WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic interaction networks

  1. An Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Interactions Involving Polymers and Silane Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo L. Oréfice

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Silane coupling agents have been frequently used as interfacial agents in polymer composites to improve interfacial strength and resistance to fluid migration. Although the capability of these agents in improving properties and performance of composites has been reported, there are still many uncertainties regarding the processing-structure-property relationships and the mechanisms of coupling developed by silane agents. In this work, an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM was used to measure interactions between polymers and silica substrates, where silane networks with a series of different structures were processed. The influence of the structure of silane networks on the interactions with polymers was studied and used to determine the mechanisms involved in the coupling phenomenon. The AFM results showed that phenomena such as chain penetration, entanglements, intersegment bonding, chain conformation in the vicinities of rigid surfaces were identified as being relevant for the overall processes of adhesion and adsorption of polymeric chains within a silane network. AFM adhesion curves showed that penetration of polymeric chains through a more open silane network can lead to higher levels of interactions between polymer and silane agents.

  2. Atomic & Molecular Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic & Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  3. Neuromorphic atomic switch networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius V Avizienis

    Full Text Available Efforts to emulate the formidable information processing capabilities of the brain through neuromorphic engineering have been bolstered by recent progress in the fabrication of nonlinear, nanoscale circuit elements that exhibit synapse-like operational characteristics. However, conventional fabrication techniques are unable to efficiently generate structures with the highly complex interconnectivity found in biological neuronal networks. Here we demonstrate the physical realization of a self-assembled neuromorphic device which implements basic concepts of systems neuroscience through a hardware-based platform comprised of over a billion interconnected atomic-switch inorganic synapses embedded in a complex network of silver nanowires. Observations of network activation and passive harmonic generation demonstrate a collective response to input stimulus in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Further, emergent behaviors unique to the complex network of atomic switches and akin to brain function are observed, namely spatially distributed memory, recurrent dynamics and the activation of feedforward subnetworks. These devices display the functional characteristics required for implementing unconventional, biologically and neurally inspired computational methodologies in a synthetic experimental system.

  4. Optically polarized atoms understanding light-atom interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, Marcis; Rochester, Simon M

    2010-01-01

    This book is addressed at upper-level undergraduate and graduate students involved in research in atomic, molecular, and optical Physics. It will also be useful to researchers practising in this field. It gives an intuitive, yet sufficiently detailed and rigorous introduction to light-atom interactions with a particular emphasis on the symmetry aspects of the interaction, especially those associated with the angular momentum of atoms and light. The book will enable readers to carryout practical calculations on their own, and is richly illustrated with examples drawn from current research topic

  5. Resonant interaction modified by the atomic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sainz, I; Klimov, A B; Chumakov, S M [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, 44410, Guadalajara, Jal. (Mexico)

    2003-04-01

    The dynamics of a resonant atom interacting with a quantum cavity field in the presence of many off-resonant atoms is studied. In the framework of the effective Hamiltonian approach we show that the results of elimination of non-resonant transitions are (a) a dynamical Stark shift of the field frequency, dependent on the populations of non-resonant atoms, (b) dependence of the coupling constant between the resonant atom and the field on the populations of non-resonant atoms, and (c) an effective dipole-dipole interaction between non-resonant atoms. Two effects (the coherent influence and dephasing) of the off-resonant environment on the dynamics of the resonant atom are discussed.

  6. Atomic form factor for twisted vortex photons interacting with atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrey, Pierson; Kaplan, Lev; McGuire, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    The relatively new atomic form factor for twisted (vortex) beams, which carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), is considered and compared to the conventional atomic form factor for plane-wave beams that carry only spin angular momentum. Since the vortex symmetry of a twisted photon is more complex that that of a plane wave, evaluation of the atomic form factor is also more complex for twisted photons. On the other hand, the twisted photon has additional parameters, including the OAM quantum number, ℓ, the nodal radial number, p, and the Rayleigh range, zR, which determine the cone angle of the vortex. This Rayleigh range may be used as a variable parameter to control the interaction of twisted photons with matter. Here we address (i) normalization of the vortex atomic form factor, (ii) displacement of target atoms away from the center of the beam vortex, and (iii) formulation of transition probabilities for a variety of photon-atom processes. We attend to features related to experiments that can test the range of validity and accuracy of calculations of these variations of the atomic form factor. Using the absolute square of the form factor for vortex beams, we introduce a vortex factor that can be directly measured.

