study provides a reference to optimize the design of proton precession magnetometer and the frequency calculation for FID signal.

  2. An all-atom structure-based potential for proteins: bridging minimal models with all-atom empirical forcefields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, Paul C; Noel, Jeffrey K; Gosavi, Shachi; Schug, Alexander; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y; Onuchic, José N

    2009-05-01

    Protein dynamics take place on many time and length scales. Coarse-grained structure-based (Go) models utilize the funneled energy landscape theory of protein folding to provide an understanding of both long time and long length scale dynamics. All-atom empirical forcefields with explicit solvent can elucidate our understanding of short time dynamics with high energetic and structural resolution. Thus, structure-based models with atomic details included can be used to bridge our understanding between these two approaches. We report on the robustness of folding mechanisms in one such all-atom model. Results for the B domain of Protein A, the SH3 domain of C-Src Kinase, and Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 are reported. The interplay between side chain packing and backbone folding is explored. We also compare this model to a C(alpha) structure-based model and an all-atom empirical forcefield. Key findings include: (1) backbone collapse is accompanied by partial side chain packing in a cooperative transition and residual side chain packing occurs gradually with decreasing temperature, (2) folding mechanisms are robust to variations of the energetic parameters, (3) protein folding free-energy barriers can be manipulated through parametric modifications, (4) the global folding mechanisms in a C(alpha) model and the all-atom model agree, although differences can be attributed to energetic heterogeneity in the all-atom model, and (5) proline residues have significant effects on folding mechanisms, independent of isomerization effects. Because this structure-based model has atomic resolution, this work lays the foundation for future studies to probe the contributions of specific energetic factors on protein folding and function.

  3. The low cost Proton Precession Magnetometer developed at the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahavarkar, P.; Singh, S.; Labde, S.; Dongre, V.; Patil, A.

    2017-05-01

    Proton magnetometers are the oldest scalar magnetometers. The first commercial units were produced in early 1960s as portable instruments. In continuation airborne instruments appeared with optimized speed of readings and sensitivity, large sensors etc. Later development of Overhauser and optically pumped magnetometers has eliminated Proton magnetometers from airborne surveys. However they remain very popular in various ground surveys and observatories. With this primary purpose of generating the ground based magnetic data, the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism (IIG) for the last 3 decades have been developing low cost Proton Precession Magnetometers (PPM). Beginning with the 1 nT PPM which has undergone several changes in design, the successor PM7 the advanced version has been successfully developed by the institute and is installed at various observatories of the institute. PM7 records the total field `F' with accuracy of 0.1 nT and a sampling rate of 10 seconds/sample. This article briefly discusses the design and development of this IIG make PM7 and compares the data recorded by this instrument with one of the commercially available Overhauser magnetometer in the world market. The quality of data recorded by PM7 is in excellent agreement with the Overhauser. With the available quality of data generated by this instrument, PM7 is an affordable PPM for scientific institutions, schools and colleges intending to carry out geomagnetic studies. The commercial cost of PM7 is ≈ 20% of the cost of Overhauser available in market.

  4. Atomic Magnetometry in the Lab, in the Field, and in the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, B.; Versolato, O.; Hovde, C.; Rochester, S.; Higbie, J.; Budker, D.

    2012-12-01

    Atomic magnetometers [1] have played an important role in geophysical research ever since their advent more than fifty years ago. They have been used in near-surface magnetic surveys, aboard ionospheric sounding rockets, and have been critical in satellite missions dedicated to precise geophysical field mapping [2]. Over the past decade, renewed interest in atomic magnetometers has led to dramatically improved sensitivity in laboratory devices. The best alkali-vapor magnetometers, operating in magnetically shielded low-field environments, can now achieve sensitivities better than 1 femtotesla in a one-second measurement [3]. The precision of atomic magnetometers operating at Earth's field, on the other hand, has lagged in comparison. We will review recent efforts to achieve better sensitivity and accuracy in all-optical alkali-vapor magnetometers operating in geophysical field ranges. Advances in laser technology, antirelaxation vapor-cell coatings [4], and optical pumping techniques have resulted in better fundamental precision and dramatically reduced systematic error in these devices. The result is a new generation of compact, low-cost, and low-power sensors which are well suited for geophysical research. In addition to these developments, we will also discuss the potential for fully remote atom-based magnetic measurements [5]. This includes a proposed scheme to measure the magnetic field within the mesospheric sodium layer using existing laser guide star technology [6]. This technique would allow magnetic surveying at length and time scales heretofore inaccessible, and would yield data relevant to magnetic anomaly mapping, ionospheric physics, ocean circulation models, and lithospheric magnetization studies. [1] Budker, D., and M. Romalis (2007), Optical magnetometry, Nat. Phys., 3(4), 227-234. [2] Ravat, D., et al. (1995), Global vector and scalar Magsat magnetic anomaly maps, J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth, 100(B10), 20111-20136. [3] Dang, H. B., et al. (2010

  5. Design and simulation of MEMS capacitive magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti, Aditi, Tripathi, C. C.; Gopal, Ram

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design and simulation of a MEMS Capacitive Magnetometer using FEM (Finite Element Method) tool COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3b and results from this simulation are closely matched with analytically calculated results. A comb drive structure is used for actuation purpose which operates at resonant frequency of device is 11.791 kHz to achieve maximum displacement. A magnetic field in z-axis can be detected by this comb drive structure. Quality factor of MEMS capacitive magnetometer obtained is 18 and it has good linear response in the magnetic field range of 100 µT.

  6. VALD-2: Progress of the Vienna Atomic Line Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupka, F.; Piskunov, N.; Ryabchikova, T. A.; Stempels, H. C.; Weiss, W. W.

    1999-07-01

    We describe the updated version of the Vienna Atomic Line Data Base (VALD, \\cite[Piskunov et al. 1995)]{pis95} which represents a considerable improvement over the first installation from 1994. The original line lists have been complemented with critically evaluated data obtained from experimental measurements and theoretical calculations which are necessary for computing state-of-the-art line opacities in stellar atmospheres, as well as for synthesizing spectra for high precision analyses. In this paper, we present new and improved data sets for neutral species and ions of Si, P, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Ru, Xe, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Re, Pt, Au, Hg, and Pb. For some species data are available in VALD for the first time. We explain our choice of quality rankings by reviewing the literature for the new data and by comparison with source lists included into VALD. For some cases, we produced new line data by weighted averaging of data from different sources with individual error estimates in order to increase the reliability of VALD line lists. Software modifications allow remote users of VALD to specify individual extraction parameters as an alternative to the default settings of the VALD team and to have direct control over the quality ranking of line data. A World-Wide-Web interface is described which provides easy access to all new features. To simplify proper crediting of all authors of atomic data, VALD now includes a compilation of all publications used in each type of reply. Finally, we briefly discuss the future roadmap of VALD developments, including the incorporation of molecular transitions and integration with external data bases. http://www.astro.univie.ac.at/~vald http://www.astro.uu.se/~vald

  7. Atomic force microscopy-based characterization and design of biointerfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsteens, David; Gaub, Hermann E.; Newton, Richard; Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J.

    2017-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based methods have matured into a powerful nanoscopic platform, enabling the characterization of a wide range of biological and synthetic biointerfaces ranging from tissues, cells, membranes, proteins, nucleic acids and functional materials. Although the unprecedented signal-to-noise ratio of AFM enables the imaging of biological interfaces from the cellular to the molecular scale, AFM-based force spectroscopy allows their mechanical, chemical, conductive or electrostatic, and biological properties to be probed. The combination of AFM-based imaging and spectroscopy structurally maps these properties and allows their 3D manipulation with molecular precision. In this Review, we survey basic and advanced AFM-related approaches and evaluate their unique advantages and limitations in imaging, sensing, parameterizing and designing biointerfaces. It is anticipated that in the next decade these AFM-related techniques will have a profound influence on the way researchers view, characterize and construct biointerfaces, thereby helping to solve and address fundamental challenges that cannot be addressed with other techniques.

  8. Compact atomic clock prototype based on coherent population trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danet Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toward the next generations of compact atomic clocks, clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT offer a very interesting alternative. Thanks to CPT, a quantum interfering process, this technology has made a decisive step in the miniaturization direction. Fractional frequency stability of 1.5x10-10 at 1 s has been demonstrated in commercial devices of a few cm3. The laboratory prototype presented here intends to explore what could be the ultimate stability of a CPT based device. To do so, an original double-Λ optical scheme and a pulsed interrogation have been implemented in order to get a good compromise between contrast and linewidth. A study of two main sources of noise, the relative intensity and the local oscillator (LO noise, has been performed. By designing simple solutions, it led to a new fractional frequency limitation lower than 4x10-13 at 1 s integration. Such a performance proves that such a technology could rival with classical ones as double resonance clocks.

  9. Atomic Structures of Molecules Based on Additivity of Atomic and/or Ionic Radii

    OpenAIRE

    Raji Heyrovska; Sara Narayan

    2009-01-01

    The authors have shown in recent years that interatomic and interionic distances are sums of the radii of the adjacent atoms and/or ions. Many examples will be provided and it will be shown how the experimental bond lengths agree with the radii sums. The examples include inorganic compounds like alkali halides, metal hydrides, graphene, etc., organic like aliphatic and aromatic compounds and biochemical like nucleic acids, amino acids, caffeine-related compounds and vitamins.

  10. Atomic magnetic gradiometer for room temperature high sensitivity magnetic field detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shoujun [Berkeley, CA; Lowery, Thomas L [Belmont, MA; Budker, Dmitry [El Cerrito, CA; Yashchuk, Valeriy V [Richmond, CA; Wemmer, David E [Berkeley, CA; Pines, Alexander [Berkeley, CA

    2009-08-11

    A laser-based atomic magnetometer (LBAM) apparatus measures magnetic fields, comprising: a plurality of polarization detector cells to detect magnetic fields; a laser source optically coupled to the polarization detector cells; and a signal detector that measures the laser source after being coupled to the polarization detector cells, which may be alkali cells. A single polarization cell may be used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by prepolarizing the nuclear spins of an analyte, encoding spectroscopic and/or spatial information, and detecting NMR signals from the analyte with a laser-based atomic magnetometer to form NMR spectra and/or magnetic resonance images (MRI). There is no need of a magnetic field or cryogenics in the detection step, as it is detected through the LBAM.

  11. Atomic force microscopy-based shape analysis of heart mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become an important medical and biological tool for the noninvasive imaging of cells and biomaterials in medical, biological, and biophysical research. The major advantages of AFM over conventional optical and electron microscopes for bio-imaging include the facts that no special coating is required and that imaging can be done in all environments-air, vacuum, or aqueous conditions. In addition, it can also precisely determine pico-nano Newton force interactions between the probe tip and the sample surface from force-distance curve measurements.It is widely known that mitochondrial swelling is one of the most important indicators of the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. As mitochondrial swelling is an ultrastructural change, quantitative analysis of this change requires high-resolution microscopic methods such as AFM. Here, we describe the use of AFM-based shape analysis for the characterization of nanostructural changes in heart mitochondria resulting from myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  12. Spin Squeezing and Entanglement with Room Temperature Atoms for Quantum Sensing and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Heng

    magnetometer at room temperature is reported. Furthermore, using spin-squeezing of atomic ensemble, the sensitivity of magnetometer is improved. Deterministic continuous variable teleportation between two distant atomic ensembles is demonstrated. The fidelity of teleportating dynamically changing sequence...... of spin states surpasses a classical benchmark, demonstrating the true quantum teleportation....

  13. Optical dipole mirror for cold atoms based on a metallic diffraction grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawalec, Tomasz; Bartoszek-Bober, Dobroslawa; Panas, Roman

    We report on the realization of a plasmonic dipole mirror for cold atoms based on a metallic grating coupler. A cloud of atoms is reflected by the repulsive potential generated by surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited on a reflection gold grating by a 780 nm laser beam. Experimentally...... and numerically determined mirror efficiencies are close to 100%. The intensity of SPPs above a real grating coupler and the atomic trajectories, as well as the momentum dispersion of the atom cloud being reflected, are computed. A suggestion is given as to how the plasmonic mirror might serve as an optical atom...

  14. Optical dipole mirror for cold atoms based on a metallic diffraction grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawalec, Tomasz; Bartoszek-Bober, Dobroslawa; Panas, Roman

    2014-01-01

    We report on the realization of a plasmonic dipole mirror for cold atoms based on a metallic grating coupler. A cloud of atoms is reflected by the repulsive potential generated by surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited on a reflection gold grating by a 780 nm laser beam. Experimentally...... and numerically determined mirror efficiencies are close to 100%. The intensity of SPPs above a real grating coupler and the atomic trajectories, as well as the momentum dispersion of the atom cloud being reflected, are computed. A suggestion is given as to how the plasmonic mirror might serve as an optical atom...

  15. Progress toward observation of quantum interference of currents in an Atom SQUID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Changhyun; Samson, E. Carlo; Boshier, Malcolm

    2016-05-01

    Quantum interference of currents was first observed in a superconducting loop with two Josephson junctions, leading to the name ``SQUID'' for this device. This interference effect has been used to develop extremely sensitive magnetometers. The Atom SQUID, an analogous device based on ultracold atoms, has been developed recently to study SQUID physics in a device offering a better understanding of the underlying microscopic dynamics. Although many exciting experiments have been done with Atom SQUIDs, the quantum interference of currents has not yet been observed. In analogy with the SQUID magnetometer, it should be possible to use the quantum interference effect in an Atom SQUID to measure rotation, which may lead to the development of a sensitive gyroscope. In a previous experiment, we showed Josephson effects with an atom SQUID by observing the change from the dc Josephson regime to the ac Josephson regime by measurement of the critical atom number for this transition. Quantum interference should cause this critical atom number to vary with rotation rate. We have simulated this system with the Gross-Pitaevski Equation and found the expected oscillatory change of the critical atom number. We will present this simulation result and report the current status of our experiment to

  16. Analysis of Full-Coverage Magnetometer Data in Relation to Statistically-Based Site Characterization Tools: Pueblo Precision Bombing and Pattern Gunnery Range #2 ESTCP Wide Area Assessment Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    magnetometer transect survey data. Variograms for use in the kriging were developed for each specific transect scenario. Details regarding development of...survey could be used to focus additional survey work to better define the boundary of potential target areas or to reduce uncertainty in suspect

  17. Atom devices based on single dopants in silicon nanostructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moraru, Daniel; Udhiarto, Arief; Anwar, Miftahul; Nowak, Roland; Jablonski, Ryszard; Hamid, Earfan; Tarido, Juli Cha; Mizuno, Takeshi; Tabe, Michiharu

    2011-01-01

    .... In this work, we review our most recent studies on key atom devices with fundamental structures of silicon-on-insulator MOSFETs, such as single-dopant transistors, preliminary memory devices, single...

  18. Vector Magnetometer Application with Moving Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii Prystai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In magnetic prospecting the aeromagnetic survey is a widespread method used for research in large territories or in the areas with difficult access (forests, swamps, shallow waters. At present, a new type of mobile carriers – remotely piloted vehicles or drones – is becoming very common. The drones supplied by magnetometer can be also used for underground utility location (for example, steel and concrete constructions, buried power cables, to name a few. For aeromagnetic survey, obtaining of 3-component magnetic field data gives higher processing precision, so the fluxgate magnetometers (FGM seem to be the most preferable by reason of low weight, noise, power consumption and costs. During movement of FGM fixed to a drone practically permanent attitude changes in the Earth’s magnetic field arises with corresponding changes of its projection at FGM axes. Also the electromagnetic interference from the drone motor and uncontrolled oscillations of drone and suspension are the factors which limit the magnetometer sensitivity level. Aroused because of this, signals significantly exceed the expected signals from a studied object and so should be removed by proper interference filtration and use of stabilized towed construction, as well as at data processing. To find the necessary resolution threshold of a drone-portable FGM, the modeling was made to estimate magnetic field value from a small sphere about 1 cm radius at the minimal altitude of drone flight and it was shown that such a small object can be reliably detected if the FGM noise level is less than 0.15 nT. Next requirement is the necessity to decrease as much as possible the FGM power consumption with retention of low noise level. Finally, because of drone movement, the broadening of a frequency range should be done. The LEMI-026 magnetometer was developed satisfying all requirements to the drone-mounted device. The field tests were successfully performed using two of LEMI-026

  19. A Web Server for MACCS Magnetometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretson, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG5-3719 was provided to Augsburg College to support the development of a web server for the Magnetometer Array for Cusp and Cleft Studies (MACCS), a two-dimensional array of fluxgate magnetometers located at cusp latitudes in Arctic Canada. MACCS was developed as part of the National Science Foundation's GEM (Geospace Environment Modeling) Program, which was designed in part to complement NASA's Global Geospace Science programs during the decade of the 1990s. This report describes the successful use of these grant funds to support a working web page that provides both daily plots and file access to any user accessing the worldwide web. The MACCS home page can be accessed at http://space.augsburg.edu/space/MaccsHome.html.

  20. Design, Construction, and Testing of MOKE Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Tighe; Miller, Casey W.

    We report on the construction of a transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) magnetometer using various optical and electrical components. Uniquely, our MOKE magnetometer is able to sweep the magnetic field at frequencies greater than one Hz using lock in amplifiers to simultaneously sample the photodetector and the Hall sensor. The buffer of a lock-in amplifier allows for 512 samples per second, which allow us to rapidly sweep the magnetic field without loss of resolution. This drastically cuts down on the time taken per scan. To demonstrate the MOKE's capabilities, scans were performed on multiple thin film magnetic structures, both with and without significant magnetic anisotropy. We were able to measure room temperature hysteresis loops of ferromagnets, such as Ni80Fe20. Our sample rotation capabilities allowed us to study the angular dependence of the exchange and magnetocrystalline anisotropy in bilayer structures. Supported by NSF 1515677.

  1. Single-atom based coherent quantum interference device structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naydenov, Borislav; Rungger, Ivan; Mantega, Mauro; Sanvito, Stefano; Boland, John J

    2015-05-13

    We describe the fabrication, operation principles, and simulation of a coherent single-atom quantum interference device (QID) structure on Si(100) controlled by the properties of single atoms. The energy and spatial distribution of the wave functions associated with the device are visualized by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and the amplitude and phase of the evanescent wave functions that couple into the quantum well states are directly measured, including the action of an electrostatic gate. Density functional theory simulations were employed to simulate the electronic structure of the device structure, which is in excellent agreement with the measurements. Simulations of device transmission demonstrate that our coherent single-atom QID can have ON-OFF ratios in excess of 10(3) with potentially minimal power dissipation.

  2. Studies of Geomagnetic Pulsations Using Magnetometer Data from the CHAMP Low-Earth-Orbit Satellite and Ground-Based Stations: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P R Sutcliffe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We review research on geomagnetic pulsations carried out using magnetic field measurements from the CHAMP low-Earth-orbit (LEO satellite and ground-based stations in South Africa and Hungary. The high quality magnetic field measurements from CHAMP made it possible to extract and clearly resolve Pi2 and Pc3 pulsations in LEO satellite data. Our analyses for nighttime Pi2 pulsations are indicative of a cavity mode resonance. However, observations of daytime Pi2 pulsation events identified in ground station data show no convincing evidence of their occurrence in CHAMP data. We also studied low-latitude Pc3 pulsations and found that different types of field line resonant structure occur, namely discrete frequencies driven by a narrow band source and L-dependent frequencies driven by a broad band source.

  3. Accurate 3D Positioning for a Mobile Platform in Non-Line-of-Sight Scenarios Based on IMU/Magnetometer Sensor Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmers, Hendrik; Kasmi, Zakaria; Norrdine, Abdelmoumen; Eichhorn, Andreas

    2018-01-04

    In recent years, a variety of real-time applications benefit from services provided by localization systems due to the advent of sensing and communication technologies. Since the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) enables localization only outside buildings, applications for indoor positioning and navigation use alternative technologies. Ultra Wide Band Signals (UWB), Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN), ultrasonic or infrared are common examples. However, these technologies suffer from fading and multipath effects caused by objects and materials in the building. In contrast, magnetic fields are able to pass through obstacles without significant propagation errors, i.e. in Non-Line of Sight Scenarios (NLoS). The aim of this work is to propose a novel indoor positioning system based on artificially generated magnetic fields in combination with Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs). In order to reach a better coverage, multiple coils are used as reference points. A basic algorithm for three-dimensional applications is demonstrated as well as evaluated in this article. The established system is then realized by a sensor fusion principle as well as a kinematic motion model on the basis of a Kalman filter. Furthermore, a pressure sensor is used in combination with an adaptive filtering method to reliably estimate the platform's altitude.

  4. Initiating Heavy-atom Based Phasing by Multi-Dimensional Molecular Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu; Lykkegaard Karlsen, Jesper; Nissen, Poul

    2014-01-01

    To obtain an electron-density map from a macromolecular crystal the phase problem needs to be solved, which often involves the use of heavy-atom derivative crystals and concomitant heavy-atom substructure determination. This is typically performed by dual-space methods, direct methods or Patterson-based approaches, which however may fail when only poorly diffracting derivative crystals are available. This is often the case for, for example, membrane proteins. Here, an approach for heavy-atom ...

  5. Micromachined fountain pen for atomic force microscope-based nanopatterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deladi, S.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Berenschot, Johan W.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; de Boer, Meint J.; de Boer, J.H.; Péter, M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2004-01-01

    We present a tool that can be used in standard atomic force microscope and that enables chemical, chemical/mechanical, or physical surface modification using continuous liquid supply. The device consists of a reservoir micromachined into the probe support that is connected to fluidic channels

  6. An atom counting and electrophilicity based QSTR approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantitative-structure-toxicity-relationship (QSTR) models are developed for predicting the toxicity (pIGC50) of 252 aliphatic compounds on Tetrahymena pyriformis. The single parameter models with a simple molecular descriptor, the number of atoms in the molecule, provide reasonable results. Better QSTR models with ...

  7. New vector/scalar Overhauser DNP magnetometers POS-4 for magnetic observatories and directional oil drilling support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapunov V.A., Denisov A.Y., Saveliev D.V., Soloviev A.A., Khomutov S.Y., Borodin P.B., Narkhov E.D., Sergeev A.V., Shirokov A.N.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper covers same results of the research directed at developing an absolute vector proton magnetometer POS-4 based on the switching bias magnetic fields methods. Due to the high absolute precision and stability magnetometer POS-4 found application not only for observatories and to directional drilling support of oi and gas well. Also we discuss the some basic errors of measurements and discuss the long-term experience in the testing of magnetic observatories ART and PARATUNKA.

  8. Accelerometer for Space Applications Based on Light-Pulse Atom Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to build a compact, high-precision single-axis accelerometer based on atom interferometry that is applicable to operation in space environments. Based on...

  9. Effect of mobility devices on orientation sensors that contain magnetometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendell, Cynthia; Lemaire, Edward D

    2009-01-01

    Orientation sensors containing magnetometers use the earth's magnetic field as a reference. Ferromagnetic objects may distort this magnetic field, leading to inaccurate orientation output. We explored the viability of these orientation sensors for motion analysis in an assistive mobility device rehabilitative setting. We attached two MTx orientation sensors (XSens; Enschade, the Netherlands), connected to the XBus Master data collection unit (XSens), to a plastic frame such that the relative angle between sensors was constant. We then moved a series of mobility devices in proximity to the plastic frame: two knee-ankle-foot orthoses (aluminum, stainless steel), one ankle-foot orthosis, two transtibial prostheses (exoskeletal, endoskeletal), two walkers (standard, Challenger Low Wide [Evolution Technologies; Port Coquitlam, Canada]), and two wheelchairs (Tango [OrthoFab; Quebec City, Canada], GTi [Quickie; Phoenix, Arizona]). For each mobility device, we calculated the average difference in relative angle between the baseline and peak angles for each of five trials. Errors ranged from less than 0.10 to 35.29 degrees, depending on the mobility device and frame positioning near the device. This demonstrated the large errors that can occur when magnetometer-based orientation sensors with mobility devices are used. While strategic orientation sensor placement on some mobility devices can minimize these errors to an acceptable level, testing protocols should be implemented to verify orientation sensor accuracy for these applications.

  10. Development of autonomous magnetometer rotorcraft for wide area assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelof Versteeg; Matt Anderson; Les Beard; Eric Corban; Darryl Curley; Jeff Gamey; Ross Johnson; Dwight Junkin; Mark McKay; Jared Salzmann; Mikhail Tchernychev; Suraj Unnikrishnan; Scott Vinson

    2010-04-01

    Large areas across the United States are potentially contaminated with UXO, with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with 1) near 100 % coverage and 2) near 100 % detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area assessment is a multi-level one, in which medium - altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry. Subsequent to this wide area assessment targeted surface investigations are performed using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be an effective tool for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 – 3 meters. These altitude requirements mean that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys (resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre). In addition, due to the low altitude there are substantial risks to pilots and equipment. Surface towed arrays provide high resolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. There is thus a need for other systems which can be used for effective data collection. An UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it reduces risk to operators, is lower in initial and Operational and Maintenance (O&M) costs (and can thus potentially be applied to smaller sites) and has the potential of being more effective in terms of detection and possibly characterization (through the use of

  11. A Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Fan; Taylor, Stephen F; Turner, Richard W; Lev, Benjamin L

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity, high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented DC-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides a 100x improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity over previous atomic scanning probe magnetometers. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnet...

  12. Accelerometer for Space Applications Based on Light-Pulse Atom Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design a compact, high-precision, single-axis accelerometer based on atom interferometry that is applicable to operation in space environments. Our...

  13. Continuous reading SQUID magnetometer and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janů, Zdeněk; Soukup, František

    2017-06-01

    We show a continuous reading superconducting quantum interference detector magnetometer used to measure the magnetic moment of small samples of materials as a function of an applied magnetic field, temperature, and time. A sample is held stationary while the magnetic field and sample temperature may be varied continuously in an arbitrary way, determined by the user. The applied field range is ±25 mT and the temperature range is 4.2-150 K. The advantage of a stationary sample technique is that the sample is not exposed to variations in the magnetic field or temperature, which may set in when the sample is moving. An evaluation of the measurements is not bound by the dipolar magnetic moment of the sample. High linearity of the detection system, low harmonic distortion of the applied time-varying magnetic field, and precise sample temperature control make this device suitable for studies of phase transitions, hysteretic phenomena, and nonlinear phenomena in magnetic materials and superconductors. The magnetometer's sensitivity (noise floor), i.e., magnetic moment noise spectral density, is 10 pA m2 Hz-1/2 in the white noise region.

  14. Comparative Sensitivities of Gravitational Wave Detectors Based on Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.; Thorpe, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe. Whether this potential advantage outweighs the additional complexity associated with including atom interferometers will require further study.

  15. Mercury Atomic Frequency Standards for Space Based Navigation and Timekeeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Burt, E. A.; Chung, S.; Hamell, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Tucker, B.; Cash, P.; Lutwak, R.

    2012-01-01

    A low power Mercury Atomic Frequency Standard (MAFS) has been developed and demonstrated on the path towards future space clock applications. A self contained mercury ion breadboard clock: emulating flight clock interfaces, steering a USO local oscillator, and consuming approx 40 Watts has been operating at JPL for more than a year. This complete, modular ion clock instrument demonstrates that key GNSS size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements can be achieved while still maintaining short and long term performance demonstrated in previous ground ion clocks. The MAFS breadboard serves as a flexible platform for optimizing further space clock development and guides engineering model design trades towards fabrication of an ion clock for space flight.

  16. Magnetometer for Balloons and UAVs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR project will investigate a new, low-cost approach to atomic magnetometry that is suited for operation from UAVs and research balloons. Atomic...

  17. Performance Improvement of Inertial Navigation System by Using Magnetometer with Vehicle Dynamic Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehee Won

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A navigation algorithm is proposed to increase the inertial navigation performance of a ground vehicle using magnetic measurements and dynamic constraints. The navigation solutions are estimated based on inertial measurements such as acceleration and angular velocity measurements. To improve the inertial navigation performance, a three-axis magnetometer is used to provide the heading angle, and nonholonomic constraints (NHCs are introduced to increase the correlation between the velocity and the attitude equation. The NHCs provide a velocity feedback to the attitude, which makes the navigation solution more robust. Additionally, an acceleration-based roll and pitch estimation is applied to decrease the drift when the acceleration is within certain boundaries. The magnetometer and NHCs are combined with an extended Kalman filter. An experimental test was conducted to verify the proposed method, and a comprehensive analysis of the performance in terms of the position, velocity, and attitude showed that the navigation performance could be improved by using the magnetometer and NHCs. Moreover, the proposed method could improve the estimation performance for the position, velocity, and attitude without any additional hardware except an inertial sensor and magnetometer. Therefore, this method would be effective for ground vehicles, indoor navigation, mobile robots, vehicle navigation in urban canyons, or navigation in any global navigation satellite system-denied environment.

  18. Self-Compensating Excitation of Fluxgate Sensors for Space Magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerman, Alec; Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter

    2008-01-01

    of the most crucial points, continuous by design of the self-compensating excitation unit and concludes with unit complex testing and application to the magnetometer. The application of the self-compensation of the excitation decreases temperature drift of the magnetometer offset caused by the temperature...... drift of the sensor (dominant source of the offset drift) by factor of 7....

  19. Internet Access to ISEE-1 and 2 Magnetometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    It is reported that the entire ISEE-1 and -2 magnetometer data are placed on-line, using an 8 Gbyte disk drive. The data are stored at 4-s and 60-s resolution. Also, an interactive world wide web page, which allows to plot, on request, any interval for which magnetometer data are available, is developed.

  20. Digital fluxgate magnetometer for the "Astrid-2" satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Erik Bøje; Primdahl, Fritz; Petersen, Jan Raagaard

    1999-01-01

    The design and performance of the Astrid-2 magnetometer are described. The magnetometer uses mathematical routines implemented by software for commercially available digital dignal processors to determine the magnetic field from the fluxgate sensor. The sensor is from the latest generation of amo...

  1. Measuring miniature eye movements by means of a SQUID magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, M. J.; Dunajski, Z.; Meijzssen, T. E. M.; Breukink, E. W.; Wevers-Henke, J. J.

    A new technique to measure small eye movements is reported. The precise recording of human eye movements is necessary for research on visual fatigue induced by visual display units. 1 So far all methods used have disadvantages: especially those which are sensitive or are rather painful. 2,3 Our method is based on a transformation of mechanical vibrations into magnetic flux variations. In order to do this a small magnet is embedded in a close-fitting soft contact lens. The magnetic flux variations caused by eyeball movements during fixation are measured by means of a SQUID magnetometer. The recordings show the typical fixation pattern of a human eye. This pattern is composed of three kinds of movements: saccades, drift and microtremor. The last-mentioned type of movements are displacements in the order of 2 μm. It is possible to distinguish between movements which are perpendicular to each other.

  2. A high stability optical frequency reference based on thermal calcium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-21

    simple, compact optical frequency standard based upon thennal calcium atoms. Using a Ramsey- Borde specu·ometer we excite features with linewidths < 5kHz...Optical Frequency (kHz) Figure 2: Ramsey- Borde fringes , shown here with both recoil components. Fringe width is < 5kHz (FWHM). tlli.s theoretical value...send ~ 2 m W of the light to a fom-beam Ramsey- Borde spectrometer that excites the atoms in a thermal beam [3]. Atoms emerge from an aperture in theCa

  3. Enrichment of true positives from structural alerts through the use of novel atomic fragment based descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, A.; Rydberg, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the discrimination rate for methods applying structural alerts and biotransformation rules in the prediction of toxicity and drug metabolism we have developed a set of novel fragment based atomic descriptors. These atomic descriptors encode the properties of the fragments separating...... an atom from the closest end of a branch or the molecule. The end of a branch and the end of a molecule, as well as the selection of the fragments, are made by an algorithm that uses only the distance matrix of the molecule. The novel descriptors are applied to a small set of biotransformation rules...

  4. Fast and accurate grid representations for atom-based docking with partner flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Sjoerd J; Zacharias, Martin

    2017-06-30

    Macromolecular docking methods can broadly be divided into geometric and atom-based methods. Geometric methods use fast algorithms that operate on simplified, grid-like molecular representations, while atom-based methods are more realistic and flexible, but far less efficient. Here, a hybrid approach of grid-based and atom-based docking is presented, combining precalculated grid potentials with neighbor lists for fast and accurate calculation of atom-based intermolecular energies and forces. The grid representation is compatible with simultaneous multibody docking and can tolerate considerable protein flexibility. When implemented in our docking method ATTRACT, grid-based docking was found to be ∼35x faster. With the OPLSX forcefield instead of the ATTRACT coarse-grained forcefield, the average speed improvement was >100x. Grid-based representations may allow atom-based docking methods to explore large conformational spaces with many degrees of freedom, such as multiple macromolecules including flexibility. This increases the domain of biological problems to which docking methods can be applied. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effect of atom- and group-based truncations on biomolecules simulated with reaction-field electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Boris

    2011-01-01

    The performance of the reaction-field method of electrostatics is tested in molecular dynamics simulations of protein human interleukin-4 and a short DNA fragment in explicit solvent. Two truncation schemes are considered: one based on the position of atomic charges in water molecules and the other on the position of groups of charges. The group-based truncation leads to the melting of the DNA double helix. In contrast, the atom-based truncation maintains the helical structure intact. Similarly for the protein, the group-based truncation leads to an unfolding at pH 2 while the atom-based truncation produces stable trajectories at low and normal pH, in agreement with experiment. Artificial repulsion between charged residues associated with the group-based truncation is identified as the microscopic reason behind unfolding of the protein. Implications of different truncation schemes in reaction-field simulations of biomolecules are discussed. PMID:21311933

  6. Restoring the lattice of Si-based atom probe reconstructions for enhanced information on dopant positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Andrew J; Moody, Michael P; Ceguerra, Anna V; Gault, Baptiste; Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Ringer, Simon P

    2015-12-01

    The following manuscript presents a novel approach for creating lattice based models of Sb-doped Si directly from atom probe reconstructions for the purposes of improving information on dopant positioning and directly informing quantum mechanics based materials modeling approaches. Sophisticated crystallographic analysis techniques are used to detect latent crystal structure within the atom probe reconstructions with unprecedented accuracy. A distortion correction algorithm is then developed to precisely calibrate the detected crystal structure to the theoretically known diamond cubic lattice. The reconstructed atoms are then positioned on their most likely lattice positions. Simulations are then used to determine the accuracy of such an approach and show that improvements to short-range order measurements are possible for noise levels and detector efficiencies comparable with experimentally collected atom probe data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Coherent and dynamic beam splitting based on light storage in cold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kwang-Kyoon Park; Tian-Ming Zhao; Jong-Chan Lee; Young-Tak Chough; Yoon-Ho Kim

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a coherent and dynamic beam splitter based on light storage in cold atoms. An input weak laser pulse is first stored in a cold atom ensemble via electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). A set of counter-propagating control fields, applied at a later time, retrieves the stored pulse into two output spatial modes. The high visibility interference between the two output pulses clearly demonstrates that the beam splitting process is coherent. Furthermore, by manipulating the...

  8. Hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De wael, Annelies, E-mail: annelies.dewael@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); De Backer, Annick [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX1 3PH Oxford (United Kingdom); Van Aert, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    A hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) images of monotype crystalline nanostructures is presented. Different atom-counting methods already exist for model-like systems. However, the increasing relevance of radiation damage in the study of nanostructures demands a method that allows atom-counting from low dose images with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the hybrid method directly includes prior knowledge from image simulations into the existing statistics-based method for atom-counting, and accounts in this manner for possible discrepancies between actual and simulated experimental conditions. It is shown by means of simulations and experiments that this hybrid method outperforms the statistics-based method, especially for low electron doses and small nanoparticles. The analysis of a simulated low dose image of a small nanoparticle suggests that this method allows for far more reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials. - Highlights: • A hybrid method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images is introduced. • Image simulations are incorporated into a statistical framework in a reliable manner. • Limits of the existing methods for atom-counting are far exceeded. • Reliable counting results from an experimental low dose image are obtained. • Progress towards reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials is made.

  9. Atomic layer deposition of scandium-based oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyns, Laura; Lisoni, Judit G.; Bosch, Geert van den; Elshocht, Sven van; Houdt, Jan van [IMEC, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-02-15

    Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} and Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} have been investigated as potential high-k intergate dielectric (IGD) in planar NAND flash technology, such as hybrid floating gate (HFG). We have examined the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3}, and Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} on Si using Sc(MeCp){sub 3}, Gd({sup i}PrCp){sub 3}, TMA, and H{sub 2}O as precursors. The composition of Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} and Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} ranged from 4% to 76% Gd and from 7% to 66% Al, respectively. All compositions show linear growth behavior. While pure Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} is crystalline as-deposited, the layer becomes amorphous once ∝20% of Al is added. The (222) reflection of the cubic phase is also seen for Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} with less than 9% Gd. The bandgap of as-deposited Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} decreases with increasing Gd content while the opposite trend is observed for Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3}. A k-value of ∝21 can be obtained for Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} with approximately 26-52% Gd, irrespective of the Gd content. For Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} on the other hand, a maximum k-value of ∝19 is achieved with ∝48% Al. Although the k-value of Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} is lower than that of Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3}, its large breakdown field makes this material more suitable for HFG flash applications. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Comparison of Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers as Space-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe.

  11. Efficient polarization insensitive complex wavefront control using Huygens' metasurfaces based on dielectric resonant meta-atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Chong, Katie E; Staude, Isabelle; James, Anthony; Dominguez, Jason; Liu, Sheng; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Decker, Manuel; Neshev, Dragomir N; Brener, Igal; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-01-01

    Subwavelength-thin metasurfaces have shown great promises for the control of optical wavefronts, thus opening new pathways for the development of efficient flat optics. In particular, Huygens' metasurfaces based on all-dielectric resonant meta-atoms have already shown a huge potential for practical applications with their polarization insensitivity and high transmittance efficiency. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a polarization insensitive holographic Huygens' metasurface based on dielectric resonant meta-atoms capable of complex wavefront control at telecom wavelengths. Our metasurface produces a hologram image in the far-field with 82% transmittance efficiency and 40% imaging efficiency. Such efficient complex wavefront control shows that Huygens' metasurfaces based on resonant dielectric meta-atoms are a big step towards practical applications of metasurfaces in wavefront design related technologies, including computer-generated holograms, ultra-thin optics, security and data storage devices.

  12. Comparing laser interferometry and atom interferometry approaches to space-based gravitational-wave measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ira Thorpe, James; Jennrich, Oliver; McNamara, Paul; Baker, John G.

    2012-07-01

    The science enabled by a space-based low-frequency gravitational-wave instrument is a high-priority objective of the international astronomy community. Mission concepts based on laser interferometry, such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), have been thoroughly studied and determined to be capable of delivering significant science returns. Ongoing developments in laboratory atom interferometry techniques have inspired new gravitational-wave mission concepts. We present a comparative analysis of LISA-like light interferometer systems and atom interferometer systems for gravitational-wave detection. Specific attention is paid to the sources of instrumental noise that are most important for light interferometer systems. We find that the response to laser frequency noise is identical in light interferometer and atom interferometer systems and that similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple-arm interferometers) must be employed to reach interesting gravitational wave sensitivities. Response to acceleration of the optical platforms is slightly different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but the acceleration noise requirements are similar. Based on this analysis, we find no clear advantage of the atom interferometry approach over traditional laser interferometry.

  13. Intermolecular orientations in liquid acetonitrile: new insights based on diffraction measurements and all-atom simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Pothoczki, Szilvia

    2016-01-01

    Intermolecular correlations in liquid acetonitrile (CH3CN) have been revisited by calculating orientational correlation functions. In the present approach, hydrogen atoms are included, so that a concept applicable for molecules of (nearly) tetrahedral shape can be exploited. In this way molecular arrangements are elucidated not only for closest neighbours but also extending well beyond the first coordination sphere. Thus a complementary viewpoint is provided to the more popular dipole-dipole correlations. Our calculations are based on large structural models that were obtained by applying diffraction data and partial radial distribution functions from potential-based (all-atom) molecular dynamics simulation simultaneously, within the framework of the Reverse Monte Carlo method.

  14. VOYAGER 2 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 48.0 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 48.0 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  15. VOYAGER 2 JUPITER MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 9.60 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Jupiter encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 9.6 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  16. VOYAGER 1 JUPITER MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 9.60 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Jupiter encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 9.6 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  17. VOYAGER 1 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 1.92 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 1.92 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  18. VOYAGER 2 JUPITER MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 1.92 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Jupiter encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 1.92 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  19. VOYAGER 2 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 9.60 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 9.6 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  20. VOYAGER 2 JUPITER MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 48.0 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Jupiter encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 48.0 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  1. VOYAGER 1 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 48.0 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 48.0 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  2. VOYAGER 2 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 1.92 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 1.92 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  3. VOYAGER 1 JUPITER MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 48.0 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Jupiter encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 48.0 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  4. VOYAGER 1 JUPITER MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 1.92 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Jupiter encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 1.92 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  5. VOYAGER 1 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 9.60 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 9.6 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  6. Self-Calibrating Vector Helium Magnetometer (SVHM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposal describes proposed development of a conceptual design for a Self-Calibrating Vector Helium Magnetometer (SVHM) for design and fabrication...

  7. High-Range Scalar Helium Magnetometer (HSHM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal describes development of a conceptual design for a High-range Scalar Helium Magnetometer (HSHM) for the field range +/-16 Gauss. The HSHM...

