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Sample records for atomic layer deposition

  1. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  2. Atomic layer deposition for semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2014-01-01

    This edited volume discusses atomic layer deposition (ALD) for all modern semiconductor devices, moving from the basic chemistry of ALD and modeling of ALD processes to sections on ALD for memories, logic devices, and machines.

  3. An Introduction to Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Vivek H.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition has been instrumental in providing a deposition method for multiple space flight applications. It is well known that ALD is a cost effective nanoadditive-manufacturing technique that allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign temperature and pressure environment. Through the introduction of paired precursor gases, thin films can be deposited on a myriad of substrates from flat surfaces to those with significant topography. By providing atomic layer control, where single layers of atoms can be deposited, the fabrication of metal transparent films, precise nano-laminates, and coatings of nano-channels, pores and particles is achievable. The feasibility of this technology for NASA line of business applications range from thermal systems, optics, sensors, to environmental protection. An overview of this technology will be presented.

  4. Perovskite Thin Films via Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Sutherland, Brandon R.

    2014-10-30

    © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. (Graph Presented) A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm-1.

  5. Atomic layer deposition of nanostructured materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pinna, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition, formerly called atomic layer epitaxy, was developed in the 1970s to meet the needs of producing high-quality, large-area fl at displays with perfect structure and process controllability. Nowadays, creating nanomaterials and producing nanostructures with structural perfection is an important goal for many applications in nanotechnology. As ALD is one of the important techniques which offers good control over the surface structures created, it is more and more in the focus of scientists. The book is structured in such a way to fi t both the need of the expert reader (du

  6. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, R. J.; Adiga, S. P.; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, L. A.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N. A.; Brigmon, R. L.; Elam, J. W.; Univ. of North Carolina; North Carolina State Univ.; Eastman Kodak Co.; North Dakota State Univ.; SRL

    2010-03-01

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials. Nanoporous alumina, also known as anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), is a nanomaterial that exhibits several unusual properties, including high pore densities, straight pores, small pore sizes, and uniform pore sizes. In 1953, Keller et al. showed that anodizing aluminum in acid electrolytes results in a thick layer of nearly cylindrical pores, which are arranged in a close-packed hexagonal cell structure. More recently, Matsuda & Fukuda demonstrated preparation of highly ordered platinum and gold nanohole arrays using a replication process. In this study, a negative structure of nanoporous alumina was initially fabricated and a positive structure of a nanoporous metal was subsequently fabricated. Over the past fifteen years, nanoporous alumina membranes have been used as templates for growth of a variety of nanostructured materials, including nanotubes, nanowires, nanorods, and nanoporous membranes.

  7. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  8. Crystalline thin films: The electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) view

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical atomic layer deposition technique is selected as one of the methods to prepare thin films for various applications, including electrocatalytic materials and compound....

  9. USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

    2010-02-08

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  10. Ultrathin-layer chromatography nanostructures modified by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, S R; Foroughi-Abari, A; Krause, K M; Li, P; Kupsta, M; Taschuk, M T; Cadien, K C; Brett, M J

    2013-07-19

    Stationary phase morphology and surface chemistry dictate the properties of ultrathin-layer chromatography (UTLC) media and interactions with analytes in sample mixtures. In this paper, we combined two powerful thin film deposition techniques to create composite chromatography nanomaterials. Glancing angle deposition (GLAD) produces high surface area columnar microstructures with aligned macropores well-suited for UTLC. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables precise fabrication of conformal, nanometer-scale coatings that can tune surfaces of these UTLC films. We coated ∼5μm thick GLAD SiO2 UTLC media with effects of ALD coatings on GLAD UTLC media were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), gas adsorption porosimetry, and lipophilic dye separations. The results collectively show that the most significant changes occur over the first few nanometers of ALD coating. They further demonstrate independent control of film microstructure and surface characteristics. ALD coatings can enhance complex GLAD microstructures to engineer new composite nanomaterials potentially useful in analytical chromatography. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Simulation of atomic layer deposition on nanoparticle agglomerates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, W.; van Ommen, J.R.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Coated nanoparticles have many potential applications; production of large quantities is feasible by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on nanoparticles in a fluidized bed reactor. However, due to the cohesive interparticle forces, nanoparticles form large agglomerates, which influences the coating

  12. Spatial atomic layer deposition of zinc oxide thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.W.G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc oxide thin films have been deposited at high growth rates (up to ~1 nm/s) by spatial atomic layer deposition technique at atmospheric pressure. Water has been used as oxidant for diethylzinc (DEZ) at deposition temperatures between 75 and 250 °C. The electrical, structural (crystallinity and

  13. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas-solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin - even non-uniform - atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid.

  14. A Review of Atomic Layer Deposition for Nanoscale Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Riyanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atomic layer deposition (ALD is a thin film growth technique that utilizes alternating, self-saturation chemical reactions between gaseous precursors to achieve a deposited nanoscale layers. It has recently become a subject of great interest for ultrathin film deposition in many various applications such as microelectronics, photovoltaic, dynamic random access memory (DRAM, and microelectromechanic system (MEMS. By using ALD, the conformability and extreme uniformity of layers can be achieved in low temperature process. It facilitates to be deposited onto the surface in many variety substrates that have low melting temperature. Eventually it has advantages on the contribution to the wider nanodevices.

  15. Spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition of alxzn1-xo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Scherpenborg, R.; Wu, Y.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of growing multicomponent oxides by spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition has been investigated. To this end, Al xZn1-xO films have been deposited using diethyl zinc (DEZ), trimethyl aluminum (TMA), and water as Zn, Al, and O precursors, respectively. When the metal precursors

  16. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko, E-mail: leena-sisko.johansson@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, PO Box 16100, FI‐00076 AALTO (Finland); Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland)

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  17. Spatial Atomic Layer Deposition of transparent conductive oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Scherpenborg, R.; Poodt, P.; Roozeboom, F.

    2013-01-01

    Undoped and indium doped ZnO films have been grown by Spatial Atomic Layer Deposition at atmospheric pressure. The electrical properties of ZnO films are controlled by varying the indium content in the range from 0 to 15 %. A minimum resistivity value of 3 mΩ•cm is measured in 180 nm thick films for

  18. Silicon protected with atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Tilley, David S.; Pedersen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The semiconducting materials used for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting must withstand the corrosive nature of the aqueous electrolyte over long time scales in order to be a viable option for large scale solar energy conversion. Here we demonstrate that atomic layer deposited titanium...

  19. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-06

    Mar 6, 2014 ... Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited aluminium oxide nanolayers and dependence of GPC on surface OH concentration. ANU PHILIP, SUBIN THOMAS and K RAJEEV KUMAR*. Department of Instrumentation, Cochin University of Science and Technology,. Cochin 682 022, India.

  20. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 82; Issue 3. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited aluminium oxide nanolayers and dependence of GPC on surface OH concentration. Anu Philip Subin Thomas K Rajeev Kumar. Research Articles Volume 82 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 563-569 ...

  1. Atomic layer deposition for nanostructured Li-ion batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoops, H. C. M.; Donders, M. E.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Notten, P. H. L.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructuring is targeted as a solution to achieve the improvements required for implementing Li-ion batteries in a wide range of applications. These applications range in size from electrical vehicles down to microsystems. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) could be an enabling technology for

  2. Method and system for continuous atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Libera, Joseph A.

    2017-03-21

    A system and method for continuous atomic layer deposition. The system and method includes a housing, a moving bed which passes through the housing, a plurality of precursor gases and associated input ports and the amount of precursor gases, position of the input ports, and relative velocity of the moving bed and carrier gases enabling exhaustion of the precursor gases at available reaction sites.

  3. Passivation effects of atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotipalli R.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atomic-layer-deposited (ALD aluminum oxide (Al2O3 has recently demonstrated an excellent surface passivation for both n- and p-type c-Si solar cells thanks to the presence of high negative fixed charges (Qf ~ 1012−1013 cm-2 in combination with a low density of interface states (Dit. This paper investigates the passivation quality of thin (15 nm Al2O3 films deposited by two different techniques: plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD and Thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD. Other dielectric materials taken into account for comparison include: thermally-grown silicon dioxide (SiO2 (20 nm, SiO2 (20 nm deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD and hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H (20 nm also deposited by PECVD. With the above-mentioned dielectric layers, Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS capacitors were fabricated for Qf and Dit extraction through Capacitance-Voltage-Conductance (C-V-G measurements. In addition, lifetime measurements were carried out to evaluate the effective surface recombination velocity (SRV. The influence of extracted C-V-G parameters (Qf,Dit on the injection dependent lifetime measurements τ(Δn, and the dominant passivation mechanism involved have been discussed. Furthermore we have also studied the influence of the SiO2 interfacial layer thickness between the Al2O3 and silicon surface on the field-effect passivation mechanism. It is shown that the field effect passivation in accumulation mode is more predominant when compared to surface defect passivation.

  4. Enhanced Photocathodes for Astrophysics using Atomic Layer Deposition Techniques Deposition Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Oswald

    The objective of this program is to exploit the recent availability of atomic layer deposition techniques to provide a new generation of high performance photocathodes. We intend to work on the enhancement of photocathodes by atomic layer deposition, and on atomic layer deposited substrate structures, and assess their performance (gain, lifetime, stability, image fidelity) in microchannel plate based detectors. This would enable detection efficiency and bandpass improvements for microchannel plate based spaceflight detectors for imaging and spectroscopic instruments in small and large formats. Applications include the detection of soft X-ray, and UV through NUV. Recent work has achieved considerable success in development of borosilicate substrate microchannel plates functionalized by atomic layer deposited resistive and photoemissive materials. These could provide stable, compatible, substrates for high efficiency photocathodes, although very limited work has been done to date on this aspect. This development addresses detector technologies for SALSO, and impending proposals for a number of other NASA sub-orbital and satellite instruments. Results with borosilicate substrate microchannel plates functionalized by atomic layer deposited surface layers has been impressive, providing economical devices with long term stable gain and low background in formats up to 20 cm. Atomic layer deposition provides a surface layer that is smooth, clean, and chemically compatible with photocathode materials, and withstands high temperatures. The substrates can also be made with larger open area ratios, and the atomic layer deposition nanofabrication processes provides high secondary emission coefficients that will enhance photocathode efficiencies. Photocathodes (GaN, etc) deposited by MOCVD or MBE processes may also be deposited using atomic layer deposition, with potential advantages in layer structuring and selective area coverage and penetration over large areas.

  5. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of silicon nitride using neopentasilane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.Weeks@intermolecular.com; Nowling, Greg; Fuchigami, Nobi; Bowes, Michael; Littau, Karl [Intermolecular, 3011 North 1st Street, San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Progress in transistor scaling has increased the demands on the material properties of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) thin films used in device fabrication and at the same time placed stringent restrictions on the deposition conditions employed. Recently, low temperature plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition has emerged as a viable technique for depositing these films with a thermal budget compatible with semiconductor processing at sub-32 nm technology nodes. For these depositions, it is desirable to use precursors that are free from carbon and halogens that can incorporate into the film. Beyond this, it is necessary to develop processing schemes that minimize the wet etch rate of the film as it will be subjected to wet chemical processing in subsequent fabrication steps. In this work, the authors introduce low temperature deposition of SiN{sub x} using neopentasilane [NPS, (SiH{sub 3}){sub 4}Si] in a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process with a direct N{sub 2} plasma. The growth with NPS is compared to a more common precursor, trisilylamine [TSA, (SiH{sub 3}){sub 3 }N] at identical process conditions. The wet etch rates of the films deposited with NPS are characterized at different plasma conditions and the impact of ion energy is discussed.

  6. Graphene oxide monolayers as atomically thin seeding layers for atomic layer deposition of metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourbakhsh, Amirhasan; Adelmann, Christoph; Song, Yi; Lee, Chang Seung; Asselberghs, Inge; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Brizzi, Simone; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeisser, Dieter; Van Elshocht, Sven; Heyns, Marc; Kong, Jing; Palacios, Tomás; De Gendt, Stefan

    2015-06-28

    Graphene oxide (GO) was explored as an atomically-thin transferable seed layer for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of dielectric materials on any substrate of choice. This approach does not require specific chemical groups on the target surface to initiate ALD. This establishes GO as a unique interface which enables the growth of dielectric materials on a wide range of substrate materials and opens up numerous prospects for applications. In this work, a mild oxygen plasma treatment was used to oxidize graphene monolayers with well-controlled and tunable density of epoxide functional groups. This was confirmed by synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, density functional theory calculations were carried out on representative epoxidized graphene monolayer models to correlate the capacitive properties of GO with its electronic structure. Capacitance-voltage measurements showed that the capacitive behavior of Al2O3/GO depends on the oxidation level of GO. Finally, GO was successfully used as an ALD seed layer for the deposition of Al2O3 on chemically inert single layer graphene, resulting in high performance top-gated field-effect transistors.

  7. Atomic layer deposition of alternative glass microchannel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Mahony, Aileen, E-mail: aom@incomusa.com; Craven, Christopher A.; Minot, Michael J.; Popecki, Mark A.; Renaud, Joseph M.; Bennis, Daniel C.; Bond, Justin L.; Stochaj, Michael E.; Foley, Michael R.; Adams, Bernhard W. [Incom, Inc., 294 Southbridge Road, Charlton, Massachusetts 01507 (United States); Mane, Anil U.; Elam, Jeffrey W. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Ertley, Camden; Siegmund, Oswald H. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) has enabled the development of alternative glass microchannel plates (MCPs) with independently tunable resistive and emissive layers, resulting in excellent thickness uniformity across the large area (20 × 20 cm), high aspect ratio (60:1 L/d) glass substrates. Furthermore, the use of ALD to deposit functional layers allows the optimal substrate material to be selected, such as borosilicate glass, which has many benefits compared to the lead-oxide glass used in conventional MCPs, including increased stability and lifetime, low background noise, mechanical robustness, and larger area (at present up to 400 cm{sup 2}). Resistively stable, high gain MCPs are demonstrated due to the deposition of uniform ALD resistive and emissive layers on alternative glass microcapillary substrates. The MCP performance characteristics reported include increased stability and lifetime, low background noise (0.04 events cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}), and low gain variation (±5%)

  8. Titanium dioxide thin films by atomic layer deposition: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemelä, Janne-Petteri; Marin, Giovanni; Karppinen, Maarit

    2017-09-01

    Within its rich phase diagram titanium dioxide is a truly multifunctional material with a property palette that has been shown to span from dielectric to transparent-conducting characteristics, in addition to the well-known catalytic properties. At the same time down-scaling of microelectronic devices has led to an explosive growth in research on atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a wide variety of frontier thin-film materials, among which TiO2 is one of the most popular ones. In this topical review we summarize the advances in research of ALD of titanium dioxide starting from the chemistries of the over 50 different deposition routes developed for TiO2 and the resultant structural characteristics of the films. We then continue with the doped ALD-TiO2 thin films from the perspective of dielectric, transparent-conductor and photocatalytic applications. Moreover, in order to cover the latest trends in the research field, both the variously constructed TiO2 nanostructures enabled by ALD and the Ti-based hybrid inorganic-organic films grown by the emerging ALD/MLD (combined atomic/molecular layer deposition) technique are discussed.

  9. Characteristics of layered tin disulfide deposited by atomic layer deposition with H2S annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungjin Lee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tin disulfide (SnS2 has attracted much attention as a two-dimensional (2D material. A high-quality, low-temperature process for producing 2D materials is required for future electronic devices. Here, we investigate tin disulfide (SnS2 layers deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD using tetrakis(dimethylaminotin (TDMASn as a Sn precursor and H2S gas as a sulfur source at low temperature (150° C. The crystallinity of SnS2 was improved by H2S gas annealing. We carried out H2S gas annealing at various conditions (250° C, 300° C, 350° C, and using a three-step method. Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS results revealed the valence state corresponding to Sn4+ and S2- in the SnS2 annealed with H2S gas. The SnS2 annealed with H2S gas had a hexagonal structure, as measured via X-ray diffraction (XRD and the clearly out-of-plane (A1g mode in Raman spectroscopy. The crystallinity of SnS2 was improved after H2S annealing and was confirmed using the XRD full-width at half-maximum (FWHM. In addition, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM images indicated a clear layered structure.

  10. Recent progress of atomic layer deposition on polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong Chen; Ye, Enyi; Li, Zibiao; Han, Ming-Yong; Loh, Xian Jun

    2017-01-01

    As a very promising surface coating technology, atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to modify the surfaces of polymeric materials for improving their functions and expanding their application areas. Polymeric materials vary in surface functional groups (number and type), surface morphology and internal structure, and thus ALD deposition conditions that typically work on a normal solid surface, usually do not work on a polymeric material surface. To date, a large variety of research has been carried out to investigate ALD deposition on various polymeric materials. This paper aims to provide an in-depth review of ALD deposition on polymeric materials and its applications. Through this review, we will provide a better understanding of surface chemistry and reaction mechanism for controlled surface modification of polymeric materials by ALD. The integrated knowledge can aid in devising an improved way in the reaction between reactant precursors and polymer functional groups/polymer backbones, which will in turn open new opportunities in processing ALD materials for better inorganic/organic film integration and potential applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis of platinum nanoparticle electrocatalysts by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubers, Alia Marie

    Demand for energy continues to increase, and without alternatives to fossil fuel combustion the effects on our environment will become increasingly severe. Fuel cells offer a promising improvement on current methods of energy generation; they are able to convert hydrogen fuel into electricity with a theoretical efficiency of up to 83% and interface smoothly with renewable hydrogen production. Fuel cells can replace internal combustion engines in vehicles and are used in stationary applications to power homes and businesses. The efficiency of a fuel cell is maximized by its catalyst, which is often composed of platinum nanoparticles supported on carbon. Economical production of fuel cell catalysts will promote adoption of this technology. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a possible method for producing catalysts at a large scale when employed in a fluidized bed. ALD relies on sequential dosing of gas-phase precursors to grow a material layer by layer. We have synthesized platinum nanoparticles on a carbon particle support (Pt/C) by ALD for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and electrochemical hydrogen pumps. Platinum nanoparticles with different characteristics were deposited by changing two chemistries: the carbon substrate through functionalization; and the deposition process by use of either oxygen or hydrogen as ligand removing reactants. The metal depositing reactant was trimethyl(methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum(IV). Functionalizing the carbon substrate increased nucleation during deposition resulting in smaller and more dispersed nanoparticles. Use of hydrogen produced smaller nanoparticles than oxygen, due to a gentler hydrogenation reaction compared to using oxygen's destructive combustion reaction. Synthesized Pt/C materials were used as catalysts in an electrochemical hydrogen pump, a device used to separate hydrogen fuel from contaminants. Catalysts deposited by ALD on functionalized carbon using a hydrogen chemistry were the most

  12. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Dippo, Patricia; Contreras, Miguel A.; Levi, Dean H.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2015-07-01

    Partial CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnOx buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II-VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide.

  13. Engineering Particle Surface Chemistry and Electrochemistry with Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David Hyman Kentaro

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase thin film coating technique that relies on sequential pulsing of precursors that undergo self-limited surface reactions. The self- limiting reactions and gas phase diffusion of the precursors together enable the conformal coating of microstructured particles with a high degree of thickness and compositional control. ALD may be used to deposit thin films that introduce new functionalities to a particle surface. Examples of new functionalities include: chemical reactivity, a mechanically strong protective coating, and an electrically resistive layer. The coatings properties are often dependent on the bulk properties and microstructure of the particle substrate, though they usually do not affect its bulk properties or microstructure. Particle ALD finds utility in the ability to synthesize well controlled, model systems, though it is expensive due to the need for costly metal precursors that are dangerous and require special handling. Enhanced properties due to ALD coating of particles in various applications are frequently described empirically, while the details of their enhancement mechanisms often remain the focus of ongoing research in the field. This study covers the various types of particle ALD and attempts to describe them from the unifying perspective of surface science.

  14. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana, E-mail: a.zuzuarregui@nanogune.eu; Gregorczyk, Keith E. [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Coto, Borja; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier [IK4-Tekniker, Iñaki Goenaga 5, 20600 Eibar (Spain); Rodríguez, Jorge [Torresol Energy (SENER Group), Avda. de Zugazarte 61, 48930 Las Arenas (Spain); Knez, Mato [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); IKERBASQUE Basque Foundation for Science, Maria Diaz de Haro 3, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-08-10

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  15. Oxygen-free atomic layer deposition of indium sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Alex B.; Hock, Adam S.; McCarthy, Robert; Weimer, Matthew S.

    2016-07-05

    A method for synthesizing an In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor including cooling a mixture comprised of diisopropylcarbodiimide and diethyl ether to approximately -30.degree. C., adding methyllithium drop-wise into the mixture, allowing the mixture to warm to room temperature, adding indium(III) chloride as a solid to the mixture to produce a white solid, dissolving the white solid in pentane to form a clear and colorless solution, filtering the mixture over a celite plug, and evaporating the solution under reduced pressure to obtain a solid In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor. This precursor has been further used to develop a novel atomic layer deposition technique for indium sulfide by dosing a reactor with the precursor, purging with nitrogen, dosing with dilute hydrogen sulfide, purging again with nitrogen, and repeating these steps to increase growth.

  16. Chemical Vapor Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition of Coatings for Mechanical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, G. L.; Mensah, B. A.; Mohseni, H.; Scharf, T. W.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of films and coatings involves the chemical reaction of gases on or near a substrate surface. This deposition method can produce coatings with tightly controlled dimensions and novel structures. Furthermore, the non-line-of-sight-deposition capability of CVD facilitates the coating of complex-shaped mechanical components. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is also a chemical gas phase thin film deposition technique, but unlike CVD, it utilizes “self-limiting” surface adsorption reactions (chemisorption) to control the thickness of deposited films. This article provides an overview of CVD and ALD, discusses some of their fundamental and practical aspects, and examines their advantages and limitations versus other vapor processing techniques such as physical vapor deposition in regard to coatings for mechanical applications. Finally, site-specific cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy inside the wear track of an ALD ZnO/ZrO2 8 bilayers nanolaminate coating determined the mechanisms that control the friction and wear.

  17. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon [School Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungjun, E-mail: hyungjun@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Han-Bo-Ram, E-mail: hbrlee@inu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Incheon National University, 406-840 Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Fundamental research plasma process for thin film deposition is presented. • VHF plasma source for PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was employed to reduce plasma damage. • The use of VHF plasma improved all of the film qualities and growth characteristics. - Abstract: Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  18. Atomic Layer Deposition for the Modification and Creation of Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Erinn Christine

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a vapor-phase technique for the conformal deposition of material with sub-nanometer precision, making it an ideal process for modifying and even creating nanomaterials. The focus of this dissertation is the study of how ALD precursors interact with organic materials, namely polymers, to create selectively deposited nano-scale patterns and how ALD coatings modify biological responses to nanomaterials, namely carbon nanotubes (CNT), after inhalation. Nanoscale patterning is vital to the semiconductor industry. With features becoming smaller and more complex with each passing year, new techniques are required to meet the needs of the industry. The ability to selectively pattern a material onto a wafer is of particular interest for the replacement of costly etching steps. In the first half of this dissertation, a method for the selective deposition of nano-scale patterns is presented. Patterned polymers were used as sacrificial sponges to soak up ALD precursors for the creation of metal-oxide features. Meanwhile, deposition in areas without polymer was limited to the monolayer regime. Following infiltration, the saturated polymer was burned away and the precursor oxidized to form a metal oxide reproduction of the polymer pattern. Determining the reaction between the ALD precursor, trimethylaluminum, and polymer, poly(methyl methacrylate), helped to achieve patterning by informing the proper selection of reactor temperature as well as exposure and purge times. Using this technique, features from tens of nanometers to tens of microns were patterned uniformly and simultaneously across a 150 mm wafer. Finally, this technique was extended to pattern two different materials using only one patterned polymer layer. ALD was first used to deposit a metal oxide were there was no polymer. By selecting ALD precursors that do not react within or on top of the polymer, selective deposition of the first material was achieved. Following this, the

  19. Atomic layer deposition of scandium-based oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyns, Laura; Lisoni, Judit G.; Bosch, Geert van den; Elshocht, Sven van; Houdt, Jan van [IMEC, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-02-15

    Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} and Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} have been investigated as potential high-k intergate dielectric (IGD) in planar NAND flash technology, such as hybrid floating gate (HFG). We have examined the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3}, and Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} on Si using Sc(MeCp){sub 3}, Gd({sup i}PrCp){sub 3}, TMA, and H{sub 2}O as precursors. The composition of Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} and Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} ranged from 4% to 76% Gd and from 7% to 66% Al, respectively. All compositions show linear growth behavior. While pure Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} is crystalline as-deposited, the layer becomes amorphous once ∝20% of Al is added. The (222) reflection of the cubic phase is also seen for Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} with less than 9% Gd. The bandgap of as-deposited Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} decreases with increasing Gd content while the opposite trend is observed for Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3}. A k-value of ∝21 can be obtained for Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} with approximately 26-52% Gd, irrespective of the Gd content. For Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} on the other hand, a maximum k-value of ∝19 is achieved with ∝48% Al. Although the k-value of Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} is lower than that of Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3}, its large breakdown field makes this material more suitable for HFG flash applications. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Applications of atomic layer deposition in nanoelectronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Damon Brooks

    2007-12-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a promising deposition technique for nanoelectronic applications. Reasons for this include low temperature processing, self-limiting growth, and sub-nanometer thickness precision. ALD can be used as a complementary technique to coat preexisting nanostructures, or as a technique to directly fabricate nanostructures. In this dissertation, applications of ALD in two nanoelectronic systems are investigated: carbon nanotubes and nanocrystals. Conformal ALD on as-grown suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is not possible due to the inertness of ALD precursor molecules to the SWNT surface. A covalent functionalization technique is presented that makes SWNTs reactive with ALD precursor molecules. Precursor reactivity with the functionalized nanotubes is shown to be due to -NO2 functional groups attached to the nanotube sidewalls. The effect of this functionalization technique on nanotube conductance is shown to be reversible, and doping caused by the deposited oxides is discussed. To improve upon the covalent functionalization method, alternating exposures of nitrogen dioxide gas and trimethylaluminum vapor are shown to functionalize the surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotubes with a self-limited functional layer. These functionalized nanotubes are shown to be susceptible to ALD of continuous, radially isotropic material. This allows for the creation of coaxial nanotube structures of multiple materials with precisely controlled diameters. This functionalization technique involves only weak physical bonding, avoiding covalent modification, which should preserve the unique optical, electrical, and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. As a fabrication technique, ALD is used to fabricate arrays of Ru nanocrystals 1--4 nm in diameter. The nanocrystal density is found to depend sensitively on the nucleating surface. A maximum density of 7 x 1012 cm -2--8 x 1012 cm-2 is achieved on Al2O3. Incorporation of these nanocrystals in

  1. Atomic Layer Deposition to Enable the Production, Optimization and Protection of Spaceflight Hardware Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique that allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign...

  2. Enhanced adhesion of atomic layer deposited titania on polycarbonate substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latella, B.A. [Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia)]. E-mail: bal@ansto.gov.au; Triani, G. [Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia); Zhang, Z. [Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia); Short, K.T. [Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia); Bartlett, J.R. [Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia); Ignat, M. [Laboratoire de Thermodynamique et de Physico-Chimie Metallurgique, associe au CNRS, E.N.S.E.E.G., BP 75, F-38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2007-01-22

    Interfacial adhesion of atomic layer deposited titania films on polycarbonate substrates with and without a water-plasma treatment has been studied using in situ observation during microtensile testing. Specific attention is paid to multiple tension-generated transverse cracks in the titania films when subjected to externally applied uniaxial tensile stresses. The strength, fracture toughness and interfacial adhesion of the titania film on polycarbonate were deduced from theoretical models based on experimentally determined parameters. The tensile tests were conducted in a micromechanical tester positioned under an optical microscope allowing in situ viewing of cracking damage. The strain to initiate first cracking and the crack density as a function of strain were obtained. The in situ observations indicated different interfacial behaviour between water-plasma-treated and non-treated samples. It is shown that the water plasma treatment drastically improves the adhesion of the titania film to polycarbonate. Calculations show that the fracture energy required for film debonding in the plasma-treated polycarbonate is 5.9 J/m{sup 2} compared to 2.5 J/m{sup 2} for the untreated sample. A simple chemical structure model was used to explain the observed differences.

  3. Surface modification of acetaminophen particles by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kääriäinen, Tommi O; Kemell, Marianna; Vehkamäki, Marko; Kääriäinen, Marja-Leena; Correia, Alexandra; Santos, Hélder A; Bimbo, Luis M; Hirvonen, Jouni; Hoppu, Pekka; George, Steven M; Cameron, David C; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2017-06-15

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) are predominantly organic solid powders. Due to their bulk properties many APIs require processing to improve pharmaceutical formulation and manufacturing in the preparation for various drug dosage forms. Improved powder flow and protection of the APIs are often anticipated characteristics in pharmaceutical manufacturing. In this work, we have modified acetaminophen particles with atomic layer deposition (ALD) by conformal nanometer scale coatings in a one-step coating process. According to the results, ALD, utilizing common chemistries for Al 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and ZnO, is shown to be a promising coating method for solid pharmaceutical powders. Acetaminophen does not undergo degradation during the ALD coating process and maintains its stable polymorphic structure. Acetaminophen with nanometer scale ALD coatings shows slowed drug release. ALD TiO 2 coated acetaminophen particles show cytocompatibility whereas those coated with thicker ZnO coatings exhibit the most cytotoxicity among the ALD materials under study when assessed in vitro by their effect on intestinal Caco-2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. High Gradient Accelerator Cavities Using Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ives, Robert Lawrence [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Parsons, Gregory [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Williams, Philip [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Oldham, Christopher [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Mundy, Zach [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Dolgashev, Valery [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-12-09

    In the Phase I program, Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR), in collaboration with North Carolina State University (NCSU), fabricated copper accelerator cavities and used Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to apply thin metal coatings of tungsten and platinum. It was hypothesized that a tungsten coating would provide a robust surface more resistant to arcing and arc damage. The platinum coating was predicted to reduce processing time by inhibiting oxides that form on copper surfaces soon after machining. Two sets of cavity parts were fabricated. One was coated with 35 nm of tungsten, and the other with approximately 10 nm of platinum. Only the platinum cavity parts could be high power tested during the Phase I program due to schedule and funding constraints. The platinum coated cavity exhibit poor performance when compared with pure copper cavities. Not only did arcing occur at lower power levels, but the processing time was actually longer. There were several issues that contributed to the poor performance. First, machining of the base copper cavity parts failed to achieve the quality and cleanliness standards specified to SLAC National Accelerator Center. Secondly, the ALD facilities were not configured to provide the high levels of cleanliness required. Finally, the nanometer coating applied was likely far too thin to provide the performance required. The coating was ablated or peeled from the surface in regions of high fields. It was concluded that the current ALD process could not provide improved performance over cavities produced at national laboratories using dedicated facilities.

  5. Selective deposition contact patterning using atomic layer deposition for the fabrication of crystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Joon [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Woong-Chul [NCD Co. Ltd., Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-509 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyo Sik, E-mail: hschang@cnu.ac.kr [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    Selective deposition contact (SDC) patterning was applied to fabricate the rear side passivation of crystalline silicon (Si) solar cells. By this method, using screen printing for contact patterning and atomic layer deposition for the passivation of Si solar cells with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, we produced local contacts without photolithography or any laser-based processes. Passivated emitter and rear-contact solar cells passivated with ozone-based Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed, for the SDC process, an up-to-0.7% absolute conversion-efficiency improvement. The results of this experiment indicate that the proposed method is feasible for conversion-efficiency improvement of industrial crystalline Si solar cells. - Highlights: • We propose a local contact formation process. • Local contact forms a screen print and an atomic layer deposited-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film. • Ozone-based Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film was selectively deposited onto patterned silicon. • Selective deposition contact patterning method can increase cell-efficiency by 0.7%.

  6. Characterization and modeling of atomic layer deposited high-density trench capacitors in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matters-Kammerer, M.K.; Jinesh, K.B.; Rijks, T.G.S.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Klootwijk, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed electrical analysis of multiple layer trench capacitors fabricated in silicon with atomic-layer-deposited Al 2O 3 and TiN is presented. It is shown that in situ ozone annealing of the Al 2O 3 layers prior to the TiN electrode deposition significantly improves the electric properties of

  7. Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Alumina Films Created Using the Atomic Layer Deposition Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    develop in chemical vapor deposited ( CVD ) films within the first 10–30nm of material, owing to the process of island formation and coalescence [44–46...George, ZnO /Al2O3 nanolaminates fabricated by atomic layer deposition: growth and surface roughness measurements, Thin Solid Films 414 (2002) 43–55. [81...homepage: www.e lsev ier .com/ locate /sna Thermo-mechanical properties of alumina films created using the atomic layer deposition technique David C

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes and their Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly Lynn

    Global issues related to energy and the environment have motivated development of advanced material solutions outside of traditional metals ceramics, and polymers. Taking inspiration from composites, where the combination of two or more materials often yields superior properties, the field of organic-inorganic hybrids has recently emerged. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-inorganic hybrids have drawn widespread and increasing interest in recent years due to their multifunctionality and potential impact across several technologically important application areas. Before the impacts of CNT-inorganic hybrids can be realized however, processing techniques must be developed for their scalable production. Optimization in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods for synthesis of CNTs and vertically aligned CNT arrays has created production routes both high throughput and economically feasible. Additionally, control of CVD parameters has allowed for growth of CNT arrays that are able to be drawn into aligned sheets and further processed to form a variety of aligned 1, 2, and 3-dimensional bulk assemblies including ribbons, yarns, and foams. To date, there have only been a few studies on utilizing these bulk assemblies for the production of CNT-inorganic hybrids. Wet chemical methods traditionally used for fabricating CNT-inorganic hybrids are largely incompatible with CNT assemblies, since wetting and drying the delicate structures with solvents can destroy their structure. It is therefore necessary to investigate alternative processing strategies in order to advance the field of CNT-inorganic hybrids. In this dissertation, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is evaluated as a synthetic route for the production of large-scale CNT-metal oxide hybrids as well as pure metal oxide architectures utilizing CNT arrays, ribbons, and ultralow density foams as deposition templates. Nucleation and growth behavior of alumina was evaluated as a function of CNT surface chemistry. While highly graphitic

  9. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnOx-CVD layers.

  10. Atomic layer deposited oxide films as protective interface layers for integrated graphene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero-Vilatela, A.; Alexander-Webber, J. A.; Sagade, A. A.; Aria, A. I.; Braeuninger-Weimer, P.; Martin, M.-B.; Weatherup, R. S.; Hofmann, S.

    2017-12-01

    The transfer of chemical vapour deposited graphene from its parent growth catalyst has become a bottleneck for many of its emerging applications. The sacrificial polymer layers that are typically deposited onto graphene for mechanical support during transfer are challenging to remove completely and hence leave graphene and subsequent device interfaces contaminated. Here, we report on the use of atomic layer deposited (ALD) oxide films as protective interface and support layers during graphene transfer. The method avoids any direct contact of the graphene with polymers and through the use of thicker ALD layers (≥100 nm), polymers can be eliminated from the transfer-process altogether. The ALD film can be kept as a functional device layer, facilitating integrated device manufacturing. We demonstrate back-gated field effect devices based on single-layer graphene transferred with a protective Al2O3 film onto SiO2 that show significantly reduced charge trap and residual carrier densities. We critically discuss the advantages and challenges of processing graphene/ALD bilayer structures.

  11. Atomic layer deposition of copper thin film and feasibility of deposition on inner walls of waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuqing, XIONG; Hengjiao, GAO; Ni, REN; Zhongwei, LIU

    2018-03-01

    Copper thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition at low temperature, using copper(I)-N,N‧-di-sec-butylacetamidinate as a precursor and hydrogen as a reductive gas. The influence of temperature, plasma power, mode of plasma, and pulse time, on the deposition rate of copper thin film, the purity of the film and the step coverage were studied. The feasibility of copper film deposition on the inner wall of a carbon fibre reinforced plastic waveguide with high aspect ratio was also studied. The morphology and composition of the thin film were studied by atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The square resistance of the thin film was also tested by a four-probe technique. On the basis of on-line diagnosis, a growth mechanism of copper thin film was put forward, and it was considered that surface functional group played an important role in the process of nucleation and in determining the properties of thin films. A high density of plasma and high free-radical content were helpful for the deposition of copper thin films.

  12. Comparative study of thermal and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, I.; Miakonkikh, A.; Kononenko, O.; Matveev, V.; Rudenko, K.

    2017-11-01

    Atomic layer deposition of alumina on graphene was studied in thermal and plasma enhanced process. Deposition was controlled by in situ ellipsometry every half cycle, which allows measuring of Al2O3 thickness and graphene equivalent thickness during the process. Properties of graphene were measured by Raman spectroscopy prior and after deposition of dielectric layer. It was shown that plasma enhanced deposition leads to decrease of effective graphene thickness, while thermal deposition does not affect graphene layer. No substantial nucleation lag was observed in both types of deposition.

  13. Effect of intermediate layers on atomic layer deposition-aluminum oxide protected silver mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryauf, David M.; Diaz Leon, Juan J.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2017-07-01

    This work investigates intermediate materials deposited between silver (Ag) thin-film mirrors and an aluminum oxide (AlOx) barrier overlayer and compares the effects on mirror durability to environmental stresses. Physical vapor deposition of various fluorides, oxides, and nitrides in combination with AlOx by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is used to develop several coating recipes. Ag-AlOx samples with different intermediate materials undergo aggressive high-temperature (80°C), high-humidity (80%) (HTHH) testing for 10 days. Reflectivity of mirror samples is measured before and after HTHH testing, and image processing techniques are used to analyze the specular surface of the samples after HTHH testing. Among the seven intermediate materials used in this work, TiN, MgAl2O4, NiO, and Al2O3 intermediate layers offer more robust protection against chemical corrosion and moisture when compared with samples with no intermediate layer. In addition, results show that the performance of the ALD-AlOx barrier overlayer depends significantly on the ALD-growth process temperature. Because higher durability is observed in samples with less transparent TiN and NiO layers, we propose a figure of merit based on post-HTHH testing reflectivity change and specular reflective mirror surface area remaining after HTHH testing to judge overall barrier performance.

  14. Zintl layer formation during perovskite atomic layer deposition on Ge (001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shen; Lin, Edward L.; Hamze, Ali K.; Posadas, Agham; Wu, HsinWei; Smith, David J.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2017-02-01

    Using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory, we analyzed the surface core level shifts and surface structure during the initial growth of ABO3 perovskites on Ge (001) by atomic layer deposition, where A = Ba, Sr and B = Ti, Hf, Zr. We find that the initial dosing of the barium- or strontium-bis(triisopropylcyclopentadienyl) precursors on a clean Ge surface produces a surface phase that has the same chemical and structural properties as the 0.5-monolayer Ba Zintl layer formed when depositing Ba by molecular beam epitaxy. Similar binding energy shifts are found for Ba, Sr, and Ge when using either chemical or elemental metal sources. The observed germanium surface core level shifts are consistent with the flattening of the initially tilted Ge surface dimers using both molecular and atomic metal sources. Similar binding energy shifts and changes in dimer tilting with alkaline earth metal adsorption are found with density functional theory calculations. High angle angular dark field scanning transmission microscopy images of BaTiO3, SrZrO3, SrHfO3, and SrHf0.55Ti0.45O3 reveal the location of the Ba (or Sr) atomic columns between the Ge dimers. The results imply that the organic ligands dissociate from the precursor after precursor adsorption on the Ge surface, producing the same Zintl template critical for perovskite growth on Group IV semiconductors during molecular beam epitaxy.

  15. Low-Temperature Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Moisture Permeation Barrier Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andringa, Anne-Marije; Perrotta, Alberto; de Peuter, Koen; Knoops, Harm C M; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M; Creatore, Mariadriana

    2015-10-14

    Encapsulation of organic (opto-)electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells, and field-effect transistors, is required to minimize device degradation induced by moisture and oxygen ingress. SiNx moisture permeation barriers have been fabricated using a very recently developed low-temperature plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) approach, consisting of half-reactions of the substrate with the precursor SiH2(NH(t)Bu)2 and with N2-fed plasma. The deposited films have been characterized in terms of their refractive index and chemical composition by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The SiNx thin-film refractive index ranges from 1.80 to 1.90 for films deposited at 80 °C up to 200 °C, respectively, and the C, O, and H impurity levels decrease when the deposition temperature increases. The relative open porosity content of the layers has been studied by means of multisolvent ellipsometric porosimetry (EP), adopting three solvents with different kinetic diameters: water (∼0.3 nm), ethanol (∼0.4 nm), and toluene (∼0.6 nm). Irrespective of the deposition temperature, and hence the impurity content in the SiNx films, no uptake of any adsorptive has been observed, pointing to the absence of open pores larger than 0.3 nm in diameter. Instead, multilayer development has been observed, leading to type II isotherms that, according to the IUPAC classification, are characteristic of nonporous layers. The calcium test has been performed in a climate chamber at 20 °C and 50% relative humidity to determine the intrinsic water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of SiNx barriers deposited at 120 °C. Intrinsic WVTR values in the range of 10(-6) g/m2/day indicate excellent barrier properties for ALD SiNx layers as thin as 10 nm, competing with that of state-of-the-art plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited SiNx layers of a few hundred

  16. Fabrication of Hyperbolic Metamaterials using Atomic Layer Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shkondin, Evgeniy

    dielectric coatings has been implemented in optical experiment where the effective medium approximation theory (EMA) was tested. Flat dielectric multilayers with strict thicknesses of either 10 or 20 nm of each individual layer, were deposited on Si substrates and characterized using x-ray photoelectron...... final structures using selective Si etch were addressed. Fabrication of HMMs requires the implementation of plasmonic components, and traditionally noble metals are used for such purposes due to their abundant free electrons in the conduction band. However, their large real and imaginary parts of the permittivity...... the concept of hyperbolic medium is explained. Metamaterial design, implementation as well as possible applications are reviewed. Electrodynamically, HMMs are described by a dielectric permittivity tensor ε with components of opposite signs (e.g. εx = εy 0). HMMs possess unusually high wavevector...

  17. Ultraviolet optical properties of aluminum fluoride thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennessy, John, E-mail: john.j.hennessy@jpl.nasa.gov; Jewell, April D.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Nikzad, Shouleh [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Aluminum fluoride (AlF{sub 3}) is a low refractive index material with promising optical applications for ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. An atomic layer deposition process using trimethylaluminum and anhydrous hydrogen fluoride has been developed for the deposition of AlF{sub 3} at substrate temperatures between 100 and 200 °C. This low temperature process has resulted in thin films with UV-optical properties that have been characterized by ellipsometric and reflection/transmission measurements at wavelengths down to 200 nm. The optical loss for 93 nm thick films deposited at 100 °C was measured to be less than 0.2% from visible wavelengths down to 200 nm, and additional microstructural characterization demonstrates that the films are amorphous with moderate tensile stress of 42–105 MPa as deposited on silicon substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows no signature of residual aluminum oxide components making these films good candidates for a variety of applications at even shorter UV wavelengths.

  18. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition delivers more active and stable Pt-based catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, H.V.; Grillo, F.; Kulkarni, S.S.; Bevaart, Ronald; Nguyên, V.T.; van der Linden, B.; Moulijn, J.A.; Makkee, M.; Kreutzer, M.T.; van Ommen, J.R.

    2017-01-01

    We tailored the size distribution of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) on graphene nanoplatelets at a given metal loading by using low-temperature atomic layer deposition carried out in a fluidized bed reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. The Pt NPs deposited at low temperature (100 °C) after 10 cycles

  19. Enhanced Barrier Performance of Engineered Paper by Atomic Layer Deposited Al

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirvakili, Mehr Negar; Bui, H.V.; van Ommen, J.R.; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G.; Englezos, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Surface modification of cellulosic paper is demonstrated by employing plasma assisted atomic layer deposition. Al2O3 thin films are deposited on paper substrates, prepared with different fiber sizes, to improve their barrier properties. Thus, a hydrophobic paper is created

  20. Atomic layer deposition of platinum clusters on titania nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goulas, A.; Van Ommen, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    We report the fabrication of platinum nanoclusters with a narrow size distribution on TiO2 nanoparticles using atomic layer deposition. With MeCpPtMe3 and ozone as reactants, the deposition can be carried out at a relatively low temperature of 250 degrees C. Our approach of working with suspended

  1. Lanthanum-oxide thin films deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun-Joo; Ko, Myoung-Gyun; Kim, Beom-Yong; Park, Sang-Kyun; Kim, Heon-Do; Park, Jong-Wan [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    Lanthanum oxide is suited as a gate oxide that can replace SiO{sub 2} due to its high dielectric constant with a band gap of 4.3 eV [1] and its thermal stability with silicon. In this work, La{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films was performed on Si substrates by using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition with La(EtCp){sub 3} as the lanthanum precursor and O{sub 3} as the reactant gas. The fully saturated growth rate of lanthanum oxide films was 0.2 A/cycle at a plasma power of 500 W. Secondary ion mass spectrometry and Rutherford backscattering measurements detected no carbon impurity content.

  2. Breakthrough to Non-Vacuum Deposition of Single-Crystal, Ultra-Thin, Homogeneous Nanoparticle Layers: A Better Alternative to Chemical Bath Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Kuang Liao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Most thin-film techniques require a multiple vacuum process, and cannot produce high-coverage continuous thin films with the thickness of a few nanometers on rough surfaces. We present a new ”paradigm shift” non-vacuum process to deposit high-quality, ultra-thin, single-crystal layers of coalesced sulfide nanoparticles (NPs with controllable thickness down to a few nanometers, based on thermal decomposition. This provides high-coverage, homogeneous thickness, and large-area deposition over a rough surface, with little material loss or liquid chemical waste, and deposition rates of 10 nm/min. This technique can potentially replace conventional thin-film deposition methods, such as atomic layer deposition (ALD and chemical bath deposition (CBD as used by the Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS thin-film solar cell industry for decades. We demonstrate 32% improvement of CIGS thin-film solar cell efficiency in comparison to reference devices prepared by conventional CBD deposition method by depositing the ZnS NPs buffer layer using the new process. The new ZnS NPs layer allows reduction of an intrinsic ZnO layer, which can lead to severe shunt leakage in case of a CBD buffer layer. This leads to a 65% relative efficiency increase.

  3. Breakthrough to Non-Vacuum Deposition of Single-Crystal, Ultra-Thin, Homogeneous Nanoparticle Layers: A Better Alternative to Chemical Bath Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yu-Kuang; Liu, Yung-Tsung; Hsieh, Dan-Hua; Shen, Tien-Lin; Hsieh, Ming-Yang; Tzou, An-Jye; Chen, Shih-Chen; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Lin, Wei-Sheng; Chan, Sheng-Wen; Shen, Yen-Ping; Cheng, Shun-Jen; Chen, Chyong-Hua; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Chen, Hao-Ming; Kuo, Shou-Yi; Charlton, Martin D B; Hsieh, Tung-Po; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2017-04-06

    Most thin-film techniques require a multiple vacuum process, and cannot produce high-coverage continuous thin films with the thickness of a few nanometers on rough surfaces. We present a new "paradigm shift" non-vacuum process to deposit high-quality, ultra-thin, single-crystal layers of coalesced sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable thickness down to a few nanometers, based on thermal decomposition. This provides high-coverage, homogeneous thickness, and large-area deposition over a rough surface, with little material loss or liquid chemical waste, and deposition rates of 10 nm/min. This technique can potentially replace conventional thin-film deposition methods, such as atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical bath deposition (CBD) as used by the Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ (CIGS) thin-film solar cell industry for decades. We demonstrate 32% improvement of CIGS thin-film solar cell efficiency in comparison to reference devices prepared by conventional CBD deposition method by depositing the ZnS NPs buffer layer using the new process. The new ZnS NPs layer allows reduction of an intrinsic ZnO layer, which can lead to severe shunt leakage in case of a CBD buffer layer. This leads to a 65% relative efficiency increase.

  4. Nano-oxide thin films deposited via atomic layer deposition on microchannel plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Baojun; Liu, Shulin; Heng, Yuekun

    2015-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) as a key part is a kind of electron multiplied device applied in many scientific fields. Oxide thin films such as zinc oxide doped with aluminum oxide (ZnO:Al2O3) as conductive layer and pure aluminum oxide (Al2O3) as secondary electron emission (SEE) layer were prepared in the pores of MCP via atomic layer deposition (ALD) which is a method that can precisely control thin film thickness on a substrate with a high aspect ratio structure. In this paper, nano-oxide thin films ZnO:Al2O3 and Al2O3 were prepared onto varied kinds of substrates by ALD technique, and the morphology, element distribution, structure, and surface chemical states of samples were systematically investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Finally, electrical properties of an MCP device as a function of nano-oxide thin film thickness were firstly studied, and the electrical measurement results showed that the average gain of MCP was greater than 2,000 at DC 800 V with nano-oxide thin film thickness approximately 122 nm. During electrical measurement, current jitter was observed, and possible reasons were preliminarily proposed to explain the observed experimental phenomenon.

  5. Properties of HfAlO film deposited by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Duo [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changning Road 865, Shanghai 200050 (China); Cheng, Xinhong, E-mail: xh_cheng@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changning Road 865, Shanghai 200050 (China); Jia, Tingting; Zheng, Li; Xu, Dawei; Wang, Zhongjian; Xia, Chao; Yu, Yuehui [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changning Road 865, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) method can reduce film growing temperature, and allow in situ plasma treatment. In this work, HfAlO and HfO{sub 2} films were deposited with PEALD at 160 °C. Microstructure analysis showed that both films were amorphous after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatment, and HfAlO sample showed better interfacial structure than HfO{sub 2}. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra indicated that main component of the interfacial layer of HfAlO sample was Hf–Si–O and Al–Si–O bonds, the valence band offset value between the HfAlO film and Si substrate was calculated to be 2.5 eV. The dominant leakage current mechanism of the samples was Schottky emission at a low electric field (<1.4 MV/cm), and Poole–Frenkel emission mechanism at a higher electric field (>1.4 MV/cm). The equivalent oxide thicknesses (EOT) of the HfAlO samples were 1.0 nm and 1.3 nm, respectively. The density of interface states between dielectric and substrate were calculated to be 1.2 × 10{sup 12} eV{sup −1}cm{sup −2} and 1.3 × 10{sup 12} eV{sup −1}cm{sup −2}, respectively. In comparison with HfO{sub 2} film, HfAlO film has good interfacial structure and electrical performance.

  6. Surface passivation of GaAs nanowires by the atomic layer deposition of AlN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shtrom, I. V., E-mail: igorstrohm@mail.ru; Bouravleuv, A. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Samsonenko, Yu. B.; Khrebtov, A. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Soshnikov, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Reznik, R. R.; Cirlin, G. E., E-mail: cirlin@beam.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Dhaka, V.; Perros, A.; Lipsanen, H. [Aalto University (Finland)

    2016-12-15

    It is shown that the atomic layer deposition of thin AlN layers can be used to passivate the surface states of GaAs nanowires synthesized by molecular-beam epitaxy. Studies of the optical properties of samples by low-temperature photoluminescence measurements shows that the photoluminescence-signal intensity can be increased by a factor of up to five by passivating the nanowires with a 25-Å-thick AlN layer.

  7. Highly Adsorptive, MOF-Functionalized Nonwoven Fiber Mats for Hazardous Gas Capture Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-20

    areas and high adsorptive capacities. We find that a nanoscale coating of Al2O3 formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on the surface of nonwoven ...distribution is unlimited. Highly Adsorptive, MOF-Functionalized Nonwoven Fiber Mats for Hazardous Gas Capture Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition The... Nonwoven Fiber Mats for Hazardous Gas Capture Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition Report Title While metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) show great

  8. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Bent, Stacey F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Dippo, Patricia; Contreras, Miguel A.; Levi, Dean H. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Partial CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnO{sub x} buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II–VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide.

  9. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Dippo, Patricia; Contreras, Miguel A.; Levi, Dean H.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2015-07-20

    Partial CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnOx buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II-VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide.

  10. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Dippo, Patricia; Contreras, Miguel A.; Levi, Dean H.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2015-07-20

    Partial CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnOx buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II–VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide.

  11. Atomic-layer deposited thulium oxide as a passivation layer on germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrovic, I. Z., E-mail: ivona@liverpool.ac.uk; Hall, S.; Weerakkody, A. D.; Sedghi, N. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Althobaiti, M.; Hesp, D.; Dhanak, V. R. [Department of Physics and Stephenson Institute for Renewable Energy, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZF (United Kingdom); Santoni, A. [ENEA, Frascati Research Centre, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Chalker, P. R. [Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Henkel, C.; Dentoni Litta, E.; Hellström, P.-E.; Östling, M. [School of ICT, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Isafjordsgatan 22, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Tan, H.; Schamm-Chardon, S. [CEMES-CNRS and Université de Toulouse, nMat group, BP 94347, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2015-06-07

    A comprehensive study of atomic-layer deposited thulium oxide (Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on germanium has been conducted using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), vacuum ultra-violet variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The valence band offset is found to be 3.05 ± 0.2 eV for Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-Ge from the Tm 4d centroid and Ge 3p{sub 3/2} charge-corrected XPS core-level spectra taken at different sputtering times of a single bulk thulium oxide sample. A negligible downward band bending of ∼0.12 eV is observed during progressive differential charging of Tm 4d peaks. The optical band gap is estimated from the absorption edge and found to be 5.77 eV with an apparent Urbach tail signifying band gap tailing at ∼5.3 eV. The latter has been correlated to HRTEM and electron diffraction results corroborating the polycrystalline nature of the Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} films. The Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ge interface is found to be rather atomically abrupt with sub-nanometer thickness. In addition, the band line-up of reference GeO{sub 2}/n-Ge stacks obtained by thermal oxidation has been discussed and derived. The observed low reactivity of thulium oxide on germanium as well as the high effective barriers for holes (∼3 eV) and electrons (∼2 eV) identify Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a strong contender for interfacial layer engineering in future generations of scaled high-κ gate stacks on Ge.

  12. Conduction mechanisms in thin atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spahr, Holger; Montzka, Sebastian; Reinker, Johannes; Hirschberg, Felix; Kowalsky, Wolfgang; Johannes, Hans-Hermann, E-mail: h2.johannes@ihf.tu-bs.de [Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Schleinitzstraße 22, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-11-14

    Thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers of 2–135 nm thickness deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition at 80 °C were characterized regarding the current limiting mechanisms by increasing voltage ramp stress. By analyzing the j(U)-characteristics regarding ohmic injection, space charge limited current (SCLC), Schottky-emission, Fowler-Nordheim-tunneling, and Poole-Frenkel-emission, the limiting mechanisms were identified. This was performed by rearranging and plotting the data in a linear scale, such as Schottky-plot, Poole-Frenkel-plot, and Fowler-Nordheim-plot. Linear regression then was applied to the data to extract the values of relative permittivity from Schottky-plot slope and Poole-Frenkel-plot slope. From Fowler-Nordheim-plot slope, the Fowler-Nordheim-energy-barrier was extracted. Example measurements in addition to a statistical overview of the results of all investigated samples are provided. Linear regression was applied to the region of the data that matches the realistic values most. It is concluded that ohmic injection and therefore SCLC only occurs at thicknesses below 12 nm and that the Poole-Frenkel-effect is no significant current limiting process. The extracted Fowler-Nordheim-barriers vary in the range of up to approximately 4 eV but do not show a specific trend. It is discussed whether the negative slope in the Fowler-Nordheim-plot could in some cases be a misinterpreted trap filled limit in the case of space charge limited current.

  13. Modeling of atomic layer deposition on nanoparticle agglomerates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, W.

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly applied in a range of fields, such as electronics, catalysis, energy and medicine, due to their small sizes and consequent high surface-volume ratio. In many applications, it is attractive to coat the nanoparticles with a layer of different materials in order to gain

  14. Surface Recombination of Crystalline Silicon Substrates Passivated by Atomic-Layer-Deposited AlOx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafune, Koji; Miki, Shohei; Matsutani, Ryosuke; Hamano, Junpei; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Tachibana, Tomihisa; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ogura, Atsuhi; Ohshita, Yoshio; Satoh, Shin-ichi

    2012-04-01

    AlOx films as passivation layers for p-type crystalline silicon were prepared by atomic layer deposition with ozone as an oxidant, and the effects of the AlOx film thickness and deposition temperature on the maximum recombination velocity (Smax) were evaluated. Smax is improved by increasing the layer thickness but saturates at a layer thickness of about 30 nm. In the case of samples deposited at room temperature, Smax is improved fivefold when the thickness is increased from 20 to 33 nm. Smax also improved as the deposition temperature was increased to 300 °C then deteriorated when it was further increased to 350 °C. After postdeposition annealing, we obtained an Smax of 8.5 cm/s.

  15. Electrocatalytic activity of atomic layer deposited Pt–Ru catalysts onto N-doped carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta; Larsen, Jackie Vincent; Verheijen, Marcel A.

    2014-01-01

    Pt–Ru catalysts of various compositions, between 0 and 100at.% of Ru, were deposited onto N-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 250°C. The Pt and Ru precursors were trimethyl(methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum (MeCpPtMe3) and bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)rut......Pt–Ru catalysts of various compositions, between 0 and 100at.% of Ru, were deposited onto N-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 250°C. The Pt and Ru precursors were trimethyl(methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum (MeCpPtMe3) and bis......-up. For the compositions investigated, the catalysts with a Ru content of 29at.% exhibited highest catalytic activity....

  16. Micro-balance sensor integrated with atomic layer deposition chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, Alex B. F.; Libera, Joseph A.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Riha, Shannon C.

    2018-01-02

    The invention is directed to QCM measurements in monitoring ALD processes. Previously, significant barriers remain in the ALD processes and accurate execution. To turn this exclusively dedicated in situ technique into a routine characterization method, an integral QCM fixture was developed. This new design is easily implemented on a variety of ALD tools, allows rapid sample exchange, prevents backside deposition, and minimizes both the footprint and flow disturbance. Unlike previous QCM designs, the fast thermal equilibration enables tasks such as temperature-dependent studies and ex situ sample exchange, further highlighting the feasibility of this QCM design for day-to-day use. Finally, the in situ mapping of thin film growth rates across the ALD reactor was demonstrated in a popular commercial tool operating in both continuous and quasi-static ALD modes.

  17. Interfacial engineering of two-dimensional nano-structured materials by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuiykov, Serge, E-mail: serge.zhuiykov@ugent.be [Ghent University Global Campus, Department of Applied Analytical & Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, 119 Songdomunhwa-ro, Yeonsu-Gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kawaguchi, Toshikazu [Global Station for Food, Land and Water Resources, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, N10W5 Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Graduate School of Environmental Science, Hokkaido University, N10W5 Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Hai, Zhenyin; Karbalaei Akbari, Mohammad; Heynderickx, Philippe M. [Ghent University Global Campus, Department of Applied Analytical & Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, 119 Songdomunhwa-ro, Yeonsu-Gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Advantages of atomic layer deposition technology (ALD) for two-dimensional nano-crystals. • Conformation of ALD technique and chemistry of precursors. • ALD of semiconductor oxide thin films. • Ultra-thin (∼1.47 nm thick) ALD-developed tungsten oxide nano-crystals on large area. - Abstract: Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is an enabling technology which provides coating and material features with significant advantages compared to other existing techniques for depositing precise nanometer-thin two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures. It is a cyclic process which relies on sequential self-terminating reactions between gas phase precursor molecules and a solid surface. ALD is especially advantageous when the film quality or thickness is critical, offering ultra-high aspect ratios. ALD provides digital thickness control to the atomic level by depositing film one atomic layer at a time, as well as pinhole-free films even over a very large and complex areas. Digital control extends to sandwiches, hetero-structures, nano-laminates, metal oxides, graded index layers and doping, and it is perfect for conformal coating and challenging 2D electrodes for various functional devices. The technique’s capabilities are presented on the example of ALD-developed ultra-thin 2D tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) over the large area of standard 4” Si substrates. The discussed advantages of ALD enable and endorse the employment of this technique for the development of hetero-nanostructure 2D semiconductors with unique properties.

  18. Atmospheric spatial atomic layer deposition of in-doped ZnO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Scherpenborg, R.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.

    2014-01-01

    Indium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:In) has been grown by spatial atomic layer deposition at atmospheric pressure (spatial-ALD). Trimethyl indium (TMIn), diethyl zinc (DEZ) and deionized water have been used as In, Zn and O precursor, respectively. The metal content of the films is controlled in the range

  19. Electrochemical atomic layer deposition of Pt nanostructures on carbon paper and Ni foam; poster

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Louw, EK

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The cost of the platinum catalyst hinders the progress of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) into the commercial world. Electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) method was used to reduce the amount of Pt used and to increase its utilization...

  20. Spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition of InxGayZnzO for thin film transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Cobb, B.; Sharma, A.; Grehl, T.; Brongersma, H.; Roozeboom, F.; Gelinck, G.; Poodt, P.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the nucleation and growth of InGaZnO thin films by spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition. Diethyl zinc (DEZ), trimethyl indium (TMIn), triethyl gallium (TEGa), and water were used as Zn, In, Ga and oxygen precursors, respectively. The vaporized metal precursors have been

  1. Fabrication of Nanolaminates with Ultrathin Nanolayers Using Atomic Layer Deposition: Nucleation & Growth Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Tecnologia de Superficies y Materiales (SMCTSM), XXVII Congreso Nacional, Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Mexico, September 26, 2007. 26. "Atomic Layer Deposition of...Nanolaminates: Fabrication and Properties" (Plenary Lecture), Sociedad Mexicana de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Superficies y Materiales (SMCTSM), XXVII

  2. Dispersion engineered high-Q silicon Nitride Ring-Resonators via Atomic Layer Deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Riemensberger, Johann; Herr, Tobias; Brasch, Victor; Holzwarth, Ronald; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate dispersion engineering of integrated silicon nitride based ring resonators through conformal coating with hafnium dioxide deposited on top of the structures via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Both, magnitude and bandwidth of anomalous dispersion can be significantly increased. All results are confirmed by high resolution frequency-comb-assisted-diode-laser spectroscopy and are in very good agreement with the simulated modification of the mode spectrum.

  3. Enhancing of catalytic properties of vanadia via surface doping with phosphorus using atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strempel, Verena E.; Naumann d' Alnoncourt, Raoul, E-mail: r.naumann@bascat.tu-berlin.de [BasCat - UniCat BASF JointLab, Technische Universität Berlin, Sekr. EW K 01, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Löffler, Daniel [Process Research and Chemical Engineering, BASF SE, Carl-Bosch-Straße 38, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Kröhnert, Jutta; Skorupska, Katarzyna; Johnson, Benjamin [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Driess, Matthias [BasCat - UniCat BASF JointLab, Technische Universität Berlin, Sekr. EW K 01, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin, Germany and Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Chemie, Sekr. C2, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Rosowski, Frank [BasCat - UniCat BASF JointLab, Technische Universität Berlin, Sekr. EW K 01, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin, Germany and Process Research and Chemical Engineering, BASF SE, Carl-Bosch-Straße 38, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition is mainly used to deposit thin films on flat substrates. Here, the authors deposit a submonolayer of phosphorus on V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in the form of catalyst powder. The goal is to prepare a model catalyst related to the vanadyl pyrophosphate catalyst (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} industrially used for the oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride. The oxidation state of vanadium in vanadyl pyrophosphate is 4+. In literature, it was shown that the surface of vanadyl pyrophosphate contains V{sup 5+} and is enriched in phosphorus under reaction conditions. On account of this, V{sub 2}O{sub 5} with the oxidation state of 5+ for vanadium partially covered with phosphorus can be regarded as a suitable model catalyst. The catalytic performance of the model catalyst prepared via atomic layer deposition was measured and compared to the performance of catalysts prepared via incipient wetness impregnation and the original V{sub 2}O{sub 5} substrate. It could be clearly shown that the dedicated deposition of phosphorus by atomic layer deposition enhances the catalytic performance of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} by suppression of total oxidation reactions, thereby increasing the selectivity to maleic anhydride.