  7. Spatial Imaging of Strongly Interacting Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaicharoen, Nithiwadee

    The strong interactions between Rydberg excitations can result in spatial correlations between the excitations. The ability to control the interaction strength and the correlations between Rydberg atoms is applicable in future technological implementations of quantum computation. In this thesis, I investigates how both the character of the Rydberg-Rydberg interactions and the details of the excitation process affect the nature of the spatial correlations and the evolution of those correlations in time. I first describes the experimental apparatus and methods used to perform high-magnification Rydberg-atom imaging, as well as three experiments in which these methods play an important role. The obtained Rydberg-atom positions reveal the correlations in the many-body Rydberg-atom system and their time dependence with sub-micron spatial resolution. In the first experiment, atoms are excited to a Rydberg state that experiences a repulsive van der Waals interaction. The Rydberg excitations are prepared with a well-defined initial separation, and the effect of van der Waals forces is observed by tracking the interatomic distance between the Rydberg atoms. The atom trajectories and thereby the interaction coefficient C6 are extracted from the pair correlation functions of the Rydberg atom positions. In the second experiment, the Rydberg atoms are prepared in a highly dipolar state by using adiabatic state transformation. The atom-pair kinetics that follow from the strong dipole-dipole interactions are observed. The pair correlation results provide the first direct visualization of the electric-dipole interaction and clearly exhibit its anisotropic nature. In both the first and the second experiment, results of semi-classical simulations of the atom-pair trajectories agree well with the experimental data. In the analysis, I use energy conservation and measurements of the initial positions and the terminal velocities of the atom pairs to extract the C6 and C 3 interaction

  8. Super-Coulombic atom-atom interactions in hyperbolic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Cristian L.; Jacob, Zubin

    2017-01-01

    Dipole-dipole interactions, which govern phenomena such as cooperative Lamb shifts, superradiant decay rates, Van der Waals forces and resonance energy transfer rates, are conventionally limited to the Coulombic near-field. Here we reveal a class of real-photon and virtual-photon long-range quantum electrodynamic interactions that have a singularity in media with hyperbolic dispersion. The singularity in the dipole-dipole coupling, referred to as a super-Coulombic interaction, is a result of an effective interaction distance that goes to zero in the ideal limit irrespective of the physical distance. We investigate the entire landscape of atom-atom interactions in hyperbolic media confirming the giant long-range enhancement. We also propose multiple experimental platforms to verify our predicted effect with phonon-polaritonic hexagonal boron nitride, plasmonic super-lattices and hyperbolic meta-surfaces as well. Our work paves the way for the control of cold atoms above hyperbolic meta-surfaces and the study of many-body physics with hyperbolic media.

  9. High intensity laser interactions with atomic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditmire, T

    2000-08-07

    The development of ultrashort pulse table top lasers with peak pulse powers in excess of 1 TW has permitted an access to studies of matter subject to unprecedented light intensities. Such interactions have accessed exotic regimes of multiphoton atomic and high energy-density plasma physics. Very recently, the nature of the interactions between these very high intensity laser pulses and atomic clusters of a few hundred to a few thousand atoms has come under study. Such studies have found some rather unexpected results, including the striking finding that these interactions appear to be more energetic than interactions with either single atoms or solid density plasmas. Recent experiments have shown that the explosion of such clusters upon intense irradiation can expel ions from the cluster with energies from a few keV to nearly 1 MeV. This phenomenon has recently been exploited to produce DD fusion neutrons in a gas of exploding deuterium clusters. Under this project, we have undertaken a general study of the intense femtosecond laser cluster interaction. Our goal is to understand the macroscopic and microscopic coupling between the laser and the clusters with the aim of optimizing high flux fusion neutron production from the exploding deuterium clusters or the x-ray yield in the hot plasmas that are produced in this interaction. In particular, we are studying the physics governing the cluster explosions. The interplay between a traditional Coulomb explosion description of the cluster disassembly and a plasma-like hydrodynamic explosion is not entirely understood, particularly for small to medium sized clusters (<1000 atoms) and clusters composed of low-Z atoms. We are focusing on experimental studies of the ion and electron energies resulting from such explosions through various experimental techniques. We are also examining how an intense laser pulse propagates through a dense medium containing these clusters.