  8. Correcting GOES-R Magnetometer Data for Stray Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Delano; Freesland, Douglas; Tadikonda, Sivakumara K.; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Todirita, Monica; Dahya, Melissa; Chu, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Time-varying spacecraft magnetic fields, i.e. stray fields, are a problem for magnetometer systems. While constant fields can be removed by calibration, stray fields are difficult to distinguish from ambient field variations. Putting two magnetometers on a long boom and solving for both the ambient and stray fields can help, but this gradiometer solution is more sensitive to noise than a single magnetometer. As shown here for the R-series Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES-R), unless the stray fields are larger than the noise, simply averaging the two magnetometer readings gives a more accurate solution. If averaging is used, it may be worthwhile to estimate and remove stray fields explicitly. Models and estimation algorithms to do so are provided for solar array, arcjet and reaction wheel fields.

  9. GALILEO ORBITER JUPITER RAW MAGNETOMETER DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains raw magnetic field data acquired by the Galileo Orbiter magnetometer at Jupiter. The data set covers the time period from 1995-11-06T00:21:30...

  10. Self-Calibrating Vector Helium Magnetometer (SVHM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase 2 SBIR proposal describes the design, fabrication and calibration of a brass-board Self-Calibrating Vector Helium Magnetometer (SVHM). The SVHM instrument...

  11. Low-Fiend Vector Magnetometer (V-400-LF) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This 2010 NASA SBIR Phase 1 proposal for an innovative Low-Field Vector Magnetometer (V-400-LF) is a response to subtopic S1.06 Particles and Field Sensors and...

  12. Real-Time Hand-Held Magnetometer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Time Magnetometer Array Geometrics ix 1.3 LIST OF ACRONYMS ADC – Analog to Digital Converter AFE – Analog Front End AGC – Automatic Gain...automatically and in real time. Linear arrays of magnetometer sensors have been deployed in many scenarios in unexploded ordnance (UXO) detection. These have...past or over a target. This leads to various positioning and time changing errors, which limits the accuracy of the device. However, linear arrays

  13. Detection Range of Airborne Magnetometers in Magnetic Anomaly Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Chengjing Li; Shucai Huang; Daozhi Wei; Yu Zhong; K. Y. Gong

    2015-01-01

    Airborne magnetometers are utilized for the small-range search, precise positioning, and identification of the ferromagnetic properties of underwater targets. As an important performance parameter of sensors, the detection range of airborne magnetometers is commonly set as a fixed value in references regardless of the influences of environment noise, target magnetic properties, and platform features in a classical model to detect airborne magnetic anomalies. As a consequence, devi...

  14. Man-Portable Simultaneous Magnetometer and EM System (MSEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    75 Hz and aliasing at 15 Hz. This is expected, and is removed with a notch filter ...distribution of weight (indeed, in the photo at YPG below, the gray bulge behind the magnetometer is a gallon jug of water used as ballast). The EM61 battery...we chop it out with a notch filter . These figures show that MSEMS’ interleaving magnetometer period counter was functioning as expected. 12

  15. Calibration of the fluxgate CSC vector magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, José M.G.; Risbo, Torben; Primdahl, Fritz

    1995-01-01

    found. The non-linearity is less than 4.0 ppm, taking into account that the coil facility where the magnetometer has been scanned has a very low noise (0.5 nT p-p) but not sufficient low to precise much more in this parameter. There is no non-linearity over the entire temperature range. The sensor...... offsets are less than 2.0 nT and 10.0 nT for the flight and flight spare electronics, respectively. They have been determinated by two procedures which give consistant results. Firstly, as output in the spherical harmonic method, and secondly, by rotation of the CSC sensor by 180° in two axes. It does...... not change with temperature. The sensitivities are different in each axis, due to the fact that any ADC has its own oltage reference and there is a slight difference between them. They change linearly with temperature. The temperature coefficient for each sensor is different since the radius of the feedback...

  16. Initiating heavy-atom-based phasing by multi-dimensional molecular replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu; Karlsen, Jesper Lykkegaard; Nissen, Poul

    2016-03-01

    To obtain an electron-density map from a macromolecular crystal the phase problem needs to be solved, which often involves the use of heavy-atom derivative crystals and concomitant heavy-atom substructure determination. This is typically performed by dual-space methods, direct methods or Patterson-based approaches, which however may fail when only poorly diffracting derivative crystals are available. This is often the case for, for example, membrane proteins. Here, an approach for heavy-atom site identification based on a molecular-replacement parameter matrix (MRPM) is presented. It involves an n-dimensional search to test a wide spectrum of molecular-replacement parameters, such as different data sets and search models with different conformations. Results are scored by the ability to identify heavy-atom positions from anomalous difference Fourier maps. The strategy was successfully applied in the determination of a membrane-protein structure, the copper-transporting P-type ATPase CopA, when other methods had failed to determine the heavy-atom substructure. MRPM is well suited to proteins undergoing large conformational changes where multiple search models should be considered, and it enables the identification of weak but correct molecular-replacement solutions with maximum contrast to prime experimental phasing efforts.

  17. Development of collisional data base for elementary processes of electron scattering by atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinković, Bratislav P., E-mail: bratislav.marinkovic@ipb.ac.rs [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering of Applied Studies, Vojvode Stepe 283, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Vujčić, Veljko [Astronomical Observatory Belgade, Volgina 7, 11050 Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Organizational Sciences, University of Belgrade, Jove Ilića 154, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Sushko, Gennady [MBN Research Center, Altenhöferallee 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vudragović, Dušan [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Marinković, Dara B. [Faculty of Organizational Sciences, University of Belgrade, Jove Ilića 154, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Đorđević, Stefan; Ivanović, Stefan; Nešić, Milutin [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering of Applied Studies, Vojvode Stepe 283, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Jevremović, Darko [Astronomical Observatory Belgade, Volgina 7, 11050 Belgrade (Serbia); Solov’yov, Andrey V. [MBN Research Center, Altenhöferallee 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Mason, Nigel J. [The Open University, Department of Physical Sciences, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    Highlights: • BEAMDB database maintaining electron/atom-molecule collisional data has been created. • The DB is MySQL, the web server is Nginx and Python application server is Gunicorn. • Only data that have been previously published and formally refereed are included. • Data protocol for exchanging and representing data is in the “xsams” xml format. • BEAMDB becomes a node within the VAMDC consortium and radiation damage RADAM basis. - Abstract: We present a progress report on the development of the Belgrade electron/molecule data base which is hosted by The Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade and The Astronomical Observatory Belgrade. The data base has been developed under the standards of Virtual Atomic Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) project which provides a common portal for several European data bases that maintain atomic and molecular data. The Belgrade data base (BEAMDB) covers collisional data of electron interactions with atoms and molecules in the form of differential (DCS) and integrated cross sections as well as energy loss spectra. The final goal of BEAMDB becoming both a node within the VAMDC consortium and within the radiation damage RADAM data base has been achieved.

  18. New type of fluxgate magnetometer for the heart’s magnetic fields detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybalko Ruslan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The application area of fluxgate sensors is limited by their sensitivity. Medical researches create high demand on the magnetometers with the characteristics of high accuracy and sensibility for measuring weak magnetic fields produced by the human body, such as the heart‘s magnetic field. Due to the insufficient sensitivity of fluxgate sensors, superconducting magnetometers (SQUID take the dominant position for the cardiomagnetic measurements. They have to be cooled by liquefied gases and it leads to high service costs. Therefore an idea of creating a high sensitive sensor based on fluxgate principles and known methods of measurement is attractive and up to date. This paper is dedicated to the modified flux-gate sensors based on Racetrack technology with a new approach of signal demodulation. The improved fluxgate sensor system provides detection of the heart‘s magnetic field without additional expenditures for use.

  19. Atom counting in HAADF STEM using a statistical model-based approach: methodology, possibilities, and inherent limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A; Martinez, G T; Rosenauer, A; Van Aert, S

    2013-11-01

    In the present paper, a statistical model-based method to count the number of atoms of monotype crystalline nanostructures from high resolution high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images is discussed in detail together with a thorough study on the possibilities and inherent limitations. In order to count the number of atoms, it is assumed that the total scattered intensity scales with the number of atoms per atom column. These intensities are quantitatively determined using model-based statistical parameter estimation theory. The distribution describing the probability that intensity values are generated by atomic columns containing a specific number of atoms is inferred on the basis of the experimental scattered intensities. Finally, the number of atoms per atom column is quantified using this estimated probability distribution. The number of atom columns available in the observed STEM image, the number of components in the estimated probability distribution, the width of the components of the probability distribution, and the typical shape of a criterion to assess the number of components in the probability distribution directly affect the accuracy and precision with which the number of atoms in a particular atom column can be estimated. It is shown that single atom sensitivity is feasible taking the latter aspects into consideration. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of Trace Elements in Nickel Base Gas Turbine Parts by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An investigation is described to ascertain whether or not atomic absorption spectrophotometry could be used to determine the concentration of trace ... elements such as silver (Ag), bismuth (Bi), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) in nickel base alloys such as IN100, B1900 and 713C, without interference from

  1. Rubidium atomic beam clock based on lamp-pumping and fluorescence-detection scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. H.; Huang, J. Q.; Gu, Y.; Liu, S. Q.; Dong, T. Q.; Lu, Z. H.

    2011-02-01

    A compact, portable rubidium atomic beam clock based on lamp-pumping and fluorescence-detection scheme is proposed. The expected short-term frequency stability can be at least two orders of magnitude better than previous experimental results. The usages of lamp pumping, fluorescence detection and microwave slow-wave resonance structures make this design robust and compact.

  2. Accelerating Atomic Orbital-based Electronic Structure Calculation via Pole Expansion plus Selected Inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Lin; Chen, Mohan; Yang, Chao; He, Lixin

    2012-02-10

    We describe how to apply the recently developed pole expansion plus selected inversion (PEpSI) technique to Kohn-Sham density function theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations that are based on atomic orbital discretization. We give analytic expressions for evaluating charge density, total energy, Helmholtz free energy and atomic forces without using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian. We also show how to update the chemical potential without using Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. The advantage of using PEpSI is that it has a much lower computational complexity than that associated with the matrix diagonalization procedure. We demonstrate the performance gain by comparing the timing of PEpSI with that of diagonalization on insulating and metallic nanotubes. For these quasi-1D systems, the complexity of PEpSI is linear with respect to the number of atoms. This linear scaling can be observed in our computational experiments when the number of atoms in a nanotube is larger than a few hundreds. Both the wall clock time and the memory requirement of PEpSI is modest. This makes it even possible to perform Kohn-Sham DFT calculations for 10,000-atom nanotubes on a single processor. We also show that the use of PEpSI does not lead to loss of accuracy required in a practical DFT calculation.

  3. C-C Coupling on Single-Atom-Based Heterogeneous Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Sun, Zaicheng; Wang, Bin; Tang, Yu; Nguyen, Luan; Li, Yuting; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2018-01-24

    Compared to homogeneous catalysis, heterogeneous catalysis allows for ready separation of products from the catalyst and thus reuse of the catalyst. C-C coupling is typically performed on a molecular catalyst which is mixed with reactants in liquid phase during catalysis. This homogeneous mixing at a molecular level in the same phase makes separation of the molecular catalyst extremely challenging and costly. Here we demonstrated that a TiO 2 -based nanoparticle catalyst anchoring singly dispersed Pd atoms (Pd 1 /TiO 2 ) is selective and highly active for more than 10 Sonogashira C-C coupling reactions (R≡CH + R'X → R≡R'; X = Br, I; R' = aryl or vinyl). The coupling between iodobenzene and phenylacetylene on Pd 1 /TiO 2 exhibits a turnover rate of 51.0 diphenylacetylene molecules per anchored Pd atom per minute at 60 °C, with a low apparent activation barrier of 28.9 kJ/mol and no cost of catalyst separation. DFT calculations suggest that the single Pd atom bonded to surface lattice oxygen atoms of TiO 2 acts as a site to dissociatively chemisorb iodobenzene to generate an intermediate phenyl, which then couples with phenylacetylenyl bound to a surface oxygen atom. This coupling of phenyl adsorbed on Pd 1 and phenylacetylenyl bound to O ad of TiO 2 forms the product molecule, diphenylacetylene.

  4. A Polarizable Atomic Multipole-Based Force Field for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Anionic Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Huiying; Peng, Xiangda; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yuebin; Li, Guohui

    2017-12-31

    In all of the classical force fields, electrostatic interaction is simply treated and explicit electronic polarizability is neglected. The condensed-phase polarization, relative to the gas-phase charge distributions, is commonly accounted for in an average way by increasing the atomic charges, which remain fixed throughout simulations. Based on the lipid polarizable force field DMPC and following the same framework as Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for BiomoleculAr (AMOEBA) simulation, the present effort expands the force field to new anionic lipid models, in which the new lipids contain DMPG and POPS. The parameters are compatible with the AMOEBA force field, which includes water, ions, proteins, etc. The charge distribution of each atom is represented by the permanent atomic monopole, dipole and quadrupole moments, which are derived from the ab initio gas phase calculations. Many-body polarization including the inter- and intramolecular polarization is modeled in a consistent manner with distributed atomic polarizabilities. Molecular dynamics simulations of the two aqueous DMPG and POPS membrane bilayer systems, consisting of 72 lipids with water molecules, were then carried out to validate the force field parameters. Membrane width, area per lipid, volume per lipid, deuterium order parameters, electron density profile, electrostatic potential difference between the center of the bilayer and water are all calculated, and compared with limited experimental data.

  5. Hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wael, Annelies; De Backer, Annick; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D; Van Aert, Sandra

    2017-06-01

    A hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) images of monotype crystalline nanostructures is presented. Different atom-counting methods already exist for model-like systems. However, the increasing relevance of radiation damage in the study of nanostructures demands a method that allows atom-counting from low dose images with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the hybrid method directly includes prior knowledge from image simulations into the existing statistics-based method for atom-counting, and accounts in this manner for possible discrepancies between actual and simulated experimental conditions. It is shown by means of simulations and experiments that this hybrid method outperforms the statistics-based method, especially for low electron doses and small nanoparticles. The analysis of a simulated low dose image of a small nanoparticle suggests that this method allows for far more reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images based on wave atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yongzhao; Liu, Gangjun; Feng, Guoying; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging noninvasive imaging technique, which is based on low-coherence interferometry. OCT images suffer from speckle noise, which reduces image contrast. A shrinkage filter based on wave atoms transform is proposed for speckle reduction in OCT images. Wave atoms transform is a new multiscale geometric analysis tool that offers sparser expansion and better representation for images containing oscillatory patterns and textures than other traditional transforms, such as wavelet and curvelet transforms. Cycle spinning-based technology is introduced to avoid visual artifacts, such as Gibbs-like phenomenon, and to develop a translation invariant wave atoms denoising scheme. The speckle suppression degree in the denoised images is controlled by an adjustable parameter that determines the threshold in the wave atoms domain. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively remove the speckle noise and improve the OCT image quality. The signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, average equivalent number of looks, and cross-correlation (XCOR) values are obtained, and the results are also compared with the wavelet and curvelet thresholding techniques. PMID:24825507

  7. Support effects on adsorption and catalytic activation of O2in single atom iron catalysts with graphene-based substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zheng-Yang; Yang, Wei-Jie; Ding, Xun-Lei; Lv, Gang; Yan, Wei-Ping

    2018-02-27

    The adsorption and catalytic activation of O 2 on single atom iron catalysts with graphene-based substrates were investigated systematically by density functional theory calculation. It is found that the support effects of graphene-based substrates have a significant influence on the stability of the single atom catalysts, the adsorption configuration, the electron transfer mechanism, the adsorption energy and the energy barrier. The differences in the stable adsorption configuration of O 2 on single atom iron catalysts with different graphene-based substrates can be well understood by the symmetrical matching principle based on frontier molecular orbital analysis. There are two different mechanisms of electron transfer, in which the Fe atom acts as the electron donor in single vacancy graphene-based substrates while the Fe atom mainly acts as the bridge for electron transfer in double vacancy graphene-based substrates. The Fermi softness and work function are good descriptors of the adsorption energy and they can well reveal the relationship between electronic structure and adsorption energy. This single atom iron catalyst with single vacancy graphene modified by three nitrogen atoms is a promising non-noble metal single atom catalyst in the adsorption and catalytic oxidation of O 2 . Furthermore, the findings can lay the foundation for the further study of graphene-based support effects and provide a guideline for the development and design of new non-noble-metal single atom catalysts.

  8. Feasibility study of a sup 3 He-magnetometer for neutron electric dipole moment experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Borisov, Y; Leduc, M; Lobashev, V; Otten, E W; Sobolev, Y

    2000-01-01

    We report on a sup 3 He-magnetometer capable of detecting tiny magnetic field fluctuations of less than 10 sup - sup 1 sup 4 T in experiments for measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron. It is based on the Ramsey technique of separated oscillating fields and uses nuclear spin-polarized sup 3 He gas which is stored in two vessels of V approx =10 l in a sandwich-type arrangement around the storage bottle for ultra-cold neutrons (UCN). The gas is polarized by means of optical pumping in a separate, small discharge cell at pressures around 0.5 mbar and is then expanded into the actual magnetometer volume. To detect the polarization of sup 3 He gas at the end of the storage cycle the gas is pumped out by means of an oil-diffusion pump and compressed again into the discharge cell where optical detection of nuclear polarization is used.

  9. Magnetocardiography measurements with 4He vector optically pumped magnetometers at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, S.; Corsi, M. C.; Fourcault, W.; Bertrand, F.; Cauffet, G.; Gobbo, C.; Alcouffe, F.; Lenouvel, F.; Le Prado, M.; Berger, F.; Vanzetto, G.; Labyt, E.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present a proof of concept study which demonstrates for the first time the possibility of recording magnetocardiography (MCG) signals with 4He vector optically pumped magnetometers (OPM) operated in a gradiometer mode. Resulting from a compromise between sensitivity, size and operability in a clinical environment, the developed magnetometers are based on the parametric resonance of helium in a zero magnetic field. Sensors are operated at room temperature and provide a tri-axis vector measurement of the magnetic field. Measured sensitivity is around 210 f T (√Hz)-1 in the bandwidth (2 Hz; 300 Hz). MCG signals from a phantom and two healthy subjects are successfully recorded. Human MCG data obtained with the OPMs are compared to reference electrocardiogram recordings: similar heart rates, shapes of the main patterns of the cardiac cycle (P/T waves, QRS complex) and QRS widths are obtained with both techniques.

  10. Design & simulation of in-plane MEMS Lorentz force magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti, Aditi, Tripathi, C. C.; Gopal, Ram

    2016-03-01

    This report presents the design and simulation of a MEMS based In-plane Lorentz Force Magnetometer (I-LFM), simulated for 8 um UV-LIGA technology using FEM tool of COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3b. Designed I-LFM was simulated in the magnetic field range varied from 1 μJT to 100μJT. The proposed structure composed of a comb drive actuator, configured such that the fingers overlap with each other to generate capacitive coupling for its actuation. The magnetic field can be detected in Z-axis by this comb drive structure. The device was excited by supplying the sinusoidal current with the frequency equivalent to resonance frequency of the device at its first mode i.e. 12.047 kHz. In order to achieve the maximum mechanical output, the device was operated at the resonant frequency. Simulations based results shows a good linearity in the magnetic field range of 1 μJT to 100 μJT with a high quality factor of 130.

  11. Ground pulsation magnetometer observations conjugated with relativistic electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahnin, A. G.; Yahnina, T. A.; Raita, T.; Manninen, J.

    2017-09-01

    In this report, we investigate the role of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in production of relativistic electron precipitation (REP). Over a thousand REP events were detected from four NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites in July-December 2005. Of these, a total of 112 events were conjugated with a ground-based network of six Finnish induction coil magnetometers and one in Lovozero observatory at Kola Peninsula, Russia. The observation of geomagnetic pulsations during the conjugated events showed that about one third of them were accompanied by pulsations in the Pc1 range, which are the signature of EMIC waves. In fact, the sources of some of these EMIC waves were well outside the location of the REP event. This means that in such cases the REP events were not originated from scattering by EMIC waves. Finally, it is concluded that for this limited set of conjugated events only a quarter might be related to scattering by EMIC waves. The majority of the events are not correlated with EMIC wave signatures in ground-based observations; they were associated with either no pulsations or noise-like pulsations PiB and PiC.

  12. Integrating a High Resolution Optically Pumped Magnetometer with a Multi-Rotor UAV towards 3-D Magnetic Gradiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, A.; Walter, C. A.; Parvar, K.

    2016-12-01

    The current platforms for collecting magnetic data include dense coverage, but low resolution traditional airborne surveys, and high resolution, but low coverage terrestrial surveys. Both platforms leave a critical observation gap between the ground surface and approximately 100m above ground elevation, which can be navigated efficiently by new technologies, such as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Specifically, multi rotor UAV platforms provide the ability to sense the magnetic field in a full 3-D tensor, which increases the quality of data collected over other current platform types. Payload requirements and target requirements must be balanced to fully exploit the 3-D magnetic tensor. This study outlines the integration of a GEM Systems Cesium Vapour UAV Magnetometer, a Lightware SF-11 Laser Altimeter and a uBlox EVK-7P GPS module with a DJI s900 Multi Rotor UAV. The Cesium Magnetometer is suspended beneath the UAV platform by a cable of varying length. A set of surveys was carried out to optimize the sensor orientation, sensor cable length beneath the UAV and data collection methods of the GEM Systems Cesium Vapour UAV Magnetometer when mounted on the DJI s900. The target for these surveys is a 12 inch steam pipeline located approximately 2 feet below the ground surface. A systematic variation of cable length, sensor orientation and inclination was conducted. The data collected from the UAV magnetometer was compared to a terrestrial survey conducted with the GEM GST-19 Proton Procession Magnetometer at the same elevation, which also served a reference station. This allowed for a cross examination between the UAV system and a proven industry standard for magnetic field data collection. The surveys resulted in optimizing the above parameters based on minimizing instrument error and ensuring reliable data acquisition. The results demonstrate that optimizing the UAV magnetometer survey can yield to industry standard measurements.

  13. Attitude Determination with Magnetometers and Accelerometers to Use in Satellite Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio Koiti Kuga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Attitude control of artificial satellites is dependent on information provided by its attitude determination process. This paper presents the implementation and tests of a fully self-contained algorithm for the attitude determination using magnetometers and accelerometers, for application on a satellite simulator based on frictionless air bearing tables. However, it is known that magnetometers and accelerometers need to be calibrated so as to allow that measurements are used to their ultimate accuracy. A calibration method is implemented which proves to be essential for improving attitude determination accuracy. For the stepwise real-time attitude determination, it was used the well-known QUEST algorithm which yields quick response with reduced computer resources. The algorithms are tested and qualified with actual data collected on the streets under controlled situations. For such street runaways, the experiment employs a solid-state magnetoresistive magnetometer and an IMU navigation block consisting of triads of accelerometers and gyros, with MEMS technology. A GPS receiver is used to record positional information. The collected measurements are processed through the developed algorithms, and comparisons are made for attitude determination using calibrated and noncalibrated data. The results show that the attitude accuracy reaches the requirements for real-time operation for satellite simulator platforms.

  14. Combined spacecraft orbit and attitude control through extended Kalman filtering of magnetometer, gyro, and GPS measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Mekky Ahmed Habib

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this research is to establish spacecraft orbit and attitude control algorithms based on extended Kalman filter which provides estimates of spacecraft orbital and attitude states. The control and estimation algorithms must be capable of dealing with the spacecraft conditions during the detumbling and attitude acquisition modes of operation. These conditions are characterized by nonlinearities represented by large initial attitude angles, large initial angular velocities, large initial attitude estimation error, and large initial position estimation error. All of the developed estimation and control algorithms are suitable for application to the next Egyptian scientific satellite, EGYPTSAT-2. The parameters of the case-study spacecraft are similar but not identical to the former Egyptian satellite EGYPTSAT-1. This is done because the parameters of EGYPTSAT-2 satellite have not been consolidated yet. The sensors utilized are gyro, magnetometer, and GPS. Gyro and magnetometer are utilized to provide measurements for the estimates of spacecraft attitude state vector where as magnetometer and GPS are utilized to provide measurements for the estimates of spacecraft orbital state vector.

  15. Ultra-sensitive Magnetic Microscopy with an Optically Pumped Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Savukov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Optically pumped magnetometers (OPMs) based on lasers and alkali-metal vapor cells are currently the most sensitive non-cryogenic magnetic field sensors. Many applications in neuroscience and other fields require high-resolution, high-sensitivity magnetic microscopic measurements. In order to meet this demand we combined a cm-size spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) OPM and flux guides (FGs) to realize an ultra-sensitive FG-OPM magnetic microscope. The FGs serve to transmit the target magnetic flux to the OPM thus improving both the resolution and sensitivity to small magnetic objects. We investigated the performance of the FG-OPM device using experimental and numerical methods, and demonstrated that an optimized device can achieve a unique combination of high resolution (80 μm) and high sensitivity (8.1 pT/). In addition, we also performed numerical calculations of the magnetic field distribution in the FGs to estimate the magnetic noise originating from the domain fluctuations in the material of the FGs. We anticipate many applications of the FG-OPM device such as the detection of micro-biological magnetic fields; the detection of magnetic nano-particles; and non-destructive testing. From our theoretical estimate, an FG-OPM could detect the magnetic field of a single neuron, which would be an important milestone in neuroscience.

  16. Modern Focused-Ion-Beam-Based Site-Specific Specimen Preparation for Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2017-04-01

    Approximately 30 years after the first use of focused ion beam (FIB) instruments to prepare atom probe tomography specimens, this technique has grown to be used by hundreds of researchers around the world. This past decade has seen tremendous advances in atom probe applications, enabled by the continued development of FIB-based specimen preparation methodologies. In this work, we provide a short review of the origin of the FIB method and the standard methods used today for lift-out and sharpening, using the annular milling method as applied to atom probe tomography specimens. Key steps for enabling correlative analysis with transmission electron-beam backscatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography are presented, and strategies for preparing specimens for modern microelectronic device structures are reviewed and discussed in detail. Examples are used for discussion of the steps for each of these methods. We conclude with examples of the challenges presented by complex topologies such as nanowires, nanoparticles, and organic materials.

  17. Lattice and strain analysis of atomic resolution Z-contrast images based on template matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Jian-Min, E-mail: jianzuo@uiuc.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Shah, Amish B. [Center for Microanalysis of Materials, Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kim, Honggyu; Meng, Yifei; Gao, Wenpei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rouviére, Jean-Luc [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble UMR-E, SP2M, LEMMA, Minatec, Grenoble 38054 (France)

    2014-01-15

    A real space approach is developed based on template matching for quantitative lattice analysis using atomic resolution Z-contrast images. The method, called TeMA, uses the template of an atomic column, or a group of atomic columns, to transform the image into a lattice of correlation peaks. This is helped by using a local intensity adjusted correlation and by the design of templates. Lattice analysis is performed on the correlation peaks. A reference lattice is used to correct for scan noise and scan distortions in the recorded images. Using these methods, we demonstrate that a precision of few picometers is achievable in lattice measurement using aberration corrected Z-contrast images. For application, we apply the methods to strain analysis of a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown LaMnO{sub 3} and SrMnO{sub 3} superlattice. The results show alternating epitaxial strain inside the superlattice and its variations across interfaces at the spatial resolution of a single perovskite unit cell. Our methods are general, model free and provide high spatial resolution for lattice analysis. - Highlights: • A real space approach is developed for strain analysis using atomic resolution Z-contrast images and template matching. • A precision of few picometers is achievable in the measurement of lattice displacements. • The spatial resolution of a single perovskite unit cell is demonstrated for a LaMnO{sub 3} and SrMnO{sub 3} superlattice grown by MBE.

  18. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Farnsworth, Paul B., E-mail: paul_farnsworth@byu.edu [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s {sup 3}S{sub 1} metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} and 0.011 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} and 0.97 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges. - Highlights: • We determine He metastable number densities for four plasma types • The highest number densities were observed in a dielectric barrier discharge • No helium metastable atoms were observed downstream from the exits of glow discharges.

  19. Simultaneous excitation of 85Rb and 87Rb isotopes inside a microfabricated vapor cell with double-RF fields for a chip-scale MZ magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qi; Shang, Jintang; Ji, Yu; Wu, Lei

    2017-11-01

    We report a novel method adopting two RF fields to simultaneously excite 85Rb and 87Rb isotopes for an MZ type atomic magnetometer. The MZ magnetometer adopts a 6 mm3 microfabricated vapor cell with natural abundance rubidium and 0.74 amagat nitrogen as buffer gas inside. The excessively broadened magnetic resonance signals of the two rubidium isotopes overlap with each other and cause deterioration in accuracy and sensitivity performance. To solve this problem, a Double-RF Field Method (DRFM) is proposed, which adopts two RF fields with a central frequency ratio of 2:3. Compared with traditional Single-RF Field Method (SRFM), the DRFM reduces the detection error by over 50% and improves the sensitivity by more than 10%. The experiments are conducted at three temperatures and under various static magnetic fields. Theoretical models are also built to discuss the performance improvement of the magnetometer by the DRFM against the SRFM. This method provides a way to improve the performance of chip-scale MZ atomic magnetometers with low cost natural abundance rubidium.

  20. Assessing and ensuring GOES-R magnetometer accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Delano; Todirita, Monica; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Dahya, Melissa; Chu, Donald

    2016-05-01

    The GOES-R magnetometer subsystem accuracy requirement is 1.7 nanoteslas (nT). During quiet times (100 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 3 sigma error per axis. During storms (300 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 2 sigma error per axis. Error comes both from outside the magnetometers, e.g. spacecraft fields and misalignments, as well as inside, e.g. zero offset and scale factor errors. Because zero offset and scale factor drift over time, it will be necessary to perform annual calibration maneuvers. To predict performance before launch, we have used Monte Carlo simulations and covariance analysis. With the proposed calibration regimen, both suggest that the magnetometer subsystem will meet its accuracy requirements.

  1. Comparing Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry Approaches to Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Thorpe, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Thoroughly studied classic space-based gravitational-wave missions concepts such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) are based on laser-interferometry techniques. Ongoing developments in atom-interferometry techniques have spurred recently proposed alternative mission concepts. These different approaches can be understood on a common footing. We present an comparative analysis of how each type of instrument responds to some of the noise sources which may limiting gravitational-wave mission concepts. Sensitivity to laser frequency instability is essentially the same for either approach. Spacecraft acceleration reference stability sensitivities are different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but acceleration noise requirements are nonetheless similar. Each approach has distinct additional measurement noise issues.

  2. Testing general relativity and alternative theories of gravity with space-based atomic clocks and atom interferometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarescu Ruxandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft’s reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gravitational perturbations in Earth’s gravitational field, potentially differentiating between different theories of gravity. This mission can measure multiple relativistic effects all during the course of a single experiment, and constrain the Parametrized Post-Newtonian Parameters around the Earth. A satellite carrying a clock of fractional timing inaccuracy of Δ f / f ∼ 10−16 in an elliptic orbit around the Earth would constrain the PPN parameters |β − 1|, |γ − 1| ≲ 10−6. We also briefly review potential constraints by atom interferometers on scalar tensor theories and in particular on Chameleon and dilaton models.

  3. Radical zinc-atom-transfer-based carbozincation of haloalkynes with dialkylzincs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Chemla

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of alkylidenezinc carbenoids by 1,4-addition/carbozincation of dialkylzincs or alkyl iodides based on zinc atom radical transfer, in the presence of dimethylzinc with β-(propargyloxyenoates having pendant iodo- and bromoalkynes, is disclosed. Formation of the carbenoid intermediate is fully stereoselective at −30 °C and arises from a formal anti-selective carbozincation reaction. Upon warming, the zinc carbenoid is stereochemically labile and isomerizes to its more stable form.

  4. Atom-probe tomography of tribological boundary films resulting from boron-based oil additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Baik, Sung-Il; Bertolucci-Coelho, Leonardo; Mazzaferro, Lucca; Ramirez, Giovanni; Erdemir, Ali; Seidman, D K

    2016-01-15

    Correlative characterization using atom-probe tomography (APT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on a tribofilm formed during sliding frictional testing with a fully formulated engine oil, which also contains a boron-based additive. The tribofilm formed is ~15 nm thick and consists of oxides of iron and compounds of B, Ca, P, and S, which are present in the additive. This study provides strong evidence for boron being embedded in the tribofilm, which effectively reduces friction and wear losses.

  5. AUTOMATED FORCE FIELD PARAMETERIZATION FOR NON-POLARIZABLE AND POLARIZABLE ATOMIC MODELS BASED ONAB INITIOTARGET DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Roux, Benoît

    2013-08-13

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on atomistic models are increasingly used to study a wide range of biological systems. A prerequisite for meaningful results from such simulations is an accurate molecular mechanical force field. Most biomolecular simulations are currently based on the widely used AMBER and CHARMM force fields, which were parameterized and optimized to cover a small set of basic compounds corresponding to the natural amino acids and nucleic acid bases. Atomic models of additional compounds are commonly generated by analogy to the parameter set of a given force field. While this procedure yields models that are internally consistent, the accuracy of the resulting models can be limited. In this work, we propose a method, General Automated Atomic Model Parameterization (GAAMP), for generating automatically the parameters of atomic models of small molecules using the results from ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) calculations as target data. Force fields that were previously developed for a wide range of model compounds serve as initial guess, although any of the final parameter can be optimized. The electrostatic parameters (partial charges, polarizabilities and shielding) are optimized on the basis of QM electrostatic potential (ESP) and, if applicable, the interaction energies between the compound and water molecules. The soft dihedrals are automatically identified and parameterized by targeting QM dihedral scans as well as the energies of stable conformers. To validate the approach, the solvation free energy is calculated for more than 200 small molecules and MD simulations of 3 different proteins are carried out.

  6. Theoretical realization of cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials based on terminated carbon atomic chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; An, Hui; Guo, Ling-Ju; Zeng, Zhi; Ju, Xin

    2011-01-14

    The capacity of carbon atomic chains with different terminations for hydrogen storage is studied using first-principles density functional theory calculations. Unlike the physisorption of H(2) on the H-terminated chain, we show that two Li (Na) atoms each capping one end of the odd- or even-numbered carbon chain can hold ten H(2) molecules with optimal binding energies for room temperature storage. The hybridization of the Li 2p states with the H(2)σ orbitals contributes to the H(2) adsorption. However, the binding mechanism of the H(2) molecules on Na arises only from the polarization interaction between the charged Na atom and the H(2). Interestingly, additional H(2) molecules can be bound to the carbon atoms at the chain ends due to the charge transfer between Li 2s2p (Na 3s) and C 2p states. More importantly, dimerization of these isolated metal-capped chains does not affect the hydrogen binding energy significantly. In addition, a single chain can be stabilized effectively by the C(60) fullerenes termination. With a hydrogen uptake of ∼10 wt.% on Li-coated C(60)-C(n)-C(60) (n = 5, 8), the Li(12)C(60)-C(n)-Li(12)C(60) complex, keeping the number of adsorbed H(2) molecules per Li and stabilizing the dispersion of individual Li atoms, can serve as better building blocks of polymers than the (Li(12)C(60))(2) dimer. These findings suggest a new route to design cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials based on terminated sp carbon chains.

  7. Observations of interplanetary dust by the Juno magnetometer investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Mathias; Jørgensen, John Leif; Denver, Troelz

    2017-01-01

    One of the Juno magnetometer investigation's star cameras was configured to search for unidentified objects during Juno's transit en route to Jupiter. This camera detects and registers luminous objects to magnitude 8. Objects persisting in more than five consecutive images and moving with an appa......One of the Juno magnetometer investigation's star cameras was configured to search for unidentified objects during Juno's transit en route to Jupiter. This camera detects and registers luminous objects to magnitude 8. Objects persisting in more than five consecutive images and moving...

  8. Calibration of the Ørsted vector magnetometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Sabaka, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    The vector fluxgate magnetometer of the Orsted satellite is routinely calibrated by comparing its output with measurements of the absolute magnetic intensity from the Overhauser instrument, which is the second magnetometer of the satellite. We describe the method used for and the result obtained ...... coordinate system and the reference system of the star imager. This is done by comparing the magnetic and attitude measurements with a model of Earth's magnetic field. The Euler angles describing this rotation are determined in this way with an accuracy of better than 4 arcsec....

  9. Associating ground magnetometer observations with current or voltage generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartinger, M. D.; Xu, Z.; Clauer, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    .”Statistical studies of ground magnetometer observations associated with dayside Transient High LatitudeCurrent Systems (THLCS) driven by similar mechanisms find contradictory results using this paradigm:some studies associate THLCS with voltage generators, others with current generators. We argue that mostof...... this contradiction arises from two assumptions used to interpret ground magnetometer observations:(1) measurements made at fixed position relative to the THLCS field-aligned current and (2) negligibleauroral precipitation contributions to ionospheric conductivity. We use observations and simulations toillustrate how...

  10. Atom-chip-based quantum gravimetry for the precise determination of absolute gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abend, Sven; Schubert, Christian; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2017-04-01

    We present a novel technique for the precise measurement of absolute local gravity with a quantum gravimeter based on an atom chip. Atom interferometry utilizes the interference of matter waves interrogated by laser light to read out inertial forces. Today's generation of these devices typically operate with test mass samples, that consists of ensembles of laser cooled atoms. Their performance is limited by the velocity spread and finite-size of the test masses that impose systematic uncertainties at the level of a few μGal [1]. Rather than laser cooled atoms we employ quantum degenerate ensembles, so called Bose-Einstein condensates [2], as ultra-sensitive probes for gravity. These sources offer unique properties that will allow to overcome the current limitations in the next generation of sensors. Furthermore, atom-chip technology offers the possibility to generate Bose-Einstein condensates in a fast and reliable way. We present a lab-based prototype that uses the atom chip itself to retro-reflect the interrogation laser and thus serves as inertial reference inside the vacuum [3]. With this setup, it is possible to demonstrate all necessary steps to measure gravity, including the preparation of the source, spanning an interferometer as well as the detection of the output signal. All steps are pursued on a baseline of 1 cm right below the atom chip and to analyze relevant systematic effects. In the framework of the center of excellence geoQ a next generation device is under construction at the Institut für Quantenoptik, that will target for in-field measurements. This device will feature a state-of-the-art atom-chip source with a high-flux of ultra-cold atoms at a repetition rate of 1-2 Hz [4]. The device will be characterized in cooperation with the Müller group at the Institut für Erdmessung the sensor and finally employed in a campaign to measure the Fennoscandian uplift at the level of 1 μGal. The presented work is supported by the CRC 1227 DQ-mat, the

  11. Recent Advances in Atomic Metal Doping of Carbon-based Nanomaterials for Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayatsarmadi, Bita; Zheng, Yao; Vasileff, Anthony; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Nanostructured metal-contained catalysts are one of the most widely used types of catalysts applied to facilitate some of sluggish electrochemical reactions. However, the high activity of these catalysts cannot be sustained over a variety of pH ranges. In an effort to develop highly active and stable metal-contained catalysts, various approaches have been pursued with an emphasis on metal particle size reduction and doping on carbon-based supports. These techniques enhances the metal-support interactions, originating from the chemical bonding effect between the metal dopants and carbon support and the associated interface, as well as the charge transfer between the atomic metal species and carbon framework. This provides an opportunity to tune the well-defined metal active centers and optimize their activity, selectivity and stability of this type of (electro)catalyst. Herein, recent advances in synthesis strategies, characterization and catalytic performance of single atom metal dopants on carbon-based nanomaterials are highlighted with attempts to understand the electronic structure and spatial arrangement of individual atoms as well as their interaction with the supports. Applications of these new materials in a wide range of potential electrocatalytic processes in renewable energy conversion systems are also discussed with emphasis on future directions in this active field of research. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Coherent and dynamic beam splitting based on light storage in cold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Zhao, Tian-Ming; Lee, Jong-Chan; Chough, Young-Tak; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-09-28

    We demonstrate a coherent and dynamic beam splitter based on light storage in cold atoms. An input weak laser pulse is first stored in a cold atom ensemble via electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). A set of counter-propagating control fields, applied at a later time, retrieves the stored pulse into two output spatial modes. The high visibility interference between the two output pulses clearly demonstrates that the beam splitting process is coherent. Furthermore, by manipulating the control lasers, it is possible to dynamically control the storage time, the power splitting ratio, the relative phase, and the optical frequencies of the output pulses. With further improvements, the active beam splitter demonstrated in this work might have applications in photonic photonic quantum information and in all-optical information processing.

  13. Double-negative acoustic metamaterial based on hollow steel tube meta-atom

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Huaijun; Ding, Changlin; Luo, Chunrong; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2012-01-01

    We presented an acoustic 'meta-atom' model of hollow steel tube (HST). The simulated and experimental results demonstrated that the resonant frequency is closely related to the length of the HST. Based on the HST model, we fabricated a two-dimensional (2D) acoustic metamaterial (AM) with negative effective mass density, which put up the transmission dip and accompanied inverse phase in experiment. By coupling the HST with split hollow sphere (SHS), another kind of 'meta-atom' with negative effective modulus in the layered sponge matrix, a three-dimensional (3D) AM was fabricated with simultaneously negative modulus and negative mass density. From the experiment, it is shown that the transmission peak similar to the electromagnetic metamaterials exhibited in the double-negative region of the AM. We also demonstrated that this kind of doble-negative AM can faithfully distinguish the acoustic sub-wavelength details ({\\lambda}/7) at the resonance frequency of 1630Hz.