  4. The Electrochemical Atomic Layer Deposition of Pt and Pd nanoparticles on Ni foam for the electrooxidation of alcohols

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrodeposition of Pt and Pd metal by surface limited redox replacement reactions was performed using the electrochemical atomic layer deposition. Carbon paper and Ni foam were used as substrates for metal deposition. Supported Pt and Pd...

  5. The electrochemical atomic layer deposition of Pt and Pd nanoparticles on Ni foam for the electro oxidation of alcohols

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrodeposition of Pt and Pd metal by surface limited redox replacement reactions was performed using the electrochemical atomic layer deposition. Carbon paper and Ni foam were used as substrates for metal deposition. Supported Pt and Pd...

  6. Electrochemical atomic layer deposition of Pt nanostructures on fuel cell gas diffusion layer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available the electrochemical activity towards hydrogen, methanol and CO adsorption. ? Deposition time will be optimised. ? Carbon paper will be modified with a conductive microporous layer (Carbon black + Nafion ionomer) before the electrodeposition step. ? Fabricate... cell gas diffusion layer Mmalewane Modibedi1, Tumaini Mkwizu1, 2, Nikiwe Kunjuzwa1,3 , Kenneth Ozoemena1 and Mkhulu Mathe1 1. Energy and Processes, Materials Science and Manufacturing, The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR...

  7. Controlling the grain size of polycrystalline TiO2 films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavre Piltaver, Ivna; Peter, Robert; Šarić, Iva; Salamon, Krešimir; Jelovica Badovinac, Ivana; Koshmak, Konstantin; Nannarone, Stefano; Delač Marion, Ida; Petravić, Mladen

    2017-10-01

    The crystal structure and the grain size of thin TiO2 films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The films of different thicknesses between 50 and 150 nm were grown at temperatures between 200 and 250 °C with a TiCl4-H2O ALD process on two different substrates, Si and NiTi. The grain size of the anatase TiO2 was dramatically increased if a thin buffer layer of Al2O3 was deposited on substrates in the same ALD sequence prior to the TiO2 deposition. The largest TiO2 plate-like grains of more than one micrometer in diameter were observed on 150 nm thick films grown at 250 °C. The present work demonstrates that the grain size of an anatase TiO2 film can be tailored and controlled on different substrates not only by the processing temperature and film thickness, but, more dramatically, by the nanometric intermediate Al2O3 layers deposited on substrates in the same ALD sequences. The large lateral grain size is explained in terms of low density of the initial nucleation grains created in TiO2 films grown on Al2O3 layers.

  8. Low temperature temporal and spatial atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaee, Morteza, E-mail: m.aghaee@tue.nl; Maydannik, Philipp S. [ASTRaL Group, Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Johansson, Petri; Kuusipalo, Jurkka [Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Creatore, Mariadriana [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Homola, Tomáš; Cameron, David C. [R& D Center for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-15

    Titanium dioxide films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using titanium tetraisopropoxide as a titanium precursor and water, ozone, or oxygen plasma as coreactants. Low temperatures (80–120 °C) were used to grow moisture barrier TiO{sub 2} films on polyethylene naphthalate. The maximum growth per cycle for water, ozone, and oxygen plasma processes were 0.33, 0.12, and 0.56 Å/cycle, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry was used to evaluate the chemical composition of the layers and the origin of the carbon contamination was studied by deconvoluting carbon C1s peaks. In plasma-assisted ALD, the film properties were dependent on the energy dose supplied by the plasma. TiO{sub 2} films were also successfully deposited by using a spatial ALD (SALD) system based on the results from the temporal ALD. Similar properties were measured compared to the temporal ALD deposited TiO{sub 2}, but the deposition time could be reduced using SALD. The TiO{sub 2} films deposited by plasma-assisted ALD showed better moisture barrier properties than the layers deposited by thermal processes. Water vapor transmission rate values lower than 5 × 10{sup −4} g day{sup −1} m{sup −2} (38 °C and 90% RH) was measured for 20 nm of TiO{sub 2} film deposited by plasma-assisted ALD.

  9. Atomic layer deposition of TiO2 thin films on nanoporous alumina templates: Medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Roger J.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Brigmon, Robin L.; Pellin, Michael J.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-06-01

    Nanostructured materials may play a significant role in controlled release of pharmacologic agents for treatment of cancer. Many nanoporous polymer materials are inadequate for use in drug delivery. Nanoporous alumina provides several advantages over other materials for use in controlled drug delivery and other medical applications. Atomic layer deposition was used to coat all the surfaces of a nanoporous alumina membrane in order to reduce the pore size in a controlled manner. Neither the 20 nm nor the 100 nm TiO2-coated nanoporous alumina membranes exhibited statistically lower viability compared to the uncoated nanoporous alumina membrane control materials. Nanostructured materials prepared using atomic layer deposition may be useful for delivering a pharmacologic agent at a precise rate to a specific location in the body. These materials may serve as the basis for “smart” drug delivery devices, orthopedic implants, or self-sterilizing medical devices.

  10. Integration of atomic layer deposited nanolaminates on silicon waveguides (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autere, Anton; Karvonen, Lasse; Säynätjoki, Antti; Roussey, Matthieu; Roenn, John; Färm, Elina; Kemell, Marianna; Tu, Xiaoguang; Liow, Tsung-Yang; Lo, Patrick; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku; Lipsanen, Harri; Honkanen, Seppo; Sun, Zhipei

    2016-05-01

    Despite all the eminent advantages of silicon photonics, other materials need to be integrated to fulfill the functions that are difficult to realize with silicon alone. This is because silicon has a low light emission efficiency and a low electro-optic coefficient, limiting the use of silicon as a material for light sources and modulators. A strong two-photon absorption (TPA) at high intensities also limits the use of silicon in applications exploiting nonlinear effects. In addition, signal amplification is needed to compensate the insertion and propagation losses in silicon nanowaveguides. To address these issues we have demonstrated the integration of atomic layer deposited nanolaminates on silicon waveguides. Firstly we demonstrate slot waveguide ring resonators patterned on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer coated with an atomic layer deposited organic/inorganic nanolaminate structure, which consists of alternating layers of tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) and polyimide (PI) [1]. These materials were selected since the ALD process for depositing Ta2O5/PI nanolaminate films is already available [2] and both materials exhibit high third order nonlinearities [3-4]. In our nanolaminate ring resonators, the optical power is not only confined in the narrow central air slot but also in several parallel sub-10 nm wide vertical polyimide slots. This indicates that the mode profiles in the silicon slot waveguide can be accurately tuned by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) method. Our results show that ALD of organic and inorganic materials can be combined with conventional silicon waveguide fabrication techniques to create slot waveguide ring resonators with varying mode profiles. Secondly we demonstrate the integration of atomic layer deposited erbium-doped aluminum oxide (Al2O3) nanolaminates on silicon waveguides. This method provides an efficient way for controlling the concentration and distribution of erbium ions. We have applied this method on silicon strip and slot

  11. Atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2} photonic crystal waveguide biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardinier, E; French, P J [Electronic Instrumentation Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, 4 Mekelweg, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Pandraud, G; Pham, M H; Sarro, P M [Electronic Components, Technology and Materials, Delft University of Technology, 17 Feldmannweg, 2628 CT Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: g.pandraud@tudelft.nl

    2009-09-01

    A photonic crystal waveguide biosensor in the visible is presented for biosensing. The sensor is applied to Refractive Index (RI) measurements. The sensitivity at different wavelength is presented for both air holes and air core configurations of photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) made of TiO{sub 2}. It is shown that by using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) the expected sensitivity of the air core configuration outperforms the previously reported results.

  12. Fabrication and surface passivation of porous 6H-SiC by atomic layer deposited films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    photoluminescence was observed and the etching process was optimized in terms of etching time and thickness. Enormous enhancement as well as redshift and broadening of photoluminescence spectra were observed after the passivation by atomic layer deposited Al2O3 and TiO2 films. No obvious luminescence was observed...... above the 6H-SiC crystal band gap, which suggests that the strong photoluminescence is ascribed to surface state produced during the anodic etching....

  13. Interfacial engineering of two-dimensional nano-structured materials by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuiykov, Serge; Kawaguchi, Toshikazu; Hai, Zhenyin; Karbalaei Akbari, Mohammad; Heynderickx, Philippe M.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is an enabling technology which provides coating and material features with significant advantages compared to other existing techniques for depositing precise nanometer-thin two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures. It is a cyclic process which relies on sequential self-terminating reactions between gas phase precursor molecules and a solid surface. ALD is especially advantageous when the film quality or thickness is critical, offering ultra-high aspect ratios. ALD provides digital thickness control to the atomic level by depositing film one atomic layer at a time, as well as pinhole-free films even over a very large and complex areas. Digital control extends to sandwiches, hetero-structures, nano-laminates, metal oxides, graded index layers and doping, and it is perfect for conformal coating and challenging 2D electrodes for various functional devices. The technique's capabilities are presented on the example of ALD-developed ultra-thin 2D tungsten oxide (WO3) over the large area of standard 4; Si substrates. The discussed advantages of ALD enable and endorse the employment of this technique for the development of hetero-nanostructure 2D semiconductors with unique properties.

  14. (Invited) Atomic Layer Deposition for Novel Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tétreault, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Herein we present the latest fabrication and characterization techniques for atomic layer deposition of Al 2O 3, ZnO, SnO 2, Nb 2O 5, HfO 2, Ga 2O 3 and TiO 2 for research on dye-sensitized solar cell. In particular, we review the fabrication of state-of-the-art 3D host-passivation-guest photoanodes and ZnO nanowires as well as characterize the deposited thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray diffraction, Hall effect, J-V curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. ©The Electrochemical Society.

  15. Atomic Layer Deposition of SnO2 on MXene for Li-Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2017-02-24

    In this report, we show that oxide battery anodes can be grown on two-dimensional titanium carbide sheets (MXenes) by atomic layer deposition. Using this approach, we have fabricated a composite SnO2/MXene anode for Li-ion battery applications. The SnO2/MXene anode exploits the high Li-ion capacity offered by SnO2, while maintaining the structural and mechanical integrity by the conductive MXene platform. The atomic layer deposition (ALD) conditions used to deposit SnO2 on MXene terminated with oxygen, fluorine, and hydroxyl-groups were found to be critical for preventing MXene degradation during ALD. We demonstrate that SnO2/MXene electrodes exhibit excellent electrochemical performance as Li-ion battery anodes, where conductive MXene sheets act to buffer the volume changes associated with lithiation and delithiation of SnO2. The cyclic performance of the anodes is further improved by depositing a very thin passivation layer of HfO2, in the same ALD reactor, on the SnO2/MXene anode. This is shown by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy to also improve the structural integrity of SnO2 anode during cycling. The HfO2 coated SnO2/MXene electrodes demonstrate a stable specific capacity of 843 mAh/g when used as Li-ion battery anodes.

  16. Atomic-Layer-Deposition of Indium Oxide Nano-films for Thin-Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Zheng, He-Mei; Shao, Yan; Zhu, Bao; Liu, Wen-Jun; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2018-01-09

    Atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) of In 2 O 3 nano-films has been investigated using cyclopentadienyl indium (InCp) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) as precursors. The In 2 O 3 films can be deposited preferentially at relatively low temperatures of 160-200 °C, exhibiting a stable growth rate of 1.4-1.5 Å/cycle. The surface roughness of the deposited film increases gradually with deposition temperature, which is attributed to the enhanced crystallization of the film at a higher deposition temperature. As the deposition temperature increases from 150 to 200 °C, the optical band gap (E g ) of the deposited film rises from 3.42 to 3.75 eV. In addition, with the increase of deposition temperature, the atomic ratio of In to O in the as-deposited film gradually shifts towards that in the stoichiometric In 2 O 3 , and the carbon content also reduces by degrees. For 200 °C deposition temperature, the deposited film exhibits an In:O ratio of 1:1.36 and no carbon incorporation. Further, high-performance In 2 O 3 thin-film transistors with an Al 2 O 3 gate dielectric were achieved by post-annealing in air at 300 °C for appropriate time, demonstrating a field-effect mobility of 7.8 cm 2 /V⋅s, a subthreshold swing of 0.32 V/dec, and an on/off current ratio of 10 7 . This was ascribed to passivation of oxygen vacancies in the device channel.

  17. Atomic-Layer-Deposition of Indium Oxide Nano-films for Thin-Film Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Zheng, He-Mei; Shao, Yan; Zhu, Bao; Liu, Wen-Jun; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2018-01-01

    Atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) of In2O3 nano-films has been investigated using cyclopentadienyl indium (InCp) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as precursors. The In2O3 films can be deposited preferentially at relatively low temperatures of 160-200 °C, exhibiting a stable growth rate of 1.4-1.5 Å/cycle. The surface roughness of the deposited film increases gradually with deposition temperature, which is attributed to the enhanced crystallization of the film at a higher deposition temperature. As the deposition temperature increases from 150 to 200 °C, the optical band gap (Eg) of the deposited film rises from 3.42 to 3.75 eV. In addition, with the increase of deposition temperature, the atomic ratio of In to O in the as-deposited film gradually shifts towards that in the stoichiometric In2O3, and the carbon content also reduces by degrees. For 200 °C deposition temperature, the deposited film exhibits an In:O ratio of 1:1.36 and no carbon incorporation. Further, high-performance In2O3 thin-film transistors with an Al2O3 gate dielectric were achieved by post-annealing in air at 300 °C for appropriate time, demonstrating a field-effect mobility of 7.8 cm2/Vṡs, a subthreshold swing of 0.32 V/dec, and an on/off current ratio of 107. This was ascribed to passivation of oxygen vacancies in the device channel.

  18. Bismuth iron oxide thin films using atomic layer deposition of alternating bismuth oxide and iron oxide layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puttaswamy, Manjunath; Vehkamäki, Marko [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Kukli, Kaupo, E-mail: kaupo.kukli@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); University of Tartu, Institute of Physics, W. Ostwald 1, EE-50411 Tartu (Estonia); Dimri, Mukesh Chandra [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, EE-12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Kemell, Marianna; Hatanpää, Timo; Heikkilä, Mikko J. [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Mizohata, Kenichiro [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Stern, Raivo [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, EE-12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2016-07-29

    Bismuth iron oxide films with varying contributions from Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared using atomic layer deposition. Bismuth (III) 2,3-dimethyl-2-butoxide, was used as the bismuth source, iron(III) tert-butoxide as the iron source and water vapor as the oxygen source. The films were deposited as stacks of alternate Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers. Films grown at 140 °C to the thickness of 200–220 nm were amorphous, but crystallized upon post-deposition annealing at 500 °C in nitrogen. Annealing of films with intermittent bismuth and iron oxide layers grown to different thicknesses influenced their surface morphology, crystal structure, composition, electrical and magnetic properties. Implications of multiferroic performance were recognized in the films with the remanent charge polarization varying from 1 to 5 μC/cm{sup 2} and magnetic coercivity varying from a few up to 8000 A/m. - Highlights: • Bismuth iron oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition at 140 °C. • The major phase formed in the films upon annealing at 500 °C was BiFeO{sub 3}. • BiFeO{sub 3} films and films containing excess Bi favored electrical charge polarization. • Slight excess of iron oxide enhanced saturative magnetization behavior.

  19. Fabrication of low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells with a nanothin protective layer by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Anode aluminum oxide-supported thin-film fuel cells having a sub-500-nm-thick bilayered electrolyte comprising a gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) layer and an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) layer were fabricated and electrochemically characterized in order to investigate the effect of the YSZ protective layer. The highly dense and thin YSZ layer acted as a blockage against electron and oxygen permeation between the anode and GDC electrolyte. Dense GDC and YSZ thin films were fabricated using radio frequency sputtering and atomic layer deposition techniques, respectively. The resulting bilayered thin-film fuel cell generated a significantly higher open circuit voltage of approximately 1.07 V compared with a thin-film fuel cell with a single-layered GDC electrolyte (approximately 0.3 V). PMID:23342963

  20. Atomic layer deposition by reaction of molecular oxygen with tetrakisdimethylamido-metal precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provine, J, E-mail: jprovine@stanford.edu; Schindler, Peter; Torgersen, Jan; Kim, Hyo Jin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Karnthaler, Hans-Peter [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Prinz, Fritz B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Tetrakisdimethylamido (TDMA) based precursors are commonly used to deposit metal oxides such as TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and HfO{sub 2} by means of chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition (ALD). Both thermal and plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD) have been demonstrated with TDMA-metal precursors. While the reactions of TDMA-type precursors with water and oxygen plasma have been studied in the past, their reactivity with pure O{sub 2} has been overlooked. This paper reports on experimental evaluation of the reaction of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) and several metal organic precursors based on TDMA ligands. The effect of O{sub 2} exposure duration and substrate temperature on deposition and film morphology is evaluated and compared to thermal reactions with H{sub 2}O and PEALD with O{sub 2} plasma.

  1. Imaging of oxide charges and contact potential difference fluctuations in Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 on Si

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Zinine, A.; Wormeester, Herbert; Poelsema, Bene; Bankras, R.G.; Holleman, J.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2005-01-01

    Ultrathin 2.5 nm high-k aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films on p-type silicon (001) deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were investigated with noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) in ultrahigh vacuum, using a conductive tip. Constant force gradient images revealed the presence of oxide

  2. Atomic layer deposition of perovskite oxides and their epitaxial integration with Si, Ge, and other semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDaniel, Martin D.; Ngo, Thong Q.; Hu, Shen; Ekerdt, John G., E-mail: ekerdt@utexas.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Posadas, Agham; Demkov, Alexander A. [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a proven technique for the conformal deposition of oxide thin films with nanoscale thickness control. Most successful industrial applications have been with binary oxides, such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}. However, there has been much effort to deposit ternary oxides, such as perovskites (ABO{sub 3}), with desirable properties for advanced thin film applications. Distinct challenges are presented by the deposition of multi-component oxides using ALD. This review is intended to highlight the research of the many groups that have deposited perovskite oxides by ALD methods. Several commonalities between the studies are discussed. Special emphasis is put on precursor selection, deposition temperatures, and specific property performance (high-k, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, etc.). Finally, the monolithic integration of perovskite oxides with semiconductors by ALD is reviewed. High-quality epitaxial growth of oxide thin films has traditionally been limited to physical vapor deposition techniques (e.g., molecular beam epitaxy). However, recent studies have demonstrated that epitaxial oxide thin films may be deposited on semiconductor substrates using ALD. This presents an exciting opportunity to integrate functional perovskite oxides for advanced semiconductor applications in a process that is economical and scalable.

  3. Preparation of gallium nitride surfaces for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, A J; Chagarov, E; Gu, S; Kaufman-Osborn, T; Madisetti, S; Wu, J; Asbeck, P M; Oktyabrsky, S; Kummel, A C

    2014-09-14

    A combined wet and dry cleaning process for GaN(0001) has been investigated with XPS and DFT-MD modeling to determine the molecular-level mechanisms for cleaning and the subsequent nucleation of gate oxide atomic layer deposition (ALD). In situ XPS studies show that for the wet sulfur treatment on GaN(0001), sulfur desorbs at room temperature in vacuum prior to gate oxide deposition. Angle resolved depth profiling XPS post-ALD deposition shows that the a-Al2O3 gate oxide bonds directly to the GaN substrate leaving both the gallium surface atoms and the oxide interfacial atoms with XPS chemical shifts consistent with bulk-like charge. These results are in agreement with DFT calculations that predict the oxide/GaN(0001) interface will have bulk-like charges and a low density of band gap states. This passivation is consistent with the oxide restoring the surface gallium atoms to tetrahedral bonding by eliminating the gallium empty dangling bonds on bulk terminated GaN(0001).

  4. Modular injector integrated linear apparatus with motion profile optimization for spatial atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Li, Yun; Lin, Jilong; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2017-11-01

    A spatial atomic layer deposition apparatus integrated with a modular injector and a linear motor has been designed. It consists of four parts: a precursor delivery manifold, a modular injector, a reaction zone, and a driving unit. An injector with multi-layer structured channels is designed to help improve precursor distribution homogeneity. During the back and forth movement of the substrate at high speed, the inertial impact caused by jerk and sudden changes of acceleration will degrade the film deposition quality. Such residual vibration caused by inertial impact will aggravate the fluctuation of the gap distance between the injector and the substrate in the deposition process. Thus, an S-curve motion profile is implemented to reduce the large inertial impact, and the maximum position error could be reduced by 84%. The microstructure of the film under the S-curve motion profile shows smaller root-mean-square and scanning voltage amplitude under an atomic force microscope, which verifies the effectiveness of the S-curve motion profile in reducing the residual vibration and stabilizing the gap distance between the injector and the substrate. The film deposition rate could reach 100 nm/min while maintaining good uniformity without obvious periodic patterns on the surface.

  5. Bi-layer Channel AZO/ZnO Thin Film Transistors Fabricated by Atomic Layer Deposition Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huijin; Han, Dedong; Liu, Liqiao; Dong, Junchen; Cui, Guodong; Zhang, Shengdong; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Yi

    2017-12-01

    This letter demonstrates bi-layer channel Al-doped ZnO/ZnO thin film transistors (AZO/ZnO TFTs) via atomic layer deposition process at a relatively low temperature. The effects of annealing in oxygen atmosphere at different temperatures have also been investigated. The ALD bi-layer channel AZO/ZnO TFTs annealed in dry O2 at 300 °C exhibit a low leakage current of 2.5 × 10-13A, I on/I off ratio of 1.4 × 107, subthreshold swing (SS) of 0.23 V/decade, and high transmittance. The enhanced performance obtained from the bi-layer channel AZO/ZnO TFT devices is explained by the inserted AZO front channel layer playing the role of the mobility booster.

  6. Ag films grown by remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition on different substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusan, Akinwumi A., E-mail: akinwumi.amusan@ovgu.de; Kalkofen, Bodo; Burte, Edmund P. [Institute of Micro and Sensor Systems, Otto-von-Guericke University, Universitätsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg (Germany); Gargouri, Hassan; Wandel, Klaus; Pinnow, Cay [SENTECH Instruments GmbH, Schwarzschildstraße 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Lisker, Marco [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Silver (Ag) layers were deposited by remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PALD) using Ag(fod)(PEt{sub 3}) (fod = 2,2-dimethyl-6,6,7,7,8,8,8-heptafluorooctane-3,5-dionato) as precursor and hydrogen plasma on silicon substrate covered with thin films of SiO{sub 2}, TiN, Ti/TiN, Co, Ni, and W at different deposition temperatures from 70  to 200 °C. The deposited silver films were analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, four point probe measurement, ellipsometric measurement, x-ray fluorescence (XRF), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). XPS revealed pure Ag with carbon and oxygen contamination close to the detection limit after 30 s argon sputtering for depositions made at 120 and 200 °C substrate temperatures. However, an oxygen contamination was detected in the Ag film deposited at 70 °C after 12 s argon sputtering. A resistivity of 5.7 × 10{sup −6} Ω cm was obtained for approximately 97 nm Ag film on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. The thickness was determined from the SEM cross section on the SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate and also compared with XRF measurements. Polycrystalline cubic Ag reflections were identified from XRD for PALD Ag films deposited at 120 and 200 °C. Compared to W surface, where poor adhesion of the films was found, Co, Ni, TiN, Ti/TiN and SiO{sub 2} surfaces had better adhesion for silver films as revealed by SEM, TEM, and AFM images.

  7. Self-limiting atomic layer deposition of conformal nanostructured silver films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golrokhi, Zahra; Chalker, Sophia; Sutcliffe, Christopher J.; Potter, Richard J., E-mail: rjpott@liverpool.ac.uk

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We grow metallic silver by direct liquid injection thermal atomic layer deposition. • Highly conformal silver nanoparticle coatings on high aspect ratio surfaces. • An ALD temperature growth window between 123 and 128 °C is established. • ALD cycles provides sub nanometre control of silver growth. • Catalytic dehydrogenation ALD mechanism has been elucidated by in-situ QCM. - Abstract: The controlled deposition of ultra-thin conformal silver nanoparticle films is of interest for applications including anti-microbial surfaces, plasmonics, catalysts and sensors. While numerous techniques can produce silver nanoparticles, few are able to produce highly conformal coatings on high aspect ratio surfaces, together with sub-nanometre control and scalability. Here we develop a self-limiting atomic layer deposition (ALD) process for the deposition of conformal metallic silver nanoparticle films. The films have been deposited using direct liquid injection ALD with ((hexafluoroacetylacetonato)silver(I)(1,5-cyclooctadiene)) and propan-1-ol. An ALD temperature window between 123 and 128 °C is identified and within this range self-limiting growth is confirmed with a mass deposition rate of ∼17.5 ng/cm{sup 2}/cycle. The effects of temperature, precursor dose, co-reactant dose and cycle number on the deposition rate and on the properties of the films have been systematically investigated. Under self-limiting conditions, films are metallic silver with a nano-textured surface topography and nanoparticle size is dependent on the number of ALD cycles. The ALD reaction mechanisms have been elucidated using in-situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements, showing chemisorption of the silver precursor, followed by heterogeneous catalytic dehydrogenation of the alcohol to form metallic silver and an aldehyde.

  8. Atomic layer deposited TiO{sub 2} for implantable brain-chip interfacing devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianci, E., E-mail: elena.cianci@mdm.imm.cnr.it [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Lattanzio, S. [Istituto di Fisiologia, Dipartimento di Anatomia Umana e Fisiologia, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Seguini, G. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Vassanelli, S. [Istituto di Fisiologia, Dipartimento di Anatomia Umana e Fisiologia, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we investigated atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited on implantable neuro-chips based on electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor (EOS) junctions, implementing both efficient capacitive neuron-silicon coupling and biocompatibility for long-term implantable functionality. The ALD process was performed at 295 Degree-Sign C using titanium tetraisopropoxide and ozone as precursors on needle-shaped silicon substrates. Engineering of the capacitance of the EOS junctions introducing a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer layer between TiO{sub 2} and silicon resulted in a further increase of the specific capacitance. Biocompatibility for long-term implantable neuroprosthetic systems was checked upon in-vitro treatment.

  9. Dielectric Properties of Thermal and Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Thin Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinesh, K. B.; van Hemmen, J. L.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Roozeboom, F.; Klootwijk, J. H.; Besling, W. F. A.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2011-01-01

    A comparative electrical characterization study of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) deposited by thermal and plasma-assisted atomic layer depositions (ALDs) in a single reactor is presented. Capacitance and leakage current measurements show that the Al2O3 deposited by the plasma-assisted ALD shows excellent

  10. Monolithic Laser Scribed Graphene Scaffold with Atomic Layer Deposited Platinum for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pranati

    2017-09-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures as scaffolds for conformal deposition of catalysts is an emerging research area with significant potential for electrocatalytic applications. In this study, we report the fabrication of monolithic, self-standing, 3D graphitic carbon scaffold with conformally deposited Pt by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst. Laser scribing is employed to transform polyimide into 3D porous graphitic carbon, which possesses good electronic conductivity and numerous edge plane sites. This laser scribed graphene (LSG) architecture makes it possible to fabricate monolithic electrocatalyst support without any binders or conductive additives. The synergistic effect between ALD of Pt on 3D network of LSG provides an avenue for minimal yet effective Pt usage, leading to an enhanced HER activity. This strategy establish a general approach for inexpensive and large scale HER device fabrication with minimum catalyst cost.

  11. Atomic layer deposition of molybdenum oxide using bis(tert-butylimido)bis(dimethylamido) molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertuch, Adam, E-mail: abertuch@ultratech.com; Sundaram, Ganesh [Ultratech/Cambridge NanoTech, 130 Turner Street, Waltham, Massachusetts 02453 (United States); Saly, Mark; Moser, Daniel; Kanjolia, Ravi [SAFC Hitech, 1429 Hilldale Avenue, Haverhill, Massachusetts 01832 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Molybdenum trioxide films have been deposited using thermal atomic layer deposition techniques with bis(tert-butylimido)bis(dimethylamido)molybdenum. Films were deposited at temperatures from 100 to 300 °C using ozone as the oxidant for the process. The Mo precursor was evaluated for thermal stability and volatility using thermogravimetric analysis and static vapor pressure measurements. Film properties were evaluated with ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and secondary electron microscopy. The growth rate per cycle was determined to extend from 0.3 to 2.4 Å/cycle with <4% nonuniformity (1-sigma) with-in-wafer across a 150 mm wafer for the investigated temperature range.

  12. Single-walled carbon nanotubes coated with ZnO by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Partha P.; Gilshteyn, Evgenia; Jiang, Hua; Timmermans, Marina; Kaskela, Antti; Tolochko, Oleg V.; Kurochkin, Alexey V.; Karppinen, Maarit; Nisula, Mikko; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Nasibulin, Albert G.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility of ZnO deposition on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with the help of an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was successfully demonstrated. The utilization of pristine SWCNTs as a support resulted in a non-uniform deposition of ZnO in the form of nanoparticles. To achieve uniform ZnO coating, the SWCNTs first needed to be functionalized by treating the samples in a controlled ozone atmosphere. The uniformly ZnO coated SWCNTs were used to fabricate UV sensing devices. An UV irradiation of the ZnO coated samples turned them from hydrophobic to hydrophilic behaviour. Furthermore, thin films of the ZnO coated SWCNTs allowed us switch p-type field effect transistors made of pristine SWCNTs to have ambipolar characteristics.

  13. Atomic Layer Deposition of Gd-Doped HfO2 Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Adelmann, C.; Tielens, H.; DEWULF, Daan; HARDY, An; Pierreux, D.; Swerts, J.; Rosseel, E.; Shi, X.; VAN BAEL, Marlies; Kittl, J. A.; Van Elshocht, S.

    2010-01-01

    GdxHf1-xOy thin films were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tris(isopropyl-cyclopentadienyl) gadolinium [Gd((PrCp)-Pr-i)(3)] and HfCl4 in combination with H2O as an oxidizer. Growth curves showed a nearly ideal ALD behavior. The growth per individual Gd((PrCp)-Pr-i)(3)/H2O or HfCl4/H2O cycle was 0.55 A degrees, independent of the Gd/(Gd+Hf) composition x in the studied range. This indicates that the amount of HfO2 deposited during a HfCl4/H2O cycle was essentially identical to...

  14. Atomic layer deposition of (K,Na)(Nb,Ta)O{sub 3} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sønsteby, Henrik Hovde, E-mail: henrik.sonsteby@kjemi.iuio.no; Nilsen, Ola; Fjellvåg, Helmer [Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, Sem Sælands vei 26, 0371 Oslo (Norway)

    2016-07-15

    Thin films of complex alkali oxides are frequently investigated due to the large range of electric effects that are found in this class of materials. Their piezo- and ferroelectric properties also place them as sustainable lead free alternatives in optoelectronic devices. Fully gas-based routes for deposition of such compounds are required for integration into microelectronic devices that need conformal thin films with high control of thickness- and composition. The authors here present a route for deposition of materials in the (K,Na)(Nb,Ta)O{sub 3}-system, including the four end members NaNbO{sub 3}, KNbO{sub 3}, NaTaO{sub 3}, and KTaO{sub 3}, using atomic layer deposition with emphasis on control of stoichiometry in such mixed quaternary and quinary compunds.

  15. Transparent ferrimagnetic semiconducting CuCr2O4 thin films by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, T. S.; Yadav, C. S.; Karppinen, M.

    2016-04-01

    We report the magnetic and optical properties of CuCr2O4 thin films fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from Cu(thd)2, Cr(acac)3, and ozone; we deposit 200 nm thick films and anneal them at 700 °C in oxygen atmosphere to crystallize the spinel phase. A ferrimagnetic transition at 140 K and a direct bandgap of 1.36 eV are determined for the films from magnetic and UV-vis spectrophotometric measurements. Electrical transport measurements confirm the p-type semiconducting behavior of the films. As the ALD technique allows the deposition of conformal pin-hole-free coatings on complex 3D surfaces, our CuCr2O4 films are interesting material candidates for various frontier applications.

  16. Transparent ferrimagnetic semiconducting CuCr2O4 thin films by atomic layer deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Tripathi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the magnetic and optical properties of CuCr2O4 thin films fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD from Cu(thd2, Cr(acac3, and ozone; we deposit 200 nm thick films and anneal them at 700 °C in oxygen atmosphere to crystallize the spinel phase. A ferrimagnetic transition at 140 K and a direct bandgap of 1.36 eV are determined for the films from magnetic and UV-vis spectrophotometric measurements. Electrical transport measurements confirm the p-type semiconducting behavior of the films. As the ALD technique allows the deposition of conformal pin-hole-free coatings on complex 3D surfaces, our CuCr2O4 films are interesting material candidates for various frontier applications.

  17. Reaction mechanism studies for platinum nanoparticle growth by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Xinhua; Zhou Yun; Li Jianhua; Weimer, Alan W., E-mail: alan.weimer@colorado.edu [University of Colorado, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Mass spectrometry is used to study the reaction mechanism of platinum (Pt) atomic layer deposition (ALD) on large quantities of high surface area silica gel particles in a fluidized bed reactor. (Methylcyclopentadienyl)trimethylplatinum [(MeCp)PtMe{sub 3}] and oxygen are used as precursors. Studies are conducted at a substrate temperature of 320 Degree-Sign C. The self-limiting behavior of ALD appears to be disrupted with overexposure of Pt precursor. The amount of the deposited Pt and the size of the Pt nanoparticles increase with an increasing overdose time of Pt precursor. This can be explained by the thermal decomposition of Pt precursor at the reaction temperature of 320 Degree-Sign C and the in situ sintering of Pt nanoparticles forming larger particles. This finding is significant and its understanding is essential for better control of Pt deposition to achieve desirable morphological and structural properties for different application requirements.

  18. Atomic layer deposition (ALD): A versatile technique for plasmonics and nanobiotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyungsoon; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Lindquist, Nathan C; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2012-02-28

    While atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been used for many years as an industrial manufacturing method for microprocessors and displays, this versatile technique is finding increased use in the emerging fields of plasmonics and nanobiotechnology. In particular, ALD coatings can modify metallic surfaces to tune their optical and plasmonic properties, to protect them against unwanted oxidation and contamination, or to create biocompatible surfaces. Furthermore, ALD is unique among thin-film deposition techniques in its ability to meet the processing demands for engineering nanoplasmonic devices, offering conformal deposition of dense and ultra-thin films on high-aspect-ratio nanostructures at temperatures below 100 °C. In this review, we present key features of ALD and describe how it could benefit future applications in plasmonics, nanosciences, and biotechnology.

  19. Layer-by-Layer Molecular Assemblies for Dye-Sensitized Photoelectrosynthesis Cells Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Degao [Department; Sheridan, Matthew V. [Department; Shan, Bing [Department; Farnum, Byron H. [Department; Marquard, Seth L. [Department; Sherman, Benjamin D. [Department; Eberhart, Michael S. [Department; Nayak, Animesh [Department; Dares, Christopher J. [Department; Das, Atanu K. [Center; Bullock, R. Morris [Center; Meyer, Thomas J. [Department

    2017-08-30

    In a Dye Sensitized Photoelectrosynthesis Cell (DSPEC) the relative orientation of catalyst and chromophore play important roles. Here we introduce a new, robust, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) procedure for the preparation of assemblies on wide bandgap semiconductors. In the procedure, phosphonated metal complex precursors react with metal ion bridging to an external chromophore or catalyst to give assemblies bridged by Al(III), Sn(IV), Ti(IV), or Zr(IV) metal oxide units as bridges. The procedure has been extended to chromophore-catalyst assemblies for water oxidation catalysis. A SnO2 bridged assembly on SnO2/TiO2 core/shell electrodes undergoes water splitting with an incident photon conversion efficiency (IPCE) of 17.1% at 440 nm. Reduction of water at a Ni(II)-based catalyst on NiO films has been shown to give H2. Compared to conventional solution-based procedures, the ALD approach offers significant advantages in scope and flexibility for the preparation of stable surface structures.

  20. Nucleation and growth of copper selective-area atomic layer deposition on palladium nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, J.; Zimmerman, D. T.; Weisel, G. J.; Willis, B. G.

    2017-10-01

    The nucleation and growth of copper atomic layer deposition (ALD) on palladium have been investigated for applications in nanoscale devices. Palladium nanostructures were fabricated by electron beam lithography and range in size from 250 nm to 5 μm, prepared on oxidized silicon wafers. Copper ALD using Cu(thd)2(s) and H2(g) as reactants was carried out to selectively deposit copper on palladium seeded regions to the exclusion of surrounding oxide surfaces. Nuclei sizes and densities have been quantified by scanning electron microscopy for different growth conditions. It is found that growth occurs via island growth at temperatures of 150-190 °C and alloy growth at temperatures above 210 °C. In the lower temperature window, nucleation density increases with decreasing temperature, reaching a maximum of 4.8 ± 0.2 × 109/cm2 at 150 °C, but growth is too slow for significant deposition at the lowest temperatures. At higher temperatures, individual nuclei cannot be quantified due to extensive mixing of copper and palladium layers. For the lower temperatures where nuclei can be quantified, rates of nucleation and growth are enhanced at high H2 partial pressures. At the smallest length scales, conformality of the deposited over-layers is limited by a finite nuclei density and evolving grain structure that cause distortion of the original nanostructure shape during growth.

  1. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} multi-density layer structure as a moisture permeation barrier deposited by radio frequency remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyunsoo [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Display Co. Ltd., Tangjeong, Chungcheongnam-Do 336-741 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Heeyoung [Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hagyoung; Ham, Giyul; Shin, Seokyoon [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyeongtag, E-mail: hjeon@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-21

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited by remote plasma atomic layer deposition have been used for thin film encapsulation of organic light emitting diode. In this study, a multi-density layer structure consisting of two Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers with different densities are deposited with different deposition conditions of O{sub 2} plasma reactant time. This structure improves moisture permeation barrier characteristics, as confirmed by a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) test. The lowest WVTR of the multi-density layer structure was 4.7 × 10{sup −5} gm{sup −2} day{sup −1}, which is one order of magnitude less than WVTR for the reference single-density Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. This improvement is attributed to the location mismatch of paths for atmospheric gases, such as O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, in the film due to different densities in the layers. This mechanism is analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, elastic recoil detection, and angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These results confirmed that the multi-density layer structure exhibits very good characteristics as an encapsulation layer via location mismatch of paths for H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} between the two layers.

  2. Atomic layer deposition on polymer based flexible packaging materials: Growth characteristics and diffusion barrier properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeaeriaeinen, Tommi O., E-mail: tommi.kaariainen@lut.f [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Prikaatinkatu 3 E, 50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Maydannik, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.maydannik@lut.f [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Prikaatinkatu 3 E, 50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Cameron, David C., E-mail: david.cameron@lut.f [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Prikaatinkatu 3 E, 50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Lahtinen, Kimmo, E-mail: kimmo.lahtinen@tut.f [Tampere University of Technology, Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, P.O. Box 541, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Johansson, Petri, E-mail: petri.johansson@tut.f [Tampere University of Technology, Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, P.O. Box 541, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Kuusipalo, Jurkka, E-mail: jurkka.kuusipalo@tut.f [Tampere University of Technology, Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, P.O. Box 541, 33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2011-03-01

    One of the most promising areas for the industrial application of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is for gas barrier layers on polymers. In this work, a packaging material system with improved diffusion barrier properties has been developed and studied by applying ALD on flexible polymer based packaging materials. Nanometer scale metal oxide films have been applied to polymer-coated papers and their diffusion barrier properties have been studied by means of water vapor and oxygen transmission rates. The materials for the study were constructed in two stages: the paper was firstly extrusion coated with polymer film, which was then followed by the ALD deposition of oxide layer. The polymers used as extrusion coatings were polypropylene, low and high density polyethylene, polylactide and polyethylene terephthalate. Water vapor transmission rates (WVTRs) were measured according to method SCAN-P 22:68 and oxygen transmission rates (O{sub 2}TRs) according to a standard ASTM D 3985. According to the results a 10 nm oxide layer already decreased the oxygen transmission by a factor of 10 compared to uncoated material. WVTR with 40 nm ALD layer was better than the level currently required for most common dry flexible packaging applications. When the oxide layer thickness was increased to 100 nm and above, the measured WVTRs were limited by the measurement set up. Using an ALD layer allowed the polymer thickness on flexible packaging materials to be reduced. Once the ALD layer was 40 nm thick, WVTRs and O{sub 2}TRs were no longer dependent on polymer layer thickness. Thus, nanometer scale ALD oxide layers have shown their feasibility as high quality diffusion barriers on flexible packaging materials.

  3. Properties of HfLaO MOS capacitor deposited on SOI with plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Wenyan; Cheng, Xinhong, E-mail: xh-cheng@mail.sim.ac.cn; Cao, Duo; Zheng, Li; Xu, Dawei; Wang, Zhongjian; Xia, Chao; Shen, Lingyan; Yu, Yuehui [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changning Road 865, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shen, DaShen [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Amorphous HfLaO dielectric film was successfully deposited on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition with in situ plasma treatment. The HfLaO film retained its insulating characteristics and is thermally stable even after annealing at 800 °C. The film has a dielectric constant of 27.3 and leakage of only 0.03 mA/cm{sup 2} at a gate bias of |Vg − V{sub fb}| = 1 V. The capacitance equivalent oxide thickness is 0.7 nm. A new parallel electrode testing structure was applied to measure C–V and J–V characteristics for the SOI samples. This testing method for metal–oxide–semiconductor capacitors has potential uses for measuring other layered substrates.

  4. Investigation of atomic layer deposition for the synthesis of electrochemical electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstock, David John

    Electrochemical processes dominate a wide range of applications, including sensing, catalysis, and energy storage. Critical to these applications is the electrochemical electrode at which the electrochemical processes are conducted. In this dissertation, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is demonstrated for the controlled synthesis of electrochemical electrodes. ALD is a thin film deposition technique that provides for highly conformal, pinhole-free films with precisely controlled thickness and composition. In particular, the deposition of thin insulating films by ALD is exploited to fabricate ultramicroelectrode (UME) probes for electrochemical imaging applications, and the conformal deposition of thin metal films within nanoporous templates is exploited to synthesize nanostructured, high surface area electrodes. UME probes are commonly used for spatially resolved electrochemical imaging via scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) techniques. One of the challenges in UME probe fabrication is the deposition of thin, high quality insulating films to define the conductive electrode solely at the probe tip. This work demonstrates the application of ALD Al2O3 as a high quality, insulating thin film that enables the fabrication of novel UME probes for SECM. In particular, ALD Al2O3 is utilized to prepare integrated probes, in which a UME is integrated into an atomic force microscopy tip and cantilever for scanning electrochemical microscopy-atomic force microscopy and into a nanopipette probe for scanning electrochemical microscopyscanning ion conductance microscopy. High surface area electrodes are also valuable in a range of electrochemical applications. The conformality of ALD is ideally-suited to the synthesis of these electrodes via the deposition of metal films within nanoporous templates. The combination of ALD and nanoporous templates provides for the synthesis of electrodes with precisely controlled morphologies and compositions. To this end, nanostructured Pt

  5. UV protective zinc oxide coating for biaxially oriented polypropylene packaging film by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahtinen, Kimmo, E-mail: kimmo.lahtinen@lut.fi [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Kääriäinen, Tommi, E-mail: tommi.kaariainen@colorado.edu [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Johansson, Petri, E-mail: petri.johansson@tut.fi [Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, Tampere University of Technology, P.O.Box 589, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Kotkamo, Sami, E-mail: sami.kotkamo@tut.fi [Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, Tampere University of Technology, P.O.Box 589, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Maydannik, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.maydannik@lut.fi [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Seppänen, Tarja, E-mail: tarja.seppanen@lut.fi [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Kuusipalo, Jurkka, E-mail: jurkka.kuusipalo@tut.fi [Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, Tampere University of Technology, P.O.Box 589, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Cameron, David C., E-mail: david.cameron@miktech.fi [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130 Mikkeli (Finland)

    2014-11-03

    Biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) packaging film was coated with zinc oxide (ZnO) coatings by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in order to protect the film from UV degradation. The coatings were made at a process temperature of 100 °C using diethylzinc and water as zinc and oxygen precursors, respectively. The UV protective properties of the coatings were tested by using UV–VIS and infrared spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and a mechanical strength tester, which characterised the tensile and elastic properties of the film. The results obtained with 36 and 67 nm ZnO coatings showed that the ZnO UV protective layer is able to provide a significant decrease in photodegradation of the BOPP film under UV exposure. While the uncoated BOPP film suffered a complete degradation after a 4-week UV exposure, the 67 nm ZnO coated BOPP film was able to preserve half of its original tensile strength and 1/3 of its elongation at break after a 6-week exposure period. The infrared analysis and DSC measurements further proved the UV protection of the ZnO coatings. The results show that a nanometre scale ZnO coating deposited by ALD is a promising option when a transparent UV protection layer is sought for polymer substrates. - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposited zinc oxide coatings were used as UV protection layers. • Biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) film was well protected against UV light. • Formation of UV degradation products in BOPP was significantly reduced. • Mechanical properties of the UV exposed BOPP film were significantly improved.

  6. Ta2O5- and TiO2-based nanostructures made by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemell, Marianna; Härkönen, Emma; Pore, Viljami; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2010-01-01

    Nanotubular Ta2O5- and TiO2-based structures were prepared by atomic layer deposition of Ta2O5 and TiO2 thin films, conformally on pore walls of porous alumina membranes. Both self-supporting alumina membranes and Si-supported thin-film membranes were studied as templates. Long Ta2O5 and TiO2 nanotubes were prepared successfully with the self-supporting membranes. The TiO2 nanotubes showed photocatalytic activity in methylene blue degradation under UV illumination. The Ta2O5 and TiO2 nanotubes were further modified by depositing Pt nanoparticles inside them. The Si-supported thin-film membranes were used as templates for the preparation of robust Ta2O5-coated Ni nanorod arrays on a Si substrate using electrodeposition, chemical etching and atomic layer deposition. In addition to photocatalysis, the nanostructures prepared in this work may find applications as other catalysts and as solid-state or electrochemical capacitors.

  7. Chemical resistance of thin film materials based on metal oxides grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammelselg, Väino, E-mail: vaino.sammelselg@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, Ravila 14a, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Netšipailo, Ivan; Aidla, Aleks; Tarre, Aivar; Aarik, Lauri; Asari, Jelena; Ritslaid, Peeter; Aarik, Jaan [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia)

    2013-09-02

    Etching rate of technologically important metal oxide thin films in hot sulphuric acid was investigated. The films of Al-, Ti-, Cr-, and Ta-oxides studied were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method on silicon substrates from different precursors in large ranges of growth temperatures (80–900 °C) in order to reveal process parameters that allow deposition of coatings with higher chemical resistance. The results obtained demonstrate that application of processes that yield films with lower concentration of residual impurities as well as crystallization of films in thermal ALD processes leads to significant decrease of etching rate. Crystalline films of materials studied showed etching rates down to values of < 5 pm/s. - Highlights: • Etching of atomic layer deposited thin metal oxide films in hot H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was studied. • Smallest etching rates of < 5 pm/s for TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} were reached. • Highest etching rate of 2.8 nm/s for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was occurred. • Remarkable differences in etching of non- and crystalline films were observed.

  8. Role of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide as oxidation barrier for silicon based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe, E-mail: g.fiorentino@tudelft.nl; Morana, Bruno [Department of Microelectronic, Delft University of Technology, Feldmannweg 17, 2628 CT Delft (Netherlands); Forte, Salvatore [Department of Electronic, University of Naples Federico II, Piazzale Tecchio, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Sarro, Pasqualina Maria [Department of Microelectronic, Delft University of Technology, Feldmannweg 17, 2628 CT, Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, the authors study the protective effect against oxidation of a thin layer of atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Nitrogen doped silicon carbide (poly-SiC:N) based microheaters coated with ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are used as test structure to investigate the barrier effect of the alumina layers to oxygen and water vapor at very high temperature (up to 1000 °C). Different device sets have been fabricated changing the doping levels, to evaluate possible interaction between the dopants and the alumina layer. The as-deposited alumina layer morphology has been evaluated by means of AFM analysis and compared to an annealed sample (8 h at 1000 °C) to estimate the change in the grain structure and the film density. The coated microheaters are subjected to very long oxidation time in dry and wet environment (up to 8 h at 900 and 1000 °C). By evaluating the electrical resistance variation between uncoated reference devices and the ALD coated devices, the oxide growth on the SiC is estimated. The results show that the ALD alumina coating completely prevents the oxidation of the SiC up to 900 °C in wet environment, while an oxide thickness reduction of 50% is observed at 1000 °C compared to uncoated devices.

  9. Growth and characterization of titanium oxide by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2013-09-01

    The growth of TiO2 films by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition using Star-Ti as a precursor has been systematically studied. The conversion from amorphous to crystalline TiO2 was observed either during high temperature growth or annealing process of the films. The refractive index and bandgap of TiO2 films changed with the growth and annealing temperatures. The optimization of the annealing conditions for TiO2 films was also done by morphology and density studies. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Microwave absorption properties of carbon nanocoils coated with highly controlled magnetic materials by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Tang, Shiwei; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Lin, Shiwei; Feng, Yuhong; Zhou, Lei; Qin, Yong

    2012-12-21

    In this work, atomic layer deposition is applied to coat carbon nanocoils with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) or Ni. The coatings have a uniform and highly controlled thickness. The coated nanocoils with coaxial multilayer nanostructures exhibit remarkably improved microwave absorption properties compared to the pristine carbon nanocoils. The enhanced absorption ability arises from the efficient complementarity between complex permittivity and permeability, chiral morphology, and multilayer structure of the products. This method can be extended to exploit other composite materials benefiting from its convenient control of the impedance matching and combination of dielectric-magnetic multiple loss mechanisms for microwave absorption applications.

  11. Resistive memory switching in ultrathin TiO{sub 2} films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, V. K., E-mail: vikassahu@rrcat.gov.in; Misra, P.; Ajimsha, R. S.; Das, A. K.; Joshi, M. P.; Kukreja, L. M. [Laser Material Processing Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Electric field controlled forming free and unipolar resistive memory switching was observed in Au/TiO{sub 2}/Pt devices containing ultrathin TiO{sub 2} films of thickness ~ 4 nm grown by atomic layer deposition. These devices showed a large resistance ratio of ~ 10{sup 3} between high and low resistance states along with appreciable time retention for ~ 10{sup 4} seconds and endurance. The spread of reset and set voltages was from ~ 0.4-0.6 V and 1.1-1.5 V respectively with a clear window between them. The resistive switching mechanism was explained based on conductive filamentary model.

  12. Antireflection Coatings for Strongly Curved Glass Lenses by Atomic Layer Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kristin Pfeiffer; Ulrike Schulz; Andreas Tünnermann; Adriana Szeghalmi

    2017-01-01

    Antireflection (AR) coatings are indispensable in numerous optical applications and are increasingly demanded on highly curved optical components. In this work, optical thin films of SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2 and Ta2O5 were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD), which is based on self-limiting surface reactions leading to a uniform film thickness on arbitrarily shaped surfaces. Al2O3/TiO2/SiO2 and Al2O3/Ta2O5/SiO2 AR coatings were successfully applied in the 400–750 nm and 400–700 nm spectral ran...

  13. Atomic Layer Deposition of Tin Oxide with Nitric Oxide as an Oxidant Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Heo, Jaeyeong; Gordon, Roy Gerald; Kim, Sang Bok

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of tin oxide \\((SnO_2)\\) thin films was achieved using a cyclic amide of Sn(II) (1,3-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4,5-dimethyl-(4R,5R)-1,3,2-diazastannolidin-2-ylidene) as a tin precursor and nitric oxide (NO) as an oxidant gas. Film properties as a function of growth temperature from \\(130-250^{\\circ}C\\) were studied. Highly conducting \\(SnO_2\\) films were obtained at \\(200-250^{\\circ}C\\) with the growth per cycle of \\(~1.4 \\mathring{A}\\)/cycle, while insulating films...

  14. Metallic nanoparticle-based strain sensors elaborated by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyoo, E.; Malhaire, C.; Thomas, D.; Rafaël, R.; R'Mili, M.; Malchère, A.; Roiban, L.; Koneti, S.; Bugnet, M.; Sabac, A.; Le Berre, M.

    2017-03-01

    Platinum nanoparticle-based strain gauges are elaborated by means of atomic layer deposition on flexible polyimide substrates. Their electro-mechanical response is tested under mechanical bending in both buckling and conformational contact configurations. A maximum gauge factor of 70 is reached at a strain level of 0.5%. Although the exponential dependence of the gauge resistance on strain is attributed to the tunneling effect, it is shown that the majority of the junctions between adjacent Pt nanoparticles are in a short circuit state. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of an all-plastic pressure sensor integrating Pt nanoparticle-based strain gauges in a Wheatstone bridge configuration.

  15. Growth mechanism of Al2O3 film on an organic layer in plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. Y.; Kim, D. W.; Kang, W. S.; Lee, J. O.; Hur, M.; Han, S. H.

    2018-01-01

    Differences in the physical and chemical properties of Al2O3 films on a Si wafer and a C x H y layer were investigated in the case of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3 film on the Si had a sharper interface and lower thickness than the Al2O3 film on the C x H y . The amount of carbon-impurity near the interface was larger for Al2O3 on the C x H y than for Al2O3 on the Si. In order to understand these differences, the concentrations of Al, O, C, and Si atoms through the Al2O3 films were evaluated by using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling. The emission intensities of CO molecule were analyzed for different numbers of deposition cycles, by using time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Finally, a growth mechanism for Al2O3 on an organic layer was proposed, based on the XPS and OES results for the Si wafer and the C x H y layer.

  16. Recent Development of Advanced Electrode Materials by Atomic Layer Deposition for Electrochemical Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Cao; Wang, John

    2016-10-01

    Electrode materials play a decisive role in almost all electrochemical energy storage devices, determining their overall performance. Proper selection, design and fabrication of electrode materials have thus been regarded as one of the most critical steps in achieving high electrochemical energy storage performance. As an advanced nanotechnology for thin films and surfaces with conformal interfacial features and well controllable deposition thickness, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been successfully developed for deposition and surface modification of electrode materials, where there are considerable issues of interfacial and surface chemistry at atomic and nanometer scale. In addition, ALD has shown great potential in construction of novel nanostructured active materials that otherwise can be hardly obtained by other processing techniques, such as those solution-based processing and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. This review focuses on the recent development of ALD for the design and delivery of advanced electrode materials in electrochemical energy storage devices, where typical examples will be highlighted and analyzed, and the merits and challenges of ALD for applications in energy storage will also be discussed.

  17. Photoluminescence enhancement in porous SiC passivated by atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Iwasa, Yoshimi; Ou, Yiyu

    2016-01-01

    Porous SiC co-doped with B and N was passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 films to enhance the photoluminescence. After optimizing the deposition conditions, as high as 14.9 times photoluminescence enhancement has been achieved.......Porous SiC co-doped with B and N was passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 films to enhance the photoluminescence. After optimizing the deposition conditions, as high as 14.9 times photoluminescence enhancement has been achieved....

  18. Temperature-dependent subsurface growth during atomic layer deposition on polypropylene and cellulose fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jur, Jesse S; Spagnola, Joseph C; Lee, Kyoungmi; Gong, Bo; Peng, Qing; Parsons, Gregory N

    2010-06-01

    Nucleation and subsequent growth of aluminum oxide by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on polypropylene fiber substrates is strongly dependent on processing temperature and polymer backbone structure. Deposition on cellulose cotton, which contains ample hydroxyl sites for ALD nucleation and growth on the polymer backbone, readily produces a uniform and conformal coating. However, similar ALD processing on polypropylene, which contains no readily available active sites for growth initiation, results in a graded and intermixed polymer/inorganic interface layer. The structure of the polymer/inorganic layer depends strongly on the process temperature, where lower temperature (60 degrees C) produced a more abrupt transition. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images of polypropylene fibers coated at higher temperature (90 degrees C) show that non-coalesced particles form in the near-surface region of the polymer, and the particles grow in size and coalesce into a film as the number of ALD cycles increases. Quartz crystal microbalance analysis on polypropylene films confirms enhanced mass uptake at higher processing temperatures, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data also confirm heterogeneous mixing between the aluminum oxide and the polypropylene during deposition at higher temperatures. The strong temperature dependence of film nucleation and subsurface growth is ascribed to a relatively large increase in bulk species diffusivity that occurs upon the temperature-driven free volume expansion of the polypropylene. These results provide helpful insight into mechanisms for controlled organic/inorganic thin film and fiber materials integration.

  19. Protecting BOPP film from UV degradation with an atomic layer deposited titanium oxide surface coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahtinen, Kimmo, E-mail: kimmo.lahtinen@lut.fi [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Mikkeli (Finland); Maydannik, Philipp; Seppänen, Tarja; Cameron, David C. [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Mikkeli (Finland); Johansson, Petri; Kotkamo, Sami; Kuusipalo, Jurkka [Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland)

    2013-10-01

    Titanium oxide layers were deposited onto a BOPP film by atomic layer deposition in order to prevent UV degradation of the film. The coatings were deposited in a low-temperature process at 80 °C by using tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium and ozone as titanium and oxygen precursors, respectively. UV block characteristics of the coatings and their effect on the polymer were measured by using UV–vis and IR spectrometry, and differential scanning calorimetry. According to the results, the coatings provided a considerable decrease in the photodegradation of the BOPP film during UV exposure. IR spectra showed that during a 6-week UV exposure, a 67 nm titanium oxide coating was able to almost completely prevent the formation of photodegradation products in the film. The mechanical properties of the film were also protected by the coating, but as opposed to what the IR study suggested they were still somewhat compromised by the UV light. After a 6-week exposure, the tensile strength and elongation at break of the 67 nm titanium oxide coated film decreased to half of the values measured before the treatment. This should be compared to the complete degradation suffered by the uncoated base sheet already after only 4 weeks of treatment. The results show that nanometre scale inorganic films deposited by ALD show a promising performance as effective UV protection for BOPP substrates.

  20. Area-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Conformal Coating, Subnanometer Thickness Control, and Smart Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ming; Ho, Johnny C

    2015-09-22

    Transistors have already been made three-dimensional (3D), with device channels (i.e., fins in trigate field-effect transistor (FinFET) technology) that are taller, thinner, and closer together in order to enhance device performance and lower active power consumption. As device scaling continues, these transistors will require more advanced, fabrication-enabling technologies for the conformal deposition of high-κ dielectric layers on their 3D channels with accurate position alignment and thickness control down to the subnanometer scale. Among many competing techniques, area-selective atomic layer deposition (AS-ALD) is a promising method that is well suited to the requirements without the use of complicated, complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-incompatible processes. However, further progress is limited by poor area selectivity for thicker films formed via a higher number of ALD cycles as well as the prolonged processing time. In this issue of ACS Nano, Professor Stacy Bent and her research group demonstrate a straightforward self-correcting ALD approach, combining selective deposition with a postprocess mild chemical etching, which enables selective deposition of dielectric films with thicknesses and processing times at least 10 times larger and 48 times shorter, respectively, than those obtained by conventional AS-ALD processes. These advances present an important technological breakthrough that may drive the AS-ALD technique a step closer toward industrial applications in electronics, catalysis, and photonics, etc. where more efficient device fabrication processes are needed.

  1. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of copper(II) oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iivonen, Tomi, E-mail: tomi.iivonen@helsinki.fi; Hämäläinen, Jani; Mattinen, Miika; Popov, Georgi; Leskelä, Markku [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Marchand, Benoît; Mizohata, Kenichiro [Division of Materials Physics, Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Kim, Jiyeon; Fischer, Roland A. [Chair of Inorganic Chemistry II, Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitätsstrasse 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Copper(II) oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using bis-(dimethylamino-2-propoxide)copper [Cu(dmap){sub 2}] and ozone in a temperature window of 80–140 °C. A thorough characterization of the films was performed using x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, UV‐Vis spectrophotometry, atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis techniques. The process was found to produce polycrystalline copper(II) oxide films with a growth rate of 0.2–0.3 Å per cycle. Impurity content in the films was relatively small for a low temperature ALD process.

  2. Controlled Synthesis of Atomically Layered Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hexagonal boron nitrite (h-BN is an attractive material for many applications including electronics as a complement to graphene, anti-oxidation coatings, light emitters, etc. However, the synthesis of high-quality h-BN is still a great challenge. In this work, via controlled chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate the synthesis of h-BN films with a controlled thickness down to atomic layers. The quality of as-grown h-BN is confirmed by complementary characterizations including high-resolution transition electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. This work will pave the way for production of large-scale and high-quality h-BN and its applications as well.

  3. Next-Generation Lithium Metal Anode Engineering via Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozen, Alexander C; Lin, Chuan-Fu; Pearse, Alexander J; Schroeder, Marshall A; Han, Xiaogang; Hu, Liangbing; Lee, Sang-Bok; Rubloff, Gary W; Noked, Malachi

    2015-06-23

    Lithium metal is considered to be the most promising anode for next-generation batteries due to its high energy density of 3840 mAh g(-1). However, the extreme reactivity of the Li surface can induce parasitic reactions with solvents, contamination, and shuttled active species in the electrolyte, reducing the performance of batteries employing Li metal anodes. One promising solution to this issue is application of thin chemical protection layers to the Li metal surface. Using a custom-made ultrahigh vacuum integrated deposition and characterization system, we demonstrate atomic layer deposition (ALD) of protection layers directly on Li metal with exquisite thickness control. We demonstrate as a proof-of-concept that a 14 nm thick ALD Al2O3 layer can protect the Li surface from corrosion due to atmosphere, sulfur, and electrolyte exposure. Using Li-S battery cells as a test system, we demonstrate an improved capacity retention using ALD-protected anodes over cells assembled with bare Li metal anodes for up to 100 cycles.

  4. Atomic layer deposition to prevent metal transfer from implants: An X-ray fluorescence study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilo, Fabjola [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Borgese, Laura, E-mail: laura.borgese@unibs.itl [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Prost, Josef; Rauwolf, Mirjam; Turyanskaya, Anna; Wobrauschek, Peter; Kregsamer, Peter; Streli, Christina [Atominstitut, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Pazzaglia, Ugo [Dipartimento Specialità Medico Chirurgiche Sc. Radiol. e Sanità Pubblica, University of Brescia, v.le Europa, 11, 25121 Brescia (Italy); Depero, Laura E. [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Co and Cr migrate from bare alloy implant to the surrounding tissue showing a cluster distribution. • Co and Cr migrate from the TiO{sub 2} coated implant to the surrounding tissue showing a decreasing gradient distribution from the alloy surface. • TiO{sub 2} coating layers obtained by ALD on Co–Cr alloy show a barrier effect for the migration of metals. • The thicker the TiO{sub 2} layer deposited by ALD, the lower the metal migration. • The migration of metals from bare alloy toward the surrounding tissue increases with time. This effect is not detected in the coated samples. - Abstract: We show that Atomic Layer Deposition is a suitable coating technique to prevent metal diffusion from medical implants. The metal distribution in animal bone tissue with inserted bare and coated Co–Cr alloys was evaluated by means of micro X-ray fluorescence mapping. In the uncoated implant, the migration of Co and Cr particles from the bare alloy in the biological tissues is observed just after one month and the number of particles significantly increases after two months. In contrast, no metal diffusion was detected in the implant coated with TiO{sub 2}. Instead, a gradient distribution of the metals was found, from the alloy surface going into the tissue. No significant change was detected after two months of aging. As expected, the thicker is the TiO{sub 2} layer, the lower is the metal migration.