  10. Anisotropic Interactions between Cold Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    AFRL-AFOSR-CL-TR-2015-0002 Anisotropic interactions between cold Rydberg atoms Luis Marcassa INSTITUTO DE FISICA DE SAO CARLOS Final Report 09/28...problem with the report +551633739806 Organization / Institution name Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos Grant/Contract Title The full title of the

  11. Coherent Photon Manipulation in Interacting Atomic Ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callum R. Murray

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Coupling photons to Rydberg excitations in a cold atomic gas yields unprecedentedly large optical nonlinearities at the level of individual light quanta. Here, the basic mechanism exploits the strong interactions between Rydberg atoms to block the formation of nearby dark-state polaritons. However, the dissipation associated with this mechanism ultimately limits the performance of many practical applications. In this work, we propose a new approach to strong photon interactions via a largely coherent mechanism at drastically suppressed photon losses. Rather than a polariton blockade, it is based on an interaction-induced conversion between distinct types of dark-state polaritons with different propagation characteristics. We outline a specific implementation of this approach and show that it permits us to turn a single photon into an effective mirror with a robust and continuously tunable reflection phase. We describe potential applications, including a detailed discussion of achievable operational fidelities.

  12. Atom slowing via dispersive optical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamda, M.; Boustimi, M.; Correia, F.; Baudon, J.; Taillandier-Loize, T.; Dutier, G.; Perales, F.; Ducloy, M.

    2012-02-01

    A promising technique of atom slowing is proposed. It is based upon the dispersive interaction of atoms with optical potential pulses generated by a far-off-resonance standing wave modulated in time. Each pulse reduces the velocity by a small amount. By repeating the process thousands of times, the velocity can be lowered from several hundreds of meters per second down to almost zero, over a path as short as 20cm. In the absence of any random recoil process, the initial characteristics of the beam are preserved.

  13. Interactions of atomic hydrogen with amorphous SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yunliang; Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yuqi; Song, Yu; Zuo, Xu

    2018-03-01

    Dozens of models are investigated by the first-principles calculations to simulate the interactions of an atomic hydrogen with a defect-free random network of amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2) and oxygen vacancies. A wide variety of stable configurations are discovered due to the disorder of a-SiO2, and their structures, charges, magnetic moments, spin densities, and density of states are calculated. The atomic hydrogen interacts with the defect-free a-SiO2 in positively or negatively charged state, and produces the structures absent in crystalline SiO2. It passivates the neutral oxygen vacancies and generates two neutral hydrogenated E‧ centers with different Si dangling bond projections. Electron spin resonance parameters, including Fermi contacts, and g-tensors, are calculated for these centers. The atomic hydrogen interacts with the positive oxygen vacancies in dimer configuration, and generate four different positive hydrogenated defects, two of which are puckered like the Eγ‧ centers. This research helps to understand the interactions between an atomic hydrogen, and defect-free a-SiO2 and oxygen vacancies, which may generate the hydrogen-complexed defects that play a key role in the degeneration of silicon/silica-based microelectronic devices.

  14. Atom-atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Jonathan D; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E; Kimble, H J

    2016-09-20

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields [Formula: see text] outside the bandgap to localized fields [Formula: see text] within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom-atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom-atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the [Formula: see text] line of atomic cesium for [Formula: see text] atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom-atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode.