  14. Magnetometer Data in the Classroom as a part of the NASA THEMIS Satellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peticolas, L. M.; Bean, J.; Walker, A.

    2011-12-01

    ratings. The PBS NewsHour piece was picked up by National Public Radio and made available on the Online NewsHour Web site where it was linked to NOVA Science NOW's Web site. Nearly all core teachers have become involved in other NASA-related programs-Heliophysics Educator Ambassadors, GSFC's Cosmic Times, SOPHIA, RBSE, etc. Jim Bean, one of the teachers in the program, highlights the benefits of this program in the classroom as: 1) inquiry/application based learning at an advanced high school level (physics; magnetism-B-field, electromagnetic radiation), 2) real-time data collection from multiple sources, i.e. Magnetometers, SOHO, iPhone and other phone Applications, etc., 3) data analysis, vector analysis, graphical representations, and 4) multiple subject integration; physics, math, geology, and astronomy.

  15. Recovery of the Earth's Gravity Field Based on Spaceborne Atom-interferometry and Its Accuracy Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Zhu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrostatic gravity gradiometer has been successfully applied as a core sensor in satellite gravity gradiometric mission GOCE, and its observations are used to recover the Earth's static gravity field with a degree and order above 200. The lifetime of GOCE has been over, and the next generation satellite gravity gradiometry with higher resolution is urgently required in order to recover the global steady-state gravity field with a degree and order of 200~360. High potential precision can be obtained in space by atom-interferometry gravity gradiometer due to its long interference time, and thus the atom-interferometry-based satellite gravity gradiometry has been proposed as one of the candidate techniques for the next satellite gravity gradiometric mission. In order to achieve the science goal for high resolution gravity field measurement in the future, a feasible scheme of atom-interferometry gravity gradiometry in micro-gravity environment is given in this paper, and the gravity gradient measurement can be achieved with a noise of 0.85mE/Hz1/2. Comparison and estimation of the Earth's gravity field recovery precision for different types of satellite gravity gradiometry is discussed, and the results show that the satellite gravity gradiometry based on atom-interferometry is expected to provide the global gravity field model with an improved accuracy of 7~8cm in terms of geoid height and 3×10-5 m/s2 in terms of gravity anomaly respectively at a degree and order of 252~290.

  16. Multilevel Atomic Coherent States and Atomic Holomorphic Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang-Qi; Haake, Fritz

    1996-01-01

    The notion of atomic coherent states is extended to the case of multilevel atom collective. Based on atomic coherent states, a holomorphic representation for atom collective states and operators is defined. An example is given to illustrate its application.

  17. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C.P.J. [University of California, Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science, Urey Hall, Mali Code 0339, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  18. Building a multi-walled carbon nanotube-based mass sensor with the atomic force microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Kuhle, A.; Marie, Rodolphe Charly Willy

    2005-01-01

    are used. The gold substrate is first covered with hydrophobic thiol molecules: octadecanthiol. The octadecanthiol molecules are then selectively removed from small areas by nanoshaving the gold substrate with the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) operating in contact mode. Hydrophilic thiols (2......We report an approach for building a mass sensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). We propose a method with a great potential for the positioning of MWCNTs based on self-assembly onto patterned hydrophilic areas. For the experiments ultra flat mica substrates covered with gold...

  19. Metallic nanoparticle-based strain sensors elaborated by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyoo, E.; Malhaire, C.; Thomas, D.; Rafaël, R.; R'Mili, M.; Malchère, A.; Roiban, L.; Koneti, S.; Bugnet, M.; Sabac, A.; Le Berre, M.

    2017-03-01

    Platinum nanoparticle-based strain gauges are elaborated by means of atomic layer deposition on flexible polyimide substrates. Their electro-mechanical response is tested under mechanical bending in both buckling and conformational contact configurations. A maximum gauge factor of 70 is reached at a strain level of 0.5%. Although the exponential dependence of the gauge resistance on strain is attributed to the tunneling effect, it is shown that the majority of the junctions between adjacent Pt nanoparticles are in a short circuit state. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of an all-plastic pressure sensor integrating Pt nanoparticle-based strain gauges in a Wheatstone bridge configuration.

  20. From a network of computed reaction enthalpies to atom-based thermochemistry (NEAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Császár, Attila G; Furtenbacher, Tibor

    2010-04-26

    A simple and fast, weighted, linear least-squares refinement protocol and code is presented for inverting the information contained in a network of quantum chemically computed 0 K reaction enthalpies. This inversion yields internally consistent 0 K enthalpies of formation for the species of the network. The refinement takes advantage of the fact that the accuracy of computed enthalpies depends strongly on the quantum-chemical protocol employed for their determination. Different protocols suffer from different sources of error; thus, the reaction enthalpies computed by them have "random" residual errors. Since it is much more natural for quantum-chemical energy and enthalpy results, including reaction enthalpies, to be based on the electronic ground states of the atoms and not on the historically preferred elemental states, and since these two possible protocols can be converted into each other straightforwardly, it is proposed that first-principles thermochemistry should employ the ground electronic states of atoms. In this scheme, called atom-based thermochemistry (AT), the enthalpy of formation of a gaseous compound corresponds simply to the total atomization energy of the species; it is always positive, and it reflects the bonding strength within the molecule. The inversion protocol developed and based on AT is termed NEAT, which represents the fact that the protocol proceeds from a network of computed reaction enthalpies toward atom-based thermochemistry, most directly to atom-based enthalpies of formation. After assembling a database that consisted of 361 ab initio reactions and reaction enthalpies involving 188 species, collected from 31 literature sources, the following dependable 0 K atom-based enthalpies of formation, Delta(f)${H{{{\\rm AT}\\hfill \\atop 0\\hfill}}}$, all in kJ mol(-1), have been obtained by means of NEAT: H(2)=432.07(0), CH=334.61(15), NH=327.69(25), OH=425.93(21), HF=566.13(31), CO=1072.08(28), O(2)=493.51(34), CH(2)=752.40(21), H(2)O

  1. Ionospheric travelling convection vortices observed by the Greenland magnetometer chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Stolle, Claudia; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    2013-01-01

    The Greenland magnetometer array continuously provides geomagnetic variometer data since the early eighties. With the polar cusp passing over it almost every day, the array is suitable to detect ionospheric traveling convection vortices (TCVs), which were rst detected by Friis-Christensen et al...

  2. Ørsted Pre-Flight Magnetometer Calibration Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risbo, T.; Brauer, Peter; Merayo, José M.G.

    2003-01-01

    modelling was developed and tested over several years and used for circle dividersted and other missions at test facilities in Europe, the United States and the Republic of South Africa. The verification of the test coil system using an Overhauser absolute scalar proton magnetometer is explained...

  3. Small Fluxgate Magnetometers: Development and Future Trends in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Pérez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we give an overview of the research on fluxgate magnetometers carried out in Spain. In particular we focus in the development of the planar-type instruments. We summarize the fabrication processes and signal processing developments as well as their use in complex systems and space.

  4. Morphological and structural study of gas atomized Zr-Cu-based glass-forming alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambon, A.; Badan, B

    2004-07-15

    Zr-Cu-based glass-forming alloys were processed in a laboratory scale gas atomizer, operated in sonic conditions with nitrogen or helium as the atomizing medium. Powders of rather wide size distributions were obtained, in the under 212 {mu}m range, which afforded to carry out comparative phase analyses on particles which underwent quite different cooling conditions. X-ray diffraction examinations as well as light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, differential thermal analysis (DTA) and microhardness determinations were used to investigate the powders belonging to different size ranges. Amorphous, partially crystalline and fully crystalline powders were obtained from each atomization batch. Light microscopy afforded to evaluate the morphometric details such as the secondary dendrite arm spacing in the crystalline particles, which were correlated with the estimated cooling rates computed by means of a simplified computer code. X-ray diffraction, TEM examinations and electron diffraction confirmed that conditions were established for the development of amorphous or nanocrystalline particles, in particular in the 'under 38 {mu}m' and in the 38-45 {mu}m size ranges. Microhardness determinations showed an extremely high hardness, of the order of 1000-1100 HV{sub 0.05} in the case of fully amorphous particles, which could be encountered mainly in the smaller size ranges, while in the case of crystalline powders the hardness was around a half of such value mainly in the larger, fully crystalline ones.

  5. Optimized distance-dependent atom-pair-based potential DOOP for protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Myong-Ho; Krull, Florian; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2015-05-01

    The DOcking decoy-based Optimized Potential (DOOP) energy function for protein structure prediction is based on empirical distance-dependent atom-pair interactions. To optimize the atom-pair interactions, native protein structures are decomposed into polypeptide chain segments that correspond to structural motives involving complete secondary structure elements. They constitute near native ligand-receptor systems (or just pairs). Thus, a total of 8609 ligand-receptor systems were prepared from 954 selected proteins. For each of these hypothetical ligand-receptor systems, 1000 evenly sampled docking decoys with 0-10 Å interface root-mean-square-deviation (iRMSD) were generated with a method used before for protein-protein docking. A neural network-based optimization method was applied to derive the optimized energy parameters using these decoys so that the energy function mimics the funnel-like energy landscape for the interaction between these hypothetical ligand-receptor systems. Thus, our method hierarchically models the overall funnel-like energy landscape of native protein structures. The resulting energy function was tested on several commonly used decoy sets for native protein structure recognition and compared with other statistical potentials. In combination with a torsion potential term which describes the local conformational preference, the atom-pair-based potential outperforms other reported statistical energy functions in correct ranking of native protein structures for a variety of decoy sets. This is especially the case for the most challenging ROSETTA decoy set, although it does not take into account side chain orientation-dependence explicitly. The DOOP energy function for protein structure prediction, the underlying database of protein structures with hypothetical ligand-receptor systems and their decoys are freely available at http://agknapp.chemie.fu-berlin.de/doop/. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Development of Autonomous Magnetometer Rotorcraft For Wide Area Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark D. McKay; Matthew O. Anderson

    2011-08-01

    Large areas across the United States and internationally are potentially contaminated with unexploded ordinance (UXO), with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with (1) near 100% coverage and (2) near 100% detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area assessment is a multi-level one, in which medium - altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry. Subsequent to this wide area assessment targeted surface investigations are performed using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be an effective tool for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 to 3 meters. These altitude requirements mean that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys, resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre. In addition, due to the low altitude there are substantial risks to pilots and equipment. Surface towed arrays provide highresolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. Thus there is a need for other systems, which can be used for effective data collection. An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it reduces risk to operators, is lower in initial and Operational and Maintenance (O&M) costs (and can thus potentially be applied to smaller sites) and has the potential of being more effective in terms of detection and possibly

  7. Experimental Implementation of a Model-Based Inverse Filter to Attenuate Hysteresis in an Atomic Force Microscope

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hatch, Andrew; Smith, Ralph G; De, Tathagata

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the development and experimental validation of a model-based, open loop control design for mitigating the frequency-dependent effects of hysteresis in an atomic force microscope (AFM...

  8. Atomic scale properties of magnetic Mn-based alloys probed by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mn-based alloys are characterized by a wealth of properties, which are of interest both from fundamental physics point of view and particularly attractive for different applications in modern technology: from magnetic storage to sensing and spin-based electronics. The possibility to tune their magnetic properties through post-growth thermal processes and/or stoichiometry engineering is highly important in order to target different applications (i.e. Mn$_{x}$Ga) or to increase their Curie temperature above room temperature (i.e. off-stoichiometric MnSi). In this project, the Mössbauer effect will be applied at $^{57}$Fe sites following implantation of radioactive $^{57}$Mn, to probe the micro-structure and magnetism of Mn-based alloys on the atomic-scale. The proposed experimental plan is devoted to establish a direct correlation between the local structure and bulk magnetism (and other physical properties) of Mn-based alloys.

  9. Guest-cage atomic interactions in a clathrate-based phase-change material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Desmond; Skelton, Jonathan M; Law, Leong-Tat; Wang, Wei-Jie; Li, Ming-Hua; Song, Wen-Dong; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Elliott, Stephen R

    2014-03-19

    New clathrate-based phase-change materials with cage-like structures incorporating Cs and Ba guest atoms, are reported as a means of altering crystallization and amorphization behavior by controlling 'guest-cage' interactions via intra-complex guest vibrational effects. Both a high resistance to spontaneous crystallization, and long retention of the amorphous phase are achieved, as well as a low melting energy. This approach provides a route for achieving cage-controlled semiconductor devices. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Athermalization in atomic force microscope based force spectroscopy using matched microstructure coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torun, H; Finkler, O; Degertekin, F L

    2009-07-01

    The authors describe a method for athermalization in atomic force microscope (AFM) based force spectroscopy applications using microstructures that thermomechanically match the AFM probes. The method uses a setup where the AFM probe is coupled with the matched structure and the displacements of both structures are read out simultaneously. The matched structure displaces with the AFM probe as temperature changes, thus the force applied to the sample can be kept constant without the need for a separate feedback loop for thermal drift compensation, and the differential signal can be used to cancel the shift in zero-force level of the AFM.

  11. Atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation study of onion abaxial epidermis walls in aqueous environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xiaoning; Tittmann, Bernhard [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Kim, Seong H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    An atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation method was employed to study how the structure of cellulose microfibril packing and matrix polymers affect elastic modulus of fully hydrated primary plant cell walls. The isolated, single-layered abaxial epidermis cell wall of an onion bulb was used as a test system since the cellulose microfibril packing in this cell wall is known to vary systematically from inside to outside scales and the most abundant matrix polymer, pectin, can easily be altered through simple chemical treatments such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and calcium ions. Experimental results showed that the pectin network variation has significant impacts on the cell wall modulus, and not the cellulose microfibril packing.

  12. Note: A microfluidic freezer based on evaporative cooling of atomized aqueous microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jin; Chung, Minsub; Kim, Dohyun

    2015-01-01

    We report for the first time water-based evaporative cooling integrated into a microfluidic chip for temperature control and freezing of biological solution. We opt for water as a nontoxic, effective refrigerant. Aqueous solutions are atomized in our device and evaporation of microdroplets under vacuum removes heat effectively. We achieve rapid cooling (-5.1 °C/s) and a low freezing temperature (-14.1 °C). Using this approach, we demonstrate freezing of deionized water and protein solution. Our simple, yet effective cooling device may improve many microfluidic applications currently relying on external power-hungry instruments for cooling and freezing.

  13. Crystallization and atomic diffusion behavior of high coercive Ta/Nd-Fe-B/Ta-based permanent magnetic thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Na; Zhang, Xiao; You, Caiyin; Fu, Huarui [Xi' an University of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an (China); Shen, Qianlong [Logistics University of People' s Armed Police Force, Tianjin (China)

    2017-06-15

    A high coercivity of about 20.4 kOe was obtained through post-annealing the sputtered Ta/Nd-Fe-B/Ta-based permanent magnetic thin films. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were performed to investigate the crystallization and atomic diffusion behaviors during post-annealing. The results show that the buffer and capping Ta layers prefered to intermix with Fe and B atoms, and Nd tends to be combined with O atoms. The preferred atomic combination caused the appearance of the soft magnetic phase of Fe-Ta-B, resulting in a kink of the second quadratic magnetic hysteresis loop. The preferred atomic diffusion and phase formation of the thin films were well explained in terms of the formation enthalpy of the various compounds. (orig.)

  14. Searches for Exotic Transient Signals with a Global Network of Optical Magnetometers for Exotic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pustelny, S

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we describe a novel scheme for searching for physics beyond the Standard Model. The idea is based on correlation of time-synchronized readouts of distant ($\\gtrsim$100~km) optical magnetometers. Such an approach limits hard-to-identify local transient noise, providing the system with unique capabilities of identification of global transient events. Careful analysis of the signal can reveal the nature of the events (e.g., its nonmagnetic origin), which opens avenues for new class of exotic-physics searches (searches for global transient exotic spin couplings) and tests of yet unverified theoretical models.

  15. Design of a Low-Cost 2-Axes Fluxgate Magnetometer for Small Satellite Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jeoung Kim

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the design and analysis results of a 2-axes magnetometer for attitude determination of small satellite. A low-cost and efficient 2-axes fluxgate magnetometer was selected as the most suitable attitude sensor for LEO microsatellites which require a low-to-medium level pointing accuracy. An optimization trade-off study has been performed for the development of 2-axes fluxgate magnetometer. All the relevant parameters such as permeability, demagnetization factor, coil diameter, core thickness, and number of coil turns were considered for the sizing of a small satellite magnetometer. The magnetometer which is designed, manufactured, and tested in-house as described in this paper satisfies linearity requirement for determining attitude position of small satellites. On the basis of magnetometer which is designed in Space System Research Lab. (SSRL, commercial magnetometer will be developed.

  16. Towards Demonstration of a MOT-Based Continuous Cold CS-Beam Atomic Clock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, H; Camparo, J. C; Iyanu, G

    2007-01-01

    ... (MOT). This technique has the unique advantage of generating a useful cold atomic beam just outside the volume of a MOT and, hence, can greatly reduce the size of the atomic clock physics package...

  17. Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kollár, Alicia J.; Taylor, Stephen F.; Turner, Richard W.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed-matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented dc-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (approximately 2 μ m ) or 6 nT /√{Hz } per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly 100 points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT /√{Hz } for each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner measures these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10-6 Φ0/√{Hz } ) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns in a system where samples may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge-transport images at temperatures from room temperature to 4 K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  18. Effects of doping of calcium atom(s) on structural, electronic and optical properties of binary strontium chalcogenides - A theoretical investigation using DFT based FP-LAPW methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Rahul; Chattopadhyaya, Surya

    2017-09-01

    The effects of doping of Ca atom(s) on structural, electronic and optical properties of binary strontium chalcogenide semiconductor compounds have been investigated theoretically using DFT based FP-LAPW approach by modeling the rock-salt (B1) ternary alloys CaxSr1-xS, CaxSr1-xSe and CaxSr1-xTe at some specific concentrations 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 and studying their aforesaid properties. The exchange-correlation potentials for their structural properties have been computed using the Wu-Cohen generalized-gradient approximation (WC-GGA) scheme, while those for the electronic and optical properties have been computed using recently developed Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) scheme. In addition, we have computed the electronic and optical properties with the traditional BLYP and PBE-GGA schemes for comparison. The atomic and orbital origin of different electronic states in the band structure of each of the compounds have been identified from the respective density of states (DOS). Using the approach of Zunger and co-workers, the microscopic origin of band gap bowing has been discussed in term of volume deformation, charge exchange and structural relaxation. Bonding characteristics among the constituent atoms of each of the specimens have been discussed from their charge density contour plots. Optical properties of the binary compounds and ternary alloys have been investigated theoretically in terms of their respective dielectric function, refractive index, normal incidence reflectivity and optical conductivity. Several calculated results have been compared with available experimental and other theoretical data.

  19. Combined alternating gradient force magnetometer and susceptometer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, M.; Mendizábal Vázquez, I. de; Aroca, C. [Dpto. Física Aplicada, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ranchal, R. [Dpto. Física de Materiales, Facultad Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Cobos, P. [ISOM, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new system that combines the performances of two different types of magnetic characterization systems, Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometers (AGFM) and susceptometers. The flexibility of our system is demonstrated by its capability to be used as any of them, AGFM or susceptometer, without any modification in the experimental set-up because of the electronics we have developed. Our system has a limit of sensitivity lower than 5 × 10{sup −7} emu. Moreover, its main advantage is demonstrated by the possibility of measuring small quantities of materials under DC or AC magnetic fields that cannot properly be measured with a commercial vibrating sample magnetometers or AGFM.

  20. A Novel Graphene Oxide-Based Protein Interaction Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung-Woong; Morita, Kyohei; Adachi, Taiji

    2015-02-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising material for biological applications because of its excellent physical/chemical properties such as aqueous processability, amphiphilicity, and surface functionalizability. Here we introduce a new biological application of GO, a novel GO-based technique for probing protein interactions using atomic force microscopy (AFM). GO sheets were intercalated between the protein-modified AFM probe and the polymer substrate in order to reduce the non-specific adhesion force observed during single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). In this study, we used SMFS to probe the interaction of the actin filament and actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3), an actin-binding protein. Our results confirm that the GO sheet reduces nonspecific adhesion of the probe to the substrate. Using the GO-based technique, we succeeded in estimating the dissociation constant of the actin filament-binding protein interaction.

  1. Electrical tomography using atomic force microscopy and its application towards carbon nanotube-based interconnects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, A; Hantschel, T; Dathe, A; Eyben, P; Ke, X; Vandervorst, W

    2012-08-03

    The fabrication and integration of low-resistance carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for interconnects in future integrated circuits requires characterization techniques providing structural and electrical information at the nanometer scale. In this paper we present a slice-and-view approach based on electrical atomic force microscopy. Material removal achieved by successive scanning using doped ultra-sharp full-diamond probes, manufactured in-house, enables us to acquire two-dimensional (2D) resistance maps originating from different depths (equivalently different CNT lengths) on CNT-based interconnects. Stacking and interpolating these 2D resistance maps results in a three-dimensional (3D) representation (tomogram). This allows insight from a structural (e.g. size, density, distribution, straightness) and electrical point of view simultaneously. By extracting the resistance evolution over the length of an individual CNT we derive quantitative information about the resistivity and the contact resistance between the CNT and bottom electrode.

  2. Multiscale modeling and experimental validation for nanochannel depth control in atomic force microscopy-based nanofabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jiaqi; Liu, Pinkuan, E-mail: pkliu@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhu, Xiaobo; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Guozhen [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-08-21

    Nanochannels are essential features of many microelectronic and biomedical devices. To date, the most commonly employed method to fabricate these nanochannels is atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, there is presently a very poor understanding on the fundamental principles underlying this process, which limits its reliability and controllability. In this study, we present a comprehensive multiscale model by incorporating strain gradient plasticity and strain gradient elasticity theories, which can predict nanochannel depths during AFM-based nanofabrication. The modeling results are directly verified with experiments performed on Cu and Pt substrates. As this model can also be extended to include many additional conditions, it has broad applicability in a wide range of AFM-based nanofabrication applications.

  3. Unscented KALMAN Filtering for Spacecraft Attitude and Rate Determination Using Magnetometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Woo Kim

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available An Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF for estimation of the attitude and rate of a spacecraft using only magnetometer vector measurement is developed. The attitude dynamics used in the estimation is the nonlinear Euler`s rotational equation which is augmented with the quaternion kinematics to construct a process model. The filter is designed for small satellite in low Earth orbit, so the disturbance torques include gravity-gradient torque, magnetic disturbance torque, and aerodynamic drag torque. The magnetometer measurements are simulated based on time-varying position of the spacecraft. The filter has been tested not only in the standby mode but also in the detumbling mode. Two types of actuators have been modeled and applied in the simulation. The PD controller is used for the two types of actuators (reaction wheels and thrusters to detumble the spacecraft. The estimation error converged to within 5 deg for attitude and 0.1 deg/s for rate respectively when the two types of actuators were used. A joint state parameter estimation has been tested and the effect of the process noise covariance on the parameter estimation has been indicated. Also, Monte-Carlo simulations have been performed to test the capability of the filter to converge with the initial conditions sampled from a uniform distribution. Finally, the UKF performance has been compared to that of the EKF and it demonstrates that UKF slightly outperforms EKF. The developed algorithm can be applied to any type of small satellites that are actuated by magnetic torquers, reaction wheels or thrusters with a capability of magnetometer vector measurements for attitude and rate estimation.

  4. Experience of 1-second magnetometer LEMI-025 use in the INTERMAGNET observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusenkov, Andriy

    2014-05-01

    More than ten years ago INTERMAGNET community decided to commence producing filtered one-second data in addition to traditional one-minute data, hourly, daily, monthly, and annual means. This decision was inspired by the increasing demand of space physics scientists, investigating wave processes in the ionosphere and the magnetosphere of the Earth's. The first requirements for a geomagnetic data acquisition system capable to acquire 1-second data were compiled during the INTERMAGNET survey, conducted by Jeffrey Love in 2005, investigating the needs of the scientific community using geomagnetic time series data. The main consensus of the survey is as follows: geomagnetic data acquired at 1 Hz sampling should have 0.01 nT resolution at least, be filtered by a digital filter and be centred onto the UTC second within 0.01 s. Besides, the one-second magnetometer has to have much lower noise than that of 1-minute one, because the natural geomagnetic signals rapidly decay at the higher frequencies. And finally, the one-second instrument has to provide a sufficient level of immunity to manmade (industrial) noise, especially as produced by power lines. In order to meet these partly conflicting requirements to the frequency response, a new magnetometer functional diagram, which combines analogue and digital filters, was proposed in the Lviv Centre of Institute for Space Research. Basing on this approach the first model LEMI-025 was designed, built, successfully tested and installed in Dourbes geomagnetic observatory (Belgium) since 2008. Later, after considerable modifications, these first commercially available instruments compatible with one-second INTERMAGNET standard were installed in a number of geomagnetic observatories over the Globe. The experience of LEMI-025 operation during the past few years let us evaluate the baseline stability of the new one-second magnetometer (factors accuracy and stability (transfer function (<0.005 %). More details on this topic will be

  5. Fluxgate Magnetometer system mounted on UAS system: First field test at Dominga IOCG deposit, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanez, G. A.; Banchero, L.; Marco, A.; Figueroa, R.

    2016-12-01

    With the support of Fundacion Chile (FCH) grant, we developed an airborne magnetic system (GeoMagDrone GFDAS) mounted on a UAS octodrone platform (DJI, S1000), based on a low cost/light-weight fluxgate magnetometer (FGM-301) and a robust/light-weight data logger for position, temperature, radar altimeter and 3 magnetic components at 16 Hz recording. Fluxgate magnetometer is hanging from the UAS platform at a distance of 2.5m where the EM noise is reduced to less than 2 nT. The whole geophysical system, including batteries, weights 650 gr., with an autonomy of 2 hours. Magnetometer calibration includes the 9 coefficients of amplitude, offset, and orthogonality, and temperature correction. We test the system over the IOCG deposit of Dominga-Chile, a magnetite ore (40%) (a block of 2x3 km with NS lines separated every 50m and a clearance of 40m, the mineral deposit buried 50-100m from the surface, where a ground magnetic survey was conducted previously. Ground conditions includes relatively rough topography with slopes of 10-20%, and some windy days. We use the digital terrain model SRTM30 to define the drape flight shape Average flight performance includes a mean speed of 35-40 km/hour, and an UAS battery consumption of 18-12 minutes depending on the wind conditions. A good correspondence was found between plan deployment and survey results in terms of line direction/separation/clearance. Line path were flown with errors less than 5 meters, whereas clearance of 40m was kept depending on the amount of control points used. The comparison between ground survey and GeoMagDrone results show a perfect match (anomaly amplitude/shape and noise envelope), validating in this way the system developed. Main concern for the productive application of this technology in unmanned geophysical platforms is the battery performance and the quality of digital terrain models to follow the topography.

  6. Fiber Optic Magnetometers Using Planar And Cylindrical Magnetostrictive Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucholtz, F.; Yurek, A. M.; Koo, K. P.; Dandridge, A.

    1987-04-01

    Fiber optic magnetometers which require high sensitivity at low frequencies (dc-10 Hz) rely on the nonlinear magnetostriction of materials such as amorphous metallic glass alloys. Typically, fiber is bonded to a magnetostrictive sample to convert strain in the sample to phase shift in a fiber interferometer. We present the results of measurements of the frequency dependence and dc and ac magnetic field sensitivity of both planar and cylindrical transducing elements, and discuss the practical advantages and disadvan-tages of each configuration.

  7. A broadband two axis flux-gate magnetometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Palangio

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available A broadband two axis flux-gate magnetometer was developed to obtain high sensitivity in magnetotelluric measurements. In magnetotelluric sounding, natural low frequency electromagnetic fields are used to estimate the conductivity of the Earth's interior. Because variations in the natural magnetic field have small amplitude(10-100 pT in the frequency range 1 Hz to 100 Hz, highly sensitive magnetic sensors are required. In magnetotelluric measurements two long and heavy solenoids, which must be installed, in the field station, perpendicular to each other (north-south and east-west and levelled in the horizontal plane are used. The coil is a critical component in magnetotelluric measurements because very slight motions create noise voltages, particularly troublesome in wooded areas; generally the installation takes place in a shallow trench. Moreover the coil records the derivative of the variations rather than the magnetic field variations, consequently the transfer function (amplitude and phase of this sensor is not constant throughout the frequency range 0.001-100 Hz. The instrument, developed at L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory, has a flat response in both amplitude and phase in the frequency band DC-100 Hz, in addition it has low weight, low power, small volume and it is easier to install in the field than induction magnetometers. The sensivity of this magnetometer is 10 pT rms.

  8. Detection Range of Airborne Magnetometers in Magnetic Anomaly Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjing Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Airborne magnetometers are utilized for the small-range search, precise positioning, and identification of the ferromagnetic properties of underwater targets. As an important performance parameter of sensors, the detection range of airborne magnetometers is commonly set as a fixed value in references regardless of the influences of environment noise, target magnetic properties, and platform features in a classical model to detect airborne magnetic anomalies. As a consequence, deviation in detection ability analysis is observed. In this study, a novel detection range model is proposed on the basis of classic detection range models of airborne magnetometers. In this model, probability distribution is applied, and the magnetic properties of targets and the environment noise properties of a moving submarine are considered. The detection range model is also constructed by considering the distribution of the moving submarine during detection. A cell-averaging greatest-of-constant false alarm rate test method is also used to calculate the detection range of the model at a desired false alarm rate. The detection range model is then used to establish typical submarine search probabilistic models. Results show that the model can be used to evaluate not only the effects of ambient magnetic noise but also the moving and geomagnetic features of the target and airborne detection platform. The model can also be utilized to display the actual operating range of sensor systems.

  9. A spinner magnetometer for large Apollo lunar samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, M.; Gattacceca, J.; Quesnel, Y.; Lepaulard, C.; Lima, E. A.; Manfredi, M.; Rochette, P.

    2017-10-01

    We developed a spinner magnetometer to measure the natural remanent magnetization of large Apollo lunar rocks in the storage vault of the Lunar Sample Laboratory Facility (LSLF) of NASA. The magnetometer mainly consists of a commercially available three-axial fluxgate sensor and a hand-rotating sample table with an optical encoder recording the rotation angles. The distance between the sample and the sensor is adjustable according to the sample size and magnetization intensity. The sensor and the sample are placed in a two-layer mu-metal shield to measure the sample natural remanent magnetization. The magnetic signals are acquired together with the rotation angle to obtain stacking of the measured signals over multiple revolutions. The developed magnetometer has a sensitivity of 5 × 10-7 Am2 at the standard sensor-to-sample distance of 15 cm. This sensitivity is sufficient to measure the natural remanent magnetization of almost all the lunar basalt and breccia samples with mass above 10 g in the LSLF vault.

  10. Noncancer mortality based on the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb survivors registry over 30 years, 1968-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasagi, Keiko [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine

    2002-04-01

    The relation of radiation exposure with noncancer mortality was examined on 44,514 atomic bomb survivors (17,935 males, 26,579 females, and mean age 22.8{+-}15.7 yrs at the time of bombing) registered at Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, based on mortality follow-up over 30 years, 1968-1997. Noncancer mortality was significantly related to radiation dose with relative risk of 1.06 at 1 Sv radiation dose, although weaker than the dose response in solid cancer mortality. The significant dose responses were observed especially in circulatory disease, stroke and urinary organ disease, and suggestive dose response in pneumonia. The temporal pattern in dose response by age at the time of bombing indicated that the relative risk of noncancer mortality was higher with follow-up period, which is contrary to a decreasing dose response in solid cancer mortality with follow-up period. The tendency was remarkable in those survivors younger at the time of bombing. These findings suggest that the significant radiation risk observed in noncancer mortality might increase as the proportion of younger survivors among atomic bomb survivors increases. (author)

  11. Ta2O5- and TiO2-based nanostructures made by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemell, Marianna; Härkönen, Emma; Pore, Viljami; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2010-01-01

    Nanotubular Ta2O5- and TiO2-based structures were prepared by atomic layer deposition of Ta2O5 and TiO2 thin films, conformally on pore walls of porous alumina membranes. Both self-supporting alumina membranes and Si-supported thin-film membranes were studied as templates. Long Ta2O5 and TiO2 nanotubes were prepared successfully with the self-supporting membranes. The TiO2 nanotubes showed photocatalytic activity in methylene blue degradation under UV illumination. The Ta2O5 and TiO2 nanotubes were further modified by depositing Pt nanoparticles inside them. The Si-supported thin-film membranes were used as templates for the preparation of robust Ta2O5-coated Ni nanorod arrays on a Si substrate using electrodeposition, chemical etching and atomic layer deposition. In addition to photocatalysis, the nanostructures prepared in this work may find applications as other catalysts and as solid-state or electrochemical capacitors.

  12. Low Power, Self Calibrated Vector Magnetometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR project investigates a novel approach to vector magnetometry based on high precision measurements of the total magnetic field. The calibration is...

  13. Feasibility Study for an Autonomous UAV -Magnetometer System -- Final Report on SERDP SEED 1509:2206

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelof Versteeg; Mark McKay; Matt Anderson; Ross Johnson; Bob Selfridge; Jay Bennett

    2007-09-01

    Large areas across the United States are potentially contaminated with UXO, with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with 1) near 100 % coverage and 2) near 100 % detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area scanning is a multi-level one, in which medium altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry followed by surface investigations using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be effective for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 – 3 meters. These altitude requirements means that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys (resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre). Surface towed arrays provide high resolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. Thus, other systems are needed allowing for effective data collection. An UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it would be safer for the operators, cheaper in initial and O&M costs, and more effective in terms of site characterization. However, while UAV data acquisition from fixed wing platforms for large (> 200 feet) stand off distances is relatively straight forward, a host of challenges exist for low stand-off distance (~ 6 feet) UAV geophysical data acquisition. The objective of SERDP SEED 1509:2006 was to identify the primary challenges

  14. netPICOMAG: a low-cost turn-key magnetometer for aurora detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, I.; Connors, M.

    2008-12-01

    Previous work on development of a compact, low-cost, fluxgate magnetometer, dubbed PICOMAG, yielded a 1-nanotesla resolution, 1-second cadence instrument, suitable for research or teaching solar/terrestrial physics. With a low-cost magnetic instrument and the wider availability of Internet connectivity in the auroral zone (of Canada for example), the potential exists to fill gaps in spatial coverage that still plague auroral geomagnetic research. Thus, the ability to widely distribute accurate, low cost magnetometers was the motivating factor to develop PICOMAG. NetPICOMAG was developed in the effort to refine PICOMAG into a turn-key magnetometer data collection system that is self contained, simple to install and requires zero-maintenance. Once the unit is placed in the ground and connected to the Internet, it locks onto a GPS time signal and begins to transmit magnetic field measurements back to a central data repository, where it is archived, processed and plotted for public viewing via the World Wide Web. It is envisaged (among many other uses) that science teachers can use real scientific data provided by netPICOMAG in teaching the interactions between the sun and the Earth's magnetic field, manifesting itself in the phenomenon known as the northern lights. As such, netPICOMAG can be aptly described and is being promoted as an aurora detector. The netPICOMAG unit is based around three spatially oriented Speake and Company FGM-3/3h series magnetic field sensors that each emit a pulse stream whose frequency is related to the magnetic field along these three axes, and is nearly linearly related to magnetic field perturbations relevant to auroral studies. The individual pulse frequencies are measured by two PIC18F252 programmable microcontrollers. The measurements are combined with a GPS timestamp from a Garmin GPS 18 LVC GPS receiver, and transmitted as plain text as UDP datagrams by a Rabbit Semiconductor RCM4010 8-bit, networked microcontroller module. The self

  15. Current status and perspectives in atomic force microscopy-based identification of cellular transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chenbo; Hu, Xiao; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the complex interplay between cells and their biomechanics and how the interplay is influenced by the extracellular microenvironment, as well as how the transforming potential of a tissue from a benign to a cancerous one is related to the dynamics of both the cell and its surroundings, holds promise for the development of targeted translational therapies. This review provides a comprehensive overview of atomic force microscopy-based technology and its applications for identification of cellular progression to a cancerous phenotype. The review also offers insights into the advancements that are required for the next user-controlled tool to allow for the identification of early cell transformation and thus potentially lead to improved therapeutic outcomes.

  16. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Nanorobotics Modelling, Simulation, Setup Building and Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Hui; Régnier, Stéphane; Sitti, Metin

    2012-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has been successfully used to perform nanorobotic manipulation operations on nanoscale entities such as particles, nanotubes, nanowires, nanocrystals, and DNA since 1990s. There have been many progress on modeling, imaging, teleoperated or automated control, human-machine interfacing, instrumentation, and applications of AFM based nanorobotic manipulation systems in literature. This book aims to include all of such state-of-the-art progress in an organized, structured, and detailed manner as a reference book and also potentially a textbook in nanorobotics and any other nanoscale dynamics, systems and controls related research and education. Clearly written and well-organized, this text introduces designs and prototypes of the nanorobotic systems in detail with innovative principles of three-dimensional manipulation force microscopy and parallel imaging/manipulation force microscopy.

  17. The possibility of multi-layer nanofabrication via atomic force microscope-based pulse electrochemical nanopatterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Uk Su; Morita, Noboru; Lee, Deug Woo; Jun, Martin; Park, Jeong Woo

    2017-05-01

    Pulse electrochemical nanopatterning, a non-contact scanning probe lithography process using ultrashort voltage pulses, is based primarily on an electrochemical machining process using localized electrochemical oxidation between a sharp tool tip and the sample surface. In this study, nanoscale oxide patterns were formed on silicon Si (100) wafer surfaces via electrochemical surface nanopatterning, by supplying external pulsed currents through non-contact atomic force microscopy. Nanoscale oxide width and height were controlled by modulating the applied pulse duration. Additionally, protruding nanoscale oxides were removed completely by simple chemical etching, showing a depressed pattern on the sample substrate surface. Nanoscale two-dimensional oxides, prepared by a localized electrochemical reaction, can be defined easily by controlling physical and electrical variables, before proceeding further to a layer-by-layer nanofabrication process.

  18. Passive microrheology of soft materials with atomic force microscopy: A wavelet-based spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Torres, C.; Streppa, L. [CNRS, UMR5672, Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d' Italie, Université de Lyon, 69007 Lyon (France); Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F. [CNRS, UMR5672, Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d' Italie, Université de Lyon, 69007 Lyon (France); CNRS, UMR5798, Laboratoire Ondes et Matière d' Aquitaine, Université de Bordeaux, 351 Cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence (France); Argoul, P. [Université Paris-Est, Ecole des Ponts ParisTech, SDOA, MAST, IFSTTAR, 14-20 Bd Newton, Cité Descartes, 77420 Champs sur Marne (France)

    2016-01-18

    Compared to active microrheology where a known force or modulation is periodically imposed to a soft material, passive microrheology relies on the spectral analysis of the spontaneous motion of tracers inherent or external to the material. Passive microrheology studies of soft or living materials with atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever tips are rather rare because, in the spectral densities, the rheological response of the materials is hardly distinguishable from other sources of random or periodic perturbations. To circumvent this difficulty, we propose here a wavelet-based decomposition of AFM cantilever tip fluctuations and we show that when applying this multi-scale method to soft polymer layers and to living myoblasts, the structural damping exponents of these soft materials can be retrieved.

  19. The study on the atomic force microscopy base nanoscale electrical discharge machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Ching; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes an innovative atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanoscale electrical discharge machining (AFM-based nanoEDM) system which combines an AFM with a self-produced metallic probe and a high-voltage generator to create an atmospheric environment AFM-based nanoEDM system and a deionized water (DI water) environment AFM-based nanoEDM system. This study combines wire-cut processing and electrochemical tip sharpening techniques on a 40-µm thick stainless steel sheet to produce a high conductive AFM probes, the production can withstand high voltage and large current. The tip radius of these probes is approximately 40 nm. A probe test was executed on the AFM using probes to obtain nanoscales morphology of Si wafer surface. The silicon wafer was as a specimen to carry out AFM-base nanoEDM process in atmospheric and DI water environments by AFM-based nanoEDM system. After experiments, the results show that the atmospheric and DI water environment AFM-based nanoEDM systems operate smoothly. From experimental results, it can be found that the electric discharge depth of the silicon wafer at atmospheric environments is a mere 14.54 nm. In a DI water environment, the depth of electric discharge of the silicon wafer can reach 25.4 nm. This indicates that the EDM ability of DI water environment AFM-based nanoEDM system is higher than that of atmospheric environment AFM-based nanoEDM system. After multiple nanoEDM process, the tips become blunt. After applying electrochemical tip sharpening techniques, the tip radius can return to approximately 40 nm. Therefore, AFM probes produced in this study can be reused. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. 3D magnetometer for a dilution refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchaikin, S.; Likhachev, A.; Cioata, F.; Perminov, I.; Sanghera, H.; Singh, I.; Spear, P.; Chavez, P.; Han, X.; Petroff, C.; Rich, C.

    2012-12-01

    In this report, we describe a development of a three dimensional system for measurements of magnetic field at a wide temperature range of 300K-4K. The system is based on 8 AMR sensors and allows for control of the magnetic environment in a dilution refrigerator during the cool down of a superconducting processor. With a low noise signal processing electronics and a special sensor saturation circuit, a magnetic induction resolution below of 1 nT was achieved.