  5. Sealing of hard CrN and DLC coatings with atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härkönen, Emma; Kolev, Ivan; Díaz, Belén; Swiatowska, Jolanta; Maurice, Vincent; Seyeux, Antoine; Marcus, Philippe; Fenker, Martin; Toth, Lajos; Radnoczi, György; Vehkamäki, Marko; Ritala, Mikko

    2014-02-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film deposition technique that is based on alternating and saturating surface reactions of two or more gaseous precursors. The excellent conformality of ALD thin films can be exploited for sealing defects in coatings made by other techniques. Here the corrosion protection properties of hard CrN and diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on low alloy steel were improved by ALD sealing with 50 nm thick layers consisting of Al2O3 and Ta2O5 nanolaminates or mixtures. In cross sectional images the ALD layers were found to follow the surface morphology of the CrN coatings uniformly. Furthermore, ALD growth into the pinholes of the CrN coating was verified. In electrochemical measurements the ALD sealing was found to decrease the current density of the CrN coated steel by over 2 orders of magnitude. The neutral salt spray (NSS) durability was also improved: on the best samples the appearance of corrosion spots was delayed from 2 to 168 h. On DLC coatings the adhesion of the ALD sealing layers was weaker, but still clear improvement in NSS durability was achieved indicating sealing of the pinholes.

  6. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of MoS{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurca, Titel; Wang, Binghao; Tan, Jeffrey M.; Lohr, Tracy L.; Marks, Tobin J. [Department of Chemistry and the Materials Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); Moody, Michael J.; Henning, Alex; Emery, Jonathan D.; Lauhon, Lincoln J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and the Materials Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2017-04-24

    Wet chemical screening reveals the very high reactivity of Mo(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} with H{sub 2}S for the low-temperature synthesis of MoS{sub 2}. This observation motivated an investigation of Mo(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} as a volatile precursor for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of MoS{sub 2} thin films. Herein we report that Mo(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} enables MoS{sub 2} film growth at record low temperatures - as low as 60 C. The as-deposited films are amorphous but can be readily crystallized by annealing. Importantly, the low ALD growth temperature is compatible with photolithographic and lift-off patterning for the straightforward fabrication of diverse device structures. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Fermi Level Tuning of ZnO Films Through Supercycled Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruomeng; Ye, Sheng; Sun, Kai; Kiang, Kian S.; de Groot, C. H. (Kees)

    2017-09-01

    A novel supercycled atomic layer deposition (ALD) process which combines thermal ALD process with in situ O2 plasma treatment is presented in this work to deposit ZnO thin films with highly tunable electrical properties. Both O2 plasma time and the number of thermal ALD cycles in a supercycle can be adjusted to achieve fine tuning of film resistivity and carrier concentration up to six orders of magnitude without extrinsic doping. The concentration of hydrogen defects are believed to play a major role in adjusting the electrical properties of ZnO films. Kelvin probe force microscopy results evidently show the shift of Fermi level in different ZnO films and are well associated with the changing of carrier concentration. This reliable and robust technique reported here clearly points towards the capability of using this method to produce ZnO films with controlled properties in different applications.

  8. Enhancing the platinum atomic layer deposition infiltration depth inside anodic alumina nanoporous membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaish, Amit, E-mail: anv@udel.edu; Krueger, Susan; Dimitriou, Michael; Majkrzak, Charles [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8313 (United States); Vanderah, David J. [Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research, NIST, Rockville, Maryland 20850 (United States); Chen, Lei, E-mail: lei.chen@nist.gov [NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8313 (United States); Gawrisch, Klaus [Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Nanoporous platinum membranes can be straightforwardly fabricated by forming a Pt coating inside the nanopores of anodic alumina membranes (AAO) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, the high-aspect-ratio of AAO makes Pt ALD very challenging. By tuning the process deposition temperature and precursor exposure time, enhanced infiltration depth along with conformal coating was achieved for Pt ALD inside the AAO templates. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and small angle neutron scattering were employed to analyze the Pt coverage and thickness inside the AAO nanopores. Additionally, one application of platinum-coated membrane was demonstrated by creating a high-density protein-functionalized interface.

  9. [Optical Properties of ZnO Films Fabricated by Atomic Layer Deposition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-mei; Wang, Dong-dong; Fang, Ming; Zhang, Ao; Wang, Xiao-yu; Chen, Qiang; Meng, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The ZnO films were deposited by atomic layer deposition method using water and diethylzinc as precursors at different temperatures (110 and 190 degrees C). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence spectra (PL) were used to investigate the elemental composition and optical properties of ZnO films. Our results showed that with the increasing of the growth temperature, the amount of -OH groups in the ZnO film decreased, which indicated that the reactions went to completion at high processing temperatures. The PL spectra of the ZnO film deposited at 110 degrees C exhibited two emission bands, one in the UV region and the other in the visible region. When the deposition temperature increased to 190 degrees C, the emission bands in the visible region disappeared, which indicated that the deep level defect in ZnO became less. The carrier mobility improved from 25 to 32 cm2 x (V x S)(-1) with the reduction of the defects in the ZnO film. The refractive index of the ZnO films decreased from 2.33 to 1.9 in the 375-800 nm region. The optical absorption edge (E(g)) values of the ZnO films deposited at different temperature were about 3.27 eV.

  10. ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF TITANIUM OXIDE THIN FILMS ONNANOPOROUS ALUMINA TEMPLATES FOR MEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.

    2009-05-05

    Nanostructured materials may play a significant role in controlled release of pharmacologic agents for treatment of cancer. Many nanoporous polymer materials are inadequate for use in drug delivery. Nanoporous alumina provides several advantages over other materials for use in controlled drug delivery and other medical applications. Atomic layer deposition was used to coat all the surfaces of the nanoporous alumina membrane in order to reduce the pore size in a controlled manner. Both the 20 nm and 100 nm titanium oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes did not exhibit statistically lower viability compared to the uncoated nanoporous alumina membrane control materials. In addition, 20 nm pore size titanium oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes exposed to ultraviolet light demonstrated activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Nanostructured materials prepared using atomic layer deposition may be useful for delivering a pharmacologic agent at a precise rate to a specific location in the body. These materials may serve as the basis for 'smart' drug delivery devices, orthopedic implants, or self-sterilizing medical devices.

  11. Mechanistic modeling study on process optimization and precursor utilization with atmospheric spatial atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhang; He, Wenjie; Duan, Chenlong [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Chen, Rong, E-mail: rongchen@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Shan, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Spatial atomic layer deposition (SALD) is a promising technology with the aim of combining the advantages of excellent uniformity and conformity of temporal atomic layer deposition (ALD), and an industrial scalable and continuous process. In this manuscript, an experimental and numerical combined model of atmospheric SALD system is presented. To establish the connection between the process parameters and the growth efficiency, a quantitative model on reactant isolation, throughput, and precursor utilization is performed based on the separation gas flow rate, carrier gas flow rate, and precursor mass fraction. The simulation results based on this model show an inverse relation between the precursor usage and the carrier gas flow rate. With the constant carrier gas flow, the relationship of precursor usage and precursor mass fraction follows monotonic function. The precursor concentration, regardless of gas velocity, is the determinant factor of the minimal residual time. The narrow gap between precursor injecting heads and the substrate surface in general SALD system leads to a low Péclet number. In this situation, the gas diffusion act as a leading role in the precursor transport in the small gap rather than the convection. Fluid kinetics from the numerical model is independent of the specific structure, which is instructive for the SALD geometry design as well as its process optimization.

  12. Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Thin Films: A Review of Recent Progress, Challenges, and Outlooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Meng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available With the continued miniaturization of devices in the semiconductor industry, atomic layer deposition (ALD of silicon nitride thin films (SiNx has attracted great interest due to the inherent benefits of this process compared to other silicon nitride thin film deposition techniques. These benefits include not only high conformality and atomic-scale thickness control, but also low deposition temperatures. Over the past 20 years, recognition of the remarkable features of SiNx ALD, reinforced by experimental and theoretical investigations of the underlying surface reaction mechanism, has contributed to the development and widespread use of ALD SiNx thin films in both laboratory studies and industrial applications. Such recognition has spurred ever-increasing opportunities for the applications of the SiNx ALD technique in various arenas. Nevertheless, this technique still faces a number of challenges, which should be addressed through a collaborative effort between academia and industry. It is expected that the SiNx ALD will be further perceived as an indispensable technique for scaling next-generation ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI technology. In this review, the authors examine the current research progress, challenges and future prospects of the SiNx ALD technique.

  13. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Yazdani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD. Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays.

  14. TiO2 nanosheets synthesized by atomic layer deposition for photocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyanto Edy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional TiO2 nanosheets were synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD on dissolvable sacrificial polymer layer. The photocatalytic performance of free-standing TiO2 nanosheets prepared with different numbers of ALD cycles (100, 300, 500, and 1000 were investigated by evaluating the degradation rates of methyl orange solutions. It is shown that the photocatalytic activity increases due to Ti3+ defect and the locally ordered structures in amorphous TiO2 nanosheets. The difference in the surface areas of nanosheets may also play a crucial role in the photocatalytic activity. The results obtained in this work can have potential applications in fields like water splitting and dye-sensitized solar cells.

  15. Property transformation of graphene with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited directly by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Li; Cao, Duo; Wang, Zhongjian; Xia, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, SIMIT, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Cheng, Xinhong, E-mail: xh-cheng@mail.sim.ac.cn; Yu, Yuehui [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, SIMIT, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shen, Dashen [University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

    2014-01-13

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films are deposited directly onto graphene by H{sub 2}O-based atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the films are pinhole-free and continuously cover the graphene surface. The growth process of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films does not introduce any detective defects in graphene, suppresses the hysteresis effect and tunes the graphene doping to n-type. The self-cleaning of ALD growth process, together with the physically absorbed H{sub 2}O and oxygen-deficient ALD environment consumes OH{sup −} bonds, suppresses the p-doping of graphene, shifts Dirac point to negative gate bias and enhances the electron mobility.

  16. Low temperature platinum atomic layer deposition on nylon-6 for highly conductive and catalytic fiber mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundy, J. Zachary; Shafiefarhood, Arya; Li, Fanxing; Khan, Saad A.; Parsons, Gregory N., E-mail: gnp@ncsu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Engineering Building I, 911 Partners Way, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7905 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Low temperature platinum atomic layer deposition (Pt-ALD) via (methylcyclopentadienyl)trimethyl platinum and ozone (O{sub 3}) is used to produce highly conductive nonwoven nylon-6 (polyamide-6, PA-6) fiber mats, having effective conductivities as high as ∼5500–6000 S/cm with only a 6% fractional increase in mass. The authors show that an alumina ALD nucleation layer deposited at high temperature is required to promote Pt film nucleation and growth on the polymeric substrate. Fractional mass gain scales linearly with Pt-ALD cycle number while effective conductivity exhibits a nonlinear trend with cycle number, corresponding to film coalescence. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy reveals island growth mode of the Pt film at low cycle number with a coalesced film observed after 200 cycles. The metallic coating also exhibits exceptional resistance to mechanical flexing, maintaining up to 93% of unstressed conductivity after bending around cylinders with radii as small as 0.3 cm. Catalytic activity of the as-deposited Pt film is demonstrated via carbon monoxide oxidation to carbon dioxide. This novel low temperature processing allows for the inclusion of highly conductive catalytic material on a number of temperature-sensitive substrates with minimal mass gain for use in such areas as smart textiles and flexible electronics.

  17. Crystallinity of inorganic films grown by atomic layer deposition: Overview and general trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miikkulainen, Ville; Leskelä, Markku; Ritala, Mikko; Puurunen, Riikka L.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is gaining attention as a thin film deposition method, uniquely suitable for depositing uniform and conformal films on complex three-dimensional topographies. The deposition of a film of a given material by ALD relies on the successive, separated, and self-terminating gas-solid reactions of typically two gaseous reactants. Hundreds of ALD chemistries have been found for depositing a variety of materials during the past decades, mostly for inorganic materials but lately also for organic and inorganic-organic hybrid compounds. One factor that often dictates the properties of ALD films in actual applications is the crystallinity of the grown film: Is the material amorphous or, if it is crystalline, which phase(s) is (are) present. In this thematic review, we first describe the basics of ALD, summarize the two-reactant ALD processes to grow inorganic materials developed to-date, updating the information of an earlier review on ALD [R. L. Puurunen, J. Appl. Phys. 97, 121301 (2005)], and give an overview of the status of processing ternary compounds by ALD. We then proceed to analyze the published experimental data for information on the crystallinity and phase of inorganic materials deposited by ALD from different reactants at different temperatures. The data are collected for films in their as-deposited state and tabulated for easy reference. Case studies are presented to illustrate the effect of different process parameters on crystallinity for representative materials: aluminium oxide, zirconium oxide, zinc oxide, titanium nitride, zinc zulfide, and ruthenium. Finally, we discuss the general trends in the development of film crystallinity as function of ALD process parameters. The authors hope that this review will help newcomers to ALD to familiarize themselves with the complex world of crystalline ALD films and, at the same time, serve for the expert as a handbook-type reference source on ALD processes and film crystallinity.

  18. Nanoscale assembly for molecular electronics and in situ characterization during atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jeong-Seok

    The work in this dissertation consists of a two-part study concerning molecular-based electronics and atomic layer deposition (ALD). As conventional "top-down" silicon-based technology approaches its expected physical and technical limits, researchers have paid considerable attention to "bottom-up" approaches including molecular-based electronics that self assembles molecular components and ALD techniques that deposit thin films with atomic layer control. Reliable fabrication of molecular-based devices and a lack of understanding of the conduction mechanisms through individual molecules still remain critical issues in molecular-based electronics. Nanoparticle/molecule(s)/nanoparticle assemblies of "dimers" and "trimers", consisting of two and three nanoparticles bridged by oligomeric ethynylene phenylene molecules (OPEs), respectively, are successfully synthesized by coworkers and applied to contact nanogap electrodes (applied voltage (≥3 VAC). After successful trapping, the sample exposure to air reveals a small rapid decrease in current, followed by a slower exponential increase, and eventual current saturation. This work also reports on the dependence of electron transport on molecular length (2 to 4.7 nm) and structure (linear-type in dimers and Y-type in trimers). The extracted electronic decay constant of ˜0.12 A-1 and effective contact resistance of ˜4 MO indicate a strong electronic coupling between the chain ends, facilitating electron transport over long distances. A three terminal molecular transistor is also demonstrated with trimers trapped across nanogap electrodes. The source-drain current is modulated within a factor of 2 with a gate bias voltage of -2 to +2 V. A subthreshold slope of ˜110 mV/decade is obtained. Finally, we report on both fundamental understanding and application of atomic layer deposition. First, in situ analysis tools such as quartz crystal microbalance and electrical conductance measurements are combined to reveal direct

  19. Atomic Layer Deposition of the Solid Electrolyte Garnet Li7La3Zr2O12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazyak, Eric; Chen, Kuan-Hung; Wood, Kevin N.; Davis, Andrew L.; Thompson, Travis; Bielinski, Ashley R.; Sanchez, Adrian; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Chongmin; Sakamoto, Jeff S.; Dasgupta, Neil P.

    2017-04-25

    Lithium solid electrolytes are a promising platform for achieving high energy density, long-lasting, and safe rechargeable batteries, which could have widespread societal impact. In particular, the ceramic oxide garnet Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO) has been shown to be a promising electrolyte due to its stability and high ionic conductivity. Two major challenges for commercialization are manufacturing of thin layers and creating stable, low-impedance, interfaces with both anode and cathode materials. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) has recently been shown as a potential method for depositing both solid electrolytes and interfacial layers to improve the stability and performance at electrode-electrolyte interfaces in battery systems. Herein we present the first reported ALD process for LLZO, demonstrating the ability to tune composition within the amorphous film and anneal to achieve the desired cubic garnet phase. Formation of the cubic phase was observed at temperatures as low as 555°C, significantly lower than is required for bulk processing. Additionally, challenges associated with achieving a dense garnet phase due to substrate reactivity, morphology changes and Li loss under the necessary high temperature annealing are quantified via in situ synchrotron diffraction.

  20. Analysis of arrayed nanocapacitor formed on nanorods by flow-rate interruption atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bo-Cheng; Ku, Ching-Shun; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Chakroborty, Subhendu; Wu, Albert T.

    2017-12-01

    Flow-rate interruption (FRI) atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was adopted to fabricate AZO/Al2O3/AZO thin film on a ZnO nanorod array template at low temperature. The high quality amorphous dielectric Al2O3 layer was deposited at 50 °C. The template with an average of 0.73 μm in length was made by a simple hydrothermal method on a c-plane sapphire with an AZO seed layer. Using Polystyrene (PS) microspheres were served as a mask to form vertical and well-aligned ZnO nanostructures. Field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show ALD to have achieved good step coverage and thickness control in the thin films structure coating. The capacitance density of the arrayed template nanocapacitor increased more than 100% than those of the thin film capacitor at an applied frequency of 10 kHz. These results suggest that the ZnO-arrayed template could enhance energy storage capability by providing significant surface area. This structure provides a concept for high surface-area nanocapacitor applications.

  1. Electrical transport and Al doping efficiency in nanoscale ZnO films prepared by atomic layer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y.; Hermkens, P.M.; Loo, B.W.H. van de; Knoops, H.C.M.; Potts, S.E.; Verheijen, M.A.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the structural, electrical, and optical properties as well as chemical bonding state of Al-doped ZnO films deposited by atomic layer deposition have been investigated to obtain insight into the doping and electrical transport mechanisms in the films. The range in doping levels from 0%

  2. Optimization studies of HgSe thin film deposition by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Venkatasamy, V

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the optimization of HgSe thin film deposition using electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE) are reported. Cyclic voltammetry was used to obtain approximate deposition potentials for each element. These potentials were then coupled...

  3. Tribological Properties of Nanometric Atomic Layer Depositions Applied on AISI 420 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atomic Layer Deposition ( ALD is a modern technique that Allows to deposit nanometric, conformal coatings on almost any kind of substrates, from plastics to ceramic, metals or even composites. ALD coatings are not dependent on the morphology of the substrate and are only regulated by the composition of the precursors, the chamber temperature and the number of cycles. In this work, mono- and bi -layer nanometric, protective low-temperature ALD Coatings, based on Al2O3 and TiO2 were applied on AISI 420 Stainless Steel in orderto enhance its relatively low corrosion resistance in chloride containing environments. Tribological testing were also performed on the ALD coated AISI 420 in order to evaluate the wear and scratch resistance of these nanometric layers and thus evaluate their durability. Scratch tests were performed using a standard Rockwell C indenter, under a variable load condition, in order to evaluate the critical loading condition for each coating. Wear testing were performed using a stainless steel counterpart, in ball-on-discconfiguration, in order to measure the friction coefficient and wear to confront the resistance. All scratch tests scars and wear tracks were then observed by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM in order to understand the wear mechanisms that occurred on the sample surfaces. Corrosion testing, performed under immersion in 0.2 M NaCl solutions, clearly showed that the ALD coatings have a strong effect in protecting the Stainless Steel Substrate against corrosion, reducing the corrosion current density by two orders of magnitude.Tribological The preliminary results showed that ALD depositions obtained at low Temperatures have a brittle behavior caused by the amorphous nature of their structure, and thus undergo delamination phenomena during Scratch Testing at relatively low applied loads. During ball-on-disc testing, the coatings were removed from the substrate, in particular for monolayer ALD configurations

  4. Development of TiO2 containing hardmasks through plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Anuja; Seshadri, Indira; Chung, Kisup; Arceo, Abraham; Meli, Luciana; Mendoza, Brock; Sulehria, Yasir; Yao, Yiping; Sunder, Madhana; Truong, Hoa; Matham, Shravan; Bao, Ruqiang; Wu, Heng; Felix, Nelson M.; Kanakasabapathy, Sivananda

    2017-04-01

    With the increasing prevalence of complex device integration schemes, trilayer patterning with a solvent strippable hardmask can have a variety of applications. Spin-on metal hardmasks have been the key enabler for selective removal through wet strip when active areas need to be protected from dry etch damage. As spin-on metal hardmasks require a dedicated track to prevent metal contamination and are limited in their ability to scale down thickness without compromising on defectivity, there has been a need for a deposited hardmask solution. Modulation of film composition through deposition conditions enables a method to create TiO2 films with wet etch tunability. This paper presents a systematic study on development and characterization of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited (PEALD) TiO2-based hardmasks for patterning applications. We demonstrate lithographic process window, pattern profile, and defectivity evaluation for a trilayer scheme patterned with PEALD-based TiO2 hardmask and its performance under dry and wet strip conditions. Comparable structural and electrical performance is shown for a deposited versus a spin-on metal hardmask.

  5. Graphene devices with bottom-up contacts by area-selective atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thissen, Nick F. W.; Vervuurt, René H. J.; Mackus, Adriaan J. M.; Mulders, Johannes J. L.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Kessels, Wilhelmus M. M.; Bol, Ageeth A.

    2017-06-01

    Graphene field-effect transistor devices were fabricated using a bottom-up and resist-free method, avoiding common compatibility issues such as contamination by resist residues. Large-area CVD graphene sheets were structured into device channels by patterning with a focused ion beam. Platinum contacts were then deposited by direct-write atomic layer deposition (ALD), which is a combination between electron beam induced deposition (EBID) and bottom-up area-selective ALD. This is a unique approach that enables nucleation of Pt ALD on graphene, and therefore these devices are the first reported graphene devices with contacts deposited by ALD. Electrical characterization of the devices confirms ambipolar transistor behaviour with typical field-effect mobilities in the range of 1000-1800 cm2 V-1 s-1. We observe clear signs of strong Pt-graphene coupling and contact induced hole doping, implying good contact properties in contrast to the conventionally weak bonding between Pt and graphene. We attribute these observations to the reduced amount of resist residue under the contacts, the improved wettability of the Pt due to the use of ALD, and the formation of a graphitic interlayer that bonds the Pt more strongly to the graphene. We conclude that direct-write ALD is a very suitable technique for metallization of graphene devices and to study the intrinsic properties of metal-graphene contacts in more detail. In addition, it offers unique opportunities to control the metal-graphene coupling strength.

  6. Spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO/TiO{sub 2} nanolaminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Rong, E-mail: rongchen@mail.hust.edu.cn; Lin, Ji-Long; He, Wen-Jie; Duan, Chen-Long; Peng, Qi; Wang, Xiao-Lei [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Shan, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Spatial atomic layer deposition (S-ALD) is a potential high-throughput manufacturing technique offering fast and large scale ultrathin films deposition. Here, an S-ALD system with modular injectors is introduced for fabricating binary oxides and their nanolaminates. By optimizing the deposition conditions, both ZnO and TiO{sub 2} films demonstrate linear growth and desired surface morphology. The as-deposited ZnO film has high carrier mobility, and the TiO{sub 2} film shows suitable optical transmittance and band gap. The ZnO/TiO{sub 2} nanolaminates are fabricated by alternating substrate movement between each S-ALD modular units of ZnO and TiO{sub 2}. The grazing incidence x-ray diffraction spectra of nanolaminates demonstrating the signature peaks are weaker for the same thickness nanolaminates with more bilayers, suggesting tuning nanolaminates from crystalline to amorphous. Optical transmittances of ZnO/TiO{sub 2} laminates are enhanced with the increase of the bilayers' number in the visible range. Refractive indices of nanolaminates increase with the thickness of each bilayer decreasing, which demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining desired refractive indices by controlling the bilayer number. The electronic properties, including mobility, carrier concentration, and conductivity, are also tunable with different bilayers.

  7. Protective coatings of hafnium dioxide by atomic layer deposition for microelectromechanical systems applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdova, Maria, E-mail: maria.berdova@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 02150, Espoo (Finland); Wiemer, Claudia; Lamperti, Alessio; Tallarida, Grazia; Cianci, Elena [Laboratorio MDM, IMM CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Lamagna, Luca; Losa, Stefano; Rossini, Silvia; Somaschini, Roberto; Gioveni, Salvatore [STMicroelectronics, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Fanciulli, Marco [Laboratorio MDM, IMM CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Università degli studi di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, 20126, Milano (Italy); Franssila, Sami, E-mail: sami.franssila@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 02150, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} from (CpMe){sub 2}Hf(OMe)Me or Hf(NMeEt){sub 4} and ozone for potential applications in microelectromechanical systems. • ALD HfO{sub 2} protects aluminum substrates from degradation in moist environment and at the same time retains good reflectance properties of the underlying material. • The resistance of hafnium dioxide to moist environment is independent of chosen precursors. - Abstract: This work presents the investigation of HfO{sub 2} deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from either HfD-CO4 or TEMAHf and ozone for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications, in particular, for environmental protection of aluminum micromirrors. This work shows that HfO{sub 2} films successfully protect aluminum in moist environment and at the same time retain good reflectance properties of underlying material. In our experimental work, the chemical composition, crystal structure, electronic density and roughness of HfO{sub 2} films remained the same after one week of humidity treatment (relative humidity of 85%, 85 °C). The reflectance properties underwent only minor changes. The observed shift in reflectance was only from 80–90% to 76–85% in 400–800 nm spectral range when coated with ALD HfO{sub 2} films grown with Hf(NMeEt){sub 4} and no shift (remained in the range of 68–83%) for films grown from (CpMe){sub 2}Hf(OMe)Me.

  8. Au/n-InP Schottky diodes using an Al2O3 interfacial layer grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hogyoung; Kim, Min Soo; Yoon, Seung Yu; Choi, Byung Joon

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the effect of an Al2O3 interfacial layer grown by atomic layer deposition on the electrical properties of Au Schottky contacts to n-type InP. Considering barrier inhomogeneity, modified Richardson plots yielded a Richardson constant of 8.4 and 7.5 Acm-2K-2, respectively, for the sample with and without the Al2O3 interlayer (theoretical value of 9.4 Acm-2K-2 for n-type InP). The dominant reverse current flow for the sample with an Al2O3 interlayer was found to be Poole-Frenkel emission. From capacitance-voltage measurements, it was observed that the capacitance for the sample without the Al2O3 interlayer was frequency dependent. Sputter-induced defects as well as structural defects were passivated effectively with an Al2O3 interlayer.

  9. LDRD Project 52523 final report :Atomic layer deposition of highly conformal tribological coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungk, John Michael (University of Minnesota); Dugger, Michael Thomas; George, Steve M. (University of Colorado); Prasad, Somuri V.; Grubbs, Robert K.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mayer, Thomas Michael; Scharf, Thomas W.; Goeke, Ronald S.; Gerberich, William W. (University of Minnesota)

    2005-10-01

    Friction and wear are major concerns in the performance and reliability of micromechanical (MEMS) devices. While a variety of lubricant and wear resistant coatings are known which we might consider for application to MEMS devices, the severe geometric constraints of many micromechanical systems (high aspect ratios, shadowed surfaces) make most deposition methods for friction and wear-resistance coatings impossible. In this program we have produced and evaluate highly conformal, tribological coatings, deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD), for use on surface micromachined (SMM) and LIGA structures. ALD is a chemical vapor deposition process using sequential exposure of reagents and self-limiting surface chemistry, saturating at a maximum of one monolayer per exposure cycle. The self-limiting chemistry results in conformal coating of high aspect ratio structures, with monolayer precision. ALD of a wide variety of materials is possible, but there have been no studies of structural, mechanical, and tribological properties of these films. We have developed processes for depositing thin (<100 nm) conformal coatings of selected hard and lubricious films (Al2O3, ZnO, WS2, W, and W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanolaminates), and measured their chemical, physical, mechanical and tribological properties. A significant challenge in this program was to develop instrumentation and quantitative test procedures, which did not exist, for friction, wear, film/substrate adhesion, elastic properties, stress, etc., of extremely thin films and nanolaminates. New scanning probe and nanoindentation techniques have been employed along with detailed mechanics-based models to evaluate these properties at small loads characteristic of microsystem operation. We emphasize deposition processes and fundamental properties of ALD materials, however we have also evaluated applications and film performance for model SMM and LIGA devices.

  10. Atomic layer deposition of cerium oxide for potential use in diesel soot combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Tatiana V., E-mail: tatiana.ivanova@lut.fi, E-mail: ivanova.tatyana.v@gmail.com; Toivonen, Jenni; Maydannik, Philipp S.; Kääriäinen, Tommi; Sillanpää, Mika [ASTRaL Team, Laboratory of Green Chemistry, School of Engineering Science, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Homola, Tomáš; Cameron, David C. [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2016-05-15

    The particulate soot emission from diesel motors has a severe impact on the environment and people's health. The use of catalytic convertors is one of the ways to minimize the emission and decrease the hazard level. In this paper, the activity of cerium oxide for catalytic combustion of diesel soot was studied. Thin films of cerium dioxide were synthesized by atomic layer deposition using tetrakis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato)cerium [Ce(thd){sub 4}] and ozone as precursors. The characteristics of the films were studied as a function of deposition conditions within the reaction temperature range of 180–350 °C. Thickness, crystallinity, elemental composition, and morphology of the CeO{sub 2} films deposited on Si (100) were characterized by ellipsometry, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The growth rate of CeO{sub 2} was observed to be 0.30 Å/cycle at temperatures up to 250 °C with a slight increase to 0.37 Å/cycle at 300 °C. The effect of CeO{sub 2} films grown on stainless steel foil supports on soot combustion was measured with annealing tests. Based on the analysis of these, in catalytic applications, CeO{sub 2} has been shown to be effective in lowering the soot combustion temperature from 600 °C for the uncoated substrates to 370 °C for the CeO{sub 2} coated ones. It was found that the higher deposition temperatures had a positive effect on the catalyst performance.

  11. Thermoelectric material including conformal oxide layers and method of making the same using atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jung Young; Ahn, Dongjoon; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2016-06-07

    A thermoelectric material includes a substrate particle and a plurality of conformal oxide layers formed on the substrate particle. The plurality of conformal oxide layers has a total oxide layer thickness ranging from about 2 nm to about 20 nm. The thermoelectric material excludes oxide nanoparticles. A method of making the thermoelectric material is also disclosed herein.

  12. Oxidant-Dependent Thermoelectric Properties of Undoped ZnO Films by Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hyunho

    2017-02-27

    Extraordinary oxidant-dependent changes in the thermoelectric properties of undoped ZnO thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been observed. Specifically, deionized water and ozone oxidants are used in the growth of ZnO by ALD using diethylzinc as a zinc precursor. No substitutional atoms have been added to the ZnO films. By using ozone as an oxidant instead of water, a thermoelectric power factor (σS) of 5.76 × 10 W m K is obtained at 705 K for undoped ZnO films. In contrast, the maximum power factor for the water-based ZnO film is only 2.89 × 10 W m K at 746 K. Materials analysis results indicate that the oxygen vacancy levels in the water- and ozone-grown ZnO films are essentially the same, but the difference comes from Zn-related defects present in the ZnO films. The data suggest that the strong oxidant effect on thermoelectric performance can be explained by a mechanism involving point defect-induced differences in carrier concentration between these two oxides and a self-compensation effect in water-based ZnO due to the competitive formations of both oxygen and zinc vacancies. This strong oxidant effect on the thermoelectric properties of undoped ZnO films provides a pathway to improve the thermoelectric performance of this important material.

  13. Recent Progress in Atomic Layer Deposition of Multifunctional Oxides and Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongfei

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has long been developed for conformal coating thin films on planar surfaces and complex structured substrates based on its unique sequential process and self-limiting surface chemistry. In general, the coated thin films can be dielectrics, semiconductors, conductors, metals, etc., while the targeted surface can vary from those of particles, wires, to deep pores, through holes, and so on. The ALD coating technique, itself, was developed from gas-phase chemical vapor deposition, but now it has been extended even to liquid phase coating/growth. Because the thickness of ALD growth is controlled in atomic level (˜0.1nm), it has recently been employed for producing two-dimensional (2D) materials, typically semiconducting nanosheets of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). In this paper, we briefly introduce recent progress in ALD of multifunctional oxides and 2D TMDCs with the focus being placed on suitable ALD precursors and their ALD processes (for both binary compounds and ternary alloys), highlighting the remaining challenges and promising potentials.

  14. Self-assembly based plasmonic arrays tuned by atomic layer deposition for extreme visible light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Carl; Zeltzer, Gabriel; Ruiz, Ricardo; Thomann, Isabell; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Brongersma, Mark L; Bent, Stacey F

    2013-07-10

    Achieving complete absorption of visible light with a minimal amount of material is highly desirable for many applications, including solar energy conversion to fuel and electricity, where benefits in conversion efficiency and economy can be obtained. On a fundamental level, it is of great interest to explore whether the ultimate limits in light absorption per unit volume can be achieved by capitalizing on the advances in metamaterial science and nanosynthesis. Here, we combine block copolymer lithography and atomic layer deposition to tune the effective optical properties of a plasmonic array at the atomic scale. Critical coupling to the resulting nanocomposite layer is accomplished through guidance by a simple analytical model and measurements by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Thereby, a maximized absorption of light exceeding 99% is accomplished, of which up to about 93% occurs in a volume-equivalent thickness of gold of only 1.6 nm. This corresponds to a record effective absorption coefficient of 1.7 × 10(7) cm(-1) in the visible region, far exceeding those of solid metals, graphene, dye monolayers, and thin film solar cell materials. It is more than a factor of 2 higher than that previously obtained using a critically coupled dye J-aggregate, with a peak width exceeding the latter by 1 order of magnitude. These results thereby substantially push the limits for light harvesting in ultrathin, nanoengineered systems.

  15. Fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor for nanoparticles coating via atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Chen-Long; Liu, Xiao; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2015-07-01

    A fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor has been designed for coating on nanoparticles (NPs) via atomic layer deposition. It consists of five major parts: reaction chamber, dosing and fluidizing section, pumping section, rotary manipulator components, as well as a double-layer cartridge for the storage of particles. In the deposition procedure, continuous fluidization of particles enlarges and homogenizes the void fraction in the particle bed, while rotation enhances the gas-solid interactions to stabilize fluidization. The particle cartridge presented here enables both the fluidization and rotation acting on the particle bed, demonstrated by the analysis of pressure drop. Moreover, enlarged interstitials and intense gas-solid contact under sufficient fluidizing velocity and proper rotation speed facilitate the precursor delivery throughout the particle bed and consequently provide a fast coating process. The cartridge can ensure precursors flowing through the particle bed exclusively to achieve high utilization without static exposure operation. By optimizing superficial gas velocities and rotation speeds, minimum pulse time for complete coating has been shortened in experiment, and in situ mass spectrometry showed the precursor usage can reach 90%. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy results suggested a saturated growth of nanoscale Al2O3 films on spherical SiO2 NPs. Finally, the uniformity and composition of the shells were characterized by high angle annular dark field-transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  16. Highly conductive and flexible nylon-6 nonwoven fiber mats formed using tungsten atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanyan, Berç; Oldham, Christopher J; Sweet, William J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2013-06-12

    Low-temperature vapor-phase tungsten atomic layer deposition (ALD) using WF6 and dilute silane (SiH4, 2% in Ar) can yield highly conductive coatings on nylon-6 microfiber mats, producing flexible and supple nonwovens with conductivity of ∼1000 S/cm. We find that an alumina nucleation layer, reactant exposure, and deposition temperature all influence the rate of W mass uptake on 3D fibers, and film growth rate is calibrated using high surface area anodic aluminum oxide. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals highly conformal tungsten coatings on nylon fibers with complex "winged" cross-section. Using reactant gas "hold" sequences during the ALD process, we conclude that reactant species can transport readily to reactive sites throughout the fiber mat, consistent with conformal uniform coverage observed by TEM. The conductivity of 1000 S/cm for the W-coated nylon is much larger than found in other conductive nonwovens. We also find that the nylon mats maintain 90% of their conductivity after being flexed around cylinders with radii as small as 0.3 cm. Metal ALD coatings on nonwovens make possible the solvent-free functionalization of textiles for electronic applications.

  17. Antireflection Coatings for Strongly Curved Glass Lenses by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Pfeiffer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Antireflection (AR coatings are indispensable in numerous optical applications and are increasingly demanded on highly curved optical components. In this work, optical thin films of SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2 and Ta2O5 were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD, which is based on self-limiting surface reactions leading to a uniform film thickness on arbitrarily shaped surfaces. Al2O3/TiO2/SiO2 and Al2O3/Ta2O5/SiO2 AR coatings were successfully applied in the 400–750 nm and 400–700 nm spectral range, respectively. Less than 0.6% reflectance with an average of 0.3% has been measured on a fused silica hemispherical (half-ball lens with 4 mm diameter along the entire lens surface at 0° angle of incidence. The reflectance on a large B270 aspherical lens with height of 25 mm and diameter of 50 mm decreased to less than 1% with an average reflectance < 0.3%. The results demonstrate that ALD is a promising technology for deposition of uniform optical layers on strongly curved lenses without complex in situ thickness monitoring.

  18. Fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor for nanoparticles coating via atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Chen-Long; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Rong, E-mail: rongchen@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Shan, Bin, E-mail: rongchen@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2015-07-15

    A fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor has been designed for coating on nanoparticles (NPs) via atomic layer deposition. It consists of five major parts: reaction chamber, dosing and fluidizing section, pumping section, rotary manipulator components, as well as a double-layer cartridge for the storage of particles. In the deposition procedure, continuous fluidization of particles enlarges and homogenizes the void fraction in the particle bed, while rotation enhances the gas-solid interactions to stabilize fluidization. The particle cartridge presented here enables both the fluidization and rotation acting on the particle bed, demonstrated by the analysis of pressure drop. Moreover, enlarged interstitials and intense gas–solid contact under sufficient fluidizing velocity and proper rotation speed facilitate the precursor delivery throughout the particle bed and consequently provide a fast coating process. The cartridge can ensure precursors flowing through the particle bed exclusively to achieve high utilization without static exposure operation. By optimizing superficial gas velocities and rotation speeds, minimum pulse time for complete coating has been shortened in experiment, and in situ mass spectrometry showed the precursor usage can reach 90%. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy results suggested a saturated growth of nanoscale Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on spherical SiO{sub 2} NPs. Finally, the uniformity and composition of the shells were characterized by high angle annular dark field-transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  19. Al2O3Underlayer Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinbao; Hultqvist, Adam; Zhang, Tian; Jiang, Liangcong; Ruan, Changqing; Yang, Li; Cheng, Yibing; Edoff, Marika; Johansson, Erik M J

    2017-10-09

    Perovskite solar cells, as an emergent technology for solar energy conversion, have attracted much attention in the solar cell community by demonstrating impressive enhancement in power conversion efficiencies. However, the high temperature and manually processed TiO 2 underlayer prepared by spray pyrolysis significantly limit the large-scale application and device reproducibility of perovskite solar cells. In this study, lowtemperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) is used to prepare a compact Al 2 O 3 underlayer for perovskite solar cells. The thickness of the Al 2 O 3 layer can be controlled well by adjusting the deposition cycles during the ALD process. An optimal Al 2 O 3 layer effectively blocks electron recombination at the perovskite/fluorine-doped tin oxide interface and sufficiently transports electrons through tunneling. Perovskite solar cells fabricated with an Al 2 O 3 layer demonstrated a highest efficiency of 16.2 % for the sample with 50 ALD cycles (ca. 5 nm), which is a significant improvement over underlayer-free PSCs, which have a maximum efficiency of 11.0 %. Detailed characterization confirms that the thickness of the Al 2 O 3 underlayer significantly influences the charge transfer resistance and electron recombination processes in the devices. Furthermore, this work shows the feasibility of using a high band-gap semiconductor such as Al 2 O 3 as the underlayer in perovskite solar cells and opens up pathways to use ALD Al 2 O 3 underlayers for flexible solar cells. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Large-area thermoelectric high-aspect-ratio nanostructures by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoho, Mikko; Juntunen, Taneli; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2016-09-01

    We report on the thermoelectric properties of large-area high-aspect-ratio nanostructures. We fabricate the structures by atomic layer deposition of conformal ZnO thin films on track-etched polycarbonate substrate. The resulting structure consists of ZnO tubules which continue through the full thickness of the substrate. The electrical and thermal properties of the structures are studied both in-plane and out-of-plane. They exhibit very low out-of-plane thermal conductivity down to 0.15 W m-1 K-1 while the in-plane sheet resistance of the films was found to be half that of the same film on glass substrate, allowing material-independent doubling of output power of any planar thin-film thermoelectric generator. The wall thickness of the fabricated nanotubes was varied within a range of up to 100 nm. The samples show polycrystalline nature with (002) preferred crystal orientation.

  1. Characterizing the field of Atomic Layer Deposition: Authors, topics, and collaborations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Alvaro

    Full Text Available This paper describes how Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD has evolved over time using a combination of bibliometric, social network, and text analysis. We examined the rate of knowledge production as well as changes in authors, journals, and collaborators, showing a steady growth of ALD research. The study of the collaboration network of ALD scientists over time points out that the ALD research community is becoming larger and more interconnected, with a largest connected component that spans 90% of the authors in 2015. In addition, the evolution of network centrality measures (degree and betweenness centrality and author productivity revealed the central figures in ALD over time, including new "stars" appearing in the last decade. Finally, the study of the title words in our dataset is consistent with a shift in focus on research topics towards energy applications and nanotechnology.

  2. Blistering mechanisms of atomic-layer-deposited AlN and Al2O3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broas, Mikael; Jiang, Hua; Graff, Andreas; Sajavaara, Timo; Vuorinen, Vesa; Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi

    2017-10-01

    Blistering of protective, structural, and functional coatings is a reliability risk pestering films ranging from elemental to ceramic ones. The driving force behind blistering comes from either excess hydrogen at the film-substrate interface or stress-driven buckling. Contrary to the stress-driven mechanism, the hydrogen-initiated one is poorly understood. Recently, it was shown that in the bulk Al-Al2O3 system, the blistering is preceded by the formation of nano-sized cavities on the substrate. The stress- and hydrogen-driven mechanisms in atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) films are explored here. We clarify issues in the hydrogen-related mechanism via high-resolution microscopy and show that at least two distinct mechanisms can cause blistering in ALD films.

  3. Building a Better Capacitor with Thin-Film Atomic Layer Deposition Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, Christopher [North Seattle College, WA (United States)

    2015-08-28

    The goal of this research is to determine procedures for creating ultra-high capacity supercapacitors by using nanofabrication techniques and high k-value dielectrics. One way to potentially solve the problem of climate change is to switch the source of energy to a source that doesn’t release many tons of greenhouse gases, gases which cause global warming, into the Earth’s atmosphere. These trap in more heat from the Sun’s solar energy and cause global temperatures to rise. Atomic layer deposition will be used to create a uniform thin-film of dielectric to greatly enhance the abilities of our capacitors and will build them on the nanoscale.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of metal oxide patterns on nonwoven fiber mats using localized physical compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, William J; Oldham, Christopher J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2014-06-25

    Patterning is an essential part of many industrial processes from printing to semiconductor manufacturing. In this work, we demonstrate a new method to pattern and selectively coat nonwoven textiles by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using compressive mask patterning. A physical mask combined with mechanical compression allows lateral definition and fidelity of the ALD coating to be controlled. We produce features of several sizes on different nonwoven fiber materials and demonstrate the ability to limit diffusion effects to within nonwoven mats is investigated by plan-view and cross-sectional imaging. Vertical growth is also analyzed by imaging coating depth into fiber mat stacks. We develop a fully quantitative transport model that describes well the effect of fiber structure and mechanical compression on the extent of coating under the physical mask. This method could be implemented for high-volume patterning for applications including flexible electronics.

  5. Tunable Electrical Properties of Vanadium Oxide by Hydrogen-Plasma-Treated Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Hejin Park

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a plasma-modified process was developed to control the electrical properties of atomic layer deposition (ALD-grown vanadium dioxide (VO2, which is potentially useful for applications such as resistive switching devices, bolometers, and plasmonic metamaterials. By inserting a plasma pulse with varying H2 gas flow into each ALD cycle, the insulator-to-metal transition (IMT temperature of postdeposition-annealed crystalline VO2 films was adjusted from 63 to 78 °C. Film analyses indicate that the tunability may arise from changes in grain boundaries, morphology, and compositional variation despite hydrogen not remaining in the annealed VO2 films. This growth method, which enables a systematic variation of the electronic behavior of VO2, provides capabilities beyond those of the conventional thermal ALD and plasma-enhanced ALD.

  6. Spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition of InxGayZnzO for thin film transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illiberi, A; Cobb, B; Sharma, A; Grehl, T; Brongersma, H; Roozeboom, F; Gelinck, G; Poodt, P

    2015-02-18

    We have investigated the nucleation and growth of InGaZnO thin films by spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition. Diethyl zinc (DEZ), trimethyl indium (TMIn), triethyl gallium (TEGa), and water were used as Zn, In, Ga and oxygen precursors, respectively. The vaporized metal precursors have been coinjected in the reactor. The metal composition of InGaZnO has been controlled by varying the TMIn or TEGa flow to the reactor, for a given DEZ flow and exposure time. The morphology of the films changes from polycrystalline, for ZnO and In-doped ZnO, to amorphous for In-rich IZO and InGaZnO. The use of these films as the active channel in TFTs has been demonstrated and the influence of In and Ga cations on the electrical characteristics of the TFTs has been studied.

  7. Activating Carrier Multiplication in PbSe Quantum Dot Solids by Infilling with Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Cate, Sybren; Liu, Yao; Suchand Sandeep, C S; Kinge, Sachin; Houtepen, Arjan J; Savenije, Tom J; Schins, Juleon M; Law, Matt; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2013-06-06

    Carrier multiplication-the generation of multiple electron-hole pairs by a single photon-is currently of great interest for the development of highly efficient photovoltaics. We study the effects of infilling PbSe quantum-dot solids with metal oxides by atomic layer deposition on carrier multiplication. Using time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements, we find, for the first time, that carrier multiplication occurs in 1,2-ethanedithiol-linked PbSe quantum-dot solids infilled with Al2O3 or Al2O3/ZnO, while it is negligible or absent in noninfilled films. The carrier-multiplication efficiency of the infilled quantum-dot solids is close to that of solution-dispersed PbSe quantum dots, and not significantly limited by Auger recombination.

  8. Photocatalytic C60-amorphous TiO2 composites prepared by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justh, Nóra; Firkala, Tamás; László, Krisztina; Lábár, János; Szilágyi, Imre Miklós

    2017-10-01

    Nanocomposites of TiO2 and single fullerene (C60) molecule are prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD). To create nucleation sites for the ALD reaction, the bare fullerene is functionalized by H2SO4/HNO3 treatment, which results in C60-SO3H. After a NaOH washing step the intermediate hydrolyzes into C60sbnd OH. This process and the consecutive ALD growth of TiO2 are monitored with FTIR, TG/DTA-MS, EDX, Raman, FTIR, XRD, and TEM measurements. Although the TiO2 grown by ALD at 80 and 160 °C onto fullerol is amorphous it enhances the decomposition of methyl orange under UV exposure. This study proves that amorphous TiO2 grown by low temperature ALD has photocatalytic activity, and it can be used e.g. as self-cleaning coatings also on heat sensitive substrates.

  9. Atomic layer deposition as pore diameter adjustment tool for nanoporous aluminum oxide injection molding masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miikkulainen, Ville; Rasilainen, Tiina; Puukilainen, Esa; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A

    2008-05-06

    The wetting properties of polypropylene (PP) surfaces were modified by adjusting the dimensions of the surface nanostructure. The nanostructures were generated by injection molding with nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) as the mold insert. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of molybdenum nitride film was used to control the pore diameters of the AAO inserts. The original 50-nm pore diameter of AAO was adjusted by depositing films of thickness 5, 10, and 15 nm on AAO. Bis(tert-butylimido)-bis(dimethylamido)molybdenum and ammonia were used as precursors in deposition. The resulting pore diameters in the nitride-coated AAO inserts were 40, 30, and 20 nm, respectively. Injection molding of PP was conducted with the coated inserts, as well as with the non-coated insert. Besides the pore diameter, the injection mold temperature was varied with temperatures of 50, 70, and 90 degrees C tested. Water contact angles of PP casts were measured and compared with theoretical contact angles calculated from Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter theories. The highest contact angle, 140 degrees , was observed for PP molded with the AAO mold insert with 30-nm pore diameter. The Cassie-Baxter theory showed better fit than the Wenzel theory to the experimental values. With the optimal AAO mask, the nanofeatures in the molded PP pieces were 100 nm high. In explanation of this finding, it is suggested that some sticking and stretching of the nanofeatures occurs during the molding. Increase in the mold temperature increased the contact angle.

  10. Coating and functionalization of high density ion track structures by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mättö, Laura [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 (Finland); Szilágyi, Imre M., E-mail: imre.szilagyi@mail.bme.hu [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Szent Gellért tér 4, Budapest H-1111 (Hungary); MTA-BME Technical Analytical Research Group, Szent Gellért tér 4, Budapest H-1111 (Hungary); Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); Laitinen, Mikko [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 (Finland); Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku [Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 (Finland)

    2016-10-01

    In this study flexible TiO{sub 2} coated porous Kapton membranes are presented having electron multiplication properties. 800 nm crossing pores were fabricated into 50 μm thick Kapton membranes using ion track technology and chemical etching. Consecutively, 50 nm TiO{sub 2} films were deposited into the pores of the Kapton membranes by atomic layer deposition using Ti({sup i}OPr){sub 4} and water as precursors at 250 °C. The TiO{sub 2} films and coated membranes were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray reflectometry (XRR). Au metal electrode fabrication onto both sides of the coated foils was achieved by electron beam evaporation. The electron multipliers were obtained by joining two coated membranes separated by a conductive spacer. The results show that electron multiplication can be achieved using ALD-coated flexible ion track polymer foils. - Highlights: • Porous Kapton membranes were obtained by ion track technology and chemical etching. • TiO{sub 2} films were deposited by ALD into the pores of the Kapton membranes. • TiO{sub 2} nanotube array was prepared by removing the polymer core. • MCP structures were obtained from the coated membranes. • Electron multiplication was achieved using the ALD-coated Kapton foils.

  11. Preferential growth of ZnO thin films by the atomic layer deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pung, Swee-Yong; Choy, Kwang-Leong; Hou, Xianghui; Shan, Chongxin

    2008-10-01

    Preferred orientation of ZnO thin films deposited by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique could be manipulated by deposition temperature. In this work, diethyl zinc (DEZn) and deionized water (H2O) were used as a zinc source and oxygen source, respectively. The results demonstrated that (10.0) dominant ZnO thin films were grown in the temperature range of 155-220 °C. The c-axis crystal growth of these films was greatly suppressed. Adhesion of anions (such as fragments of an ethyl group) on the (00.2) polar surface of the ZnO thin film was believed to be responsible for this suppression. In contrast, (00.2) dominant ZnO thin films were obtained between 220 and 300 °C. The preferred orientations of (10.0) and (00.2) of the ZnO thin films were examined by XRD texture analysis. The texture analysis results agreed well with the alignments of ZnO nanowires (NWs) which were grown from these ZnO thin films. In this case, the nanosized crystals of ZnO thin films acted as seeds for the growth of ZnO nanowires (NWs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The highly (00.2) textured ZnO thin films deposited at high temperatures, such as 280 °C, contained polycrystals with the c axis perpendicular to the substrate surface and provided a good template for the growth of vertically aligned ZnO NWs.

  12. A comprehensive study on atomic layer deposition of molybdenum sulfide for electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Do Hyun; Jin, Zhenyu; Shin, Seokhee; Lee, Wook-Seong; Min, Yo-Sep

    2016-03-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has emerged as an efficient method to design and prepare catalysts with atomic precision. Here, we report a comprehensive study on ALD of molybdenum sulfide (MoSx) for an electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction. By using molybdenum hexacarbonyl and dimethyldisulfide as the precursors of Mo and S, respectively, the MoSx catalysts are grown at 100 °C on porous carbon fiber papers (CFPs). The ALD process results in the growth of particle-like MoSx on the CFP due to the lack of adsorption sites, and its crystallographic structure is a mixture of amorphous and nano-crystalline phases. In order to unveil the intrinsic activity of the ALD-MoSx, the exchange current densities, Tafel slopes, and turnover frequencies of the catalysts grown under various ALD conditions have been investigated by considering the fractional surface coverage of MoSx on the CFP and catalytically-active surface area. In addition, the ALD-MoSx/CFP catalysts exhibit excellent catalytic stability due to the strong adhesion of MoSx on the CFP and the mixed phase.Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has emerged as an efficient method to design and prepare catalysts with atomic precision. Here, we report a comprehensive study on ALD of molybdenum sulfide (MoSx) for an electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction. By using molybdenum hexacarbonyl and dimethyldisulfide as the precursors of Mo and S, respectively, the MoSx catalysts are grown at 100 °C on porous carbon fiber papers (CFPs). The ALD process results in the growth of particle-like MoSx on the CFP due to the lack of adsorption sites, and its crystallographic structure is a mixture of amorphous and nano-crystalline phases. In order to unveil the intrinsic activity of the ALD-MoSx, the exchange current densities, Tafel slopes, and turnover frequencies of the catalysts grown under various ALD conditions have been investigated by considering the fractional surface coverage of MoSx on the CFP and catalytically

  13. High Throughput Atomic Layer Deposition Processes: High Pressure Operations, New Reactor Designs, and Novel Metal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, MoatazBellah Mahmoud

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase nano-coating process that deposits very uniform and conformal thin film materials with sub-angstrom level thickness control on various substrates. These unique properties made ALD a platform technology for numerous products and applications. However, most of these applications are limited to the lab scale due to the low process throughput relative to the other deposition techniques, which hinders its industrial adoption. In addition to the low throughput, the process development for certain applications usually faces other obstacles, such as: a required new processing mode (e.g., batch vs continuous) or process conditions (e.g., low temperature), absence of an appropriate reactor design for a specific substrate and sometimes the lack of a suitable chemistry. This dissertation studies different aspects of ALD process development for prospect applications in the semiconductor, textiles, and battery industries, as well as novel organic-inorganic hybrid materials. The investigation of a high pressure, low temperature ALD process for metal oxides deposition using multiple process chemistry revealed the vital importance of the gas velocity over the substrate to achieve fast depositions at these challenging processing conditions. Also in this work, two unique high throughput ALD reactor designs are reported. The first is a continuous roll-to-roll ALD reactor for ultra-fast coatings on porous, flexible substrates with very high surface area. While the second reactor is an ALD delivery head that allows for in loco ALD coatings that can be executed under ambient conditions (even outdoors) on large surfaces while still maintaining very high deposition rates. As a proof of concept, part of a parked automobile window was coated using the ALD delivery head. Another process development shown herein is the improvement achieved in the selective synthesis of organic-inorganic materials using an ALD based process called sequential vapor

  14. Ionization potential and electron attenuation length of titanium dioxide deposited by atomic layer deposition determined by photoelectron spectroscopy in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Francisco C.; Jasieniak, Jacek J.

    2017-11-01

    Photoelectron emission spectroscopy in air (PESA) has been used to investigate titanium dioxide (TiO2) deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD). A procedure has been developed to unambiguously determine the photoemission threshold energy (also referred to as the ;ionization potential;) of TiO2 thin films, avoiding inherent artifacts due to photoelectron emission from the substrate, which supplies misleading results. This has been achieved using PESA measurements performed as a function of TiO2 film thickness on two substrates with different work functions. We find that proper measurements of the photoemission threshold energy (including work function and ionization potential) of thin films by PESA require the use of films much thicker than their electron attenuation length (EAL). A photoemission threshold energy of 5.0 ± 0.2 eV is obtained for TiO2 and has been attributed to a trap level due to oxygen vacancies, which lie within the band gap of the TiO2. The analysis of the photoemission decay with film thickness also provides a method for determining a ;practical; (or effective) EAL at excitation energy slightly above the photoemission threshold energy of the material. We extract an EAL for the deposited TiO2 of 0.65 ± 0.02 nm (at 0.5 eV). The procedure can also be adopted for determining the thickness of extremely thin films, provided their thickness is smaller than their EAL.

  15. In-situ atomic layer deposition growth of Hf-oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karavaev, Konstantin

    2010-06-17

    We have grown HfO{sub 2} on Si(001) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using HfCl{sub 4}, TEMAHf, TDMAHf and H{sub 2}O as precursors. The early stages of the ALD were investigated with high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We observed the changes occurring in the Si 2p, O 1s, Hf 4f, Hf 4d, and Cl 2p (for HfCl{sub 4} experiment) core level lines after each ALD cycle up to the complete formation of two layers of HfO{sub 2}. The investigation was carried out in situ giving the possibility to determine the properties of the grown film after every ALD cycle or even after a half cycle. This work focused on the advantages in-situ approach in comparison with ex-situ experiments. The study provides to follow the evolution of the important properties of HfO{sub 2}: contamination level, density and stoichiometry, and influence of the experimental parameters to the interface layer formation during ALD. Our investigation shows that in-situ XPS approach for ALD gives much more information than ex-situ experiments. (orig.)

  16. Preparation of Supported Metal Catalysts by Atomic and Molecular Layer Deposition for Improved Catalytic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Troy D.

    Creating catalysts with enhanced selectivity and activity requires precise control over particle shape, composition, and size. Here we report the use of atomic layer deposition (ALD) to synthesize supported Ni, Pt, and Ni-Pt catalysts in the size regime (nanoparticles by depositing Ni on Al2O3 with two half-reactions of Ni(Cp)2 and H2. By changing the number of ALD cycles, Ni weight loadings were varied from 4.7 wt% to 16.7 wt% and the average particle sizes ranged from 2.5 to 3.3 nm, which increased the selectivity for C 3H6 hydrogenolysis by an order of magnitude over a much larger Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Pt particles were deposited by varying the number of ALD cycles and the reaction chemistry (H2 or O 2) to control the particle size from approximately 1 to 2 nm, which allowed lower-coordinated surface atoms to populate the particle surface. These Pt ALD catalysts demonstrated some of the highest oxidative dehydrogenation of propane selectivities (37%) of a Pt catalyst synthesized by a scalable technique. Dry reforming of methane (DRM) is a reaction of interest due to the recent increased recovery of natural gas, but this reaction is hindered from industrial implementation because the Ni catalysts are plagued by deactivation from sintering and coking. This work utilized Ni ALD and NiPt ALD catalysts for the DRM reaction. These catalysts did not form destructive carbon whiskers and had enhanced reaction rates due to increased bimetallic interaction. To further limit sintering, the Ni and NiPt ALD catalysts were coated with a porous alumina matrix by molecular layer deposition (MLD). The catalysts were evaluated for DRM at 973 K, and the MLD-coated Ni catalysts outperformed the uncoated Ni catalysts in either activity (with 5 MLD cycles) or stability (with 10 MLD cycles). In summary, this thesis developed a new Ni nanoparticle ALD chemistry, explored possibilities for changing Pt ALD particle size, brought the two techniques together to create enhanced bimetallic

  17. Electromagnetic interference shielding behaviors of Zn-based conducting oxide films prepared by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-June; Kang, Kyung-Mun; Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Hyung-Ho, E-mail: hhpark@yonsei.ac.kr

    2015-05-29

    The structural, electrical, and optical properties of undoped ZnO, F-doped ZnO (ZnO:F), and Al-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) thin films with two different thicknesses deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were investigated to evaluate the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE). A diluted fluoride hydroxide was used as a single reactant source for F doping in a ZnO matrix, and the F doping concentration was about 1 at.% in the ZnO:F films. The fabrication of the ZnO:Al films was followed by the typical ALD method, and the Al doping concentration of about 2 at.% was adjusted by the dopant deposition intervals of the ZnO:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} precursor pulse cycle ratios, which were fixed at 19:1. The film thickness variations were controlled with 600 and 1600 total ALD cycles of approximately 100 nm and 300 nm, respectively. The carrier concentration of the films is monotonically increased in order of the undoped ZnO, ZnO:F, and ZnO:Al films. The EMI-SE values of the undoped ZnO, ZnO:F, and ZnO:Al films at 1 GHz were 0.9 dB, 2.6 dB, and 6.0 dB for ~ 100 nm, and were 2.1 dB, 9.7 dB, and 13.1 dB for ~ 300 nm, respectively. In our work, the EMI-SE value was increased by the enhancement of both the carrier concentration and film thickness due to reflection via the free carrier scattering effect. - Highlights: • Fluorine or aluminum doped ZnO thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition • Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE) of ZnO thin films • Carrier concentration and film thickness enhanced the EMI-SE. • The enhancement of EMI-SE was due to reflection via free carrier scattering effect.

  18. Integrating atomic layer deposition and ultra-high vacuum physical vapor deposition for in situ fabrication of tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Alan J; Malek, Gary A; Lu, Rongtao; Han, Siyuan; Yu, Haifeng; Zhao, Shiping; Wu, Judy Z

    2014-07-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a promising technique for growing ultrathin, pristine dielectrics on metal substrates, which is essential to many electronic devices. Tunnel junctions are an excellent example which require a leak-free, ultrathin dielectric tunnel barrier of typical thickness around 1 nm between two metal electrodes. A challenge in the development of ultrathin dielectric tunnel barriers using ALD is controlling the nucleation of dielectrics on metals with minimal formation of native oxides at the metal surface for high-quality interfaces between the tunnel barrier and metal electrodes. This poses a critical need for integrating ALD with ultra-high vacuum (UHV) physical vapor deposition. In order to address these challenges, a viscous-flow ALD chamber was designed and interfaced to an UHV magnetron sputtering chamber via a load lock. A sample transportation system was implemented for in situ sample transfer between the ALD, load lock, and sputtering chambers. Using this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system, superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Nb-Al/Al2O2/Nb Josephson tunnel junctions were fabricated with tunnel barriers of thickness varied from sub-nm to ~1 nm. The suitability of using an Al wetting layer for initiation of the ALD Al2O3 tunnel barrier was investigated with ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and electrical transport measurements. With optimized processing conditions, leak-free SIS tunnel junctions were obtained, demonstrating the viability of this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system for the fabrication of tunnel junctions and devices comprised of metal-dielectric-metal multilayers.

  19. Integrating atomic layer deposition and ultra-high vacuum physical vapor deposition for in situ fabrication of tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Alan J.; Malek, Gary A.; Lu, Rongtao; Han, Siyuan; Yu, Haifeng; Zhao, Shiping; Wu, Judy Z.

    2014-07-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a promising technique for growing ultrathin, pristine dielectrics on metal substrates, which is essential to many electronic devices. Tunnel junctions are an excellent example which require a leak-free, ultrathin dielectric tunnel barrier of typical thickness around 1 nm between two metal electrodes. A challenge in the development of ultrathin dielectric tunnel barriers using ALD is controlling the nucleation of dielectrics on metals with minimal formation of native oxides at the metal surface for high-quality interfaces between the tunnel barrier and metal electrodes. This poses a critical need for integrating ALD with ultra-high vacuum (UHV) physical vapor deposition. In order to address these challenges, a viscous-flow ALD chamber was designed and interfaced to an UHV magnetron sputtering chamber via a load lock. A sample transportation system was implemented for in situ sample transfer between the ALD, load lock, and sputtering chambers. Using this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system, superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Nb-Al/Al2O2/Nb Josephson tunnel junctions were fabricated with tunnel barriers of thickness varied from sub-nm to ˜1 nm. The suitability of using an Al wetting layer for initiation of the ALD Al2O3 tunnel barrier was investigated with ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and electrical transport measurements. With optimized processing conditions, leak-free SIS tunnel junctions were obtained, demonstrating the viability of this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system for the fabrication of tunnel junctions and devices comprised of metal-dielectric-metal multilayers.