  15. 2010 Atomic & Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd Martinez

    2010-07-23

    The Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Conferences is justifiably recognized for its broad scope, touching on areas ranging from fundamental gas phase and gas-condensed matter collision dynamics, to laser-molecule interactions, photophysics, and unimolecular decay processes. The meeting has traditionally involved scientists engaged in fundamental research in gas and condensed phases and those who apply these concepts to systems of practical chemical and physical interest. A key tradition in this meeting is the strong mixing of theory and experiment throughout. The program for 2010 conference continues these traditions. At the 2010 AMI GRC, there will be talks in 5 broadly defined and partially overlapping areas of intermolecular interactions and chemical dynamics: (1) Photoionization and Photoelectron Dynamics; (2) Quantum Control and Molecules in Strong Fields; (3) Photochemical Dynamics; (4) Complex Molecules and Condensed Phases; and (5) Clusters and Reaction Dynamics. These areas encompass many of the most productive and exciting areas of chemical physics, including both reactive and nonreactive processes, intermolecular and intramolecular energy transfer, and photodissociation and unimolecular processes. Gas phase dynamics, van der Waals and cluster studies, laser-matter interactions and multiple potential energy surface phenomena will all be discussed.

  16. Cadherin interaction probed by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, W.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ness, W.; Raab, A.; Vestweber, D.; Schindler, H.; Drenckhahn, D.

    2000-04-01

    Single molecule atomic force microscopy was used to characterize structure, binding strength (unbinding force), and binding kinetics of a classical cadherin, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, secreted by transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells as cis-dimerized full-length external domain fused to Fc-portion of human IgG. In physiological buffer, the external domain of VE-cadherin dimers is a 20-nm-long rod-shaped molecule that collapses and dissociates into monomers (V-shaped structures) in the absence of Ca2+. Trans-interaction of dimers is a low-affinity reaction (KD = 10-3-10-5 M, koff = 1.8 s-1, kon = 103-105 M-1·s-1) with relatively low unbinding force (35-55 pN at retrace velocities of 200-4,000 nm·s-1). Higher order unbinding forces, that increase with interaction time, indicate association of cadherins into complexes with cumulative binding strength. These observations favor a model by which the inherently weak unit binding strength and affinity of cadherin trans-interaction requires clustering and cytoskeletal immobilization for amplification. Binding is regulated by low-affinity Ca2+ binding sites (KD = 1.15 mM) with high cooperativity (Hill coefficient of 5.04). Local changes of free extracellular Ca2+ in the narrow intercellular space may be of physiological importance to facilitate rapid remodeling of intercellular adhesion and communication.

  17. Networks and Interactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Considine, Mark; Lewis, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    The systemic reform of employment services in OECD countries was driven by New Public Management (NPM) and then post-NPM reforms, when first-phase changes such as privatization were amended with `joined up' processes to help manage fragmentation. This article examines the networking strategies...... of `street-level' employment services staff for the impacts of this. Contrary to expectations, networking has generally declined over the last decade. There are signs of path dependence in networking patterns within each country, but also a convergence of patterns for the UK and Australia......, but not The Netherlands. Networking appears to be mediated by policy and regulatory imperatives....

  18. Online Social Network Interactions:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jung Chang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross-cultural comparison of social networking structure on McDonald’s Facebook fan sites between Taiwan and the USA was conducted utilizing the individualism/collectivism dimension proposed by Hofstede. Four network indicators are used to describe the network structure of McDonald’s Facebook fan sites: size, density, clique and centralization. Individuals who post on both Facebook sites for the year of 2012 were considered as network participants for the purpose of the study. Due to the huge amount of data, only one thread of postings was sampled from each month of the year of 2012. The final data consists of 1002 postings written by 896 individuals and 5962 postings written by 5532 individuals from Taiwan and the USA respectively. The results indicated that the USA McDonald’s Facebook fan network has more fans, while Taiwan’s McDonald’s Facebook fan network is more densely connected. Cliques did form among the overall multiplex and within the individual uniplex networks in two countries, yet no significant differences were found between them. All the fan networks in both countries are relatively centralized, mostly on the site operators.