  1. Ferromagnetism and Half-Metallicity in Atomically Thin Holey Nitrogenated Graphene Based Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Indrani; Pathak, Biswarup

    2017-09-06

    Metal-free half-metallicity has been the subject of immense research focus in the field of spintronic devices. By using density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations, atomically thin holey nitrogenated graphene (C2 N) based systems are studied for possible spintronic applications. Ferromagnetism is observed in all the C-doped holey nitrogenated graphene. Interestingly, the holey nitrogenated graphene (C2 N) based system shows strong half-metallicity with a Curie temperature of approximately 297 K when a particular C-doping concentration is reached. It shows a strong half-metallicity compared with any metal-free systems studied to date. Thus, such carbon nitride based systems can be used for a 100 % spin polarized current. Furthermore, such C-doped systems show excellent dynamical, thermal, and mechanical properties. Thus, we predict a metal-free planar ferromagnetic half-metallic holey nitrogenated graphene based system for room-temperature spintronic devices. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Crystal engineering of giant molecules based on perylene diimide conjugated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nano-atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, He

    . In such "bottom-up" approach, the precise fabrication of 2 nm 100 nm nanostructures, is of great research interest. In this thesis, crystal engineering of giant molecules based on PDI conjugated POSS Nano-Atom (PDI-BPOSS) nano-atoms via self-assembly is performed and studied. Herein, three different giant molecules were synthesized: shape amphiphile, m-phenyl-(PDI-BPOSS)2 (S1) and tetrahedron, R-(PDI-BPOSS)4 (S2) and S-(PDI-BPOSS)4 (S3). Single crystals were grown for S1 and S2, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were performed, and crystal structures of these samples were determined, while hexagonal superlattice without crystal order can be observed for S3 to exhibit crystal-like morphology.

  3. Counter electrojet features in the Brazilian sector: simultaneous observation by radar, digital sounder and magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Denardini

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work we show new results regarding equatorial counter electrojet (CEJ events in the Brazilian sector, based on the RESCO radar, two set of fluxgate magnetometer systems and a digital sounder. RESCO radar is a 50 MHz backscatter coherent radar installed in 1998 at São Luís (SLZ, 2.33° S, 44.60° W, an equatorial site. The Digital sounder routinely monitors the electron density profile at the radar site. The magnetometer systems are fluxgate-type installed at SLZ and Eusébio (EUS, 03.89° S, 38.44° W. From the difference between the horizontal component of magnetic field at SLZ station and the same component at EUS (EEJ ground strength several cases of westward morning electrojet and its normal inversion to the eastward equatorial electrojet (EEJ have been observed. Also, the EEJ ground strength has shown some cases of CEJ events, which been detected with the RESCO radar too. Detection of these events were investigated with respect to their time and height of occurrence, correlation with sporadic E (Es layers at the same time, and their spectral characteristics as well as the radar echo power intensity.

  4. Real-time estimation of projectile roll angle using magnetometers: in-lab experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changey, S.; Pecheur, E.; Wey, P.; Sommer, E.

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge of the roll angle of a projectile is decisive to apply guidance and control law. For example, the goal of ISL's project GSP (Guided Supersonic Projectile) is to change the flight path of an airdefence projectile in order to correct the aim error due to the target manoeuvres. The originality of the concept is based on pyrotechnical actuators and onboard sensors which control the angular motion of the projectile. First of all, the control of the actuators requires the precise control of the roll angle of the projectile. To estimate the roll angle of the projectile, two magnetometers are embedded in the projectile to measure the projection of the Earth magnetic field along radial axes of the projectiles. Then, an extended Kalman filter (EKF) is used to compute the roll angle estimation. As the rolling frequency of the GSP is about 22 Hz, it was easy to test the navigation algorithm in laboratory. In a previous paper [1], the In-Lab demonstration of this concept showed that the roll angle estimation was possible with an accuracy of about 1◦ . In this paper, the demonstration is extended to high-speed roll rate, up to 1000 Hz. Thus, two magnetometers, a DSP (Digital Signal Processor) and a LED (Light Eminent Diode), are rotated using a pneumatic motor; the DSP runs an EKF and a guidance algorithm to compute the trigger times of the LED. By using a high-speed camera, the accuracy of the method can be observed and improved.

  5. The influence of physical and physiological cues on atomic force microscopy-based cell stiffness assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chiou

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All of these cues show a significant influence on the cell elasticity assessment. Sharp AFM tips create a two-fold increase in the value of the effective Young's modulus (E(eff relative to that of the blunt tips. Higher indenting force at the same loading rate generates higher estimated cell elasticity. Increasing the operation temperature of the AFM leads to decreases in the cell stiffness because the structure of actin filaments becomes disorganized. The physiological cues include the presence of fetal bovine serum or extracellular matrix-coated surfaces, the culture passage number, and the culture density. Both fetal bovine serum and the extracellular matrix are critical for cells to maintain the integrity of actin filaments and consequently exhibit higher elasticity. Unlike primary cells, mouse kidney progenitor cells can be passaged and maintain their morphology and elasticity for a very long period without a senescence phenotype. Finally, cell elasticity increases with increasing culture density only in MDCK epithelial cells. In summary, for researchers who use AFM to assess cell elasticity, our results provide basic and significant information about the suitable selection of physical and physiological cues.

  6. Erosion of Carbon-based spacecraft structures in LEO by Atomic Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1998-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is constantly generated on the topside of the atmosphere by ionizing radiation. The ionizing solar radiation, UV and particles, will on impact dissociate molecular oxygen to atomic oxygen. However, due to the ratio between the UV and the particle flux from the sun, and due to compar...

  7. I-DWRL: Improved Dual Wireless Radio Localization Using Magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Abdul; Kumar, Ramesh; Joe, Inwhee

    2017-11-15

    In the dual wireless radio localization (DWRL) technique each sensor node is equipped with two ultra-wide band (UWB) radios; the distance between the two radios is a few tens of centimeters. For localization, the DWRL technique must use at least two pre-localized nodes to fully localize an unlocalized node. Moreover, in the DWRL technique it is also not possible for two sensor nodes to properly communicate location information unless each of the four UWB radios of two communicating sensor nodes cannot approach the remaining three radios. In this paper, we propose an improved DWRL (I-DWRL) algorithm along with mounting a magnetometer sensor on one of the UWB radios of all sensor nodes. This addition of a magnetometer helps to improve DWRL algorithm such that only one localized sensor node is required for the localization of an unlocalized sensor node, and localization can also be achieved even when some of the four radios of two nodes are unable to communicate with the remaining three radios. The results show that with the use of a magnetometer a greater number of nodes can be localized with a smaller transmission range, less energy and a shorter period of time. In comparison with the conventional DWRL algorithm, our I-DWRL not only maintains the localization error but also requires around half of semi-localizations, 60% of the time, 70% of the energy and a shorter communication range to fully localize an entire network. Moreover, I-DWRL can even localize more nodes while transmission range is not sufficient for DWRL algorithm.

  8. Opportunity Science Using the Juno Magnetometer Investigation Star Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joergensen, J. L.; Connerney, J. E.; Bang, A. M.; Denver, T.; Oliversen, R. J.; Benn, M.; Lawton, P.

    2013-12-01

    The magnetometer experiment onboard Juno is equipped with four non-magnetic star tracker camera heads, two of which reside on each of the magnetometer sensor optical benches. These are located 10 and 12 m from the spacecraft body at the end of one of the three solar panel wings. The star tracker, collectively referred to as the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC), provides high accuracy attitude information for the magnetometer sensors throughout science operations. The star tracker camera heads are pointed +/- 13 deg off the spin vector, in the anti-sun direction, imaging a 13 x 20 deg field of view every ¼ second as Juno rotates at 1 or 2 rpm. The ASC is a fully autonomous star tracker, producing a time series of attitude quaternions for each camera head, utilizing a suite of internal support functions. These include imaging capabilities, autonomous object tracking, automatic dark-sky monitoring, and related capabilities; these internal functions may be accessed via telecommand. During Juno's cruise phase, this capability can be tapped to provide unique science and engineering data available along the Juno trajectory. We present a few examples of the JUNO ASC opportunity science here. As the Juno spacecraft approached the Earth-Moon system for the close encounter with the Earth on October 9, 2013, one of the ASC camera heads obtained imagery of the Earth-Moon system while the other three remained in full science (attitude determination) operation. This enabled the first movie of the Earth and Moon obtained by a spacecraft flying past the Earth in gravity assist. We also use the many artificial satellites in orbit about the Earth as calibration targets for the autonomous asteroid detection system inherent to the ASC autonomous star tracker. We shall also profile the zodiacal dust disk, using the interstellar image data, and present the outlook for small asteroid body detection and distribution being performed during Juno's passage from Earth flyby to Jovian orbit

  9. A critical comparison of coarse-grained structure-based approaches and atomic models of protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie; Chen, Tao; Wang, Moye; Chan, Hue Sun; Zhang, Zhuqing

    2017-05-31

    Structure-based coarse-grained Gō-like models have been used extensively in deciphering protein folding mechanisms because of their simplicity and tractability. Meanwhile, explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with physics-based all-atom force fields have been applied successfully to simulate folding/unfolding transitions for several small, fast-folding proteins. To explore the degree to which coarse-grained Gō-like models and their extensions to incorporate nonnative interactions are capable of producing folding processes similar to those in all-atom MD simulations, here we systematically compare the computed unfolded states, transition states, and transition paths obtained using coarse-grained models and all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations. The conformations in the unfolded state in common Gō models are more extended, and are thus more in line with experiment, than those from all-atom MD simulations. Nevertheless, the structural features of transition states obtained by the two types of models are largely similar. In contrast, the folding transition paths are significantly more sensitive to modeling details. In particular, when common Gō-like models are augmented with nonnative interactions, the predicted dimensions of the unfolded conformations become similar to those computed using all-atom MD. With this connection, the large deviations of all-atom MD from simple diffusion theory are likely caused in part by the presence of significant nonnative effects in folding processes modelled by current atomic force fields. The ramifications of our findings to the application of coarse-grained modeling to more complex biomolecular systems are discussed.

  10. StatSTEM: An efficient program for accurate and precise model-based quantification of atomic resolution electron microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A.; van den Bos, K. H. W.; Van den Broek, W.; Sijbers, J.; Van Aert, S.

    2017-09-01

    An efficient model-based estimation algorithm is introduced in order to quantify the atomic column positions and intensities from atomic resolution (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) images. This algorithm uses the least squares estimator on image segments containing individual columns fully accounting for the overlap between neighbouring columns, enabling the analysis of a large field of view. For this algorithm, the accuracy and precision with which measurements for the atomic column positions and scattering cross-sections from annular dark field (ADF) STEM images can be estimated, is investigated. The highest attainable precision is reached even for low dose images. Furthermore, advantages of the model-based approach taking into account overlap between neighbouring columns are highlighted. To provide end-users this well-established quantification method, a user friendly program, StatSTEM, is developed which is freely available under a GNU public license.

  11. Study on Droplet Size and Velocity Distributions of a Pressure Swirl Atomizer Based on the Maximum Entropy Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A predictive model for droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer has been proposed based on the maximum entropy formalism (MEF. The constraint conditions of the MEF model include the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy. The effects of liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio on the droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer are investigated. Results show that model based on maximum entropy formalism works well to predict droplet size and velocity distributions under different spray conditions. Liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio have different effects on droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer.

  12. Miniature scientific-grade induction magnetometer for cubesats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronenko, Vira

    2017-04-01

    One of the main areas of space research is the study and forecasting of space weather. The society is more and more depending nowadays on satellite technology and communications, so it is vital to understand the physical process in the solar-terrestrial system which may disturb them. Besides the solar radiation and Space Weather effects, the Earth's ionosphere is also modified by the ever increasing industrial activity. There have been also multiple reports relating VLF and ELF wave activity to atmospheric storms and geological processes, such as earthquakes and volcanic activity. For advancing in these fields, the AC magnetic field permanent monitoring is crucial. Using the cubesat technology would allow increasing the number of measuring points dramatically. It is necessary to mention that the cubesats use for scientific research requires the miniaturization of scientific sensors what is a serious problem because the reduction of their dimensions leads, as a rule, to the parameters degradation, especially of sensitivity threshold. Today, there is no basic model of a sensitive miniature induction magnetometer. Even the smallest one of the known - for the Bepi-Colombo mission to Mercury - is too big for cubesats. The goal of the present report is to introduce the new design of miniature three-component sensor for measurement of alternative vector magnetic fields - induction magnetometer (IM). The study directions were concentrated on the ways and possibilities to create the miniature magnetometer with best combination of parameters. For this a set of scientific and technological problems, mostly aimed at the sensor construction improvement, was solved. The most important parameter characterizing magnetometer quality is its own magnetic noise level (NL). The analysis of the NL influencing factors is made and the ways to decrease it are discussed in the report. Finally, the LEMI-151 IM was developed for the SEAM cubesat mission with optimal performances within the

  13. Evaluating the morphology of erythrocyte population: An approach based on atomic force microscopy and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sayari; Chakraborty, Ishita; Chakraborty, Monojit; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Mishra, Raghwendra; Sarkar, Debasish

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocyte morphology is gaining importance as a powerful pathological index in identifying the severity of any blood related disease. However, the existing technique of quantitative microscopy is highly time consuming and prone to personalized bias. On the other hand, relatively unexplored, complementary technique based on flow cytometry has not been standardized till date, particularly due to the lack of a proper morphological scoring scale. In this article, we have presented a new approach to formulate a non-empirical scoring scale based on membrane roughness (R(rms)) data obtained from atomic force microscopy. Subsequently, the respective morphological quantifier of the whole erythrocyte population, commonly known as morphological index, was expressed as a function of highest correlated statistical parameters of scattered signal profiles generated by flow cytometry. Feed forward artificial neural network model with multilayer perceptron architecture was used to develop the intended functional form. High correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.95), even for model-formulation exclusive samples, clearly indicates the universal validity of the proposed model. Moreover, a direct pathological application of the proposed model has been illustrated in relation to patients, diagnosed to be suffering from a wide variety of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  14. Atomically dispersed metal sites in MOF-based materials for electrocatalytic and photocatalytic energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zibin; Qu, Chong; Xia, Dingguo; Zou, Ruqiang; Xu, Qiang

    2018-02-19

    Metal sites play an essential role for both electrocatalytic and photocatalytic energy conversion applications. The highly ordered arrangements of the organic linkers and metal nodes and the well-defined pore structures of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) make them ideal substrates to support atomically dispersed metal sites (ADMSs) located in their metal nodes, linkers, and pores. Besides, porous carbon materials doped with ADMSs can be derived from these ADMS-incorporated MOF precursors through controlled treatments. These ADMSs incorporated in pristine MOFs and MOF-derived carbon materials possess unique merits over the molecular or the bulk metal-based catalysts, bridging the gap between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts for energy conversion applications. In this review, recent progress and perspective of design and incorporation of ADMSs in pristine MOFs and MOF-derived materials for energy conversion applications are highlighted, which will hopefully promote further developments of advanced MOF-based catalysts in foreseeable future. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. [Determination of soil exchangeable base cations by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer and extraction with ammonium acetate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-ge; Xiao, Min; Dong, Yi-hua; Jiang, Yong

    2012-08-01

    A method to determine soil exchangeable calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), and sodium (Na) by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) and extraction with ammonium acetate was developed. Results showed that the accuracy of exchangeable base cation data with AAS method fits well with the national standard referential soil data. The relative errors for parallel samples of exchangeable Ca and Mg with 66 pair samples ranged from 0.02%-3.14% and 0.06%-4.06%, and averaged to be 1.22% and 1.25%, respectively. The relative errors for exchangeable K and Na with AAS and flame photometer (FP) ranged from 0.06%-8.39% and 0.06-1.54, and averaged to be 3.72% and 0.56%, respectively. A case study showed that the determination method for exchangeable base cations by using AAS was proven to be reliable and trustable, which could reflect the real situation of soil cation exchange properties in farmlands.

  16. Going Vertical To Improve the Accuracy of Atomic Force Microscopy Based Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, Robert; Van Patten, William J; Adhikari, Ayush; Perkins, Thomas T

    2018-01-23

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is a powerful technique to characterize the energy landscape of individual proteins, the mechanical properties of nucleic acids, and the strength of receptor-ligand interactions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based SMFS benefits from ongoing progress in improving the precision and stability of cantilevers and the AFM itself. Underappreciated is that the accuracy of such AFM studies remains hindered by inadvertently stretching molecules at an angle while measuring only the vertical component of the force and extension, degrading both measurements. This inaccuracy is particularly problematic in AFM studies using double-stranded DNA and RNA due to their large persistence length (p ≈ 50 nm), often limiting such studies to other SMFS platforms (e.g., custom-built optical and magnetic tweezers). Here, we developed an automated algorithm that aligns the AFM tip above the DNA's attachment point to a coverslip. Importantly, this algorithm was performed at low force (10-20 pN) and relatively fast (15-25 s), preserving the connection between the tip and the target molecule. Our data revealed large uncorrected lateral offsets for 100 and 650 nm DNA molecules [24 ± 18 nm (mean ± standard deviation) and 180 ± 110 nm, respectively]. Correcting this offset yielded a 3-fold improvement in accuracy and precision when characterizing DNA's overstretching transition. We also demonstrated high throughput by acquiring 88 geometrically corrected force-extension curves of a single individual 100 nm DNA molecule in ∼40 min and versatility by aligning polyprotein- and PEG-based protein-ligand assays. Importantly, our software-based algorithm was implemented on a commercial AFM, so it can be broadly adopted. More generally, this work illustrates how to enhance AFM-based SMFS by developing more sophisticated data-acquisition protocols.

  17. Facile encapsulation of oxide based thin film transistors by atomic layer deposition based on ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Morteza; Babin, Nikolai; Behrendt, Andreas; Jakob, Timo; Görrn, Patrick; Riedl, Thomas

    2013-05-28

    A simplified encapsulation strategy for metal-oxide based TFTs, using ozone instead of water as an oxygen source in a low-temperature ALD process is demonstrated. Thereby, the threshold voltage remains unaltered and the hysteresis is permanently reduced. Costly energy- and time-consuming post-treatment processes can be avoided. This concept is widely applicable to various encapsulation materials (e.g., Al2 O3 , TiO2 , ZrO2 ) and metal-oxide channel semiconductors (e.g., zinc-tin-oxide (ZTO), indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO)). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  19. Atomic and molecular manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Work with individual atoms and molecules aims to demonstrate that miniaturized electronic, optical, magnetic, and mechanical devices can operate ultimately even at the level of a single atom or molecule. As such, atomic and molecular manipulation has played an emblematic role in the development of the field of nanoscience. New methods based on the use of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) have been developed to characterize and manipulate all the degrees of freedom of individual atoms and molecules with an unprecedented precision. In the meantime, new concepts have emerged to design molecules and substrates having specific optical, mechanical and electronic functions, thus opening the way to the fabrication of real nano-machines. Manipulation of individual atoms and molecules has also opened up completely new areas of research and knowledge, raising fundamental questions of "Optics at the atomic scale", "Mechanics at the atomic scale", Electronics at the atomic scale", "Quantum physics at the atomic sca...

  20. Optical memory based on quantized atomic center-of-mass motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, J P; de Almeida, A J F; Felinto, D; Tabosa, J W R

    2017-11-01

    We report a new type of optical memory using a pure two-level system of cesium atoms cooled by the magnetically assisted Sisyphus effect. The optical information of a probe field is stored in the coherence between quantized vibrational levels of the atoms in the potential wells of a 1-D optical lattice. The retrieved pulse shows Rabi oscillations with a frequency determined by the reading beam intensity and are qualitatively understood in terms of a simple theoretical model. The exploration of the external degrees of freedom of an atom may add another capability in the design of quantum-information protocols using light.

  1. Correlative atomic force microscopy and localization-based super-resolution microscopy: revealing labelling and image reconstruction artefacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrate, Aitor; Casado, Santiago; Flors, Cristina

    2014-03-17

    Hybrid microscopy: A correlative microscopy tool that combines in situ super-resolution fluorescence microscopy based on single-molecule localization and atomic force microscopy is presented. Direct comparison with high- resolution topography allows the authors to improve fluorescence labeling and image analysis in super-resolution imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Development Of Beam Position And Profile Monitor Based On Light Radiation Of Atoms Excited By The Beam Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Balalykin, N I; Brovko, O I; Bykovsky, V F; Dietrich, J; Kamerdzhiev, V; Meshkov, I N; Mohos, I; Parfenov, A N

    2004-01-01

    Particle beam position and profile monitor based on registration of the light radiated by residual gas atoms is being developed by collaboration JINR-Forschungszentrum Jülich. Proposed device and first experiments have been performed at Nuclotron (JINR) and COSY (FZJ) accelerators are presented in this report.

  3. Mobile setup for synchrotron based in situ characterization during thermal and plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dendooven, Jolien; Solano, Eduardo; Minjauw, Matthias M; Van de Kerckhove, Kevin; Coati, Alessandro; Fonda, Emiliano; Portale, Giuseppe; Garreau, Yves; Detavernier, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    We report the design of a mobile setup for synchrotron based in situ studies during atomic layer processing. The system was designed to facilitate in situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS), x-ray fluorescence (XRF), and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at synchrotron

  4. Fabrication of large scale nanostructures based on a modified atomic force microscope nanomechanical machining system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z J; Yan, Y D; Zhao, X S; Gao, D W; Wei, Y Y; Wang, J H

    2011-12-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomechanical machining has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for fabricating complex 2D∕3D nanostructures. But the machining scale is very small, which holds back this technique severely. How to enlarge the machining scale is always a major concern for the researches. In the present study, a modified AFM tip-based nanomechanical machining system is established through combination of a high precision X-Y stage with the moving range of 100 mm × 100 mm and a commercial AFM in order to enlarge the machining scale. It is found that the tracing property of the AFM system is feasible for large scale machining by controlling the constant normal load. Effects of the machining parameters including the machining direction and the tip geometry on the uniform machined depth with a large scale are evaluated. Consequently, a new tip trace and an increasing load scheme are presented to achieve a uniform machined depth. Finally, a polymer nanoline array with the dimensions of 1 mm × 0.7 mm, the line density of 1000 lines/mm and the average machined depth of 150 nm, and a 20 × 20 polymer square holes array with the scale of 380 μm × 380 μm and the average machined depth of 250 nm are machined successfully. The uniform of the machined depths for all the nanostructures is acceptable. Therefore, it is verified that the AFM tip-based nanomechanical machining method can be used to machine millimeter scale nanostructures.

  5. Improved zero-order fringe positioning algorithms in white light interference based atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chi; Liu, Xiaojun; Yang, Wenjun; Lu, Wenlong; Yu, Nengguo; Chang, Suping

    2018-01-01

    In white light interference based atomic force microscopy (WLIAFM), the vertical displacement of the probe is obtained by zero-order fringe positioning on the probe cantilever, so the accuracy of zero-order fringe positioning will affect directly that of the WLIAFM. However, due to non-uniform distribution of light intensity and photoelectric noises, accurate zero-order fringe positioning becomes a problem. In this paper, two algorithms are proposed to improve the zero-order fringe positioning accuracy. In the first algorithm which is called improved maximum algorithm, multi-row maximum positions of the interference fringes are obtained and error theory is applied to eliminate erroneous maximum positions, then the average of remaining maximum positions is used as the zero-order fringe position. Another is called phase evaluation algorithm, in which wavelet transform is applied to eliminate effects from disturbances mentioned above and Hilbert transform is used for phase evaluation to obtain the zero-order fringe position. The practicability and accuracy of the two algorithms have been verified by series of experiments. The experiment results indicate that both two algorithms are suitable in this condition and the phase evaluation algorithm has higher accuracy while the improved maximum algorithm has higher processing speed.

  6. Role of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide as oxidation barrier for silicon based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe, E-mail: g.fiorentino@tudelft.nl; Morana, Bruno [Department of Microelectronic, Delft University of Technology, Feldmannweg 17, 2628 CT Delft (Netherlands); Forte, Salvatore [Department of Electronic, University of Naples Federico II, Piazzale Tecchio, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Sarro, Pasqualina Maria [Department of Microelectronic, Delft University of Technology, Feldmannweg 17, 2628 CT, Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, the authors study the protective effect against oxidation of a thin layer of atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Nitrogen doped silicon carbide (poly-SiC:N) based microheaters coated with ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are used as test structure to investigate the barrier effect of the alumina layers to oxygen and water vapor at very high temperature (up to 1000 °C). Different device sets have been fabricated changing the doping levels, to evaluate possible interaction between the dopants and the alumina layer. The as-deposited alumina layer morphology has been evaluated by means of AFM analysis and compared to an annealed sample (8 h at 1000 °C) to estimate the change in the grain structure and the film density. The coated microheaters are subjected to very long oxidation time in dry and wet environment (up to 8 h at 900 and 1000 °C). By evaluating the electrical resistance variation between uncoated reference devices and the ALD coated devices, the oxide growth on the SiC is estimated. The results show that the ALD alumina coating completely prevents the oxidation of the SiC up to 900 °C in wet environment, while an oxide thickness reduction of 50% is observed at 1000 °C compared to uncoated devices.

  7. Physics-based all-atom modeling of RNA energetics and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Louis G; Zhao, Jianbo; Mathews, David H; Turner, Douglas H

    2017-09-01

    The database of RNA sequences is exploding, but knowledge of energetics, structures, and dynamics lags behind. All-atom computational methods, such as molecular dynamics, hold promise for closing this gap. New algorithms and faster computers have accelerated progress in improving the reliability and accuracy of predictions. Currently, the methods can facilitate refinement of experimentally determined nuclear magnetic resonance and x-ray structures, but are 'unreliable' for predictions based only on sequence. Much remains to be discovered, however, about the many molecular interactions driving RNA folding and the best way to approximate them quantitatively. The large number of parameters required means that a wide variety of experimental results will be required to benchmark force fields and different approaches. As computational methods become more reliable and accessible, they will be used by an increasing number of biologists, much as x-ray crystallography has expanded. Thus, many fundamental physical principles underlying the computational methods are described. This review presents a summary of the current state of molecular dynamics as applied to RNA. It is designed to be helpful to students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty who are considering or starting computational studies of RNA. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1422. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1422. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Compact metal probes: a solution for atomic force microscopy based tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, R D; Sheremet, E; Müller, S; Gordan, O D; Villabona, A; Schulze, S; Hietschold, M; Zahn, D R T

    2012-12-01

    There are many challenges in accomplishing tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and obtaining a proper tip is probably the greatest one. Since tip size, composition, and geometry are the ultimate parameters that determine enhancement of intensity and lateral resolution, the tip becomes the most critical component in a TERS experiment. However, since the discovery of TERS the cantilevers used in atomic force microscopy (AFM) have remained basically the same: commercial silicon (or silicon nitride) tips covered by a metallic coating. The main issues of using metal-coated silicon cantilevers, such as wearing off of the metal layer or increased tip radius, can be completely overcome by using all-metal cantilevers. Until now in TERS experiments such probes have only been used in a scanning tunneling microscope or in a tuning fork-based shear force microscope but not in AFM. In this work for the first time, we show the use of compact silver cantilevers that are fully compatible with contact and tapping modes in AFM demonstrating their superb performance in TERS experiments.

  9. Mechanical characterization of polymeric thin films by atomic force microscopy based techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeri, Daniele; Rossi, Marco; Tamburri, Emanuela; Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2013-02-01

    Polymeric thin films have been awakening continuous and growing interest for application in nanotechnology. For such applications, the assessment of their (nano)mechanical properties is a key issue, since they may dramatically vary between the bulk and the thin film state, even for the same polymer. Therefore, techniques are required for the in situ characterization of mechanical properties of thin films that must be nondestructive or only minimally destructive. Also, they must also be able to probe nanometer-thick ultrathin films and layers and capable of imaging the mechanical properties of the sample with nanometer lateral resolution, since, for instance, at these scales blends or copolymers are not uniform, their phases being separated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been proposed as a tool for the development of a number of techniques that match such requirements. In this review, we describe the state of the art of the main AFM-based methods for qualitative and quantitative single-point measurements and imaging of mechanical properties of polymeric thin films, illustrating their specific merits and limitations.

  10. Terahertz response of fractal meta-atoms based on concentric rectangular square resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Zhenyu, E-mail: zyzhao@shnu.edu.cn; Shi, Wangzhou [Department of Physics, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Peng, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2015-11-21

    We investigate the terahertz electromagnetic responses of fractal meta-atoms (MAs) induced by different mode coupling mechanisms. Two types of MAs based on concentric rectangular square (CRS) resonators are presented: independent CRS (I-CRS) and junctional-CRS (J-CRS). In I-CRS, each resonator works as an independent dipole so as to result in the multiple resonance modes when the fractal level is above 1. In J-CRS, however, the generated layer is rotated by π/2 radius to the adjacent CRS in one MA. The multiple resonance modes are coupled into a single mode resonance. The fractal level increasing induces resonance modes redshift in I-CRS while blueshift in J-CRS. When the fractal level is below 4, the mode Q factor of J-CRS is in between the two modes of I-CRS; when the fractal level is 4 or above, the mode Q factor of J-CRS exceeds the two modes of I-CRS. Furthermore, the modulation depth (MD) decreases in I-CRS while it increases in J-CRS with the increase in fractal levels. The surface currents analysis reveals that the capacitive coupling of modes in I-CRS results in the modes redshift, while the conductive coupling of modes in J-CRS induces the mode blueshift. A high Q mode with large MD can be achieved via conductive coupling between the resonators of different scales in a fractal MA.

  11. Intelligent tuning method of PID parameters based on iterative learning control for atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Li, Yingzi; Zhang, Yingxu; Chen, Yifu; Song, Zihang; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Suoxin; Qian, Jianqiang

    2018-01-01

    Proportional-integral-derivative (PID) parameters play a vital role in the imaging process of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Traditional parameter tuning methods require a lot of manpower and it is difficult to set PID parameters in unattended working environments. In this manuscript, an intelligent tuning method of PID parameters based on iterative learning control is proposed to self-adjust PID parameters of the AFM according to the sample topography. This method gets enough information about the output signals of PID controller and tracking error, which will be used to calculate the proper PID parameters, by repeated line scanning until convergence before normal scanning to learn the topography. Subsequently, the appropriate PID parameters are obtained by fitting method and then applied to the normal scanning process. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by the convergence analysis. Simulations and experimental results indicate that the proposed method can intelligently tune PID parameters of the AFM for imaging different topographies and thus achieve good tracking performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Efficiency of hemoperfusion on clearing thallium based on atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Wang, Yongan; Nie, Zhiyong; Wang, Jiao; Peng, Xiaobo; Yuan, Ye; Li, Wanhua; Qiu, Zewu; Xue, Yanping; Xiong, Yiru

    2015-04-01

    To determine thallium in whole blood by atomic absorption detection method, and to investigate the eliminating effect of hemoperfusion (HP) for thallium in blood. The blood of Beagle dogs which had not exposed to thallium before were obtained for preparation of thallium nitrate ( TlNO3 )-containing solution in three concentrations according to the conversion formula based on animal weight and volume of blood. HP was performed in the simulated in vivo environment. The content of TlNO3 in blood of the next group was determined on the amount of TlNO3 for the last HP of the former dose group. Thallium quantity in different samples was measured with atomic absorption spectrometer blood samples before and after HP. Finally, the thallium concentration in blood was analyzed statistically. Thallium concentrations showed a good linear relationship in the range of 0-200 μg/L (r = 0.998 4). The intra-day precision (RSD) was lower than 4.913%, the intra-day recovery rate was 96.2%-111.9%; the inter-day precision (RSD) was lower than 7.502%, the inter-day recovery rate was 89.6%-105.2%. The concentration of thallium in blood was significantly reduced after HP per time in high, middle, and low dose groups [(453.43 ± 27.80) mg/L to (56.09 ± 14.44) mg/L in high dose group, F = 8.820, P = 0.003; (64.51 ± 13.60) mg/L to (3.19 ± 0.23) mg/L in middle dose group, F = 36.312, P = 0.000; (5.40 ± 0.98) mg/L to (0.38 ± 0.25) mg/L in low dose group, F = 46.240, P = 0.000 ]. The adsorption rate of four times of HP in high, middle and low dose group were (87.63 ± 2.48 )%, (95.06 ± 1.54 )% and (92.76 ± 4.87)%, respectively, without significant difference (F = 4.231, P = 0.070). The method for measuring thallium was established, and it shows a very stable, simple, sensitive for determination of thallium. HP can effectively remove thallium from blood. Thallium concentration can be reduced by 90% after four times of HP. HP is also effective even when thallium concentration is not high.

  13. High power laser source for atom cooling based on reliable telecoms technology with all fibre frequency stabilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Thomas; Farries, Mark

    2017-02-01

    Cold atom interferometers are emerging as important tools for metrology. Designed into gravimeters they can measure extremely small changes in the local gravitational field strength and be used for underground surveying to detect buried utilities, mineshafts and sinkholes prior to civil works. To create a cold atom interferometer narrow linewidth, frequency stabilised lasers are required to cool the atoms and to setup and measure the atom interferometer. These lasers are commonly either GaAs diodes, Ti Sapphire lasers or frequency doubled InGaAsP diodes and fibre lasers. The InGaAsP DFB lasers are attractive because they are very reliable, mass-produced, frequency controlled by injection current and simply amplified to high powers with fibre amplifiers. In this paper a laser system suitable for Rb atom cooling, based on a 1560nm DFB laser and erbium doped fibre amplifier, is described. The laser output is frequency doubled with fibre coupled periodically poled LiNbO3 to a wavelength of 780nm. The output power exceeds 1 W at 780nm. The laser is stabilised at 1560nm against a fibre Bragg resonator that is passively temperature compensated. Frequency tuning over a range of 1 GHz is achieved by locking the laser to sidebands of the resonator that are generated by a phase modulator. This laser design is attractive for field deployable rugged systems because it uses all fibre coupled components with long term proven reliability.

  14. Structural influence on atomic hopping and electronic states of Pd-based bulk metallic glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, X.-P.; Löffler, Jörg F.; Schwarz, R. B.; Johnson, William L.; Wu, Yue

    2005-01-01

    Atomic motion and electronic structures of Pd–Ni–Cu–P bulk metallic glasses were investigated using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance. The hopping rate of P atoms was determined by the stimulated echo technique. Significant hopping was observed in all alloys well below the glass transition temperature. Increasing the Cu content to above 25 at. % increases P hopping significantly, consistent with the previous finding that the openness of the structure increases with Cu content. In contrast, P h...

  15. Quantum gates in mesoscopic atomic ensembles based on adiabatic passage and Rydberg blockade

    OpenAIRE

    Beterov, I. I.; Saffman, M.; Yakshina, E. A.; Zhukov, V. P.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Entin, V. M.; Ryabtsev, I. I.; Mansell, C. W.; MacCormick, C.; Bergamini, S.; Fedoruk, M. P.

    2012-01-01

    We present schemes for geometric phase compensation in adiabatic passage which can be used for the implementation of quantum logic gates with atomic ensembles consisting of an arbitrary number of strongly interacting atoms. Protocols using double sequences of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) or adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) pulses are analyzed. Switching the sign of the detuning between two STIRAP sequences, or inverting the phase between two ARP pulses, provides state transfer wit...

  16. Dead-zone-free atomic magnetometry with simultaneous excitation of orientation and alignment resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Kish, A; Romalis, M V

    2010-11-05

    Atomic magnetometers have very high absolute precision and sensitivity to magnetic fields but suffer from a fundamental problem: the vectorial or tensorial interaction of light with atoms leads to "dead zones," certain orientations of the magnetic field where the magnetometer loses its sensitivity. We demonstrate a simple polarization modulation scheme that simultaneously creates coherent population trapping (CPT) in orientation and alignment, thereby eliminating dead zones. Using 87Rb in a 10 Torr buffer gas cell we measure narrow, high-contrast CPT transparency peaks for all orientations and also show the absence of systematic effects associated with nonlinear Zeeman splitting.

  17. Atomic layer deposition of tantalum nitride based thin films from cyclopentadienyl type precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anacleto, A. Correia, E-mail: anthony.correia@airliquide.co [Air Liquide, Centre de Recherche Claude Delorme, 1, chemin de la porte des loges - Les Loges en Josas - BP 126, 78354 Jouy en Josas Cedex (France); Zauner, A.; Cany-Canian, D. [Air Liquide, Centre de Recherche Claude Delorme, 1, chemin de la porte des loges - Les Loges en Josas - BP 126, 78354 Jouy en Josas Cedex (France); Gatineau, J. [Air Liquide, Air Liquide Laboratories, 28 Wadai, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-Pref. 300-4247 (Japan); Hugon, M.-C. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas, UMR 8578, CNRS - Universite Paris Sud 11, 15, rue Georges Clemenceau, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2010-10-29

    Tantalum nitride based thin films have been deposited on p-Si (100) and SiO{sub 2}/Si by thermal Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) using either the Ta(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 3} or a derivative, in which one dialkylamido ligand is substituted by a {eta}{sup 5}-cyclopentadienyl ({eta}{sup 5}-Cp), as metal organic precursors with ammonia as reducing agent. TaN{sub x}C{sub y} self-limiting temperature dependent ALD growth was achieved for the TaCp(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 2}/NH{sub 3} process with a growth rate of 0.51-0.91 A cycle{sup -1} in the 400-425 {sup o}C temperature range while between 240 and 280 {sup o}C, the growth of TaN based films from the Ta(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 3} was accompanied by a partial decomposition of the precursor. The {eta}{sup 5}-cyclopentadienyl type compound allows lower nitrogen content in the precursor and thereafter in the deposited film. Although N/Ta ratio is close to one at temperatures of 390 and 400 {sup o}C, as analyzed by Rutherford Back Scattering and Nuclear Reaction Analysis, films were amorphous independently of the deposition temperature. Since Ta-C bonds are present in the Cp derivative, the TaCp(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 2} tends more likely to form tantalum carbide compared to Ta(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 3}, which leads to lower thin film resistivity. For both precursors, employed in their respective ALD window, films were smooth with a root-mean-square roughness close to 1 nm.

  18. Integrated microchip incorporating atomic magnetometer and microfluidic channel for NMR and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Micah P [Oakland, CA; Savukov, Igor M [Los Alamos, NM; Budker, Dmitry [El Cerrito, CA; Shah, Vishal K [Plainsboro, NJ; Knappe, Svenja [Boulder, CO; Kitching, John [Boulder, CO; Michalak, David J [Berkeley, CA; Xu, Shoujun [Houston, TX; Pines, Alexander [Berkeley, CA

    2011-08-09

    An integral microfluidic device includes an alkali vapor cell and microfluidic channel, which can be used to detect magnetism for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Small magnetic fields in the vicinity of the vapor cell can be measured by optically polarizing and probing the spin precession in the small magnetic field. This can then be used to detect the magnetic field of in encoded analyte in the adjacent microfluidic channel. The magnetism in the microfluidic channel can be modulated by applying an appropriate series of radio or audio frequency pulses upstream from the microfluidic chip (the remote detection modality) to yield a sensitive means of detecting NMR and MRI.

  19. Micro-fabricated atomic magnetometer with hybrid vector-scalar operation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Measurement of magnetic fields provides valuable information about charged particles and plasma interactions in the solar system, and about planetary dynamics and...

  20. Correlation between fluxgate and SQUID magnetometer data sets for geomagnetic storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matladi Thabang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There has always been a need to monitor the near Earth's magnetic field, as this monitoring provides understanding and possible predictions of Space Weather events such as geomagnetic storms. Conventional magnetometers such as fluxgates have been used for decades for Space Weather research. The use of highly sensitive magnetometers such as Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs, promise to give more insight into Space Weather. SQUIDs are relatively recent types of magnetometers that exploit the superconductive effects of flux quantization and Josephson tunneling to measure magnetic flux. SQUIDs have a very broad bandwidth compared to most conventional magnetometers and can measure magnetic flux as low as a few femtotesla. Since SQUIDs have never been used in Space Weather research, unshielded, it is necessary to investigate if they can be reliable Space Weather instruments. The validation is performed by comparing the frequency content of the SQUID and fluxgate magnetometers, as reported by Phiri.

  1. Atomic rivals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  2. An improved quaternion Gauss–Newton algorithm for attitude determination using magnetometer and accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Fei

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available For the vector attitude determination, the traditional optimal algorithms which are based on quaternion estimator (QUEST measurement noise model are complicated for just two observations. In our application, the magnetometer and accelerometer are not two comparable kinds of sensors and both are not small field-of-view sensors as well. So in this paper a new unit measurement model is derived. According to the Wahba problem, the optimal weights for each measurement are obtained by the error variance researches. Then an improved quaternion Gauss–Newton method is presented and adopted to acquire attitude. Eventually, simulation results and experimental validation employed to test the proposed method demonstrate the usefulness of the improved algorithm.

  3. Motor Bourn Magnetic Noise Filtering for Magnetometers in Micro-Rotary Aerial Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan J. UNWIN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Avionics systems of micro aerial vehicles (MAV pose unique problems in system design, sensor signal handling and control. This is evident in micro-rotary aircraft as their whole body rotates with the sensors of the flight control. The precise calculation of attitude and heading from magnetometer readings is complex due to the body rotation. It is made even more difficult by noise induced in the geomagnetic signal by fluctuating magnetic field of the closely positioned motors. Filtering that noise is challenging since the rotation speed of motors and the vehicle can be very close. This paper presents analysis of motor induced noise, based on experimental data of brushless micro motors. A novel time domain filter is proposed, designed, implemented in FPGA hardware, tested and compared to other filters. This filter provides good performance even when the rotational rate of the motor and vehicle are close and traditional frequency domain filters would perform poorly.