  20. Long period gratings coated with hafnium oxide by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition for refractive index measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Luis; Burton, Geoff; Kubik, Philip; Wild, Peter

    2016-04-04

    Long period gratings (LPGs) are coated with hafnium oxide using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) to increase the sensitivity of these devices to the refractive index of the surrounding medium. PEALD allows deposition at low temperatures which reduces thermal degradation of UV-written LPGs. Depositions targeting three different coating thicknesses are investigated: 30 nm, 50 nm and 70 nm. Coating thickness measurements taken by scanning electron microscopy of the optical fibers confirm deposition of uniform coatings. The performance of the coated LPGs shows that deposition of hafnium oxide on LPGs induces two-step transition behavior of the cladding modes.

  1. Al2O3 on WSe2 by ozone based atomic layer deposition: Nucleation and interface study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Azcatl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the atomic layer deposition process using ozone and trimethylaluminum (TMA for the deposition of Al2O3 films on WSe2 was investigated. It was found that the ozone-based atomic layer deposition enhanced the nucleation of Al2O3 in comparison to the water/TMA process. In addition, the chemistry at the Al2O3/WSe2 interface and the surface morphology of the Al2O3 films exhibited a dependence on the deposition temperature. A non-covalent functionalizing effect of ozone on WSe2 at low deposition temperatures 30 °C was identified which prevented the formation of pinholes in the Al2O3 films. These findings aim to provide an approach to obtain high-quality gate dielectrics on WSe2 for two-dimensional transistor applications.

  2. Atomic layer deposition of tantalum nitride based thin films from cyclopentadienyl type precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anacleto, A. Correia, E-mail: anthony.correia@airliquide.co [Air Liquide, Centre de Recherche Claude Delorme, 1, chemin de la porte des loges - Les Loges en Josas - BP 126, 78354 Jouy en Josas Cedex (France); Zauner, A.; Cany-Canian, D. [Air Liquide, Centre de Recherche Claude Delorme, 1, chemin de la porte des loges - Les Loges en Josas - BP 126, 78354 Jouy en Josas Cedex (France); Gatineau, J. [Air Liquide, Air Liquide Laboratories, 28 Wadai, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-Pref. 300-4247 (Japan); Hugon, M.-C. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas, UMR 8578, CNRS - Universite Paris Sud 11, 15, rue Georges Clemenceau, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2010-10-29

    Tantalum nitride based thin films have been deposited on p-Si (100) and SiO{sub 2}/Si by thermal Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) using either the Ta(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 3} or a derivative, in which one dialkylamido ligand is substituted by a {eta}{sup 5}-cyclopentadienyl ({eta}{sup 5}-Cp), as metal organic precursors with ammonia as reducing agent. TaN{sub x}C{sub y} self-limiting temperature dependent ALD growth was achieved for the TaCp(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 2}/NH{sub 3} process with a growth rate of 0.51-0.91 A cycle{sup -1} in the 400-425 {sup o}C temperature range while between 240 and 280 {sup o}C, the growth of TaN based films from the Ta(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 3} was accompanied by a partial decomposition of the precursor. The {eta}{sup 5}-cyclopentadienyl type compound allows lower nitrogen content in the precursor and thereafter in the deposited film. Although N/Ta ratio is close to one at temperatures of 390 and 400 {sup o}C, as analyzed by Rutherford Back Scattering and Nuclear Reaction Analysis, films were amorphous independently of the deposition temperature. Since Ta-C bonds are present in the Cp derivative, the TaCp(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 2} tends more likely to form tantalum carbide compared to Ta(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 3}, which leads to lower thin film resistivity. For both precursors, employed in their respective ALD window, films were smooth with a root-mean-square roughness close to 1 nm.

  3. AxBAxB… pulsed atomic layer deposition: Numerical growth model and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneshwar, Triratna; Cadien, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is widely used for the fabrication of advanced semiconductor devices and related nanoscale structures. During ALD, large precursor doses (>1000 L per pulse) are often required to achieve surface saturation, of which only a small fraction is utilized in film growth while the rest is pumped from the system. Since the metal precursor constitutes a significant cost of ALD, strategies to enhance precursor utilization are essential for the scaling of ALD processes. In the precursor reaction step, precursor physisorption is restricted by steric hindrance (mA1) from ligands on the precursor molecules. On reaction, some of these ligands are removed as by-products resulting in chemisorbed species with reduced steric hindrance (mA1 → mA2, where mA2 mA1) and some of the initially hindered surface reaction sites becoming accessible for further precursor physisorption. To utilize these additional reaction sites, we propose a generalized AxBAxB… pulsed deposition where the total precursor dose (ΦA) is introduced as multiple x (x > 1, x ∈ I) short-pulses rather than a single pulse. A numerical first-order surface reaction kinetics growth model is presented and applied to study the effect of AxBAxB… pulsed ALD on the growth per cycle (GPC). The model calculations predict higher GPC for AxBAxB… pulsing than with ABAB… deposition. In agreement with the model predictions, with AxBAxB… pulsed deposition, the GPC was found to increase by ˜46% for ZrN plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD), ˜49% for HfO2 PEALD, and ˜8% for thermal Al2O3 ALD with respect to conventional ABAB… pulsed growth.

  4. Well-ordered ZnO nanotube arrays and networks grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Ren, Wei; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2015-06-01

    Semiconductor ZnO, possessing a large exciton binding energy and wide band gap, has received a great deal of attention because it shows great potential for applications in optoelectronics. Precisely controlling the growth of three-dimensional ZnO nanotube structures with a uniform morphology constitutes an important step forward toward integrating ZnO nanostructures into microelectronic devices. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, featured with self-limiting surface reactions, is an ideal approach to the fabrication of ZnO nanostructures, because it allows for accurate control of the thickness at atomic level and conformal coverage in complex 3D structures. In this work, well-ordered ZnO nanotube arrays and networks are prepared by ALD. The morphology, crystallinity and wall thickness of these nanotube structures are examined for different growth conditions. The microstructure of the ZnO nanotubes is investigated by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The high aspect ratio of ZnO nanotubes provides a large specific area which could enhance the kinetics of chemical reactions taking place between the ZnO and its surroundings, making the potential devices more efficient and compact.

  5. A review of atomic layer deposition providing high performance lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Xifei; Bai, Zhimin; Song, Xiaosheng; Xiong, Dongbin; Zhao, Mengli; Li, Dejun; Lu, Shigang

    2017-01-01

    With the significant obstacles that have been conquered in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, it is urgent to impel accelerating development of room-temperature Li-S batteries with high energy density and long-term stability. In view of the unique solid-liquid-solid conversion processes of Li-S batteries, however, designing effective strategies to address the insulativity and volume effect of cathode, shuttle of soluble polysulfides, and/or safety hazard of Li metal anode has been challenging. An atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a representative thin film technology with exceptional capabilities in developing atomic-precisely conformal films. It has been demonstrated to be a promise strategy of solving emerging issues in advanced electrical energy storage (EES) devices via the surface modification and/or the fabrication of complex nanostructured materials. In this review, the recent developments and significances on how ALD improves the performance of Li-S batteries were discussed in detail. Significant attention mainly focused on the various strategies with the use of ALD to refine the electrochemical interfaces and cell configurations. Furthermore, the novel opportunities and perspective associated with ALD for future research directions were summarized. This review may boost the development and application of advanced Li-S batteries using ALD.

  6. Growth kinetics and initial stage growth during plasma-enhanced Ti atomic layer deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, H

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the growth kinetics of plasma-enhanced Ti atomic layer deposition (ALD) using a quartz crystal microbalance. Ti ALD films were grown at temperatures from 20 to 200 deg. C using TiCl sub 4 as a source gas and rf plasma-produced atomic H as the reducing agent. Postdeposition ex situ chemical analyses of thin films showed that the main impurity is oxygen, mostly incorporated during the air exposure prior to analysis. The thickness per cycle, corresponding to the growth rate, was measured by quartz crystal microbalance as a function of various key growth parameters, including TiCl sub 4 and H exposure time, rf plasma power, and sample temperature. The growth rates were independent of TiCl sub 4 exposure above 1x10 sup 3 L, indicating typical ALD mode growth. The key kinetic parameters for Cl extraction reaction and TiCl sub 4 adsorption kinetics were obtained and the growth kinetics were modeled to predict the growth rates based upon these results. Also, the dependency of growth kinetics on d...

  7. Growth process optimization of ZnO thin film using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Binbin; Wang, Jingyu; Larson, Preston; Liu, Yingtao

    2016-12-01

    The work reports experimental studies of ZnO thin films grown on Si(100) wafers using a customized thermal atomic layer deposition. The impact of growth parameters including H2O/DiethylZinc (DEZn) dose ratio, background pressure, and temperature are investigated. The imaging results of scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy reveal that the dose ratio is critical to the surface morphology. To achieve high uniformity, the H2O dose amount needs to be at least twice that of DEZn per each cycle. If the background pressure drops below 400 mTorr, a large amount of nanoflower-like ZnO grains would emerge and increase surface roughness significantly. In addition, the growth temperature range between 200 °C and 250 °C is found to be the optimal growth window. And the crystal structures and orientations are also strongly correlated to the temperature as proved by electron back-scattering diffraction and x-ray diffraction results.

  8. Surface smoothing effect of an amorphous thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition on a surface with nano-sized roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. S. Lau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously, Lau (one of the authors pointed out that the deposition of an amorphous thin film by atomic layer deposition (ALD on a substrate with nano-sized roughness probably has a surface smoothing effect. In this letter, polycrystalline zinc oxide deposited by ALD onto a smooth substrate was used as a substrate with nano-sized roughness. Atomic force microscopy (AFM and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM were used to demonstrate that an amorphous aluminum oxide thin film deposited by ALD can reduce the surface roughness of a polycrystalline zinc oxide coated substrate.

  9. Effect of Al 2 O 3 Recombination Barrier Layers Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition in Solid-State CdS Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Roelofs, Katherine E.

    2013-03-21

    Despite the promise of quantum dots (QDs) as a light-absorbing material to replace the dye in dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) efficiencies remain low, due in part to high rates of recombination. In this article, we demonstrate that ultrathin recombination barrier layers of Al2O3 deposited by atomic layer deposition can improve the performance of cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dot-sensitized solar cells with spiro-OMeTAD as the solid-state hole transport material. We explored depositing the Al2O3 barrier layers either before or after the QDs, resulting in TiO2/Al2O3/QD and TiO 2/QD/Al2O3 configurations. The effects of barrier layer configuration and thickness were tracked through current-voltage measurements of device performance and transient photovoltage measurements of electron lifetimes. The Al2O3 layers were found to suppress dark current and increase electron lifetimes with increasing Al 2O3 thickness in both configurations. For thin barrier layers, gains in open-circuit voltage and concomitant increases in efficiency were observed, although at greater thicknesses, losses in photocurrent caused net decreases in efficiency. A close comparison of the electron lifetimes in TiO2 in the TiO2/Al2O3/QD and TiO2/QD/Al2O3 configurations suggests that electron transfer from TiO2 to spiro-OMeTAD is a major source of recombination in ss-QDSSCs, though recombination of TiO2 electrons with oxidized QDs can also limit electron lifetimes, particularly if the regeneration of oxidized QDs is hindered by a too-thick coating of the barrier layer. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  10. Structural and chemical analysis of annealed plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition aluminum nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broas, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.broas@aalto.fi; Vuorinen, Vesa [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Sippola, Perttu; Pyymaki Perros, Alexander; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University. P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-07-15

    Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition was utilized to grow aluminum nitride (AlN) films on Si from trimethylaluminum and N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} plasma at 200 °C. Thermal treatments were then applied on the films which caused changes in their chemical composition and nanostructure. These changes were observed to manifest in the refractive indices and densities of the films. The AlN films were identified to contain light element impurities, namely, H, C, and excess N due to nonideal precursor reactions. Oxygen contamination was also identified in the films. Many of the embedded impurities became volatile in the elevated annealing temperatures. Most notably, high amounts of H were observed to desorb from the AlN films. Furthermore, dinitrogen triple bonds were identified with infrared spectroscopy in the films. The triple bonds broke after annealing at 1000 °C for 1 h which likely caused enhanced hydrolysis of the films. The nanostructure of the films was identified to be amorphous in the as-deposited state and to become nanocrystalline after 1 h of annealing at 1000 °C.

  11. Photoelectric and passivation properties of atomic layer deposited gradient AZO thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Tang, Li-dan; Wang, Bing; Jia, Yi; Feng, Jia-heng

    2017-02-01

    Gradient Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films were deposited at 150 °C by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with different Al concentration gradient, and their photoelectric and passivation properties were investigated. With increasing Al concentration gradient from 0.09 to 1.21%/nm, Hall-effect showed that the resistivity of gradient AZO thin films deteriorates. The minimal resistivity (2.81 × 10-3 Ω cm), the maximum mobility (9.03 cm2/Vs) and the maximum carrier concentration (2.46 × 1020 cm-3) were obtained at 0.09%/nm Al concentration gradient. The average transmittance of all the gradient AZO films can be more than 85% in the visible region. In addition, gradient AZO thin films demonstrated excellent passivation properties. The maximum minority carrier lifetime (120.6 μs) and the minimal surface recombination velocity (≤208.3 cm/s) were obtained at 0.71%/nm Al concentration gradient.

  12. Low-Temperature Crystalline Titanium Dioxide by Atomic Layer Deposition for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chandiran, Aravind Kumar

    2013-04-24

    Low-temperature processing of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) is crucial to enable commercialization with low-cost, plastic substrates. Prior studies have focused on mechanical compression of premade particles on plastic or glass substrates; however, this did not yield sufficient interconnections for good carrier transport. Furthermore, such compression can lead to more heterogeneous porosity. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a low-temperature processing route for photoanodes where crystalline TiO2 is deposited onto well-defined, mesoporous templates. The TiO2 is grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the crystalline films are achieved at a growth temperature of 200 C. The ALD TiO2 thickness was systematically studied in terms of charge transport and performance to lead to optimized photovoltaic performance. We found that a 15 nm TiO2 overlayer on an 8 μm thick SiO2 film leads to a high power conversion efficiency of 7.1% with the state-of-the-art zinc porphyrin sensitizer and cobalt bipyridine redox mediator. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  13. Atomic-Layer-Deposition Functionalized Carbonized Mesoporous Wood Fiber for High Sulfur Loading Lithium Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao; Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Wei; Shen, Fei; Fan, Xiulin; Dai, Jiaqi; Liang, Yujia; Wang, Chunsheng; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-05-03

    Lithium-sulfur battery (LSB) as one of the most promising energy storage devices suffers from poor conductivity of sulfur and fast capacity decay triggered by the dissolution of polysulfides. In this work, functionalized carbonized mesoporous wood fiber (f-CMWF) is employed as a host to accommodate sulfur for the first time. Natural wood microfiber has unique hierarchical and mesoporous structure, which is well-maintained after carbonization. With such a hierarchical mesoporous structure, a high sulfur loading of 76 wt % is achieved in CMWF electrodes. The pore size of CMWF is tunable by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a 5 nm Al 2 O 3 coating to form the f-CMWF. Such a thin layer slightly decreases the sulfur loading to 70%, but it remarkably promotes the cyclic stability of sulfur cathode, which delivers an initial capacity of 1115 mAh g -1 , and maintains a reversible capacity of 859 mAh g -1 for 450 cycles, corresponding to a slow capacity decay rate of 0.046% per cycle. More importantly, natural wood microfiber is first used as a raw material for sulfur encapsulating. This work is also critical for using low cost and mesoporous biomass carbon as bifunctional scaffold for LSB.

  14. Corrosion Resistance of Atomic Layer Deposition-Generated Amorphous Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michael D; Aitchison, Brad; Johnson, David C

    2016-11-09

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to prepare amorphous thin films of Al2O3, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 on both silicon substrates and aluminum blocks. Etch rates in 10 M NH4OH were determined from X-ray reflectometry data collected as a function of time. Amorphous Al2O3 thin films were found to have an etch rate of 0.5 nm min(-1) and an increase in roughness of ∼0.01 nm min(-1). Electron microscopy data showed etch pits, consistent with the increase in roughness. Amorphous Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 films showed no appreciable etching or roughening over the course of a ∼500 h continuous immersion. An Nb2O5-coated aluminum block showed no corrosion after immersion in 10 M NH4OH for over 200 h, suggesting that the coatings were pinhole-free. These results suggest that amorphous ALD thin films of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 are candidates as barrier layers for aluminum in caustic environments.

  15. Environmental sensing with optical fiber sensors processed with focused ion beam and atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Raquel; Janeiro, Ricardo; Dahlem, Marcus; Viegas, Jaime

    2015-03-01

    We report an optical fiber chemical sensor based on a focused ion beam processed optical fiber. The demonstrated sensor is based on a cavity formed onto a standard 1550 nm single-mode fiber by either chemical etching, focused ion beam milling (FIB) or femtosecond laser ablation, on which side channels are drilled by either ion beam milling or femtosecond laser irradiation. The encapsulation of the cavity is achieved by optimized fusion splicing onto a standard single or multimode fiber. The empty cavity can be used as semi-curved Fabry-Pérot resonator for gas or liquid sensing. Increased reflectivity of the formed cavity mirrors can be achieved with atomic layer deposition (ALD) of alternating metal oxides. For chemical selective optical sensors, we demonstrate the same FIB-formed cavity concept, but filled with different materials, such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) which show selective swelling when immersed in different solvents. Finally, a reducing agent sensor based on a FIB formed cavity partially sealed by fusion splicing and coated with a thin ZnO layer by ALD is presented and the results discussed. Sensor interrogation is achieved with spectral or multi-channel intensity measurements.

  16. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2} thin layers for the processing of memristive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porro, Samuele, E-mail: samuele.porro@polito.it; Conti, Daniele; Guastella, Salvatore; Ricciardi, Carlo [Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Jasmin, Alladin; Pirri, Candido F. [Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino, Italy and Center for Space Human Robotics@PoliTo, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, C.so Trento 21, 10129 Torino (Italy); Bejtka, Katarzyna; Perrone, Denis; Chiolerio, Alessandro [Center for Space Human Robotics@PoliTo, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, C.so Trento 21, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) represents one of the most fundamental techniques capable of satisfying the strict technological requirements imposed by the rapidly evolving electronic components industry. The actual scaling trend is rapidly leading to the fabrication of nanoscaled devices able to overcome limits of the present microelectronic technology, of which the memristor is one of the principal candidates. Since their development in 2008, TiO{sub 2} thin film memristors have been identified as the future technology for resistive random access memories because of their numerous advantages in producing dense, low power-consuming, three-dimensional memory stacks. The typical features of ALD, such as self-limiting and conformal deposition without line-of-sight requirements, are strong assets for fabricating these nanosized devices. This work focuses on the realization of memristors based on low-temperature ALD TiO{sub 2} thin films. In this process, the oxide layer was directly grown on a polymeric photoresist, thus simplifying the fabrication procedure with a direct liftoff patterning instead of a complex dry etching process. The TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited in a temperature range of 120–230 °C were characterized via Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrical current–voltage measurements taken in voltage sweep mode were employed to confirm the existence of resistive switching behaviors typical of memristors. These measurements showed that these low-temperature devices exhibit an ON/OFF ratio comparable to that of a high-temperature memristor, thus exhibiting similar performances with respect to memory applications.

  17. Indium Oxide Thin Films by Atomic Layer Deposition Using Trimethylindium and Ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mane, Anil U.; Allen, Amy J.; Kanjolia, Ravindra K.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2016-05-12

    We investigated the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of indium oxide (In2O3) thin films using alternating exposures of trimethylindium (TMIn) and a variety of oxygen sources: ozone (O-3), O-2, deionized H2O, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We used in situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements to evaluate the effectiveness of the different oxygen sources and found that only O-3 yielded viable and sustained 111203 growth with TMIn. These measurements also provided details about the In2O3 growth mechanism and enabled us to verify that both the TMIn and O-3 surface reactions were self-limiting. In2O3 thin films were prepared and characterized using X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet visible spectrophotometry, spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical transport properties of these layers were studied by Hall probe measurements. We found that, at deposition temperatures within the range of 100-200 degrees C, the In2O3 growth per cycle was nearly constant at 0.46 angstrom/cycle and the films were dense and pure. The film thickness was highly uniform (<0.3% variation) along the 45 cm length of our tubular ALD reactor. At higher growth temperatures the In2O3 growth per cycle increased due to thermal decomposition of the TMIn. The ALD In2O3 films showed resistivities as low as 3.2 x 10(-3) Omega cm, and carrier concentrations as large as 7.0 x 10(19) cm(-3). This TMIn/O-3 process for In2O3 ALD should be suitable for eventual scale-up in photovoltaics.

  18. Recommended reading list of early publications on atomic layer deposition-Outcome of the "Virtual Project on the History of ALD"

    OpenAIRE

    Ahvenniemi, Esko; Akbashev, Andrew R.; Ali, Saima; Bechelany, Mikhael; Berdova, Maria; Boyadjiev, Stefan; Cameron, David C.; Chen, Rong; Chubarov, Mikhail; Cremers, Veronique; Devi, Anjana; Drozd, Viktor; Elnikova, Liliya; Gottardi, Gloria; Grigoras, Kestutis

    2017-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD), a gas-phase thin film deposition technique based on repeated, self-terminating gas-solid reactions, has become the method of choice in semiconductor manufacturing and many other technological areas for depositing thin conformal inorganic material layers for various applications. ALD has been discovered and developed independently, at least twice, under different names: atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) and molecular layering. ALE, dating back to 1974 in Finland, has be...

  19. Sub-nanometer dimensions control of core/shell nanoparticles prepared by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M J; Verheijen, M A; Bol, A A; Kessels, W M M

    2015-03-06

    Bimetallic core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) are the subject of intense research due to their unique electronic, optical and catalytic properties. Accurate and independent control over the dimensions of both core and shell would allow for unprecedented catalytic performance. Here, we demonstrate that both core and shell dimensions of Pd/Pt core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) supported on Al2O3 substrates can be controlled at the sub-nanometer level by using a novel strategy based on atomic layer deposition (ALD). From the results it is derived that the main conditions for accurate dimension control of these core/shell NPs are: (i) a difference in surface energy between the deposited core metal and the substrate to obtain island growth; (ii) a process yielding linear growth of the NP cores with ALD cycles to obtain monodispersed NPs with a narrow size distribution; (iii) a selective ALD process for the shell metal yielding a linearly increasing thickness to obtain controllable shell growth exclusively on the cores. For Pd/Pt core/shell NPs it is found that a minimum core diameter of 1 nm exists above which the NP cores are able to catalytically dissociate the precursor molecules for shell growth. In addition, initial studies on the stability of these core/shell NPs have been carried out, and it has been demonstrated that core/shell NPs can be deposited by ALD on high aspect ratio substrates such as nanowire arrays. These achievements show therefore that ALD has significant potential for the preparation of tuneable heterogeneous catalyst systems.

  20. Thin film growth into the ion track structures in polyimide by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mättö, L.; Malm, J.; Arstila, K.; Sajavaara, T.

    2017-09-01

    High-aspect ratio porous structures with controllable pore diameters and without a stiff substrate can be fabricated using the ion track technique. Atomic layer deposition is an ideal technique for depositing thin films and functional surfaces on complicated 3D structures due to the high conformality of the films. In this work, we studied Al2O3 and TiO2 films grown by ALD on pristine polyimide (Kapton HN) membranes as well as polyimide membranes etched in sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and boric acid (BO3) solution by means of RBS, PIXE, SEM-EDX and helium ion microcopy (HIM). The focus was on the first ALD growth cycles. The areal density of Al2O3 film in the 400 cycle sample was determined to be 51 ± 3 × 1016 at./cm2, corresponding to the thickness of 55 ± 3 nm. Furthermore, the growth per cycle was 1.4 Å/cycle. The growth is highly linear from the first cycles. In the case of TiO2, the growth per cycle is clearly slower during the first 200 cycles but then it increases significantly. The growth rate based on RBS measurements is 0.24 Å/cycle from 3 to 200 cycles and then 0.6 Å/cycle between 200 and 400 cycles. The final areal density of TiO2 film after 400 cycles is 148 ± 3 × 1015 at./cm2 which corresponds to the thickness of 17.4 ± 0.4 nm. The modification of the polyimide surface by etching prior to the deposition did not have an effect on the Al2O3 and TiO2 growth.

  1. Atomic layer deposition: an enabling technology for the growth of functional nanoscale semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyikli, Necmi; Haider, Ali

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the progress in the growth of nanoscale semiconductors grown via atomic layer deposition (ALD). After the adoption by semiconductor chip industry, ALD became a widespread tool to grow functional films and conformal ultra-thin coatings for various applications. Based on self-limiting and ligand-exchange-based surface reactions, ALD enabled the low-temperature growth of nanoscale dielectric, metal, and semiconductor materials. Being able to deposit wafer-scale uniform semiconductor films at relatively low-temperatures, with sub-monolayer thickness control and ultimate conformality, makes ALD attractive for semiconductor device applications. Towards this end, precursors and low-temperature growth recipes are developed to deposit crystalline thin films for compound and elemental semiconductors. Conventional thermal ALD as well as plasma-assisted and radical-enhanced techniques have been exploited to achieve device-compatible film quality. Metal-oxides, III-nitrides, sulfides, and selenides are among the most popular semiconductor material families studied via ALD technology. Besides thin films, ALD can grow nanostructured semiconductors as well using either template-assisted growth methods or bottom-up controlled nucleation mechanisms. Among the demonstrated semiconductor nanostructures are nanoparticles, nano/quantum-dots, nanowires, nanotubes, nanofibers, nanopillars, hollow and core-shell versions of the afore-mentioned nanostructures, and 2D materials including transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene. ALD-grown nanoscale semiconductor materials find applications in a vast amount of applications including functional coatings, catalysis and photocatalysis, renewable energy conversion and storage, chemical sensing, opto-electronics, and flexible electronics. In this review, we give an overview of the current state-of-the-art in ALD-based nanoscale semiconductor research including the already demonstrated and future applications.

  2. Effective optimization of surface passivation on porous silicon carbide using atomic layer deposited Al2O3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Iwasa, Yoshimi; Ou, Yiyu

    2017-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide (B–N co-doped SiC) produced by anodic oxidation showed strong photoluminescence (PL) at around 520 nm excited by a 375 nm laser. The porous SiC samples were passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films, resulting in a significant enhancement...

  3. Understanding and Controlling the Aggregative Growth of Platinum Nanoparticles in Atomic Layer Deposition : an Avenue to Size Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grillo, F.; Bui, H.V.; Moulijn, J.A.; Kreutzer, M.T.; van Ommen, J.R.

    2017-01-01

    We present an atomistic understanding of the evolution of the size distribution with temperature and number of cycles in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Pt nanoparticles (NPs). Atomistic modeling of our experiments teaches us that the NPs grow mostly via NP diffusion and coalescence rather than

  4. Protective capping and surface passivation of III-V nanowires by atomic layer deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veer Dhaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature (∼200 °C grown atomic layer deposition (ALD films of AlN, TiN, Al2O3, GaN, and TiO2 were tested for protective capping and surface passivation of bottom-up grown III-V (GaAs and InP nanowires (NWs, and top-down fabricated InP nanopillars. For as-grown GaAs NWs, only the AlN material passivated the GaAs surface as measured by photoluminescence (PL at low temperatures (15K, and the best passivation was achieved with a few monolayer thick (2Å film. For InP NWs, the best passivation (∼2x enhancement in room-temperature PL was achieved with a capping of 2nm thick Al2O3. All other ALD capping layers resulted in a de-passivation effect and possible damage to the InP surface. Top-down fabricated InP nanopillars show similar passivation effects as InP NWs. In particular, capping with a 2 nm thick Al2O3 layer increased the carrier decay time from 251 ps (as-etched nanopillars to about 525 ps. Tests after six months ageing reveal that the capped nanostructures retain their optical properties. Overall, capping of GaAs and InP NWs with high-k dielectrics AlN and Al2O3 provides moderate surface passivation as well as long term protection from oxidation and environmental attack.

  5. Protective capping and surface passivation of III-V nanowires by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhaka, Veer, E-mail: veer.dhaka@aalto.fi; Perros, Alexander; Kakko, Joona-Pekko; Haggren, Tuomas; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Micronova, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 (Finland); Naureen, Shagufta; Shahid, Naeem [Research School of Physics & Engineering, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia); Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko [Department of Applied Physics and Nanomicroscopy Center, Aalto University, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 (Finland); Srinivasan, Anand [School of Information and Communication Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, S-164 40 Kista (Sweden)

    2016-01-15

    Low temperature (∼200 °C) grown atomic layer deposition (ALD) films of AlN, TiN, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, GaN, and TiO{sub 2} were tested for protective capping and surface passivation of bottom-up grown III-V (GaAs and InP) nanowires (NWs), and top-down fabricated InP nanopillars. For as-grown GaAs NWs, only the AlN material passivated the GaAs surface as measured by photoluminescence (PL) at low temperatures (15K), and the best passivation was achieved with a few monolayer thick (2Å) film. For InP NWs, the best passivation (∼2x enhancement in room-temperature PL) was achieved with a capping of 2nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. All other ALD capping layers resulted in a de-passivation effect and possible damage to the InP surface. Top-down fabricated InP nanopillars show similar passivation effects as InP NWs. In particular, capping with a 2 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer increased the carrier decay time from 251 ps (as-etched nanopillars) to about 525 ps. Tests after six months ageing reveal that the capped nanostructures retain their optical properties. Overall, capping of GaAs and InP NWs with high-k dielectrics AlN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} provides moderate surface passivation as well as long term protection from oxidation and environmental attack.

  6. Improvement of the thermal stability of nickel silicide using a ruthenium interlayer deposited via remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Inhye [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, South Korea and System LSI Manufacturing Operation Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd, Gyeonggi-do 17113 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jingyu; Jeon, Heeyoung; Kim, Hyunjung; Shin, Changhee [Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Seokyoon; Lee, Kunyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyeongtag, E-mail: hjeon@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, South Korea and Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the effects of a thin Ru interlayer on the thermal and morphological stability of NiSi have been investigated. Ru and Ni thin films were deposited sequentially to form a Ni/Ru/Si bilayered structure, without breaking the vacuum, by remote plasma atomic layer deposition (RPALD) on a p-type Si wafer. After annealing at various temperatures, the thermal stabilities of the Ni/Ru/Si and Ni/Si structures were investigated by various analysis techniques. The results showed that the sheet resistance of the Ni/Ru/Si sample was consistently lower compared to the Ni/Si sample over the entire temperature range. Although both samples exhibited the formation of NiSi{sub 2} phases at an annealing temperature of 800 °C, as seen with glancing angle x-ray diffraction, the peaks of the Ni/Ru/Si sample were observed to have much weaker intensities than those obtained for the Ni/Si sample. Moreover, the NiSi film with a Ru interlayer exhibited a better interface and improved surface morphologies compared to the NiSi film without a Ru interlayer. These results show that the phase transformation of NiSi to NiSi{sub 2} was retarded and that the smooth NiSi/Si interface was retained due to the activation energy increment for NiSi{sub 2} nucleation that is caused by adding a Ru interlayer. Hence, it can be said that the Ru interlayer deposited by RPALD can be used to control the phase transformation and physical properties of nickel silicide phases.

  7. Well-ordered ZnO nanotube arrays and networks grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yijun [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education & International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Liu, Ming, E-mail: mingliu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education & International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Ren, Wei, E-mail: wren@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education & International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Ye, Zuo-Guang, E-mail: zye@sfu.ca [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education & International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Department of Chemistry and 4D LABS, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanotube networks and well-ordered ZnO nanotube arrays are fabricated by ALD. • The wall thickness of the ZnO nanotubes can be well-controlled at the angstrom level. • The fishing net-like networks of ZnO nanotubes with an ultra thin wall thickness are fabricated. • The ZnO nanotube arrays have an aspect ratio as high as 1000:1. - Abstract: Semiconductor ZnO, possessing a large exciton binding energy and wide band gap, has received a great deal of attention because it shows great potential for applications in optoelectronics. Precisely controlling the growth of three-dimensional ZnO nanotube structures with a uniform morphology constitutes an important step forward toward integrating ZnO nanostructures into microelectronic devices. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, featured with self-limiting surface reactions, is an ideal approach to the fabrication of ZnO nanostructures, because it allows for accurate control of the thickness at atomic level and conformal coverage in complex 3D structures. In this work, well-ordered ZnO nanotube arrays and networks are prepared by ALD. The morphology, crystallinity and wall thickness of these nanotube structures are examined for different growth conditions. The microstructure of the ZnO nanotubes is investigated by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The high aspect ratio of ZnO nanotubes provides a large specific area which could enhance the kinetics of chemical reactions taking place between the ZnO and its surroundings, making the potential devices more efficient and compact.

  8. Electrode surface engineering by atomic layer deposition: A promising pathway toward better energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2016-04-29

    Research on electrochemical energy storage devices including Li ion batteries (LIBs), Na ion batteries (NIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs) has accelerated in recent years, in part because developments in nanomaterials are making it possible to achieve high capacities and energy and power densities. These developments can extend battery life in portable devices, and open new markets such as electric vehicles and large-scale grid energy storage. It is well known that surface reactions largely determine the performance and stability of electrochemical energy storage devices. Despite showing impressive capacities and high energy and power densities, many of the new nanostructured electrode materials suffer from limited lifetime due to severe electrode interaction with electrolytes or due to large volume changes. Hence control of the surface of the electrode material is essential for both increasing capacity and improving cyclic stability of the energy storage devices.Atomic layer deposition (ALD) which has become a pervasive synthesis method in the microelectronics industry, has recently emerged as a promising process for electrochemical energy storage. ALD boasts excellent conformality, atomic scale thickness control, and uniformity over large areas. Since ALD is based on self-limiting surface reactions, complex shapes and nanostructures can be coated with excellent uniformity, and most processes can be done below 200. °C. In this article, we review recent studies on the use of ALD coatings to improve the performance of electrochemical energy storage devices, with particular emphasis on the studies that have provided mechanistic insight into the role of ALD in improving device performance. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Sub-5 nm nanostructures fabricated by atomic layer deposition using a carbon nanotube template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ju Yeon; Han, Hyo; Kim, Ji Weon; Lee, Seung-Mo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Shim, Joon Hyung; Han, Chang-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication of nanostructures having diameters of sub-5 nm is very a important issue for bottom-up nanofabrication of nanoscale devices. In this work, we report a highly controllable method to create sub-5 nm nano-trenches and nanowires by combining area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as templates. Alumina nano-trenches having a depth of 2.6 ∼ 3.0 nm and SiO2 nano-trenches having a depth of 1.9 ∼ 2.2 nm fully guided by the SWNTs have been formed on SiO2/Si substrate. Through infilling ZnO material by ALD in alumina nano-trenches, well-defined ZnO nanowires having a thickness of 3.1 ∼ 3.3 nm have been fabricated. In order to improve the electrical properties of ZnO nanowires, as-fabricated ZnO nanowires by ALD were annealed at 350 °C in air for 60 min. As a result, we successfully demonstrated that as-synthesized ZnO nanowire using a specific template can be made for various high-density resistive components in the nanoelectronics industry.

  10. Thermal stability of atomic layer deposited WCxNy electrodes for metal oxide semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonensain, Oren; Fadida, Sivan; Fisher, Ilanit; Gao, Juwen; Danek, Michal; Eizenberg, Moshe

    2018-01-01

    This study is a thorough investigation of the chemical, structural, and electrical stability of W based organo-metallic films, grown by atomic layer deposition, for future use as gate electrodes in advanced metal oxide semiconductor structures. In an earlier work, we have shown that high effective work-function (4.7 eV) was produced by nitrogen enriched films (WCxNy) dominated by W-N chemical bonding, and low effective work-function (4.2 eV) was produced by hydrogen plasma resulting in WCx films dominated by W-C chemical bonding. In the current work, we observe, using x-ray diffraction analysis, phase transformation of the tungsten carbide and tungsten nitride phases after 900 °C annealing to the cubic tungsten phase. Nitrogen diffusion is also observed and is analyzed with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. After this 900 °C anneal, WCxNy effective work function tunability is lost and effective work-function values of 4.7-4.8 eV are measured, similar to stable effective work function values measured for PVD TiN up to 900 °C anneal. All the observed changes after annealing are discussed and correlated to the observed change in the effective work function.

  11. Catalyst synthesis and evaluation using an integrated atomic layer deposition synthesis-catalysis testing tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Bunquin, Jeffrey; Shou, Heng; Aich, Payoli; Beaulieu, David R.; Klotzsch, Helmut; Bachman, Stephen; Marshall, Christopher L.; Hock, Adam; Stair, Peter

    2015-08-01

    An integrated atomic layer deposition synthesis-catalysis (I-ALD-CAT) tool was developed. It combines an ALD manifold in-line with a plug-flow reactor system for the synthesis of supported catalytic materials by ALD and immediate evaluation of catalyst reactivity using gas-phase probe reactions. The I-ALD-CAT delivery system consists of 12 different metal ALD precursor channels, 4 oxidizing or reducing agents, and 4 catalytic reaction feeds to either of the two plug-flow reactors. The system can employ reactor pressures and temperatures in the range of 10-3 to 1 bar and 300-1000 K, respectively. The instrument is also equipped with a gas chromatograph and a mass spectrometer unit for the detection and quantification of volatile species from ALD and catalytic reactions. In this report, we demonstrate the use of the I-ALD-CAT tool for the synthesis of platinum active sites and Al2O3 overcoats, and evaluation of catalyst propylene hydrogenation activity.

  12. Catalyst synthesis and evaluation using an integrated atomic layer deposition synthesis–catalysis testing tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho-Bunquin, Jeffrey; Shou, Heng; Marshall, Christopher L. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Aich, Payoli [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Beaulieu, David R.; Klotzsch, Helmut; Bachman, Stephen [Arradiance Inc., Sudbury, Massachusetts 01776 (United States); Hock, Adam [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Stair, Peter [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    An integrated atomic layer deposition synthesis-catalysis (I-ALD-CAT) tool was developed. It combines an ALD manifold in-line with a plug-flow reactor system for the synthesis of supported catalytic materials by ALD and immediate evaluation of catalyst reactivity using gas-phase probe reactions. The I-ALD-CAT delivery system consists of 12 different metal ALD precursor channels, 4 oxidizing or reducing agents, and 4 catalytic reaction feeds to either of the two plug-flow reactors. The system can employ reactor pressures and temperatures in the range of 10{sup −3} to 1 bar and 300–1000 K, respectively. The instrument is also equipped with a gas chromatograph and a mass spectrometer unit for the detection and quantification of volatile species from ALD and catalytic reactions. In this report, we demonstrate the use of the I-ALD-CAT tool for the synthesis of platinum active sites and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overcoats, and evaluation of catalyst propylene hydrogenation activity.

  13. Room Temperature Ferroelectricity and Photovoltaic Effect in Atomic Layer Deposited SnTiOX Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, R.; Sharma, Y.; Chang, S.; Nakhmanson, S.; Takoudis, C.; Katiyar, R.; Hong, S.

    We have studied ferroelectricity and photovoltaic effects in atomic layer deposited 40 nm thick SnTiOX films. These films showed well-defined and repeatable polarization hysteresis loops at room temperature, as detected by polarization versus electric field (P-E) and field cycling measurements. A photo-induced enhancement in ferroelectricity was also observed as the spontaneous polarization increased under white-light illumination, indicating photoferroelectric nature of SnTiOX films. Interestingly, we observed ferroelectric photovoltaic behavior in these films under the illumination of wide spectrum of light, from visible to ultraviolet regions. A short circuit current of 3 micro Amp. and open circuit voltage of 0.12 V were observed under visible light, while these values were found to be slightly lower in ultraviolet illumination. Though, the origin of ferroelectricity is not very clear yet, but we believe that either the formation of non-centrosymmetric crystalline phases in the film matrix during the growth or presence of charged defects in non-stoichiometric SnTiOX could be the possible reasons. Our study provides a way to develop green ferroelectric SnTiOx thin films, which are compatible to semiconducting processes, and can be used for various ferroelectric applications.

  14. Fluidized-bed atomic layer deposition reactor for the synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didden, Arjen P.; Middelkoop, Joost; Krol, Roel van de, E-mail: roel.vandekrol@helmholtzberlin.de [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Department of Chemical Engineering, P.O. Box 5045, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Besling, Wim F. A. [NXP Semiconductors, High Tech Campus 32, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Nanu, Diana E. [Thin Film Factory B.V., Hemma Oddastrjitte 5, 8927 AA Leeuwarden (Netherlands)

    2014-01-15

    The design of a fluidized bed atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor is described in detail. The reactor consists of three parts that have all been placed in one protective cabinet: precursor dosing, reactor, and residual gas treatment section. In the precursor dosing section, the chemicals needed for the ALD reaction are injected into the carrier gas using different methods for different precursors. The reactor section is designed in such a way that a homogeneous fluidized bed can be obtained with a constant, actively controlled, reactor pressure. Furthermore, no filters are required inside the reactor chamber, minimizing the risk of pressure increase due to fouling. The residual gas treatment section consists of a decomposition furnace to remove residual precursor and a particle filter and is installed to protect the pump. In order to demonstrate the performance of the reactor, SiO{sub 2} particles have been coated with TiO{sub 2} using tetrakis-dimethylamino titanium (TDMAT) and H{sub 2}O as precursors. Experiments with varying pulse times show that saturated growth can be obtained with TDMAT pulse times larger than 600 s. Analysis of the powder with High-Angle Annular Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF-STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that after 50 cycles, all SiO{sub 2} particles were coated with a 1.6 nm homogenous shell of TiO{sub 2}.

  15. Catalyst synthesis and evaluation using an integrated atomic layer deposition synthesis-catalysis testing tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Bunquin, Jeffrey; Shou, Heng; Aich, Payoli; Beaulieu, David R; Klotzsch, Helmut; Bachman, Stephen; Marshall, Christopher L; Hock, Adam; Stair, Peter

    2015-08-01

    An integrated atomic layer deposition synthesis-catalysis (I-ALD-CAT) tool was developed. It combines an ALD manifold in-line with a plug-flow reactor system for the synthesis of supported catalytic materials by ALD and immediate evaluation of catalyst reactivity using gas-phase probe reactions. The I-ALD-CAT delivery system consists of 12 different metal ALD precursor channels, 4 oxidizing or reducing agents, and 4 catalytic reaction feeds to either of the two plug-flow reactors. The system can employ reactor pressures and temperatures in the range of 10(-3) to 1 bar and 300-1000 K, respectively. The instrument is also equipped with a gas chromatograph and a mass spectrometer unit for the detection and quantification of volatile species from ALD and catalytic reactions. In this report, we demonstrate the use of the I-ALD-CAT tool for the synthesis of platinum active sites and Al2O3 overcoats, and evaluation of catalyst propylene hydrogenation activity.

  16. Atomic Layer Deposited Coatings on Nanowires for High Temperature Water Corrosion Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersak, Alexander S; Lewis, Ryan J; Liew, Li-Anne; Wen, Rongfu; Yang, Ronggui; Lee, Yung-Cheng

    2016-11-30

    Two-phase liquid-cooling technologies incorporating micro/nanostructured copper or silicon surfaces have been established as a promising thermal management solution to keep up with the increasing power demands of high power electronics. However, the reliability of nanometer-scale features of copper and silicon in these devices has not been well investigated. In this work, accelerated corrosion testing reveals that copper nanowires are not immune to corrosion in deaerated pure hot water. To solve this problem, we investigate atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO 2 coatings grown at 150 and 175 °C. We measured no difference in coating thickness for a duration of 12 days. Using a core/shell approach, we grow ALD TiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 protective coatings on copper nanowires and demonstrate a preservation of nanoengineered copper features. These studies have identified a critical reliability problem of nanoscale copper and silicon surfaces in deaerated, pure, hot water and have successfully demonstrated a reliable solution using ALD TiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 protective coatings.

  17. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) grown thin films for ultra-fine pitch pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Härkönen, J. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, CMS Upgrade Project, Helsinki (Finland); Ott, J. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, CMS Upgrade Project, Helsinki (Finland); Laboratory of Radio Chemistry, University of Helsinki (Finland); Mäkelä, M. [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki (Finland); Arsenovich, T.; Gädda, A.; Peltola, T. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, CMS Upgrade Project, Helsinki (Finland); Tuovinen, E. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, CMS Upgrade Project, Helsinki (Finland); VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Microsystem and Nanoelectronics (Finland); Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, CMS Upgrade Project, Helsinki (Finland); Junkes, A. [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg (Germany); Niinistö, J.; Ritala, M. [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2016-09-21

    In this report we cover two special applications of Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) thin films to solve these challenges of the very small size pixel detectors. First, we propose to passivate the p-type pixel detector with ALD grown Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} field insulator with a negative oxide charge instead of using the commonly adopted p-stop or p-spray technologies with SiO{sub 2}, and second, to use plasma-enhanced ALD grown titanium nitride (TiN) bias resistors instead of the punch through biasing structures. Surface passivation properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} field insulator was studied by Photoconductive Decay (PCD) method and our results indicate that after appropriate annealing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} provides equally low effective surface recombination velocity as thermally oxidized Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. Furthermore, with properly designed annealing steps, the TiN thin film resistors can be tuned to have up to several MΩ resistances with a few µm of physical size required in ultra-fine pitch pixel detectors.

  18. Rational Design of Hyperbranched Nanowire Systems for Tunable Superomniphobic Surfaces Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielinski, Ashley R.; Boban, Mathew; He, Yang; Kazyak, Eric; Lee, Duck H.; Wang, Chongmin; Tuteja, Anish; Dasgupta, Neil P.

    2017-01-24

    A method for tunable control of geometry in hyperbranched ZnO nanowire (NW) systems is reported, which enables the rational design and fabrication of superomniphobic surfaces. Branched NWs with tunable density and orientation were grown via a sequential hydrothermal process, in which atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used for NW seeding, disruption of epitaxy, and selective blocking of NW nucleation. This approach allows for the rational design and optimization of three-level hierarchical structures, in which the geometric parameters of each level of hierarchy can be individually controlled. We demonstrate the coupled relationships between geometry and contact angle for a variety of liquids, which is supported by mathematical models of structural superomniphobicity. The highest performing superomniphobic surface was designed with three levels of hierarchy and achieved the following advancing/receding contact angles, water: 172°/170°, hexadecane: 166°/156°, octane: 162°/145°, and heptane: 160°/130°. Low surface tension liquids were shown to bounce off the surface from a height of 7 cm without breaking through and wetting. This approach demonstrates the power of ALD as an enabling technique for hierarchical materials by design, spanning the macro, micro, and nano length scales.

  19. Emerging applications of atomic layer deposition for lithium-ion battery studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangbo; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Sun, Xueliang

    2012-07-17

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are used widely in today's consumer electronics and offer great potential for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs, pure EVs, and also in smart grids as future energy-storage devices. However, many challenges must be addressed before these future applications of LIBs are realized, such as the energy and power density of LIBs, their cycle and calendar life, safety characteristics, and costs. Recently, a technique called atomic layer deposition (ALD) attracted great interest as a novel tool and approach for resolving these issues. In this article, recent advances in using ALD for LIB studies are thoroughly reviewed, covering two technical routes: 1) ALD for designing and synthesizing new LIB components, i.e., anodes, cathodes, and solid electrolytes, and; 2) ALD used in modifying electrode properties via surface coating. This review will hopefully stimulate more extensive and insightful studies on using ALD for developing high-performance LIBs. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Atomic Layer Deposition of Aluminum Sulfide: Growth Mechanism and Electrochemical Evaluation in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xiangbo [Department; Cao, Yanqiang [Energy; Libera, Joseph A. [Energy; Elam, Jeffrey W. [Energy

    2017-10-17

    This study describes the synthesis of aluminum sulfide (AlSx) thin films by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tris(dimethylamido)aluminum and hydrogen sulfide. We employed a suite of in situ measurement techniques to explore the ALD AlSx growth mechanism, including quartz crystal microbalance, quadrupole mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A variety of ex situ characterization techniques were used to determine the growth characteristics, morphology, elemental composition, and crystallinity of the resultant AlSx films. This study revealed that the AlSx growth was self-limiting in the temperature range 100-250 degrees C, and the growth per cycle decreased linearly with increasing temperature from similar to 0.45 angstrom/cycle at 100 degrees C to similar to 0.1 angstrom/cycle at 250 degrees C. The AlSx films were amorphous in this temperature range. We conducted electrochemical testing to evaluate the ALD AlSx as a potential anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The ALD AlSx exhibited reliable cyclability over 60 discharge-charge cycles with a sustainable discharge capacity of 640 mAh/g at a current density of 100 mA/g in the voltage window of 0.6-3.5

  1. Surface reaction of silicon chlorides during atomic layer deposition of silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusup, Luchana L.; Park, Jae-Min; Mayangsari, Tirta R.; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Lee, Won-Jun

    2018-02-01

    The reaction of precursor with surface active site is the critical step in atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. We performed the density functional theory calculation with DFT-D correction to study the surface reaction of different silicon chloride precursors during the first half cycle of ALD process. SiCl4, SiH2Cl2, Si2Cl6 and Si3Cl8 were considered as the silicon precursors, and an NH/SiNH2*-terminated silicon nitride surface was constructed to model the thermal ALD processes using NH3 as well as the PEALD processes using NH3 plasma. The total energies of the system were calculated for the geometry-optimized structures of physisorption, chemisorption, and transition state. The order of silicon precursors in energy barrier, from lowest to highest, is Si3Cl8 (0.92 eV), Si2Cl6 (3.22 eV), SiH2Cl2 (3.93 eV) and SiCl4 (4.49 eV). Silicon precursor with lower energy barrier in DFT calculation showed lower saturation dose in literature for both thermal and plasma-enhanced ALD of silicon nitride. Therefore, DFT calculation is a promising tool in predicting the reactivity of precursor during ALD process.

  2. Direct Measurements of Half-Cycle Reaction Heats during Atomic Layer Deposition by Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lownsbury, James M. [Department; Gladden, James A. [Department; Campbell, Charles T. [Department; Department; Kim, In Soo [Materials; Martinson, Alex B. F. [Materials

    2017-10-05

    We introduce a new high-temperature adsorption calorimeter that approaches the ideal limit of a heat detector whereby the signal at any time is proportional to the heat power being delivered to the sample and prove its sensitivity for measuring pulse-to-pulse heats of half-reactions during atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 400 K. The heat dynamics of amorphous Al2O3 growth via sequential self-limiting surface reaction of trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O is clearly resolved. Calibration enables quantitation of the exothermic TMA and H2O half-reactions with high precision, -343 kJ/mol TMA and -251 kJ/mol H2O, respectively. A time resolution better than 1 ms is demonstrated, allowing for the deconvolution of at least two distinct surface reactions during TMA microdosing. It is further demonstrated that this method can provide the heat of reaction versus extent of reaction during each precursors half-reaction, thus providing even richer mechanistic information on the surface processes involved. The broad applicability of this novel calorimeter is demonstrated through excellent signal-to-noise ratios of less exothermic ALD half-reactions to produce TiO2 and MnO.

  3. Atomic layer deposition on polymer fibers and fabrics for multifunctional and electronic textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozena, Alexandra H.; Oldham, Christopher J.; Parsons, Gregory N., E-mail: gnp@ncsu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7905 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Textile materials, including woven cotton, polymer knit fabrics, and synthetic nonwoven fiber mats, are being explored as low-cost, flexible, and light-weight platforms for wearable electronic sensing, communication, energy generation, and storage. The natural porosity and high surface area in textiles is also useful for new applications in environmental protection, chemical decontamination, pharmaceutical and chemical manufacturing, catalytic support, tissue regeneration, and others. These applications raise opportunities for new chemistries, chemical processes, biological coupling, and nanodevice systems that can readily combine with textile manufacturing to create new “multifunctional” fabrics. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has a unique ability to form highly uniform and conformal thin films at low processing temperature on nonuniform high aspect ratio surfaces. Recent research shows how ALD can coat, modify, and otherwise improve polymer fibers and textiles by incorporating new materials for viable electronic and other multifunctional capabilities. This article provides a current overview of the understanding of ALD coating and modification of textiles, including current capabilities and outstanding problems, with the goal of providing a starting point for further research and advances in this field. After a brief introduction to textile materials and current textile treatment methods, the authors discuss unique properties of ALD-coated textiles, followed by a review of recent electronic and multifunctional textiles that use ALD coatings either as direct functional components or as critical nucleation layers for active materials integration. The article concludes with possible future directions for ALD on textiles, including the challenges in materials, manufacturing, and manufacturing integration that must be overcome for ALD to reach its full potential in electronic and other emerging multifunctional textile systems.

  4. Effect of the nature of the substrate on the surface chemistry of atomic layer deposition precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yunxi; Coyle, Jason P.; Barry, Seán T.; Zaera, Francisco

    2017-02-01

    The thermal chemistry of Cu(I)-sec-butyl-2-iminopyrrolidinate, a promising copper amidinate complex for atomic layer deposition (ALD) applications, was explored comparatively on several surfaces by using a combination of surface-sensitive techniques, specifically temperature-programmed desorption and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The substrates explored include single crystals of transition metals (Ni(110) and Cu(110)), thin oxide films (NiO/Ni(110) and SiO2/Ta), and oxygen-treated metals (O/Cu(110)). Decomposition of the pyrrolidinate ligand leads to the desorption of several gas-phase products, including CH3CN, HCN and butene from the metals and CO and CO2 from the oxygen-containing surfaces. In all cases dehydrogenation of the organic moieties is accompanied by hydrogen removal from the surface, in the form of H2 on metals and mainly as water from the metal oxides, but the threshold for this chemistry varies wildly, from 270 K on Ni(110) to 430 K on O/Cu(110), 470 K on Cu(110), 500 K on NiO/Ni(110), and 570 K on SiO2/Ta. Copper reduction is also observed in both the Cu 2p3/2 XPS and the Cu L3 VV Auger (AES) spectra, reaching completion by 300 K on Ni(110) but occurring only between 500 and 600 K on Cu(110). On NiO/Ni(110), both Cu(I) and Cu(0) coexist between 200 and 500 K, and on SiO2/Ta a change happens between 500 and 600 K but the reduction is limited, with the copper atoms retaining a significant ionic character. Additional experiments to test adsorption at higher temperatures led to the identification of temperature windows for the self-limiting precursor uptake required for ALD between approximately 300 and 450 K on both Ni(110) and NiO/Ni(110); the range on SiO2 had been previously determined to be wider, reaching an upper limit at about 500 K. Finally, deposition of copper metal films via ALD cycles with O2 as the co-reactant was successfully accomplished on the Ni(110) substrate.

  5. Fundamental studies of water oxidation at model hematite electrodes prepared by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klahr, Benjamin M.

    An increasing global demand for energy, combined with an awareness of anthropogenic climate change, has recently fueled the search for abundant, carbon neutral energy sources. The sun offers an enormous amount of energy that is practically inexhaustible and well distributed across Earth. Thus, it is an ideal source for meeting our future energy needs in a carbon neutral fashion. This work focuses on using hematite and sunlight to oxidize water, which is the rate limiting step of splitting water into the energy dense fuel, hydrogen, and the byproduct, oxygen. Hematite is abundant, absorbs a large fraction of the solar spectrum and has an appropriately placed valence band for water oxidation. However, the often cited poor bulk properties, and slow charge transfer kinetics require large applied potentials to oxidize water. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was utilized to deposit uniform thin films of hematite on transparent conductive substrates as model electrodes to better understand the nature of the limitations in the bulk and at the surface. Comparison of the oxidation of water to the oxidation of fast redox shuttles allowed for the separation of bulk and surface processes. A combination of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, photoelectrochemical and electrochemical measurements were employed to determine the cause of the large required applied potential. It was found that photogenerated holes initially oxidize the electrode surface under water oxidation conditions, which is attributed to the first step in water oxidation. A critical number of these surface intermediates need to be generated in order for subsequent hole-transfer steps to proceed. At low applied potentials, these intermediates are subject to recombination from the large concentration of electrons in the conduction band due to low band bending. At higher applied potentials, high band bending eliminates surface recombination and the charge collection efficiency of the electrolyte reaches unity. A

  6. Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of TiO2 compact layers for flexible mesostructured perovskite solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zardetto, V.; Di Giacomo, F.; Lucarelli, G.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Brown, T.M.; Creatore, M.

    2017-01-01

    In mesostructured perovskite solar cell devices, charge recombination processes at the interface between the transparent conductive oxide, perovskite and hole transport layer are suppressed by depositing an efficient compact TiO2 blocking layer. In this contribution we investigate the role of the

  7. High performance few-layer MoS2 transistor arrays with wafer level homogeneity integrated by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianbao; Wang, Yang; Xu, Jing; Chen, Lin; Zhu, Hao; Sun, Qingqing; Ding, Shijin; Zhang, David Wei

    2018-01-01

    Wafer-level integration of 2D transition metal disulfide is the key factor for future large-scale integration of the continuously scaling-down devices, and has attracted great attention in recent years. Compared with other ultra-thin film growth methods, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has the advantages of excellent step coverage, uniformity and thickness controllability. In this work, we synthesized large-scale and thickness-controllable MoS2 films on sapphire substrate by ALD at 150 °C with molybdenum hexcarbonyl and hexamethyldisilathiane (HMDST) as precursors followed by high-temperature annealing in sulfur atmosphere. HMDST is introduced for the first time to enable a toxic-free process without hazardous sulfur precursors such as H2S and CH3SSCH3. The synthesized MoS2 retains the inherent benefits from the ALD process, including thickness controllability, reproducibility, wafer-level thickness uniformity, and high conformity. Finally, field-effect transistor (FET) arrays were fabricated based on the large-area ALD MoS2 films. The top-gate FETs exhibited excellent electrical performance such as high on/off current ratio over 103 and peak room-temperature mobility up to 11.56 cm2 V‑1 s‑1. This work opens up an attractive approach to realize the application of high-quality 2D materials with wafer scale homogeneity.

  8. Hardness, elastic modulus, and wear resistance of hafnium oxide-based films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdova, Maria; Liu, Xuwen; Franssila, Sami, E-mail: sami.franssila@aalto.fi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Aalto University, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Wiemer, Claudia; Lamperti, Alessio; Tallarida, Grazia; Cianci, Elena [Laboratorio MDM, IMM CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Fanciulli, Marco [Laboratorio MDM, IMM CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB), Italy and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università degli studi di Milano Bicocca, 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2016-09-15

    The investigation of mechanical properties of atomic layer deposition HfO{sub 2} films is important for implementing these layers in microdevices. The mechanical properties of films change as a function of composition and structure, which accordingly vary with deposition temperature and post-annealing. This work describes elastic modulus, hardness, and wear resistance of as-grown and annealed HfO{sub 2}. From nanoindentation measurements, the elastic modulus and hardness remained relatively stable in the range of 163–165 GPa and 8.3–9.7 GPa as a function of deposition temperature. The annealing of HfO{sub 2} caused significant increase in hardness up to 14.4 GPa due to film crystallization and densification. The structural change also caused increase in the elastic modulus up to 197 GPa. Wear resistance did not change as a function of deposition temperature, but improved upon annealing.

  9. Photoluminescence Enhancement in Nanotextured Fluorescent SiC Passivated by Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    The influence of thickness of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films on nano-textured fluorescent 6H-SiC passivation is investigated. The passivation effect on the light emission has been characterized by photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence at room temperature. The results show...... that 20nm thickness of Al2O3 layer is favorable to observe a large photoluminescence enhancement (25.9%) and long carrier lifetime (0.86ms). This is a strong indication for an interface hydrogenation that takes place during post-thermal annealing. These results show that an Al2O3 layer could serve...

  10. Interface characterization of atomic layer deposited high-k on non-polar GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ye; Zeng, Ke; Singisetti, Uttam

    2017-10-01

    The interface properties between dielectrics and semiconductors are crucial for electronic devices. In this work, we report the electrical characterization of the interface properties between atomic layer deposited Al2O3 and HfO2 on non-polar a-plane ( 11 2 ¯ 0 ) and m-plane ( 1 1 ¯ 00 ) GaN grown by hybrid vapor phase epitaxy. A metal oxide semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) structure was used to evaluate the interface properties. The impact of annealing on the interface properties was also investigated. The border trap in the oxide, characterized by the capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis loop, was low. The interface state density (Dit), extracted using the ac conductance method, is in the range of 0.5 × 1012/cm2 eV to 7.5 × 1011/cm2 eV within an energy range from 0.2 eV to 0.5 eV below the conduction band minimum. The m-plane GaN MOSCAPs exhibited better interface properties than the a-plane GaN MOSCAPs after annealing. Without annealing, Al2O3 dielectrics had higher border trap density and interface state density compared to HfO2 dielectrics. However, the annealing had different impacts on Al2O3 dielectrics as compared to HfO2. Our results showed that the annealing degraded the quality of the interface in HfO2, but it improved the quality of the interface in Al2O3 devices. The annealing also reduced the positive trapped oxide charge, resulting in a shift of C-V curves towards the positive bias region.

  11. Atomic Layer Deposition of In2O3:H from InCp and H2O/O2: Microstructure and Isotope Labeling Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y.; Macco, B.; Vanhemel, D.; Koelling, S.; Verheijen, M.A.; Koenraad, P.M.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Roozeboom, F.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD), a gas-phase thin film deposition technique based on repeated, self-terminating gas–solid reactions, has become the method of choice in semiconductor manufacturing and many other technological areas for depositing thin conformal inorganic material layers for various

  12. Review article: Recommended reading list of early publications on atomic layer deposition-outcome of the "virtual project on the history of ALD"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahvenniemi, E.; Akbashev, A.R.; Ali, S.; Bechelany, M.; Berdova, Maria; Boyadjiev, S.; Cameron, D.C.; Chen, R.; Chubarov, M.; Cremers, V.; Devi, A.; Drozd, V.; Elnikova, L.; Gottardi, G.; Grigoras, K.; Hausmann, D.M.; Hwang, C.S.; Jen, S.H.; Kallio, T.; Kanervo, J.; Khmelnitskiy, I.; Kim, D.H.; Klibanov, L.; Koshtyal, Y.; Krause, A.O.I.; Kuhs, J.; Karkkanen, I.; Kaariainen, M.L.; Kaariainen, T.; Lamagna, L.; Lapicki, A.A.; Leskela, M.; Lipsanen, H.; Lyytinen, J.; Malkov, A.; Malygin, A.; Mennad, A.; Militzer, C.; Molarius, J.; Norek, M.; Ozgit-Akgun, C.; Panov, M.; Pedersen, H.; Piallat, F.; Popov, G.; Puurunen, R.L.; Rampelberg, G.; Ras, R.H.A.; Rauwel, E.; Roozeboom, F.; Sajavaara, T.; Salami, H.; Savin, H.; Schneider, N.; Seidel, T.E.; Sundqvist, J.; Suyatin, D.B.; Torndahl, T.; van Ommen, J.R.; Wiemer, C.; Ylivaara, O.M.E.; Yurkevich, O.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD), a gas-phase thin film deposition technique based on repeated, self-terminating gas–solid reactions, has become the method of choice in semiconductor manufacturing and many other technological areas for depositing thin conformal inorganic material layers for various

  13. Nitrogen doping in atomic layer deposition grown titanium dioxide films by using ammonium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeaeriaeinen, M.-L., E-mail: marja-leena.kaariainen@lut.fi; Cameron, D.C.