  19. Topology of molecular interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Molecular interactions are often represented as network models which have become the common language of many areas of biology. Graphs serve as convenient mathematical representations of network models and have themselves become objects of study. Their topology has been intensively researched over the last decade after evidence was found that they share underlying design principles with many other types of networks. Initial studies suggested that molecular interaction network topology is related to biological function and evolution. However, further whole-network analyses did not lead to a unified view on what this relation may look like, with conclusions highly dependent on the type of molecular interactions considered and the metrics used to study them. It is unclear whether global network topology drives function, as suggested by some researchers, or whether it is simply a byproduct of evolution or even an artefact of representing complex molecular interaction networks as graphs. Nevertheless, network biology has progressed significantly over the last years. We review the literature, focusing on two major developments. First, realizing that molecular interaction networks can be naturally decomposed into subsystems (such as modules and pathways), topology is increasingly studied locally rather than globally. Second, there is a move from a descriptive approach to a predictive one: rather than correlating biological network topology to generic properties such as robustness, it is used to predict specific functions or phenotypes. Taken together, this change in focus from globally descriptive to locally predictive points to new avenues of research. In particular, multi-scale approaches are developments promising to drive the study of molecular interaction networks further. PMID:24041013

  20. Efficiency of repeated network interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, Judith B.; Mandjes, M.R.H.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider a network with interactions by two users. Each of them repeatedly issues download requests on the network. These requests may be unsuccessful due to congestion or non-congestion related errors. A user decides when to cancel a request (that is, what his impatience threshold

  1. Positron Interactions with Atoms and Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2012-01-01

    Dirac, in 1928, combining the ideas of quantum mechanics and the ideas of relativity invented the well-known relativistic wave equation. In his formulation, he predicted an antiparticle of the electron of spin n-bar/2. He thought that this particle must be a proton. Dirac published his interpretation in a paper 'A theory of electrons and protons.' It was shown later by the mathematician Hermann Weyl that the Dirac theory was completely symmetric between negative and positive particles and the positive particle must have the same mass as that of the electron. In his J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Prize Acceptance Speech, Dirac notes that 'Blackett was really the first person to obtain hard evidence for the existence of a positron but he was afraid to publish it. He wanted confirmation, he was really over cautious.' Positron, produced by the collision of cosmic rays in a cloud chamber, was detected experimentally by Anderson in 1932. His paper was published in Physical Review in 1933. The concept of the positron and its detection were the important discoveries of the 20th century. I have tried to discuss various processes involving interactions of positrons with atoms and ions. This includes scattering, bound states and resonances. It has not been possible to include the enormous work which has been carried out during the last 40 or 50 years in theory and measurements.

  2. Interactive Network Exploration with Orange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Štajdohar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Network analysis is one of the most widely used techniques in many areas of modern science. Most existing tools for that purpose are limited to drawing networks and computing their basic general characteristics. The user is not able to interactively and graphically manipulate the networks, select and explore subgraphs using other statistical and data mining techniques, add and plot various other data within the graph, and so on. In this paper we present a tool that addresses these challenges, an add-on for exploration of networks within the general component-based environment Orange.

  3. Basic atomic interactions of accelerated heavy ions in matter atomic interactions of heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Tolstikhina, Inga; Winckler, Nicolas; Shevelko, Viacheslav

    2018-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the recent experimental and theoretical results on interactions of heavy ions with gaseous, solid and plasma targets from the perspective of atomic physics. The topics discussed comprise stopping power, multiple-electron loss and capture processes, equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state fractions in penetration of fast ion beams through matter including relativistic domain. It also addresses mean charge-states and equilibrium target thickness in ion-beam penetrations, isotope effects in low-energy electron capture, lifetimes of heavy ion beams, semi-empirical formulae for effective cross sections. The book is intended for researchers and graduate students working in atomic, plasma and accelerator physics.