  4. Atomic orbital-based SOS-MP2 with tensor hypercontraction. II. Local tensor hypercontraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chenchen; Martínez, Todd J.

    2017-01-01

    In the first paper of the series [Paper I, C. Song and T. J. Martinez, J. Chem. Phys. 144, 174111 (2016)], we showed how tensor-hypercontracted (THC) SOS-MP2 could be accelerated by exploiting sparsity in the atomic orbitals and using graphical processing units (GPUs). This reduced the formal scaling of the SOS-MP2 energy calculation to cubic with respect to system size. The computational bottleneck then becomes the THC metric matrix inversion, which scales cubically with a large prefactor. In this work, the local THC approximation is proposed to reduce the computational cost of inverting the THC metric matrix to linear scaling with respect to molecular size. By doing so, we have removed the primary bottleneck to THC-SOS-MP2 calculations on large molecules with O(1000) atoms. The errors introduced by the local THC approximation are less than 0.6 kcal/mol for molecules with up to 200 atoms and 3300 basis functions. Together with the graphical processing unit techniques and locality-exploiting approaches introduced in previous work, the scaled opposite spin MP2 (SOS-MP2) calculations exhibit O(N2.5) scaling in practice up to 10 000 basis functions. The new algorithms make it feasible to carry out SOS-MP2 calculations on small proteins like ubiquitin (1231 atoms/10 294 atomic basis functions) on a single node in less than a day.

  5. Specific Adaptation of Gas Atomization Processing for Al-Based Alloy Powder for Additive Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iver [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Siemon, John [Alcoa, Inc, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-06-30

    The initial three atomization attempts resulted in “freeze-outs” within the pour tubes in the pilot-scale system and yielded no powder. Re-evaluation of the alloy liquidus temperatures and melting characteristics, in collaboration with Alcoa, showed further superheat to be necessary to allow the liquid metal to flow through the pour tube to the atomization nozzle. A subsequent smaller run on the experimental atomization system verified these parameters and was successful, as were all successive runs on the larger pilot scale system. One alloy composition froze-out part way through the atomization on both pilot scale runs. SEM images showed needle formation and phase segregations within the microstructure. Analysis of the pour tube freeze-out microstructures showed that large needles formed within the pour tube during the atomization experiment, which eventually blocked the melt stream. Alcoa verified the needle formation in this alloy using theoretical modeling of phase solidification. Sufficient powder of this composition was still generated to allow powder characterization and additive manufacturing trials at Alcoa.

  6. Atomic force microscopy based investigations of anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Jiang; Cai, Huaihong; Yang, Fen; Jin, Hua; Liu, Jianxin; Yang, Peihui; Cai, Jiye

    2016-01-01

    A new method based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of drugs on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. The LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cell line is a widely used in vitro cell model for the screening of anti-inflammatory drugs or the study of anti-inflammatory mechanisms. In this work, the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone and quercetin on LPS-CD14 receptor binding in RAW264.7 macrophages was probed by LPS-functionalized tips for the first time. Both dexamethasone and quercetin were found to inhibit LPS-induced NO production, iNOS expression, IκBα phosphorylation, and IKKα/β phosphorylation in RAW264.7 macrophages. The morphology and ultrastructure of RAW264.7 macrophages were determined by AFM, which indicated that dexamethasone and quercetin could inhibit LPS-induced cell surface particle size and roughness increase in RAW264.7 macrophages. The binding of LPS and its receptor in RAW264.7 macrophages was determined by LPS-functionalized AFM tips, which demonstrated that the binding force and binding probability between LPS and CD14 receptor on the surface of RAW264.7 macrophages were also inhibited by dexamethasone or quercetin treatment. The obtained results imply that AFM, which is very useful for the investigation of potential targets for anti-inflammatory drugs on native macrophages and the enhancement of our understanding of the anti-inflammatory effects of drugs, is expected to be developed into a promising tool for the study of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  7. Atomic layer deposition on polymer based flexible packaging materials: Growth characteristics and diffusion barrier properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeaeriaeinen, Tommi O., E-mail: tommi.kaariainen@lut.f [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Prikaatinkatu 3 E, 50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Maydannik, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.maydannik@lut.f [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Prikaatinkatu 3 E, 50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Cameron, David C., E-mail: david.cameron@lut.f [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Prikaatinkatu 3 E, 50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Lahtinen, Kimmo, E-mail: kimmo.lahtinen@tut.f [Tampere University of Technology, Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, P.O. Box 541, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Johansson, Petri, E-mail: petri.johansson@tut.f [Tampere University of Technology, Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, P.O. Box 541, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Kuusipalo, Jurkka, E-mail: jurkka.kuusipalo@tut.f [Tampere University of Technology, Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, P.O. Box 541, 33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2011-03-01

    One of the most promising areas for the industrial application of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is for gas barrier layers on polymers. In this work, a packaging material system with improved diffusion barrier properties has been developed and studied by applying ALD on flexible polymer based packaging materials. Nanometer scale metal oxide films have been applied to polymer-coated papers and their diffusion barrier properties have been studied by means of water vapor and oxygen transmission rates. The materials for the study were constructed in two stages: the paper was firstly extrusion coated with polymer film, which was then followed by the ALD deposition of oxide layer. The polymers used as extrusion coatings were polypropylene, low and high density polyethylene, polylactide and polyethylene terephthalate. Water vapor transmission rates (WVTRs) were measured according to method SCAN-P 22:68 and oxygen transmission rates (O{sub 2}TRs) according to a standard ASTM D 3985. According to the results a 10 nm oxide layer already decreased the oxygen transmission by a factor of 10 compared to uncoated material. WVTR with 40 nm ALD layer was better than the level currently required for most common dry flexible packaging applications. When the oxide layer thickness was increased to 100 nm and above, the measured WVTRs were limited by the measurement set up. Using an ALD layer allowed the polymer thickness on flexible packaging materials to be reduced. Once the ALD layer was 40 nm thick, WVTRs and O{sub 2}TRs were no longer dependent on polymer layer thickness. Thus, nanometer scale ALD oxide layers have shown their feasibility as high quality diffusion barriers on flexible packaging materials.

  8. A Systematic Methodology for Uncertainty Analysis of Group Contribution Based and Atom Connectivity Index Based Models for Estimation of Properties of Pure Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hukkerikar, Amol; Sarup, Bent; Sin, Gürkan

    concentration. The application of the developed methodology is highlighted through a set of molecules not used in the parameter estimation step. The developed methodology can be used to assist uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of product/process design to obtain rationally the risk/ safety factors...... and atomic connectivity index method) has been employed to create the missing groups and predict their contributions through the regressed contributions of connectivity indices. The objective of this work is to develop a systematic methodology to carry out uncertainty analysis of group contribution based...... and atom connectivity index based property prediction models. This includes: (i) parameter estimation using available MG based property prediction models and large training sets to determine improved group and atom contributions; and (ii) uncertainty analysis to establish statistical information...

  9. The Global Network of Optical Magnetometers for Exotic physics (GNOME): A novel scheme to search for physics beyond the Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustelny, Szymon [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jackson Kimball, Derek F. [Department of Physics, California State University, Hayward, CA (United States); Pankow, Chris [Center for Gravitation, Cosmology, and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Ledbetter, Micah P. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wlodarczyk, Przemyslaw [Department of Electronics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Wcislo, Piotr [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun (Poland); Pospelov, Maxim [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Smith, Joshua R.; Read, Jocelyn [Gravitational-Wave Physics and Astronomy Center, Department of Physics, California State University, Fullerton, CA (United States); Gawlik, Wojciech [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Budker, Dmitry [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-09-15

    A novel experimental scheme enabling the investigation of transient exotic spin couplings is discussed. The scheme is based on synchronous measurements of optical-magnetometer signals from several devices operating in magnetically shielded environments in distant locations (>or similar 100 km). Although signatures of such exotic couplings may be present in the signal from a single magnetometer, it would be challenging to distinguish them from noise. By analyzing the correlation between signals from multiple, geographically separated magnetometers, it is not only possible to identify the exotic transient but also to investigate its nature. The ability of the network to probe presently unconstrained physics beyond the Standard Model is examined by considering the spin coupling to stable topological defects (e.g., domain walls) of axion-like fields. In the spirit of this research, a brief ({proportional_to}2 hours) demonstration experiment involving two magnetometers located in Krakow and Berkeley ({proportional_to}9000 km separation) is presented and discussion of the data-analysis approaches that may allow identification of transient signals is provided. The prospects of the network are outlined in the last part of the paper. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Adhesion of resin-based sealers to dentine: an atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Prado, M; de Assis, D F; Gomes, B P F A; Simão, R A

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of several final irrigants on the adhesion force (Fad) between dentine and resin-based sealers by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Twelve distal roots of mandibular molars were used. The roots were smoothened and cut to obtain 36 specimens. During chemomechanical preparation of the root canals, 5.25% NaOCl was used as the irrigant. The specimens were then divided into six groups according to the final irrigant used: control group - immersed in distilled water (DW) for 1 min; chlorhexidine (CHX) group - in 2% CHX for 1 min; NaOCl group - in 5.25% NaOCl for 1 min; EDTA group - in 17% EDTA for 5 min, EDTA/CHX group - in EDTA, followed by intermediate flushing with DW and then immersed in CHX; EDTA/NaOCl group - in EDTA, followed by intermediate flushing with DW and then immersed in NaOCl. After the treatments, all groups were washed with DW to remove all traces of the irrigants. Afterwards, the samples were dried and attached to a glass base. AFM tips containing AH Plus and Real Seal SE sealers were used to obtain force-distance curves with regard to dentine-treated surfaces. Data were analysed statistically using nonparametric tests with the significance level set at P < 0.05. In the groups with smear layer, a final flush with CHX and NaOCl resulted in significantly higher Fad values than the control group for both sealers (P < 0.001). When smear layer was removed, the highest Fad values associated with AH Plus occurred with a final flush of NaOCl, whilst in Real Seal SE, the highest values were found with a final flush of CHX (all results significant at P < 0.001). Irrigants had a positive effect on the adhesion of the resin-based sealers, AH Plus and Real Seal SE, to dentine. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Nanomechanical assessment of human and murine collagen fibrils via atomic force microscopy cantilever-based nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriotis, Orestis G; Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Zekonyte, Jurgita; Katsamenis, Orestis L; Fabri, Sebastien; Howarth, Peter H; Davies, Donna E; Thurner, Philipp J

    2014-11-01

    The nanomechanical assessment of collagen fibrils via atomic force microscopy (AFM) is of increasing interest within the biomedical research community. In contrast to conventional nanoindentation there exists no common standard for conducting experiments and analysis of data. Currently used analysis approaches vary between studies and validation of quantitative results is usually not performed, which makes comparison of data from different studies difficult. Also there are no recommendations with regards to the maximum indentation depth that should not be exceeded to avoid substrate effects. Here we present a methodology and analysis approach for AFM cantilever-based nanoindentation experiments that allows efficient use of captured data and relying on a reference sample for determination of tip shape. Further we show experimental evidence that maximum indentation depth on collagen fibrils should be lower than 10-15% of the height of the fibril to avoid substrate effects and we show comparisons between our and other approaches used in previous works. While our analysis approach yields similar values for indentation modulus compared to the Oliver-Pharr method we found that Hertzian analysis yielded significantly lower values. Applying our approach we successfully and efficiently indented collagen fibrils from human bronchi, which were about 30 nm in size, considerably smaller compared to collagen fibrils obtained from murine tail-tendon. In addition, derived mechanical parameters of collagen fibrils are in agreement with data previously published. To establish a quantitative validation we compared indentation results from conventional and AFM cantilever-based nanoindentation on polymeric samples with known mechanical properties. Importantly we can show that our approach yields similar results when compared to conventional nanoindentation on polymer samples. Introducing an approach that is reliable, efficient and taking into account the AFM tip shape, we anticipate

  12. Electrostatic trapping and in situ detection of Rydberg atoms above chip-based transmission lines

    CERN Document Server

    Lancuba, P

    2016-01-01

    Beams of helium atoms in Rydberg-Stark states with principal quantum number $n=48$ and electric dipole moments of 4600~D have been decelerated from a mean initial longitudinal speed of 2000~m/s to zero velocity in the laboratory-fixed frame-of-reference in the continuously moving electric traps of a transmission-line decelerator. In this process accelerations up to $-1.3\\times10^{7}$~m/s$^2$ were applied, and changes in kinetic energy of $\\Delta E_{\\mathrm{kin}}=1.3\\times10^{-20}$~J ($\\Delta E_{\\mathrm{kin}}/e = 83$~meV) per atom were achieved. Guided and decelerated atoms, and those confined in stationary electrostatic traps, were detected in situ by pulsed electric field ionisation. The results of numerical calculations of particle trajectories within the decelerator have been used to characterise the observed deceleration efficiencies, and aid in the interpretation of the experimental data.

  13. 4D Flexible Atom-Pairs: An efficient probabilistic conformational space comparison for ligand-based virtual screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The performance of 3D-based virtual screening similarity functions is affected by the applied conformations of compounds. Therefore, the results of 3D approaches are often less robust than 2D approaches. The application of 3D methods on multiple conformer data sets normally reduces this weakness, but entails a significant computational overhead. Therefore, we developed a special conformational space encoding by means of Gaussian mixture models and a similarity function that operates on these models. The application of a model-based encoding allows an efficient comparison of the conformational space of compounds. Results Comparisons of our 4D flexible atom-pair approach with over 15 state-of-the-art 2D- and 3D-based virtual screening similarity functions on the 40 data sets of the Directory of Useful Decoys show a robust performance of our approach. Even 3D-based approaches that operate on multiple conformers yield inferior results. The 4D flexible atom-pair method achieves an averaged AUC value of 0.78 on the filtered Directory of Useful Decoys data sets. The best 2D- and 3D-based approaches of this study yield an AUC value of 0.74 and 0.72, respectively. As a result, the 4D flexible atom-pair approach achieves an average rank of 1.25 with respect to 15 other state-of-the-art similarity functions and four different evaluation metrics. Conclusions Our 4D method yields a robust performance on 40 pharmaceutically relevant targets. The conformational space encoding enables an efficient comparison of the conformational space. Therefore, the weakness of the 3D-based approaches on single conformations is circumvented. With over 100,000 similarity calculations on a single desktop CPU, the utilization of the 4D flexible atom-pair in real-world applications is feasible. PMID:21733172

  14. 4D Flexible Atom-Pairs: An efficient probabilistic conformational space comparison for ligand-based virtual screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahn Andreas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The performance of 3D-based virtual screening similarity functions is affected by the applied conformations of compounds. Therefore, the results of 3D approaches are often less robust than 2D approaches. The application of 3D methods on multiple conformer data sets normally reduces this weakness, but entails a significant computational overhead. Therefore, we developed a special conformational space encoding by means of Gaussian mixture models and a similarity function that operates on these models. The application of a model-based encoding allows an efficient comparison of the conformational space of compounds. Results Comparisons of our 4D flexible atom-pair approach with over 15 state-of-the-art 2D- and 3D-based virtual screening similarity functions on the 40 data sets of the Directory of Useful Decoys show a robust performance of our approach. Even 3D-based approaches that operate on multiple conformers yield inferior results. The 4D flexible atom-pair method achieves an averaged AUC value of 0.78 on the filtered Directory of Useful Decoys data sets. The best 2D- and 3D-based approaches of this study yield an AUC value of 0.74 and 0.72, respectively. As a result, the 4D flexible atom-pair approach achieves an average rank of 1.25 with respect to 15 other state-of-the-art similarity functions and four different evaluation metrics. Conclusions Our 4D method yields a robust performance on 40 pharmaceutically relevant targets. The conformational space encoding enables an efficient comparison of the conformational space. Therefore, the weakness of the 3D-based approaches on single conformations is circumvented. With over 100,000 similarity calculations on a single desktop CPU, the utilization of the 4D flexible atom-pair in real-world applications is feasible.

  15. Magnetometer-augmented IMU simulator: in-depth elaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Thomas; Lauffenburger, Jean-Philippe; Changey, Sébastien; Basset, Michel

    2015-03-04

    The location of objects is a growing research topic due, for instance, to the expansion of civil drones or intelligent vehicles. This expansion was made possible through the development of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), inexpensive and miniaturized inertial sensors. In this context, this article describes the development of a new simulator which generates sensor measurements, giving a specific input trajectory. This will allow the comparison of pose estimation algorithms. To develop this simulator, the measurement equations of every type of sensor have to be analytically determined. To achieve this objective, classical kinematic equations are used for the more common sensors, i.e., accelerometers and rate gyroscopes. As nowadays, the MEMS inertial measurement units (IMUs) are generally magnetometer-augmented, an absolute world magnetic model is implemented. After the determination of the perfect measurement (through the error-free sensor models), realistic error models are developed to simulate real IMU behavior. Finally, the developed simulator is subjected to different validation tests.

  16. Associating ground magnetometer observations with current or voltage generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartinger, M. D.; Xu, Z.; Clauer, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    A circuit analogy for magnetosphere-ionosphere current systems has two extremes for driversof ionospheric currents: ionospheric elec tric fields/voltages constant while current/conductivity vary—the“voltage generator”—and current constant while electric field/conductivity vary—the “current generator.......”Statistical studies of ground magnetometer observations associated with dayside Transient High LatitudeCurrent Systems (THLCS) driven by similar mechanisms find contradictory results using this paradigm:some studies associate THLCS with voltage generators, others with current generators. We argue that mostof...... these two assumptions substantially alter expectations for magnetic perturbations associatedwith either a current or a voltage generator. Our results demonstrate that before interpreting groundmagnetometer observations of THLCS in the context of current/voltage generators, the location...

  17. Construction and Operation of a Differential Hall Element Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Matthew W.; Javernick, Philip D.; Quintero, Pedro A.; Calm, Yitzi M.; Meisel, Mark W.

    2012-02-01

    A Differential Hall Element Magnetometer (DHEM) was constructed to measure the magnetic saturation and coercive fields of small samples consisting of magnetic nanoparticles that may have biomedical applications. The device consists of two matched Hall elements that can be moved through the room temperature bore of a 9 Tesla superconducting magnet. The Hall elements are wired in opposition such that a null response, to within a small offset, is measured in the absence of a sample that may be located on top of one unit. A LabVIEW program controls the current through the Hall elements and measures the net Hall voltage while simultaneously moving the probe through the magnetic field by regulating a linear stepper motor. Ultimately, the system will be tested to obtain a figure of merit using successively smaller samples. Details of the apparatus will be provided along with preliminary data.

  18. Magnetometer-Augmented IMU Simulator: In-Depth Elaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brunner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The location of objects is a growing research topic due, for instance, to the expansion of civil drones or intelligent vehicles. This expansion was made possible through the development of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS, inexpensive and miniaturized inertial sensors. In this context, this article describes the development of a new simulator which generates sensor measurements, giving a specific input trajectory. This will allow the comparison of pose estimation algorithms. To develop this simulator, the measurement equations of every type of sensor have to be analytically determined. To achieve this objective, classical kinematic equations are used for the more common sensors, i.e., accelerometers and rate gyroscopes. As nowadays, the MEMS inertial measurement units (IMUs are generally magnetometer-augmented, an absolute world magnetic model is implemented. After the determination of the perfect measurement (through the error-free sensor models, realistic error models are developed to simulate real IMU behavior. Finally, the developed simulator is subjected to different validation tests.

  19. Benchtop time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Anjan; Kimura, T; Otani, Y; Fukuma, Y; Akahane, K; Meguro, S

    2008-12-01

    We present here the construction and application of a compact benchtop time-resolved Kerr magnetometer to measure the magnetization precession in magnetic thin films and lithographically patterned elements. As opposed to very expensive femtosecond lasers this system is built upon a picosecond pulsed injection diode laser and electronic pulse and delay generators. The precession is triggered by the electronic pulses of controlled duration and shape, which is launched onto the sample by a microstrip line. We used polarized optical pulses synchronous to the electronic pulses to measure the magneto-optical Kerr rotation. The system is integrated in a conventional upright microscope configuration with separate illumination, imaging, and magneto-optical probe paths. The system offers high stability, relative ease of alignment, sample changing, and a long range of time delay. We demonstrate the measurements of time-resolved dynamics of a Permalloy microwire and microdot using this system, which showed dynamics at two different time scales.

  20. The Search-coil Magnetometer for the THOR mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraoui, Fouad; Jannet, Guillaume; Pinçon, Jean-louis; Mansour, Malik; Chalumeau, Gilles; Chabassière, Michel; Hachemi, Tedjani; Jeandet, Alexis; Henri, Pierre; Le Contel, Olivier; Rezeau, Laurence

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space that is fully dedicated to plasma turbulence. The search-coil magnetometer (SCM) of THOR is a triaxial dual-band antenna dedicated to measuring the magnetic field fluctuations in the frequency range [1Hz,4kHz] and [1,200]kHz. THOR/SCM has a long heritage from earlier space missions such as Cluster, Themis, MMS, BepiColombo, Taranis, Solar orbiter and Solar Probe. In comparison to those missions, the SCM of THOR has a higher sensitivity level, which makes it capable of measuring very low amplitude magnetic fluctuations, in particular in the solar wind. Those measurements are crucial to address the problem of turbulence and energy dissipation at electron scales, a central goal of the THOR mission.

  1. First Results of the Juno Magnetometer Investigation in Jupiter's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, Jack; Oliversen, Ronald; Espley, Jared; Kotsiaros, Stavros; Joergensen, John; Joergensen, Peter; Merano, Jose; Denver, Troelz; Benn, Mathias; Bloxham, Jeremy; Bolton, Scott; Levin, Steve

    2017-04-01

    The Juno spacecraft entered polar orbit about Jupiter on July 4, 2016, after a Jupiter Orbit Insertion (JOI) main engine burn lasting 35 minutes. Juno's science instruments were not powered during the critical maneuver sequence ( 5 days) but were fully operational shortly afterward. The 53.5-day capture orbit provides Juno's science instruments with the opportunity to sample the Jovian environment close up (to 1.06 Jovian radii, Rj) and in polar orbit extending to the outer reaches of the Jovian magnetosphere. Jupiter's gravity and magnetic fields will be globally mapped with unprecedented accuracy as Juno conducts a study of Jupiter's interior structure and composition, as well as the first comprehensive exploration of the polar magnetosphere. The magnetic field investigation onboard Juno is equipped with two magnetometer sensor suites, located at 10 and 12 m from the spacecraft body at the end of one of the three solar panel wings. Each contains a vector fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) sensor and a pair of co-located non-magnetic star tracker camera heads which provide accurate attitude determination for the FGM sensors. The first few periapsis passes available to date revealed an extraordinary spatial variation of the magnetic field close to the planet's surface, suggesting that Juno may be sampling the field closer to the dynamo region than widely anticipated, i.e., portending a dynamo surface extending to relatively large radial distance ( 0.9Rj?). We present the first observations of Jupiter's magnetic field obtained in close proximity to the planet, and speculate on what wonders await as more longitudes are drawn across the global map (32 polar orbits separated by <12° longitude) that the Juno mission was designed to acquire.

  2. Micromachined fountain pen as a tool for atomic force microscope-based nanoelectrochemical metal deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deladi, S.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, Meint J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; de Boer, J.H.

    2005-01-01

    We present a device that enables nanoelectrochemical deposition using atomic force microscope. The micromachined fountain pen is a probe that consists of a fluidic reservoir, fluidic channels encapsulated in cantilevers and a pyramidal probe tip by which the fluid transfer to the sample surface

  3. T-Path Formula and Atomic Bases for Cluster Algebras of Type D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Emily; Musiker, Gregg

    2015-07-01

    We extend a T-path expansion formula for arcs on an unpunctured surface to the case of arcs on a once-punctured polygon and use this formula to give a combinatorial proof that cluster monomials form the atomic basis of a cluster algebra of type D.

  4. Determination of Trace Elements in Nickel Base Alloys by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An investigation is described to ascertain whether or not atomic absorption spectrophotometry could be used to determine the concentration of trace ... elements such as silver (Ag), bismuth (Bi), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), phosphorus (P), and arsenic (As) in nickel alloys such as Udimet 500 without interference of other constituent elements. (Author)

  5. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition delivers more active and stable Pt-based catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, H.V.; Grillo, F.; Kulkarni, S.S.; Bevaart, Ronald; Nguyên, V.T.; van der Linden, B.; Moulijn, J.A.; Makkee, M.; Kreutzer, M.T.; van Ommen, J.R.

    2017-01-01

    We tailored the size distribution of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) on graphene nanoplatelets at a given metal loading by using low-temperature atomic layer deposition carried out in a fluidized bed reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. The Pt NPs deposited at low temperature (100 °C) after 10 cycles

  6. Effective atomic numbers of some H-, C-, N-and O-based composite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The differential incoherent scattering cross-sections of the composite materials of interest measured at these three angles in the same set-up and substituted in this expression would yield their effective atomic number at the three energies. Results obtained in this manner for bakelite, nylon, epoxy, teflon, perspex and some ...

  7. Initiating Heavy-atom Based Phasing by Multi-Dimensional Molecular Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu

    2014-01-01

    in the determination of a membrane protein structure, the CopA Cu+-ATPase, when other methods had failed to resolve the heavy atom substructure. MRPM is particularly suited for proteins undergoing large conformational changes where multiple search models should be generated, and it enables the identification of weak...

  8. Chain-Branching Control of the Atomic Structure of Alkanethiol-Based Gold–Sulfur Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yun; Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong

    2011-01-01

    Density functional theory structure calculations at 0 K and simulations at 300 K of observed high-resolution in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images reveal three different atomic-interface structures for the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of three isomeric butanethiols on Au(111...

  9. Initiating Heavy-atom Based Phasing by Multi-Dimensional Molecular Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus Emanuel; Liu, Xiangyu

    2014-01-01

    in the determination of a membrane protein structure, the CopA Cu+-ATPase, when other methods had failed to resolve the heavy atom substructure. MRPM is particularly suited for proteins undergoing large conformational changes where multiple search models should be generated, and it enables the identification of weak...... but correct molecular replacement solutions with maximum contrast to prime experimental phasing efforts....

  10. Rydberg-atom based radio-frequency electrometry using frequency modulation spectroscopy in room temperature vapor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Fan, Haoquan; Kübler, Harald; Jahangiri, Akbar J; Shaffer, James P

    2017-04-17

    Rydberg atom-based electrometry enables traceable electric field measurements with high sensitivity over a large frequency range, from gigahertz to terahertz. Such measurements are particularly useful for the calibration of radio frequency and terahertz devices, as well as other applications like near field imaging of electric fields. We utilize frequency modulated spectroscopy with active control of residual amplitude modulation to improve the signal to noise ratio of the optical readout of Rydberg atom-based radio frequency electrometry. Matched filtering of the signal is also implemented. Although we have reached similarly, high sensitivity with other read-out methods, frequency modulated spectroscopy is advantageous because it is well-suited for building a compact, portable sensor. In the current experiment, ∼3 µV cm-1 Hz-1/2 sensitivity is achieved and is found to be photon shot noise limited.

  11. High-Sensitivity Low-Noise Miniature Fluxgate Magnetometers Using a Flip Chip Conceptual Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Cheng Lu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel class of miniature fluxgate magnetometers fabricated on a print circuit board (PCB substrate and electrically connected to each other similar to the current “flip chip” concept in semiconductor package. This sensor is soldered together by reversely flipping a 5 cm × 3 cm PCB substrate to the other identical one which includes dual magnetic cores, planar pick-up coils, and 3-D excitation coils constructed by planar Cu interconnections patterned on PCB substrates. Principles and analysis of the fluxgate sensor are introduced first, and followed by FEA electromagnetic modeling and simulation for the proposed sensor. Comprehensive characteristic experiments of the miniature fluxgate device exhibit favorable results in terms of sensitivity (or “responsivity” for magnetometers and field noise spectrum. The sensor is driven and characterized by employing the improved second-harmonic detection technique that enables linear V-B correlation and responsivity verification. In addition, the double magnitude of responsivity measured under very low frequency (1 Hz magnetic fields is experimentally demonstrated. As a result, the maximum responsivity of 593 V/T occurs at 50 kHz of excitation frequency with the second harmonic wave of excitation; however, the minimum magnetic field noise is found to be 0.05 nT/Hz1/2 at 1 Hz under the same excitation. In comparison with other miniature planar fluxgates published to date, the fluxgate magnetic sensor with flip chip configuration offers advances in both device functionality and fabrication simplicity. More importantly, the novel design can be further extended to a silicon-based micro-fluxgate chip manufactured by emerging CMOS-MEMS technologies, thus enriching its potential range of applications in modern engineering and the consumer electronics market.

  12. High-sensitivity low-noise miniature fluxgate magnetometers using a flip chip conceptual design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Jeff; Chiu, Po-Kai; Chiu, Shih-Liang; Jeng, Jen-Tzong

    2014-07-30

    This paper presents a novel class of miniature fluxgate magnetometers fabricated on a print circuit board (PCB) substrate and electrically connected to each other similar to the current "flip chip" concept in semiconductor package. This sensor is soldered together by reversely flipping a 5 cm × 3 cm PCB substrate to the other identical one which includes dual magnetic cores, planar pick-up coils, and 3-D excitation coils constructed by planar Cu interconnections patterned on PCB substrates. Principles and analysis of the fluxgate sensor are introduced first, and followed by FEA electromagnetic modeling and simulation for the proposed sensor. Comprehensive characteristic experiments of the miniature fluxgate device exhibit favorable results in terms of sensitivity (or "responsivity" for magnetometers) and field noise spectrum. The sensor is driven and characterized by employing the improved second-harmonic detection technique that enables linear V-B correlation and responsivity verification. In addition, the double magnitude of responsivity measured under very low frequency (1 Hz) magnetic fields is experimentally demonstrated. As a result, the maximum responsivity of 593 V/T occurs at 50 kHz of excitation frequency with the second harmonic wave of excitation; however, the minimum magnetic field noise is found to be 0.05 nT/Hz(1/2) at 1 Hz under the same excitation. In comparison with other miniature planar fluxgates published to date, the fluxgate magnetic sensor with flip chip configuration offers advances in both device functionality and fabrication simplicity. More importantly, the novel design can be further extended to a silicon-based micro-fluxgate chip manufactured by emerging CMOS-MEMS technologies, thus enriching its potential range of applications in modern engineering and the consumer electronics market.

  13. Exploring the Use of Alfven Waves in Magnetometer Calibration at Geosynchronous Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, John; Sheppard, David; RIch, Frederick; Redmon, Robert; Loto'aniu, Paul; Chu, Donald

    2016-01-01

    An Alfven wave is a type magnetohydrodynamicwave that travels through a conducting fluid under the influence of a magnetic field. Researchers have successfully calculated offset vectors of magnetometers in interplanetary space by optimizing the offset to maximize certain Alfvenic properties of observed waves (Leinweber, Belcher). If suitable Alfven waves can be found in the magnetosphere at geosynchronous altitude then these techniques could be used to augment the overall calibration plan for magnetometers in this region such as on the GOES spacecraft, possibly increasing the time between regular maneuvers. Calibration maneuvers may be undesirable because they disrupt the activities of other instruments. Various algorithms to calculate an offset using Alfven waves were considered. A new variation of the Davis-Smith method was derived because it can be mathematically shown that the Davis-Smith method tolerates filtered data, which expands potential applications. The variant developed was designed to find only the offset in the plane normal to the main field because the overall direction of Earth's magnetic field rarely changes, and theory suggests the Alfvenic disturbances occur transverse to the main field. Other variations of the Davis-Smith method encounter problems with data containing waves that propagate in mostly the same direction. A searching algorithm was then designed to look for periods of time with potential Alfven waves in GOES 15 data based on parameters requiring that disturbances be normal to the main field and not change field magnitude. Final waves for calculation were hand-selected. These waves produced credible two-dimensional offset vectors when input to the Davis-Smith method. Multiple two-dimensional solutions in different planes can be combined to get a measurement of the complete offset. The resulting three dimensional offset did not show sufficient precision over several years to be used as a primary calibration method, but reflected

  14. Understanding the Atomic Scale Mechanisms that Control the Attainment of Ultralow Friction and Wear in Carbon-Based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-16

    2015. 15. Invited. New Insights into Friction and Wear through In-Situ Nanotribology. Joint Symposium of the Surface Science Society of Japan and...and Carpick, R.W. Influence of Surface Passivation on the Friction and Wear Behavior of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond and Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0053 Understanding the Atomic Scale Mechanism that controls the attainment of ultralow friction and wear in carbon based

  15. A new model based on group theory for correlating vibrational displacement vectors of attached atoms and shapes of the central atom otbitals in ABn(n=2-5 molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tayebee

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available   Stretching and bending normal vibrations of AB2(C2v, AB3(D3h, AB4(D4h, and AB5(D3h molecules are described by correlating the vibrational displacement vectors of the attached atoms with the standard representations of s, p and d atomic orbitals of the central atom in ABn(n=2-5 molecules. It is found that stretching and bending normal vibrations of simple molecules accord with probability density of hybrid orbitals of the central atom. So, stretching and bending normal vibrations can be determined based on the irreducible representations of each vibration, and symbols for the representations which are suggested by Muliken.

  16. StatSTEM: An efficient approach for accurate and precise model-based quantification of atomic resolution electron microscopy images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A.; Bos, K.H.W. van den [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Van den Broek, W. [AG Strukturforschung/Elektronenmikroskopie, Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Sijbers, J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2016-12-15

    An efficient model-based estimation algorithm is introduced to quantify the atomic column positions and intensities from atomic resolution (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) images. This algorithm uses the least squares estimator on image segments containing individual columns fully accounting for overlap between neighbouring columns, enabling the analysis of a large field of view. For this algorithm, the accuracy and precision with which measurements for the atomic column positions and scattering cross-sections from annular dark field (ADF) STEM images can be estimated, has been investigated. The highest attainable precision is reached even for low dose images. Furthermore, the advantages of the model-based approach taking into account overlap between neighbouring columns are highlighted. This is done for the estimation of the distance between two neighbouring columns as a function of their distance and for the estimation of the scattering cross-section which is compared to the integrated intensity from a Voronoi cell. To provide end-users this well-established quantification method, a user friendly program, StatSTEM, is developed which is freely available under a GNU public license. - Highlights: • An efficient model-based method for quantitative electron microscopy is introduced. • Images are modelled as a superposition of 2D Gaussian peaks. • Overlap between neighbouring columns is taken into account. • Structure parameters can be obtained with the highest precision and accuracy. • StatSTEM, auser friendly program (GNU public license) is developed.

  17. Fullerene-Based Macro-Heterocycle Prepared through Selective Incorporation of Three N and Two O Atoms into C60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanbang; Zhang, Gaihong; Wang, Dian; Xu, Beidi; Xu, Dan; Lou, Ning; Gan, Liangbing

    2016-11-14

    A 14-membered heterocycle is created on the C 60 cage skeleton through a multistep procedure. Key steps involve repeated PCl 5 -induced hydroxylamino N-O bond cleavage leading to insertion of nitrogen atoms, and also piperidine-induced peroxo O-O bond cleavage leading to insertion of oxygen atoms. The hetero atoms form one pyrrole, two pyran, and one diazepine rings in conjunction with the C 60 skeleton carbon atoms. The fullerene-based macrocycle showed unique reactivities towards fluoride ion and copper salts. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Atomic-resolution measurements with a new tunable diode laser-based interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, R.M.; Zou, H.; Gonda, S.

    2004-01-01

    We develop a new implementation of a Michelson interferometer designed to make measurements with an uncertainty of less than 20 pm. This new method uses a tunable diode laser as the light source, with the diode laser wavelength continuously tuned to fix the number of fringes in the measured optical...... path. The diode laser frequency is measured by beating against a reference laser. High-speed, accurate frequency measurements of the beat frequency signal enables the diode laser wavelength to be measured with nominally 20-pm accuracy for the measurements described. The new interferometer design...... is lightweight and is mounted directly on an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope capable of atomic resolution. We report the simultaneous acquisition of an atomic resolution image, while the relative lateral displacement of the tip along the sample distance is measured with the new tunable diode...

  19. Localised quantum states of atomic and molecular particles physisorbed on carbon-based nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Trachta, Michal; Bludský, Ota; Špirko, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 11 (2014), "114702-1"-"114702-10" ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/0571; GA ČR GAP208/11/0436; GA ČR GAP208/10/0725 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : periodic structure * carbon nanostructures * graphene * quantum mechanics * physisorbed Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2014

  20. Relativistic multireference coupled-cluster theory based on a B -spline basis: Application to atomic francium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong-Bo; Lou, Bing-Qiong; Shi, Ting-Yun

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we report the relativistic Fock space multireference coupled-cluster method for atomic structure calculations. We use the no-pair Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian, together with a finite B -spline basis set to expand the large and small components of the Dirac wave function. Our method is applied to calculate ionization energies, reduced matrix elements, lifetimes, and polarizabilities for many states of atomic francium. To evaluate uncertainties of our results and investigate the role of electron correlation effects, we carry out calculations using approximated models at different levels. The quality of our calculations is assessed by comparing with available experimental results, showing a good agreement. In addition, the tune-out wavelengths of the ground state in the range of 340-800 nm, the magic wavelengths for the transition 7 s -8 s in the range of 800-1500 nm and the transition 7 s -7 p in the range of 600-1500 nm are determined by evaluating the dynamic polarizabilities of the 7 s , 8 s , and 7 p states for a linearly polarized light. These tune-out and magic wavelengths may be useful for laser cooling and trapping of the Fr atom, and for related high-precision trapping measurements.

  1. A simple image based method for obtaining electron density and atomic number in dual energy CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Qi, Zhihua; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    The extraction of electron density and atomic number information in computed tomography is possible when image values can be sampled using two different effective energies. The foundation for this extraction lies in the ability to express the linear attenuation coefficient using two basis functions that are dependent on electron density and atomic number over the diagnostic energy range used in CT. Material basis functions separate images into clinically familiar quantities such as 'bone' images and 'soft tissue' images. Physically, all basis function choices represent the expression of the linear attenuation coefficient in terms of a photoelectric and a Compton scattering term. The purpose of this work is to develop a simple dual energy decomposition method that requires no a priori knowledge about the energy characteristics of the imaging system. It is shown that the weighted sum of two basis images yields an electron density image where the weights for each basis image are the electron density of that basis image's basis material. Using the electron density image, effective atomic number information can also be obtained. These methods are performed solely in the image domain and require no spectrum or detector energy response information as required by some other dual energy decomposition methods.

  2. A Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Benjamin

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity, high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented DC-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (2 um), or 6 nT / Hz1 / 2 per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly one-hundred points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT / Hz1 / 2 each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner would measure these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly two orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10- 6 Phi0 / Hz1 / 2) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are for the first time carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns and done so using samples that may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge transport images at temperatures from room to \\x9D4K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  3. Multiscale approach for the construction of equilibrated all-atom models of a poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianfeng; Murthy, N. Sanjeeva; Becker, Matthew L.; Latour, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    A multiscale modeling approach is presented for the efficient construction of an equilibrated all-atom model of a cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel using the all-atom polymer consistent force field (PCFF). The final equilibrated all-atom model was built with a systematic simulation toolset consisting of three consecutive parts: (1) building a global cross-linked PEG-chain network at experimentally determined cross-link density using an on-lattice Monte Carlo method based on the bond fluctuation model, (2) recovering the local molecular structure of the network by transitioning from the lattice model to an off-lattice coarse-grained (CG) model parameterized from PCFF, followed by equilibration using high performance molecular dynamics methods, and (3) recovering the atomistic structure of the network by reverse mapping from the equilibrated CG structure, hydrating the structure with explicitly represented water, followed by final equilibration using PCFF parameterization. The developed three-stage modeling approach has application to a wide range of other complex macromolecular hydrogel systems, including the integration of peptide, protein, and/or drug molecules as side-chains within the hydrogel network for the incorporation of bioactivity for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications. PMID:27013229

  4. A neural network potential-energy surface for the water dimer based on environment-dependent atomic energies and charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawietz, Tobias; Sharma, Vikas; Behler, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the unique properties of water still represents a significant challenge for theory and experiment. Computer simulations by molecular dynamics require a reliable description of the atomic interactions, and in recent decades countless water potentials have been reported in the literature. Still, most of these potentials contain significant approximations, for instance a frozen internal structure of the individual water monomers. Artificial neural networks (NNs) offer a promising way for the construction of very accurate potential-energy surfaces taking all degrees of freedom explicitly into account. These potentials are based on electronic structure calculations for representative configurations, which are then interpolated to a continuous energy surface that can be evaluated many orders of magnitude faster. We present a full-dimensional NN potential for the water dimer as a first step towards the construction of a NN potential for liquid water. This many-body potential is based on environment-dependent atomic energy contributions, and long-range electrostatic interactions are incorporated employing environment-dependent atomic charges. We show that the potential and derived properties like vibrational frequencies are in excellent agreement with the underlying reference density-functional theory calculations.

  5. IMF By effects on ground magnetometer response to increased solar wind dynamic pressure derived from global MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Dogacan Su; Zou, Shasha; Slavin, James A.