    2012-12-30

    Titanium dioxide films have been created by atomic layer deposition using titanium chloride as the metal source and a solution of ammonium hydroxide in water as oxidant. Ammonium hydroxide has been used as a source of nitrogen for doping and three thickness series have been deposited at 350 Degree-Sign C. A 15 nm anatase dominated film was found to possess the highest photocatalytic activity in all film series. Furthermore almost three times better photocatalytic activity was discovered in the doped series compared to undoped films. The doped films also had lower resistivity. The results from X-ray photoemission spectroscopy showed evidence for interstitial nitrogen in the titanium dioxide structure. Besides, there was a minor red shift observable in the thickest samples. In addition the film conductivity was discovered to increase with the feeding pressure of ammonium hydroxide in the oxidant precursor. This may indicate that nitrogen doping has caused the decrease in the resistivity and therefore has an impact as an enhanced photocatalytic activity. The hot probe test showed that all the anatase or anatase dominant films were p-type and all the rutile dominant films were n-type. The best photocatalytic activity was shown by anatase-dominant films containing a small amount of rutile. It may be that p-n-junctions are formed between p-type anatase and n-type rutile which cause carrier separation and slow down the recombination rate. The combination of nitrogen doping and p-n junction formation results in superior photocatalytic performance. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found all N-doped and undoped anatase dominating films p-type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found all N-doped and undoped rutile dominating films n-type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose that p-n junctions are formed in anatase-rutile mixture films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that low level N-doping has increased TiO{sub 2} conductivity. Black

  14. Engineering the mechanical properties of ultrabarrier films grown by atomic layer deposition for the encapsulation of printed electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulusu, A.; Singh, A.; Kim, H. [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Wang, C. Y.; Dindar, A.; Fuentes-Hernandez, C.; Kippelen, B. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Cullen, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008 MS-6064, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Graham, S., E-mail: sgraham@gatech.edu [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008 MS-6064, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Direct deposition of barrier films by atomic layer deposition (ALD) onto printed electronics presents a promising method for packaging devices. Films made by ALD have been shown to possess desired ultrabarrier properties, but face challenges when directly grown onto surfaces with varying composition and topography. Challenges include differing nucleation and growth rates across the surface, stress concentrations from topography and coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch, elastic constant mismatch, and particle contamination that may impact the performance of the ALD barrier. In such cases, a polymer smoothing layer may be needed to coat the surface prior to ALD barrier film deposition. We present the impact of architecture on the performance of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})/hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) ALD nanolaminate barrier films deposited on fluorinated polymer layer using an optical calcium (Ca) test under damp heat. It is found that with increasing polymer thickness, the barrier films with residual tensile stress are prone to cracking resulting in rapid failure of the Ca sensor at 50 °C/85% relative humidity. Inserting a SiN{sub x} layer with residual compressive stress between the polymer and ALD layers is found to prevent cracking over a range of polymer thicknesses with more than 95% of the Ca sensor remaining after 500 h of testing. These results suggest that controlling mechanical properties and film architecture play an important role in the performance of direct deposited ALD barriers.

  15. Atomic layer deposition synthesized TiO{sub x} thin films and their application as microbolometer active materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanrikulu, Mahmud Yusuf, E-mail: mytanrikulu@adanabtu.edu.tr [Department of Electrical-Electronics Engineering, Adana Science and Technology University, Adana 01180 (Turkey); Rasouli, Hamid Reza [Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Ghaffari, Mohammad [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Topalli, Kagan [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800, Turkey and Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Okyay, Ali Kemal [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2016-05-15

    This paper demonstrates the possible usage of TiO{sub x} thin films synthesized by atomic layer deposition as a microbolometer active material. Thin film electrical resistance is investigated as a function of thermal annealing. It is found that the temperature coefficient of resistance values can be controlled by coating/annealing processes, and the value as high as −9%/K near room temperature is obtained. The noise properties of TiO{sub x} films are characterized. It is shown that TiO{sub x} films grown by atomic layer deposition technique could have a significant potential to be used as a new active material for microbolometer-based applications.

  16. Preface: Special Topic on Atomic and Molecular Layer Processing: Deposition, Patterning, and Etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, James R.; Kummel, Andrew C.

    2017-02-01

    Thin film processing technologies that promise atomic and molecular scale control have received increasing interest in the past several years, as traditional methods for fabrication begin to reach their fundamental limits. Many of these technologies involve at their heart phenomena occurring at or near surfaces, including adsorption, gas-surface reactions, diffusion, desorption, and re-organization of near-surface layers. Moreover many of these phenomena involve not just reactions occurring under conditions of local thermodynamic equilibrium but also the action of energetic species including electrons, ions, and hyperthermal neutrals. There is a rich landscape of atomic and molecular scale interactions occurring in these systems that is still not well understood. In this Special Topic Issue of The Journal of Chemical Physics, we have collected recent representative examples of work that is directed at unraveling the mechanistic details concerning atomic and molecular layer processing, which will provide an important framework from which these fields can continue to develop. These studies range from the application of theory and computation to these systems to the use of powerful experimental probes, such as X-ray synchrotron radiation, probe microscopies, and photoelectron and infrared spectroscopies. The work presented here helps in identifying some of the major challenges and direct future activities in this exciting area of research involving atomic and molecular layer manipulation and fabrication.

  17. Atmospheric spatial atomic-layer-deposition of Zn(O, S) buffer layer for flexible Cu(In, Ga)Se2 solar cells: From lab-scale to large area roll to roll processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijters, C.H.; Bolt, P.J.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Knaapen, R.; Brink, J. van den; Ruth, M.; Bremaud, D.; Illiberi, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript we present the first successful application of a spatial atomic-layer-deposition process to thin film solar cells. Zn(O,S) has been grown by spatial atomic layer deposition (S-ALD) at atmospheric pressure and applied as buffer layer in rigid and flexible CIGS cells by a lab-scale

  18. Advanced Materials Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition for High Energy Density Rechargeable Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin

    In order to meet the ever increasing energy needs of society and realize the US Department of Energy (DOE)'s target for energy storage, acquiring a fundamental understanding of the chemical mechanisms in batteries for direct guidance and searching novel advanced materials with high energy density are critical. To realize rechargeable batteries with superior energy density, great cathodes and excellent anodes are required. LiMn2O4 (LMO) has been considered as a simpler surrogate for high energy cathode materials like NMC. Previous studies demonstrated that Al2O3 coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) improved the capacity of LMO cathodes. This improvement was attributed to a reduction in surface area and diminished Mn dissolution. However, here we propose a different mechanism for ALD Al 2O3 on LMO based on in-situ and ex-situ investigations coupled with density functional theory calculations. We discovered that Al2O 3 not only coats the LMO, but also dopes the LMO surface with Al leading to changes in the Mn oxidation state. Different thicknesses of Al2O 3 were deposited on nonstoichiometric LiMn2O4 for electrochemical measurements. The LMO treated with one cycle of ALD Al2O3 (1xAl 2O3 LMO) to produce a sub-monolayer coating yielded a remarkable initial capacity, 16.4% higher than its uncoated LMO counterpart in full cells. The stability of 1xAl2O3 LMO is also much better as a result of stabilized defects with Al species. Furthermore, 4xAl 2O3 LMO demonstrates remarkable capacity retention. Stoichiometric LiMn2O4 was also evaluated with similar improved performance achieved. All superior results, accomplished by great stability and reduced Mn dissolution, is thanks to the synergetic effects of Al-doping and ALD Al2O 3 coating. Turning our attention to the anode, we again utilized aluminum oxide ALD to form conformal films on lithium. We elaborately designed and studied, for the first time, the growth mechanism during Al2O3 ALD on lithium metal in

  19. Atomic layer deposition of titanium oxide films on As-synthesized magnetic Ni particles: Magnetic and safety properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uudeküll, Peep, E-mail: peep.uudekull@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi Str.1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Kozlova, Jekaterina; Mändar, Hugo [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi Str.1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Link, Joosep [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Sihtmäe, Mariliis [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Käosaar, Sandra [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Faculty of Chemical and Materials Technology, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Blinova, Irina; Kasemets, Kaja; Kahru, Anne [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Stern, Raivo [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Tätte, Tanel [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi Str.1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Kukli, Kaupo [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi Str.1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Tamm, Aile [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi Str.1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2017-05-01

    Spherical nickel particles with size in the range of 100–400 nm were synthesized by non-aqueous liquid phase benzyl alcohol method. Being developed for magnetically guided biomedical applications, the particles were coated by conformal and antimicrobial thin titanium oxide films by atomic layer deposition. The particles retained their size and crystal structure after the deposition of oxide films. The sensitivity of the coated particles to external magnetic fields was increased compared to that of the uncoated powder. Preliminary toxicological investigations on microbial cells and small aquatic crustaceans revealed non-toxic nature of the synthesized particles.

  20. Phase-change properties of GeSbTe thin films deposited by plasma-enchanced atomic layer depositon

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Sannian; Yao, Dongning; Song, Zhitang; Gao, Lina; Zhang, Zhonghua; Li, Le; Shen, Lanlan; Wu, Liangcai; Liu, Bo; Cheng, Yan; Feng, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    Phase-change access memory (PCM) appears to be the strongest candidate for next-generation high-density nonvolatile memory. The fabrication of ultrahigh-density PCM depends heavily on the thin-film growth technique for the phase-changing chalcogenide material. In this study, Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) and GeSb8Te thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) method using Ge [(CH3)2?N]4, Sb [(CH3)2?N]3, Te(C4H9)2 as precursors and plasma-activated H2 gas as reducing agent of ...

  1. Precise Nanoscale Surface Modification and Coating of Macroscale Objects: Open-Environment in Loco Atomic Layer Deposition on an Automobile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Moataz Bellah M; Oldham, Christopher J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2015-09-09

    The fundamental chemical reaction conditions that define atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be achieved in an open environment on a macroscale surface too large and complex for typical laboratory reactor-based ALD. We describe the concept of in loco ALD using conventional modulated reactant flow through a surface-mounted "ALD delivery head" to form a precise nanoscale Al2O3 film on the window of a parked automobile. Analysis confirms that the processes eliminated ambient water contamination and met other conditions that define ALD growth. Using this tool, we demonstrate open-ambient patterned deposition, metal corrosion protection, and polymer surface modification.

  2. Ellipsometry and XPS comparative studies of thermal and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited Al2O3-films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Haeberle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on results on the preparation of thin (2O3 films on silicon substrates using thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD in the SENTECH SI ALD LL system. The T-ALD Al2O3 layers were deposited at 200 °C, for the PE-ALD films we varied the substrate temperature range between room temperature (rt and 200 °C. We show data from spectroscopic ellipsometry (thickness, refractive index, growth rate over 4” wafers and correlate them to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS results. The 200 °C T-ALD and PE-ALD processes yield films with similar refractive indices and with oxygen to aluminum elemental ratios very close to the stoichiometric value of 1.5. However, in both also fragments of the precursor are integrated into the film. The PE-ALD films show an increased growth rate and lower carbon contaminations. Reducing the deposition temperature down to rt leads to a higher content of carbon and CH-species. We also find a decrease of the refractive index and of the oxygen to aluminum elemental ratio as well as an increase of the growth rate whereas the homogeneity of the film growth is not influenced significantly. Initial state energy shifts in all PE-ALD samples are observed which we attribute to a net negative charge within the films.

  3. Spatial Atomic Layer Deposition for Coating Flexible Porous Li-Ion Battery Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, Katherine E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ban, Chunmei [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tenent, Robert C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yersak, Alexander S. [University of Colorado; Sharma, Kashish [University of Colorado; Wallas, Jasmine M. [University of Colorado; Dameron, Arrelaine A. [University of Colorado; Li, Xuemin [Colorado School of Mines; Yang, Yongan [Colorado School of Mines; George, Steven M. [University of Colorado

    2017-12-29

    Ultrathin atomic layer deposition (ALD) coatings on the electrodes of Li-ion batteries can enhance the capacity stability of the Li-ion batteries. To commercialize ALD for Li-ion battery production, spatial ALD is needed to decrease coating times and provide a coating process compatible with continuous roll-to-roll (R2R) processing. The porous electrodes of Li-ion batteries provide a special challenge because higher reactant exposures are needed for spatial ALD in porous substrates. This work utilized a modular rotating cylinder spatial ALD reactor operating at rotation speeds up to 200 revolutions/min (RPM) and substrate speeds up to 200 m/min. The conditions for spatial ALD were adjusted to coat flexible porous substrates. The reactor was initially used to characterize spatial Al2O3 and ZnO ALD on flat, flexible metalized polyethylene terephthalate foils. These studies showed that slower rotation speeds and spacers between the precursor module and the two adjacent pumping modules could significantly increase the reactant exposure. The modular rotating cylinder reactor was then used to coat flexible, model porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. The uniformity of the ZnO ALD coatings on the porous AAO membranes was dependent on the aspect ratio of the pores and the reactant exposures. Larger reactant exposures led to better uniformity in the pores with higher aspect ratios. The reactant exposures were increased by adding spacers between the precursor module and the two adjacent pumping modules. The modular rotating cylinder reactor was also employed for Al2O3 ALD on porous LiCoO2 (LCO) battery electrodes. Uniform Al coverages were obtained using spacers between the precursor module and the two adjacent pumping modules at rotation speeds of 25 and 50 RPM. The LCO electrodes had a thickness of ~49 um and pores with aspect ratios of ~12-25. Coin cells were then constructed using the ALD-coated LCO electrodes and were tested to determine their battery

  4. Investigations into the impact of various substrates and ZnO ultra thin seed layers prepared by atomic layer deposition on growth of ZnO nanowire array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, JN; Liu, YB; Tan, CB; Yuan, NY

    2012-07-01

    The impact of various substrates and zinc oxide (ZnO) ultra thin seed layers prepared by atomic layer deposition on the geometric morphology of subsequent ZnO nanowire arrays (NWs) fabricated by the hydrothermal method was investigated. The investigated substrates included B-doped ZnO films, indium tin oxide films, single crystal silicon (111), and glass sheets. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the geometry and aligment of the NWs were controlled by surface topography of the substrates and thickness of the ZnO seed layers, respectively. According to atomic force microscopy data, we suggest that the substrate, fluctuate amplitude and fluctuate frequency of roughness on ZnO seed layers have a great impact on the alignment of the resulting NWs, whereas the influence of the seed layers' texture was negligible.

  5. Efficient, air-stable colloidal quantum dot solar cells encapsulated using atomic layer deposition of a nanolaminate barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Ip, Alexander H.

    2013-12-23

    Atomic layer deposition was used to encapsulate colloidal quantum dot solar cells. A nanolaminate layer consisting of alternating alumina and zirconia films provided a robust gas permeation barrier which prevented device performance degradation over a period of multiple weeks. Unencapsulated cells stored in ambient and nitrogen environments demonstrated significant performance losses over the same period. The encapsulated cell also exhibited stable performance under constant simulated solar illumination without filtration of harsh ultraviolet photons. This monolithically integrated thin film encapsulation method is promising for roll-to-roll processed high efficiency nanocrystal solar cells. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  6. Efficient, air-stable colloidal quantum dot solar cells encapsulated using atomic layer deposition of a nanolaminate barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ip, Alexander H.; Labelle, André J.; Sargent, Edward H., E-mail: ted.sargent@utoronto.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada)

    2013-12-23

    Atomic layer deposition was used to encapsulate colloidal quantum dot solar cells. A nanolaminate layer consisting of alternating alumina and zirconia films provided a robust gas permeation barrier which prevented device performance degradation over a period of multiple weeks. Unencapsulated cells stored in ambient and nitrogen environments demonstrated significant performance losses over the same period. The encapsulated cell also exhibited stable performance under constant simulated solar illumination without filtration of harsh ultraviolet photons. This monolithically integrated thin film encapsulation method is promising for roll-to-roll processed high efficiency nanocrystal solar cells.

  7. Atomic layer deposition of {HfO}_2 for integration into three-dimensional metal-insulator-metal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaud, Loïc; Pitzschel, Kristina; Barr, Maïssa K. S.; Petit, Matthieu; Monier, Guillaume; Hanbücken, Margrit; Santinacci, Lionel

    2017-12-01

    {HfO}_2 nanotubes have been fabricated via a template-assisted deposition process for further use in three-dimensional metal-insulator-metal (MIM) devices. {HfO}_2 thin layers were grown by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) in anodic alumina membranes (AAM). The ALD was carried out using tetrakis(ethylmethylamino)hafnium and water as Hf and O sources, respectively. Long exposure durations to the precursors have been used to maximize the penetration depth of the {HfO}_2 layer within the AAM and the effect of the process temperature was investigated. The morphology, the chemical composition, and the crystal structure were studied as a function of the deposition parameters using transmission and scanning electron microscopies, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, respectively. As expected, the {HfO}_2 layers grown at low-temperature (T = 150°C) were amorphous, while for a higher temperature (T= 250°C), polycrystalline films were observed. The electrical characterizations have shown better insulating properties for the layers grown at low temperature. Finally, {TiN}/ {HfO}_2/ {TiN} multilayers were grown in an AAM as proof-of-concept for three-dimensional MIM nanostructures.

  8. Effect of atomic layer deposited Al2O3:ZnO alloys on thin-film silicon photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Hadi, Sabina; Dushaq, Ghada; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we present the effects of the Al2O3:ZnO ratio on the optical and electrical properties of aluminum doped ZnO (AZO) layers deposited by atomic layer deposition, along with AZO application as the anti-reflective coating (ARC) layer and in heterojunction configurations. Here, we report complex refractive indices for AZO layers with different numbers of aluminum atomic cycles (ZnO:Al2O3 = 1:0, 39:1, 19:1, and 9:1) and we confirm their validity by fitting models to experimental data. Furthermore, the most conductive layer (ZnO:Al2O3 = 19:1, conductivity ˜4.6 mΩ cm) is used to fabricate AZO/n+/p-Si thin film solar cells and AZO/p-Si heterojunction devices. The impact of the AZO layer on the photovoltaic properties of these devices is studied by different characterization techniques, resulting in the extraction of recombination and energy band parameters related to the AZO layer. Our results confirm that AZO 19:1 can be used as a low cost and effective conductive ARC layer for solar cells. However, AZO/p-Si heterojunctions suffer from an insufficient depletion region width (˜100 nm) and recombination at the interface states, with an estimated potential barrier of ˜0.6-0.62 eV. The work function of AZO (ZnO:Al2O3 = 19:1) is estimated to be in the range between 4.36 and 4.57 eV. These material properties limit the use of AZO as an emitter in Si solar cells. However, the results imply that AZO based heterojunctions could have applications as low-cost photodetectors or photodiodes, operating under relatively low reverse bias.

  9. Controlled decoration of Pd on Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles by atomic layer deposition for high ethanol oxidation activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yiwu; Chen, Jinwei; Zhang, Jie; Zeng, Yaping; Wang, Yichun; Zhou, Feilong; Kiani, Maryam; Wang, Ruilin

    2017-10-01

    A new catalysts electrode was prepared by in situ controllable deposition of Pd shell layer on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) supported Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology. High resolution transmission electron microscope confirmed that the Ni(OH)2 core was coated by several atomic layers of Pd. The core-shell Ni(OH)2@Pd catalysts with different thickness of Pd shell are easily prepared by controlling ALD cycle. Electrochemical tests showed that the 100-Ni(OH)2@Pd/GDL catalyst prepared via 100 ALD cycles presented the highest catalytic activity for ethanol electro-oxidation reaction (EOR). The peaking current density of Ni(OH)2@Pd/GDL was 1439 mA mgPd-1, which was about 2.75 times as high as that of Pd/GDL (522 mA mgPd-1). The shift in binding energy of the XPS peak of Pd in Ni(OH)2@Pd catalyst confirmed the strong interaction between the Pd shell and the Ni(OH)2 core. We suggested that the high catalytic activity of Ni(OH)2@Pd/GDL catalyst layer may be due to following factors: high Pd dispersion arising from the core-shell structure, high Pd utilization because of the in situ deposition of Pd on catalyst layer and the interaction between the Pd shell and the Ni(OH)2 core. Herein, the ALD technology exhibits a promising application prospect for preparing core-shell structure and precisely controlling shell thickness of nano-composite as an electro-catalyst toward EOR.

  10. Mobile setup for synchrotron based in situ characterization during thermal and plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendooven, Jolien; Solano, Eduardo; Minjauw, Matthias M.; Van de Kerckhove, Kevin; Coati, Alessandro; Fonda, Emiliano; Portale, Giuseppe; Garreau, Yves; Detavernier, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    We report the design of a mobile setup for synchrotron based in situ studies during atomic layer processing. The system was designed to facilitate in situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS), x-ray fluorescence (XRF), and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at synchrotron facilities. The setup consists of a compact high vacuum pump-type reactor for atomic layer deposition (ALD). The presence of a remote radio frequency plasma source enables in situ experiments during both thermal as well as plasma-enhanced ALD. The system has been successfully installed at different beam line end stations at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and SOLEIL synchrotrons. Examples are discussed of in situ GISAXS and XRF measurements during thermal and plasma-enhanced ALD growth of ruthenium from RuO4 (ToRuS™, Air Liquide) and H2 or H2 plasma, providing insights in the nucleation behavior of these processes.

  11. Electrowetting properties of atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} decorated silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkumar, K.; Rajavel, K. [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu (India); Cameron, D. C. [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Mikkeli (Finland); current address Miktech Oy, Mikkeli (Finland); Mangalaraj, D. [Department of NanoScience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu (India); Rajendrakumar, R. T., E-mail: buc@edu.in [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of NanoScience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-06-24

    This paper reports the electrowetting properties of liquid droplet on superhydrophobic silicon nanowires with Atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as dielectric layer. Silicon wafer were etched by metal assisted wet chemical etching with silver as catalyst. ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films of 10nm thickness were conformally deposited over silicon nanowires. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectric film coated silicon nanowires was chemically modified with Trichloro (1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorooctyl) silane to make it superhydrophobic(SHP). The contact angle was measured and all the samples exhibited superhydrophobic nature with maximum contact angles of 163° and a minimum contact angle hysteresis of 6°. Electrowetting induced a maximum reversible decrease of the contact angle of 20°at 150V in air.

  12. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere.

  13. Competition between Al2O3 atomic layer etching and AlF3 atomic layer deposition using sequential exposures of trimethylaluminum and hydrogen fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuMont, Jaime W.; George, Steven M.

    2017-02-01

    The thermal atomic layer etching (ALE) of Al2O3 can be performed using sequential and self-limiting reactions with trimethylaluminum (TMA) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) as the reactants. The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of AlF3 can also be accomplished using the same reactants. This paper examined the competition between Al2O3 ALE and AlF3 ALD using in situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) vibrational spectroscopy measurements on Al2O3 ALD-coated SiO2 nanoparticles. The FTIR spectra could observe an absorbance loss of the Al-O stretching vibrations during Al2O3 ALE or an absorbance gain of the Al-F stretching vibrations during AlF3 ALD. The transition from AlF3 ALD to Al2O3 ALE occurred versus reaction temperature and was also influenced by the N2 or He background gas pressure. Higher temperatures and lower background gas pressures led to Al2O3 ALE. Lower temperatures and higher background gas pressures led to AlF3 ALD. The FTIR measurements also monitored AlCH3* and HF* species on the surface after the TMA and HF reactant exposures. The loss of AlCH3* and HF* species at higher temperatures is believed to play a vital role in the transition between AlF3 ALD at lower temperatures and Al2O3 ALE at higher temperatures. The change between AlF3 ALD and Al2O3 ALE was defined by the transition temperature. Higher transition temperatures were observed using larger N2 or He background gas pressures. This correlation was associated with variations in the N2 or He gas thermal conductivity versus pressure. The fluorination reaction during Al2O3 ALE is very exothermic and leads to temperature rises in the SiO2 nanoparticles. These temperature transients influence the Al2O3 etching. The higher N2 and He gas thermal conductivities are able to cool the SiO2 nanoparticles more efficiently and minimize the size of the temperature rises. The competition between Al2O3 ALE and AlF3 ALD using TMA and HF illustrates the interplay between etching and growth and the importance of substrate

  14. Atomic Layer Deposition Al2O3 Coatings Significantly Improve Thermal, Chemical, and Mechanical Stability of Anodic TiO2 Nanotube Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We report on a very significant enhancement of the thermal, chemical, and mechanical stability of self-organized TiO2 nanotubes layers, provided by thin Al2O3 coatings of different thicknesses prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD). TiO2 nanotube layers coated with Al2O3 coatings exhibit significantly improved thermal stability as illustrated by the preservation of the nanotubular structure upon annealing treatment at high temperatures (870 °C). In addition, a high anatase content is preserved in the nanotube layers against expectation of the total rutile conversion at such a high temperature. Hardness of the resulting nanotube layers is investigated by nanoindentation measurements and shows strongly improved values compared to uncoated counterparts. Finally, it is demonstrated that Al2O3 coatings guarantee unprecedented chemical stability of TiO2 nanotube layers in harsh environments of concentrated H3PO4 solutions. PMID:28291942

  15. Stability of 8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum films encapsulated by a single Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier deposited by low temperature atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maindron, Tony, E-mail: tony.maindron@cea.fr [CEA-LETI, MINATEC Campus, LETI/DOPT/SCOOP/Laboratoire des Composants pour la Visualisation, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Simon, Jean-Yves; Viasnoff, Emilie [CEA-LETI, MINATEC Campus, LETI/DOPT/SCOOP/Laboratoire des Composants pour la Visualisation, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Lafond, Dominique [CEA-LETI, MINATEC Campus, LETI/DTSI/SCMC/, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-09-30

    100 nm thick 8-AlQ{sub 3} films deposited onto silicon wafers have been encapsulated by mean of low temperature atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (20 nm). Investigation of the film evolution under storage test as harsh as 65 Degree-Sign C/85% RH has been investigated up to {approx} 1000 h and no severe degradation could be noticed. The results have been compared to raw AlQ{sub 3} films which deteriorate far faster in the same conditions. For that purpose, fluorescence measurements and atomic force microscopy have been used to monitor the film evolution while transmission electron microscopy has been used to image the interface between AlQ{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This concept of bilayer AlQ{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier films has finally been tested as an encapsulation barrier onto an organic light-emitting diode. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films have been deposited by atomic layer deposition onto organic films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AlQ{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-encapsulated organic light-emitting diodes show long-term stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unencapsulated reference AlQ{sub 3} films degrade much faster.

  16. Cathode encapsulation of OLEDs by atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films and Al2O3/a-SiNx:H stacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuning, W.; Van de Weijer, P.; Lifka, H.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Creatore, M.

    2011-01-01

    Al2O3 thin films synthesized by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition(ALD) at room temperature (25 ºC) have been tested as water vapor per-meation barriers for OLED devices. Silicon nitride films (a-SiNx:H)deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD) servedas reference and were

  17. Uniform coating of Ta2O5 on vertically aligned substrate: A prelude to forced flow atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Mrinalini; Kei, Chi-Chung; Yu, Yu-Hsuan; Liu, Wei-Szu; Perng, Tsong-Pyng

    2017-06-01

    Uniform tantalum oxide thin films, with a growth rate of 0.6 Å/cycle, were fabricated on vertically aligned, 10 cm-long, silicon substrates using an innovative atomic layer deposition (ALD) design. The ALD system, with a reaction chamber depth of 13.3 cm and 18 vertical enclosed channels (inner diameter 1.3 cm), was coupled with a shower-head type precursor conduit plate bearing 6 radial channels. This design enabled deposition on 6 silicon substrates at a time. The degrees of non-uniformity of deposits along the length of the silicon wafer and across different positions in the ALD chamber were found to be 1.77%-6.21% and 3.27%-5.45%, respectively. A further advantage of the design is that the conduit plate may be modified and the number of channels increased to process 18 substrates simultaneously, thus moving toward efficient and expedited ALD systems.

  18. Barrier properties of plastic films coated with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer by roll-to-toll atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvikorpi, Terhi, E-mail: Terhi.Hirvikorpi@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Laine, Risto, E-mail: Risto.Laine@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: Mika.Vaha-Nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Kilpi, Väinö, E-mail: Vaino.Kilpi@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Salo, Erkki, E-mail: Erkki.Salo@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Li, Wei-Min, E-mail: Wei-Min.Li@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Lindfors, Sven, E-mail: Sven.Lindfors@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Vartiainen, Jari, E-mail: Jari.Vartiainen@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Kenttä, Eija, E-mail: Eija.Kentta@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Nikkola, Juha, E-mail: Juha.Nikkola@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Harlin, Ali, E-mail: Ali.Harlin@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Kostamo, Juhana, E-mail: Juhana.Kostamo@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2014-01-01

    Thin (30–40 nm) and highly uniform Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings have been deposited at relatively low temperature of 100 °C onto various polymeric materials employing the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, both batch and roll-to-roll (R2R) mode. The applications for ALD have long been limited those feasible for batch processing. The work demonstrates that R2R ALD can deposit thin films with properties that are comparable to the film properties fabricated by in batch. This accelerates considerably the commercialization of many products, such as flexible, printed electronics, organic light-emitting diode lighting, third generation thin film photovoltaic devices, high energy density thin film batteries, smart textiles, organic sensors, organic/recyclable packaging materials, and flexible displays, to name a few. - Highlights: • Thin and uniform Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings have been deposited onto polymers materials. • Batch and roll-to-roll (R2R) atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been employed. • Deposition with either process improved the barrier properties. • Sensitivity of coated films to defects affects barrier obtained with R2R ALD.

  19. Atomic layer deposition precursor step repetition and surface plasma pretreatment influence on semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talkenberg, Florian, E-mail: florian.talkenberg@ipht-jena.de; Illhardt, Stefan; Schmidl, Gabriele; Schleusener, Alexander; Sivakov, Vladimir [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Radnóczi, György Zoltán; Pécz, Béla [Centre for Energy Research, Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly-Thege Miklós u. 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Dikhanbayev, Kadyrjan; Mussabek, Gauhar [Department of Physics and Engineering, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 al-Farabi Ave., 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Gudovskikh, Alexander [Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre, St. Petersburg Academic University, Russian Academy of Sciences, Hlopina Str. 8/3, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    Semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cells were prepared using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The silicon surface was treated with oxygen and hydrogen plasma in different orders before dielectric layer deposition. A plasma-enhanced ALD process was applied to deposit dielectric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the plasma pretreated n-type Si(100) substrate. Aluminum doped zinc oxide (Al:ZnO or AZO) was deposited by thermal ALD and serves as transparent conductive oxide. Based on transmission electron microscopy studies the presence of thin silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) layer was detected at the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. The SiO{sub x} formation depends on the initial growth behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and has significant influence on solar cell parameters. The authors demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma pretreatment and a precursor dose step repetition of a single precursor improve the initial growth behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and avoid the SiO{sub x} generation. Furthermore, it improves the solar cell performance, which indicates a change of the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface states.

  20. Correlation of film density and wet etch rate in hydrofluoric acid of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provine, J., E-mail: jprovine@stanford.edu; Schindler, Peter; Kim, Yongmin; Walch, Steve P.; Kim, Hyo Jin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Kim, Ki-Hyun [Manufacturing Technology Center, Samsung Electronics, Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of); Prinz, Fritz B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The continued scaling in transistors and memory elements has necessitated the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}), particularly for use a low k dielectric spacer. One of the key material properties needed for SiN{sub x} films is a low wet etch rate (WER) in hydrofluoric (HF) acid. In this work, we report on the evaluation of multiple precursors for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of SiN{sub x} and evaluate the film’s WER in 100:1 dilutions of HF in H{sub 2}O. The remote plasma capability available in PEALD, enabled controlling the density of the SiN{sub x} film. Namely, prolonged plasma exposure made films denser which corresponded to lower WER in a systematic fashion. We determined that there is a strong correlation between WER and the density of the film that extends across multiple precursors, PEALD reactors, and a variety of process conditions. Limiting all steps in the deposition to a maximum temperature of 350 °C, it was shown to be possible to achieve a WER in PEALD SiN{sub x} of 6.1 Å/min, which is similar to WER of SiN{sub x} from LPCVD reactions at 850 °C.

  1. Structure, optical properties and visible-light-induced photochemical activity of nanocrystalline ZnO films deposited by atomic layer deposition onto Si(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozd, V.E.; Titov, V.V.; Kasatkin, I.A.; Basov, L.L. [Fock Institute of Physics, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, Ul' yanovskaya st., 1, Saint-Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation); Lisachenko, A.A., E-mail: a.lisachenko@spbu.ru [Fock Institute of Physics, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, Ul' yanovskaya st., 1, Saint-Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation); Stroyuk, O.L., E-mail: alstroyuk@ukr.net [L.V. Pysarzhevsky Institute of Physical Chemistry of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 31 Nauky av., Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine); Kuchmiy, S.Y. [L.V. Pysarzhevsky Institute of Physical Chemistry of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 31 Nauky av., Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine)

    2014-12-31

    Nano-layers of ZnO (thickness 2–300 nm) were deposited on the surface of p-Si(100), SiO{sub x}/p-Si(100), and n-Si(111) using the atomic layer deposition technique. Morphology, microstructure, and electronic structure of the ZnO/Si(100), ZnO/SiO{sub x}/Si(100), and n- Si(111) films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and reflectometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The layers have good adhesion to the substrate, polycrystalline structure, and uniform thickness. Starting from the thickness of 4 nm, the hexagonal crystal structure of zincite (wurtzite-type) could be detected with a weak texture changing from [100] to [001] with increasing thickness of the layer. Desorption of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} at ∼ 10{sup −4} Pa from the surface under irradiation with visible light (λ > 500 nm)—the interval of ZnO transparency—was measured by mass-spectrometry. This proves a sensitization of the photocatalytically active ZnO films to the visible light by silicon substrate and opens possibilities of using the composite Si/ZnO materials. - Highlights: • ZnO films (2–300-nm thick) were deposited on Si(100) by atomic layer deposition. • Si substrate sensitizes ZnO nano-layer to the visible light (λ > 500 nm). • Si/ZnO heterojunction can act as a visible-light-sensitive photocatalyst.

  2. Effect of N bonding structure in AlON deposited by plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition on electrical properties of 4H-SiC MOS capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Wakana; Yamamoto, Kensaku; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Sigeaki

    2018-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the N bonding structure in an AlON layer deposited by plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) on the electrical properties of a 4H-SiC MOS structure. The properties of defects in the AlON and SiO2 layers were investigated from the capacitance–voltage and current density–voltage (J–V) characteristics of AlON/SiO2/4H-SiC MOS structures. The density of negatively charged defects in the AlON layer decreases with increasing N content. We found that the leakage current decreases with increasing N content at a low-voltage region from J–V characteristics. The bonding structure in the AlON layer was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The densities of Al–N and Al–O–N bonds in the AlON layer increase with the N content. In contrast, the density of Al–NO2 bonds decreases with increasing N content. We suggest that the decrease in the defect density in the AlON layer is related to the increasing number of Al–N and Al–O–N bonds. Thus, we concluded that it is important to form Al–N and Al–ON bonds in the AlON layer while suppressing the formation of Al–NO2 bonds.

  3. Controlled Gas Molecules Doping of Monolayer MoS2 via Atomic-Layer-Deposited Al2O3 Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanzheng; Li, Xinshu; Chen, Heyu; Shi, Jia; Shang, Qiuyu; Zhang, Shuai; Qiu, Xiaohui; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Haiyang; Liu, Weizhen; Liu, Xinfeng; Liu, Yichun

    2017-08-23

    MoS2 as atomically thin semiconductor is highly sensitive to ambient atmosphere (e.g., oxygen, moisture, etc.) in optical and electrical properties. Here we report a controlled gas molecules doping of monolayer MoS2 via atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 films. The deposited Al2O3 films, in the shape of nanospheres, can effectively control the contact areas between ambient atmosphere and MoS2 that allows precise modulation of gas molecules doping. By analyzing photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra of MoS2 with different thickness of Al2O3, the doped carrier concentration is estimated at ∼2.7 × 10(13) cm(-2) based on the mass action model. Moreover, time-dependent PL measurements indicate an incremental stability of single layer MoS2 as the thicknesses of Al2O3 capping layer increase. Effective control of gas molecules doping in monolayer MoS2 provides us a valuable insight into the applications of MoS2 based optical and electrical devices.

  4. Review of recent progresses on flexible oxide semiconductor thin film transistors based on atomic layer deposition processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiazhen; Han, Ki-Lim; Hong, TaeHyun; Choi, Wan-Ho; Park, Jin-Seong

    2018-01-01

    The current article is a review of recent progress and major trends in the field of flexible oxide thin film transistors (TFTs), fabricating with atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes. The ALD process offers accurate controlling of film thickness and composition as well as ability of achieving excellent uniformity over large areas at relatively low temperatures. First, an introduction is provided on what is the definition of ALD, the difference among other vacuum deposition techniques, and the brief key factors of ALD on flexible devices. Second, considering functional layers in flexible oxide TFT, the ALD process on polymer substrates may improve device performances such as mobility and stability, adopting as buffer layers over the polymer substrate, gate insulators, and active layers. Third, this review consists of the evaluation methods of flexible oxide TFTs under various mechanical stress conditions. The bending radius and repetition cycles are mostly considering for conventional flexible devices. It summarizes how the device has been degraded/changed under various stress types (directions). The last part of this review suggests a potential of each ALD film, including the releasing stress, the optimization of TFT structure, and the enhancement of device performance. Thus, the functional ALD layers in flexible oxide TFTs offer great possibilities regarding anti-mechanical stress films, along with flexible display and information storage application fields. Project supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) (No. NRF-2017R1D1A1B03034035), the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy (No. #10051403), and the Korea Semiconductor Research Consortium.

  5. Atomic Layer Deposition of Ruthenium with TiN Interface for Sub-10 nm Advanced Interconnects beyond Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Liang Gong; Roussel, Philippe; Pedreira, Olalla Varela

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition of ruthenium is studied as a barrierless metallization solution for future sub-10 nm interconnect technology nodes. We demonstrate the void-free filling in sub-10 nm wide single damascene lines using an ALD process in combination with 2.5 angstrom of ALD TiN interface and po......'stdeposition annealing. At such small dimensions, the ruthenium effective resistance depends less on the scaling than that of Cu/barrier systems. Ruthenium effective resistance potentially crosses the Cu curve at 14 and 10 nm according to the semiempirical interconnect resitance model for advanced technology nodes...

  6. Atomic-layer chemical-vapor-deposition of TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111)

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S; Kim, Y D; Kim, W M

    2000-01-01

    An atomic-layer chemical vapor deposition (AL-CVD) system was used to deposit TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111) substrates by cyclic exposures of TiCl sub 4 and NH sub 3. The growth rate was measured by using the number of deposition cycles, and the physical properties were compared with those of TiN films grown by using conventional deposition methods. To investigate the growth mechanism, we suggest a growth model for TiN n order to calculate the growth rate per cycle with a Cerius program. The results of the calculation with the model were compared with the experimental values for the TiN film deposited using the AL-CVD method. The stoichiometry of the TiN film was examined by using Auger electron spectroscopy, and the chlorine and the oxygen impurities were examined. The x-ray diffraction and the transmission electron microscopy results for the TiN film exhibited a strong (200) peak and a randomly oriented columnar microstructure. The electrical resistivity was found to decrease with increasing deposit...

  7. Atomic layer deposition of cobalt carbide films and their magnetic properties using propanol as a reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarr, Mouhamadou, E-mail: sarrtapha44@yahoo.fr [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Bahlawane, Naoufal; Arl, Didier [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Dossot, Manuel [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Microbiology for the Environment, UMR 7564 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, 54601 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); McRae, Edward [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198CNRS-Université de Lorraine, FST, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Lenoble, Damien, E-mail: damien.lenoble@list.lu [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Conformal carbon-Co-carbide thin films. • Chemically growth carbone-Co-carbide composite. • Tuneable magnetic properties. - Abstract: The investigation of highly conformal thin films using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is driven by a variety of applications in modern technologies. In particular, the emergence of 3D memory device architectures requires conformal materials with tuneable magnetic properties. Here, nanocomposites of carbon, cobalt and cobalt carbide are deposited by ALD using cobalt acetylacetonate with propanol as a reducing agent. Films were grown by varying the ALD deposition parameters including deposition temperature and propanol exposure time. The morphology, the chemical composition and the crystalline structure of the cobalt carbide film were investigated. Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements revealed magnetic hysteresis loops with a coercivity reaching 500 Oe and a maximal saturation magnetization of 0.9 T with a grain size less than 15 nm. Magnetic properties are shown to be tuneable by adjusting the deposition parameters that significantly affect the microstructure and the composition of the deposited films.

  8. Nucleation and growth mechanisms of Al2O3 atomic layer deposition on synthetic polycrystalline MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Chiappe, D.; Meersschaut, J.; Conard, T.; Franquet, A.; Nuytten, T.; Mannarino, M.; Radu, I.; Vandervorst, W.; Delabie, A.

    2017-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are of great interest for applications in nano-electronic devices. Their incorporation requires the deposition of nm-thin and continuous high-k dielectric layers on the 2D TMDs. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of high-k dielectric layers is well established on Si surfaces: the importance of a high nucleation density for rapid layer closure is well known and the nucleation mechanisms have been thoroughly investigated. In contrast, the nucleation of ALD on 2D TMD surfaces is less well understood and a quantitative analysis of the deposition process is lacking. Therefore, in this work, we investigate the growth of Al2O3 (using Al(CH3)3/H2O ALD) on MoS2 whereby we attempt to provide a complete insight into the use of several complementary characterization techniques, including X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. To reveal the inherent reactivity of MoS2, we exclude the impact of surface contamination from a transfer process by direct Al2O3 deposition on synthetic MoS2 layers obtained by a high temperature sulfurization process. It is shown that Al2O3 ALD on the MoS2 surface is strongly inhibited at temperatures between 125°C and 300°C, with no growth occurring on MoS2 crystal basal planes and selective nucleation only at line defects or grain boundaries at MoS2 top surface. During further deposition, the as-formed Al2O3 nano-ribbons grow in both vertical and lateral directions. Eventually, a continuous Al2O3 film is obtained by lateral growth over the MoS2 crystal basal plane, with the point of layer closure determined by the grain size at the MoS2 top surface and the lateral growth rate. The created Al2O3/MoS2 interface consists mainly of van der Waals interactions. The nucleation is improved by contributions of reversible adsorption on the MoS2 basal planes by using low

  9. From atoms to layers: in situ gold cluster growth kinetics during sputter deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Buffet, Adeline; Körstgens, Volker; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Schlage, Kai; Benecke, Gunthard; Perlich, Jan; Rawolle, Monika; Rothkirch, André; Heidmann, Berit; Herzog, Gerd; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Röhlsberger, Ralf; Gehrke, Rainer; Stribeck, Norbert; Roth, Stephan V.

    2013-05-01

    The adjustment of size-dependent catalytic, electrical and optical properties of gold cluster assemblies is a very significant issue in modern applied nanotechnology. We present a real-time investigation of the growth kinetics of gold nanostructures from small nuclei to a complete gold layer during magnetron sputter deposition with high time resolution by means of in situ microbeam grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (μGISAXS). We specify the four-stage growth including their thresholds with sub-monolayer resolution and identify phase transitions monitored in Yoneda intensity as a material-specific characteristic. An innovative and flexible geometrical model enables the extraction of morphological real space parameters, such as cluster size and shape, correlation distance, layer porosity and surface coverage, directly from reciprocal space scattering data. This approach enables a large variety of future investigations of the influence of different process parameters on the thin metal film morphology. Furthermore, our study allows for deducing the wetting behavior of gold cluster films on solid substrates and provides a better understanding of the growth kinetics in general, which is essential for optimization of manufacturing parameters, saving energy and resources.The adjustment of size-dependent catalytic, electrical and optical properties of gold cluster assemblies is a very significant issue in modern applied nanotechnology. We present a real-time investigation of the growth kinetics of gold nanostructures from small nuclei to a complete gold layer during magnetron sputter deposition with high time resolution by means of in situ microbeam grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (μGISAXS). We specify the four-stage growth including their thresholds with sub-monolayer resolution and identify phase transitions monitored in Yoneda intensity as a material-specific characteristic. An innovative and flexible geometrical model enables the extraction

  10. Integration of atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics on GaSb via hydrogen plasma exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B. Ruppalt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter we report the efficacy of a hydrogen plasma pretreatment for integrating atomic layer deposited (ALD high-k dielectric stacks with device-quality p-type GaSb(001 epitaxial layers. Molecular beam eptiaxy-grown GaSb surfaces were subjected to a 30 minute H2/Ar plasma treatment and subsequently removed to air. High-k HfO2 and Al2O3/HfO2 bilayer insulating films were then deposited via ALD and samples were processed into standard metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS capacitors. The quality of the semiconductor/dielectric interface was probed by current-voltage and variable-frequency admittance measurements. Measurement results indicate that the H2-plamsa pretreatment leads to a low density of interface states nearly independent of the deposited dielectric material, suggesting that pre-deposition H2-plasma exposure, coupled with ALD of high-k dielectrics, may provide an effective means for achieving high-quality GaSb MOS structures for advanced Sb-based digital and analog electronics.

  11. Atomic layer deposition-Sequential self-limiting surface reactions for advanced catalyst "bottom-up" synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junling; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Stair, Peter C.

    2016-06-01

    Catalyst synthesis with precise control over the structure of catalytic active sites at the atomic level is of essential importance for the scientific understanding of reaction mechanisms and for rational design of advanced catalysts with high performance. Such precise control is achievable using atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is similar to chemical vapor deposition (CVD), except that the deposition is split into a sequence of two self-limiting surface reactions between gaseous precursor molecules and a substrate. The unique self-limiting feature of ALD allows conformal deposition of catalytic materials on a high surface area catalyst support at the atomic level. The deposited catalytic materials can be precisely constructed on the support by varying the number and type of ALD cycles. As an alternative to the wet-chemistry based conventional methods, ALD provides a cycle-by-cycle "bottom-up" approach for nanostructuring supported catalysts with near atomic precision. In this review, we summarize recent attempts to synthesize supported catalysts with ALD. Nucleation and growth of metals by ALD on oxides and carbon materials for precise synthesis of supported monometallic catalyst are reviewed. The capability of achieving precise control over the particle size of monometallic nanoparticles by ALD is emphasized. The resulting metal catalysts with high dispersions and uniformity often show comparable or remarkably higher activity than those prepared by conventional methods. For supported bimetallic catalyst synthesis, we summarize the strategies for controlling the deposition of the secondary metal selectively on the primary metal nanoparticle but not on the support to exclude monometallic formation. As a review of the surface chemistry and growth behavior of metal ALD on metal surfaces, we demonstrate the ways to precisely tune size, composition and structure of bimetallic metal nanoparticles. The cycle-by-cycle "bottom up" construction of bimetallic (or multiple

  12. Development of electrostatic supercapacitors by atomic layer deposition on nanoporous anodic aluminium oxides for energy harvesting applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia eIglesias

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials can provide innovative solutions for solving the usual energy harvesting and storage drawbacks that take place in conventional energy storage devices based on batteries or electrolytic capacitors, because they are not fully capable for attending the fast energy demands and high power densities required in many of present applications. Here, we report on the development and characterization of novel electrostatic supercapacitors made by conformal Atomic Layer Deposition on the high open surface of nanoporous anodic alumina membranes employed as templates. The structure of the designed electrostatic supercapacitor prototype consists of successive layers of Aluminium doped Zinc Oxide, as the bottom and top electrodes, together Al2O3 as the intermediate dielectric layer. The conformality of the deposited conductive and dielectric layers, together with their composition and crystalline structure have been checked by XRD and electron microscopy techniques. Impedance measurements performed for the optimized electrostatic supercapacitor device give a high capacitance value of 200 µF/cm2 at the frequency of 40 Hz, which confirms the theoretical estimations for such kind of prototypes, and the leakage current reaches values around of 1.8 mA/cm2 at 1 V. The high capacitance value achieved by the supercapacitor prototype together its small size turns these devices in outstanding candidates for using in energy harvesting and storage applications.

  13. A modular reactor design for in situ synchrotron x-ray investigation of atomic layer deposition processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Jeffrey A.; Weimer, Matthew S.; Emery, Jonathan D.; Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Seifert, Sönke; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Martinson, Alex B. F.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Hock, Adam S.; Proslier, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron characterization techniques provide some of the most powerful tools for the study of film structure and chemistry. The brilliance and tunability of the Advanced Photon Source allow access to scattering and spectroscopic techniques unavailable with in-house laboratory setups and provide the opportunity to probe various atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes in situ starting at the very first deposition cycle. Here, we present the design and implementation of a portable ALD instrument which possesses a modular reactor scheme that enables simple experimental switchover between various beamlines and characterization techniques. As first examples, we present in situ results for (1) X-ray surface scattering and reflectivity measurements of epitaxial ZnO ALD on sapphire, (2) grazing-incidence small angle scattering of MnO nucleation on silicon, and (3) grazing-incidence X-ray absorption spectroscopy of nucleation-regime Er2O3 ALD on amorphous ALD alumina and single crystalline sapphire.

  14. Atomic Layer Deposition of SiO2 for the Performance Enhancement of Fin Field Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Yuki; Matsukawa, Takashi; Liu, Yongxun; O'uchi, Shin-ichi; Sakamoto, Kunihiro; Tsukada, Junichi; Yamauchi, Hiromi; Masahara, Meishoku

    2013-11-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of SiO2 by using a tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) or a bis(ethylmethylamino)silane (BEMAS) have been studied for the side-wall spacer formation of the fin field effect transistor (FinFET). The ALD-SiO2 can be deposited conformally at 50 °C for the TEOS and at 250 °C for the BEMAS precursor. As a result, FinFETs with a 25-nm-long extension of the source/drain using the ALD grown SiO2 sidewall spacer have been successfully fabricated. The performance of the FinFET has been successfully improved by reduction of the parasitic resistance.

  15. Atomic layer deposition and properties of mixed Ta2O5 and ZrO2 films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaupo Kukli

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Thin solid films consisting of ZrO2 and Ta2O5 were grown by atomic layer deposition at 300 °C. Ta2O5 films doped with ZrO2, TaZr2.75O8 ternary phase, or ZrO2 doped with Ta2O5 were grown to thickness and composition depending on the number and ratio of alternating ZrO2 and Ta2O5 deposition cycles. All the films grown exhibited resistive switching characteristics between TiN and Pt electrodes, expressed by repetitive current-voltage loops. The most reliable windows between high and low resistive states were observed in Ta2O5 films mixed with relatively low amounts of ZrO2, providing Zr to Ta cation ratio of 0.2.

  16. Research Update: Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films: Reactors, doping, and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoye, Robert L. Z., E-mail: rlzh2@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: jld35@cam.ac.uk; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L., E-mail: rlzh2@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: jld35@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Muñoz-Rojas, David [LMGP, University Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS, F-3800 Grenoble (France); Nelson, Shelby F. [Kodak Research Laboratories, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York 14650 (United States); Illiberi, Andrea; Poodt, Paul [Holst Centre/TNO Thin Film Technology, Eindhoven, 5656 AE (Netherlands); Roozeboom, Fred [Holst Centre/TNO Thin Film Technology, Eindhoven, 5656 AE (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, Eindhoven, 5600 MB (Netherlands)

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD) has recently emerged as an appealing technique for rapidly producing high quality oxides. Here, we focus on the use of AP-SALD to deposit functional ZnO thin films, particularly on the reactors used, the film properties, and the dopants that have been studied. We highlight how these films are advantageous for the performance of solar cells, organometal halide perovskite light emitting diodes, and thin-film transistors. Future AP-SALD technology will enable the commercial processing of thin films over large areas on a sheet-to-sheet and roll-to-roll basis, with new reactor designs emerging for flexible plastic and paper electronics.

  17. Research Update: Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films: Reactors, doping, and devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Z. Hoye

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD has recently emerged as an appealing technique for rapidly producing high quality oxides. Here, we focus on the use of AP-SALD to deposit functional ZnO thin films, particularly on the reactors used, the film properties, and the dopants that have been studied. We highlight how these films are advantageous for the performance of solar cells, organometal halide perovskite light emitting diodes, and thin-film transistors. Future AP-SALD technology will enable the commercial processing of thin films over large areas on a sheet-to-sheet and roll-to-roll basis, with new reactor designs emerging for flexible plastic and paper electronics.

  18. 7-Octenyltrichrolosilane/trimethyaluminum hybrid dielectrics fabricated by molecular-atomic layer deposition on ZnO thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Lee, Mingun; Lucero, Antonio T.; Cheng, Lanxia; Ha, Min-Woo; Kim, Jiyoung

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of 7-octenytrichlorosilane (7-OTS)/trimethylaluminum (TMA) organic-inorganic hybrid films using molecular-atomic layer deposition (MALD). The properties of 7-OTS/TMA hybrid films are extensively investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and electrical measurements. Our results suggest that uniform and smooth amorphous hybrid thin films with excellent insulating properties are obtained using the MALD process. Films have a relatively high dielectric constant of approximately 5.0 and low leakage current density. We fabricate zinc oxide (ZnO) based thin film transistors (TFTs) using 7-OTS/TMA hybrid material as a back gate dielectric with the top ZnO channel layer deposited in-situ via MALD. The ZnO TFTs exhibit a field effect mobility of approximately 0.43 cm2 V-1 s-1, a threshold voltage of approximately 1 V, and an on/off ratio of approximately 103 under low voltage operation (from -3 to 9 V). This work demonstrates an organic-inorganic hybrid gate dielectric material potentially useful in flexible electronics application.

  19. Atomic layer deposited ZrO2nanofilm on Mg-Sr alloy for enhanced corrosion resistance and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiuyue; Yuan, Wei; Liu, Xiangmei; Zheng, Yufeng; Cui, Zhenduo; Yang, Xianjin; Pan, Haobo; Wu, Shuilin

    2017-08-01

    The biodegradability and good mechanical property of magnesium alloys make them potential biomedical materials. However, their rapid corrosion rate in the human body's environment impairs these advantages and limits their clinical use. In this work, a compact zirconia (ZrO 2 ) nanofilm was fabricated on the surface of a magnesium-strontium (Mg-Sr) alloy by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) method, which can regulate the thickness of the film precisely and thus also control the corrosion rate. Corrosion tests reveal that the ZrO 2 film can effectively reduce the corrosion rate of Mg-Sr alloys that is closely related to the thickness of the film. The cell culture test shows that this kind of ZrO 2 film can also enhance the activity and adhesion of osteoblasts on the surfaces of Mg-Sr alloys. The significance of the current work is to develop a zirconia nanofilm on biomedical MgSr alloy with controllable thickness precisely through atomic layer deposition technique. By adjusting the thickness of nanofilm, the corrosion rate of Mg-Sr alloy can be modulated, thereafter, the degradation rate of Mg-based alloys can be controlled precisely according to actual clinical requirement. In addition, this zirconia nanofilm modified Mg-Sr alloys show excellent biocompatibility than the bare samples. Hence, this work provides a new surface strategy to control the degradation rate while improving the biocompatibility of substrates. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanotubes/chitosan hybrids on Ti implants by atom layer deposited ZnO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yizhou; Liu, Xiangmei [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Yeung, Kelvin W.K. [Division of Spine Surgery, Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics & Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wu, Shuilin, E-mail: shuilin.wu@gmail.com [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Carbon naonotubes/chitosan/ZnO coating was first constructed on Ti implants. • This system endowed Ti implants with excellent self-antibacterial activity. • The amount of Zn could be precisely controlled by atom layer deposition. • This system could regulate cell behaviors on metallic implants. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ZnO using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on chitosan (CS) modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were first introduced onto the surfaces of biomedical implants. When the content of ZnO is not sufficient, CNTs can strengthen the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus by 8% and 39%, respectively. CS can improve the cytocompatibility of CNTs and ZnO. The amount of Zn content can be controlled by changing the cycling numbers of ALD processes. This hybrid coating can not only endow medical implants with high self-antibacterial efficacy against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) of over 73% and 98%, respectively, but also regulate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts by controlling the amount of ZnO.

  1. Formation of silicon carbide defect qubits with optically transparent electrodes and atomic layer deposited silicon oxide surface passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, O. M.; Higa, B.; Liu, B.; Sims, P.; Torres, C.; Davidson, B.; Lerum, L.; Romero, H.; Fahem, M.; Lasher, M.; Barua, R.; deEscobar, A.; Cothern, J.; Simonsen, K.; Ramirez, A. D.; Banks, H.; Carter, S. G.; Gaskill, D. K.; Reinecke, T. L.

    2017-08-01

    Defect qubits in silicon carbide are an emerging system for quantum information science and technology. It is important to passivate and protect the surface to preserve the particular defect configurations as well as to provide means to tune the opto-electronic properties via electronic or opto-electronic gating. In this work, we construct defect qubit device structures that integrate Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) electrodes and a thin atomic layer deposited (ALD) siliconoxide surface passivation. The devices are formed via 12C ion implantation and high temperature annealing of 4H and 6H silicon carbide. The process involves the integration of optically transparent indium tin oxide electrodes and a surface passivation film of silicon-oxide by atomic layer deposition. We find good contact is formed between ITO and SiC, and after complete processing, the measured broad-band photoluminescence (PL) with excitation at 785 nm in a scanning PL system is consistent with the formation of silicon vacancies. We find minimal change in the room temperature emission in regions beneath the ITO electrodes and the SiOx-SiC passivated surface. We evaluate the ability of an electric field to tune the optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) response of the qubit system by simulations of the spectrum with a modified spin Hamiltonian that considers the Stark Effect. We quantify the simulated strength of the electric-field tuning of the energy levels and ODMR response for the various identified spin 3/2 transitions of the silicon vacancy.

  2. Interface engineering of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and atomic layer deposited Zn(O,S) heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sebastian S.; Merdes, Saoussen; Steigert, Alexander; Klenk, Reiner; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Simsek Sanli, Ekin; van Aken, Peter A.; Oertel, Mike; Schneikart, Anja; Dimmler, Bernhard; Schlatmann, Rutger

    2017-08-01

    Atomic layer deposition of Zn(O,S) is an attractive dry and Cd-free process for the preparation of buffer layers for chalcopyrite solar modules. As we previously reported, excellent cell and module efficiencies were achieved using absorbers from industrial pilot production. These absorbers were grown using a selenization/sulfurization process. In this contribution we report on the interface engineering required to adapt the process to sulfur-free multi source evaporated absorbers. Different approaches to a local sulfur enrichment at the heterojunction have been studied by using surface analysis (XPS) and scanning transmission electron microscopy. We correlate the microstructure and element distribution at the interface with device properties obtained by electronic characterization. The optimized completely dry process yields cell efficiencies >16% and 30 × 30 cm2 minimodule efficiencies of up to 13.9% on industrial substrates. Any degradation observed in the dry heat stress test is fully reversible after light soaking.

  3. Effect of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment on ZnO-based metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet photodetectors deposited using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yu-Chang; Lee, Hsin-Ying, E-mail: hylee@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Photonics, Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tsung-Hsin [Metal Industries Research and Development Centre, Kaohsiung 82151, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, zinc oxide (ZnO) films were deposited on sapphire substrates using a plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition system. Prior to deposition, the substrates were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in order to increase nucleation on the initial sapphire surface and, thus, enhance the quality of deposited ZnO films. Furthermore, x-ray diffraction spectroscopy measurements indicated that the crystallinity of ZnO films was considerably enhanced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment, with the strongest (002) diffraction peak occurring for the film pretreated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for 60 min. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy also was used, and the results indicated that a high number of Zn–O bonds was generated in ZnO films pretreated appropriately with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The ZnO film deposited on a sapphire substrate with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment for 60 min was applied to metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet photodetectors (MSM-UPDs) as an active layer. The fabricated ZnO MSM-UPDs showed improvements in dark current and ultraviolet–visible rejection ratios (0.27 μA and 1.06 × 10{sup 3}, respectively) compared to traditional devices.

  4. Flexible and High-Performance Amorphous Indium Zinc Oxide Thin-Film Transistor Using Low-Temperature Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiazhen; Lee, Hwan-Jae; Oh, Saeroonter; Park, Jin-Seong

    2016-12-14

    Amorphous indium zinc oxide (IZO) thin films were deposited at different temperatures, by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using [1,1,1-trimethyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)silanaminato]indium (INCA-1) as the indium precursor, diethlzinc (DEZ) as the zinc precursor, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as the reactant. The ALD process of IZO deposition was carried by repeated supercycles, including one cycle of indium oxide (In2O3) and one cycle of zinc oxide (ZnO). The IZO growth rate deviates from the sum of the respective In2O3 and ZnO growth rates at ALD growth temperatures of 150, 175, and 200 °C. We propose growth temperature-dependent surface reactions during the In2O3 cycle that correspond with the growth-rate results. Thin-film transistors (TFTs) were fabricated with the ALD-grown IZO thin films as the active layer. The amorphous IZO TFTs exhibited high mobility of 42.1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and good positive bias temperature stress stability. Finally, flexible IZO TFT was successfully fabricated on a polyimide substrate without performance degradation, showing the great potential of ALD-grown TFTs for flexible display applications.

  5. Long time stability of ITO/NiPc/ZnO/Al devices with ZnO buffer layer formed by atomic layer deposition technique-impedance spectroscopy analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stakhira, Pavlo Y., E-mail: stakhira@polynet.lviv.ua [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera 12, 79013 Lviv (Ukraine); Grygorchak, Ivan I.; Cherpak, Vladyslav V.; Ivastchyshyn, Fedir O.; Volynyuk, Dmytro Y. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera 12, 79013 Lviv (Ukraine); Luka, Grzegorz [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Godlewski, Marek [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences College of Science, Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University, Dewajtis 5, 01-815 Warsaw (Poland); Guziewicz, Elzbieta [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Pakhomov, Georgi L. [Institute for Physics of Microstructure of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPM RAS), RF 603950 Nizhny Novgorod GSP-105 (Russian Federation); Hotra, Zenon Y. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera 12, 79013 Lviv (Ukraine); Rzeszow University of Technology, W. Pola 2, 35-959 Rzeszow (Poland)

    2010-09-15

    We report on stable in time organic photovoltaic devices based on metal-phthalocyanine structures, which were formed by vacuum deposition of nickel phthalocyanine (NiPc). The reported stability is due to ultra-thin zinc oxide (ZnO) layer formed at low temperature on top of the structure (beneath the metal contact) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. We performed comparative analysis of current density-voltage characteristics and frequency dependencies of the impedance for freshly made ITO/NiPc/ZnO/Al and ITO/NiPc/Al devices and after storage during one month in air. We conclude that introducing of ultra-thin ZnO film into under-cathode region of ITO/NiPc/Al structure provides long-term protection of NiPc films from atmospheric effects.

  6. Atomic layer deposition of two dimensional MoS{sub 2} on 150 mm substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdivia, Arturo; Conley, John F., E-mail: jconley@eecs.oregonstate.edu [School of EECS, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Tweet, Douglas J. [Sharp Labs of America, Camas, Washington 98607 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Low temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) of monolayer to few layer MoS{sub 2} uniformly across 150 mm diameter SiO{sub 2}/Si and quartz substrates is demonstrated. Purge separated cycles of MoCl{sub 5} and H{sub 2}S precursors are used at reactor temperatures of up to 475 °C. Raman scattering studies show clearly the in-plane (E{sup 1}{sub 2g}) and out-of-plane (A{sub 1g}) modes of MoS{sub 2}. The separation of the E{sup 1}{sub 2g} and A{sub 1g} peaks is a function of the number of ALD cycles, shifting closer together with fewer layers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that stoichiometry is improved by postdeposition annealing in a sulfur ambient. High resolution transmission electron microscopy confirms the atomic spacing of monolayer MoS{sub 2} thin films.