  4. First-Order Quantum Phase Transition for Dicke Model Induced by Atom-Atom Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiu-Qin; Liu, Ni; Liang, Jiu-Qing

    2017-05-01

    In this article, we use the spin coherent state transformation and the ground state variational method to theoretically calculate the ground function. In order to consider the influence of the atom-atom interaction on the extended Dicke model’s ground state properties, the mean photon number, the scaled atomic population and the average ground energy are displayed. Using the self-consistent field theory to solve the atom-atom interaction, we discover the system undergoes a first-order quantum phase transition from the normal phase to the superradiant phase, but a famous Dicke-type second-order quantum phase transition without the atom-atom interaction. Meanwhile, the atom-atom interaction makes the phase transition point shift to the lower atom-photon collective coupling strength. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11275118, 11404198, 91430109, 61505100, 51502189, and the Scientific and Technological Innovation Programs of Higher Education Institutions in Shanxi Province (STIP) under Grant No. 2014102, and the Launch of the Scientific Research of Shanxi University under Grant No. 011151801004, and the National Fundamental Fund of Personnel Training under Grant No. J1103210. The Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi Province under Grant No. 2015011008

  5. Revealing and exploiting hierarchical material structure through complex atomic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Grant, William P.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2017-08-01

    One of the great challenges of modern science is to faithfully model, and understand, matter at a wide range of scales. Starting with atoms, the vastness of the space of possible configurations poses a formidable challenge to any simulation of complex atomic and molecular systems. We introduce a computational method to reduce the complexity of atomic configuration space by systematically recognising hierarchical levels of atomic structure, and identifying the individual components. Given a list of atomic coordinates, a network is generated based on the distances between the atoms. Using the technique of modularity optimisation, the network is decomposed into modules. This procedure can be performed at different resolution levels, leading to a decomposition of the system at different scales, from which hierarchical structure can be identified. By considering the amount of information required to represent a given modular decomposition we can furthermore find the most succinct descriptions of a given atomic ensemble. Our straightforward, automatic and general approach is applied to complex crystal structures. We show that modular decomposition of these structures considerably simplifies configuration space, which in turn can be used in discovery of novel crystal structures, and opens up a pathway towards accelerated molecular dynamics of complex atomic ensembles. The power of this approach is demonstrated by the identification of a possible allotrope of boron containing 56 atoms in the primitive unit cell, which we uncover using an accelerated structure search, based on a modular decomposition of a known dense phase of boron, γ-B28.

  6. An elementary quantum network of single atoms in optical cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Stephan; Nölleke, Christian; Hahn, Carolin; Reiserer, Andreas; Neuzner, Andreas; Uphoff, Manuel; Mücke, Martin; Figueroa, Eden; Bochmann, Joerg; Rempe, Gerhard

    2012-04-11

    Quantum networks are distributed quantum many-body systems with tailored topology and controlled information exchange. They are the backbone of distributed quantum computing architectures and quantum communication. Here we present a prototype of such a quantum network based on single atoms embedded in optical cavities. We show that atom-cavity systems form universal nodes capable of sending, receiving, storing and releasing photonic quantum information. Quantum connectivity between nodes is achieved in the conceptually most fundamental way-by the coherent exchange of a single photon. We demonstrate the faithful transfer of an atomic quantum state and the creation of entanglement between two identical nodes in separate laboratories. The non-local state that is created is manipulated by local quantum bit (qubit) rotation. This efficient cavity-based approach to quantum networking is particularly promising because it offers a clear perspective for scalability, thus paving the way towards large-scale quantum networks and their applications.