    2017-05-01

    During sudden solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements, the magnetosphere undergoes rapid compression resulting in a reconfiguration of the global current systems, most notably the field-aligned currents (FACs). Ground-based magnetometers are traditionally used to study such compression events. However, factors affecting the polarity and magnitude of the ground-based magnetic perturbations are still not well understood. In particular, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By is known to create significant asymmetries in the FAC patterns. We use the University of Michigan Block Adaptive Tree Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS'R'US) magnetohydrodynamic code to investigate the effects of IMF By on the global variations of ground magnetic perturbations during solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements. Using virtual magnetometers in three idealized simulations with varying IMF By, we find asymmetries in the peak amplitude and magnetic local time of the ground magnetic perturbations during the preliminary impulse (PI) and the main impulse (MI) phases. These asymmetries are especially evident at high-latitude ground magnetometer responses where the peak amplitudes differ by 50 nT at different locations. We show that the FACs related with the PI are due to magnetopause deformation, and the FACs related with the MI are generated by vortical flows within the magnetosphere, consistent with other simulation results. The perturbation FACs due to pressure enhancements and their magnetospheric sources do not differ much under different IMF By polarities. However, the conductance profile affected by the superposition of the preexisting FACs and the perturbation FACs including their closure currents is responsible for the magnitude and location asymmetries in the ground magnetic perturbations.

  6. Characterization of nano-sized precipitates in a Mn-based lean maraging steel by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millan, J.; Ponge, D.; Raabe, D.; Choi, P.; Dmitrieva, O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    We present atom probe tomography results of a precipitation-hardened Mn-based maraging steel (9 Mn, 1.9 Ni, 0.6 Mo, 1.1 Ti, 0.33 Al; in at.%). The alloy is characterized by the surprising effect that both, strength and total elongation increase upon aging. The material reveals a high ultimate tensile strength (UTS) up to 1 GPa and good ductility (total elongation (TE) of up to 15% in a tensile test) depending on aging conditions. We map the evolution of the precipitates after 450 C aging treatment using atom probe tomography in terms of chemical composition and size distribution. (Copyright copyright 2011 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Atomic-scale insight into the origin of pyridine inhibition of MoS2-based hydrotreating catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Temel, Burcin; Tuxen, Anders K.; Kibsgaard, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Basic nitrogen-containing compounds such as pyridine are well known to be inhibitors of the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) reaction for the MoS2-based catalysts. From an interplay of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, atomic-scale insight...... also at the edges. The calculated DFT energies and simulated STM images allowed us to conclude that these species are pyridinium ions located at the catalytically active brim sites. Furthermore, the DFT results for the vibrational modes of the adsorbed pyridinium species agree well with those observed...... in earlier IR experiments on high surface alumina-supported MoS2 catalyst. The adsorption sites appear to be very similar to the brim sites involved in hydrogenation reactions in HDS. Thus, the combined STM and DFT results provide new atomic-scale insight into the inhibition effect of basic N...

  8. Mapping of Proteomic Composition on the Surfaces of Bacillus spores by Atomic Force Microscopy-based Immunolabeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plomp, M; Malkin, A J

    2008-06-02

    Atomic force microscopy provides a unique capability to image high-resolution architecture and structural dynamics of pathogens (e.g. viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores) at near molecular resolution in native conditions. Further development of atomic force microscopy in order to enable the correlation of pathogen protein surface structures with specific gene products is essential to understand the mechanisms of the pathogen life cycle. We have applied an AFM-based immunolabeling technique for the proteomic mapping of macromolecular structures through the visualization of the binding of antibodies, conjugated with nanogold particles, to specific epitopes on Bacillus spore surfaces. This information is generated while simultaneously acquiring the surface morphology of the pathogen. The immunospecificity of this labeling method was established through the utilization of specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies that target spore coat and exosporium epitopes of Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus anthracis spores.

  9. Imaging method for downward-looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar based on reweighted atomic norm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qian; Han, Kuoye; Lin, Yun; Zhang, Bingchen; Liu, Jianguo; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    We propose an imaging algorithm for downward-looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) in the circumstance of cross-track sparse and nonuniform array configuration. Considering the off-grid effect and the resolution improvement, the algorithm combines pseudo-polar formatting algorithm, reweighed atomic norm minimization (RANM), and a parametric relaxation-based cyclic approach (RELAX) to improve the imaging performance with a reduced number of array antennas. RANM is employed in the cross-track imaging after pseudo-polar formatting the DLSLA 3-D SAR echo signal, then the reconstructed results are refined by RELAX. By taking advantage of the reweighted scheme, RANM can improve the resolution of the atomic norm minimization, and outperforms discretized compressive sensing schemes that suffer from off-grid effect. The simulated and real data experiments of DLSLA 3-D SAR verify the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Mobile setup for synchrotron based in situ characterization during thermal and plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendooven, Jolien; Solano, Eduardo; Minjauw, Matthias M.; Van de Kerckhove, Kevin; Coati, Alessandro; Fonda, Emiliano; Portale, Giuseppe; Garreau, Yves; Detavernier, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    We report the design of a mobile setup for synchrotron based in situ studies during atomic layer processing. The system was designed to facilitate in situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS), x-ray fluorescence (XRF), and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at synchrotron facilities. The setup consists of a compact high vacuum pump-type reactor for atomic layer deposition (ALD). The presence of a remote radio frequency plasma source enables in situ experiments during both thermal as well as plasma-enhanced ALD. The system has been successfully installed at different beam line end stations at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and SOLEIL synchrotrons. Examples are discussed of in situ GISAXS and XRF measurements during thermal and plasma-enhanced ALD growth of ruthenium from RuO4 (ToRuS™, Air Liquide) and H2 or H2 plasma, providing insights in the nucleation behavior of these processes.

  11. Al2O3 on WSe2 by ozone based atomic layer deposition: Nucleation and interface study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Azcatl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the atomic layer deposition process using ozone and trimethylaluminum (TMA for the deposition of Al2O3 films on WSe2 was investigated. It was found that the ozone-based atomic layer deposition enhanced the nucleation of Al2O3 in comparison to the water/TMA process. In addition, the chemistry at the Al2O3/WSe2 interface and the surface morphology of the Al2O3 films exhibited a dependence on the deposition temperature. A non-covalent functionalizing effect of ozone on WSe2 at low deposition temperatures 30 °C was identified which prevented the formation of pinholes in the Al2O3 films. These findings aim to provide an approach to obtain high-quality gate dielectrics on WSe2 for two-dimensional transistor applications.

  12. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom–atom and atom–wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom–atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0−3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time. PMID:24934478

  13. M(H) dependence and size distribution of SPIONs measured by atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, Simone; Grujic, Zoran D; Dolgovskiy, Vladimir; Weis, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the quasistatic recording of the magnetic excitation function M(H) of superparamagnetic iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle (SPION) suspensions by an atomic magnetometer allows a precise determination of the sample's iron mass content mFe and the particle size distribution.

  14. IceBridge Flux Gate Magnetometer L0 Raw Magnetic Field

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Flux Gate Magnetometer L0 Raw Magnetic Field (IMFGM0) data set contains magnetic field readings taken over Antarctica using the Integrity...

  15. In-orbit calibration of the lunar magnetometer onboard SELENE (KAGUYA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Takahashi, Futoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Matsushima, Masaki; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsuoka, Ayako; Nakazawa, Satoru; Iijima, Yuichi; Otake, Hisashi; Tsunakawa, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    The high-sensitivity fluxgate Lunar MAGnetometer (LMAG) is mounted on SELENE (KAGUYA) to investigate the near-surface electromagnetic environment and the evolution of the Moon through magnetic field observation...

  16. IceBridge Scintrex CS-3 Cesium Magnetometer L0 Raw Magnetic Field

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Scintrex CS-3 Cesium Magnetometer L0 Raw Magnetic Field data set contains magnetic field readings and fluxgate values taken over Greenland using...

  17. IceBridge Geometrics 823A Cesium Magnetometer L0 Raw Magnetic Field

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Geometrics 823A Cesium Magnetometer L0 Raw Magnetic Field (IMGEO0) data set contains magnetic field readings taken over Antarctica using the...

  18. IceBridge Flux Gate Magnetometer L0 Raw Magnetic Field, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Flux Gate Magnetometer L0 Raw Magnetic Field (IMFGM0) data set contains magnetic field readings taken over Antarctica using the Integrity...

  19. IceBridge Geometrics 823A Cesium Magnetometer L0 Raw Magnetic Field, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Geometrics 823A Cesium Magnetometer L0 Raw Magnetic Field (IMGEO0) data set contains magnetic field readings taken over Antarctica using the...

  20. IceBridge Geometrics 823A Cesium Magnetometer L2 Geolocated Magnetic Anomalies, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Geometrics 823A Cesium Magnetometer L2 Geolocated Magnetic Anomalies (IMGEO2) data set contains magnetic anomaly measurements taken over...

  1. IceBridge Geometrics 823A Cesium Magnetometer L2 Geolocated Magnetic Anomalies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Geometrics 823A Cesium Magnetometer L2 Geolocated Magnetic Anomalies (IMGEO2) data set contains magnetic anomaly measurements taken over...

  2. Rad-Hard Sigma-Delta 3-channel ADC for Fluxgate Magnetometers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project aims to develop a multi-channel analog to digital converter (ADC) required for a fluxgate magnetometer (EPD) employed on NASA's planetary...

  3. Integration of a MEMS Inertial Measuring Unit with a MEMS Magnetometer for 3D Orientation Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Junping; Malureanu, Christian; Andersen, Niels Lervad

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for combining the measurements of a MEMS Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and a MEMS magnetometer. The measurements are done using a special designed and customized miniature detecting system for 3D orientation estimation, and position tracking......This paper presents an algorithm for combining the measurements of a MEMS Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and a MEMS magnetometer. The measurements are done using a special designed and customized miniature detecting system for 3D orientation estimation, and position tracking...

  4. Identification of a dynamic atmosphere at Enceladus with the Cassini magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, M K; Khurana, K K; Neubauer, F M; Russell, C T; Saur, J; Leisner, J S; Burton, M E

    2006-03-10

    The Cassini magnetometer has detected the interaction of the magnetospheric plasma of Saturn with an atmospheric plume at the icy moon Enceladus. This unanticipated finding, made on a distant flyby, was subsequently confirmed during two follow-on flybys, one very close to Enceladus. The magnetometer data are consistent with local outgassing activity via a plume from the surface of the moon near its south pole, as confirmed by other Cassini instruments.

  5. Calibrating the Swarm: Networked Small Satellite Magnetometers for Auroral Plasma Science

    OpenAIRE

    Parham, Jonathan; Van Dessel, Osi; Kromis, Maria; Teng, Phillip; Semeter, Joshua; Zosuls, Alexks; Walsh, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by small-scale auroral plasma science, ANDESITE, a 6U CubeSat with eight deployable picosatellites, will fly a network of magnetometers through the Northern Lights. With the spacecraft due to launch on the upcoming ELaNa XIX mission, this work details its science mission architecture along with the payload design and calibration. Each three-axis magnetometer instrument is hosted by a deployable picosatellite about the size of a piece of toast. Calibration of these sensors included a...

  6. The MAGIC of CINEMA: First in-flight science results from a miniaturised anisotropic magnetoresistive magnetometer

    OpenAIRE

    M. O. Archer; Horbury, T. S.; Brown, P; Eastwood, J. P.; Oddy, T. M.; B. J. Whiteside; Sample, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first in-flight results from a novel miniaturised anisotropic magnetoresistive space magnetometer, MAGIC (MAGnetometer from Imperial College), aboard the first CINEMA (CubeSat for Ions, Neutrals, Electrons and MAgnetic fields) spacecraft in low Earth orbit. An attitude-independent calibration technique is detailed using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF), which is temperature dependent in the case of the outboard sensor. We show that the sens...

  7. Testing the three axis magnetometer and gradiometer MOURA and data comparison on San Pablo de los Montes Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belen Fernandez, Ana; Sanz, Ruy; Covisa, Pablo; Tordesillas, Jose Manuel; Diaz-Michelena, Marina

    2013-04-01

    A magnetometer and gradiometer named MOURA has been developed with the objective to measure the magnetic field on Mars in the frame of Mars MetNet Precursor Mission (MMPM) [1]. MOURA is a compact, miniaturized, intelligent and low cost instrument, based on two sets of triaxial magnetometers separated one centimeter from each other to do gradiometry studies. It has a resolution of 2.2 nT, and a field range of + 65μT, which can be extended to +130 μT when sensors are saturated. [2] These sensor heads are Anisotropic MagnetoResistances (AMR) Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) by Honeywell, specifically HMC1043, which has been selected due to their relative low consumption, weight and size, factors very important for the mission with very limited mass and power budget (shared 150 g for three full payloads). Also, this technology has been previously successfully employed on board Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) to perform geomagnetic surveys in extreme conditions areas [3], and in several space missions for different applications. [4] After the development of the MOURA Engineering Qualification Model (EQM) in November 2011, an exhaustive set of tests have been performed to validate and fully characterize the instrument. Compensation equations have been derived for the temperature corrections in the operation range (between -135 °C and 30 °C) in controlled environments. These compensation equations have been applied to field data, which have shown to follow the daily Earth's magnetic field variations as registered by San Pablo Geomagnetic Observatory (IAGA code: SPT) (available at www.ign.es and www.intermagnet.org) with deviations lower than 40 nT. These deviations were attributed to several error factors as the different locations between MOURA and SPT and other possible different geomagnetic conditions. Due to the above, a measurement campaign on SPT installations are been done. The main objective is to compare MOURA measurements on a relevant environment, with data

  8. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  9. Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  10. Co-seismic signatures in magnetometer, geophone, and infrasound data during the Meinong Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jann-Yenq Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper utilizes 10 stations of co-located seismometer, QuakeFinder/infrasound to observe co-seismic signatures triggered by the 6 February 2016 M 6.6 Meinong Earthquake. Each QuakeFinder system consists of a 3-axes induction magnetometer, an air conductivity sensor, a geophone, and temperature/relative humidity sensors. There are no obvious charges in the positive/negative ions, the temperature, and the humidity, while the magnetometer, the geophone, and infrasound data detect clear co-seismic signatures, similar to seismic waves recorded by seismometers. The magnetometers register high-frequency pulsations, like seismic waves, and superimpose with low-frequency variations, which could be caused by the magnetometer shaking/tilting and/or the underground water level change, respectively, upon the arrival of seismic waves. The spectrum centering around 2.0 Hz of the co-seismic geophone fluctuations is similar to that of the seismic waves. However, the energy of co-seismic geophone fluctuations (also magnetometer pulsations yields an exponential decay to the distance of a station to the epicenter, while the energy of the seismic waves is inversely proportional to the square of the distance. This suggests that the mechanisms for detecting seismic waves of the QuakeFinder system and seismometers are different. In general, the geophone and magnetometer/infrasound system are useful to record high- and low-frequency seismic waves, respectively.

  11. A portable Hall magnetometer probe for characterization of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Jefferson F.D.F.; Costa, Mateus C.; Louro, Sonia R.W.; Bruno, Antonio C., E-mail: acbruno@puc-rio.br

    2017-03-15

    We have built a portable Hall magnetometer probe, for measuring magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles, that can be used for bulk materials and liquid samples as well. The magnetometer probe consists of four voltage-programmable commercial Hall sensors and a thin acrylic plate for positioning the sensors. In order to operate, it needs to be attached to a pole of an electromagnet and connected to an AD converter and a computer. It acquires a complete magnetization curve in a couple of minutes and has a magnetic moment sensitivity of 3.5×10{sup −7} Am{sup 2}. We tested its performance with magnetic nanoparticles containing an iron oxide core and having coating layers with different sizes. The magnetization results obtained were compared with measurements performed on commercial stand-alone magnetometers, and exhibited errors of about ±0.2 Am{sup 2}/kg (i.e 0.4%) at saturation and below 0.5 Am{sup 2}/kg (i.e. 10%) at remanence. - Highlights: • A low-cost portable Hall magnetometer probe has been built. • The Hall magnetometer probe can be attached to any electromagnet. • The Hall probe was calibrated and successfully compared to industry standard magnetometers. • The Hall probe was able to measure iron oxide nanoparticles with different coatings.

  12. Comparison of 4 analytical techniques based on atomic spectrometry for the determination of total tin in canned foodstuffs

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Different techniques for the determination of total tin in beverage and canned food by atomic spectrometry were compared. The performance characteristics of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Hydride Generation Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (HG-ICP-AES), Electrothermal Atomization Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (ETA-AAS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) were determined in term of linearity, ...

  13. Self-assembly based plasmonic arrays tuned by atomic layer deposition for extreme visible light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Carl; Zeltzer, Gabriel; Ruiz, Ricardo; Thomann, Isabell; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Brongersma, Mark L; Bent, Stacey F

    2013-07-10

    Achieving complete absorption of visible light with a minimal amount of material is highly desirable for many applications, including solar energy conversion to fuel and electricity, where benefits in conversion efficiency and economy can be obtained. On a fundamental level, it is of great interest to explore whether the ultimate limits in light absorption per unit volume can be achieved by capitalizing on the advances in metamaterial science and nanosynthesis. Here, we combine block copolymer lithography and atomic layer deposition to tune the effective optical properties of a plasmonic array at the atomic scale. Critical coupling to the resulting nanocomposite layer is accomplished through guidance by a simple analytical model and measurements by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Thereby, a maximized absorption of light exceeding 99% is accomplished, of which up to about 93% occurs in a volume-equivalent thickness of gold of only 1.6 nm. This corresponds to a record effective absorption coefficient of 1.7 × 10(7) cm(-1) in the visible region, far exceeding those of solid metals, graphene, dye monolayers, and thin film solar cell materials. It is more than a factor of 2 higher than that previously obtained using a critically coupled dye J-aggregate, with a peak width exceeding the latter by 1 order of magnitude. These results thereby substantially push the limits for light harvesting in ultrathin, nanoengineered systems.

  14. High-speed atomic force microscope based on an astigmatic detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, H.-S.; Chen, Y.-H.; Ding, R.-F.; Huang, H.-F.; Wang, W.-M.; Hwu, E.-T.; Huang, K.-Y.; Chang, C.-S.; Hwang, I.-S.

    2014-10-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) enables visualizing dynamic behaviors of biological molecules under physiological conditions at a temporal resolution of 1s or shorter. A small cantilever with a high resonance frequency is crucial in increasing the scan speed. However, detecting mechanical resonances of small cantilevers is technically challenging. In this study, we constructed an atomic force microscope using a digital versatile disc (DVD) pickup head to detect cantilever deflections. In addition, a flexure-guided scanner and a sinusoidal scan method were implemented. In this work, we imaged a grating sample in air by using a regular cantilever and a small cantilever with a resonance frequency of 5.5 MHz. Poor tracking was seen at the scan rate of 50 line/s when a cantilever for regular AFM imaging was used. Using a small cantilever at the scan rate of 100 line/s revealed no significant degradation in the topographic images. The results indicate that a smaller cantilever can achieve a higher scan rate and superior force sensitivity. This work shows the potential for using a DVD pickup head in future HS-AFM technology.

  15. Hierarchical surface atomic structure of a manganese-based spinel cathode for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanghan; Yoon, Gabin; Jeong, Minseul; Lee, Min-Joon; Kang, Kisuk; Cho, Jaephil

    2015-01-19

    The increasing use of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) in high-power applications requires improvement of their high-temperature electrochemical performance, including their cyclability and rate capability. Spinel lithium manganese oxide (LiMn2O4) is a promising cathode material because of its high stability and abundance. However, it exhibits poor cycling performance at high temperatures owing to Mn dissolution. Herein we show that when stoichiometric lithium manganese oxide is coated with highly doped spinels, the resulting epitaxial coating has a hierarchical atomic structure consisting of cubic-spinel, tetragonal-spinel, and layered structures, and no interfacial phase is formed. In a practical application of the coating to doped spinel, the material retained 90% of its capacity after 800 cycles at 60 °C. Thus, the formation of an epitaxial coating with a hierarchical atomic structure could enhance the electrochemical performance of LIB cathode materials while preventing large losses in capacity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Chemical resistance of thin film materials based on metal oxides grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammelselg, Väino, E-mail: vaino.sammelselg@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, Ravila 14a, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Netšipailo, Ivan; Aidla, Aleks; Tarre, Aivar; Aarik, Lauri; Asari, Jelena; Ritslaid, Peeter; Aarik, Jaan [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia)

    2013-09-02

    Etching rate of technologically important metal oxide thin films in hot sulphuric acid was investigated. The films of Al-, Ti-, Cr-, and Ta-oxides studied were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method on silicon substrates from different precursors in large ranges of growth temperatures (80–900 °C) in order to reveal process parameters that allow deposition of coatings with higher chemical resistance. The results obtained demonstrate that application of processes that yield films with lower concentration of residual impurities as well as crystallization of films in thermal ALD processes leads to significant decrease of etching rate. Crystalline films of materials studied showed etching rates down to values of < 5 pm/s. - Highlights: • Etching of atomic layer deposited thin metal oxide films in hot H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was studied. • Smallest etching rates of < 5 pm/s for TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} were reached. • Highest etching rate of 2.8 nm/s for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was occurred. • Remarkable differences in etching of non- and crystalline films were observed.

  17. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Yueh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Tse; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Chang, Chia-Seng; Hwang, Ing-Shouh, E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wei-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å){sup −1} were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage.

  18. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  19. Prospecting For Magnetite Ore Deposits With A Innovative Sensor's of Unique Fundamentally New Magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelianenko, T. I.; Tachaytdinov, R. S.; Sarichev, V. F.; Kotov, B. V.; Susoeva, G. N.

    After careful study of principles and abilities of all existing magnetmeters of all three revolutions in magnetic prospecting we have come to the conclusion that they cannot solve local guestions of the magnetic prospecting or determine centre coordinates of magnetite ore body before drilling Electromagnetism lows and achievents magnetprospectings and radioelectronics of all 20th century serve as a theoretical base of the "locator". While creating this cardinally new magnetmeter , we borrowed different things from radio-prospectors, magnetprospectors, wireless operators and combined all of them while creating the "locators''. The "locators' construction is bas ed on the "magnetic intensification" principle ,owing to which this "locators" are characterised by hight sensitiveness and ability to determine centers of even little commercial magnetite ore deposits with relatively weak magnetic anomalies. The main advantage of the "locators" over existing ones is that it can solve local questions determine centre coordinates. A remarkably simple locator construction determine direction of the on-surface measurings towards the ore body centre and gives approximate prognosis resourses before/withour/ drilling. The "locators" were worked out for the first time in history , they have 2 licences. The fundamental design and drawbacks of the existing magnetometers have been inherited from the original magnetometre dating back two or three hundred years. The developers of the existing magnetometres have all gone along the same well- beaten track of replacing the primitive sensor in the form of a piece of ore hung on a string at first by an arrow sensor and later by magnetically oriented protons and quanta, with amplification of the sensors' OUTPUT signal. Furthermore, all the existing magnetometres are imperfect in that they, lacking the directivity of the ground-level magnetic measurements, only record the overall magnetic vector field generated by all the ore bodies around the

  20. Subluminal and superluminal propagation in a three-level atom in the radiative limit based on coherent population oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalo, Isabel [Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: igonzalo@fis.ucm.es; Anton, M.A.; Carreno, F.; Calderon, Oscar G. [Escuela Universitaria de Optica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalon, 28037 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-10-13

    We investigate a three-level atomic system in the radiative limit to control the light propagation from the subluminal regime to the superluminal one. Here the three levels are connected between them by radiative transitions. We show that depending on the decay rates, this scheme, which is based on coherent population oscillations, allows to switch from one regime to the other by changing the Rabi frequencies of the driving fields. We also show that this scheme is also capable of producing absorptionless self-phase modulation.

  1. Nanofabrication technique based on localized photocatalytic reactions using a TiO2-coated atomic force microscopy probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Takayuki; Iio, Naohiro; Furukawa, Hiromi; Nagai, Moeto

    2017-02-01

    We performed a fundamental study on the photocatalytic degradation of fluorescently labeled DNA molecules immobilized on titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films under ultraviolet irradiation. The films were prepared by the electrochemical anodization of Ti thin films sputtered on silicon substrates. We also confirmed that the photocurrent arising from the photocatalytic oxidation of DNA molecules can be detected during this process. We then demonstrated an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanofabrication technique by employing TiO2-coated AFM probes to penetrate living cell membranes under near-physiological conditions for minimally invasive intracellular delivery.

  2. Determination of Copper-Based Fungicides by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using Digestion Procedure with Sulfuric and Nitric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Milinović

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper-based fungicides can be effectively digested by treatment with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric and nitric acid in exactly 15 minutes for the rapid determination via copper using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS. Under optimum conditions, the results of copper fungicide analysis were consistent to those obtained by the AOAC’s recommended method. Recovery values ranged from 98.63 to 103.40%. Relative standard deviation values are lower than 2%. The proposed digestion procedure applied for determination of copper ranged from 100 to 594 g Cu kg-1 in different commercial fungicideproducts.

  3. Specialized probes based on hydroxyapatite calcium for heart tissues research by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, Mikhail, E-mail: cloudjyk@yandex.ru; Golubok, Alexander [St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO University), Kronverkskii pr. 49, St. Petersburg, 197101 (Russian Federation); Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Rizhskii pr. 26, St. Petersburg, 190103 (Russian Federation); Gulyaev, Nikolai [Military Medical Academy named after S.M. Kirov, Academic Lebedev str. 6, St. Petersburg, 194044 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    The new specialized AFM-probes with hydroxyapatite structures for atomic force microscopy of heart tissues calcification were created and studied. A process of probe fabrication is demonstrated. The adhesive forces between specialized hydroxyapatite probe and endothelium/subendothelial layers were investigated. It was found that the adhesion forces are significantly higher for the subendothelial layers. We consider that it is connected with the formation and localization of hydroxyapatite in the area of subendothelial layers of heart tissues. In addition, the roughness analysis and structure visualization of the endothelial surface of the heart tissue were carried out. The results show high efficiency of created specialized probes at study a calcinations process of the aortic heart tissues.

  4. Atomically Thin Heterostructures Based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide and Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2014-11-10

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. In order to engineer pristine layers and their interfaces, epitaxial growth of such heterostructures is required. We report the direct growth of crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG) grown from silicon carbide. Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and scanning tunneling microscopy confirm high-quality WSe2 monolayers, whereas transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface, and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that an additional barrier to carrier transport beyond the expected WSe2/EG band offset exists due to the interlayer gap, which is supported by theoretical local density of states (LDOS) calculations using self-consistent density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green\\'s function (NEGF).

  5. Atomic force microscope-based single-molecule force spectroscopy of RNA unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heus, Hans A; Puchner, Elias M; van Vugt-Jonker, Aafke J; Zimmermann, Julia L; Gaub, Hermann E

    2011-07-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) using the atomic force microscope (AFM) has emerged as an important tool for probing biomolecular interaction and exploring the forces, dynamics, and energy landscapes that underlie function and specificity of molecular interaction. These studies require attaching biomolecules on solid supports and AFM tips to measure unbinding forces between individual binding partners. Herein we describe efficient and robust protocols for probing RNA interaction by AFM and show their value on two well-known RNA regulators, the Rev-responsive element (RRE) from the HIV-1 genome and an adenine-sensing riboswitch. The results show the great potential of AFM-SMFS in the investigation of RNA molecular interactions, which will contribute to the development of bionanodevices sensing single RNA molecules. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prediction of oxidoreductase-catalyzed reactions based on atomic properties of metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Fangping; Unkefer, Pat J; Unkefer, Clifford J; Hlavacek, William S

    2006-12-15

    Our knowledge of metabolism is far from complete, and the gaps in our knowledge are being revealed by metabolomic detection of small-molecules not previously known to exist in cells. An important challenge is to determine the reactions in which these compounds participate, which can lead to the identification of gene products responsible for novel metabolic pathways. To address this challenge, we investigate how machine learning can be used to predict potential substrates and products of oxidoreductase-catalyzed reactions. We examined 1956 oxidation/reduction reactions in the KEGG database. The vast majority of these reactions (1626) can be divided into 12 subclasses, each of which is marked by a particular type of functional group transformation. For a given transformation, the local structures of reaction centers in substrates and products can be characterized by patterns. These patterns are not unique to reactants but are widely distributed among KEGG metabolites. To distinguish reactants from non-reactants, we trained classifiers (linear-kernel Support Vector Machines) using negative and positive examples. The input to a classifier is a set of atomic features that can be determined from the 2D chemical structure of a compound. Depending on the subclass of reaction, the accuracy of prediction for positives (negatives) is 64 to 93% (44 to 92%) when asking if a compound is a substrate and 71 to 98% (50 to 92%) when asking if a compound is a product. Sensitivity analysis reveals that this performance is robust to variations of the training data. Our results suggest that metabolic connectivity can be predicted with reasonable accuracy from the presence or absence of local structural motifs in compounds and their readily calculated atomic features. Classifiers reported here can be used freely for noncommercial purposes via a Java program available upon request.

  7. Electrodynamics of an omega-band as deduced from optical and magnetometer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vanhamäki

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate an omega-band event that took place above northern Scandinavia around 02:00–02:30 UT on 9 March 1999. In our analysis we use ground based magnetometer, optical and riometer measurements together with satellite based optical images. The optical and riometer data are used to estimate the ionospheric Hall and Pedersen conductances, while ionospheric equivalent currents are obtained from the magnetometer measurements. These data sets are used as input in a local KRM calculation, which gives the ionospheric potential electric field as output, thus giving us a complete picture of the ionospheric electrodynamic state during the omega-band event. The overall structure of the electric field and field-aligned current (FAC provided by the local KRM method are in good agreement with previous studies. Also the E×B drift velocity calculated from the local KRM solution is in good qualitative agreement with the plasma velocity measured by the Finnish CUTLASS radar, giving further support for the new local KRM method. The high-resolution conductance estimates allow us to discern the detailed structure of the omega-band current system. The highest Hall and Pedersen conductances, ~50 and ~25 S, respectively, are found at the edges of the bright auroral tongue. Inside the tongue, conductances are somewhat smaller, but still significantly higher than typical background values. The electric field shows a converging pattern around the tongues, and the field strength drops from ~40 mV/m found at optically dark regions to ~10 mV/m inside the areas of enhanced conductivity. Downward FAC flow in the dark regions, while upward currents flow inside the auroral tongue. Additionally, sharp conductance gradients at the edge of an auroral tongue are associated with narrow strips of intense FACs, so that a strip of downward current flows at the eastern (leading edge and a similar strip of upward current is present at the western (trailing edge. The Joule

  8. Plasma enhanced ultrastable self-powered visible-blind deep ultraviolet photodetector based on atomically thin boron nitride sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Peter Xianping; Rivera, Manuel; Velazquez, Rafael; Aldalbahi, Ali

    We extend our work on the use of digitally controlled plasma deposition technique to synthesize high quality boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs). The nanoscale morphologies and layered growth characteristics of the BNNSs were characterized using scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The experimental data indicated each sample consists of multiple atomically thin, highly transparent BNNSs that overlap one another with certain orientations. Purity and structural properties were characterized by Raman scattering, XRD, FTIR and XPS. Based on these characterizations, 2D BNNSs based self-powered, visible blind deep UV detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested. The bias, temperature, and humidity effects on the photocurrent strength were investigated. A significant increase of signal-to-noise ratio after plasma treatment was observed. The fabricated photodetectors presented exceptional properties: a very stable baseline and a high sensitivity to weak intensities of radiation in both UVC and UVB range while remaining visible-blind, a high signal-to-noise ratio, and excellent repeatability even when the operating temperature was up to 400 0C. The shift in cutoff wavelength was also observed. This work is supported by the Army Research Office/DoD Grant (62826-RT-REP) and the ISPP#0058 at King Saud University.

  9. Electromagnetic interference shielding behaviors of Zn-based conducting oxide films prepared by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-June; Kang, Kyung-Mun; Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Hyung-Ho, E-mail: hhpark@yonsei.ac.kr

    2015-05-29

    The structural, electrical, and optical properties of undoped ZnO, F-doped ZnO (ZnO:F), and Al-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) thin films with two different thicknesses deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were investigated to evaluate the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE). A diluted fluoride hydroxide was used as a single reactant source for F doping in a ZnO matrix, and the F doping concentration was about 1 at.% in the ZnO:F films. The fabrication of the ZnO:Al films was followed by the typical ALD method, and the Al doping concentration of about 2 at.% was adjusted by the dopant deposition intervals of the ZnO:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} precursor pulse cycle ratios, which were fixed at 19:1. The film thickness variations were controlled with 600 and 1600 total ALD cycles of approximately 100 nm and 300 nm, respectively. The carrier concentration of the films is monotonically increased in order of the undoped ZnO, ZnO:F, and ZnO:Al films. The EMI-SE values of the undoped ZnO, ZnO:F, and ZnO:Al films at 1 GHz were 0.9 dB, 2.6 dB, and 6.0 dB for ~ 100 nm, and were 2.1 dB, 9.7 dB, and 13.1 dB for ~ 300 nm, respectively. In our work, the EMI-SE value was increased by the enhancement of both the carrier concentration and film thickness due to reflection via the free carrier scattering effect. - Highlights: • Fluorine or aluminum doped ZnO thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition • Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE) of ZnO thin films • Carrier concentration and film thickness enhanced the EMI-SE. • The enhancement of EMI-SE was due to reflection via free carrier scattering effect.

  10. Rotating disk atomization of Gd and Gd-Y for hydrogen liquefaction via magnetocaloric cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slinger, Tyler [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-12-17

    In order to enable liquid hydrogen fuel cell technologies for vehicles the cost of hydrogen liquefaction should be lowered. The current method of hydrogen liquefaction is the Claude cycle that has a figure of merit (FOM) of 0.3-0.35. New magnetocaloric hydrogen liquefaction devices have been proposed with a FOM>0.5, which is a significant improvement. A significant hurdle to realizing these devices is the synthesis of spherical rare earth based alloy powders of 200μm in diameter. In this study a centrifugal atomization method that used a rotating disk with a rotating oil quench bath was developed to make gadolinium and gadolinium-yttrium spheres. The composition of the spherical powders included pure Gd and Gd0.91Y0.09. The effect of atomization parameters, such as superheat, melt properties, disk shape, disk speed, and melt system materials and design, were investigated on the size distribution and morphology of the resulting spheres. The carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen impurity levels also were analyzed and compared with the magnetic performance of the alloys. The magnetic properties of the charge material as well as the resulting powders were measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization and Curie temperature were the target properties for the resulting spheres. These values were compared with measurements taken on the charge material in order to investigate the effect of atomization processing on the alloys.

  11. Low-Frequency Noise in High-T Superconductor Josephson Junctions, Squids, and Magnetometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklich, Andrew Hostetler

    The design and performance of high-T_ {rm c} dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), the junctions that comprise them, and magnetometers made from them are described, with special attention paid to sources of 1/f noise. Biepitaxial junctions are found to have large levels of critical current fluctuations which make them unsuitable for low-noise SQUIDs. This noise suggests a poorly connected interface at the grain boundary junction. SQUIDs from bicrystal junctions, in contrast, have levels of critical current noise that are controllable using bias current reversal techniques which leave the noise white down to frequencies of a few Hz. A SQUID with an energy resolution of 1.5times 10^{-30} J Hz^ {-1} at 1 Hz is reported. Magnetometers in which a (9 mm)^2 pickup loop is directly coupled to a SQUID body have achieved field resolutions of 93 fT Hz^{-1/2} down to frequencies below 1 Hz, improving to 39 fT Hz^{-1/2} at 1 Hz with the addition of a 50 mm-diameter single-turn flux transformer. Although the performance of these devices is sufficient for single -channel biomagnetometry or geophysical studies, their relatively poor coupling to the pickup loop makes it difficult to satisfy the competing goals of high field resolution and small detector size necessary for multichannel biomagnetic imaging. Improved coupling is demonstrated by the use of multiturn-input-coil flux transformers, and a resolution of 35 fT Hz^{-1/2} in the white noise region is reported with a (10 mm) ^2 pickup loop. However, additional 1/f noise from the processed multilayer structures in the transformer limits the resolution at 1 Hz to 114 fT Hz^ {-1/2}. High-T_{ rm c} SQUIDs are shown to exhibit additional 1/f noise when they are cooled in a nonzero static magnetic field because of the additional flux vortices trapped in the film, with the noise power at 1 Hz typically increasing by a factor of 10-20 in a field of 0.05 mT (0.5 G). Finally, a SQUID-based voltmeter with a resolution

  12. Low-frequency noise in high-(Tc) superconductor Josephson junctions, SQUIDs, and magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklich, A. H.

    1994-05-01

    Design and performance of high-T(sub c) dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID's), junctions that comprise them, and magnetometers made from them are described, with attention to sources of 1/f noise. Biepitaxial junctions are found to have large levels of critical current fluctuations which make them unsuitable for low-noise SQUID's; this suggests a poorly connected interface at the grain boundary junction. SQUID's from bicrystal junctions have levels of critical current noise controllable using bias current reversal techniques which leave the noise white down to frequencies of a few Hz. A SQUID with an energy resolution of 1.5 x 10(exp -30) J Hz(exp -1) at 1 Hz is reported. Magnetometers in which a (9 mm)(exp 2) pickup loop is directly coupled to a SQUID body have achieved field resolutions of 93 fT Hz(exp -1/2) down to frequencies below 1 Hz, improving to 39 fT Hz(exp -1/2) at 1 Hz with the addition of a 50mm-diameter single-turn flux transformer. Poor coupling to pickup loop makes it difficult to satisfy competing goals of high field resolution and small detector size necessary for multichannel biomagnetic imaging. Improved coupling is demonstrated by the use of multiturn-input-coil flux transformers, and a resolution of 35 fT Hz(exp -1/2) in the white noise region is reported with a (10 mm)(exp 2) pickup loop. However, additional 1/f noise from processed multilayer structures in the transformer limits the resolution at 1 Hz to 114 fT Hz(exp -1/2). High-T(sub c) SQUID's exhibit additional 1/f noise when cooled in a nonzero static magnetic field because of additional flux vortices trapped in the film, with the noise power at 1 Hz typically increasing by a factor of 10-20 in a field of 0.05mT (0.5 G). Finally, a SQUID-based voltmeter with a resolution of 9.2 pV Hz(exp -1/2) at 10 Hz (24 pV Hz(exp -1/2) at 1 Hz) is described.

  13. Entropy in bimolecular simulations: A comprehensive review of atomic fluctuations-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Summer; Ahmed, Marawan; El-Sheikh, Salah; Barakat, Khaled H

    2015-11-01

    Entropy of binding constitutes a major, and in many cases a detrimental, component of the binding affinity in biomolecular interactions. While the enthalpic part of the binding free energy is easier to calculate, estimating the entropy of binding is further more complicated. A precise evaluation of entropy requires a comprehensive exploration of the complete phase space of the interacting entities. As this task is extremely hard to accomplish in the context of conventional molecular simulations, calculating entropy has involved many approximations. Most of these golden standard methods focused on developing a reliable estimation of the conformational part of the entropy. Here, we review these methods with a particular emphasis on the different techniques that extract entropy from atomic fluctuations. The theoretical formalisms behind each method is explained highlighting its strengths as well as its limitations, followed by a description of a number of case studies for each method. We hope that this brief, yet comprehensive, review provides a useful tool to understand these methods and realize the practical issues that may arise in such calculations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J. J.; Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Twedt, K. A.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Wilson, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 μK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga+ liquid metal ion source. In this review we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Nevertheless, a number of promising new approaches have been proposed and/or demonstrated, suggesting that a rapid evolution of this type of source is likely in the near future. PMID:27239245

  15. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, J. J.; Wilson, T. M. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Schwarzkopf, A. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); zeroK NanoTech, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20878 (United States); Twedt, K. A. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Maryland Nanocenter, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 μK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga{sup +} liquid metal ion source. In this review, we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Nevertheless, a number of promising new approaches have been proposed and/or demonstrated, suggesting that a rapid evolution of this type of source is likely in the near future.

  16. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  17. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  18. Comparison of four analytical techniques based on atomic spectrometry for the determination of total tin in canned foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutakhrit, K; Crisci, M; Bolle, F; Van Loco, J

    2011-02-01

    Different techniques for the determination of total tin in beverages and canned foods by atomic spectrometry were compared. The performance characteristics of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), hydride generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (HG-ICP-AES), electrothermal atomisation-atomic absorption spectrometry (ETA-AAS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were determined in terms of linearity, precision, recovery, limit of detection, decision limit (CCα) and detection capability (CCβ) (Decision 2002/657/EC). Calibration ranges were covered from ng l⁻¹ to mg l⁻¹ level. Limits of detection that ranged from 0.01, 0.05, 2.0 to 200 µg l⁻¹ were reached for ICP-MS; HG-ICP-AES; ETA-AAS and ICP-AES, respectively. Precision, calculated according to ISO 5725-2 for repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility and expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), ranged from 1.6% to 4.9%; and recovery, based on Decision 2002/657/EC, was found to be between 95% and 110%. Procedures for the mineralisation or extraction of total tin were compared. Wet digestion, sequentially, with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide provided the best results. The influence of possible interferences present in canned food and beverage was studied, but no interference in the determination of tin was observed. Since maximum levels for tin established by European Union legislation vary from 50 mg kg⁻¹ in canned baby foods and infant foods up to 200 mg kg⁻¹ in canned food, ICP-AES was chosen as the preferred technique for routine analysis thanks to its good precision, reliability and ease of use. The accuracy of this routine method was confirmed by participation in six proficiency test schemes with z-scores ranging from -1.9 to 0.6. Several canned foodstuffs and beverage samples from a local market were analysed with this technique.