  7. Modification of SnO2 Anodes by Atomic Layer Deposition for High Performance Lithium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Yesibolati, Nulati

    2013-05-01

    Tin dioxide (SnO2) is considered one of the most promising anode materials for Lithium ion batteries (LIBs), due to its large theoretical capacity and natural abundance. However, its low electronic/ionic conductivities, large volume change during lithiation/delithiation and agglomeration prevent it from further commercial applications. In this thesis, we investigate modified SnO2 as a high energy density anode material for LIBs. Specifically two approaches are presented to improve battery performances. Firstly, SnO2 electrochemical performances were improved by surface modification using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Ultrathin Al2O3 or HfO2 were coated on SnO2 electrodes. It was found that electrochemical performances had been enhanced after ALD deposition. In a second approach, we implemented a layer-by-layer (LBL) assembled graphene/carbon-coated hollow SnO2 spheres as anode material for LIBs. Our results indicated that the LBL assembled electrodes had high reversible lithium storage capacities even at high current densities. These superior electrochemical performances are attributed to the enhanced electronic conductivity and effective lithium diffusion, because of the interconnected graphene/carbon networks among nanoparticles of the hollow SnO2 spheres.

  8. 3D-nanoarchitectured Pd/Ni catalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition for the electrooxidation of formic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Assaud

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensionally (3D nanoarchitectured palladium/nickel (Pd/Ni catalysts, which were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD on high-aspect-ratio nanoporous alumina templates are investigated with regard to the electrooxidation of formic acid in an acidic medium (0.5 M H2SO4. Both deposition processes, Ni and Pd, with various mass content ratios have been continuously monitored by using a quartz crystal microbalance. The morphology of the Pd/Ni systems has been studied by electron microscopy and shows a homogeneous deposition of granularly structured Pd onto the Ni substrate. X-ray diffraction analysis performed on Ni and NiO substrates revealed an amorphous structure, while the Pd coating crystallized into a fcc lattice with a preferential orientation along the [220]-direction. Surface chemistry analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed both metallic and oxide contributions for the Ni and Pd deposits. Cyclic voltammetry of the Pd/Ni nanocatalysts revealed that the electrooxidation of HCOOH proceeds through the direct dehydrogenation mechanism with the formation of active intermediates. High catalytic activities are measured for low masses of Pd coatings that were generated by a low number of ALD cycles, probably because of the cluster size effect, electronic interactions between Pd and Ni, or diffusion effects.

  9. Deposition of HgTe by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Venkatasamy, V

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available . Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) studies of this cycle, also using an automated flow cell, indicated that some deposited Te was stripped at the potential used to deposit Hg. X-ray diffraction studies showed the deposits to grow in a strongly (1 1...

  10. Influence of homo-buffer layers and post-deposition rapid thermal annealing upon atomic layer deposition grown ZnO at 100 °C with three-pulsed precursors per growth cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yung-Chen; Yuan, Kai-Yun; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2017-10-01

    ZnO main epilayers are deposited with three-pulsed precursors in every growth cycle at 100 °C on various thicknesses of 300 °C-grown homo-buffer layers by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on sapphire substrate. Samples are treated without and with post-deposition rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Two different annealing temperatures 300 and 1000 °C are utilized in the ambience of oxygen for 5 min. Extremely low background electron concentration 8.4 × 1014 cm-3, high electron mobility 62.1 cm2/V s, and pronounced enhancement of near bandgap edge photoluminescence (PL) are achieved for ZnO main epilayer with sufficient thickness of buffer layer (200 ALD cycles) and post-deposition RTA at 1000 °C. Effective block and remove of thermally unstable mobile defects and other crystal lattice imperfections are the agents of quality promotion of ZnO thin film.

  11. Methanol electro-oxidation catalyzed by platinum deposited on various substrates using Electrochemical Atomic Layer Deposition (ECALD)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Louw, EK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available , & Srinivasan, 1997). 22 2.5.3 Ion beam deposition Ion plating uses concurrent or periodic energetic particle bombardment of the depositing film to modify and control the composition and properties of the deposited film and to improve surface coverage...

  12. Low-Temperature Atomic Layer Deposition of Crystalline and Photoactive Ultrathin Hematite Films for Solar Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steier, Ludmilla; Luo, Jingshan; Schreier, Marcel; Mayer, Matthew T; Sajavaara, Timo; Grätzel, Michael

    2015-12-22

    We developed a low-temperature atomic layer deposition route to deposit phase pure and crystalline hematite (α-Fe2O3) films at 230 °C without the need for postannealing. Homogenous and conformal deposition with good aspect ratio coverage was demonstrated on a nanostructured substrate and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. These as-deposited α-Fe2O3 films were investigated as photoanodes for photoelectrochemical water oxidation and found to be highly photoactive. Combined with a TiO2 underlayer and a low-cost Ni(OH)2 catalyst, hematite films of less than 10 nm in thickness reached photocurrent densities of 0.3 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 V vs RHE and a photocurrent onset potential of less than 0.9 V vs RHE, previously unseen for films this thin and without high temperature annealing. In a thickness-dependent photoelectrochemical analysis, we identified a hematite thickness of only 10 nm to yield the highest internal quantum efficiency when using a suitable underlayer such as TiO2 that induces doping of the hematite film and reduces electron/hole recombination at the back contact. We find that, at high bias potentials, photocurrent density and quantum efficiency proportionally increase with light absorption in films thinner than 10 nm and are limited by the space charge layer width in thicker films. Thus, we propose to apply hematite films of 10 nm in thickness for future developments on suitable nanostructured conductive scaffolds that can now be extended to organic scaffolds due to our low-temperature process.

  13. Iridium-coated micropore x-ray optics using dry etching of a silicon wafer and atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Tomohiro; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Moriyama, Teppei; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Kakiuchi, Takuya; Ohashi, Takaya; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Putkonen, Matti

    2013-08-20

    To enhance x-ray reflectivity of silicon micropore optics using dry etching of silicon (111) wafers, iridium coating is tested by use of atomic layer deposition. An iridium layer is successfully formed on sidewalls of tiny micropores with a pore width of 20 μm and depth of 300 μm. The film thickness is ∼20  nm. An enhanced x-ray reflectivity compared to that of silicon is confirmed at Ti Kα 4.51 keV, for what we believe to be the first time, with this type of optics. Some discrepancies from a theoretical reflectivity curve of iridium-coated silicon are noticed at small incident angles <1.3°. When a geometrical shadowing effect due to occultation by a ridge existing on the sidewalls is taken into account, the observed reflectivity becomes well represented by the modified theoretical curve. An estimated surface micro roughness of ∼1  nm rms is consistent with atomic force microscope measurements of the sidewalls.

  14. Atomic layer deposition on porous powders with in situ gravimetric monitoring in a modular fixed bed reactor setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strempel, V E; Naumann d'Alnoncourt, R; Driess, M; Rosowski, F

    2017-07-01

    A modular setup for Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) on high-surface powder substrates in fixed bed reactors with a gravimetric in situ monitoring was developed. The design and operation are described in detail. An integrated magnetically suspended balance records mass changes during ALD. The highly versatile setup consists of three modular main units: a dosing unit, a reactor unit, and a downstream unit. The reactor unit includes the balance, a large fixed bed reactor, and a quartz crystal microbalance. The dosing unit is equipped with a complex manifold to deliver gases and gaseous reagents including three different ALD precursors, five oxidizing or reducing agents, and two purge gas lines. The system employs reactor temperatures and pressures in the range of 25-600 °C and 10 -3 to 1 bar, respectively. Typically, powder batches between 100 mg and 50 g can be coated. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by coating mesoporous SiO 2 powder with a thin AlO x (submono) layer using three cycles with trimethylaluminium and H 2 O. The self-limiting nature of the deposition has been verified with the in situ gravimetric monitoring and full saturation curves are presented. The process parameters were used for a scale-up in a large fixed bed reactor. The samples were analyzed with established analytics such as X-ray diffraction, N 2 adsorption, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

  15. Zinc release from atomic layer deposited zinc oxide thin films and its antibacterial effect on Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kääriäinen, M.-L., E-mail: marja-leena.kaariainen@lut.fi [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Weiss, C.K.; Ritz, S.; Pütz, S. [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Cameron, D.C. [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Mailänder, V. [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); III. Medical Clinic, University Medicine of the Johannes-Gutenberg University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, D-55131 Mainz (Germany); Landfester, K. [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    Zinc oxide films have been grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at different reaction temperatures and in various thicknesses. Zinc-ion release has been examined from the ZnO films in water and in phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS). Additionally, the antibacterial effect has been studied on Escherichia coli. The thickness of the ZnO film or its crystal orientation did not affect the rate of dissolution. ALD grown aluminum oxide films were deposited on top of the ZnO films and they acted as an effective barrier against zinc dissolution. The bacteriostatic effect was not dependent on the film thickness but both 45 nm and 280 nm thick ZnO films significantly reduced bacterial attachment and growth in dark conditions by 99.7% and 99.5%, respectively. The results indicated that photoirradiation is not required for to enhance antibacterial properties of inorganic films and that the elution of zinc ions is probably responsible for the antibacterial properties of the ZnO films. The duration of the antibacterial effect of ZnO can be controlled by accurate control of the film thickness, which is a feature of ALD, and the onset of the antibacterial effect can be delayed by a time which can be adjusted by controlling the thickness of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} blocking layer. This gives the possibility of obtaining dual antibacterial release profiles through a nanolaminate structure of these two materials.

  16. Impacts of oxidants in atomic layer deposition method on Al2O3/GaN interface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoka, Noriyuki; Kubo, Toshiharu; Yamada, Toshikazu; Egawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Mitsuaki

    2018-01-01

    The electrical interface properties of GaN metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) capacitors with an Al2O3 gate insulator formed by atomic layer deposition method using three kinds of oxidants were investigated by the capacitance–voltage technique, Terman method, and conductance method. We found that O3 and the alternate supply of H2O and O3 (AS-HO) are effective for reducing the interface trap density (D it) at the energy range of 0.15 to 0.30 eV taking from the conduction band minimum. On the other hand, we found that surface potential fluctuation (σs) induced by interface charges for the AS-HO oxidant is much larger than that for a Si MOS capacitor with a SiO2 layer formed by chemical vapor deposition despite the small D it values for the AS-HO oxidant compared with the Si MOS capacitor. This means that the total charged center density including the fixed charge density, charged slow trap density, and charged interface trap density for the GaN MOS capacitor is higher than that for the Si MOS capacitor. Therefore, σs has to be reduced to improve the performances and reliability of GaN devices with the Al2O3/GaN interfaces.

  17. Atomic layer deposition on porous powders with in situ gravimetric monitoring in a modular fixed bed reactor setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strempel, V. E.; Naumann d'Alnoncourt, R.; Driess, M.; Rosowski, F.

    2017-07-01

    A modular setup for Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) on high-surface powder substrates in fixed bed reactors with a gravimetric in situ monitoring was developed. The design and operation are described in detail. An integrated magnetically suspended balance records mass changes during ALD. The highly versatile setup consists of three modular main units: a dosing unit, a reactor unit, and a downstream unit. The reactor unit includes the balance, a large fixed bed reactor, and a quartz crystal microbalance. The dosing unit is equipped with a complex manifold to deliver gases and gaseous reagents including three different ALD precursors, five oxidizing or reducing agents, and two purge gas lines. The system employs reactor temperatures and pressures in the range of 25-600 °C and 10-3 to 1 bar, respectively. Typically, powder batches between 100 mg and 50 g can be coated. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by coating mesoporous SiO2 powder with a thin AlOx (submono) layer using three cycles with trimethylaluminium and H2O. The self-limiting nature of the deposition has been verified with the in situ gravimetric monitoring and full saturation curves are presented. The process parameters were used for a scale-up in a large fixed bed reactor. The samples were analyzed with established analytics such as X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

  18. Impact of the atomic layer deposition precursors diffusion on solid-state carbon nanotube based supercapacitors performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Vollebregt, Sten; Tichelaar, F. D.; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Sarro, Pasqualina M.

    2015-02-01

    A study on the impact of atomic layer deposition (ALD) precursors diffusion on the performance of solid-state miniaturized nanostructure capacitor array is presented. Three-dimensional nanostructured capacitor array based on double conformal coating of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) bundles is realized using ALD to deposit Al2O3 as dielectric layer and TiN as high aspect-ratio conformal counter-electrode on 2 μm long MWCNT bundles. The devices have a small footprint (from 100 μm2 to 2500 μm2) and are realized using an IC wafer-scale manufacturing process with high reproducibility (≤0.3E-12F deviation). To evaluate the enhancement of the electrode surface, the measured capacitance values are compared to a lumped circuital model. The observed discrepancies are explained with a partial coating of the CNT, that determine a limited use of the available electrode surface area. To analyze the CNT coating effectiveness, the ALD precursors diffusions inside the CNT bundle is studied using a Knudsen diffusion mechanism.

  19. Thin films of copper oxide and copper grown by atomic layer deposition for applications in metallization systems of microelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waechtler, Thomas

    2010-05-25

    Copper-based multi-level metallization systems in today's ultralarge-scale integrated electronic circuits require the fabrication of diffusion barriers and conductive seed layers for the electrochemical metal deposition. Such films of only several nanometers in thickness have to be deposited void-free and conformal in patterned dielectrics. The envisaged further reduction of the geometric dimensions of the interconnect system calls for coating techniques that circumvent the drawbacks of the well-established physical vapor deposition. The atomic layer deposition method (ALD) allows depositing films on the nanometer scale conformally both on three-dimensional objects as well as on large-area substrates. The present work therefore is concerned with the development of an ALD process to grow copper oxide films based on the metal-organic precursor bis(trin- butylphosphane)copper(I)acetylacetonate [({sup n}Bu{sub 3}P){sub 2}Cu(acac)]. This liquid, non-fluorinated {beta}-diketonate is brought to react with a mixture of water vapor and oxygen at temperatures from 100 to 160 C. Typical ALD-like growth behavior arises between 100 and 130 C, depending on the respective substrate used. On tantalum nitride and silicon dioxide substrates, smooth films and selfsaturating film growth, typical for ALD, are obtained. On ruthenium substrates, positive deposition results are obtained as well. However, a considerable intermixing of the ALD copper oxide with the underlying films takes place. Tantalum substrates lead to a fast self-decomposition of the copper precursor. As a consequence, isolated nuclei or larger particles are always obtained together with continuous films. The copper oxide films grown by ALD can be reduced to copper by vapor-phase processes. If formic acid is used as the reducing agent, these processes can already be carried out at similar temperatures as the ALD, so that agglomeration of the films is largely avoided. Also for an integration with subsequent

  20. Fabrication of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes by atomic layer deposition and their photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chih-Chieh; Kei, Chi-Chung; Perng, Tsong-Pyng, E-mail: tpperng@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-07

    The formation of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes was conducted by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) gallium (GaQ{sub 3}) nanowires as a template at different substrate temperatures, 50, 100, and 200 deg. C. TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were formed only at 50 and 100 deg. C. Although a higher growth rate at 50 deg. C was observed, nanotubes with better uniformity, conformality, and less residual chloride were obtained at 100 deg. C because of a different formation mechanism. A photocatalysis test of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes prepared by different cycle numbers at 100 {sup 0}C was conducted. It showed that TiO{sub 2} nanotubes prepared by 400 cycles of ALD and treated at 700 deg. C for 1 h to form anatase phase had the best photocatalytic performance. Compared with P-25, the nanotubes showed higher photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B and water splitting efficiency.

  1. Optically sensitive devices based on Pt nano particles fabricated by atomic layer deposition and embedded in a dielectric stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhelashvili, V.; Padmanabhan, R.; Meyler, B.; Yofis, S.; Atiya, G.; Cohen-Hyams, Z.; Weindling, S.; Ankonina, G.; Salzman, J.; Kaplan, W. D.; Eisenstein, G.

    2015-10-01

    We report a series of metal insulator semiconductor devices with embedded Pt nano particles (NPs) fabricated using a low temperature atomic layer deposition process. Optically sensitive nonvolatile memory cells as well as optical sensors: (i) varactors, whose capacitance-voltage characteristics, nonlinearity, and peak capacitance are strongly dependent on illumination intensity; (ii) highly linear photo detectors whose responsivity is enhanced due to the Pt NPs. Both single devices and back to back pairs of diodes were used. The different configurations enable a variety of functionalities with many potential applications in biomedical sensing, environmental surveying, simple imagers for consumer electronics and military uses. The simplicity and planar configuration of the proposed devices makes them suitable for standard CMOS fabrication technology.

  2. Temperature and bias-voltage dependence of atomic-layer-deposited HfO{sub 2}-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabretti, Savio, E-mail: fabretti@physik.uni-bielefeld.de [Thin Films and Physics of Nanostructures, Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Zierold, Robert; Nielsch, Kornelius [Institute of Applied Physics, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Voigt, Carmen; Ronning, Carsten [Institute for Solid State Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Peretzki, Patrick; Seibt, Michael [4. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August University Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Thomas, Andy [Thin Films and Physics of Nanostructures, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld, Germany, and Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, Staudingerweg 9, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-09-29

    Magnetic tunnel junctions with HfO{sub 2} tunnel barriers were prepared through a combination of magnetron sputtering and atomic layer deposition. We investigated the tunneling transport behavior, including the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio and the current-voltage characteristics between room temperature and 2 K. Here, we achieved a tunneling magneto resistance ratio of 10.3% at room temperature and 19.3% at 2 K. Furthermore, we studied the bias-voltage and temperature dependencies and compared the results with those of commonly used alumina- and magnesia-based magnetic tunnel junctions. We observed a polycrystalline/amorphous electrode-barrier system via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  3. Surface chemistry of plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 studied by infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langereis, E.; Keijmel, J.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2008-06-01

    The surface groups created during plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3 were studied by infrared spectroscopy. For temperatures in the range of 25-150°C, -CH3 and -OH were unveiled as dominant surface groups after the Al(CH3)3 precursor and O2 plasma half-cycles, respectively. At lower temperatures more -OH and C-related impurities were found to be incorporated in the Al2O3 film, but the impurity level could be reduced by prolonging the plasma exposure. The results demonstrate that -OH surface groups rule the surface chemistry of the Al2O3 process and likely that of plasma-assisted ALD of metal oxides from organometallic precursors in general.

  4. Interfacial characteristics of Y2O3/GaSb(001) grown by molecular beam epitaxy and atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y. H.; Lin, K. Y.; Hsueh, W. J.; Young, L. B.; Chang, T. W.; Chyi, J. I.; Pi, T. W.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    2017-11-01

    High quality Y2O3 on GaSb was achieved using both molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) with interfacial characteristics studied by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) electrical measurements. Ga-oxide and stoichiometric Sb-oxides were obtained in the MBE-Y2O3/GaSb and non-stoichiometric Sb2Ox (x<4) was found in the ALD-Y2O3/GaSb according to the XPS spectra. From the capacitance-voltage (CV) measurements, MBE-Y2O3 provides lower interfacial trap density (Dit) grown at elevated temperature of 200°C, while ALD-grown Y2O3 shows smaller hysteresis and higher dielectric constant.

  5. Optically sensitive devices based on Pt nano particles fabricated by atomic layer deposition and embedded in a dielectric stack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhelashvili, V.; Padmanabhan, R.; Eisenstein, G. [Electrical Engineering Department, Technion, Haifa 3200 (Israel); Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion, Haifa 3200 (Israel); Meyler, B.; Yofis, S.; Weindling, S.; Salzman, J. [Electrical Engineering Department, Technion, Haifa 3200 (Israel); Atiya, G.; Cohen-Hyams, Z.; Kaplan, W. D. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Technion, Haifa 3200 (Israel); Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion, Haifa 3200 (Israel); Ankonina, G. [Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion, Haifa 3200 (Israel); Photovoltaic Laboratory, Technion, Haifa 3200 (Israel)

    2015-10-07

    We report a series of metal insulator semiconductor devices with embedded Pt nano particles (NPs) fabricated using a low temperature atomic layer deposition process. Optically sensitive nonvolatile memory cells as well as optical sensors: (i) varactors, whose capacitance-voltage characteristics, nonlinearity, and peak capacitance are strongly dependent on illumination intensity; (ii) highly linear photo detectors whose responsivity is enhanced due to the Pt NPs. Both single devices and back to back pairs of diodes were used. The different configurations enable a variety of functionalities with many potential applications in biomedical sensing, environmental surveying, simple imagers for consumer electronics and military uses. The simplicity and planar configuration of the proposed devices makes them suitable for standard CMOS fabrication technology.

  6. Nucleation and growth of MgO atomic layer deposition: A real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Han; Fu, Kan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269. (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of MgO thin films from bis(cyclopentadienyl) magnesium and H{sub 2}O was studied using in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), ex-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. It is found that the initial growth is not linear during the first ten cycles, and magnesium silicate forms spontaneously on the SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates at 250 °C. Submonolayer sensitivity of SE is demonstrated by the analysis of each half-cycle and self-limiting adsorption, revealing characteristic features of hetero- and homo-MgO ALD processes.

  7. Recent Progresses and Development of Advanced Atomic Layer Deposition towards High-Performance Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Lu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrode materials and electrolytes play a vital role in device-level performance of rechargeable Li-ion batteries (LIBs. However, electrode structure/component degeneration and electrode-electrolyte sur-/interface evolution are identified as the most crucial obstacles in practical applications. Thanks to its congenital advantages, atomic layer deposition (ALD methodology has attracted enormous attention in advanced LIBs. This review mainly focuses upon the up-to-date progress and development of the ALD in high-performance LIBs. The significant roles of the ALD in rational design and fabrication of multi-dimensional nanostructured electrode materials, and finely tailoring electrode-electrolyte sur-/interfaces are comprehensively highlighted. Furthermore, we clearly envision that this contribution will motivate more extensive and insightful studies in the ALD to considerably improve Li-storage behaviors. Future trends and prospects to further develop advanced ALD nanotechnology in next-generation LIBs were also presented.

  8. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanotubes/chitosan hybrids on Ti implants by atom layer deposited ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yizhou; Liu, Xiangmei; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Chu, Paul K.; Wu, Shuilin

    2017-04-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ZnO using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on chitosan (CS) modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were first introduced onto the surfaces of biomedical implants. When the content of ZnO is not sufficient, CNTs can strengthen the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus by 8% and 39%, respectively. CS can improve the cytocompatibility of CNTs and ZnO. The amount of Zn content can be controlled by changing the cycling numbers of ALD processes. This hybrid coating can not only endow medical implants with high self-antibacterial efficacy against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) of over 73% and 98%, respectively, but also regulate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts by controlling the amount of ZnO.

  9. Synthesis of carbon nanotube-nickel nanocomposites using atomic layer deposition for high-performance non-enzymatic glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Taejin; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hangil; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Eunkyoung; Park, Jusang; Kim, Hyungjun

    2015-01-15

    A useful strategy has been developed to fabricate carbon-nanotube-nickel (CNT-Ni) nanocomposites through atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Ni and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of functionalized CNTs. Various techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), were used to characterize the morphology and the structure of as-prepared samples. It was confirmed that the products possess uniform Ni nanoparticles that are constructed by finely controlled deposition of Ni onto oxygen or bromine functionalized CNT surface. Electrochemical studies indicate that the CNT-Ni nanocomposites exhibit high electrocatalytic activity for glucose oxidation in alkaline solutions, which enables the products to be used in enzyme-free electrochemical sensors for glucose determination. It was demonstrated that the CNT-Ni nanocomposite-based glucose biosensor offers a variety of merits, such as a wide linear response window for glucose concentrations of 5 μM-2 mM, short response time (3 s), a low detection limit (2 μM), high sensitivity (1384.1 μA mM(-1) cm(-2)), and good selectivity and repeatability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Interface charge trapping induced flatband voltage shift during plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition in through silicon via

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunlong; Suhard, Samuel; Van Huylenbroeck, Stefaan; Meersschaut, Johan; Van Besien, Els; Stucchi, Michele; Croes, Kristof; Beyer, Gerald; Beyne, Eric

    2017-12-01

    A Through Silicon Via (TSV) is a key component for 3D integrated circuit stacking technology, and the diameter of a TSV keeps scaling down to reduce the footprint in silicon. The TSV aspect ratio, defined as the TSV depth/diameter, tends to increase consequently. Starting from the aspect ratio of 10, to improve the TSV sidewall coverage and reduce the process thermal budget, the TSV dielectric liner deposition process has evolved from sub-atmospheric chemical vapour deposition to plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD). However, with this change, a strong negative shift in the flatband voltage is observed in the capacitance-voltage characteristic of the vertical metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) parasitic capacitor formed between the TSV copper metal and the p-Si substrate. And, no shift is present in planar MOS capacitors manufactured with the same PE-ALD oxide. By comparing the integration process of these two MOS capacitor structures, and by using Elastic Recoil Detection to study the elemental composition of our films, it is found that the origin of the negative flatband voltage shift is the positive charge trapping at the Si/SiO2 interface, due to the positive PE-ALD reactants confined to the narrow cavity of high aspect ratio TSVs. This interface charge trapping effect can be effectively mitigated by high temperature annealing. However, this is limited in the real process due to the high thermal budget. Further investigation on liner oxide process optimization is needed.

  11. Atomic Layer Deposition of CdS Quantum Dots for Solid-State Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2011-10-04

    Functioning quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells have been fabricated using the vacuum deposition technique atomic layer deposition (ALD). Utilizing the incubation period of CdS growth by ALD on TiO 2, we are able to grow QDs of adjustable size which act as sensitizers for solid-state QDsensitized solar cells (ssQDSSC). The size of QDs, studied with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), varied with the number of ALD cycles from 1-10 nm. Photovoltaic devices with the QDs were fabricated and characterized using a ssQDSSC device architecture with 2,2\\',7,7\\'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p methoxyphenylamine) 9,9\\'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD) as the solid-state hole conductor. The ALD approach described here can be applied to fabrication of quantum-confined structures for a variety of applications, including solar electricity and solar fuels. Because ALD provides the ability to deposit many materials in very high aspect ratio substrates, this work introduces a strategy by which material and optical properties of QD sensitizers may be adjusted not only by the size of the particles but also in the future by the composition. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Atomic Layer Deposition of Pt Nanoparticles within the Cages of MIL-101: A Mild and Recyclable Hydrogenation Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Leus

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the in situ synthesis of Pt nanoparticles within MIL-101-Cr (MIL = Materials Institute Lavoisier by means of atomic layer deposition (ALD. The obtained Pt@MIL-101 materials were characterized by means of N2 adsorption and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD measurements, showing that the structure of the metal organic framework was well preserved during the ALD deposition. X-ray fluorescence (XRF and transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis confirmed the deposition of highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles with sizes determined by the MIL-101-Cr pore sizes and with an increased Pt loading for an increasing number of ALD cycles. The Pt@MIL-101 material was examined as catalyst in the hydrogenation of different linear and cyclic olefins at room temperature, showing full conversion for each substrate. Moreover, even under solvent free conditions, full conversion of the substrate was observed. A high concentration test has been performed showing that the Pt@MIL-101 is stable for a long reaction time without loss of activity, crystallinity and with very low Pt leaching.

  13. Brookite TiO2 thin film epitaxially grown on (110) YSZ substrate by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dai-Hong; Kim, Won-Sik; Kim, Sungtae; Hong, Seong-Hyeon

    2014-08-13

    Epitaxial brookite TiO2 (B-TiO2) film was deposited on (110) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, and its structural, optical, and gas sensing properties were investigated. As-deposited TiO2 film was a pure brookite and (120) oriented. The determined in-plane orientation relationships were [21̅0]B-TiO2//[1̅10]YSZ and [001]B-TiO2 //[001]YSZ. The B-TiO2 film showed ∼70% transmittance and the optical band gap energy was 3.29 eV. The B-TiO2 film-based gas sensor responded to H2 gas even at room temperature and the highest magnitude of the gas response was determined to be ∼150 toward 1000 ppm of H2/air at 150 °C. In addition, B-TiO2 sensor showed a high selectivity for H2 against CO, EtOH, and NH3.

  14. Impact of post-deposition annealing on interfacial chemical bonding states between AlGaN and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Center of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Hong, E-mail: ewanghong@ntu.edu.sg [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Center of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); CINTRA CNRS/NTU/Thales, UMI 3288, 50 Nanyang Drive (Singapore); Ng, Serene Lay Geok; Ji, Rong [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A-STAR), 5 Engineering Drive 1, 117608 (Singapore); Liu, Zhi Hong [Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, 1 CREATE Way, Singapore 138602 (Singapore)

    2015-03-02

    The effect of post-deposition annealing on chemical bonding states at interface between Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is studied by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It has been found that both of Al-O/Al 2p and Ga-O/Ga 3d area ratio decrease at annealing temperatures lower than 500 °C, which could be attributed to “clean up” effect of ALD-ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN. Compared to Ga spectra, a much larger decrease in Al-O/Al 2p ratio at a smaller take-off angle θ is observed, which indicates higher effectiveness of the passivation of Al-O bond than Ga-O bond through “clean up” effect near the interface. However, degradation of ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface quality due to re-oxidation at higher annealing temperature (>500 °C) is also found. The XPS spectra clearly reveal that Al atoms at ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface are easier to get oxidized as compared with Ga atoms.

  15. Surface chemistry of group 11 atomic layer deposition precursors on silica using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallister, Peter J.; Barry, Seán T.

    2017-02-01

    The use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) as thin film deposition techniques has had a major impact on a number of fields. The deposition of pure, uniform, conformal thin films requires very specific vapour-solid reactivity that is largely unknown for the majority of ALD and CVD precursors. This work examines the initial chemisorption of several thin film vapour deposition precursors on high surface area silica (HSAS) using 13C, 31P, and quantitative 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two copper metal precursors, 1,3-diisopropyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper (I) hexamethyldisilazide (1) and 1,3-diethyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper(I) hexamethyldisilazide (2), and one gold metal precursor, trimethylphosphine gold(III) trimethyl (3), are examined. Compounds 1 and 2 were found to chemisorb at the hydroxyl surface-reactive sites to form a ||-O-Cu-NHC surface species and fully methylated silicon (||-SiMe3, due to reactivity of the hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) ligand on the precursor) at 150 °C and 250 °C. From quantitative 29Si solid-state NMR (SS-NMR) spectroscopy measurements, it was found that HMDS preferentially reacts at geminal disilanol surface sites while the copper surface species preferentially chemisorbed to lone silanol surface species. Additionally, the overall coverage was strongly dependent on temperature, with higher overall coverage of 1 at higher temperature but lower overall coverage of 2 at higher temperature. The chemisorption of 3 was found to produce a number of interesting surface species on HSAS. Gold(III) trimethylphosphine, reduced gold phosphine, methylated phosphoxides, and graphitic carbon were all observed as surface species. The overall coverage of 3 on HSAS was only about 10% at 100 °C and, like the copper compounds, had a preference for lone silanol surface reactive sites. The overall coverage and chemisorbed surface species have implications to the overall growth rate and purity of

  16. Microscratch testing method for systematic evaluation of the adhesion of atomic layer deposited thin films on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilpi, Lauri, E-mail: Lauri.Kilpi@vtt.fi; Ylivaara, Oili M. E.; Vaajoki, Antti; Puurunen, Riikka L.; Ronkainen, Helena [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Malm, Jari [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, Jyväskylä 40014 (Finland); Sintonen, Sakari [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University School of Electrical Engineering, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 AALTO (Finland); Tuominen, Marko [ASM Microchemistry Oy, Pietari Kalmin katu 1 F 2, FIN-00560 Helsinki (Finland)

    2016-01-15

    The scratch test method is widely used for adhesion evaluation of thin films and coatings. Usual critical load criteria designed for scratch testing of coatings were not applicable to thin atomic layer deposition (ALD) films on silicon wafers. Thus, the bases for critical load evaluation were established and the critical loads suitable for ALD coating adhesion evaluation on silicon wafers were determined in this paper as L{sub CSi1}, L{sub CSi2}, L{sub CALD1}, and L{sub CALD2}, representing the failure points of the silicon substrate and the coating delamination points of the ALD coating. The adhesion performance of the ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, TiN, and TaCN+Ru coatings with a thickness range between 20 and 600 nm and deposition temperature between 30 and 410 °C on silicon wafers was investigated. In addition, the impact of the annealing process after deposition on adhesion was evaluated for selected cases. The tests carried out using scratch and Scotch tape test showed that the coating deposition and annealing temperature, thickness of the coating, and surface pretreatments of the Si wafer had an impact on the adhesion performance of the ALD coatings on the silicon wafer. There was also an improved load carrying capacity due to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the magnitude of which depended on the coating thickness and the deposition temperature. The tape tests were carried out for selected coatings as a comparison. The results show that the scratch test is a useful and applicable tool for adhesion evaluation of ALD coatings, even when carried out for thin (20 nm thick) coatings.

  17. Non-destructive functionalisation for atomic layer deposition of metal oxides on carbon nanotubes: effect of linking agents and defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemnade, N.; Shearer, C. J.; Dieterle, D. J.; Cherevan, A. S.; Gebhardt, P.; Wilde, G.; Eder, D.

    2015-02-01

    The hybridisation of metal oxides and nanocarbons has created a promising new class of functional materials for environmental and sustainable energy applications. The performance of such hybrids can be further improved by rationally designing interfaces and morphologies. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is among the most powerful techniques for the controlled deposition of inorganic compounds, due to its ability to form conformal coatings on porous substrates at low temperatures with high surface sensitivity and atomic control of film thickness. The hydrophobic nature of the nanocarbon surface has so far limited the applicability of ALD on CNTs. Herein we investigate the role of structural defects in CNTs, both intrinsic and induced by acid treatment, on coverage, uniformity and crystallinity of ZnO coatings. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of small aromatic molecules, including benzyl alcohol (BA), naphthalene carboxylic acid (NA) and pyrene carboxylic acid (PCA), as active nucleation sites and linking agents. Importantly, only PCA exhibits sufficiently strong interactions with the pristine CNT surface to withstand desorption under reaction conditions. Thus, PCA enables a versatile and non-destructive alternative route for the deposition of highly uniform metal oxide coatings onto pristine CNTs via ALD over a wide temperature range and without the typical surface corrosion induced by covalent functionalisation. Importantly, preliminary tests demonstrated that the improved morphology obtained with PCA has indeed considerably increased the hybrid's photocatalytic activity towards hydrogen evolution via sacrificial water splitting. The concept demonstrated in this work is transferable to a wide range of other inorganic compounds including metal oxides, metal (oxy)nitrides and metal chalcogenides on a variety of nanocarbons.The hybridisation of metal oxides and nanocarbons has created a promising new class of functional materials for environmental and

  18. Comparison of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and BN deposited by atomic layer deposition for forming ultrashallow dopant regions by solid state diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consiglio, Steven, E-mail: steve.consiglio@us.tel.com; Clark, Robert D.; O' Meara, David; Wajda, Cory S.; Tapily, Kandabara; Leusink, Gert J. [TEL Technology Center, America, LLC, 255 Fuller Rd., Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the authors investigated atomic layer deposition (ALD) of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and BN for conformal, ultrashallow B doping applications and compared the effect of dopant-containing overlayers on sheet resistance (R{sub s}) and B profiles for both types of films subjected to a drive-in thermal anneal. For the deposition of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, tris(dimethylamido)borane and O{sub 3} were used as coreactants and for the deposition of BN, BCl{sub 3} and NH{sub 3} were used as coreactants. Due to the extreme air instability of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} films, physical analysis was performed on B{sub 2}O{sub 3} films, which were capped in-situ with ∼30 Å ALD grown Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers. For the BN films, in-situ ALD grown Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} capping layers (∼30 Å) were used for comparison. From spectroscopic ellipsometry, a thickness decrease was observed after 1000 °C, 30 s anneal for the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} containing stack with 60 ALD cycles of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, whereas the BN containing stacks showed negligible thickness decrease after the annealing step, regardless of the number of BN cycles tested. The postanneal reduction in film thickness as well as decrease in R{sub s} for the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} containing stack suggests that the solid state diffusion dopant mechanism is effective, whereas for the BN containing stacks this phenomenon seems to be suppressed. Further clarification of the effectiveness of the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} containing layer compared to the film stacks with BN was evidenced in backside secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling of B atoms. Thus, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed by an ALD process and subsequently capped in-situ followed by a drive-in anneal offers promise as a dopant source for ultrashallow doping, whereas the same method using BN seems ineffective. An integrated approach for B{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition and annealing on a clustered tool also demonstrated controllable R{sub s} reduction without the use of a capping layer.

  19. Atomic layer deposition of VO{sub 2} films with Tetrakis-dimethyl-amino vanadium (IV) as vanadium precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Xinrui [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials CAS, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Cao, Yunzhen, E-mail: yzhcao@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials CAS, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Yan, Lu; Li, Ying; Song, Lixin [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials CAS, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • VO{sub 2} film was easily deposited by ALD using novel vanadium precursor V(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4}. • Deposition and annealing condition were systematically investigated. • Comparable transition properties of VO{sub 2} film on resistance and spectral transmittance were studied. - Abstract: VO{sub 2} thin films have been grown on Si(100) (VO{sub 2}/Si) and fused silica substrates (VO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tetrakis-dimethyl-amino vanadium (IV) (TDMAV) as a novel vanadium precursor and water as reactant gas. The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurement was performed to study the ALD process of VO{sub 2} thin film deposition, and a constant growth rate of about 0.95 Å/cycle was obtained at the temperature range of 150–200 °C. XRD measurement was performed to study the influence of deposition temperature and post-annealing condition on the crystallization of VO{sub 2} films, which indicated that the films deposited between 150 and 200 °C showed well crystallinity after annealing at 475 °C for 100 min in Ar atmosphere. XPS measurement verified that the vanadium oxidation state was 4+ for both as-deposited film and post-annealed VO{sub 2}/Si film. AFM was applied to study the surface morphology of VO{sub 2}/Si films, which showed a dense polycrystalline film with roughness of about 1 nm. The resistance of VO{sub 2}/Si films deposited between 150 °C and 200 °C as a function of temperature showed similar semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT) characters with the transition temperature for heating branch (T{sub c,h}) of about 72 °C, a hysteresis width of about 10 °C and the resistance change of two orders of magnitude. The increase of T{sub c,h} compared with the bulk VO{sub 2} (68 °C) may be attributed to the tensile stress along the c-axis in the film. Transmittance measurement of VO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} films showed typical thermochromic property with a NIR switching efficiency of above 50% at 2 μm across

  20. ZnO/Al:ZnO Transparent Resistive Switching Devices Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition for Memristor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundle, Rajeh; Carvajal, Christian; Pradhan, Aswini K

    2016-05-17

    ZnO has intrinsic semiconductor conductivity because of an unintentional doping mechanism resulting from the growth process that is mainly attributable to oxygen vacancies (VO) positioned in the bandgap. ZnO has multiple electronic states that depend on the number of vacancies and the charge state of each vacancy. In addition to the individual electron states, the vacancies have different vibrational states. We developed a high-temperature precursor vapor mask technique using Al2O3 to pattern the atomic layer deposition of ZnO and Al:ZnO layers on ZnO-based substrates. This technique was used to create a memristor device based on Al:ZnO thin films having metallic and semiconducting and insulating transport properties ZnO. We demonstrated that adding combination of Al2O3 and TiO2 barrier layers improved the resistive switching behavior. The change in the resistance between the high- and low-resistivity states of the memristor with a combination of Al2O3 and TiO2 was approximately 157%. The devices were exposed to laser light from three different laser diodes. The 450 nm laser diode noticeably affected the combined Al2O3 and TiO2 barrier, creating a high-resistivity state with a 2.9% shift under illumination. The high-resistivity state shift under laser illumination indicates defect shifts and the thermodynamic transition of ZnO defects.

  1. Wafer-scale single-domain-like graphene by defect-selective atomic layer deposition of hexagonal ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Sun; Kim, Sejoon; Kim, Hongbum; Kwon, Deokhyeon; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Min, Sung-Wook; Im, Seongil; Choi, Hyoung Joon; Lim, Seulky; Shin, Hyunjung; Koo, Sang Man; Sung, Myung Mo

    2015-10-01

    Large-area graphene films produced by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are polycrystalline and thus contain numerous grain boundaries that can greatly degrade their performance and produce inhomogeneous properties. A better grain boundary engineering in CVD graphene is essential to realize the full potential of graphene in large-scale applications. Here, we report a defect-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) for stitching grain boundaries of CVD graphene with ZnO so as to increase the connectivity between grains. In the present ALD process, ZnO with a hexagonal wurtzite structure was selectively grown mainly on the defect-rich grain boundaries to produce ZnO-stitched CVD graphene with well-connected grains. For the CVD graphene film after ZnO stitching, the inter-grain mobility is notably improved with only a little change in the free carrier density. We also demonstrate how ZnO-stitched CVD graphene can be successfully integrated into wafer-scale arrays of top-gated field-effect transistors on 4-inch Si and polymer substrates, revealing remarkable device-to-device uniformity.Large-area graphene films produced by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are polycrystalline and thus contain numerous grain boundaries that can greatly degrade their performance and produce inhomogeneous properties. A better grain boundary engineering in CVD graphene is essential to realize the full potential of graphene in large-scale applications. Here, we report a defect-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) for stitching grain boundaries of CVD graphene with ZnO so as to increase the connectivity between grains. In the present ALD process, ZnO with a hexagonal wurtzite structure was selectively grown mainly on the defect-rich grain boundaries to produce ZnO-stitched CVD graphene with well-connected grains. For the CVD graphene film after ZnO stitching, the inter-grain mobility is notably improved with only a little change in the free carrier density. We also

  2. Subnanometer Ga 2 O 3 Tunnelling Layer by Atomic Layer Deposition to Achieve 1.1 V Open-Circuit Potential in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chandiran, Aravind Kumar

    2012-08-08

    Herein, we present the first use of a gallium oxide tunnelling layer to significantly reduce electron recombination in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC). The subnanometer coating is achieved using atomic layer deposition (ALD) and leading to a new DSC record open-circuit potential of 1.1 V with state-of-the-art organic D-π-A sensitizer and cobalt redox mediator. After ALD of only a few angstroms of Ga 2O 3, the electron back reaction is reduced by more than an order of magnitude, while charge collection efficiency and fill factor are increased by 30% and 15%, respectively. The photogenerated exciton separation processes of electron injection into the TiO 2 conduction band and the hole injection into the electrolyte are characterized in detail. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Surface Passivation of MoO3 Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition Towards High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2015-06-03

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in Lithium (Li) ion batteries at high rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g, on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li–ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex–situ HRTEM, X–ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and X–ray diffraction was carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  4. Enabling high solubility of ZnO in TiO2 by nanolamination of atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, C.-Y.; Wang, C.-C.; Hsueh, Y.-C.; Gurylev, V.; Kei, C.-C.; Perng, T.-P.

    2015-11-01

    Zn-doped TiO2 nanotubes were fabricated by nanolaminated packing of alternating layers of TiO2 and ZnO by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using a polycarbonate (PC) membrane as a template. With 400 cycles of ALD, the nanotubes with a thickness of 28 nm and an outer diameter of 220 nm were obtained after removing the PC membrane by annealing at 450 °C. The doping concentration of ZnO in TiO2 depends on the precursor cycle ratio of ZnO to TiO2. With the precursor cycle ratio of ZnO : TiO2 at 0.04, a uniform bulk solubility of ~8 at% is obtained, and the surface concentration of Zn is even higher, ~16 at%. From the depth profiles measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, Zn is uniformly distributed across the thickness, which is further confirmed by analyses of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, from the transmission electron microscopic observation, the highly doped anatase TiO2 exhibits some regions of severe deformation that results in localized solid-state amorphization.Zn-doped TiO2 nanotubes were fabricated by nanolaminated packing of alternating layers of TiO2 and ZnO by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using a polycarbonate (PC) membrane as a template. With 400 cycles of ALD, the nanotubes with a thickness of 28 nm and an outer diameter of 220 nm were obtained after removing the PC membrane by annealing at 450 °C. The doping concentration of ZnO in TiO2 depends on the precursor cycle ratio of ZnO to TiO2. With the precursor cycle ratio of ZnO : TiO2 at 0.04, a uniform bulk solubility of ~8 at% is obtained, and the surface concentration of Zn is even higher, ~16 at%. From the depth profiles measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, Zn is uniformly distributed across the thickness, which is further confirmed by analyses of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, from the transmission electron microscopic observation, the highly doped anatase TiO2

  5. Tribological Properties of Nanometric Atomic Layer Depositions Applied on AISI 420 Stainless Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    E. Marin; A. Lanzutti; L. Fedrizzi

    2013-01-01

    .... In this work, mono- and bi -layer nanometric, protective low-temperature ALD Coatings, based on Al2O3 and TiO2 were applied on AISI 420 Stainless Steel in orderto enhance its relatively low corrosion...

  6. Quasi-metallic behavior of ZnO grown by atomic layer deposition: The role of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, Holger; Hiller, Daniel; Bruns, Michael; Welle, Alexander; Becker, Hans-Werner; Berghoff, Birger; Sürgers, Christoph; Merz, Rolf; Zacharias, Margit

    2017-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is intrinsically well-conductive (˜5 mΩ cm), in contrast to the single-crystalline bulk material or sputtered ZnO thin films. There are generally three groups of candidates for the intrinsic n-type conductivity: intrinsic point defects, elemental impurities other than hydrogen, and incorporated hydrogen itself. In this study, we assess the different candidates concerning their impact on conductivity. In the presence of free electron densities of up to 5 × 1019 cm-3, impurities other than hydrogen are ruled out due to their ultra-low concentrations in the ppm range. Intrinsic point defects are also considered unlikely since the evolution of conductivity with deposition temperature is not reproduced in the Zn/O ratio as measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Hence, the most promising candidate is hydrogen with a concentration of ˜1 at. %, i.e., more than sufficient to account for the free electron density. In addition, we find a correlation between the deposition-temperature dependence of the carrier concentration and the hydrogen concentration. The formation energy of the conductive, hydrogen-related state is determined to be ˜40 meV. Hall measurements down to liquid helium temperatures revealed that the electron densities are constant over the whole temperature range. This constitutes a quasi-metallic behavior of ALD-ZnO for deposition temperatures of ≥150 °C. We propose that the very high concentration of hydrogen-induced donor states causes a vanishing ionization energy so that the donor band merges energetically with the ZnO conduction band. This model is supported by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurements.

  7. Growth characteristics and properties of indium oxide and indium-doped zinc oxide by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Donghyun; Nam, Taewook; Park, Jusang [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Gatineau, Julien [Air Liquide Laboratories, 28 Wadai, Tsukuba 300-4247 (Japan); Kim, Hyungjun, E-mail: hyungjun@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    We investigated the growth of indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and indium-doped zinc oxide (In-doped ZnO, IZO) thin films synthesized using thermal atomic layer deposition with dimethylamino-dimethylindium as the precursor, while varying the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ZnO ratio. The IZO films were deposited using the supercycle method, and the doping concentration of these films was controlled by changing the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ZnO cycle ratio. The microstructural properties and chemical compositions of the films were analyzed using X-ray diffraction analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Further, the electrical properties of the IZO films, including their carrier concentration, mobility, and resistivity, were investigated through Hall measurements. The lowest resistivity (6.15 × 10{sup −2} Ω·cm) was exhibited by the IZO film. The highest carrier concentration and mobility exhibited by the IZO films grown at 300 °C were 4.4 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and 28.7 cm{sup 2}/V·s, respectively. - Highlights: • Indium oxide and In-doped ZnO (IZO) were deposited using thermal ALD with DMLDMIn. • In doped ZnO (IZO) was deposited using thermal ALD using supercycle method. • Properties of IZO were investigated as a function of doping concentration. • The lowest resistivity can be obtained at the maximum In solubility of ZnO.

  8. Redeposition in plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition: Silicon nitride film quality ruled by the gas residence time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoops, Harm C. M., E-mail: h.c.m.knoops@tue.nl, E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, North End, Bristol BS49 4AP (United Kingdom); Peuter, K. de; Kessels, W. M. M., E-mail: h.c.m.knoops@tue.nl, E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-07-06

    The requirements on the material properties and growth control of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) spacer films in transistors are becoming ever more stringent as scaling of transistor structures continues. One method to deposit high-quality films with excellent control is atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, depositing SiN{sub x} by ALD has turned out to be very challenging. In this work, it is shown that the plasma gas residence time τ is a key parameter for the deposition of SiN{sub x} by plasma-assisted ALD and that this parameter can be linked to a so-called “redeposition effect”. This previously ignored effect, which takes place during the plasma step, is the dissociation of reaction products in the plasma and the subsequent redeposition of reaction-product fragments on the surface. For SiN{sub x} ALD using SiH{sub 2}(NH{sup t}Bu){sub 2} as precursor and N{sub 2} plasma as reactant, the gas residence time τ was found to determine both SiN{sub x} film quality and the resulting growth per cycle. It is shown that redeposition can be minimized by using a short residence time resulting in high-quality films with a high wet-etch resistance (i.e., a wet-etch rate of 0.5 nm/min in buffered HF solution). Due to the fundamental nature of the redeposition effect, it is expected to play a role in many more plasma-assisted ALD processes.

  9. Evaluation of Alternative Atomistic Models for the Incipient Growth of ZnO by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Manh-Hung; Tian, Liang; Chaker, Ahmad; Skopin, Evgenii; Cantelli, Valentina; Ouled, Toufik; Boichot, Raphaël; Crisci, Alexandre; Lay, Sabine; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Thomas, Olivier; Deschanvres, Jean-Luc; Renevier, Hubert; Fong, Dillon; Ciatto, Gianluca

    2017-06-01

    ZnO thin films are interesting for applications in several technological fields, including optoelectronics and renewable energies. Nanodevice applications require controlled synthesis of ZnO structures at nanometer scale, which can be achieved via atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, the mechanisms governing the initial stages of ALD had not been addressed until very recently. Investigations into the initial nucleation and growth as well as the atomic structure of the heterointerface are crucial to optimize the ALD process and understand the structure-property relationships for ZnO. We have used a complementary suite of in situ synchrotron x-ray techniques to investigate both the structural and chemical evolution during ZnO growth by ALD on two different substrates, i.e., SiO2 and Al2O3, which led us to formulate an atomistic model of the incipient growth of ZnO. The model relies on the formation of nanoscale islands of different size and aspect ratio and consequent disorder induced in the Zn neighbors' distribution. However, endorsement of our model requires testing and discussion of possible alternative models which could account for the experimental results. In this work, we review, test, and rule out several alternative models; the results confirm our view of the atomistic mechanisms at play, which influence the overall microstructure and resulting properties of the final thin film.

  10. Evaluation of Alternative Atomistic Models for the Incipient Growth of ZnO by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Manh-Hung; Tian, Liang; Chaker, Ahmad; Skopin, Evgenii; Cantelli, Valentina; Ouled, Toufik; Boichot, Raphaël; Crisci, Alexandre; Lay, Sabine; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Thomas, Olivier; Deschanvres, Jean-Luc; Renevier, Hubert; Fong, Dillon; Ciatto, Gianluca

    2017-03-20

    ZnO thin films are interesting for applications in several technological fields, including optoelectronics and renewable energies. Nanodevice applications require controlled synthesis of ZnO structures at nanometer scale, which can be achieved via atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, the mechanisms governing the initial stages of ALD had not been addressed until very recently. Investigations into the initial nucleation and growth as well as the atomic structure of the heterointerface are crucial to optimize the ALD process and understand the structure-property relationships for ZnO. We have used a complementary suite of in situ synchrotron x-ray techniques to investigate both the structural and chemical evolution during ZnO growth by ALD on two different substrates, i.e., SiO2 and Al2O3, which led us to formulate an atomistic model of the incipient growth of ZnO. The model relies on the formation of nanoscale islands of different size and aspect ratio and consequent disorder induced in the Zn neighbors' distribution. However, endorsement of our model requires testing and discussion of possible alternative models which could account for the experimental results. In this work, we review, test, and rule out several alternative models; the results confirm our view of the atomistic mechanisms at play, which influence the overall microstructure and resulting properties of the final thin film.

  11. Reducing adhesion force by means of atomic layer deposition of ZnO films with nanoscale surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Zhimin; Liu, Yuhong; Lu, Xinchun; He, Dannong

    2014-03-12

    Adhesion is a big concern for the design of Si-based microelectromechanical devices. A ZnO film with nanoscale surface roughness is a promising candidate to decrease adhesion as the protective coating. In this study, the adhesion force of ZnO films prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a Si (100) substrate was studied. The root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the ZnO films was in the range of 0.7-4.28 nm, and the contact angle of water was in the range of 85-88°. The adhesion force was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at both low (12%) and high (60%) relative humidities. The results show that the adhesion force decreases as the surface roughness increases. A low adhesion force at high RMS roughness is attributed to the large asperities on the film, and a large adhesion force at high humidity is attributed to the large capillary force. The experimental adhesion force was compared to the force calculated using the Rabinovich model. Although the theoretical value underestimates the experimental value, the proportion of the two components of the adhesion force is clearly shown. At the low humidity, the van der Waals force component differs not greatly with the capillary force component, while at the high humidity, the capillary force component becomes dominant.

  12. The annealing effect on work function variation of WN{sub x}C{sub y} films deposited by remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunjung; Shin, Changhee; Lim, Heewoo; Kim, Manseok [Department of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Woochool; Lee, Kunyoung [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yuh, Junhan [Division of Steel Solution, POSCO, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyeongtag [Department of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Tungsten-nitrogen-carbide (WN{sub x}C{sub y}) thin films were investigated as the metal gate of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices. WN{sub x}C{sub y} thin films were deposited by employing the remote plasma atomic layer deposition (RPALD) using a bis(tert-butylimido) bis (dimethylamido) tungsten (BTBMW) precursor and hydrogen plasma as a reactant. The growth rate of the WN{sub x}C{sub y} films was about 0.12 nm/cycle. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that the films consisted of a mixture of tungsten carbide and tungsten nitride phases. The atomic force microscope (AFM) analysis further confirmed that the WN{sub x}C{sub y} film surfaces deposited by RPALD were smooth. In addition, the chemical bonding state analysis showed that the WN{sub x}C{sub y} films consisted of WN, WC, and WO phases. To measure the work function of the WN{sub x}C{sub y} film, a MOSCAP (metal oxide semiconductor capacitor) stack was fabricated and the flat band voltage was measured by current-voltage (C-V) measurements. A WN{sub x}C{sub y} work function value of 4.91 eV was suitable for p-MOS and the work function of the WN{sub x}C{sub y} films varied depending on the annealing treatment, and was higher than the work function of the as-deposited WN{sub x}C{sub y} film. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Atomic-Layer-Deposited SnO2 as Gate Electrode for Indium-Free Transparent Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Alshammari, Fwzah Hamud

    2017-08-04

    Atomic-layer-deposited SnO2 is used as a gate electrode to replace indium tin oxide (ITO) in thin-film transistors and circuits for the first time. The SnO2 films deposited at 200 °C show low electrical resistivity of ≈3.1 × 10−3 Ω cm with ≈93% transparency in most of the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Thin-film transistors fabricated with SnO2 gates show excellent transistor properties including saturation mobility of 15.3 cm2 V−1 s−1, a low subthreshold swing of ≈130 mV dec−1, a high on/off ratio of ≈109, and an excellent electrical stability under constant-voltage stressing conditions to the gate terminal. Moreover, the SnO2-gated thin-film transistors show excellent electrical characteristics when used in electronic circuits such as negative channel metal oxide semiconductor (NMOS) inverters and ring oscillators. The NMOS inverters exhibit a low propagation stage delay of ≈150 ns with high DC voltage gain of ≈382. A high oscillation frequency of ≈303 kHz is obtained from the output sinusoidal signal of the 11-stage NMOS inverter-based ring oscillators. These results show that SnO2 can effectively replace ITO in transparent electronics and sensor applications.

  14. Temperature and electric field induced metal-insulator transition in atomic layer deposited VO2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadjer, Marko J.; Wheeler, Virginia D.; Downey, Brian P.; Robinson, Zachary R.; Meyer, David J.; Eddy, Charles R.; Kub, Fritz J.

    2017-10-01

    Amorphous vanadium oxide (VO2) films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were crystallized with an ex situ anneal at 660-670 °C for 1-2 h under a low oxygen pressure (10-4 to 10-5 Torr). Under these conditions the crystalline VO2 phase was maintained, while formation of the V2O5 phase was suppressed. Electrical transition from the insulator to the metallic phase was observed in the 37-60 °C range, with an ROFF/RON ratio of up to about 750 and ΔTC ≅ 7-10 °C. Lateral electric field applied across two-terminal device structures induced a reversible phase change, with a room temperature transition field of about 25 kV/cm in the VO2 sample processed with the 2 h long O2 anneal. Both the width and slope of the field induced MIT I-V hysteresis were dependent upon the VO2 crystalline quality.

  15. Electrical and optical properties of Ti doped ZnO films grown on glass substrate by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Zhixin [School of Convergence Science, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeong-Dong, Geumjeong-Gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kwack, Won-Sub [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Materials R and D Center, SK Innovation, Daejeon 305-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woo-Jae; Jang, Seung-II [School of Convergence Science, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeong-Dong, Geumjeong-Gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye-Ri; Kim, Jin-Woong [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Materials R and D Center, SK Innovation, Daejeon 305-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kang-Won [Department of New Biology, DGIST, Dalseong-gun, Daegu 711-873 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Won-Ja; Yu, Kyu-Sang [K-MAC, Yongsan-Dong 554, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-500 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung-Hun [Automotive Parts Institute Center 35, Maegoksaneop, Buk-gu, Ulsan 683-420 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Eun-Young [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeon-Dong Geumjeong-Gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin-Hyock, E-mail: jinhyock.kim@sk.com [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Materials R and D Center, SK Innovation, Daejeon 305-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Se-Hun, E-mail: sehun@pusan.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeon-Dong Geumjeong-Gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Ti doped ZnO films were prepared on Corning XG glass substrate by ALD. • The electrical properties and optical properties were systematically investigated. • An optimized Ti doped ZnO films had low resistivity and excellent optical transmittance. - Abstract: Titanium doped zinc oxide (Ti doped ZnO) films were prepared by atomic layer deposition methods at a deposition temperature of 200 °C. The Ti content in Ti doped ZnO films was varied from 5.08 at.% to 15.02 at.%. X-ray diffraction results indicated that the crystallinity of the Ti doped ZnO films had degraded with increasing Ti content. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the microstructural evolution of the Ti doped ZnO films, showing that both the grain size and crystallinity reduced with increasing Ti content. The electrical resistivity of the Ti doped ZnO films showed a minimum value of 1.6 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm with the Ti content of 6.20 at.%. Furthermore, the Ti doped ZnO films exhibited excellent transmittance.

  16. Atomic layer deposition of molybdenum disulfide films using MoF 6 and H 2 S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mane, Anil U. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439; Letourneau, Steven [Micron School of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise, Idaho 83725; Mandia, David J. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439; Liu, Jian [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, Illinois 60208; Libera, Joseph A. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439; Lei, Yu [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439; Peng, Qing [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439; Graugnard, Elton [Micron School of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise Idaho 83725; Elam, Jeffrey W. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, Illinois 60439

    2018-01-01

    Molybdenum sulfide films were grown by atomic layer deposition on silicon and fused silica substrates using molybdenum hexafluoride (MoF6) and hydrogen sulfide at 200 degrees C. In situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements confirmed linear growth at 0.46 angstrom/cycle and self-limiting chemistry for both precursors. Analysis of the QCM step shapes indicated that MoS2 is the reaction product, and this finding is supported by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements showing that Mo is predominantly in the Mo(IV) state. However, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction measurements failed to identify crystalline MoS2 in the as-deposited films, and this might result from unreacted MoFx residues in the films. Annealing the films at 350 degrees C in a hydrogen rich environment yielded crystalline MoS2 and reduced the F concentration in the films. Optical transmission measurements yielded a bandgap of 1.3 eV. Finally, the authors observed that the MoS2 growth per cycle was accelerated when a fraction of the MoF6 pulses were substituted with diethyl zinc. Published by the AVS

  17. In Situ Conductance Analysis of Zinc Oxide Nucleation and Coalescence during Atomic Layer Deposition on Metal Oxides and Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, William J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2015-07-07

    Real time in situ conductance is collected continuously during atomic layer deposition (ALD) of zinc oxide films, and trends are used to study ALD nucleation on polypropylene, nylon-6, SiO2, TiO2, and Al2O3 substrates. The detailed conductance change during the ALD cycle is ascribed to changes in surface band bending upon precursor/reactant exposure. Conductive pathways form earlier on the inorganic surfaces than on the polymers, with Al2O3 substrates showing more rapid nucleation than SiO2 or TiO2, consistent with the expected density of nucleation sites (e.g., hydroxyl groups) on these different materials. The measured conductance is ohmic, and both two- and four-electrode configurations show the same data trends. Detailed analysis of conductivity at deposition temperatures between 100 and 175 °C shows faster conductivity decay at higher temperature during the water purge step, ascribed to thermally activated water desorption kinetics. Analysis of real-time conductivity during ALD of other material systems could provide further insight into key aspects of film nucleation and nuclei coalescence.

  18. Iron oxide/aluminum/graphene energetic nanocomposites synthesized by atomic layer deposition: Enhanced energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ning; Qin, Lijun; Hao, Haixia; Hui, Longfei; Zhao, Fengqi; Feng, Hao

    2017-06-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide (Fe2O3) and nano-sized aluminum (Al), possessing outstanding exothermic redox reaction characteristics, are highly promising nanothermite materials. However, the reactant diffusion inhibited in the solid state system makes the fast and complete energy release very challenging. In this work, Al nanoparticles anchored on graphene oxide (GO/Al) was initially prepared by a solution assembly approach. Fe2O3 was deposited on GO/Al substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Simultaneously thermal reduction of GO occurs, resulting in rGO/Al@Fe2O3 energetic composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis reveals that rGO/Al@Fe2O3 composite containing 4.8 wt% of rGO exhibits a 50% increase of the energy release compared to the Al@Fe2O3 nanothermite synthesized by ALD, and an increase of about 130% compared to a random mixture of rGO/Al/Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The enhanced energy release of rGO/Al@Fe2O3 is attributed to the improved spatial distribution as well as the increased interfacial intimacy between the oxidizer and the fuel. Moreover, the rGO/Al@Fe2O3 composite with an rGO content of 9.6 wt% exhibits significantly reduced electrostatic discharge sensitivity. These findings may inspire potential pathways for engineering energetic nanocomposites with enhanced energy release and improved safety characteristics.

  19. Two-Dimensional Electron Gas at SrTiO3-Based Oxide Heterostructures via Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Woon Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG at an oxide interface has been attracting considerable attention for physics research and nanoelectronic applications. Early studies reported the formation of 2DEG at semiconductor interfaces (e.g., AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with interesting electrical properties such as high electron mobility. Besides 2DEG formation at semiconductor junctions, 2DEG was realized at the interface of an oxide heterostructure such as the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO heterojunction. The origin of 2DEG was attributed to the well-known “polar catastrophe” mechanism in oxide heterostructures, which consist of an epitaxial LAO layer on a single crystalline STO substrate among proposed mechanisms. Recently, it was reported that the creation of 2DEG was achieved using the atomic layer deposition (ALD technique, which opens new functionality of ALD in emerging nanoelectronics. This review is focused on the origin of 2DEG at oxide heterostructures using the ALD process. In particular, it addresses the origin of 2DEG at oxide interfaces based on an alternative mechanism (i.e., oxygen vacancies.