  7. Atoms and molecules interacting with light atomic physics for the laser era

    CERN Document Server

    Straten, Peter van der

    2016-01-01

    This in-depth textbook with a focus on atom-light interactions prepares students for research in a fast-growing and dynamic field. Intended to accompany the laser-induced revolution in atomic physics, it is a comprehensive text for the emerging era in atomic, molecular and optical science. Utilising an intuitive and physical approach, the text describes two-level atom transitions, including appendices on Ramsey spectroscopy, adiabatic rapid passage and entanglement. With a unique focus on optical interactions, the authors present multi-level atomic transitions with dipole selection rules, and M1/E2 and multiphoton transitions. Conventional structure topics are discussed in some detail, beginning with the hydrogen atom and these are interspersed with material rarely found in textbooks such as intuitive descriptions of quantum defects. The final chapters examine modern applications and include many references to current research literature. The numerous exercises and multiple appendices throughout enable advanc...

  8. The Effective Interaction between Atoms of Liquid ^{4}He

    CERN Document Server

    Minasyan, V N

    2002-01-01

    A new method of "mixed" representation for the Bose-system is presented. On the basis of this method we have found the effective potential interaction between atoms of ^{4}He, which is formed by the interaction of atoms density oscillations and the interaction between two atoms, represented in the form of S-wave pseudopotential in the model of hard spheres. It is also shown that two types of bosons can be axcited in liquid ^{4}He. This result coincides with the experimental data.

  9. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jae Min; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Jung, E. C.; Choe, A. S.; Lee, J. M

    1998-01-01

    The basic research on the control of atoms using the coherent interaction, such as the development of the generator of the thermal atomic beam with high directionality, the photodeflection of atomic beam and the coherent excitation of atoms, has been performed. Yb atomic beam with small divergence was generated and the deflection mechanism of the atomic beam was studied by using a broad band dye laser and a narrow band laser. It has been proved that the single mode dye laser with narrow bandwidth was suitable for deflection of atoms but the frequency locking system was indispensable. And the apparatus for intermodulated optogalvanic (IMOG) experiment was developed and the high resolution optogalvanic spectroscopy was studied for laser frequency stabilization. (author). 74 refs., 1 tab., 26 figs

  10. Processus d'interaction entre photons et atomes

    CERN Document Server

    Fellot, Dominique

    1996-01-01

    This work expounds the basic force interactions between photons and atoms, as well as an analysis of more complex processes. Various theoretical methods are introduced and illustrated with simple systems that help broach that subject.

  11. A Quantum Network with Atoms and Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    extraneous noise photon measurements from the quantum memory SEDD developed and experimentally tested the use of a 85Rb vapor cell to attenuate pump...Meyers, Keith S Deacon, Arnold D Tunick, Qudsia Quraishi, and Patricia Lee 5d. PROJECT NUMBER  5e. TASK NUMBER 5f.  WORK  UNIT NUMBER  7. PERFORMING...information. We constructed the rubidium (⁸⁷Rb) atomic memory magneto optical trap (MOT) cell and laser controls, and developed protocols, hardware, and

  12. Entanglement distillation for quantum communication network with atomic-ensemble memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Yang, Guo-Jian; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-10-06

    Atomic ensembles are effective memory nodes for quantum communication network due to the long coherence time and the collective enhancement effect for the nonlinear interaction between an ensemble and a photon. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving the entanglement distillation for nonlocal atomic ensembles by the input-output process of a single photon as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We give an optimal entanglement concentration protocol (ECP) for two-atomic-ensemble systems in a partially entangled pure state with known parameters and an efficient ECP for the systems in an unknown partially entangled pure state with a nondestructive parity-check detector (PCD). For the systems in a mixed entangled state, we introduce an entanglement purification protocol with PCDs. These entanglement distillation protocols have high fidelity and efficiency with current experimental techniques, and they are useful for quantum communication network with atomic-ensemble memories.

  13. Two-electron atom with a screened interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Downing, C. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present analytical solutions to a quantum-mechanical three-body problem in three dimensions, which describes a helium-like two-electron atom. Similarly to Hooke's atom, the Coulombic electron-nucleus interaction potentials are replaced by harmonic potentials. The electron-electron interaction potential is taken to be both screened (decaying faster than the inverse of the interparticle separation) and regularized (in the limit of zero separation). We reveal the exactly solvable few-electron...