  19. The absolute magnetometers on board Swarm, lessons learned from more than two years in space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulot, Gauthier; Leger, Jean-Michel; Vigneron, Pierre

    ESA's Swarm satellites carry 4He absolute magnetometers (ASM), designed by CEA-Léti and developed in partnership with CNES. These instruments are the first-ever space-borne magnetometers to use a common sensor to simultaneously deliver 1Hz independent absolute scalar and vector readings of the ma......ESA's Swarm satellites carry 4He absolute magnetometers (ASM), designed by CEA-Léti and developed in partnership with CNES. These instruments are the first-ever space-borne magnetometers to use a common sensor to simultaneously deliver 1Hz independent absolute scalar and vector readings...... of the magnetic field. They have provided the very high accuracy scalar field data nominally required by the mission (for both science and calibration purposes, since each satellite also carries a low noise high frequency fluxgate magnetometer designed by DTU), but also very useful experimental absolute vector...... the advantages of flying ASM instruments on space-borne magnetic missions for data quality checks, geomagnetic field modeling and science objectives....

  20. A dumbbell-shaped hybrid magnetometer operating in DC-10 kHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongyu; Wang, Yanzhang; Chen, Siyu; Lin, Jun

    2017-12-01

    This study is motivated by the need to design a hybrid magnetometer operating in a wide-frequency band from DC to 10 kHz. To achieve this objective, a residence times difference fluxgate magnetometer (RTDFM) and an induction magnetometer (IM) have been integrated into a compact form. The hybrid magnetometer has a dumbbell-shaped structure in which the RTDFM transducer is partially inserted into the tube cores of the IM. Thus, the sensitivity of the RTDFM is significantly improved due to the flux amplification. The optimal structure, which has maximum sensitivity enhancement, was obtained through FEM analysis. To validate the theoretical analysis, the optimal hybrid magnetometer was manufactured, and its performance was evaluated. The device has a sensitivity of 45 mV/nT at 1 kHz in IM mode and 0.38 μs/nT in RTDFM mode, which is approximately 3.45 times as large as that of the single RTDFM structure. Furthermore, to obtain a lower noise performance in the entire frequency band, two operation modes switch at the cross frequency (0.16 Hz) of their noise levels. The noise level is 30 pT/√Hz in RTDFM mode and 0.07 pT/√Hz at 1 kHz in IM mode.

  1. Simulation-based evaluation of a cold atom interferometry gradiometer concept for gravity field recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douch, Karim; Wu, Hu; Schubert, Christian; Müller, Jürgen; Pereira dos Santos, Franck

    2018-03-01

    The prospects of future satellite gravimetry missions to sustain a continuous and improved observation of the gravitational field have stimulated studies of new concepts of space inertial sensors with potentially improved precision and stability. This is in particular the case for cold-atom interferometry (CAI) gradiometry which is the object of this paper. The performance of a specific CAI gradiometer design is studied here in terms of quality of the recovered gravity field through a closed-loop numerical simulation of the measurement and processing workflow. First we show that mapping the time-variable field on a monthly basis would require a noise level below 5mE /√{Hz } . The mission scenarios are therefore focused on the static field, like GOCE. Second, the stringent requirement on the angular velocity of a one-arm gradiometer, which must not exceed 10-6 rad/s, leads to two possible modes of operation of the CAI gradiometer: the nadir and the quasi-inertial mode. In the nadir mode, which corresponds to the usual Earth-pointing satellite attitude, only the gradient Vyy , along the cross-track direction, is measured. In the quasi-inertial mode, the satellite attitude is approximately constant in the inertial reference frame and the 3 diagonal gradients Vxx,Vyy and Vzz are measured. Both modes are successively simulated for a 239 km altitude orbit and the error on the recovered gravity models eventually compared to GOCE solutions. We conclude that for the specific CAI gradiometer design assumed in this paper, only the quasi-inertial mode scenario would be able to significantly outperform GOCE results at the cost of technically challenging requirements on the orbit and attitude control.

  2. Determination of arsenic in petroleum refinery streams by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after multivariate optimization based on Doehlert design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassella, Ricardo J.; de Sant'Ana, Otoniel D.; Santelli, Ricardo E.

    2002-12-01

    This paper reports the development of a methodology for the determination of arsenic in petroleum refinery aqueous streams containing large amounts of unknown volatile organic compounds, employing electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with polarized Zeeman-effect background correction. In order to make the procedure applicable, the influence of chemical modification and the drying step was examined. Also, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures and the amount of nitric acid added to the sample were optimized using a multivariate approach based on Doehlert matrix. Obtained results indicate that, in this kind of sample, arsenic must be determined by standard addition procedure with a careful control of the drying step temperature and ramp pattern. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the procedure, a test was performed in six spiked samples of petroleum refinery aqueous streams and the relative errors verified in the analysis of such samples (added As between 12.5 and 190 μg l -1) ranged from -7.2 to +16.7%. The detection limit and the relative standard deviation were also calculated and the values are 68 pg and 7.5% (at 12.5 μg l -1 level), respectively.

  3. Atomic Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) is a new technology which can be used for developing high performance laser components for atom-based sensors...

  4. Signal Conditioning for the Kalman Filter: Application to Satellite Attitude Estimation with Magnetometer and Sun Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segundo Esteban

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Most satellites use an on-board attitude estimation system, based on available sensors. In the case of low-cost satellites, which are of increasing interest, it is usual to use magnetometers and Sun sensors. A Kalman filter is commonly recommended for the estimation, to simultaneously exploit the information from sensors and from a mathematical model of the satellite motion. It would be also convenient to adhere to a quaternion representation. This article focuses on some problems linked to this context. The state of the system should be represented in observable form. Singularities due to alignment of measured vectors cause estimation problems. Accommodation of the Kalman filter originates convergence difficulties. The article includes a new proposal that solves these problems, not needing changes in the Kalman filter algorithm. In addition, the article includes assessment of different errors, initialization values for the Kalman filter; and considers the influence of the magnetic dipole moment perturbation, showing how to handle it as part of the Kalman filter framework.

  5. Real-space imaging of non-collinear antiferromagnetic order with a single-spin magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, I.; Akhtar, W.; Garcia, V.; Martínez, L. J.; Chouaieb, S.; Garcia, K.; Carrétéro, C.; Barthélémy, A.; Appel, P.; Maletinsky, P.; Kim, J.-V.; Chauleau, J. Y.; Jaouen, N.; Viret, M.; Bibes, M.; Fusil, S.; Jacques, V.

    2017-09-01

    Although ferromagnets have many applications, their large magnetization and the resulting energy cost for switching magnetic moments bring into question their suitability for reliable low-power spintronic devices. Non-collinear antiferromagnetic systems do not suffer from this problem, and often have extra functionalities: non-collinear spin order may break space-inversion symmetry and thus allow electric-field control of magnetism, or may produce emergent spin-orbit effects that enable efficient spin-charge interconversion. To harness these traits for next-generation spintronics, the nanoscale control and imaging capabilities that are now routine for ferromagnets must be developed for antiferromagnetic systems. Here, using a non-invasive, scanning single-spin magnetometer based on a nitrogen-vacancy defect in diamond, we demonstrate real-space visualization of non-collinear antiferromagnetic order in a magnetic thin film at room temperature. We image the spin cycloid of a multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) thin film and extract a period of about 70 nanometres, consistent with values determined by macroscopic diffraction. In addition, we take advantage of the magnetoelectric coupling present in BiFeO3 to manipulate the cycloid propagation direction by an electric field. Besides highlighting the potential of nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry for imaging complex antiferromagnetic orders at the nanoscale, these results demonstrate how BiFeO3 can be used in the design of reconfigurable nanoscale spin textures.

  6. Signal Conditioning for the Kalman Filter: Application to Satellite Attitude Estimation with Magnetometer and Sun Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Segundo; Girón-Sierra, Jose M; Polo, Óscar R; Angulo, Manuel

    2016-10-31

    Most satellites use an on-board attitude estimation system, based on available sensors. In the case of low-cost satellites, which are of increasing interest, it is usual to use magnetometers and Sun sensors. A Kalman filter is commonly recommended for the estimation, to simultaneously exploit the information from sensors and from a mathematical model of the satellite motion. It would be also convenient to adhere to a quaternion representation. This article focuses on some problems linked to this context. The state of the system should be represented in observable form. Singularities due to alignment of measured vectors cause estimation problems. Accommodation of the Kalman filter originates convergence difficulties. The article includes a new proposal that solves these problems, not needing changes in the Kalman filter algorithm. In addition, the article includes assessment of different errors, initialization values for the Kalman filter; and considers the influence of the magnetic dipole moment perturbation, showing how to handle it as part of the Kalman filter framework.

  7. Magnetic measurements with a SQUID magnetometer: Possible artifacts induced by sample-holder off-centering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casañ-Pastor, Nieves; Gomez-Romero, Pedro; Baker, Louis C. W.

    1991-04-01

    Asymmetries in sample holders used for magnetic measurements on magnetometers based on induction methods, such as those equipped with SQUID sensors, can lead to substantial errors and/or important artifacts which resemble phase transitions. They occur under the conditions for which sample and/holder have signals of opposite sign, but are nearly equal in magnitude. The most serious errors can occur often, but not exclusively, for compounds having intermediate magnetic dilution. We present here a general discussion of the problem illustrated by measurements of a polyoxometallate with the known Keggin structure K6[Fe(III)W12O40]ṡnH2O, done on a SHE VTS model 905. While one of the obvious solutions to this problem is the use of holders with a signal much smaller than that of the sample, it would be preferable if, in addition, the holder had a response of the same sign as that of the sample, for all temperatures and fields measured.

  8. Tuning of electronic band gaps and optoelectronic properties of binary strontium chalcogenides by means of doping of magnesium atom(s)- a first principles based theoretical initiative with mBJ, B3LYP and WC-GGA functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Bimal; Sarkar, Utpal; Debbarma, Manish; Bhattacharjee, Rahul; Chattopadhyaya, Surya

    2018-02-01

    First principle based theoretical initiative is taken to tune the optoelectronic properties of binary strontium chalcogenide semiconductors by doping magnesium atom(s) into their rock-salt unit cells at specific concentrations x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0 and such tuning is established by studying structural, electronic and optical properties of designed binary compounds and ternary alloys employing WC-GGA, B3LYP and mBJ exchange-correlation functionals. Band structure of each compound is constructed and respective band gaps under all the potential schemes are measured. The band gap bowing and its microscopic origin are calculated using quadratic fit and Zunger's approach, respectively. The atomic and orbital origins of electronic states in the band structure of any compound are explored from its density of states. The nature of chemical bonds between the constituent atoms in each compound is explored from the valence electron density contour plots. Optical properties of any specimen are explored from the computed spectra of its dielectric function, refractive index, extinction coefficient, normal incidence reflectivity, optical conductivity optical absorption and energy loss function. Several calculated results are compared with available experimental and earlier theoretical data.

  9. Single atom electrochemical and atomic analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rama

    In the past decade, advances in electron and scanning-probe based microscopies have led to a wealth of imaging and spectroscopic data with atomic resolution, yielding substantial insight into local physics and chemistry in a diverse range of systems such as oxide catalysts, multiferroics, manganites, and 2D materials. However, typical analysis of atomically resolved images is limited, despite the fact that image intensities and distortions of the atoms from their idealized positions contain unique information on the physical and chemical properties inherent to the system. Here, we present approaches to data mine atomically resolved images in oxides, specifically in the hole-doped manganite La5/8Ca3/8MnO3, on epitaxial films studied by in-situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Through application of bias to the STM tip, atomic-scale electrochemistry is demonstrated on the manganite surface. STM images are then further analyzed through a suite of algorithms including 2D autocorrelations, sliding window Fourier transforms, and others, and can be combined with basic thermodynamic modelling to reveal relevant physical and chemical descriptors including segregation energies, existence and strength of atomic-scale diffusion barriers, surface energies and sub-surface chemical species identification. These approaches promise to provide tremendous insights from atomically resolved functional imaging, can provide relevant thermodynamic parameters, and auger well for use with first-principles calculations to yield quantitative atomic-level chemical identification and structure-property relations. This research was sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, BES, DOE. Research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which also provided support and is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  10. Construction and calibration of a low cost and fully automated vibrating sample magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Alaily, T.M., E-mail: toson_alaily@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); El-Nimr, M.K.; Saafan, S.A.; Kamel, M.M.; Meaz, T.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); Assar, S.T. [Engineering Physics and Mathematics Department, Faculty of Engineering, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt)

    2015-07-15

    A low cost vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) has been constructed by using an electromagnet and an audio loud speaker; where both are controlled by a data acquisition device. The constructed VSM records the magnetic hysteresis loop up to 8.3 KG at room temperature. The apparatus has been calibrated and tested by using magnetic hysteresis data of some ferrite samples measured by two scientifically calibrated magnetometers; model (Lake Shore 7410) and model (LDJ Electronics Inc. Troy, MI). Our VSM lab-built new design proved success and reliability. - Highlights: • A low cost automated vibrating sample magnetometer VSM has been constructed. • The VSM records the magnetic hysteresis loop up to 8.3 KG at room temperature. • The VSM has been calibrated and tested by using some measured ferrite samples. • Our VSM lab-built new design proved success and reliability.

  11. Mott theory predicted thermoelectric properties based on electronic structure of Bi and Sb atoms substituted PbTe material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora-ud, Athorn

    2017-11-01

    In this work, thermoelectric properties of Bi and Sb atoms substituted PbTe material were predicted by Mott theory through electronic structure calculation. This calculation has been carried by the first-principles DV-Xα molecular orbital method based on Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation. The Pb14Te13, Pb13SbTe13 and Pb13BiTe13 small clusters with a cubic rocksalt structure (Fm-3m; 225) were designed to be performed PbTe, Pb0.75Sb0.25Te and Pb0.75Bi0.25Te materials, respectively. The electronic structure showed that the high symmetry crystal structure, spin energy levels, partial spin density of states and electron charge density. The energy gap and Fermi level have been obtained from energy levels and density of state to be evaluated of electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient within Mott's theory predication.

  12. Optical microscope combined with the nanopipette-based quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope for nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sangmin; Stambaugh, Corey; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Kunyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Kim, Qwhan; Jhe, Wonho

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrated the optical microscope (OM) combined with nanopipette-based quartz tuning fork - atomic force microscope (QTF-AFM) for nanolithography. The nanoparticle (Au, 5 nm), nanowire, PDMS solutions are ejected onto the substrate through the nano/microaperture of the pulled pipette, and the nano/microscale objects were in-situ formed on the surface with the proposed patterning system, while the position is defined by monitoring the phenomena on the substrate with a home-made OM. After forming of capillary condensation between apex of the pipette tip and the surface, the electric field is applied to extract out the inside liquid to the substrate and the nano/microscale objects are fabricated. The nanoscale patterning size can be controlled by the aperture diameters of the pulled pipette.

  13. Temperature and bias-voltage dependence of atomic-layer-deposited HfO{sub 2}-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabretti, Savio, E-mail: fabretti@physik.uni-bielefeld.de [Thin Films and Physics of Nanostructures, Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Zierold, Robert; Nielsch, Kornelius [Institute of Applied Physics, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Voigt, Carmen; Ronning, Carsten [Institute for Solid State Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Peretzki, Patrick; Seibt, Michael [4. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August University Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Thomas, Andy [Thin Films and Physics of Nanostructures, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld, Germany, and Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, Staudingerweg 9, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-09-29

    Magnetic tunnel junctions with HfO{sub 2} tunnel barriers were prepared through a combination of magnetron sputtering and atomic layer deposition. We investigated the tunneling transport behavior, including the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio and the current-voltage characteristics between room temperature and 2 K. Here, we achieved a tunneling magneto resistance ratio of 10.3% at room temperature and 19.3% at 2 K. Furthermore, we studied the bias-voltage and temperature dependencies and compared the results with those of commonly used alumina- and magnesia-based magnetic tunnel junctions. We observed a polycrystalline/amorphous electrode-barrier system via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Determination of corner positions for calculation of step height of atomic force microscope images based on ISO 5436-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, Adedayo S; Xuezeng, Zhao; Weijie, Wang

    2013-06-01

    Step height is defined as the vertical spacing between two plane-parallel planes comprising an elevation or an indentation and the substrate. In atomic force microscopy (AFM), there are many algorithms for determining feature dimensions such as step height and width. One common problem of many algorithms is the difficulty for users to accurately determine the corner positions needed to properly implement the said algorithms. A new algorithm based on ISO 5436-1 is proposed that determines the necessary corner positions along with two examples illustrating the implementation of this algorithm. We propose calling this new method the determinant method. Since the corner positions are automatically decided, feature dimensions such as step height of an AFM image are easily determined. Comparative experiments carried out to compare the step height measurement using this algorithm and the SPIP software from Image Metrology show encouraging results.

  15. Atomic force microscopy-based microrheology reveals significant differences in the viscoelastic response between malign and benign cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Jan; Nöding, Helen; Mey, Ingo; Janshoff, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Mechanical phenotyping of cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was proposed as a novel tool in cancer cell research as cancer cells undergo massive structural changes, comprising remodelling of the cytoskeleton and changes of their adhesive properties. In this work, we focused on the mechanical properties of human breast cell lines with different metastatic potential by AFM-based microrheology experiments. Using this technique, we are not only able to quantify the mechanical properties of living cells in the context of malignancy, but we also obtain a descriptor, namely the loss tangent, which provides model-independent information about the metastatic potential of the cell line. Including also other cell lines from different organs shows that the loss tangent (G″/G') increases generally with the metastatic potential from MCF-10A representing benign cells to highly malignant MDA-MB-231 cells.

  16. P-type polymer-based Ag2S atomic switch for “tug of war” operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Carolin; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Adelsberger, Christoph; Hayakawa, Ryoma; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2017-06-01

    The Ag2S gap-type atomic switch based “tug of war” device is a promising element for building a new type of CMOS free neuromorphic computer-hardware. Since Ag+ cations are reduced during operation of the device, it was thought that the gap-material should be a n-type polymer. In this study, we revealed that the polymer bithiophene-oligoethyleneoxide (BTOE) doped poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), which was used as gap-material in the first demonstration of the “tug of war”, is a p-type polymer. For this we used impedance spectroscopy and transistor measurements. We elaborate on how the electrochemical processes in the “tug of war” devices could be explained in the case of p-type conductive gap-materials.

  17. Direct method for magnetostriction coefficient measurement based on atomic force microscope, illustrated by the example of Tb–Co film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, B.L.S. [Laboratório de Sensores Óticos, Escola Politécnica, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Maximino, F.L. [Laboratório de Materiais Magnéticos, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CEP:05314-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, J.C. [Laboratório de Sensores Óticos, Escola Politécnica, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, A.D., E-mail: adsantos@if.usp.br [Laboratório de Materiais Magnéticos, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CEP:05314-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a method based on the Atomic Force Microscopy technique for direct measurement of magnetostriction coefficient of amorphous Tb–Co films deposited on Si(100) substrate. The magnetostriction coefficient of the film is determined by AFM measuring the deflection of the sample when applying a magnetic field. In order to maximize the deflection of the sample, in-plane magnetic anisotropy was induced by heat treatment under a magnetic field of 5 kOe. The value obtained for the saturation magnetostriction is 204×10{sup −6} for the Tb{sub 23}Co{sub 77} film. - Highlights: • Measurement of magnetostriction coefficient using AFM. • Tb–Co thin films produced by magnetron sputtering. • Magnetostriction characterization of magnetic thin films on nonmagnetic substrates.

  18. The multi-position calibration of the stiffness for atomic-force microscope cantilevers based on vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yelong; Song, Le; Hu, Gang; Cai, Xue; Liu, Hongguang; Ma, Jinyu; Zhao, Meirong; Fang, Fengzhou

    2015-05-01

    Calibration of the stiffness of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is critical for industry and academic research. The multi-position calibration method for AFM cantilevers based on vibration is investigated. The position providing minimum uncertainty is deduced. The validity of the multi-position approach is shown via theoretical and experimental means. We applied it to the recently developed vibration method using an AFM cantilever with a normal stiffness of 0.1 N m-1. The standard deviation of the measured stiffness is 0.002 N m-1 with a mean value of 0.189 N m-1 and the relative combined uncertainty is approximately 7%, which is better than the approach using the single position at the tip of the cantilever.

  19. On the control of magnetic perturbing field onboard landers: the Magnetometer Protection program for the ESA ExoMars/Humboldt MSMO magnetometer experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menvielle, M.; Primdahl, Fritz; Brauer, Peter

    as characterizing its sub-surface. Magnetic fields are generated by electric currents in the planetary space environment, induced currents in the planetary interior and possibly remanent magnetism. In consequence, hardly any other single physical quantity can be used in such a variety of studies related......Magnetic field observations at a planetary surface have a wide potential of scientific applications, ranging from processes in the dynamic interaction between the planet environment and the solar wind, to determining the structure and thermal evolution of the interior of the planet as well...... to planetary research. The major difficulty in implementing a magnetometer experiment onboard a lander is to achieve at acceptable costs a good Magnetometer Protection, namely to control the perturbing magnetic field generated by the lander during operations at the planetary surfa ce, so as to achieve...

  20. Swarm's absolute magnetometer experimental vector mode, an innovative capability for space magnetometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulot, Gauthier; Vigneron, Pierre; Leger, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    readings of the magnetic eld. Since launch, these ASMs provided very high accuracy scalar eld data, as nominally required for the mission, together with experimental vector eld data. Here, we compare geomagnetic eld models built from such ASM-only data with models built from the mission's nominal 1Hz data......, combining ASM scalar data with independent uxgate magnetometer vector data. The high level of agreement between these models demonstrates the potential of the ASM's vector mode for data quality control and as a stand alone magnetometer, and illustrates the way the evolution of key eld features can easily...

  1. Integrated high-transition temperature magnetometer with only two superconducting layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, R.; Kingston, J.J.; Miklich, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and testing of an integrated YBa2Cu3O7-x thin-film magnetometer consisting of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), with biepitaxial grain boundary junctions, integrated with a flux transformer on a single substrate. Only two superconducting layers...... are required, the SQUID body serving as the crossunder that completes the multiturn flux transformer. The highest temperature at which any of the magnetometers functioned was 76 K. At 60 K the magnetic field gain of this device was 63, and the magnetic field noise was 160 fT Hz-1/2 at 2 kHz, increasing to 3...

  2. Study of 3He Rabi nutations by optically-pumped cesium magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Hans-Christian; Bison, Georg; Grujić, Zoran Dragan; Heil, Werner; Kasprzak, Malgorzata; Knowles, Paul; Kraft, Andreas; Pazgalev, Anatoly; Schnabel, Allard; Voigt, Jens; Weis, Antoine

    2017-10-01

    We describe a method for recording the Rabi nutation of nuclear spin polarized 3He by optically pumped cesium magnetometers. The measurement is performed by detecting the time-dependent magnetic field produced by the 3He magnetization. The observed signals are compared to theoretical models and the results are used to precisely trace the evolution of the magnetization. This procedure represents a convenient way to control and measure the Rabi flip angle and the degree of spin polarization in experiments using 3He magnetometers. The method requires only very coarse knowledge of the applied magnetic field's magnitude.

  3. Role of atoms in atomic gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcia, Matthew A.; Cline, Julia R. K.; Thompson, James K.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that space-based atomic sensors may be used to detect gravitational waves. These proposals describe the sensors either as clocks or as atom interferometers. Here, we seek to explore the fundamental similarities and differences between the two types of proposals. We present a framework in which the fundamental mechanism for sensitivity is identical for clock and atom interferometer proposals, with the key difference being whether or not the atoms are tightly confined by an external potential. With this interpretation in mind, we propose two major enhancements to detectors using confined atoms, which allow for an enhanced sensitivity analogous to large momentum transfer used in atom interferometry (though with no transfer of momentum to the atoms), and a way to extend the useful coherence time of the sensor beyond the atom's excited-state lifetime.

  4. Low-Drift Coherent Population Trapping Clock Based on Laser-Cooled Atoms and High-Coherence Excitation Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochi; Ivanov, Eugene; Yudin, Valeriy I.; Kitching, John; Donley, Elizabeth A.

    2017-11-01

    A compact cold-atom coherent population trapping clock in which laser-cooled atoms are interrogated with highly coherent coherent population trapping fields under free fall is presented. The system achieves fractional frequency instability at the level of 3 ×10-13 on the time scale of an hour. The clock may lend itself to portable applications since the atoms typically fall only 1.6 mm during the typical interrogation period of 18 ms.

  5. The effect of winding and core support material on the thermal gain dependence of a fluxgate magnetometer sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Miles

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluxgate magnetometers are an important tool in geophysics and space physics but are typically sensitive to variations in sensor temperature. Changes in instrumental gain with temperature, thermal gain dependence, are thought to be predominantly due to changes in the geometry of the wire coils that sense the magnetic field and/or provide magnetic feedback. Scientific fluxgate magnetometers typically employ some form of temperature compensation and support and constrain wire sense coils with bobbins constructed from materials such as MACOR machinable ceramic (Corning Inc. which are selected for their ultra-low thermal deformation rather than for robustness, cost, or ease of manufacturing. We present laboratory results comparing the performance of six geometrically and electrically matched fluxgate sensors in which the material used to support the windings and for the base of the sensor is varied. We use a novel, low-cost thermal calibration procedure based on a controlled sinusoidal magnetic source and quantitative spectral analysis to measure the thermal gain dependence of fluxgate magnetometer sensors at the ppm°C−1 level in a typical magnetically noisy university laboratory environment. We compare the thermal gain dependence of sensors built from MACOR, polyetheretherketone (PEEK engineering plastic (virgin, 30 % glass filled and 30 % carbon filled, and acetal to examine the trade between the thermal properties of the material, the impact on the thermal gain dependence of the fluxgate, and the cost and ease of manufacture. We find that thermal gain dependence of the sensor varies as one half of the material properties of the bobbin supporting the wire sense coils rather than being directly related as has been historically thought. An experimental sensor constructed from 30 % glass-filled PEEK (21.6 ppm°C−1 had a thermal gain dependence within 5 ppm°C−1 of a traditional sensor constructed from MACOR ceramic (8.1

  6. The effect of winding and core support material on the thermal gain dependence of a fluxgate magnetometer sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, David M.; Mann, Ian R.; Kale, Andy; Milling, David K.; Narod, Barry B.; Bennest, John R.; Barona, David; Unsworth, Martyn J.

    2017-10-01

    Fluxgate magnetometers are an important tool in geophysics and space physics but are typically sensitive to variations in sensor temperature. Changes in instrumental gain with temperature, thermal gain dependence, are thought to be predominantly due to changes in the geometry of the wire coils that sense the magnetic field and/or provide magnetic feedback. Scientific fluxgate magnetometers typically employ some form of temperature compensation and support and constrain wire sense coils with bobbins constructed from materials such as MACOR machinable ceramic (Corning Inc.) which are selected for their ultra-low thermal deformation rather than for robustness, cost, or ease of manufacturing. We present laboratory results comparing the performance of six geometrically and electrically matched fluxgate sensors in which the material used to support the windings and for the base of the sensor is varied. We use a novel, low-cost thermal calibration procedure based on a controlled sinusoidal magnetic source and quantitative spectral analysis to measure the thermal gain dependence of fluxgate magnetometer sensors at the ppm°C-1 level in a typical magnetically noisy university laboratory environment. We compare the thermal gain dependence of sensors built from MACOR, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) engineering plastic (virgin, 30 % glass filled and 30 % carbon filled), and acetal to examine the trade between the thermal properties of the material, the impact on the thermal gain dependence of the fluxgate, and the cost and ease of manufacture. We find that thermal gain dependence of the sensor varies as one half of the material properties of the bobbin supporting the wire sense coils rather than being directly related as has been historically thought. An experimental sensor constructed from 30 % glass-filled PEEK (21.6 ppm°C-1) had a thermal gain dependence within 5 ppm°C-1 of a traditional sensor constructed from MACOR ceramic (8.1 ppm°C-1). If a modest increase in thermal

  7. Magnetization distribution of hydrothermal deposits from three component magnetometer survey using ROV in the Lau Basin, the southwestern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C.; Choi, S.; Park, C.

    2013-12-01

    Deep sea three component magnetic surveys, using ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle), were conducted at Apr., 2011 and Jan., 2012 in TA25 and TA26 seamounts, the Lau Basin, the southwestern Pacific. At 2011, the survey area was only the western slope of the caldera of TA25 using IBRV(Ice Breaker Research Vessel) ARAON of KIOST (Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology) and ROV of Oceaneering Co. And, at Jan. 2012, the magnetic survey was conducted in the western (site A) and eastern (site B) slopes of the caldera of TA25 and the summit area of TA26 using German R/V SONNE and ROV of ROPOS Co. The 2011 and 2012 three component magnetic survey lines were the 13 N-S lines and the 29 N-S lines (TA25-East : 12 lines, TA25-West : 11 lines, TA26 : 6 lines) with about 100 m spacing, respectively. Also, we conducted the 8 figure circle rotation survey of ROV for magnetic calibration at 2011 and 2012. For the magnetic survey, the magnetometer sensor was attached with the line frame of ROV and the data logger and motion sensor in ROV. The three component magnetometer measure the X (North), Y (East) and Z (Vertical) vector components of a magnetic field. A motion sensor (Octans) provided us the data of pitch, roll, yaw for the correction of the magnetic data to the motion of ROV. In the survey, ROV followed the tracks of the plan at 50 m above seafloor. The data of the magnetometer and motion sensors and the USBL(Ultra Short Base Line) data of the position of ROV were recorded on a notebook through the optical cable of ROV. Hydrothermal fluids over Curie temperature can quickly alter or replace the iron-rich magnetic minerals, reducing the magnetic remanence of the crustal rocks, in some cases to near 0 A/m magnetization. Low magnetization zones occur in the south-western and northern parts of TA25 site A and the south-south-western, north-western and central parts of TA25 site B. TA26 has low magnetization zones in the central part. The low magnetization zones of the survey

  8. Single-atom nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Prati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Single-Atom Nanoelectronics covers the fabrication of single-atom devices and related technology, as well as the relevant electronic equipment and the intriguing new phenomena related to single-atom and single-electron effects in quantum devices. It also covers the alternative approaches related to both silicon- and carbon-based technologies, also from the point of view of large-scale industrial production. The publication provides a comprehensive picture of the state of the art at the cutting edge and constitutes a milestone in the emerging field of beyond-CMOS technology. Although there are

  9. Synergistic effect of EUV from the laser-sustained detonation plasma in a ground-based atomic oxygen simulation on fluorinated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Masahito; Abe, Shingo; Kishida, Kazuhiro; Yokota, Kumiko; Okamoto, Akio

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) from a laser-sustained plasma on the mass loss phenomenon of fluorinated polymer in a ground-based laser-detonation atomic oxygen beam source was evaluated. The atomic oxygen beam and EUV from the oxygen plasma were separated by the high-speed chopper wheel installed in the beam source. The mass changes of the fluorinated polymer and polyimide were measured from the frequency shift of the quartz crystal microbalance during the beam exposures. It has been made clear that the fluorinated polymer erodes by EUV exposure alone. In contrast, no erosion was detected for polyimide by EUV alone. The atomic oxygen-induced erosion was measured for both materials even without EUV exposure. However, no strong synergistic effect was observed for a fluorinated polymer even under the simultaneous exposure condition of atomic oxygen and EUV. Similar results were observed even in simultaneous exposure of atomic oxygen (without EUV) and 172 nm vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) from an excimer lamp. These experiments suggest that the primary origin of the accelerated erosion of fluorinated polymer observed in a laser detonation atomic oxygen source is not the EUV from the laser-sustained plasma.

  10. Dictionary-Based Image Denoising by Fused-Lasso Atom Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed an efficient image denoising scheme by fused lasso with dictionary learning. The scheme has two important contributions. The first one is that we learned the patch-based adaptive dictionary by principal component analysis (PCA with clustering the image into many subsets, which can better preserve the local geometric structure. The second one is that we coded the patches in each subset by fused lasso with the clustering learned dictionary and proposed an iterative Split Bregman to solve it rapidly. We present the capabilities with several experiments. The results show that the proposed scheme is competitive to some excellent denoising algorithms.

  11. Mesoscale effects in electrochemical conversion: coupling of chemistry to atomic- and nanoscale structure in iron-based electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiaderek, Kamila M; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Pereira, Nathalie; Ilavsky, Jan; Amatucci, Glenn G; Chupas, Peter J; Chapman, Karena W

    2014-04-30

    The complex coupling of atomic, chemical, and electronic transformations across multiple length scales underlies the performance of electrochemical energy storage devices. Here, the coupling of chemistry with atomic- and nanoscale structure in iron conversion electrodes is resolved by combining pair distribution function (PDF) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis for a series of Fe fluorides, oxyfluorides, and oxides. The data show that the anion chemistry of the initial electrode influences the abundance of atomic defects in the Fe atomic lattice. This, in turn, is linked to different atom mobilities and propensity for particle growth. Competitive nanoparticle growth in mixed anion systems contributes to a distinct nanostructure, without the interconnected metallic nanoparticles formed for single anion systems.

  12. Comparison between SuperDARN flow vectors and equivalent ionospheric currents from ground magnetometer arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weygand, J. M.; Amm, O.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2012-01-01

    that may influence the alignment include ionospheric conductivity gradients and quiet time backgrounds. Our results can be used to approximate the macroscopic (similar to 1000 km) ionospheric convection patterns. The SECS maps represent a value-added product from the raw magnetometer database and can...

  13. Periodic H2 Synthesis for Spacecraft Attitude Determination and Control with a Vector Magnetometer and Magnetorquers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2001-01-01

    the expected magnetic field vector and the true magnetometer data is used for the attitude determination. The magnetic attitude control and determination is intrinsically periodic due to periodic nature of the geomagnetic field variation in orbit. The control performance is specified by the generalized H2...

  14. MgB2 magnetometer with directly coupled pick-up loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portesi, C.; Mijatovic, D.; Veldhuis, Dick; Brinkman, Alexander; Monticone, E.; Gonnelli, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    magnetometer with a directly coupled pick-up loop. We used an all in situ technique for fabricating magnesium diboride films, which consists of the co-evaporation of B and Mg by means of an e-gun and a resistive heater respectively. Consequently, we realized the superconducting device, which

  15. Characterization and demonstration results of a SQUID magnetometer system developed for geomagnetic field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, J.; Miyamoto, M.; Kawabata, M.; Nosé, M.; Haruta, Y.; Uehara, G.

    2017-08-01

    We characterized a low temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer system developed for high-sensitivity geomagnetic field measurement, and demonstrated the detection of weak geomagnetic signals. The SQUID magnetometer system is comprised of three-axis SQUID magnetometers housed in a glass fiber reinforced plastic cryostat, readout electronics with flux locked loop (FLL), a 24-bit data logger with a global positioning system and batteries. The system noise was approximately 0.2 pT √Hz- 1/2 in the 1-50 Hz frequency range. This performance was determined by including the thermal noise and the shielding effect of the copper shield, which covered the SQUID magnetometers to eliminate high-frequency interference. The temperature drift of the system was ˜0.8 pT °C- 1 in an FLL operation. The system operated for a month using 33 l liquid helium. Using this system, we performed the measurements of geomagnetic field in the open-air, far away from the city. The system could detect weak geomagnetic signals such as the Schumann resonance with sixth harmonics, and the ionospheric Alfvén resonance appearing at night, for the north-south and east-west components of the geomagnetic field. We confirm that the system was capable of high-sensitivity measurement of the weak geomagnetic activities.

  16. An atomic orbital based real-time time-dependent density functional theory for computing electronic circular dichroism band spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goings, Joshua J; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-06-21

    One of the challenges of interpreting electronic circular dichroism (ECD) band spectra is that different states may have different rotatory strength signs, determined by their absolute configuration. If the states are closely spaced and opposite in sign, observed transitions may be washed out by nearby states, unlike absorption spectra where transitions are always positive additive. To accurately compute ECD bands, it is necessary to compute a large number of excited states, which may be prohibitively costly if one uses the linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. Here we implement a real-time, atomic-orbital based TDDFT method for computing the entire ECD spectrum simultaneously. The method is advantageous for large systems with a high density of states. In contrast to previous implementations based on real-space grids, the method is variational, independent of nuclear orientation, and does not rely on pseudopotential approximations, making it suitable for computation of chiroptical properties well into the X-ray regime.

  17. Atomic force microscopy-based antibody recognition imaging of proteins in the pathological deposits in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creasey, Rhiannon [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Sharma, Shiwani [School of Medicine, Ophthalmology, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Gibson, Christopher T. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Craig, Jamie E. [School of Medicine, Ophthalmology, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Ebner, Andreas [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler Universitaet Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Becker, Thomas [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, 6845 WA (Australia); Hinterdorfer, Peter [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler Universitaet Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Voelcker, Nicolas H., E-mail: nico.voelcker@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia)

    2011-07-15

    The phenomenon of protein aggregation is of considerable interest to various disciplines, including the field of medicine. A range of disease pathologies are associated with this phenomenon. One of the ocular diseases hallmarked by protein aggregation is the Pseudoexfoliation (PEX) Syndrome. This condition is characterized by the deposition of insoluble proteinaceous material on the anterior human lens capsule. Genomic and proteomic analyses have revealed an association of specific genetic markers and various proteins, respectively, with PEX syndrome. However, the ultrastructure of the protein aggregates is poorly characterized. This study seeks to build capacity to determine the molecular nature of PEX aggregates on human lens capsules in their native state by AFM-based antibody recognition imaging. Lysyl oxidase-Like 1 (LOXL1), a protein identified as a component of PEX aggregates, is detected by an antibody-modified AFM probe. Topographical AFM images and antibody recognition images are obtained using three AFM-based techniques: TREC, phase and force-volume imaging. LOXL1 is found to be present on the lens capsule surface, and is localized around fibrous protein aggregates. Our evaluation shows that TREC imaging is best suited for human tissue imaging and holds significant potential for imaging of human disease tissues in their native state. -- Highlights: {yields} Atomic force microscopy techniques were applied to diseased human tissues. {yields} LOXL1 protein was detected on the small fibers of Pseudoexfoliation deposits. {yields} PicoTREC was the optimum technique for investigating protein aggregates.

  18. A Comparison of Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yields of Carbon and Selected Polymers Exposed in Ground Based Facilities and in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Cales, Michael

    1994-01-01

    A comparison of the relative erosion yields (volume of material removed per oxygen atom arriving) for FEP Teflon, polyethylene, and pyrolytic graphite with respect to Kapton HN was performed in an atomic oxygen directed beam system, in a plasma asher, and in space on the EOIM-III (Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Materials-III) flight experiment. This comparison was performed to determine the sensitivity of material reaction to atomic oxygen flux, atomic oxygen fluence, and vacuum ultraviolet radiation for enabling accurate estimates of durability in ground based facilities. The relative erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite was found not to be sensitive to these factors, that for FEP was sensitive slightly to fluence and possibly ions, and that for polyethylene was found to be partially VUV and flux sensitive but more sensitive to an unknown factor. Results indicate that the ability to use these facilities for material relative durability prediction is great as long as the sensitivity of particular materials to conditions such as VUV, and atomic oxygen flux and fluence are taken into account. When testing materials of a particular group such as teflon, it may be best to use a witness sample made of a similar material that has some available space data on it. This would enable one to predict an equivalent exposure in the ground based facility.

  19. Fabrication of sensitive bioelectrode based on atomically thin CVD grown graphene for cancer biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay K; Kumar, Saurabh; Pandey, Sumit Kumar; Srivastava, Saurabh; Mishra, Monu; Gupta, Govind; Malhotra, B D; Tiwari, R S; Srivastava, Anchal

    2018-05-15

    Motivation behind the present work is to fabricate a cost effective and scalable biosensing platform for an easy and reliable detection of cancer biomarker Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Here, we report the sensitive and selective detection of CEA using graphene based bio-sensing platform. Large sized (~ 2.5 × 1.0cm 2 ), uniform, continuous, single and few layers graphene films have been grown on copper (Cu) substrate employing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique using hexane as a liquid precursor. Functional group has been created over Graphene/Cu substrate through π-π stacking of 1- pyrenebutanoic acid succinimidyl ester (PBSE). Further, to make the sensor specific to CEA, antibody of CEA (anti-CEA) has been covalently immobilized onto PBSE/Graphene/Cu electrode. Selective and sensitive detection of CEA is achieved by anti-CEA/PBSE/Graphene/Cu electrode through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Under optimal condition, the fabricated sensor shows linear response in the physiological range 1.0-25.0ngmL -1 (normal value ~ 5.0ngmL -1 ), revealing sensitivity 563.4Ωng -1 mLcm -2 with a correlation coefficient of 0.996 and limit of detection (LOD) 0.23ngmL -1 . In this way, one step electrode fabrication with high specific surface area provides a light weight, low cost, reliable and scalable novel biosensing platform for sensitive and selective detection of CEA. We believe that this bioelectrode equipped with specific recognition elements could be utilized for detection of other biomolecules too. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  1. Atomic scale engineering of HfO{sub 2}-based dielectrics for future DRAM applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudek, Piotr

    2011-02-14

    Modern dielectrics in combination with appropriate metal electrodes have a great potential to solve many difficulties associated with continuing miniaturization process in the microelectronic industry. One significant branch of microelectronics incorporates dynamic random access memory (DRAM) market. The DRAM devices scaled for over 35 years starting from 4 kb density to several Gb nowadays. The scaling process led to the dielectric material thickness reduction, resulting in higher leakage current density, and as a consequence higher power consumption. As a possible solution for this problem, alternative dielectric materials with improved electrical and material science parameters were intensively studied by many research groups. The higher dielectric constant allows the use of physically thicker layers with high capacitance but strongly reduced leakage current density. This work focused on deposition and characterization of thin insulating layers. The material engineering process was based on Si cleanroom compatible HfO{sub 2} thin films deposited on TiN metal electrodes. A combined materials science and dielectric characterization study showed that Ba-added HfO{sub 2} (BaHfO{sub 3}) films and Ti-added BaHfO{sub 3} (BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}) layers are promising candidates for future generation of state-of-the-art DRAMs. In especial a strong increase of the dielectric permittivity k was achieved for thin films of cubic BaHfO{sub 3} (k{proportional_to}38) and BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} (k{proportional_to}90) with respect to monoclinic HfO{sub 2} (k{proportional_to}19). Meanwhile the CET values scaled down to 1 nm for BaHfO{sub 3} and {proportional_to}0.8 nm for BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} with respect to HfO{sub 2} (CET=1.5 nm). The Hf{sup 4+} ions substitution in BaHfO{sub 3} by Ti{sup 4+} ions led to a significant decrease of thermal budget from 900 C for BaHfO{sub 3} to 700 C for BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}. Future studies need to focus

  2. A game-theoretic approach for calibration of low-cost magnetometers under noise uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddharth, S.; Ali, A. S.; El-Sheimy, N.; Goodall, C. L.; Syed, Z. F.