  20. Atomic-layer-deposition-assisted ZnO nanoparticles for oxide charge-trap memory thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Gi Ho; Yun, Da Jeong; Lee, Won Ho; Yoon, Sung Min

    2017-02-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) with monolayer structures were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) to use for a charge-trap layer (CTL) for nonvolatile memory thin-film transistors (MTFTs). The optimum ALD temperature of the NP formation was demonstrated to be 160 °C. The size and areal density of the ZnO NPs was estimated to be approximately 33 nm and 4.8 × 109 cm-2, respectively, when the number of ALD cycles was controlled to be 20. The fabricated MTFTs using a ZnO-NP CTL exhibited typical memory window properties, which are generated by charge-trap/de-trap processes, in their transfer characteristics and the width of the memory window (MW) increased from 0.6 to 18.0 V when the number of ALD cycles increased from 5 to 30. The program characteristics of the MTFT were markedly enhanced by the post-annealing process performed at 180 °C in an oxygen ambient due to the improvements in the interface and bulk qualities of the ZnO NPs. The program/erase (P/E) speed was estimated to be 10 ms at P/E voltages of -14 and 17 V. The memory margin showed no degradation with the lapse in retention time for 2 × 104 s and after the repetitive P/E operations of 7 × 103 cycles.

  1. Photon up-converting (Yb,Er){sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomisto, Minnea [Department of Chemistry, University of Turku (Finland); Doctoral Programme in Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of Turku Graduate School (UTUGS), Turku (Finland); Giedraityte, Zivile; Karppinen, Maarit [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, School of Chemical Engineering, Aalto University (Finland); Lastusaari, Mika [Department of Chemistry, University of Turku (Finland); Turku University Centre for Materials and Surfaces (MatSurf), Turku (Finland)

    2017-06-15

    We report up-converting (Yb,Er){sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films grown with the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The films are crystalline and show a homogeneous morphology with a roughness less than 1 nm for 40 nm thick films. High-intensity near-infrared (NIR) to green and red two-photon up-conversion emission is obtained with 974 nm excitation through an absorption by Yb{sup 3+}, followed by a Yb{sup 3+}-Er{sup 3+} energy transfer and emission from Er{sup 3+}. The ALD technique promises to be excellent for producing up-converting films for many applications such as near-infrared radiation absorbing layers for solar cells and sensors in point-of-care biomedical diagnostics. Schematic picture of the ALD-grown (Yb,Er){sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film including the up-conversion emission spectra. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Epitaxial TiO 2/SnO 2 core-shell heterostructure by atomic layer deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin

    2012-01-01

    Taking TiO 2/SnO 2 core-shell nanowires (NWs) as a model system, we systematically investigate the structure and the morphological evolution of this heterostructure synthesized by atomic layer deposition/epitaxy (ALD/ALE). All characterizations, by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and Raman spectra, reveal that single crystalline rutile TiO 2 shells can be epitaxially grown on SnO 2 NWs with an atomically sharp interface at low temperature (250 °C). The growth behavior of the TiO 2 shells highly depends on the surface orientations and the geometrical shape of the core SnO 2 NW cross-section. Atomically smooth surfaces are found for growth on the {110} surface. Rough surfaces develop on {100} surfaces due to (100) - (1 × 3) reconstruction, by introducing steps in the [010] direction as a continuation of {110} facets. Lattice mismatch induces superlattice structures in the TiO 2 shell and misfit dislocations along the interface. Conformal epitaxial growth has been observed for SnO 2 NW cores with an octagonal cross-section ({100} and {110} surfaces). However, for a rectangular core ({101} and {010} surfaces), the shell also derives an octagonal shape from the epitaxial growth, which was explained by a proposed model based on ALD kinetics. The surface steps and defects induced by the lattice mismatch likely lead to improved photoluminescence (PL) performance for the yellow emission. Compared to the pure SnO 2 NWs, the PL spectrum of the core-shell nanostructures exhibits a stronger emission peak, which suggests potential applications in optoelectronics. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

  3. Spatial Atmospheric Pressure Atomic Layer Deposition of Tin Oxide as an Impermeable Electron Extraction Layer for Perovskite Solar Cells with Enhanced Thermal Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Lukas; Brinkmann, Kai O; Malerczyk, Jessica; Rogalla, Detlef; Becker, Tim; Theirich, Detlef; Shutsko, Ivan; Görrn, Patrick; Riedl, Thomas

    2018-02-14

    Despite the notable success of hybrid halide perovskite-based solar cells, their long-term stability is still a key-issue. Aside from optimizing the photoactive perovskite, the cell design states a powerful lever to improve stability under various stress conditions. Dedicated electrically conductive diffusion barriers inside the cell stack, that counteract the ingress of moisture and prevent the migration of corrosive halogen species, can substantially improve ambient and thermal stability. Although atomic layer deposition (ALD) is excellently suited to prepare such functional layers, ALD suffers from the requirement of vacuum and only allows for a very limited throughput. Here, we demonstrate for the first time spatial ALD-grown SnO x at atmospheric pressure as impermeable electron extraction layers for perovskite solar cells. We achieve optical transmittance and electrical conductivity similar to those in SnO x grown by conventional vacuum-based ALD. A low deposition temperature of 80 °C and a high substrate speed of 2.4 m min -1 yield SnO x layers with a low water vapor transmission rate of ∼10 -4 gm -2 day -1 (at 60 °C/60% RH). Thereby, in perovskite solar cells, dense hybrid Al:ZnO/SnO x electron extraction layers are created that are the key for stable cell characteristics beyond 1000 h in ambient air and over 3000 h at 60 °C. Most notably, our work of introducing spatial ALD at atmospheric pressure paves the way to the future roll-to-roll manufacturing of stable perovskite solar cells.

  4. Comparison of hydrolytic and non-hydrolytic atomic layer deposition chemistries: Interfacial electronic properties at alumina-silicon interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marstell, Roderick J.; Strandwitz, Nicholas C.

    2015-11-01

    We report the differences in the passivation and electronic properties of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) deposited on silicon via traditional hydrolytic atomic layer deposition (ALD) and non-hydrolytic (NH) ALD chemistries. Traditional films were grown using trimethylaluminum (TMA) and water and NHALD films grown using TMA and isopropanol at 300 °C. Hydrolytically grown ALD films contain a smaller amount of fixed charge than NHALD films (oxide fixed charge Qf Traditional = -8.1 × 1011 cm-2 and Qf NHALD = -3.6 × 1012 cm-2), and a larger degree of chemical passivation than NHALD films (density of interface trap states, Dit Traditional = 5.4 × 1011 eV-1 cm-2 and Dit NHALD = 2.9 × 1012 eV-1 cm-2). Oxides grown with both chemistries were found to have a band gap of 7.1 eV. The conduction band offset was 3.21 eV for traditionally grown films and 3.38 eV for NHALD. The increased Dit for NHALD films may stem from carbon impurities in the oxide layer that are at and near the silicon surface, as evidenced by both the larger trap state time constant (τTraditional = 2.2 × 10-9 s and τNHALD = 1.7 × 10-7 s) and the larger carbon concentration. We have shown that the use of alcohol-based oxygen sources in NHALD chemistry can significantly affect the resulting interfacial electronic behavior presenting an additional parameter for understanding and controlling interfacial electronic properties at semiconductor-dielectric interfaces.

  5. A combined coating strategy based on atomic layer deposition for enhancement of corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangmei; Yang, Qiuyue; Li, Zhaoyang; Yuan, Wei; Zheng, Yufeng; Cui, Zhenduo; Yang, Xianjin; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Wu, Shuilin

    2018-03-01

    Rapid corrosion restricts the wide application of Mg and Mg-based alloys. In this work, a combined surface strategy was employed to modify the surface of AZ31 Mg Alloy. An atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was utilized to prepare ZrO2 nanofilm on Mg substrate. During this course, the film thickness could be precisely controlled by adjusting the ALD cycles with a deposition rate of 0.117 nm/cycle. The subsequent PLGA grafting on ZrO2 nanofilm was carried out by a spin-coating process to further enhance the corrosion resistance. The nanoscratch tests showed that this hybrid coating had good bonding strength with substrate and similar Young's modulus to natural bone. In vitro corrosion tests demonstrated that a thicker ZrO2 nanofilm on the surface could reduce the corrosion rate of Mg substrate when compared to a thinner coating. When increasing ZrO2 deposition cycles from 25 to 100, the corrosion resistance could be significantly increased by two or three orders of magnitude. Hydrogen evolution tests revealed the synergetic effects of both galvanic corrosion and local acidic action could accelerate the corrosion of the AZ31 modified with the PLGA/ZrO2 coating once the ZrO2 nanofilm was damaged. Therefore, by changing the ALD cycles, the corrosion resistance of both ZrO2 thin film and ZrO2/PLGA hybrid coatings can be adjusted. This work provides an effective combined surface strategy that can be employed to adjust the corrosion resistance of Mg-based alloys for biomedical applications.

  6. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of inverted pyramid-based nanostructured black-silicon solar cells passivated by an atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Yan; Lu, Hong-Liang; Ren, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2015-09-01

    Inverted pyramid-based nanostructured black-silicon (BS) solar cells with an Al2O3 passivation layer grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been demonstrated. A multi-scale textured BS surface combining silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and inverted pyramids was obtained for the first time by lithography and metal catalyzed wet etching. The reflectance of the as-prepared BS surface was about 2% lower than that of the more commonly reported upright pyramid-based SiNW BS surface over the whole of the visible light spectrum, which led to a 1.7 mA cm-2 increase in short circuit current density. Moreover, the as-prepared solar cells were further passivated by an ALD-Al2O3 layer. The effect of annealing temperature on the photovoltaic performance of the solar cells was investigated. It was found that the values of all solar cell parameters including short circuit current, open circuit voltage, and fill factor exhibit a further increase under an optimized annealing temperature. Minority carrier lifetime measurements indicate that the enhanced cell performance is due to the improved passivation quality of the Al2O3 layer after thermal annealing treatments. By combining these two refinements, the optimized SiNW BS solar cells achieved a maximum conversion efficiency enhancement of 7.6% compared to the cells with an upright pyramid-based SiNWs surface and conventional SiNx passivation.

  7. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of inverted pyramid-based nanostructured black-silicon solar cells passivated by an atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Yan; Lu, Hong-Liang; Ren, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2015-10-07

    Inverted pyramid-based nanostructured black-silicon (BS) solar cells with an Al2O3 passivation layer grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been demonstrated. A multi-scale textured BS surface combining silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and inverted pyramids was obtained for the first time by lithography and metal catalyzed wet etching. The reflectance of the as-prepared BS surface was about 2% lower than that of the more commonly reported upright pyramid-based SiNW BS surface over the whole of the visible light spectrum, which led to a 1.7 mA cm(-2) increase in short circuit current density. Moreover, the as-prepared solar cells were further passivated by an ALD-Al2O3 layer. The effect of annealing temperature on the photovoltaic performance of the solar cells was investigated. It was found that the values of all solar cell parameters including short circuit current, open circuit voltage, and fill factor exhibit a further increase under an optimized annealing temperature. Minority carrier lifetime measurements indicate that the enhanced cell performance is due to the improved passivation quality of the Al2O3 layer after thermal annealing treatments. By combining these two refinements, the optimized SiNW BS solar cells achieved a maximum conversion efficiency enhancement of 7.6% compared to the cells with an upright pyramid-based SiNWs surface and conventional SiNx passivation.

  8. Epitaxial Graphene Surface Preparation for Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    effect transistors ( FETs ), and to meet the challenge of scaling devices to small sizes ( nm). In addition, AlN is a suitable dielectric for...using a Cambridge NanoTech, Inc. Savannah 200 thermal ALD system. The sources were electronic- grade TMA (Sigma-Aldrich) and triply distilled H2O which...most layer of EG grown on the C-face of SiC is doped heav- ily p-type. In addition, Lohmann et al.31 also presented data supporting the mechanism of

  9. Stabilizing hybrid perovskites against moisture and temperature via non-hydrolytic atomic layer deposited overlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Soo; Martinson, Alex B. F.

    2015-01-01

    A novel non-hydrolytic (nh) surface chemistry is utilized to allow the direct synthesis of pinhole-fee oxide overlayers directly on conventional hybrid perovskite halide absorbers without damage. Utilizing water-free ALD Al2O3 passivation, a minimum of ten-fold increase in stability against relative humidity (RH) 85% was achieved along with a dramatically improved thermal resistance (up to 250 °C). Moreover, we extend this approach to synthesize nh-TiO2 directly on hybrid perovskites to establish its potential in inverted photovoltaic devices as a dual stabilizing and electron accepting layer, as evidenced by photoluminescence (PL) quenching.

  10. Bimetallic Nickel/Ruthenium Catalysts Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition for Low-Temperature Direct Methanol Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heonjae; Kim, Jun Woo; Park, Joonsuk; An, Jihwan; Lee, Tonghun; Prinz, Fritz B; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2016-11-09

    Nickel and ruthenium bimetallic catalysts were heterogeneously synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD) for use as the anode of direct methanol solid oxide fuel cells (DMSOFCs) operating in a low-temperature range. The presence of highly dispersed ALD Ru islands over a porous Ni mesh was confirmed, and the Ni/ALD Ru anode microstructure was observed. Fuel cell tests were conducted using Ni-only and Ni/ALD Ru anodes with approximately 350 μm thick gadolinium-doped ceria electrolytes and platinum cathodes. The performance of fuel cells was assessed using pure methanol at operating temperatures of 300-400 °C. Micromorphological changes of the anode after cell operation were investigated, and the content of adsorbed carbon on the anode side of the operated samples was measured. The difference in the maximum power density between samples utilizing Ni/ALD Ru and Pt/ALD Ru, the latter being the best catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells, was observed to be less than 7% at 300 °C and 30% at 350 °C. The improved electrochemical activity of the Ni/ALD Ru anode compared to that of the Ni-only anode, along with the reduction of the number of catalytically active sites due to agglomeration of Ni and carbon formation on the Ni surface as compared to Pt, explains this decent performance.

  11. Preparation of highly dispersed tungsten oxide on MCM-41 via atomic layer deposition and its application to butanol dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeonjoo; Jeong, Soyeon; Kim, Do Heui; Park, Young-Kwon; Jeon, Jong-Ki

    2012-07-01

    Highly dispersed tungsten oxide on MCM-41 was synthesized using a novel atomic layer deposition (ALD) method. BET, XRD, XPS, NH3-TPD, and pyridine-IR were used to study the physicochemical properties of the supported tungsten oxides. In this study, the maximum loading of tungsten oxide on MCM-41 that could be prepared using the modified ALD method was 27.0 wt%. It was confirmed that the textural properties of the mesoporous silica were maintained after tungsten oxide loading. The NH3-TPD and Py-IR results indicated that weak acid sites, mainly Lewis acid sites, were produced over the WO3/MCM-41 samples. Moreover, 2-butanol dehydration was performed to demonstrate the potential advantages of the WO3/MCM-41 catalysts. The WO3/MCM-41 catalyst with 27.0 wt% tungsten oxide loading showed the highest activity in the dehydration of 2-butanol, which was attributed to the highest overall number of acid sites among the WO3/MCM-41 catalysts. The highly dispersed tungsten oxide on MCM-41 prepared via ALD can be an effective catalyst for producing butenes through 2-butanol dehydration.

  12. Characterization and Electrochemical Performance at High Discharge Rates of Tin Dioxide Thin Films Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximov, M. Yu.; Novikov, P. A.; Nazarov, D. V.; Rymyantsev, A. M.; Silin, A. O.; Zhang, Y.; Popovich, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, thin films of tin dioxide have been synthesized on substrates of silicon and stainless steel by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with tetraethyl tin and by inductively coupled remote oxygen plasma as precursors. Studies of the surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy show a strong dependence on synthesis temperature. According to the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, the samples contain tin in the oxidation state +4. The thickness of the thin films for electrochemical performance was approximately 80 nm. Electrochemical cycling in the voltage range of 0.01-0.8 V have shown that tin oxide has a stable discharge capacity of approximately 650 mAh/g during 400 charge/discharge cycles with an efficiency of approximately 99.5%. The decrease in capacity after 400 charge/discharge cycles was around 5-7%. Synthesized SnO2 thin films have fast kinetics of lithium ions intercalation and excellent discharge efficiency at high C-rates, up to 40C, with a small decrease in capacity of less than 20%. Specific capacity and cyclic stability of thin films of SnO2 synthesized by ALD exceed the values mentioned in the literature for pure tin dioxide thin films.

  13. Ferroelectric properties of lightly doped La:HfO2 thin films grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozodaev, M. G.; Chernikova, A. G.; Korostylev, E. V.; Park, M. H.; Schroeder, U.; Hwang, C. S.; Markeev, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    The structural and ferroelectric properties of lightly La-doped (1 mol. %) HfO2 thin films grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition were examined. An annealing temperature as low as 400 °C crystallized the film into the desired orthorhombic phase, which resulted in it displaying promising ferroelectric performance. The remanent polarization (Pr) increased with annealing temperature, but the performance enhancement seemed to saturate at 500 °C. A slight decrease in the dielectric constant, which was associated with the preferential formation of a polar orthorhombic phase at higher temperatures, was also observed. The long-term wake-up effect, i.e., a marked rise in the 2Pr value during field cycling, was demonstrated for films processed at all annealing temperatures. The presence of domain groups with opposite internal electric biases was found in the pristine state, while the internal bias distribution became more uniform during wake-up. The endurance of up to 4 × 108 switching cycles without marked fatigue using bipolar pulses with a duration of 600 ns, and an amplitude of ±3 MV/cm was demonstrated.

  14. Porphyrins as Templates for Site-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Vapor Metalation and in Situ Monitoring of Island Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Jason R.; Emery, Jonathan D.; Pellin, Michael J.; Martinson, Alex B. F.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2016-08-10

    Examinations of enzymatic catalysts suggest one key to efficient catalytic activity is discrete size metallo clusters. Mimicking enzymatic cluster systems is synthetically challenging because conventional solution methods are prone to aggregation or require capping of the cluster, thereby limiting its catalytic activity. We introduce site-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on porphyrins as an alternative approach to grow isolated metal oxide islands that are spatially separated. Surface-bound tetra-acid free base porphyrins (H2TCPP) may be metalated with Mn using conventional ALD precursor exposure to induce homogeneous hydroxide synthetic handles which acts as a nucleation point for subsequent ALD MnO island growth. Analytical fitting of in situ QCM mass uptake reveals island growth to be hemispherical with a convergence radius of 1.74 nm. This growth mode is confirmed with synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. Finally, we extend this approach to other ALD chemistries to demonstrate the generality of this route to discrete metallo island materials.

  15. Effect of substrates and thickness on optical properties in atomic layer deposition grown ZnO thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dipayan; Singhal, Jaya; Mathur, Aakash; Singh, Ajaib; Dutta, Surjendu; Zollner, Stefan; Chattopadhyay, Sudeshna

    2017-11-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition technique was used to grow high quality, very low roughness, crystalline, Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin films on silicon (Si) and fused quartz (SiO2) substrates to study the optical properties. Spectroscopic ellipsometry results of ZnO/Si system, staggered type-II quantum well, demonstrate that there is a significant drop in the magnitudes of both the real and imaginary parts of complex dielectric constants and in near-band gap absorption along with a blue shift of the absorption edge with decreasing film thickness at and below ∼20 nm. Conversely, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy of ZnO/SiO2, thin type-I quantum well, consisting of a narrower-band gap semiconductor grown on a wider-band gap (insulator) substrate, shows the similar thickness dependent blue-shift of the absorption edge but with an increase in the magnitude of near-band gap absorption with decreasing film thickness. Thickness dependent blue shift, energy vs. 1/d2, in two different systems, ZnO/Si and ZnO/SiO2, show a difference in their slopes. The observed phenomena can be consistently explained by the corresponding exciton (or carrier/s) deconfinement and confinement effects at the ZnO/Si and ZnO/SiO2 interface respectively, where Tanguy-Elliott amplitude pre-factor plays the key role through the electron-hole overlap factor at the interface.

  16. Ellipsometry study on Pd thin film grown by atomic layer deposition with Maxwell–Garnett effective medium approximation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yihang; Zhou, Xueqi; Cao, Kun [State Key Laboratory of Digital of Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die & Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chen, Xiuguo; Deng, Zhang [State Key Laboratory of Digital of Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu, Shiyuan, E-mail: shyliu@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Digital of Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Shan, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die & Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chen, Rong, E-mail: rongchen@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Digital of Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Maxwell–Garnett effective medium approximation (MG-EMA) model is chosen to study Pd ultrathin film grown on Si substrate, as well as its growth on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) modified substrate respectively. The general oscillator (GO) model with one Drude and two Lorentz oscillators is firstly applied to fix the optical constants of Pd. Compared with Pd bulk model, MG-EMA model with GO is more reliable to predict the film thickness verified by X-ray reflection test. The stable growth rate on Si substrate reveals our methods are feasible and the quartz crystal microbalance measurement confirms the stability of the ALD chamber. For Pd coverage, MG-EMA fitting result is similar to the statistical computation from scanning electron microscope when Pd ALD cycles are over 400, while large bias exists for cycles under 400, might be due to that air is not the proper filling medium between nanoparticles. Then we change the filling medium into SAMs as a comparison, better fitting performance is obtained. It is demonstrated that the filling medium between nanoparticles is important for the application of MG-EMA model. - Highlights: • Ultrathin Pd thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition. • The measurement of thin film was important to understand initial growth behavior. • Maxwell–Garnett effective medium approximation model was applied. • Pd nanoparticle size and coverage were studied. • The filling medium between nanoparticles was important for model application.

  17. Method for Aluminum Oxide Thin Films Prepared through Low Temperature Atomic Layer Deposition for Encapsulating Organic Electroluminescent Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ying Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of dense alumina (Al2O3 thin film through atomic layer deposition (ALD provides a pathway to achieve the encapsulation of organic light emitting devices (OLED. Unlike traditional ALD which is usually executed at higher reaction n temperatures that may affect the performance of OLED, this application discusses the development on preparation of ALD thin film at a low temperature. One concern of ALD is the suppressing effect of ambient temperature on uniformity of thin film. To mitigate this issue, the pumping time in each reaction cycle was increased during the preparation process, which removed reaction byproducts and inhibited the formation of vacancies. As a result, the obtained thin film had both high uniformity and density properties, which provided an excellent encapsulation performance. The results from microstructure morphology analysis, water vapor transmission rate, and lifetime test showed that the difference in uniformity between thin films prepared at low temperatures, with increased pumping time, and high temperatures was small and there was no obvious influence of increased pumping time on light emitting performance. Meanwhile, the permeability for water vapor of the thin film prepared at a low temperature was found to reach as low as 1.5 × 10−4 g/(m2·day under ambient conditions of 25 °C and 60% relative humidity, indicating a potential extension in the lifetime for the OLED.

  18. Iron oxide/aluminum/graphene energetic nanocomposites synthesized by atomic layer deposition: Enhanced energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Ning; Qin, Lijun [Laboratory of Material Surface Engineering and Nanofabrication, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Hao, Haixia [Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Hui, Longfei [Laboratory of Material Surface Engineering and Nanofabrication, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Zhao, Fengqi [Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Feng, Hao, E-mail: fenghao98@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Material Surface Engineering and Nanofabrication, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); State Key Laboratory of Fluorine and Nitrogen Chemicals, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China)

    2017-06-30

    Highlights: • Energetic rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}nanocompositeswerefabricatedbyatomiclayerdepositionapproach. • A novel Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} unit featuring core-shell structure was decorated on the graphene nanosheet. • RGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite exhibits superior energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard. - Abstract: Nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and nano-sized aluminum (Al), possessing outstanding exothermic redox reaction characteristics, are highly promising nanothermite materials. However, the reactant diffusion inhibited in the solid state system makes the fast and complete energy release very challenging. In this work, Al nanoparticles anchored on graphene oxide (GO/Al) was initially prepared by a solution assembly approach. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was deposited on GO/Al substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Simultaneously thermal reduction of GO occurs, resulting in rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} energetic composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis reveals that rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite containing 4.8 wt% of rGO exhibits a 50% increase of the energy release compared to the Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanothermite synthesized by ALD, and an increase of about 130% compared to a random mixture of rGO/Al/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. The enhanced energy release of rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is attributed to the improved spatial distribution as well as the increased interfacial intimacy between the oxidizer and the fuel. Moreover, the rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite with an rGO content of 9.6 wt% exhibits significantly reduced electrostatic discharge sensitivity. These findings may inspire potential pathways for engineering energetic nanocomposites with enhanced energy release and improved safety characteristics.

  19. Comparison of the cohesive and delamination fatigue properties of atomic-layer-deposited alumina and titania ultrathin protective coatings deposited at 200 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Sadeghi-Tohidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue properties of ultrathin protective coatings on silicon thin films were investigated. The cohesive and delamination fatigue properties of 22 nm-thick atomic-layered-deposited (ALD titania were characterized and compared to that of 25 nm-thick alumina. Both coatings were deposited at 200 °C. The fatigue rates are comparable at 30 °C, 50% relative humidity (RH while they are one order of magnitude larger for alumina compared to titania at 80 °C, 90% RH. The improved fatigue performance is believed to be related to the improved stability of the ALD titania coating with water compared to ALD alumina, which may in part be related to the fact that ALD titania is crystalline, while ALD alumina is amorphous. Static fatigue crack nucleation and propagation was not observed. The underlying fatigue mechanism is different from previously documented mechanisms, such as stress corrosion cracking, and appears to result from the presence of compressive stresses and a rough coating–substrate interface.

  20. Deterministic tuning of slow-light in photonic-crystal waveguides through the C and L bands by atomic layer deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Charlton J; Meric, Inanc; Shepard, Ken L; Wong, Chee Wei; Green, William M J; Vlasov, Yurii A; Assefa, Solomon

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate digital tuning of the slow-light regime in silicon photonic-crystal waveguides by performing atomic layer deposition of hafnium oxide. The high group-index regime was deterministically controlled (red-shift of 140 +/- 10 pm per atomic layer) without affecting the group-velocity dispersion and third-order dispersion. Additionally, differential tuning of 110 +/- 30 pm per monolayer of the slow-light TE-like and TM-like modes was observed. This passive post-fabrication process has potential applications including the tuning of chip-scale optical interconnects, as well as Raman and parametric amplification.

  1. The Influence of Hafnium Doping on Density of States in Zinc Oxide Thin-Film Transistors Deposited via Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xingwei; Qin, Cunping; Song, Jiantao; Zhang, Jianhua; Jiang, Xueyin; Zhang, Zhilin

    2017-12-01

    Thin-film transistors (TFTs) with atomic layer deposition (ALD) HfZnO (HZO) as channel layer and Al2O3 as gate insulator were successfully fabricated. Compared with ZnO-TFT, the stability of HZO-TFT was obviously improved as Hf doping can suppress the generation of oxygen related defects. The transfer characteristics of TFTs at different temperatures were also investigated, and temperature stability enhancement was observed for the TFT with Hf doping. The density of states (DOS) was calculated based on the experimentally obtained E a, which can explain the experimental observation. A high-field effect mobility of 9.4 cm(2)/Vs, a suitable turn-on voltage of 0.26 V, a high on/off ratio of over 10(7) and a steep sub-threshold swing of 0.3 V/decade were obtained in HZO-TFT. The results showed that temperature stability enhancement in HfZnO thin-film transistors are attributed to the smaller DOS.

  2. Low-temperature self-limiting atomic layer deposition of wurtzite InN on Si(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, Ali, E-mail: ali.haider@bilkent.edu.tr, E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr; Kizir, Seda; Biyikli, Necmi, E-mail: ali.haider@bilkent.edu.tr, E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 Turkey (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 Turkey (Turkey)

    2016-04-15

    In this work, we report on self-limiting growth of InN thin films at substrate temperatures as low as 200 °C by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (HCPA-ALD). The precursors used in growth experiments were trimethylindium (TMI) and N{sub 2} plasma. Process parameters including TMI pulse time, N{sub 2} plasma exposure time, purge time, and deposition temperature have been optimized for self-limiting growth of InN with in ALD window. With the increase in exposure time of N{sub 2} plasma from 40 s to 100 s at 200 °C, growth rate showed a significant decrease from 1.60 to 0.64 Å/cycle. At 200 °C, growth rate saturated as 0.64 Å/cycle for TMI dose starting from 0.07 s. Structural, optical, and morphological characterization of InN were carried out in detail. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed the hexagonal wurtzite crystalline structure of the grown InN films. Refractive index of the InN film deposited at 200 °C was found to be 2.66 at 650 nm. 48 nm-thick InN films exhibited relatively smooth surfaces with Rms surface roughness values of 0.98 nm, while the film density was extracted as 6.30 g/cm{sup 3}. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements depicted the peaks of indium, nitrogen, carbon, and oxygen on the film surface and quantitative information revealed that films are nearly stoichiometric with rather low impurity content. In3d and N1s high-resolution scans confirmed the presence of InN with peaks located at 443.5 and 396.8 eV, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) further confirmed the polycrystalline structure of InN thin films and elemental mapping revealed uniform distribution of indium and nitrogen along the scanned area of the InN film. Spectral absorption measurements exhibited an optical band edge around 1.9 eV. Our findings demonstrate that HCPA-ALD might be a promising technique to grow crystalline wurtzite InN thin films at low substrate

  3. Low-temperature self-limiting atomic layer deposition of wurtzite InN on Si(100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Haider

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report on self-limiting growth of InN thin films at substrate temperatures as low as 200 °C by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (HCPA-ALD. The precursors used in growth experiments were trimethylindium (TMI and N2 plasma. Process parameters including TMI pulse time, N2 plasma exposure time, purge time, and deposition temperature have been optimized for self-limiting growth of InN with in ALD window. With the increase in exposure time of N2 plasma from 40 s to 100 s at 200 °C, growth rate showed a significant decrease from 1.60 to 0.64 Å/cycle. At 200 °C, growth rate saturated as 0.64 Å/cycle for TMI dose starting from 0.07 s. Structural, optical, and morphological characterization of InN were carried out in detail. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed the hexagonal wurtzite crystalline structure of the grown InN films. Refractive index of the InN film deposited at 200 °C was found to be 2.66 at 650 nm. 48 nm-thick InN films exhibited relatively smooth surfaces with Rms surface roughness values of 0.98 nm, while the film density was extracted as 6.30 g/cm3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS measurements depicted the peaks of indium, nitrogen, carbon, and oxygen on the film surface and quantitative information revealed that films are nearly stoichiometric with rather low impurity content. In3d and N1s high-resolution scans confirmed the presence of InN with peaks located at 443.5 and 396.8 eV, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and selected area electron diffraction (SAED further confirmed the polycrystalline structure of InN thin films and elemental mapping revealed uniform distribution of indium and nitrogen along the scanned area of the InN film. Spectral absorption measurements exhibited an optical band edge around 1.9 eV. Our findings demonstrate that HCPA-ALD might be a promising technique to grow crystalline wurtzite InN thin films at low substrate temperatures.

  4. Plasma etch characteristics of aluminum nitride mask layers grown by low-temperature plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition in SF{sub 6} based plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perros, Alexander; Bosund, Markus; Sajavaara, Timo; Laitinen, Mikko; Sainiemi, Lauri; Huhtio, Teppo; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University School of Electrical Engineering, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, 40014, Jyvaeskylae,Finland (Finland); Department of Micro and Nanosciences, School of Electrical Engineering, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076, Aalto (Finland)

    2012-01-15

    The plasma etch characteristics of aluminum nitride (AlN) deposited by low-temperature, 200 deg. C, plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) was investigated for reactive ion etch (RIE) and inductively coupled plasma-reactive ion etch (ICP-RIE) systems using various mixtures of SF{sub 6} and O{sub 2} under different etch conditions. During RIE, the film exhibits good mask properties with etch rates below 10r nm/min. For ICP-RIE processes, the film exhibits exceptionally low etch rates in the subnanometer region with lower platen power. The AlN film's removal occurred through physical mechanisms; consequently, rf power and chamber pressure were the most significant parameters in PEALD AlN film removal because the film was inert to the SF{sub x}{sup +} and O{sup +} chemistries. The etch experiments showed the film to be a resilient masking material. This makes it an attractive candidate for use as an etch mask in demanding SF{sub 6} based plasma etch applications, such as through-wafer etching, or when oxide films are not suitable.

  5. Electrical properties of GaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor structure comprising Al2O3 gate oxide and AlN passivation layer fabricated in situ using a metal–organic vapor deposition/atomic layer deposition hybrid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Aoki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a compressive study on the fabrication and optimization of GaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS structures comprising a Al2O3 gate oxide, deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD, with an AlN interfacial passivation layer prepared in situ via metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD. The established protocol afforded self-limiting growth of Al2O3 in the atmospheric MOCVD reactor. Consequently, this enabled successive growth of MOCVD-formed AlN and ALD-formed Al2O3 layers on the GaAs substrate. The effects of AlN thickness, post-deposition anneal (PDA conditions, and crystal orientation of the GaAs substrate on the electrical properties of the resulting MOS capacitors were investigated. Thin AlN passivation layers afforded incorporation of optimum amounts of nitrogen, leading to good capacitance–voltage (C–V characteristics with reduced frequency dispersion. In contrast, excessively thick AlN passivation layers degraded the interface, thereby increasing the interfacial density of states (Dit near the midgap and reducing the conduction band offset. To further improve the interface with the thin AlN passivation layers, the PDA conditions were optimized. Using wet nitrogen at 600 °C was effective to reduce Dit to below 2 × 1012 cm−2 eV−1. Using a (111A substrate was also effective in reducing the frequency dispersion of accumulation capacitance, thus suggesting the suppression of traps in GaAs located near the dielectric/GaAs interface. The current findings suggest that using an atmosphere ALD process with in situ AlN passivation using the current MOCVD system could be an efficient solution to improving GaAs MOS interfaces.

  6. Effects of Deposition Temperature on the Device Characteristics of Oxide Thin-Film Transistors Using In-Ga-Zn-O Active Channels Prepared by Atomic-Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung-Min; Seong, Nak-Jin; Choi, Kyujeong; Seo, Gi-Ho; Shin, Woong-Chul

    2017-07-12

    We demonstrated the physical and electrical properties of the In-Ga-Zn-O (IGZO) thin films prepared by atomic-layer deposition (ALD) method and investigated the effects of the ALD temperature. The film composition (atomic ratio of In:Ga:Zn) and film density were examined to be 1:1:3 and 5.9 g/cm3, respectively, for all the temperature conditions. The optical band gaps decreased from 3.81 to 3.21 eV when the ALD temperature increased from 130 to 170 °C. The amounts of oxygen-related defects such as oxygen vacancies increased with increasing the ALD temperature. It was found from the in situ temperature-dependent electrical conductivity measurements that the electronic natures including the defect structures and conduction mechanism of the IGZO thin films prepared at different temperatures showed marked variations. The carrier mobilities in the saturation regions (μsat's) for the fabricated thin film transistors (TFTs) using the IGZO channel layers were estimated to be 6.1 to 14.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 with increasing the ALD temperature from 130 to 170 °C. Among the devices, when the ALD temperature was controlled to be 150 °C, the IGZO TFTs showed the best performance, which resulted from the fact that the amounts of oxygen vacancies and interstitial defects could be appropriately modulated at this condition. Consequently, the μsat, subthreshold swing, and on/off ratio for the TFT using the IGZO channel prepared at 150 °C showed 10.4 cm2 V-1 s-1, 90 mV/dec, and 2 × 109, respectively. The threshold voltage shifts of this device could also be effectively reduced to be 0.6 and -3.2 V under the positive-bias and negative-bias-illumination stress conditions. These obtained characteristics can be comparable to those for the sputter-deposited IGZO TFTs.

  7. Mobile setup for synchrotron based in situ characterization during thermal and plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dendooven, Jolien; Solano, Eduardo; Minjauw, Matthias M; Van de Kerckhove, Kevin; Coati, Alessandro; Fonda, Emiliano; Portale, Giuseppe; Garreau, Yves; Detavernier, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    We report the design of a mobile setup for synchrotron based in situ studies during atomic layer processing. The system was designed to facilitate in situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS), x-ray fluorescence (XRF), and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at synchrotron

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition of Ultrathin Nickel Sulfide Films and Preliminary Assessment of Their Performance as Hydrogen Evolution Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çimen, Yasemin; Peters, Aaron W; Avila, Jason R; Hoffeditz, William L; Goswami, Subhadip; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-11-22

    Transition metal sulfides show great promise for applications ranging from catalysis to electrocatalysis to photovoltaics due to their high stability and conductivity. Nickel sulfide, particularly known for its ability to electrochemically reduce protons to hydrogen gas nearly as efficiently as expensive noble metals, can be challenging to produce with certain surface site compositions or morphologies, e.g., conformal thin films. To this end, we employed atomic layer deposition (ALD), a preeminent method to fabricate uniform and conformal films, to construct thin films of nickel sulfide (NiSx) using bis(N,N'-di-tert-butylacetamidinato)nickel(II) (Ni(amd)2) vapor and hydrogen sulfide gas. Effects of experimental conditions such as pulse and purge times and temperature on the growth of NiSx were investigated. These revealed a wide temperature range, 125-225 °C, over which self-limiting NiSx growth can be observed. In situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies revealed conventional linear growth behavior for NiSx films, with a growth rate of 9.3 ng/cm2 per cycle being obtained. The ALD-synthesized films were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. To assess the electrocatalyitic activity of NiSx for evolution of molecular hydrogen, films were grown on conductive-glass supports. Overpotentials at a current density of 10 mA/cm2 were recorded in both acidic and pH 7 phosphate buffer aqueous reaction media and found to be 440 and 576 mV, respectively, with very low NiSx loading. These results hint at the promise of ALD-grown NiSx materials as water-compatible electrocatalysts.

  9. Effect of ozone concentration on silicon surface passivation by atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastrow, Guillaume von, E-mail: guillaume.von.gastrow@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Li, Shuo [Aalto University, Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Putkonen, Matti [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Aalto University School of Chemical Technology, Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, FI-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Laitinen, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, FIN-40014 University of Jyvaskyla (Finland); Savin, Hele [Aalto University, Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation quality can be controlled by the ozone concentration. • Ozone concentration affects the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface charge and defect density. • A surface recombination velocity of 7 cm/s is reached combining ozone and water ALD. • Carbon and hydrogen concentrations correlate with the surface passivation quality. - Abstract: We study the impact of ozone-based Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) on the surface passivation quality of crystalline silicon. We show that the passivation quality strongly depends on the ozone concentration: the higher ozone concentration results in lower interface defect density and thereby improved passivation. In contrast to previous studies, our results reveal that too high interface hydrogen content can be detrimental to the passivation. The interface hydrogen concentration can be optimized by the ozone-based process; however, the use of pure ozone increases the harmful carbon concentration in the film. Here we demonstrate that low carbon and optimal hydrogen concentration can be achieved by a single process combining the water- and ozone-based reactions. This process results in an interface defect density of 2 × 10{sup 11} eV{sup −1} cm{sup −2}, and maximum surface recombination velocities of 7.1 cm/s and 10 cm/s, after annealing and after an additional firing at 800 °C, respectively. In addition, our results suggest that the effective oxide charge density can be optimized in a simple way by varying the ozone concentration and by injecting water to the ozone process.

  10. High performance asymmetric V2O5-SnO2 nanopore battery by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chanyuan; Kim, Nam; Rubloff, Gary W; Lee, Sang Bok

    2017-08-17

    Here we report the high performance and cyclability of an asymmetric full cell nanopore battery, comprised of V2O5 as the cathode and prelithiated SnO2 as the anode, with integrated nanotubular Pt current collectors underneath each nanotubular storage electrode, confined within an anodized aluminium oxide (AAO) nanopore. Enabled by atomic layer deposition (ALD), this coaxial nanotube full cell is fully confined within a high aspect ratio nanopore (150 nm in diameter, 50 μm in length), with an ultra-small volume of about 1 fL. By controlling the amount of lithium ion prelithiated into the SnO2 anode, we can tune the full cell output voltage in the range of 0.3 V to 3 V. When tested as a massively parallel device (∼2 billion cm(-2)), this asymmetric nanopore battery array displays exceptional rate performance and cyclability: when cycled between 1 V and 3 V, capacity retention at the 200C rate is ∼73% of that at 1C, and at 25C rate only 2% capacity loss occurs after more than 500 charge/discharge cycles. With the increased full cell output potential, the asymmetric V2O5-SnO2 nanopore battery shows significantly improved energy and power density over the previously reported symmetric cell, 4.6 times higher volumetric energy and 5.2 times higher power density - an even more promising indication that controlled nanostructure designs employing nanoconfined environments with large electrode surface areas present promising directions for future battery technology.

  11. Atomic Layer Deposition of ZnO on Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Its Use for Synthesis of CNT–ZnO Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, direct coating of ZnO on PECVD-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs is achieved using atomic layer deposition (ALD. Transmission electron microscopy investigation shows that the deposited ZnO shell is continuous and uniform, in contrast to the previously reported particle morphology. The ZnO layer has a good crystalline quality as indicated by Raman and photoluminescence (PL measurements. We also show that such ZnO layer can be used as seed layer for subsequent hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanorods, resulting in branched CNT–inorganic hybrid nanostructures. Potentially, this method can also apply to the fabrication of ZnO-based hybrid nanostructures on other carbon nanomaterials.

  12. In situ Al-doped ZnO films by atomic layer deposition with an interrupted flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jheng-Ming [Program for Science and Technology of Accelerator Light Source, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Ku, Ching-Shun [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chih-Ming, E-mail: cmlin@mail.nhcue.edu.tw [Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu 30014, Taiwan (China); Chen, San-Yuan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hsin-Yi, E-mail: hylee@nsrrc.org.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu 30014, Taiwan (China)

    2015-09-01

    In situ aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) films were grown on glass substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with an interrupted flow at temperatures in range 200–280 °C; the optimal temperature, 260 °C, depended on the electrical properties. To assess the effect of the ratio of pulses of diethylzinc (DEZn) and trimethylaluminium (TMA) on the structural, optical and electrical properties, we grew AZO films with various pulse ratios of DEZn:TMA in a range from 3:1 to 10:1 at 260 °C. These properties and the content of Al were investigated with X-ray diffraction, X-ray reflectivity (XRR), a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), a secondary-ion mass spectrometer (SIMS), transmission spectra, Hall measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). The electrical resistivity was least, 5.7 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm, for ALD-AZO films with pulse ratio 6:1; the carrier mobility was 8.80 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} and optical transmittance up to 94%. The epitaxial AZO films grown in situ also on m-plane sapphire exhibited the two-fold symmetry of ZnO (110) in the orthorhombic crystal system. All results show that a novel in situ doping method with an interrupted flow controls the Al content of AZO films more easily, and is more usefully applicable for a structure with a large aspect ratio for an advanced photoelectric device. - Highlights: • In situ Al-doped ZnO films were grown on glass substrates by ALD with an interrupted flow. • AZO films deposited at 260 °C show superior electrical and optical properties. • In situ doping method provides highly crystalline quality and improves the electrical properties. • In situ doping method controls the Al content of AZO films more easily. • In situ doping method is more suitable for a structure with a large aspect ratio for an advanced photoelectric device.

  13. Impedance Characterization of the Capacitive field-Effect pH-Sensor Based on a thin-Layer Hafnium Oxide Formed by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael LEE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As a sensing element, silicon dioxide (SiO2 has been applied within ion-sensitive field effect transistors (ISFET. However, a requirement of increasing pH-sensitivity and stability has observed an increased number of insulating materials that obtain high-k gate being applied as FETs. The increased high-k gate reduces the required metal oxide layer and, thus, the fabrication of thin hafnium oxide (HfO2 layers by atomic layer deposition (ALD has grown with interest in recent years. This metal oxide presents advantageous characteristics that can be beneficial for the advancements within miniaturization of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS technology. In this article, we describe a process for fabrication of HfO2 based on ALD by applying water (H2O as the oxygen precursor. As a first, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements were performed with varying pH (2-10 to demonstrate the sensitivity of HfO2 as a potential pH sensing material. The Nyquist plot demonstrates a high clear shift of the polarization resistance (Rp between pH 6-10 (R2 = 0.9986, Y = 3,054X + 12,100. At acidic conditions (between pH 2-10, the Rp change was small due to the unmodified oxide gate (R2 = 0.9655, Y = 2,104X + 4,250. These preliminary results demonstrate the HfO2 substrate functioned within basic to neutral conditions and establishes a great potential for applying HfO2 as a dielectric material for future pH measuring FET sensors.

  14. Comparison of precursor infiltration into polymer thin films via atomic layer deposition and sequential vapor infiltration using in-situ quartz crystal microgravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padbury, Richard P.; Jur, Jesse S., E-mail: jsjur@ncsu.edu [Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Previous research exploring inorganic materials nucleation behavior on polymers via atomic layer deposition indicates the formation of hybrid organic–inorganic materials that form within the subsurface of the polymer. This has inspired adaptations to the process, such as sequential vapor infiltration, which enhances the diffusion of organometallic precursors into the subsurface of the polymer to promote the formation of a hybrid organic–inorganic coating. This work highlights the fundamental difference in mass uptake behavior between atomic layer deposition and sequential vapor infiltration using in-situ methods. In particular, in-situ quartz crystal microgravimetry is used to compare the mass uptake behavior of trimethyl aluminum in poly(butylene terephthalate) and polyamide-6 polymer thin films. The importance of trimethyl aluminum diffusion into the polymer subsurface and the subsequent chemical reactions with polymer functional groups are discussed.

  15. Atomic Layer Deposition of Electron Selective SnOx and ZnO Films on Mixed Halide Perovskite: Compatibility and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Aitola, Kerttu; Sveinbjörnsson, Kári; Saki, Zahra; Larsson, Fredrik; Törndahl, Tobias; Johansson, Erik; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edoff, Marika

    2017-09-06

    The compatibility of atomic layer deposition directly onto the mixed halide perovskite formamidinium lead iodide:methylammonium lead bromide (CH(NH2)2, CH3NH3)Pb(I,Br)3 (FAPbI3:MAPbBr3) perovskite films is investigated by exposing the perovskite films to the full or partial atomic layer deposition processes for the electron selective layer candidates ZnO and SnOx. Exposing the samples to the heat, the vacuum, and even the counter reactant of H2O of the atomic layer deposition processes does not appear to alter the perovskite films in terms of crystallinity, but the choice of metal precursor is found to be critical. The Zn precursor Zn(C2H5)2 either by itself or in combination with H2O during the ZnO atomic layer deposition (ALD) process is found to enhance the decomposition of the bulk of the perovskite film into PbI2 without even forming ZnO. In contrast, the Sn precursor Sn(N(CH3)2)4 does not seem to degrade the bulk of the perovskite film, and conformal SnOx films can successfully be grown on top of it using atomic layer deposition. Using this SnOx film as the electron selective layer in inverted perovskite solar cells results in a lower power conversion efficiency of 3.4% than the 8.4% for the reference devices using phenyl-C70-butyric acid methyl ester. However, the devices with SnOx show strong hysteresis and can be pushed to an efficiency of 7.8% after biasing treatments. Still, these cells lacks both open circuit voltage and fill factor compared to the references, especially when thicker SnOx films are used. Upon further investigation, a possible cause of these losses could be that the perovskite/SnOx interface is not ideal and more specifically found to be rich in Sn, O, and halides, which is probably a result of the nucleation during the SnOx growth and which might introduce barriers or alter the band alignment for the transport of charge carriers.

  16. Atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 on V2O5 xerogel film for enhanced lithium-ion intercalation stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dawei; Liu, Yanyi; Candelaria, Stephanie L.; Cao, Guozhong; Liu, Jun; Jeong, Yoon-Ha

    2012-01-29

    V2O5 xerogel films were fabricated by casting V2O5 sols onto fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates at room temperature. Five, ten and twenty atomic layers of Al2O3 were grown onto as-fabricated films respectively. The bare film and Al2O3-deposited films all exhibited hydrous V2O5 phase only. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study revealed increased surface charge-transfer resistance of V2O5 films as more Al2O3 atomic layers were deposited. Lithium-ion intercalation tests at 600 mAg_1 showed that bare V2O5 xerogel film possessed high initial discharge capacity of 219 mAhg_1 but suffered from severe capacity degradation, i.e., having only 136 mAhg_1 after 50 cycles. After deposition of ten atomic layers of Al2O3, the initial discharge capacity was 195 mAhg_1 but increased over cycles before stabilizing; after 50 cycles, the discharge capacity was as high as 225 mAhg_1. The noticeably improved cyclic stability of Al2O3-deposited V2O5 xerogel film could be attributed to the improved surface chemistry and enhanced mechanical strength. During repeated lithium-ion intercalation/de-intercalation, atomic layers of Al2O3 which were coated onto V2O5 surface could prevent V2O5 electrode dissolution into electrolyte by reducing direct contact between active electrode and electrolyte while at the same time acting as binder to maintain good mechanical contact between nanoparticles inside the film. VC 2012 American Vacuum Society.

  17. Ta2O5/ Al2O3/ SiO2 - antireflective coating for non-planar optical surfaces by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, K.; Schulz, U.; Tünnermann, A.; Szeghalmi, A.

    2017-02-01

    Antireflective coatings are essential to improve transmittance of optical elements. Most research and development of AR coatings has been reported on a wide variety of plane optical surfaces; however, antireflection is also necessary on nonplanar optical surfaces. Physical vapor deposition (PVD), a common method for optical coatings, often results in thickness gradients on strongly curved surfaces, leading to a failure of the desired optical function. In this work, optical thin films of tantalum pentoxide, aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD), which is based on self-limiting surface reactions. The results demonstrate that ALD optical layers can be deposited on both vertical and horizontal substrate surfaces with uniform thicknesses and the same optical properties. A Ta2O5/Al2O3/ SiO2 multilayer AR coating (400-700 nm) was successfully applied to a curved aspheric glass lens with a diameter of 50 mm and a center thickness of 25 mm.

  18. Ru-decorated Pt nanoparticles on N-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes by atomic layer deposition for direct methanol fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta; Yang, R.B.; Haugshøj, K.B.

    2013-01-01

    We present atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a new method for the preparation of highly dispersed Ru-decorated Pt nanoparticles for use as catalyst in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The nanoparticles were deposited onto N-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) at 250 °C using trimethyl......(methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum MeCpPtMe3, bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium Ru(EtCp)2 and O2 as the precursors. Catalysts with 5, 10 and 20 ALD Ru cycles grown onto the CNT-supported ALD Pt nanoparticles (150 cycles) were prepared and tested towards the electro-oxidation of CO and methanol, using cyclic voltammetry...

  19. Optical and electrical properties of transparent conducting gallium-doped ZnO electrodes prepared by atomic layer deposition for application in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yoon Seog [Department of Electronics Engineering, Dankook University, San #29, Anseo-dong, Cheonan-si, Chungcheongnam-do 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Nak Jin; Choi, Kyu Jeong [Department of Research and Development Center, NCD Co., Ltd, 14-1, Techno2ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon-si 305-509 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Sang Ouk, E-mail: ryuso@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Electronics Engineering, Dankook University, San #29, Anseo-dong, Cheonan-si, Chungcheongnam-do 330-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    Transparent and conducting gallium-doped ZnO electrodes were fabricated by means of atomic layer deposition. The electrode showed the lowest resistivity of 7.19 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm at a 5% cyclic layer deposition ratio of Trimethyl-gallium and Diethyl-zinc chemicals. The electrodes showed minimum resistivity when deposited at a temperature of 250 °C. The electrode also showed optical transmittance of about 82%–89% with film thicknesses between 100 nm and 300 nm. An organic solar cell made with a 300-nm-thick gallium-doped ZnO electrode exhibited 2.5% power conversion efficiency, and an efficiency equivalent to that of cells made with conventional indium tin oxide electrodes. - Highlights: • Ga-doped ZnO thin films were successfully grown by atomic layer deposition • The grown thin film has low resistivity compatible to conventional ITO electrodes • The Ga-doped ZnO films were successfully integrated into organic solar cells • The power conversion efficiency was equivalent to the cells with ITO electrodes.

  20. Chemical stabilization and improved thermal resilience of molecular arrangements: possible formation of a surface network of bonds by multiple pulse atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pauli, Muriel; Matos, Matheus J S; Siles, Pablo F; Prado, Mariana C; Neves, Bernardo R A; Ferreira, Sukarno O; Mazzoni, Mário S C; Malachias, Angelo

    2014-08-14

    In this work, we make use of an atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface reaction based on trimethyl-aluminum (TMA) and water to modify O-H terminated self-assembled layers of octadecylphosphonic acid (OPA). The structural modifications were investigated by X-ray reflectivity, X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. We observed a significant improvement in the thermal stability of ALD-modified molecules, with the existence of a supramolecular packing structure up to 500 °C. Following the experimental observations, density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate the possibility of formation of a covalent network with aluminum atoms connecting OPA molecules at terrace surfaces. Chemical stability is also achieved on top of such a composite surface, inhibiting further ALD oxide deposition. On the other hand, in the terrace edges, where the covalent array is discontinued, the chemical conditions allow for oxide growth. Analysis of the DFT results on band structure and density of states of modified OPA molecules suggests that besides the observed thermal resilience, the dielectric character of OPA layers is preserved. This new ALD-modified OPA composite is potentially suitable for applications such as dielectric layers in organic devices, where better thermal performance is required.

  1. Spatial atomic layer deposition: Performance of low temperature H{sub 2}O and O{sub 3} oxidant chemistry for flexible electronics encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maydannik, Philipp S., E-mail: philipp.maydannik@lut.fi; Plyushch, Alexander; Sillanpää, Mika [Advanced Surface Technology Research Laboratory Team (ASTRaL), Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, Mikkeli 50130 (Finland); Cameron, David C. [R and D Center for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-15

    Water and oxygen were compared as oxidizing agents for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposition process using spatial atomic layer deposition reactor. The influence of the precursor dose on the deposition rate and refractive index, which was used as a proxy for film density, was measured as a function of residence time, defined as the time which the moving substrate spent within one precursor gas zone. The effect of temperature on the growth characteristics was also measured. The water-based process gave faster deposition rates and higher refractive indices but the ozone process allowed deposition to take place at lower temperatures while still maintaining good film quality. In general, processes based on both oxidation chemistries were able to produce excellent moisture barrier films with water vapor transmission rate levels of 10{sup −4} g/m{sup 2} day measured at 38 °C and 90% of relative humidity on polyethylene naphthalate substrates. However, the best result of <5 × 10{sup −5} was obtained at 100 °C process temperature with water as precursor.

  2. Surface poisoning in the nucleation and growth of palladium atomic layer deposition with Pd(hfac){sub 2} and formalin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, D.N. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, 215 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); George, S.M., E-mail: Steven.George@Colorado.Edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, 215 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado, 424 UCB, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Palladium (Pd) atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be performed with Pd(hfac){sub 2} (hfac = hexafluoroacetyl-acetone) and formalin as the reactants. For Pd ALD on oxide surfaces, the nucleation of Pd ALD has been observed to require between 20 and 100 ALD cycles. To understand the long nucleation periods, this study explored the surface reactions occurring during Pd ALD nucleation and growth on hydroxylated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates. In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy on high surface area nanopowders was used to observe the surface species. The adsorption of Pd(hfac){sub 2} on hydroxylated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates was found to yield both Pd(hfac)* and Al(hfac)* surface species. The identity of the Al(hfac)* species was confirmed by separate FTIR studies of hfacH adsorption on the hydroxylated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates. Isothermal loss of the Al(hfac)* species revealed second-order kinetics at 448-523 K with an activation barrier of E{sub d} = 39.4 kcal/mol. The lack of correlation between Al(hfac)* and AlOH* species during the loss of Al(hfac)* species suggested that the Al(hfac)* species may desorb as Al(hfac){sub 3}. After Pd(hfac){sub 2} exposure and the subsequent formalin exposure on hydroxylated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates, only hfac ligands from Pd(hfac)* species were removed from the surface. In addition, the formalin exposure added formate species. The Al(hfac)* species was identified as the cause of the long nucleation period because Al(hfac)* behaves as a site blocker. The surface poisoning by Al(hfac)* species was corroborated by adsorbing hfacH prior to the Pd(hfac){sub 2} exposures. The amount of Pd(hfac)* species after Pd(hfac){sub 2} exposures decreased progressively versus the previous hfacH exposure. Pd ALD occurred gradually during the subsequent Pd ALD cycles as the Al(hfac)* species were slowly removed from the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface. Ex situ transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed Pd nanoclusters

  3. SnO{sub 2} thin films grown by atomic layer deposition using a novel Sn precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min-Jung [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Cheol Jin [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Chon; Pyeon, Jung Joon [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyung-Ho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo-Suk; Han, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Chang Gyoun; Chung, Taek-Mo [Division of Advanced Materials, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Tae Joo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan, 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Beomjin [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Doo Seok; Baek, Seung-Hyub [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanomaterials, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chong-Yun; Kim, Jin-Sang [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Keun, E-mail: s.k.kim@kist.re.kr [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanomaterials, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • We developed a new ALD process for SnO{sub 2} films using dimethylamino-2-methyl-2-propoxy-tin(II) as a novel Sn precursor. • The SnO{sub 2} films grown from Sn(dmamp){sub 2} has negligible impurity contents. • Sn ions in the films had a single binding state corresponding to Sn{sup 4+} in SnO{sub 2}. - Abstract: SnO{sub 2} thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with dimethylamino-2-methyl-2-propoxy-tin(II) (Sn(dmamp){sub 2}) and O{sub 3} in a temperature range of 100–230 °C. The ALD window was found to be in the range of 100–200 °C. The growth per cycle of the films in the ALD window increased with temperature in the range from 0.018 to 0.042 nm/cycle. Above 230 °C, the self-limiting behavior which is a unique characteristic of ALD, was not observed in the growth because of the thermal decomposition of the Sn(dmamp){sub 2} precursor. The SnO{sub 2} films were amorphous in the ALD window and exhibited quite a smooth surface. Sn ions in all films had a single binding state corresponding to Sn{sup 4+} in SnO{sub 2}. The concentration of carbon and nitrogen in the all SnO{sub 2} films was below the detection limit of the auger electron spectroscopy technique and a very small amount of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen was detected by secondary ions mass spectroscopy only. The impurity contents decreased with increasing the growth temperature. This is consistent with the increase in the density of the SnO{sub 2} films with respect to the growth temperature. The ALD process with Sn(dmamp){sub 2} and O{sub 3} shows excellent conformality on a hole structure with an aspect ratio of ∼9. This demonstrates that the ALD process with Sn(dmamp){sub 2} and O{sub 3} is promising for growth of robust and highly pure SnO{sub 2} films.

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition of Gadolinium Aluminate using Gd((PrCp)-Pr-i)(3), TMA, and O-3 or H2O

    OpenAIRE

    Adelmann, Christoph; Pierreux, Dieter; Swerts, Johan; DEWULF, Dann; HARDY, An; TIELENS, Hilde; Franquet, Alexis; Brijs, Bert; Moussa, Alain; Conard, Thierry; VAN BAEL, Marlies; Maes, Jan W.; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Kittl, Jorge A.; Van Elshocht, Sven

    2010-01-01

    For future generations of non-volatile memory applications, the replacement of the interpoly dielectric by a suitable high-K material is required. Rare-earth aluminates are potential candidates because they are predicted to combine a high dielectric permittivity with a large band gap. We demonstrate the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of GdxAl2O3 layers using Gd((PrCp)-Pr-i)(3), trimethyl-aluminum (TMA), and H2O or O-3. Process windows for both H2O and O3 as oxidants are explored. H2O is shown ...

  5. The importance of dye chemistry and TiCl4 surface treatment in the behavior of Al2O3 recombination barrier layers deposited by atomic layer deposition in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to fabricate Al 2O 3 recombination barriers in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSSCs) employing an organic hole transport material (HTM) for the first time. Al 2O 3 recombination barriers of varying thickness were incorporated into efficient ss-DSSCs utilizing the Z907 dye adsorbed onto a 2 μm-thick nanoporous TiO 2 active layer and the HTM spiro-OMeTAD. The impact of Al 2O 3 barriers was also studied in devices employing different dyes, with increased active layer thicknesses, and with substrates that did not undergo the TiCl 4 surface treatment. In all instances, electron lifetimes (as determined by transient photovoltage measurements) increased and dark current was suppressed after Al 2O 3 deposition. However, only when the TiCl 4 treatment was eliminated did device efficiency increase; in all other instances efficiency decreased due to a drop in short-circuit current. These results are attributed in the former case to the similar effects of Al 2O 3 ALD and the TiCl 4 surface treatment whereas the insulating properties of Al 2O 3 hinder charge injection and lead to current loss in TiCl 4-treated devices. The impact of Al 2O 3 barrier layers was unaffected by doubling the active layer thickness or using an alternative ruthenium dye, but a metal-free donor-π-acceptor dye exhibited a much smaller decrease in current due to its higher excited state energy. We develop a model employing prior research on Al 2O 3 growth and dye kinetics that successfully predicts the reduction in device current as a function of ALD cycles and is extendable to different dye-barrier systems. © This journal is the Owner Societies 2012.

  6. Effect of surface pretreatment on interfacial chemical bonding states of atomic layer deposited ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Hong, E-mail: ewanghong@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore and CINTRA CNRS/NTU/Thales, UMI 3288, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Ng, Serene Lay Geok; Ji, Rong [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A-STAR), 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Liu, Zhi Hong [Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, 1 CREATE Way, Singapore 138602 (Singapore)

    2015-09-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZrO{sub 2} on native oxide covered (untreated) and buffered oxide etchant (BOE) treated AlGaN surface was analyzed by utilizing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Evidenced by Ga–O and Al–O chemical bonds by XPS, parasitic oxidation during deposition is largely enhanced on BOE treated AlGaN surface. Due to the high reactivity of Al atoms, more prominent oxidation of Al atoms is observed, which leads to thicker interfacial layer formed on BOE treated surface. The results suggest that native oxide on AlGaN surface may serve as a protecting layer to inhibit the surface from further parasitic oxidation during ALD. The findings provide important process guidelines for the use of ALD ZrO{sub 2} and its pre-ALD surface treatments for high-k AlGaN/GaN metal–insulator–semiconductor high electron mobility transistors and other related device applications.

  7. Relation of lifetime to surface passivation for atomic-layer-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on crystalline silicon solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Joon [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hee Eun, E-mail: hsong@kier.re.kr [Photovoltaic Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyo Sik, E-mail: hschang@cnu.ac.kr [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on Si solar wafer to lifetime. • We deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si solar wafer after several cleaning process. • Potassium can be left on Si surface by incomplete cleaning process and degrade the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation quality. - Abstract: We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on a crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface after potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching to the lifetime of the c-Si solar cell. Alkaline solution was employed for saw damage removal (SDR), texturing, and planarization of a textured c-Si solar wafer prior to atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth. In the solar-cell manufacturing process, ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation is utilized to obtain higher conversion efficiency. ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows excellent surface passivation, though minority carrier lifetime varies with cleaning conditions. In the present study, we investigated the relation of potassium contamination to lifetime in solar-cell processing. The results showed that the potassium-contaminated samples, due to incomplete cleaning of KOH, had a short lifetime, thus establishing that residual potassium can degrade Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface passivation.