    2012-02-01

    Pedestrian heading estimation is a fundamental challenge in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)-denied environments. Additionally, the heading observability considerably degrades in low-speed mode of operation (e.g. walking), making this problem even more challenging. The goal of this work is to improve the heading solution when hand-held personal/portable devices, such as cell phones, are used for positioning and to improve the heading estimation in GNSS-denied signal environments. Most smart phones are now equipped with self-contained, low cost, small size and power-efficient sensors, such as magnetometers, gyroscopes and accelerometers. A magnetometer needs calibration before it can be properly employed for navigation purposes. Magnetometers play an important role in absolute heading estimation and are embedded in many smart phones. Before the users navigate with the phone, a calibration is invoked to ensure an improved signal quality. This signal is used later in the heading estimation. In most of the magnetometer-calibration approaches, the motion modes are seldom described to achieve a robust calibration. Also, suitable calibration approaches fail to discuss the stopping criteria for calibration. In this paper, the following three topics are discussed in detail that are important to achieve proper magnetometer-calibration results and in turn the most robust heading solution for the user while taking care of the device misalignment with respect to the user: (a) game-theoretic concepts to attain better filter parameter tuning and robustness in noise uncertainty, (b) best maneuvers with focus on 3D and 2D motion modes and related challenges and (c) investigation of the calibration termination criteria leveraging the calibration robustness and efficiency.

  3. The Casimir atomic pendulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razmi, H. [Department of Physics, University of Qom, Qom 37185-359 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: razmi@qom.ac.ir; Abdollahi, M. [Department of Physics, University of Qom, Qom 37185-359 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mah.abdollahi@gmail.com

    2008-11-10

    We want to introduce an atomic pendulum whose driving force (torque) is due to the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Applying the well-known Casimir-Polder effect to a special configuration (a combined structure of an atomic nanostring and a conducting plate), an atomic pendulum (Casimir atomic pendulum) is designed. Using practically acceptable data corresponding to the already known world of nanotechnology and based on reasonable/reliable numerical estimates, the period of oscillation for the pendulum is computed. This pendulum can be considered as both a new micro(nano)-electromechanical system and a new simple vacuum machine. Its design may be considered as a first step towards realizing the visualized vacuum (Casimir) clock{exclamation_point}.

  4. The Casimir atomic pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmi, H.; Abdollahi, M.

    2008-11-01

    We want to introduce an atomic pendulum whose driving force (torque) is due to the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Applying the well-known Casimir-Polder effect to a special configuration (a combined structure of an atomic nanostring and a conducting plate), an atomic pendulum (Casimir atomic pendulum) is designed. Using practically acceptable data corresponding to the already known world of nanotechnology and based on reasonable/reliable numerical estimates, the period of oscillation for the pendulum is computed. This pendulum can be considered as both a new micro(nano)-electromechanical system and a new simple vacuum machine. Its design may be considered as a first step towards realizing the visualized vacuum (Casimir) clock!

  5. Knowledge-based instantiation of full atomic detail into coarse-grain RNA 3D structural models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonikas, Magdalena A; Radmer, Randall J; Altman, Russ B

    2009-12-15

    The recent development of methods for modeling RNA 3D structures using coarse-grain approaches creates a need to bridge low- and high-resolution modeling methods. Although they contain topological information, coarse-grain models lack atomic detail, which limits their utility for some applications. We have developed a method for adding full atomic detail to coarse-grain models of RNA 3D structures. Our method [Coarse to Atomic (C2A)] uses geometries observed in known RNA crystal structures. Our method rebuilds full atomic detail from ideal coarse-grain backbones taken from crystal structures to within 1.87-3.31 A RMSD of the full atomic crystal structure. When starting from coarse-grain models generated by the modeling tool NAST, our method builds full atomic structures that are within 1.00 A RMSD of the starting structure. The resulting full atomic structures can be used as starting points for higher resolution modeling, thus bridging high- and low-resolution approaches to modeling RNA 3D structure. Code for the C2A method, as well as the examples discussed in this article, are freely available at www.simtk.org/home/c2a. russ.altman@stanford.edu

  6. Meridian-scanning photometer, coherent HF radar, and magnetometer observations of the cusp: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the cusp region and post-noon sector for an interval of predominantly IMF By, Bz < 0 nT are studied with the CUTLASS Finland coherent HF radar, a meridian-scanning photometer located at Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, and a meridional network of magnetometers. The scanning mode of the radar is such that one beam is sampled every 14 s, and a 30° azimuthal sweep is completed every 2 minutes, all at 15 km range resolution. Both the radar backscatter and red line (630 nm optical observations are closely co-located, especially at their equatorward boundary. The optical and radar aurora reveal three different behaviours which can interchange on the scale of minutes, and which are believed to be related to the dynamic nature of energy and momentum transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere through transient dayside reconnection. Two interpretations of the observations are presented, based upon the assumed location of the open/closed field line boundary (OCFLB. In the first, the OCFLB is co-located with equatorward boundary of the optical and radar aurora, placing most of the observations on open field lines. In the second, the observed aurora are interpreted as the ionospheric footprint of the region 1 current system, and the OCFLB is placed near the poleward edge of the radar backscatter and visible aurora; in this interpretation, most of the observations are placed on closed field lines, though transient brightenings of the optical aurora occur on open field lines. The observations reveal several transient features, including poleward and equatorward steps in the observed boundaries, "braiding" of the backscatter power, and 2 minute quasi-periodic enhancements of the plasma drift and optical intensity, predominantly on closed field lines.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; plasma convection · Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause · cusp · and boundary layers

  7. Theoretical investigation of hydrogen atom transfer in the cytosine-guanine base pair and its coupling with electronic rearrangement. Concerted vs stepwise mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Giovanni

    2010-07-29

    The transformation of the DNA base pairs from the Watson-Crick (WC) structures to its tautomers having imino-enol form can be achieved via two types of hydrogen atom transfer processes: (i) concerted, and/or (ii) stepwise (step by step). Here, we have studied and compared these two mechanisms in the cytosine-guanine (C-G) system. In the first mechanism there is the concerted movement of two hydrogen atoms along two of the three H-bridges that bond the bases, one from the cytosine to guanine and the other in the opposite direction. This movement must be coupled to an electronic reorganization, with some bond orders that pass from single to double and vice versa, in order to preserve the neutrality of these new structures. In the stepwise mechanism the movement of the hydrogen atoms and the electronic reorganization are not concerted, and it implicates the movement of a hydrogen atom at a time with the identification of two or more steps in this reaction. There are two possible neutral imino-enol structures in the C-G system, and both have been considered here. The principal result from this paper is that a different behavior is observed if the hydrogen transfer begins with a H of the guanine or of the cytosine and that a concerted (synchronic in the N-N and asynchronic in the N-O) double-hydrogen transfer can be activated only when the first H atom to move is that of the guanine, in particular. This is different from the A-T system(1) studied previously where the movement in a N-N bridge produces a zwitterionic structure and that in the N-O the concerted double-hydrogen transfer. In both cases a general conclusion can be given: the concerted double-hydrogen process begins with a hydrogen atom of a purinic base.

  8. Atomic Power

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atomic Power. By Denis Taylor: Dr. Taylor was formerly Chief UNESCO Advisor at the University. College, Nairobi, Kenya and is now Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Uni- versity of ... method of producing radioactive isotopes, which are materials .... the sealing and the pressure balancing, all can be carried out ...

  9. Lipid Bilayer Membrane in a Silicon Based Micron Sized Cavity Accessed by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Shuja; Dosoky, Noura Sayed; Patel, Darayas; Weimer, Jeffrey; Williams, John Dalton

    2017-07-05

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are widely used in biophysical research to probe the functionality of biological membranes and to provide diagnoses in high throughput drug screening. Formation of SLBs at below phase transition temperature (Tm) has applications in nano-medicine research where low temperature profiles are required. Herein, we report the successful production of SLBs at above-as well as below-the Tm of the lipids in an anisotropically etched, silicon-based micro-cavity. The Si-based cavity walls exhibit controlled temperature which assist in the quick and stable formation of lipid bilayer membranes. Fusion of large unilamellar vesicles was monitored in real time in an aqueous environment inside the Si cavity using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the lateral organization of the lipid molecules was characterized until the formation of the SLBs. The stability of SLBs produced was also characterized by recording the electrical resistance and the capacitance using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Analysis was done in the frequency regime of 10(-2)-10⁵ Hz at a signal voltage of 100 mV and giga-ohm sealed impedance was obtained continuously over four days. Finally, the cantilever tip in AFM was utilized to estimate the bilayer thickness and to calculate the rupture force at the interface of the tip and the SLB. We anticipate that a silicon-based, micron-sized cavity has the potential to produce highly-stable SLBs below their Tm. The membranes inside the Si cavity could last for several days and allow robust characterization using AFM or EIS. This could be an excellent platform for nanomedicine experiments that require low operating temperatures.

  10. In situ development of self-reinforced cellulose nanocrystals based thermoplastic elastomers by atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Juan; Wang, Chunpeng; Wang, Jifu; Chu, Fuxiang

    2016-05-05

    Recently, the utilization of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as a reinforcing material has received a great attention due to its high elastic modulus. In this article, a novel strategy for the synthesis of self-reinforced CNCs based thermoplastic elastomers (CTPEs) is presented. CNCs were first surface functionalized with an initiator for surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Subsequently, SI-ATRP of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and butyl acrylate (BA) was carried out in the presence of sacrificial initiator to form CTPEs in situ. The CTPEs together with the simple blends of CNCs and linear poly(MMA-co-BA) copolymer (P(MMA-co-BA)) were characterized for comparative study. The results indicated that P(MMA-co-BA) was successfully grafted onto the surface of CNCs and the compatibility between CNCs and the polymer matrix in CTPEs was greatly enhanced. Specially, the CTPEs containing 2.15wt% CNCs increased Tg by 19.2°C and tensile strength by 100% as compared to the linear P(MMA-co-BA). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The performance and limitations of FPGA-based digital servos for atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shi Jing; Fajeau, Emma; Liu, Lin Qiao; Jones, David J; Madison, Kirk W

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we address the advantages, limitations, and technical subtleties of employing field programmable gate array (FPGA)-based digital servos for high-bandwidth feedback control of lasers in atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments. Specifically, we provide the results of benchmark performance tests in experimental setups including noise, bandwidth, and dynamic range for two digital servos built with low and mid-range priced FPGA development platforms. The digital servo results are compared to results obtained from a commercially available state-of-the-art analog servo using the same plant for control (intensity stabilization). The digital servos have feedback bandwidths of 2.5 MHz, limited by the total signal latency, and we demonstrate improvements beyond the transfer function offered by the analog servo including a three-pole filter and a two-pole filter with phase compensation to suppress resonances. We also discuss limitations of our FPGA-servo implementation and general considerations when designing and using digital servos.

  12. Piezoelectric bimorph-based scanner in the tip-scan mode for high speed atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianyong; Gong, Weitao; Cai, Wei; Shang, Guangyi

    2013-08-01

    A piezoelectric bimorph-based scanner operating in tip-scan mode for high speed atomic force microscope (AFM) is first presented. The free end of the bimorph is used for fixing an AFM cantilever probe and the other one is mounted on the AFM head. The sample is placed on the top of a piezoelectric tube scanner. High speed scan is performed with the bimorph that vibrates at the resonant frequency, while slow scanning is carried out by the tube scanner. The design and performance of the scanner is discussed and given in detailed. Combined with a commercially available data acquisition system, a high speed AFM has been built successfully. By real-time observing the deformation of the pores on the surface of a commercial piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT-5) ceramics under electric field, the dynamic imaging capability of the AFM is demonstrated. The results show that the notable advantage of the AFM is that dynamic process of the sample with large dimensions can be easily investigated. In addition, this design could provide a way to study a sample in real time under the given experimental condition, such as under an external electric field, on a heating stage, or in a liquid cell.

  13. Determination of electrostatic force and its characteristics based on phase difference by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kesheng; Cheng, Jia; Yao, Shiji; Lu, Yijia; Ji, Linhong; Xu, Dengfeng

    2016-12-01

    Electrostatic force measurement at the micro/nano scale is of great significance in science and engineering. In this paper, a reasonable way of applying voltage is put forward by taking an electrostatic chuck in a real integrated circuit manufacturing process as a sample, applying voltage in the probe and the sample electrode, respectively, and comparing the measurement effect of the probe oscillation phase difference by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy. Based on the phase difference obtained from the experiment, the quantitative dependence of the absolute magnitude of the electrostatic force on the tip-sample distance and applied voltage is established by means of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. The results show that the varying characteristics of the electrostatic force with the distance and voltage at the micro/nano scale are similar to those at the macroscopic scale. Electrostatic force gradually decays with increasing distance. Electrostatic force is basically proportional to the square of applied voltage. Meanwhile, the applicable conditions of the above laws are discussed. In addition, a comparison of the results in this paper with the results of the energy dissipation method shows the two are consistent in general. The error decreases with increasing distance, and the effect of voltage on the error is small.

  14. Implementation and characterization of a quartz tuning fork based probe consisted of discrete resonators for dynamic mode atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Terunobu; de Rooij, Nicolaas F; Staufer, Urs; Detterbeck, Manfred; Braendlin, Dominik; Waldmeier, Simon; Scheidiger, Martin

    2010-06-01

    The quartz tuning fork based probe {e.g., Akiyama et al. [Appl. Surf. Sci. 210, 18 (2003)]}, termed "A-Probe," is a self-sensing and self-actuating (exciting) probe for dynamic mode atomic force microscope (AFM) operation. It is an oscillatory force sensor consisting of the two discrete resonators. This paper presents the investigations on an improved A-Probe: its batch fabrication and assembly, mounting on an AFM head, electrical setup, characterization, and AFM imaging. The fundamental features of the A-Probe are electrically and optically characterized in "approach-withdraw" experiments. Further investigations include the frequency response of an A-Probe to small mechanical vibrations externally applied to the tip and the effective loading force yielding between the tip and the sample during the periodic contact. Imaging of an electronic chip, a compact disk stamper, carbon nanotubes, and Si beads is demonstrated with this probe at ambient conditions in the so-called frequency modulation mode. A special probe substrate, which can snap on a receptacle fixed on an AFM head, and a special holder including a preamplifier electronic are introduced. We hope that the implementation and characterization of the A-Probe described in this paper will provide hints for new scanning probe techniques.

  15. Microplasma source based on a dielectric barrier discharge for the determination of mercury by atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenli; Chan, George C-Y; Ray, Steven J; Zhang, Xinrong; Hieftje, Gary M

    2008-11-15

    A low-power, atmospheric-pressure microplasma source based on a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has been developed for use in atomic emission spectrometry. The small plasma (0.6 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm) is generated within a glass cell by using electrodes that do not contact the plasma. Powered by an inexpensive ozone generator, the discharge ignites spontaneously, can be easily sustained in Ar or He at gas flow rates ranging from 5 to 200 mL min(-1), and requires less than 1 W of power. The effect of operating parameters such as plasma gas identity, plasma gas flow rate, and residual water vapor on the DBD source performance has been investigated. The plasma can be operated without removal of residual water vapor, permitting it to be directly coupled with cold vapor generation sample introduction. The spectral background of the source is quite clean in the range from 200 to 260 nm with low continuum and structured components. The DBD source has been applied to the determination of Hg by continuous-flow, cold vapor generation and offers detection limits from 14 (He-DBD) to 43 pg mL(-1) (Ar-DBD) without removal of the residual moisture. The use of flow injection with the He-DBD permits measurement of Hg with a 7.2 pg limit of detection, and with repetitive injections having an RSD of <2% for a 10 ng mL(-1) standard.

  16. A telecom-wavelength conversion from near-infrared light based on a cold Rubidium atomic ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei; Pu, Yunfei; Jiang, Nan; Li, Chang; Zhang, Sheng; Duan, Luming; Center for Quantum Information Lab4, IIIS, Tsinghua University Team

    2017-04-01

    Exponential photon transmission losses in fiber is a severe limitation to realize long-distance quantum communication. It's helpful to use telecom-wavelength photon transmission to mitigate these absorption losses. However, typical atomic electronic transition from ground-level is in visible wavelengths or near-infrared wavelengths, such as transitions based on Rubidium. Here we report our progress in telecom-wavelength conversion from 780nm to 1475nm and from 795nm to 1530nm in a cold optically thick gas of Rubidium. Both these two conversions are using a diamond configuration transition that we use 5S1/2-5P3/2-4D3/2 cascade transition for the 780nm to 1475nm route and 5S1/2-5P1/2-4D3/2 cascade transition for the 795nm to 1530nm route. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China and the quantum information project from the Ministry of Education of China. LMD acknowledges in addition support from the IARPA MUSIQC program, the AFOSR and the ARO MURI program.

  17. Two-Dimensional Electron Gas at SrTiO3-Based Oxide Heterostructures via Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Woon Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG at an oxide interface has been attracting considerable attention for physics research and nanoelectronic applications. Early studies reported the formation of 2DEG at semiconductor interfaces (e.g., AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with interesting electrical properties such as high electron mobility. Besides 2DEG formation at semiconductor junctions, 2DEG was realized at the interface of an oxide heterostructure such as the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO heterojunction. The origin of 2DEG was attributed to the well-known “polar catastrophe” mechanism in oxide heterostructures, which consist of an epitaxial LAO layer on a single crystalline STO substrate among proposed mechanisms. Recently, it was reported that the creation of 2DEG was achieved using the atomic layer deposition (ALD technique, which opens new functionality of ALD in emerging nanoelectronics. This review is focused on the origin of 2DEG at oxide heterostructures using the ALD process. In particular, it addresses the origin of 2DEG at oxide interfaces based on an alternative mechanism (i.e., oxygen vacancies.

  18. Impact of the atomic layer deposition precursors diffusion on solid-state carbon nanotube based supercapacitors performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Vollebregt, Sten; Tichelaar, F. D.; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Sarro, Pasqualina M.

    2015-02-01

    A study on the impact of atomic layer deposition (ALD) precursors diffusion on the performance of solid-state miniaturized nanostructure capacitor array is presented. Three-dimensional nanostructured capacitor array based on double conformal coating of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) bundles is realized using ALD to deposit Al2O3 as dielectric layer and TiN as high aspect-ratio conformal counter-electrode on 2 μm long MWCNT bundles. The devices have a small footprint (from 100 μm2 to 2500 μm2) and are realized using an IC wafer-scale manufacturing process with high reproducibility (≤0.3E-12F deviation). To evaluate the enhancement of the electrode surface, the measured capacitance values are compared to a lumped circuital model. The observed discrepancies are explained with a partial coating of the CNT, that determine a limited use of the available electrode surface area. To analyze the CNT coating effectiveness, the ALD precursors diffusions inside the CNT bundle is studied using a Knudsen diffusion mechanism.

  19. Ionization of atoms by strong infrared fields: Solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in momentum space for a model based on separable potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tetchou Nganso, Hugues [Universite Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); University of Douala (Cameroon); Popov, Yuri [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Piraux, Bernard [Universite Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Madronero, Javier [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Kwato Njock, Moise Godfroy [University of Douala (Cameroon)

    2011-07-01

    We consider the ionization of atomic hydrogen by a strong infrared field. By starting from the corresponding time-dependent Schroedinger equation in momentum space, we develop a model in which the kernel of the non-local Coulomb potential is replaced by a finite sum of separable potentials. Each separable potential supports one bound state of atomic hydrogen. Here, we consider only the 1s, 2s and 2p states. In this way, the full 3-dimensional Schroedinger equation reduces to a system of a few coupled 1-dimensional linear Volterra integral equations. This model is a theoretical tool to understand the actual role of the atomic potential in the intensity regime where tunnel ionization is supposed to take place and where the experimental data for the first ATI peaks are in contradiction with the theoretical predictions based on the strong field approximation model.

  20. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  1. Atomic interferometry; Interferometrie atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudon, J.; Robert, J. [Paris-13 Univ., 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2004-07-01

    Since the theoretical works of L. De Broglie (1924) and the famous experiment of Davisson and Germer (1927), we know that a wave is linked with any particle of mass m by the relation {lambda} = h/(mv), where {lambda} is the wavelength, v the particle velocity and h is the Planck constant. The basic principle of the interferometry of any material particle, atom, molecule or aggregate is simple: using a simple incident wave, several mutually consistent waves (with well-defined relative phases) are generated and controllable phase-shifts are introduced between them in order to generate a wave which is the sum of the previous waves. An interference figure is obtained which consists in a succession of dark and bright fringes. The atomic interferometry is based on the same principle but involves different techniques, different wave equations, but also different beams, sources and correlations which are described in this book. Because of the small possible wavelengths and the wide range of possible atomic interactions, atomic interferometers can be used in many domains from the sub-micron lithography to the construction of sensors like: inertial sensors, gravity-meters, accelerometers, gyro-meters etc. The first chapter is a preliminary study of the space and time diffraction of atoms. The next chapters is devoted to the description of slit, light separation and polarization interferometers, and the last chapter treats of the properties of Bose-Einstein condensates which are interesting in atomic interferometry. (J.S.)

  2. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, M.; Tomonaga, M.; Amenomori, T.; Matsuo, T. (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-12-01

    Characteristic features of the leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. Dose estimates of atomic bomb radiation were based on T65D, but the new dosimetry system DS86 was used for some analyses. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic to atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. The threshold of CML occurrence in Hiroshima is likely to be between 0.5{approx}0.09 Gy. However, the threshold of acute leukemia appears to be nearly 1 Gy. In the distribution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes by French-American-British classification, there was no M3 case in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Although aplastic anemia has not increased as a late effect of the atomic bomb radiation exposure, many atypical leukemia or other myeloproliferative diseases who had been diagnosed as aplastic anemia or its related diseases have been experienced among atomic bomb survivors. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral T-cells in several atomic bomb survivors. (author).

  3. A combined coating strategy based on atomic layer deposition for enhancement of corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangmei; Yang, Qiuyue; Li, Zhaoyang; Yuan, Wei; Zheng, Yufeng; Cui, Zhenduo; Yang, Xianjin; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Wu, Shuilin

    2018-03-01

    Rapid corrosion restricts the wide application of Mg and Mg-based alloys. In this work, a combined surface strategy was employed to modify the surface of AZ31 Mg Alloy. An atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was utilized to prepare ZrO2 nanofilm on Mg substrate. During this course, the film thickness could be precisely controlled by adjusting the ALD cycles with a deposition rate of 0.117 nm/cycle. The subsequent PLGA grafting on ZrO2 nanofilm was carried out by a spin-coating process to further enhance the corrosion resistance. The nanoscratch tests showed that this hybrid coating had good bonding strength with substrate and similar Young's modulus to natural bone. In vitro corrosion tests demonstrated that a thicker ZrO2 nanofilm on the surface could reduce the corrosion rate of Mg substrate when compared to a thinner coating. When increasing ZrO2 deposition cycles from 25 to 100, the corrosion resistance could be significantly increased by two or three orders of magnitude. Hydrogen evolution tests revealed the synergetic effects of both galvanic corrosion and local acidic action could accelerate the corrosion of the AZ31 modified with the PLGA/ZrO2 coating once the ZrO2 nanofilm was damaged. Therefore, by changing the ALD cycles, the corrosion resistance of both ZrO2 thin film and ZrO2/PLGA hybrid coatings can be adjusted. This work provides an effective combined surface strategy that can be employed to adjust the corrosion resistance of Mg-based alloys for biomedical applications.

  4. Atomic structure of defects in anion-deficient perovskite-based ferrites with a crystallographic shear structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batuk, Maria; Turner, Stuart; Abakumov, Artem M; Batuk, Dmitry; Hadermann, Joke; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2014-02-17

    Crystallographic shear (CS) planes provide a new structure-generation mechanism in the anion-deficient perovskites containing lone-pair cations. Pb2Sr2Bi2Fe6O16, a new n = 6 representative of the A(n)B(n)O(3n-2) homologous series of the perovskite-based ferrites with the CS structure, has been synthesized using the solid-state technique. The structure is built of perovskite blocks with a thickness of four FeO6 octahedra spaced by double columns of FeO5 edge-sharing distorted tetragonal pyramids, forming 1/2[110](101)p CS planes (space group Pnma, a = 5.6690(2) Å, b = 3.9108(1) Å, c = 32.643(1) Å). Pb2Sr2Bi2Fe6O16 features a wealth of microstructural phenomena caused by the flexibility of the CS planes due to the variable ratio and length of the constituting fragments with {101}p and {001}p orientation. This leads to the formation of "waves", "hairpins", "Γ-shaped" defects, and inclusions of the hitherto unknown layered anion-deficient perovskites Bi2(Sr,Pb)Fe3O8.5 and Bi3(Sr,Pb)Fe4O11.5. Using a combination of diffraction, imaging, and spectroscopic transmission electron microscopy techniques this complex microstructure was fully characterized, including direct determination of positions, chemical composition, and coordination number of individual atomic species. The complex defect structure makes these perovskites particularly similar to the CS structures in ReO3-type oxides. The flexibility of the CS planes appears to be a specific feature of the Sr-based system, related to the geometric match between the SrO perovskite layers and the {100}p segments of the CS planes.

  5. Studies of base pair sequence effects on DNA solvation based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Surjit B; Mezei, Mihaly; Beveridge, David L

    2012-07-01

    Detailed analyses of the sequence-dependent solvation and ion atmosphere of DNA are presented based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on all the 136 unique tetranucleotide steps obtained by the ABC consortium using the AMBER suite of programs. Significant sequence effects on solvation and ion localization were observed in these simulations. The results were compared to essentially all known experimental data on the subject. Proximity analysis was employed to highlight the sequence dependent differences in solvation and ion localization properties in the grooves of DNA. Comparison of the MD-calculated DNA structure with canonical A- and B-forms supports the idea that the G/C-rich sequences are closer to canonical A- than B-form structures, while the reverse is true for the poly A sequences, with the exception of the alternating ATAT sequence. Analysis of hydration density maps reveals that the flexibility of solute molecule has a significant effect on the nature of observed hydration. Energetic analysis of solute-solvent interactions based on proximity analysis of solvent reveals that the GC or CG base pairs interact more strongly with water molecules in the minor groove of DNA that the AT or TA base pairs, while the interactions of the AT or TA pairs in the major groove are stronger than those of the GC or CG pairs. Computation of solvent-accessible surface area of the nucleotide units in the simulated trajectories reveals that the similarity with results derived from analysis of a database of crystallographic structures is excellent. The MD trajectories tend to follow Manning's counterion condensation theory, presenting a region of condensed counterions within a radius of about 17 A from the DNA surface independent of sequence. The GC and CG pairs tend to associate with cations in the major groove of the DNA structure to a greater extent than the AT and TA pairs. Cation association is more frequent in the minor groove of AT than the GC pairs. In general, the

  6. Development of Geomagnetic Monitoring System Using a Magnetometer for the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Cheol; Kim, Sung-Wook; Choi, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, In-Soo

    2014-05-01

    Three institutes including KMA (Korea Meteorological Administration), KSWC (Korean Space Weather Center) of NRRA (National Radio Research Agency) and KIGAM (Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources) are now operating magnetic observatories. Those observatories observe the total intensity and three components of geomagnetic element. This paper comes up with a magnetic monitoring system now under development that uses a magnetometer for field survey. In monitoring magnetic variations in areas (active faults or volcanic regions), more reliable results can be obtained when an array of several magnetometers are used rather than a single magnetometer. In order to establish and operate a magnetometer array, such factors as expenses, convenience of the establishment and operation of the array should be taken into account. This study has come up with a magnetic monitoring system complete with a magnetometer for the field survey of our own designing. A magnetic monitoring system, which is composed of two parts. The one is a field part and the other a data part. The field part is composed of a magnetometer, an external memory module, a power supply and a set of data transmission equipment. The data part is a data server which can store the data transmitted from the field part, analyze the data and provide service to the web. This study has developed an external memory module for ENVI-MAG (Scintrex Ltd.) using an embedded Cortex-M3 board, which can be programmed, attach other functional devices (SD memory cards, GPS antennas for time synchronization, ethernet cards and so forth). The board thus developed can store magnetic measurements up to 8 Gbytes, synchronize with the GPS time and transmit the magnetic measurements to the data server which is now under development. A monitoring system of our own developing was installed in Jeju island, taking measurements throughout Korea. Other parts including a data transfer module, a server and a power supply using solar

  7. Atomic arias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  8. Deep cooling of optically trapped atoms implemented by magnetic levitation without transverse confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Zhou, Tianwei; Zhai, Yueyang; Xiang, Jinggang; Luan, Tian; Huang, Qi; Yang, Shifeng; Xiong, Wei; Chen, Xuzong

    2017-05-01

    We report a setup for the deep cooling of atoms in an optical trap. The deep cooling is implemented by eliminating the influence of gravity using specially constructed magnetic coils. Compared to the conventional method of generating a magnetic levitating force, the lower trap frequency achieved in our setup provides a lower limit of temperature and more freedoms to Bose gases with a simpler solution. A final temperature as low as ˜ 6 nK is achieved in the optical trap, and the atomic density is decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude during the second stage of evaporative cooling. This deep cooling of optically trapped atoms holds promise for many applications, such as atomic interferometers, atomic gyroscopes, and magnetometers, as well as many basic scientific research directions, such as quantum simulations and atom optics.

  9. Certified quantum non-demolition measurement of atomic spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Robert; Napolitano, Mario; Behbood, Naeimeh; Colangelo, Giorgio; Martin Ciurana, Ferran; Mitchell, Morgan

    2014-05-01

    We report certified quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement of atomic spins via paramagnetic Faraday rotation, recently used to demonstrate spin squeezing in an optical magnetometer [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 253605 (2012)]. We apply rigorous criteria, originally developed for continuous variable experiments in optics [Nature 396, 537 (1998)] and which we have extended to describe measurements of material systems [New J. Phys. 14, 085021 (2012)], to distinguish QND from similar non-classical measurements. We observe quantum state preparation (QSP) and information-damage trade-off (IDT) beyond their classical limits by seven and twelve standard deviations, respectively [Nat. Phot. 7, 517 (2013)].

  10. Pharmacophore modelling and atom-based 3D-QSAR studies on N-methyl pyrimidones as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Karnati Konda; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Dessalew, Nigus; Tripathi, Sunil Kumar; Selvaraj, Chandrabose

    2012-06-01

    Pharmacophore modelling and atom-based 3D-QSAR studies were carried out for a series of compounds belonging to N-methyl pyrimidones as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. Based on the ligand-based pharmacophore model, we got 5-point pharmacophore model AADDR, with two hydrogen bond acceptors (A), two hydrogen bond donors (D) and one aromatic ring (R). The generated pharmacophore-based alignment was used to derive a predictive atom-based 3D-QSAR model for the training set (r(2) = 0.92, SD = 0.16, F = 84.8, N = 40) and for test set (Q(2) = 0.71, RMSE = 0.06, Pearson R = 0.90, N = 10). From these results, AADDR pharmacophore feature was selected as best common pharmacophore hypothesis, and atom-based 3D-QSAR results also support the outcome by means of favourable and unfavourable regions of hydrophobic and electron-withdrawing groups for the most potent compound 30. These results can be useful for further design of new and potent HIV-1 IN inhibitors.

  11. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  12. KFC2: a knowledge-based hot spot prediction method based on interface solvation, atomic density, and plasticity features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Mitchell, Julie C

    2011-09-01

    Hot spots constitute a small fraction of protein-protein interface residues, yet they account for a large fraction of the binding affinity. Based on our previous method (KFC), we present two new methods (KFC2a and KFC2b) that outperform other methods at hot spot prediction. A number of improvements were made in developing these new methods. First, we created a training data set that contained a similar number of hot spot and non-hot spot residues. In addition, we generated 47 different features, and different numbers of features were used to train the models to avoid over-fitting. Finally, two feature combinations were selected: One (used in KFC2a) is composed of eight features that are mainly related to solvent accessible surface area and local plasticity; the other (KFC2b) is composed of seven features, only two of which are identical to those used in KFC2a. The two models were built using support vector machines (SVM). The two KFC2 models were then tested on a mixed independent test set, and compared with other methods such as Robetta, FOLDEF, HotPoint, MINERVA, and KFC. KFC2a showed the highest predictive accuracy for hot spot residues (True Positive Rate: TPR = 0.85); however, the false positive rate was somewhat higher than for other models. KFC2b showed the best predictive accuracy for hot spot residues (True Positive Rate: TPR = 0.62) among all methods other than KFC2a, and the False Positive Rate (FPR = 0.15) was comparable with other highly predictive methods. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Discrimination Between Cervical Cancer Cells and Normal Cervical Cells Based on Longitudinal Elasticity Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueqin; Zhong, Yunxin; Ye, Ting; Wang, Dajing; Mao, Bingwei

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of cells are considered promising biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancer. Recently, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation technology has been utilized for the examination of cell cortex mechanics in order to distinguish malignant cells from normal cells. However, few attempts to evaluate the biomechanical properties of cells have focused on the quantification of the non-homogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cellular structures. In the present study, we applied a variation of the method of Carl and Schillers to investigate the differences between longitudinal elasticity of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (CaSki) and normal cervical epithelial cells (CRL2614) using AFM. The results reveal a three-layer heterogeneous structure in the probing volume of both cell types studied. CaSki cells exhibited a lower whole-cell stiffness and a softer nuclei zone compared to the normal counterpart cells. Moreover, a better differentiated cytoskeleton was found in the inner cytoplasm/nuclei zone of the normal CRL2614 cells, whereas a deeper cytoskeletal distribution was observed in the probing volume of the cancerous counterparts. The sensitive cortical panel of CaSki cells, with a modulus of 0.35~0.47 kPa, was located at 237~225 nm; in normal cells, the elasticity was 1.20~1.32 kPa at 113~128 nm. The present improved method may be validated using the conventional Hertz-Sneddon method, which is widely reported in the literature. In conclusion, our results enable the quantification of the heterogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cancer cells, in particular the correlation with the corresponding depth. Preliminary results indicate that our method may potentially be applied to improve the detection of cancerous cells and provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease.

  14. Novel atomic force microscopy based biopanning for isolation of morphology specific reagents against TDP-43 variants in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephanie M; Venkataraman, Lalitha; Tian, Huilai; Khan, Galam; Harris, Brent T; Sierks, Michael R

    2015-02-12

    Because protein variants play critical roles in many diseases including TDP-43 in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), alpha-synuclein in Parkinson's disease and beta-amyloid and tau in Alzheimer's disease, it is critically important to develop morphology specific reagents that can selectively target these disease-specific protein variants to study the role of these variants in disease pathology and for potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. We have developed novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) based biopanning techniques that enable isolation of reagents that selectively recognize disease-specific protein variants. There are two key phases involved in the process, the negative and positive panning phases. During the negative panning phase, phages that are reactive to off-target antigens are eliminated through multiple rounds of subtractive panning utilizing a series of carefully selected off-target antigens. A key feature in the negative panning phase is utilizing AFM imaging to monitor the process and confirm that all undesired phage particles are removed. For the positive panning phase, the target antigen of interest is fixed on a mica surface and bound phages are eluted and screened to identify phages that selectively bind the target antigen. The target protein variant does not need to be purified providing the appropriate negative panning controls have been used. Even target protein variants that are only present at very low concentrations in complex biological material can be utilized in the positive panning step. Through application of this technology, we acquired antibodies to protein variants of TDP-43 that are selectively found in human ALS brain tissue. We expect that this protocol should be applicable to generating reagents that selectively bind protein variants present in a wide variety of different biological processes and diseases.

  15. IceBridge Geometrics 823A Cesium Magnetometer L1B Time-Tagged Magnetic Field, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Geometrics 823A Cesium Magnetometer L1B Time-Tagged Magnetic Field (IMGEO1B) data set contains magnetic field strength measurements taken over...

  16. Monitoring geomagnetic signals of groundwater movement using multiple underground SQUID magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater can influence the geomagnetic field measured underground in at least two key ways. The water levels in rock will determine its electrical conductivity, and thus change the magnitude of the telluric currents induced in the rock by changing magnetic fields generated in the ionosphere. This can be studied by using multiple magnetometers at different underground locations. Secondly the flow of water through rock will generate a small magnetic signal, of unknown magnitude, through the electrokinetic effect. SQUID magnetometry has the potential to allow passive studies of groundwater changes in complex systems such as karst. We have monitored geomagnetic signals using two SQUID magnetometers at the LSBB underground laboratory, and set an initial limit on the magnitude of the electrokinetic signal. We now plan to carry out a longer term measurement using three SQUID systems as well as fluxgate sensors to track changes in the gradient of the magnetic field across the underground complex.

  17. On-orbit real-time magnetometer bias determination for micro-satellites without attitude information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the disadvantages such as complex calculation, low accuracy of estimation, and being non real time in present methods, a new real-time algorithm is developed for on-orbit magnetometer bias determination of micro-satellites without attitude knowledge in this paper. This method uses the differential value approach. It avoids the impact of quartic nature and uses the iterative method to satisfy real-time applications. Simulation results indicate that the new real-time algorithm is more accurate compared with other methods, which are also tested by an experiment system using real noise data. With the new real-time algorithm, a magnetometer calibration can be taken on-orbit and will reduce the demand for computing power effectively.

  18. Micromechanical ``Trampoline'' Magnetometers for Use in Pulsed Magnetic Fields Exceeding 60 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakirev, F. F.; Boebinger, G. S.; Aksyuk, V.; Gammel, P. L.; Haddon, R. C.; Bishop, D. J.

    1998-03-01

    We present the design, construction, and operation of a novel magnetometer for use in intense pulsed magnetic fields. The magnetometer consists of a silicon micromachined "trampoline" to which the sample is attached. The small size of the device (typically 400 microns on a side) gives a fast mechanical response (10,000 to 50,000 Hz) and extremely high sensitivity (10-11 Am^2, corresponding to 10-13 Am^2/Hz^(1/2)). The device is robust against electrical and mechanical noise and requires no special vibration isolation from the pulsed magnet. As a demonstration, we present data taken in a 60 tesla pulsed magnetic field which show clear de Haas-van Alphen oscillations in a one microgram sample of the organic superconductor K-(BEDT-TTF)_2Cu(NCS)_2.

  19. Versatile, high sensitivity, and automatized angular dependent vectorial Kerr magnetometer for the analysis of nanostructured materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, J M; Lusche, R; Ventura, J; Fermento, R; Carpinteiro, F; Araujo, J P; Sousa, J B; Cardoso, S; Freitas, P P

    2011-04-01

    Magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) magnetometry is an indispensable, reliable, and one of the most widely used techniques for the characterization of nanostructured magnetic materials. Information, such as the magnitude of coercive fields or anisotropy strengths, can be readily obtained from MOKE measurements. We present a description of our state-of-the-art vectorial MOKE magnetometer, being an extremely versatile, accurate, and sensitivity unit with a low cost and comparatively simple setup. The unit includes focusing lenses and an automatized stepper motor stage for angular dependent measurements. The performance of the magnetometer is demonstrated by hysteresis loops of Co thin films displaying uniaxial anisotropy induced on growth, MnIr/CoFe structures exhibiting the so called exchange bias effect, spin valves, and microfabricated flux guides produced by optical lithography. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  20. A Magnetized Nanoparticle Based Solid-Phase Extraction Procedure Followed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry to Determine Arsenic, Lead and Cadmium in Water, Milk, Indian Rice and Red Tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Salameh; Es'haghi, Zarrin

    2017-06-01

    A sensitive and simple method using magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs-Fe 3 O 4 MNP), as the adsorbent, has been successfully developed for extraction and pre-concentration of arsenic, lead and cadmium with detection by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The nanosorbent was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The key factors affecting the signal intensity such as pH, adsorbent amount, etc. were investigated. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection (three-time of signal to noise ratio, S/N 3) were 0.3, 0.6, 0.3 ng/mL for arsenic, lead and cadmium, respectively. Application of the adsorbent was investigated by the analysis of water, milk, Indian rice and red tea. The experimental data was analyzed and obeyed Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. The kinetic data was fitted to the pseudo-second-order model. Thermodynamic studies revealed the feasibility and exothermic nature of the system.