  8. Thickness scaling of atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 films and their application to wafer-scale graphene tunnelling transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seong-Jun; Gu, Yeahyun; Heo, Jinseong; Yang, Jaehyun; Lee, Chang-Seok; Lee, Min-Hyun; Lee, Yunseong; Kim, Hyoungsub; Park, Seongjun; Hwang, Sungwoo

    2016-02-10

    The downscaling of the capacitance equivalent oxide thickness (CET) of a gate dielectric film with a high dielectric constant, such as atomic layer deposited (ALD) HfO2, is a fundamental challenge in achieving high-performance graphene-based transistors with a low gate leakage current. Here, we assess the application of various surface modification methods on monolayer graphene sheets grown by chemical vapour deposition to obtain a uniform and pinhole-free ALD HfO2 film with a substantially small CET at a wafer scale. The effects of various surface modifications, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone treatment and introduction of sputtered ZnO and e-beam-evaporated Hf seed layers on monolayer graphene, and the subsequent HfO2 film formation under identical ALD process parameters were systematically evaluated. The nucleation layer provided by the Hf seed layer (which transforms to the HfO2 layer during ALD) resulted in the uniform and conformal deposition of the HfO2 film without damaging the graphene, which is suitable for downscaling the CET. After verifying the feasibility of scaling down the HfO2 thickness to achieve a CET of ~1.5 nm from an array of top-gated metal-oxide-graphene field-effect transistors, we fabricated graphene heterojunction tunnelling transistors with a record-low subthreshold swing value of <60 mV/dec on an 8" glass wafer.

  9. Atomic Layer Deposition TiO2 Films and TiO2/SiNx Stacks Applied for Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu-Po Yang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Titanium oxide (TiO2 films and TiO2/SiNx stacks have potential in surface passivation, anti-reflection coatings and carrier-selective contact layers for crystalline Si solar cells. A Si wafer, deposited with 8-nm-thick TiO2 film by atomic layer deposition, has a surface recombination velocity as low as 14.93 cm/s at the injection level of 1.0 × 1015 cm−3. However, the performance of silicon surface passivation of the deposited TiO2 film declines as its thickness increases, probably because of the stress effects, phase transformation, atomic hydrogen and thermal stability of amorphous TiO2 films. For the characterization of 66-nm-thick TiO2 film, the results of transmission electron microscopy show that the anatase TiO2 crystallinity forms close to the surface of the Si. Secondary ion mass spectrometry shows the atomic hydrogen at the interface of TiO2 and Si which serves for chemical passivation. The crystal size of anatase TiO2 and the homogeneity of TiO2 film can be deduced by the measurements of Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry, respectively. For the passivating contacts of solar cells, in addition, a stack composed of 8-nm-thick TiO2 film and a plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited 72-nm-thick SiNx layer has been investigated. From the results of the measurement of the reflectivity and effective carrier lifetime, TiO2/SiNx stacks on Si wafers perform with low reflectivity and some degree of surface passivation for the Si wafer.

  10. Nucleation and initial growth of atomic layer deposited titanium oxide determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry and the effect of pretreatment by surface barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, David C., E-mail: dccameron@mail.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Krumpolec, Richard, E-mail: richard.krumpolec@fmph.uniba.sk [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, 842 4 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ivanova, Tatiana V., E-mail: tatiana.ivanova@lut.fi [ASTRaL team, Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Homola, Tomáš, E-mail: tomas.homola@mail.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Černák, Mirko, E-mail: cernak@physics.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Spectroscopic ellipsometry shows initial nucleation and growth process in atomic layer deposited titanium dioxide. • Quantum confinement effects were used to measure evolution of crystallite size. • Crystallite surface density can be extracted from ellipsometric surface roughness data and crystallite size. • Pretreatment of silicon substrates by diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge has only minor effects on titanium dioxide film nucleation and growth. - Abstract: This paper reports on the use of spectroscopic ellipsometry to characterise the initial nucleation stage of the atomic layer deposition of the anatase phase of titanium dioxide on silicon substrates. Careful control and analysis of the ellipsometric measurements enables the determination of the evolution of crystallite diameter and surface density in the nucleation stage before a continuous film is formed. This growth behaviour is in line with atomic force microscopy measurements of the crystallite size. The crystallite diameter is a linear function of the number of ALD cycles with a slope of approximately 1.7 Å cycle{sup −1} which is equivalent to a layer growth rate of 0.85 Å cycle{sup −1} consistent with a ripening process which increases the crystallite size while reducing their density. The crystallite density decreases from ∼3 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3} in the initial nucleation stages to ∼3 × 10{sup 15} m{sup −3} before the film becomes continuous. The effect of exposing the substrate to a diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge in an air atmosphere before deposition was measured and only small differences were found: the plasma treated samples were slightly rougher in the initial stages and required a greater number of cycles to form a continuous film (∼80) compared to the untreated films (∼50). A thicker layer of native oxide was found after plasma treatment.

  11. Room-Temperature Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2 O3 : Impact on Efficiency, Stability and Surface Properties in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kot, Malgorzata; Das, Chittaranjan; Wang, Zhiping; Henkel, Karsten; Rouissi, Zied; Wojciechowski, Konrad; Snaith, Henry J; Schmeisser, Dieter

    2016-12-20

    In this work, solar cells with a freshly made CH3 NH3 PbI3 perovskite film showed a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.4 % whereas the one with 50 days aged perovskite film only 6.1 %. However, when the aged perovskite was covered with a layer of Al2 O3 deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at room temperature (RT), the PCE value was clearly enhanced. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study showed that the ALD precursors are chemically active only at the perovskite surface and passivate it. Moreover, the RT-ALD-Al2 O3 -covered perovskite films showed enhanced ambient air stability. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A study of the effect of surface pretreatment on atomic layer deposited Al2O3 interface with GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianyi; Li, Wenwen; Mandal, Saptarshi; Chowdhury, Srabanti

    2017-08-01

    Al2O3 has been an attractive gate dielectric for GaN power devices owing to its large conduction band offset with GaN ( 2.13eV), relatively high dielectric constant ( 9.0) and high breakdown electric field ( 10 MV/cm). Due to exceptional control over film uniformity and deposition rate, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been widely used for Al2O3 deposition. The major obstacle to ALD Al2O3 on GaN is its high interface-state density (Dit) caused by incomplete chemical bonds, native oxide layer and impurities at the Al2O3/GaN interface. Therefore, an appropriate surface pretreatment prior to deposition is essential for obtaining high-quality interface. In this study, we investigated the effect of TMA, H2O and Ar/N2 plasma pretreatment on Dit and border traps (Nbt). 5 cycles of TMA purge, 5 cycles of H2O purge and Ar/N2 plasma pretreatment were conducted on GaN prior to deposition of ALD Al2O3. Al2O3/GaN metaloxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) were fabricated for the characterization of Dit and Nbt using UV-assisted capacitance-voltage (C-V) technique. The results show that TMA and H2O pretreatment had trivial effects on interface engineering whereas Ar/N2 plasma pretreatment slightly reduced Dit and significantly reduced Nbt.

  13. Atomic layer deposition of TiO2 and Al2O3 on nanographite films: structure and field emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleshch, Victor I.; Ismagilov, Rinat R.; Smolnikova, Elena A.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Tuyakova, Feruza; Obraztsov, Alexander N.

    2016-03-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metal oxides (MO) was used to modify the properties of nanographite (NG) films produced by direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. NG films consist of a few layers of graphene flakes (nanowalls) and nanoscrolls homogeneously distributed over a silicon substrate with a predominantly vertical orientation of graphene sheets to the substrate surface. TiO2 and Al2O3 layers, with thicknesses in the range of 50 to 250 nm, were deposited on NG films by ALD. The obtained NG-MO composite materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that ALD forms a uniform coating on graphene flakes, while on the surface of needle-like nanoscrolls it forms spherical nanoparticles. Field emission properties of the films were measured in a flat vacuum diode configuration. Analysis based on obtained current-voltage characteristics and electrostatic calculations show that emission from NG-TiO2 films is determined by the nanoscrolls protruding from the TiO2 coverage. The TiO2 layers with thicknesses of stabilize the NG films' surface and can lead to an improvement of the NG cold cathode performance in vacuum electronics.

  14. Electrical hysteresis in p-GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor with atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 as gate dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kexiong; Liao, Meiyong; Imura, Masataka; Nabatame, Toshihide; Ohi, Akihiko; Sumiya, Masatomo; Koide, Yasuo; Sang, Liwen

    2016-12-01

    The electrical hysteresis in current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage characteristics was observed in an atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3/p-GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor (PMOSCAP). The absolute minimum leakage currents of the PMOSCAP for forward and backward I-V scans occurred not at 0 V but at -4.4 and +4.4 V, respectively. A negative flat-band voltage shift of 5.5 V was acquired with a capacitance step from +4.4 to +6.1 V during the forward scan. Mg surface accumulation on p-GaN was demonstrated to induce an Mg-Ga-Al-O oxidized layer with a trap density on the order of 1013 cm-2. The electrical hysteresis is attributed to the hole trapping and detrapping process in the traps of the Mg-Ga-Al-O layer via the Poole-Frenkel mechanism.

  15. Tuning of undoped ZnO thin film via plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition and its application for an inverted polymer solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-jin Jin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the tuning of structural and optical properties of ZnO thin film and its correlation to the efficiency of inverted solar cell using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD. The sequential injection of DEZn and O2 plasma was employed for the plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin film. As the growth temperature of ZnO film was increased from 100 °C to 300 °C, the crystallinity of ZnO film was improved from amorphous to highly ordered (002 direction ploy-crystal due to self crystallization. Increasing oxygen plasma time in PEALD process also introduces growing of hexagonal wurtzite phase of ZnO nanocrystal. Excess of oxygen plasma time induces enhanced deep level emission band (500 ∼ 700 nm in photoluminescence due to Zn vacancies and other defects. The evolution of structural and optical properties of PEALD ZnO films also involves in change of electrical conductivity by 3 orders of magnitude. The highly tunable PEALD ZnO thin films were employed as the electron conductive layers in inverted polymer solar cells. Our study indicates that both structural and optical properties rather than electrical conductivities of ZnO films play more important role for the effective charge collection in photovoltaic device operation. The ability to tune the materials properties of undoped ZnO films via PEALD should extend their functionality over the wide range of advanced electronic applications.

  16. Performance of inverted polymer solar cells with randomly oriented ZnO nanorods coupled with atomic layer deposited ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafar, Muhammad [School of Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300 Youngbong-dong, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Ju-Young [Center for Vacuum, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, 267 Gajeong-ro, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do-Heyoung, E-mail: kdhh@chonnam.ac.kr [School of Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300 Youngbong-dong, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Hydrothermally grown, randomly oriented, and low areal density ZnO nanorods have been successfully adopted as the electron transport layer in inverted organic solar cells. • The addition of atomic layer deposited ZnO on the ZnO nanorods effectively enhance the photovoltaic performances of inverted organic solar cells. • The inverted organic solar cells with 5 nm thick-ALD ZnO showed the highest power conversion efficiency of 3.08%, which is an enhancement of approximately 80% compared to the cells without the ALD ZnO layer (PCE = 1.67%). - Abstract: Nanostructuring of the electron transport layer (ETL) in organic photovoltaic cells (OPV) is of great interest because it increases the surface area of the cell and electron transport. In this work, hydrothermally grown, randomly oriented, and low areal density ZnO nanorods (NRs) have been adopted as the ETL, and the effect of adding atomic layer deposited (ALD) ZnO on the ZnO NRs on the inverted organic solar cell performance has been investigated. The fabricated inverted organic solar cell with 5-nm-thick ALD-ZnO grown on the ZnO NRs showed the highest power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.08%, which is an enhancement of 85% from that of the cell without ALD-ZnO (PCE = 1.67%). The ultrathin ALD-ZnO was found to act as a curing layer of the surface defects on the hydrothermally grown ZnO NRs, resulting in an improvement in photovoltaic performance.

  17. Atomic layer deposition of Cu( i ) oxide films using Cu( ii ) bis(dimethylamino-2-propoxide) and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, J. R.; Peters, A. W.; Li, Zhanyong; Ortuño, M. A.; Martinson, A. B. F.; Cramer, C. J.; Hupp, J. T.; Farha, O. K.

    2017-01-01

    To grow fIlms of Cu2O, bis-(dimethylamino-2-propoxide)Cu(II), or Cu(dmap), is used as an atomic layer deposition precursor using only water vapor as a co-reactant. Between 110 and 175 °C, a growth rate of 0.12 ± 0.02 Å per cycle was measured using an in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the growth of metal– oxide films featuring Cu(I).

  18. Structure, reactivity, electronic configuration and magnetism of samarium atomic layers deposited on Si(0 0 1) by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheorghe, Nicoleta G.; Lungu, George A.; Husanu, Marius A.; Costescu, Ruxandra M.; Macovei, Dan [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105 b, 077125 Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Teodorescu, Cristian M., E-mail: teodorescu@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105 b, 077125 Magurele-Ilfov (Romania)

    2013-02-15

    The surface structure, interface reactivity, electron configuration and magnetic properties of Sm layers deposited on Si(0 0 1) at various temperatures are investigated by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). It is found that metal Sm is present on samples prepared at low temperature, with an interface layer containing SmSi{sub 2} and Sm{sub 4}Si{sub 3}. When samples are prepared at high temperature, much less metal Sm is found, with an increasing amount of SmSi{sub 2}. Room temperature ferromagnetism is observed for all prepared layers, with a decrease of the saturation magnetization when samples are prepared at high temperature. It is found that ferromagnetism implies mostly a compound with approximate stoichiometry Sm{sub 4}Si{sub 3}. Also, the decrease in the intensity of the XAS 2p{sub 3/2} → 3d white lines with the corresponding increasing amount of SmSi{sub 2} may be explained by assuming a higher occupancy of Sm 5d orbitals (5d{sup 2} configuration), most probably due to hybridation effects.

  19. Thermal atomic layer deposition of In2O3 thin films using dimethyl(N-ethoxy-2,2-dimethylcarboxylicpropanamide)indium and H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbenyeke, Raphael Edem; Jung, Eun Ae; Park, Bo Keun; Chung, Taek-Mo; Kim, Chang Gyoun; Han, Jeong Hwan

    2017-10-01

    Indium oxide (In2O3) thin films were deposited by atomic layer deposition using dimethyl(N-ethoxy-2,2-dimethylcarboxylicpropanamide)indium (Me2In(EDPA)) and H2O as the In-precursor and reactant, respectively. The In2O3 films exhibited a saturated growth rate of 0.083 nm/cycle at a deposition temperature of 300 °C. Porous and amorphous films were grown at 150 °C, whereas dense polycrystalline films were deposited at higher deposition temperatures of 200-300 °C. XPS analysis revealed negligible carbon and nitrogen impurities incorporation within the films. The estimated bandgap of the In2O3 films by spectroscopic ellipsometry and UV-vis spectroscopy was about 3.7 eV and the increase in refractive index with deposition temperature from 150 to 300 °C indicated that dense films were grown at higher temperatures. The high transmittance (>94% in visible light) and good electrical properties (resistivity ∼1.2-7 mΩ cm, Hall mobility ∼28-66 cm2/V s) of the In2O3 films make them a viable option for optoelectronic applications.

  20. Growth of thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on biaxially oriented polymer films by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaehae-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Kauppi, Emilia, E-mail: emilia.kauppi@vti.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Sahagian, Khoren, E-mail: khoren@anasysinstruments.com [Anasys Instruments, 121 Gray Avenue, Suite 100, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (United States); Johansson, Leena-Sisko, E-mail: leena-sisko.johansson@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 AALTO (Finland); Peresin, Maria Soledad; Sievaenen, Jenni; Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2012-11-01

    The effects of thin film nucleation and initial growth on roughness, chemistry and thermomechanical properties of polymer film surfaces were studied. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was deposited onto commercial biaxially oriented polypropylene and polylactic acid films at 80 Degree-Sign C by using atomic layer deposition technique. Both substrates, especially the more hydrophobic polypropylene, showed initial growth through Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} clusters. There was a faster deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on polylactic acid film than on polypropylene at the early stages of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition. There were also indications of chemical interactions between polylactic acid and trimethyl aluminum used as a precursor for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Changes in the thermo-mechanical properties of the polymer surfaces with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} also evidenced the differences between the substrate polymer films. The near surface interphase formed in polylactic acid probably contributed to the strong increase and scattering in the softening temperature during the early thin film growth. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth of atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at 80 Degree-Sign C was studied on commercial films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both substrate films showed early Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth through clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initial growth rate depends on the nature of the substrate film surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There were indications of chemical interactions between substrate and precursor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Film thickness and chemical interactions affect thermo-mechanical properties.

  1. Native Oxide Transport and Removal During Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2 Films on GaAs(100) Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henegar, Alex J; Cook, Andrew J; Dang, Phillip; Gougousi, Theodosia

    2016-01-27

    In this work, we studied the evolution and transport of the native oxides during the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO2 on GaAs(100) from tetrakis dimethyl amino titanium and H2O. Arsenic oxide transport through the TiO2 film and removal during the ALD process was investigated using transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Experiments were designed to decouple these processes by utilizing their temperature dependence. A 4 nm TiO2 layer was initially deposited on a native oxide surface at 100 °C. Ex situ XPS confirmed that this step disturbed the interface minimally. An additional 3 nm TiO2 film was subsequently deposited at 150 to 250 °C with and without an intermediate thermal treatment step at 250 °C. Arsenic and gallium oxide removal was confirmed during this second deposition, leading to the inevitable conclusion that these oxides traversed at least 4 nm of film so as to react with the precursor and its surface reaction/decomposition byproducts. XPS measurements confirmed the relocation of both arsenic and gallium oxides from the interface to the bulk of the TiO2 film under normal processing conditions. These results explain the continuous native oxide removal observed for alkyl-amine precursor-based ALD processes on III-V surfaces and provide further insight into the mechanisms of film growth.

  2. ZnS thin films grown by atomic layer deposition on GaAs and HgCdTe substrates at very low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C. H.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, T. N.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y. Y.; Ye, Z. H.

    2017-09-01

    ZnS films grown on GaAs and HgCdTe substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) under very low temperature were investigated in this work. ZnS films were grown under several temperatures lower than 140 °C. The properties of the films were investigated with high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed the ZnS films were polycrystalline. The growth rate monotonically decreased with temperature, as well as the root mean square (r.m.s) roughness measured by AFM. XPS measurement revealed the films were stoichiometric in Zn and S.

  3. Investigation of Ag-TiO2 Interfacial Reaction of Highly Stable Ag Nanowire Transparent Conductive Film with Conformal TiO2 Coating by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ming-Hua; Chen, Po-Hsun; Yang, Yi-Ching; Chen, Guan-Hong; Chen, Hsueh-Shih

    2017-03-29

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique is applied to coat Ag nanowires (NWs) with a highly uniform and conformal TiO2 layer to improve the stability and sustainability of Ag NW transparent conductive films (TCFs) at high temperatures. The TiO2 layer can be directly deposited on Ag NWs with a surface polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coat that acts a bed for TiO2 seeding in the ALD process. The ALD TiO2 layer significantly enhances the thermal stability at least 100 fold when aged between 200-400 °C and also provides an extra function of violet-blue light filtration for Ag NW TCFs. Investigation into the interaction between TiO2 and Ag reveals that the conformal TiO2 shell could effectively prevent Ag from 1D-to-3D ripening. However, Ag could penetrate the conformal TiO2 shell and form nanocrystals on the TiO2 shell surface when it is aged at 400 °C. According to experimental data and thermodynamic evaluation, the Ag penetration leads to an interlayer composed of mixed Ag-Ag2O-amorphous carbon phases and TiO2-x at the Ag-TiO2 interface, which is thought to be caused by extremely high vapor pressure of Ag at the Ag-TiO2 interface at a higher temperature (e.g., 400 °C).

  4. Indium diffusion and native oxide removal during the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO2 films on InAs(100) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Liwang; Gougousi, Theodosia

    2013-08-28

    A thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) process with tetrakis(dimethylamino) titanium and H2O as reagents has been used to deposit TiO2 films on native oxide and etched InAs(100) surfaces at 200 °C. TiO2 was deposited on etched InAs(100) surface without the formation of undesirable interfacial layers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data on a series of films of increasing thickness deposited on surfaces covered with native oxide has shown that the surface arsenic oxides are removed within the first 2-3 nm of film deposition. The indium oxides, however, after an initial reduction seem to persist and increase in intensity with film thickness. For a 6.4-nm-thick TiO2 film, XPS depth profile data demonstrate an accumulation of indium oxides at the TiO2 film surface. When the topmost layer of the indium/TiO2 film is removed, then a sharp interface between the TiO2 film and the InAs substrate is detected. This observation demonstrates that the surface oxides diffuse through fairly thick TiO2 films and may subsequently be removed by reaction with the precursor and amine byproducts of the ALD reaction. These findings underscore the importance of diffusion in understanding the so-called "interface clean-up" reaction and its potential impact on the fabrication of high-quality InAs and other Group III-V-based MOS devices.

  5. Polymer-inorganic core-shell nanofibers by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition: flexible nylon-ZnO core-shell nanofiber mats and their photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaci, Fatma; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Donmez, Inci; Biyikli, Necmi; Uyar, Tamer

    2012-11-01

    Polymer-inorganic core-shell nanofibers were produced by two-step approach; electrospinning and atomic layer deposition (ALD). First, nylon 6,6 (polymeric core) nanofibers were obtained by electrospinning, and then zinc oxide (ZnO) (inorganic shell) with precise thickness control was deposited onto electrospun nylon 6,6 nanofibers using ALD technique. The bead-free and uniform nylon 6,6 nanofibers having different average fiber diameters (∼80, ∼240 and ∼650 nm) were achieved by using two different solvent systems and polymer concentrations. ZnO layer about 90 nm, having uniform thickness around the fiber structure, was successfully deposited onto the nylon 6,6 nanofibers. Because of the low deposition temperature utilized (200 °C), ALD process did not deform the polymeric fiber structure, and highly conformal ZnO layer with precise thickness and composition over a large scale were accomplished regardless of the differences in fiber diameters. ZnO shell layer was found to have a polycrystalline nature with hexagonal wurtzite structure. The core-shell nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mats were flexible because of the polymeric core component. Photocatalytic activity of the core-shell nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mats were tested by following the photocatalytic decomposition of rhodamine-B dye. The nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mat, having thinner fiber diameter, has shown better photocatalytic efficiency due to higher surface area of this sample. These nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mats have also shown structural stability and kept their photocatalytic activity for the second cycle test. Our findings suggest that core-shell nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mat can be a very good candidate as a filter material for water purification and organic waste treatment because of their photocatalytic properties along with structural flexibility and stability.

  6. Atomic Layer Deposited MgO: A Lower Overpotential Coating for Li[Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2]O2 Cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, Masihhur R; Jackson, David H K; Xu, Shenzhen; Hamers, Robert J; Morgan, Dane; Kuech, Thomas F

    2017-03-29

    An ultrathin MgO coating was synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD) to improve the surface properties of the Li[Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2]O2 (NMC) cathode. An in-situ quartz crystal sensor was used to monitor the "self-limiting" surface reactions during ALD process and estimate the density of the deposited film. The electrochemical performance of the MgO-coated NMC cathode was evaluated in a half-cell assembly and compared to other ALD-based coatings, such as Al2O3 and ZrO2. Cyclic voltammetry studies suggested that ALD MgO has a higher Li-diffusion coefficient which resulted in lower overpotential on the NMC cathode surface and improved Li-ion battery rate performance. MgO-coated NMC also yielded improved capacity retention over uncoated NMC in a long-range cycling test.

  7. Structural Properties Characterized by the Film Thickness and Annealing Temperature for La2O3 Films Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Liu, Hongxia; Zhao, Lu; Fei, Chenxi; Feng, Xingyao; Chen, Shupeng; Wang, Yongte

    2017-03-01

    La2O3 films were grown on Si substrates by atomic layer deposition technique with different thickness. Crystallization characteristics of the La2O3 films were analyzed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction after post-deposition rapid thermal annealing treatments at several annealing temperatures. It was found that the crystallization behaviors of the La2O3 films are affected by the film thickness and annealing temperatures as a relationship with the diffusion of Si substrate. Compared with the amorphous La2O3 films, the crystallized films were observed to be more unstable due to the hygroscopicity of La2O3. Besides, the impacts of crystallization characteristics on the bandgap and refractive index of the La2O3 films were also investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry, respectively.

  8. Uniformity and passivation research of Al2O3 film on silicon substrate prepared by plasma-enhanced atom layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Endong; Zhou, Chunlan; Wang, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced atom layer deposition (PEALD) can deposit denser films than those prepared by thermal ALD. But the improvement on thickness uniformity and the decrease of defect density of the films deposited by PEALD need further research. A PEALD process from trimethyl-aluminum (TMA) and oxygen plasma was investigated to study the influence of the conditions with different plasma powers and deposition temperatures on uniformity and growth rate. The thickness and refractive index of films were measured by ellipsometry, and the passivation effect of alumina on n-type silicon before and after annealing was measured by microwave photoconductivity decay method. Also, the effects of deposition temperature and annealing temperature on effective minority carrier lifetime were investigated. Capacitance-voltage and conductance-voltage measurements were used to investigate the interface defect density of state (D it) of Al2O3/Si. Finally, Al diffusion P(+) emitter on n-type silicon was passivated by PEALD Al2O3 films. The conclusion is that the condition of lower substrate temperature accelerates the growth of films and that the condition of lower plasma power controls the films' uniformity. The annealing temperature is higher for samples prepared at lower substrate temperature in order to get the better surface passivation effects. Heavier doping concentration of Al increased passivation quality after annealing by the effective minority carrier lifetime up to 100 μs.

  9. Realization of solution-processed semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes thin film transistors with atomic layer deposited ZrAlOx gate insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuan-Xin; Li, Jun; Zhong, De-Yao; Zhao, Cheng-Yu; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Jiang, Xue-Yin; Zhang, Zhi-Lin

    2017-06-01

    In this study, the semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (semi-SWCNT) thin film transistors (TFTs) with high dielectric constant (κ) atomic layer deposited ZrAlOx gate insulator are fabricated by the drop-casted method. The hysteresis characteristic, negative gate voltage stress stability, and thermal stability are studied, and the semi-SWCNT TFTs with ZrAlOx gate insulators show a small hysteresis of 0.2 V, a little threshold voltage shift of 2.5 V under the negative gate voltage stress, and a threshold voltage shift of 2 V under the thermal stress. Such advantages are due to the amorphous structure and smooth surface of the atomic layer deposited ZrAlOx gate insulator, which induces less trap states. In addition, the thermal stress stability of semi-SWCNT TFTs is investigated. It is found that the behavior of semi-SWCNT TFTs under thermal stress obeys the thermally activated hopping model obviously. This model explains the threshold voltage shift of the device under thermal stress, which is very reasonable.

  10. Surface preparation of gold nanostructures on glass by ultraviolet ozone and oxygen plasma for thermal atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, Cady A., E-mail: lancaster@chem.utah.edu; Shumaker-Parry, Jennifer S., E-mail: shumaker-parry@chem.utah.edu

    2016-08-01

    Thin film deposition to create robust plasmonic nanomaterials is a growing area of research. Plasmonic nanomaterials have tunable optical properties and can be used as substrates for surface-enhanced spectroscopies. Due to the surface sensitivity and the dependence of the near-field behavior on structural details, degradation from cleaning or spectroscopic interrogation causes plasmonic nanostructures to lose distinctive localized surface plasmon resonances or exhibit diminished optical near-field enhancements over time. To decrease degradation, conformal thin films of alumina are deposited on nanostructured substrates using atomic layer deposition. While film growth on homogenous surfaces has been studied extensively, atomic layer deposition-based film growth on heterogeneous nanostructured surfaces is not well characterized. In this report, we have evaluated the impact of oxygen plasma and ultraviolet ozone pre-treatments on Au nanoparticle substrates for thin film growth by monitoring changes in plasmonic response and nanostructure morphology. We have found that ultraviolet ozone is more effective than oxygen plasma for cleaning gold nanostructured surfaces, which is in contrast to bulk films of the same material. Our results show that oxygen plasma treatment negatively impacts the nanostructure and alumina coating based on both scanning electron microscopy analysis of morphology and changes in the plasmonic response. - Highlights: • Plasmonic response indicates oxygen plasma damages Au structures and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films. • Ultraviolet ozone (UVO) re-activates aged Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-coated Au nanostructures. • UVO treatments do not damage Au or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-coated nanostructures.

  11. Atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2} and Al-doped TiO{sub 2} films on Ir substrates for ultralow leakage currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Keun; Han, Sora; Han, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Woongkyu; Hwang, Cheol Seong [WCU Hybrid Materials Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    TiO{sub 2} and Al-doped TiO{sub 2} (ATO) films were grown on Ir substrates by atomic layer deposition using O{sub 3} as the oxygen source. With increasing O{sub 3} feeding time, the crystalline structure of the TiO{sub 2} films was transformed from anatase to rutile. Above an O{sub 3} feeding time of 35 s, the films crystallized as only rutile due to the formation of IrO{sub 2} layer at the interface. The TiO{sub 2} and ATO films showed higher dielectric constants of 78 and 51, respectively. The films on Ir showed superior leakage properties compared to the films on Ru due to the high work-function of Ir. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Area-selective atomic layer deposition of Ru on electron-beam-written Pt(C) patterns versus SiO2 substratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junige, Marcel; Löffler, Markus; Geidel, Marion; Albert, Matthias; Bartha, Johann W.; Zschech, Ehrenfried; Rellinghaus, Bernd; van Dorp, Willem F.

    2017-09-01

    Area selectivity is an emerging sub-topic in the field of atomic layer deposition (ALD), which employs opposite nucleation phenomena to distinct heterogeneous starting materials on a surface. In this paper, we intend to grow Ru exclusively on locally pre-defined Pt patterns, while keeping a SiO2 substratum free from any deposition. In a first step, we study in detail the Ru ALD nucleation on SiO2 and clarify the impact of the set-point temperature. An initial incubation period with actually no growth was revealed before a formation of minor, isolated RuO x islands; clearly no continuous Ru layer formed on SiO2. A lower temperature was beneficial in facilitating a longer incubation and consequently a wider window for (inherent) selectivity. In a second step, we write C-rich Pt micro-patterns on SiO2 by focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID), varying the number of FEBID scans at two electron beam acceleration voltages. Subsequently, the localized Pt(C) deposits are pre-cleaned in O2 and overgrown by Ru ALD. Already sub-nanometer-thin Pt(C) patterns, which were supposedly purified into some form of Pt(O x ), acted as very effective activation for the locally restricted, thus area-selective ALD growth of a pure, continuous Ru covering, whereas the SiO2 substratum sufficiently inhibited towards no growth. FEBID at lower electron energy reduced unwanted stray deposition and achieved well-resolved pattern features. We access the nucleation phenomena by utilizing a hybrid metrology approach, which uniquely combines in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry, in-vacuo x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ex-situ high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, and mapping energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

  13. Synthesis of Pt@TiO2@CNTs Hierarchical Structure Catalyst by Atomic Layer Deposition and Their Photocatalytic and Photoelectrochemical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shih-Yun; Yang, Ya-Chu; Huang, Sheng-Hsin; Gan, Jon-Yiew

    2017-04-29

    Pt@TiO2@CNTs hierarchical structures were prepared by first functionalizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with nitric acid at 140 °C. Coating of TiO2 particles on the CNTs at 300 °C was then conducted by atomic layer deposition (ALD). After the TiO2@CNTs structure was fabricated, Pt particles were deposited on the TiO2 surface as co-catalyst by plasma-enhanced ALD. The saturated deposition rates of TiO2 on a-CNTs were 1.5 Å/cycle and 0.4 Å/cycle for substrate-enhanced process and linear process, respectively. The saturated deposition rate of Pt on TiO2 was 0.39 Å/cycle. The photocatalytic activities of Pt@TiO2@CNTs hierarchical structures were higher than those without Pt co-catalyst. The particle size of Pt on TiO2@CNTs was a key factor to determine the efficiency of methylene blue (MB) degradation. The Pt@TiO2@CNTs of 2.41 ± 0.27 nm exhibited the best efficiency of MB degradation.

  14. Work function tuning of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited WC{sub x}N{sub y} electrodes for metal/oxide/semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonensain, Oren; Fadida, Sivan; Eizenberg, Moshe [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Fisher, Ilanit; Gao, Juwen; Chattopadhyay, Kaushik; Harm, Greg; Mountsier, Tom; Danek, Michal [Lam Research Corporation, 4000 N. First Street, San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    One of the main challenges facing the integration of metals as gate electrodes in advanced MOS devices is control over the Fermi level position at the metal/dielectric interface. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to tune the effective work function (EWF) of W-based electrodes by process modifications of the atomic layer deposited (ALD) films. Tungsten carbo-nitrides (WC{sub x}N{sub y}) films were deposited via plasma-enhanced and/or thermal ALD processes using organometallic precursors. The process modifications enabled us to control the stoichiometry of the WC{sub x}N{sub y} films. Deposition in hydrogen plasma (without nitrogen based reactant) resulted in a stoichiometry of WC{sub 0.4} with primarily W-C chemical bonding, as determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These films yielded a relatively low EWF of 4.2 ± 0.1 eV. The introduction of nitrogen based reactant to the plasma or the thermal ALD deposition resulted in a stoichiometry of WC{sub 0.1}N{sub 0.6–0.8} with predominantly W-N chemical bonding. These films produced a high EWF of 4.7 ± 0.1 eV.

  15. Investigation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier film properties made by atomic layer deposition onto fluorescent tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium molecular films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maindron, Tony; Aventurier, Bernard [LETI/DOPT/SCOOP/Laboratoire des Composants pour la Visualisation, CEA-LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ghazouani, Ahlem; Jullien, Tony [LETI/DTSI/SDEP/Laboratoire Dépôt Equipe 2, CEA-LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rochat, Névine [LETI/DTSI/Service de Caractérisation des Matériaux et Composants, CEA-LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Simon, Jean-Yves; Viasnoff, Emilie [LETI/DOPT/SCOOP/Laboratoire des Composants pour la Visualisation, CEA-LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2013-12-02

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films have been deposited at 85 °C by atomic layer deposition onto single 100 nm thick tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (AlQ{sub 3}) films made onto silicon wafers. It has been found that a thick ALD-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer (> 11 nm) greatly prevents the photo-oxidation of AlQ{sub 3} films when exposed to continuous UV irradiation (350 mW/cm{sup 2}). Thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thicknesses (< 11 nm) on the contrary yield lower barrier performances. Defects in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer have been easily observed as non-fluorescent AlQ{sub 3} singularities, or black spots, under UV light on the system Si/AlQ{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} stored into laboratory conditions (22 °C/50% Relative Humidity (RH)) for long time scale (∼ 2000 h). Accelerated aging conditions in a climatic chamber (85 °C/85% RH) also allow faster visualization of the same defects (168 h). The black spot density grows upon time and the black spot density occurrence rates have been calculated to be 0.024 h{sup −1}·cm{sup −2} and 0.243 h{sup −1}·cm{sup −2} respectively for the two testing conditions. A detailed investigation of these defects did show that they cannot be ascribed to the presence of a detectable particle. In that sense they are presumably the consequence of the existence of nanometre-scaled defects which cannot be detected onto fresh samples. Interestingly, an additional overcoating of ebeam-deposited SiO{sub 2} onto the Si/AlQ{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sample helps to decrease drastically the black spot density occurrence rates down to 0.004 h{sup −1}·cm{sup −2} and 0.04 h{sup −1}·cm{sup −2} respectively for 22 °C/50% RH and 85 °C/85% RH testing conditions. These observations highlight the moisture sensitivity of low temperature ALD-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films and confirm the general idea that a single Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD film performs as an ultra-high barrier but needs to be overprotected from water condensation by an

  16. Carbon-coated ZnO mat passivation by atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mi-Hee

    2017-11-01

    ZnO has had little consideration as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries compared with other transition-metal oxides due to its inherent poor electrical conductivity and large volume expansion upon cycling and pulverization of ZnO-based electrodes. A logical design and facile synthesis of ZnO with well-controlled particle sizes and a specific morphology is essential to improving the performance of ZnO in lithium-ion batteries. In this paper, a simple approach is reported that uses a cation surfactant and a chelating agent to synthesize three-dimensional hierarchical nanostructured carbon-coated ZnO mats, in which the ZnO mats are composed of stacked individual ZnO nanowires and form well-defined nanoporous structures with high surface areas. In order to improve the performance of lithium-ion batteries, HfO2 is deposited on the carbon-coated ZnO mat electrode via atomic layer deposition. Lithium-ion battery devices based on the carbon-coated ZnO mat passivation by atomic layer deposited HfO2 exhibit an excellent initial discharge and charge capacities of 2684.01 and 963.21mAhg(-1), respectively, at a current density of 100mAg(-1) in the voltage range of 0.01-3V. They also exhibit cycle stability after 125 cycles with a capacity of 740mAhg(-1) and a remarkable rate capability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. In Situ Control of Oxygen Vacancies in TaOx Thin Films via Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition for Resistive Switching Memory Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Konstantin V; Kuzmichev, Dmitry S; Chizhov, Pavel S; Lebedinskii, Yuri Yu; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Markeev, Andrey M

    2017-04-19

    The plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process using Ta(OC2H5)5 as a Ta precursor and plasma-activated hydrogen as a reactant for the deposition of TaOx films with a controllable concentration of oxygen vacancies (VO) is reported herein. The VO concentration control was achieved by varying the hydrogen volume fraction of the hydrogen-argon mixture in the plasma, allowing the control of the leakage current density in the tantalum oxide films within the range of 5 orders of magnitude compared with the Ta2O5 film grown via thermal ALD using the identical Ta precursor and H2O. Temperature-dependent current-voltage measurements combined with Poole-Frenkel emission modeling demonstrated that the bulk trap depth decreases with the increasing hydrogen volume fraction, which could be attributed to the increase of the VO concentration. The possible chemical change in the PEALD TaOx films grown under different hydrogen volume fractions was confirmed by the in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements of the Ta 4f core and valence band spectra. The comparison of the XPS-measured nonstoichiometry and the secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis of the hydrogen content allowed this study to conclude that the nonstoichiometry is largely related to the formation of Ta-VO sites rather than of Ta-H sites. Such oxygen-deficient TaOx layers were studied for application as an oxygen-deficient layer in a resistance switching random access memory stack (Ta2O5/TaOx) where the actual switching occurred within the stoichiometric Ta2O5 layer. The bilayer memory stack showed reliable resistance switching up to ∼106 switching cycles, whereas the single-layer Ta2O5 memory showed only several hundred switching cycles.

  18. Antibacterial and barrier properties of oriented polymer films with ZnO thin films applied with atomic layer deposition at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044, VTT (Finland); Pitkänen, Marja; Salo, Erkki; Kenttä, Eija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044, VTT (Finland); Tanskanen, Anne, E-mail: Anne.Tanskanen@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Sajavaara, Timo, E-mail: timo.sajavaara@jyu.fi [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Putkonen, Matti; Sievänen, Jenni; Sneck, Asko; Rättö, Marjaana [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044, VTT (Finland); Karppinen, Maarit, E-mail: Maarit.Karppinen@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044, VTT (Finland)

    2014-07-01

    Concerns on food safety, and need for high quality and extended shelf-life of packaged foods have promoted the development of antibacterial barrier packaging materials. Few articles have been available dealing with the barrier or antimicrobial properties of zinc oxide thin films deposited at low temperature with atomic layer deposition (ALD) onto commercial polymer films typically used for packaging purposes. The purpose of this paper was to study the properties of ZnO thin films compared to those of aluminum oxide. It was also possible to deposit ZnO thin films onto oriented polylactic acid and polypropylene films at relatively low temperatures using ozone instead of water as an oxidizing precursor for diethylzinc. Replacing water with ozone changed both the structure and the chemical composition of films deposited on silicon wafers. ZnO films deposited with ozone contained large grains covered and separated probably by a more amorphous and uniform layer. These thin films were also assumed to contain zinc salts of carboxylic acids. The barrier properties of a 25 nm ZnO thin film deposited with ozone at 100 °C were quite close to those obtained earlier with ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} of similar apparent thickness on similar polymer films. ZnO thin films deposited at low temperature indicated migration of antibacterial agent, while direct contact between ZnO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films and bacteria promoted antibacterial activity. - Highlights: • Thin films were grown from diethylzinc also with ozone instead of water at 70 and 100 °C. • ZnO films deposited with diethylzinc and ozone had different structures and chemistries. • Best barrier properties obtained with zinc oxide films close to those obtained with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} • Ozone as oxygen source provided better barrier properties at 100 °C than water. • Both aluminum and zinc oxide thin films showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli.

  19. Conformal SiO2 coating of sub-100 nm diameter channels of polycarbonate etched ion-track channels by atomic layer deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Sobel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Polycarbonate etched ion-track membranes with about 30 µm long and 50 nm wide cylindrical channels were conformally coated with SiO2 by atomic layer deposition (ALD. The process was performed at 50 °C to avoid thermal damage to the polymer membrane. Analysis of the coated membranes by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS reveals a homogeneous, conformal layer of SiO2 in the channels at a deposition rate of 1.7–1.8 Å per ALD cycle. Characterization by infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS confirms the stoichiometric composition of the SiO2 films. Detailed XPS analysis reveals that the mechanism of SiO2 formation is based on subsurface crystal growth. By dissolving the polymer, the silica nanotubes are released from the ion-track membrane. The thickness of the tube wall is well controlled by the ALD process. Because the track-etched channels exhibited diameters in the range of nanometres and lengths in the range of micrometres, cylindrical tubes with an aspect ratio as large as 3000 have been produced.

  20. Thermal MEMS actuator operation in aqueous media/seawater: Performance enhancement through atomic layer deposition post processing of PolyMUMPs devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnat, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.warnat@dal.ca; Forbrigger, Cameron; Hubbard, Ted [Mechanical Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 2X4 (Canada); Bertuch, Adam; Sundaram, Ganesh [Ultratech Inc., Waltham, Massachusetts 02453 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A method to enhance thermal microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuators in aqueous media by using dielectric encapsulation layers is presented. Aqueous media reduces the available mechanical energy of the thermal actuator through an electrical short between actuator structures. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} laminates with various thicknesses were deposited on packaged PolyMUMPs devices to electrically separate the actuator from the aqueous media. Atomic layer deposition was used to form an encapsulation layer around released MEMS structures and the package. The enhancement was assessed by the increase of the elastic energy, which is proportional to the mechanical stiffness of the actuator and the displacement squared. The mechanical stiffness of the encapsulated actuators compared with the noncoated actuators was increased by factors ranging from 1.45 (for 45 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 20 nm TiO{sub 2}) to 1.87 (for 90 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 40 nm TiO{sub 2}). Displacement measurements were made for all laminate combinations in filtered tap water and seawater by using FFT based displacement measurement technique with a repeatability of ∼10 nm. For all laminate structures, the elastic energy increased and enhanced the actuator performance: In seawater, the mechanical output energy increased by factors ranging from 5 (for 90 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to 11 (for 90 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 40 nm TiO{sub 2}). The authors also measured the long-term actuator stability/reliability in seawater. Samples were stored for 29 days in seawater and tested for 17 days in seawater. Laminates with TiO{sub 2} layers allowed constant operation over the entire measurement period.

  1. Effect of crystalline structure of TiO{sub 2} substrates on initial growth of atomic layer deposited Ru thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Keun; Han, Sora; Han, Jeong Hwan [WCU Hybrid Materials Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Interuniversity, Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Cheol Seong, E-mail: cheolsh@snu.ac.kr [WCU Hybrid Materials Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Interuniversity, Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Ru thin films were grown on polymorphic TiO{sub 2} thin film substrates at 230 and 250 deg. C by atomic layer deposition using 2,4-(dimethylpentadienyl)(ethylcyclopentadienyl)Ru and an O{sub 2} gas. While the Ru films grown on amorphous and rutile TiO{sub 2} substrates showed a relatively long incubation cycle number of approximately 350 and 100 at 230 and 250 deg. C, respectively, the Ru films grown on anatase TiO{sub 2} substrates exhibited a significantly shorter incubation delay which was attributed to the catalytic activity of anatase TiO{sub 2}. This difference in the incubation cycle affected the surface morphology of the Ru films on different TiO{sub 2} substrates.

  2. Exploring Pore Formation of Atomic Layer-Deposited Overlayers by in Situ Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tao; Karwal, Saurabh; Aoun, Bachir; Zhao, Haiyan; Ren, Yang; Canlas, Christian P.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Winans, Randall E.

    2016-10-11

    In this work, we explore the pore structure of overcoated materials by in situ synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)/(WAXS). Thin films of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) with thicknesses of 4.9 and 2.5 nm, respectively, are prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on non-porous nanoparticles. In situ X-ray measurements reveal that porosity is induced in the ALD films by annealing the samples at high temperature. Moreover, this pore formation can be attributed to densification resulting from an amorphous to crystalline phase transition of the ALD films as confirmed by high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) and pair distribution function (PDF). Simultaneous SAXS/WAXS results not only show the porosity is formed by the phase transition but also that the pore size increases with temperature.

  3. Exploring Pore Formation of Atomic Layer-Deposited Overlayers by in Situ Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tao; Karwal, Saurabh; Aoun, Bachir; Zhao, Haiyan; Ren, Yang; Canlas, Christian P.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Winans, Randall E.

    2016-10-11

    In this work, we explore the pore structure of overcoated materials by in situ synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)/(WAXS). Thin films of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) with thicknesses of 4.9 and 2.5 nm, respectively, are prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on non-porous nanoparticles. In situ X-ray measurements reveal that porosity is induced in the ALD films by annealing the samples at high temperature. Moreover, this pore formation can be attributed to densification resulting from an amorphous to crystalline phase transition of the ALD films as confirmed by high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) and pair distribution function (PDF). Simultaneous SAXS/WAXS results not only show that the porosity is formed by this phase transition but also that the pore size increases with temperature.

  4. Substrate temperature influence on the properties of GaN thin films grown by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alevli, Mustafa, E-mail: mustafaalevli@marmara.edu.tr; Gungor, Neşe [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Marmara University, Goztepe, 34722 Istanbul (Turkey); Haider, Ali; Kizir, Seda; Leghari, Shahid A.; Biyikli, Necmi, E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr [Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Bilkent, 06800 Ankara, Turkey and National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-01-15

    Gallium nitride films were grown by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition using triethylgallium and N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} plasma. An optimized recipe for GaN film was developed, and the effect of substrate temperature was studied in both self-limiting growth window and thermal decomposition-limited growth region. With increased substrate temperature, film crystallinity improved, and the optical band edge decreased from 3.60 to 3.52 eV. The refractive index and reflectivity in Reststrahlen band increased with the substrate temperature. Compressive strain is observed for both samples, and the surface roughness is observed to increase with the substrate temperature. Despite these temperature dependent material properties, the chemical composition, E{sub 1}(TO), phonon position, and crystalline phases present in the GaN film were relatively independent from growth temperature.

  5. Data set for fabrication of conformal two-dimensional TiO2 by atomic layer deposition using tetrakis (dimethylamino titanium (TDMAT and H2O precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Zhuiykov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data and complementary information presented hare are related to the research article of “http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2017.02.016; Materials and Design 120 (2017 99–108” [1]. The article provides data and information on the case of atomic layer deposition (ALD of ultra-thin two-dimensional TiO2 film. The chemical structure of precursors, and the fabrication process were illustrated. The data of spectral ellipsometric measurements and the methods of calculations were presented. Data of root mean square roughness and the average roughness of the ADL TiO2 film are presented. The method of bandgap measurements and the bandgap calculation are also explained in the present data article.

  6. Influence of the oxygen concentration of atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 films on the dielectric property and interface trap density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehoo; Cho, Moonju; Kim, Seong Keun; Park, Tae Joo; Lee, Suk Woo; Hong, Sug Hun; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2005-03-01

    The influence of the ozone concentration (160-370g/m3) during atomic layer deposition of HfO2-gate dielectrics on the dielectric performance of the films grown on Si was studied. Although ozone was effective in reducing the impurity concentration in the film compared to H2O, the higher concentration slightly deteriorated the dielectric performance. More importantly, the degradation in the interface trap property with increasing post-annealing temperature became more serious as the ozone concentration increased. Investigation of the interface states using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the excessive oxygen incorporated during the film growth made the interfacial sub-oxide species (SiO, Si2O3, and silicate) and SiO2 coordinate more with oxygen. This increased the interface trap density and degraded the interface properties.

  7. The Enhanced Catalytic Performance and Stability of Rh/γ-Al₂O₃ Catalyst Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) for Methane Dry Reforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunlin; Jiang, Jing; Zhu, Chaosheng; Li, Lili; Li, Quanliang; Ding, Yongjie; Yang, Weijie

    2018-01-22

    Rh/γ-Al₂O₃ catalysts were synthesized by both incipient wetness impregnation (IWI) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). The TEM images of the two catalysts showed that the catalyst from ALD had smaller particle size, and narrower size distribution. The surface chemical states of both catalysts were investigated by both XPS and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), and the catalyst from IWI had higher concentration of Rh 3+ than that from ALD. The catalytic performance of both catalysts was tested in the dry reforming of methane reaction. The catalyst from ALD showed a higher conversion and selectivity than that from IWI. The stability testing results indicated that the catalyst from ALD showed similar stability to that from IWI at 500 °C, but higher stability at 800 °C.

  8. Conductivity and touch-sensor application for atomic layer deposition ZnO and Al:ZnO on nylon nonwoven fiber mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, William J.; Oldham, Christopher J.; Parsons, Gregory N., E-mail: parsons@ncsu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Flexible electronics and wearable technology represent a novel and growing market for next generation devices. In this work, the authors deposit conductive zinc oxide films by atomic layer deposition onto nylon-6 nonwoven fiber mats and spun-cast films, and quantify the impact that deposition temperature, coating thickness, and aluminum doping have on the conductivity of the coated substrates. The authors produce aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) coated fibers with conductivity of 230 S/cm, which is ∼6× more conductive than ZnO coated fibers. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate AZO coated fibers maintain 62% of their conductivity after being bent around a 3 mm radius cylinder. As an example application, the authors fabricate an “all-fiber” pressure sensor using AZO coated nylon-6 electrodes. The sensor signal scales exponentially under small applied force (<50 g/cm{sup 2}), yielding a ∼10{sup 6}× current change under 200 g/cm{sup 2}. This lightweight, flexible, and breathable touch/force sensor could function, for example, as an electronically active nonwoven for personal or engineered system analysis and diagnostics.

  9. Unusual stoichiometry control in the atomic layer deposition of manganese borate films from manganese bis(tris(pyrazolyl)borate) and ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klesko, Joseph P.; Bellow, James A.; Saly, Mark J.; Winter, Charles H., E-mail: chw@chem.wayne.edu [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Julin, Jaakko; Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, 40014 Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2016-09-15

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of films with the approximate compositions Mn{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} and CoB{sub 2}O{sub 4} is described using MnTp{sub 2} or CoTp{sub 2} [Tp = tris(pyrazolyl)borate] with ozone. The solid state decomposition temperatures of MnTp{sub 2} and CoTp{sub 2} are ∼370 and ∼340 °C, respectively. Preparative-scale sublimations of MnTp{sub 2} and CoTp{sub 2} at 210 °C/0.05 Torr afforded >99% recoveries with <0.1% nonvolatile residues. Self-limited ALD growth was demonstrated at 325 °C for MnTp{sub 2} or CoTp{sub 2} with ozone as the coreactant. The growth rate for the manganese borate process was 0.19 Å/cycle within the ALD window of 300–350 °C. The growth rate for the cobalt borate process was 0.39–0.42 Å/cycle at 325 °C. X-ray diffraction of the as-deposited films indicated that they were amorphous. Atomic force microscopy of 35–36 nm thick manganese borate films grown within the 300–350 °C ALD window showed root mean square surface roughnesses of 0.4–0.6 nm. Film stoichiometries were assessed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time of flight-elastic recoil detection analysis. The differing film stoichiometries obtained from the very similar precursors MnTp{sub 2} and CoTp{sub 2} are proposed to arise from the oxidizing ability of the intermediate high valent manganese oxide layers and lack thereof for cobalt.

  10. SnO2 anode surface passivation by atomic layer deposited HfO2 improves li-ion battery performance

    KAUST Repository

    Yesibolati, Nulati

    2014-03-14

    For the first time, it is demonstrated that nanoscale HfO2 surface passivation layers formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) significantly improve the performance of Li ion batteries with SnO2-based anodes. Specifically, the measured battery capacity at a current density of 150 mAg -1 after 100 cycles is 548 and 853 mAhg-1 for the uncoated and HfO2-coated anodes, respectively. Material analysis reveals that the HfO2 layers are amorphous in nature and conformably coat the SnO2-based anodes. In addition, the analysis reveals that ALD HfO2 not only protects the SnO2-based anodes from irreversible reactions with the electrolyte and buffers its volume change, but also chemically interacts with the SnO2 anodes to increase battery capacity, despite the fact that HfO2 is itself electrochemically inactive. The amorphous nature of HfO2 is an important factor in explaining its behavior, as it still allows sufficient Li diffusion for an efficient anode lithiation/delithiation process to occur, leading to higher battery capacity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Performance of inverted polymer solar cells with randomly oriented ZnO nanorods coupled with atomic layer deposited ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Muhammad; Yun, Ju-Young; Kim, Do-Heyoung

    2017-03-01

    Nanostructuring of the electron transport layer (ETL) in organic photovoltaic cells (OPV) is of great interest because it increases the surface area of the cell and electron transport. In this work, hydrothermally grown, randomly oriented, and low areal density ZnO nanorods (NRs) have been adopted as the ETL, and the effect of adding atomic layer deposited (ALD) ZnO on the ZnO NRs on the inverted organic solar cell performance has been investigated. The fabricated inverted organic solar cell with 5-nm-thick ALD-ZnO grown on the ZnO NRs showed the highest power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.08%, which is an enhancement of 85% from that of the cell without ALD-ZnO (PCE = 1.67%). The ultrathin ALD-ZnO was found to act as a curing layer of the surface defects on the hydrothermally grown ZnO NRs, resulting in an improvement in photovoltaic performance.

  12. Capacitive effective thickness of a few nanometers by atomic layer deposition and device performance in Ge gate-all-around fin field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chu-Lin; Chen, Bo-Yuan; Fuh, Yiin-Kuen

    2015-10-01

    Ge gate-all-around fin field-effect transistors (Ge FinFETs) with a capacitive effective thickness of a few nanometers have been successfully achieved via atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) high-dielectric Al2O3 on GeO2/Ge and by adopting low-cost thermo ALD equipment. The MOS interface properties of the ZrO2 or Al2O3/GeO2/Ge structures have been studied systematically. It has been found that a GeO2 interfacial layer that is greater than approximately 2.5 nm results in a significant degradation of the MOS interfaces, while an equivalent oxide thickness of FinFET's value has been demonstrated with the Al2O3/GeO2/Ge gate stack prepared using a thermal ALD layer of Al2O3. The experimental results indicate that the MOS interface quality obtained with the technique developed for high-permittivity/Ge gate stacks is also extremely useful for the fabrication of triangle-fin complementary metal oxide semiconductor devices. An I/I ratio of 3.2×104 and a subthreshold swing of 103 mV/dec were obtained for the triangular n-type Ge gate-all-around FET with (111) sidewalls. The drain current at VGS-VT=VDS=-1.5 V is 88 mA/mm.

  13. Polysulfide Anchoring Mechanism Revealed by Atomic Layer Deposition of V2O5 and Sulfur-Filled Carbon Nanotubes for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Muralidharan, Nitin; Cohn, Adam P; Douglas, Anna; Pint, Cary L

    2017-03-01

    Despite the promise of surface engineering to address the challenge of polysulfide shuttling in sulfur-carbon composite cathodes, melt infiltration techniques limit mechanistic studies correlating engineered surfaces and polysulfide anchoring. Here, we present a controlled experimental demonstration of polysulfide anchoring using vapor phase isothermal processing to fill the interior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) after assembly into binder-free electrodes and atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating of polar V2O5 anchoring layers on the CNT surfaces. The ultrathin submonolayer V2O5 coating on the CNT exterior surface balances the adverse effect of polysulfide shuttling with the necessity for high sulfur utilization due to binding sites near the conductive CNT surface. The sulfur loaded into the CNT interior provides a spatially separated control volume enabling high sulfur loading with direct sulfur-CNT electrical contact for efficient sulfur conversion. By controlling ALD coating thickness, high initial discharge capacity of 1209 mAh/gS at 0.1 C and exceptional cycling at 0.2 C with 87% capacity retention after 100 cycles and 73% at 450 cycles is achieved and correlated to an optimal V2O5 anchoring layer thickness. This provides experimental evidence that surface engineering approaches can be effective to overcome polysulfide shuttling by controlled design of molecular-scale building blocks for efficient binder free lithium sulfur battery cathodes.

  14. Modification of Ni-Rich FCG NMC and NCA Cathodes by Atomic Layer Deposition: Preventing Surface Phase Transitions for High-Voltage Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Debasish; Dahlberg, Kevin; King, David M.; David, Lamuel A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Wood, David L.; Daniel, Claus; Dhar, Subhash; Mahajan, Vishal; Lee, Myongjai; Albano, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    The energy density of current lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) based on layered LiMO2 cathodes (M = Ni, Mn, Co: NMC; M = Ni, Co, Al: NCA) needs to be improved significantly in order to compete with internal combustion engines and allow for widespread implementation of electric vehicles (EVs). In this report, we show that atomic layer deposition (ALD) of titania (TiO2) and alumina (Al2O3) on Ni-rich FCG NMC and NCA active material particles could substantially improve LIB performance and allow for increased upper cutoff voltage (UCV) during charging, which delivers significantly increased specific energy utilization. Our results show that Al2O3 coating improved the NMC cycling performance by 40% and the NCA cycling performance by 34% at 1 C/-1 C with respectively 4.35 V and 4.4 V UCV in 2 Ah pouch cells. High resolution TEM/SAED structural characterization revealed that Al2O3 coatings prevented surface-initiated layered-to-spinel phase transitions in coated materials which were prevalent in uncoated materials. EIS confirmed that Al2O3-coated materials had significantly lower increase in the charge transfer component of impedance during cycling. The ability to mitigate degradation mechanisms for Ni-rich NMC and NCA illustrated in this report provides insight into a method to enable the performance of high-voltage LIBs.

  15. Novel Cyclosilazane-Type Silicon Precursor and Two-Step Plasma for Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Min; Jang, Se Jin; Lee, Sang-Ick; Lee, Won-Jun

    2018-03-02

    We designed cyclosilazane-type silicon precursors and proposed a three-step plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process to prepare silicon nitride films with high quality and excellent step coverage. The cyclosilazane-type precursor, 1,3-di-isopropylamino-2,4-dimethylcyclosilazane (CSN-2), has a closed ring structure for good thermal stability and high reactivity. CSN-2 showed thermal stability up to 450 °C and a sufficient vapor pressure of 4 Torr at 60 °C. The energy for the chemisorption of CSN-2 on the undercoordinated silicon nitride surface as calculated by density functional theory method was -7.38 eV. The PEALD process window was between 200 and 500 °C, with a growth rate of 0.43 Å/cycle. The best film quality was obtained at 500 °C, with hydrogen impurity of ∼7 atom %, oxygen impurity less than 2 atom %, low wet etching rate, and excellent step coverage of ∼95%. At 300 °C and lower temperatures, the wet etching rate was high especially at the lower sidewall of the trench pattern. We introduced the three-step PEALD process to improve the film quality and the step coverage on the lower sidewall. The sequence of the three-step PEALD process consists of the CSN-2 feeding step, the NH 3 /N 2 plasma step, and the N 2 plasma step. The H radicals in NH 3 /N 2 plasma efficiently remove the ligands from the precursor, and the N 2 plasma after the NH 3 plasma removes the surface hydrogen atoms to activate the adsorption of the precursor. The films deposited at 300 °C using the novel precursor and the three-step PEALD process showed a significantly improved step coverage of ∼95% and an excellent wet etching resistance at the lower sidewall, which is only twice as high as that of the blanket film prepared by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition.

  16. Atomic layer deposition of indium oxide thin film from a liquid indium complex containing 1-dimethylamino-2-methyl-2-propoxy ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jeong Hwan, E-mail: jhan@krict.re.kr [Division of Advanced Materials, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), 141 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34114 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Convergence Materials, University of Science and Technology (UST), 217 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Deajeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Eun Ae [Division of Advanced Materials, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), 141 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34114 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo Yeon [Division of Advanced Materials, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), 141 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34114 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-Ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Da Hye [Division of Advanced Materials, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), 141 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34114 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bo Keun [Division of Advanced Materials, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), 141 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34114 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Convergence Materials, University of Science and Technology (UST), 217 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Deajeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Seong [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-Ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Seung Uk [Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Novel liquid indium complex, tris(1-dimethylamino-2-methyl-2-propoxy)indium, was developed with showing excellent thermal properties. • Self-limited atomic layer deposition (ALD) of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} was realized from the newly developed indium precursor and O{sub 3} at the deposition temperatures of 150–200 °C. • The In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown at 150–200 °C showed carrier concentrations of 1.5 × 10{sup 18}–6.6 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}, resistivities of 2 × 10{sup −3}–15.1 Ω cm, and Hall mobilities of 0.8–42 cm{sup 2}/(V s). - Abstract: In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films were grown from a newly developed, liquid, homoleptic, In-based complex, tris(1-dimethylamino-2-methyl-2-propoxy)indium [In(dmamp){sub 3}], and O{sub 3} by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at growth temperatures of 150–200 °C. In(dmamp){sub 3} exhibited single-step evaporation with negligible residue and excellent thermal stability between 30 and 250 °C. The self-limiting surface reaction of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} during ALD was demonstrated by varying the In(dmamp){sub 3} and O{sub 3} pulse lengths, with a growth rate of 0.027 nm/cycle achieved at 200 °C. The In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown at temperatures over 175 °C exhibited negligible concentrations of impurities, whereas that grown below 175 °C had concentrations of residual C of 6–8 at.%. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction revealed that the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were polycrystalline in nature when the deposition temperature was greater than 200 °C. The In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown at 150–200 °C exhibited carrier concentrations of 1.5 × 10{sup 18}–6.6 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}, resistivities of 15.1–2 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm, and Hall mobilities of 0.8–42 cm{sup 2}/(V s).

  17. Improving photoelectrochemical performance on quantum dots co-sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays using ZnO energy barrier by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Min [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Advanced Materials in Tropical Island Resources, College of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Hainan University, Haikou 570228 (China); Zeng, Xi [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming, 650500 (China); Peng, Xiange; Zhu, Zhuo; Liao, Jianjun; Liu, Kai; Wang, Guizhen [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Advanced Materials in Tropical Island Resources, College of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Hainan University, Haikou 570228 (China); Lin, Shiwei, E-mail: linsw@hainu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Advanced Materials in Tropical Island Resources, College of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Hainan University, Haikou 570228 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The length of TNTAs has a balance between the charge recombination and the QDs loading. • The introduction of ZnO interlayer by ALD could improve the QDs absorption. • The optimal thickness of ZnO interlayer is 1.5 nm prepared by 10 cycles ALD. - Abstract: PbS and CdS quantum dots (QDs) have been deposited onto TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (TNTAs) in turn via a sonication-assisted successive ionic layer a