  14. Collisional interaction between metastable neon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drunen, Wouter Johannes van

    2008-07-07

    In this thesis, the study of cold gases of neon atoms in different metastable states is described. It contains measurements of the collisional parameters for both the 3s[3/2]{sub 2} and the 3s'[1/2]{sub 0} metastable state and the dependence of the inelastic loss on external fields. Furthermore, the investigation of frequency dependent laser-induced collisions, and the possibility to excite photoassociation resonances is presented. For the measurements described here, neon atoms have been confined in a magnetooptical trap, in a magnetostatic trap, or in an optical dipole trap, respectively. By laser cooling inside the magnetic trap, atomic samples with more than 95 percent occupation of the magnetic substate m{sub J} = +2 could be prepared. They have a typical temperature of 0.5 mK, central densities up to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, and a central phase-space density of up to 2.2.10{sup -7}. After loading the optical dipole trap from the magnetic trap, 2.5.10{sup 6} atoms with typical temperatures of 0.1 mK, and central densities up to 5.10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} were trapped. By evaporative cooling of the atoms in the magnetic trap we could increase the phase-space density by a factor of 200 to 5.10{sup -5}. Investigating the frequency dependence of laser-induced collisions did not reveal an experimental signature for the excitation of photoassociation resonances. For the {sup 3}D{sub 3} line a frequency dependence of laser enhanced Penning ionization was observed. Measurement of the two-body loss coefficient as function of the magnetic field showed a field dependence of the inelastic loss. These losses increase towards both small and large offset fields. The implementation of an optical dipole trap allowed us to trap the {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable state. From the trap loss measurements we determined the two-body loss coefficient of the {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable state for both bosonic isotopes {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne. For {sup 20}Ne we obtained {beta}=6{sup +5}{sub

  15. Quantum optics and cavity QED Quantum network with individual atoms and photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rempe G.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantum physics allows a new approach to information processing. A grand challenge is the realization of a quantum network for long-distance quantum communication and large-scale quantum simulation. This paper highlights a first implementation of an elementary quantum network with two fibre-linked high-finesse optical resonators, each containing a single quasi-permanently trapped atom as a stationary quantum node. Reversible quantum state transfer between the two atoms and entanglement of the two atoms are achieved by the controlled exchange of a time-symmetric single photon. This approach to quantum networking is efficient and offers a clear perspective for scalability. It allows for arbitrary topologies and features controlled connectivity as well as, in principle, infinite-range interactions. Our system constitutes the largest man-made material quantum system to date and is an ideal test bed for fundamental investigations, e.g. quantum non-locality.

  16. Cadherin interaction probed by atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgartner, W.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ness, W.; Raab, A.; Vestweber, D; Schindler, H; Drenckhahn, D

    2000-01-01

    Single molecule atomic force microscopy was used to characterize structure, binding strength (unbinding force), and binding kinetics of a classical cadherin, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, secreted by transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells as cis-dimerized full-length external domain fused to Fc-portion of human IgG. In physiological buffer, the external domain of VE-cadherin dimers is a ≈20-nm-long rod-shaped molecule that collapses and dissociates into monomers (V-shaped structures) i...

  17. A Quantum Network with Atoms and Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents. Citation of manufacturer’s or trade...stored. The incipient quantum repeater network development is based on an architecture where nodes are entangled with their nearest neighbors through...unlimited iii 5.2.9 Spontaneous Parametric Down conversion (SPDC) and Up Conversion 21 5.3 Teleportation Implementation 22 5.4 Entanglement and

  18. Single-atom gating and magnetic interactions in quantum corrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, Anh T.; Kim, Eugene H.; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    2017-04-01

    Single-atom gating, achieved by manipulation of adatoms on a surface, has been shown in experiments to allow precise control over superposition of electronic states in quantum corrals. Using a Green's function approach, we demonstrate theoretically that such atom gating can also be used to control the coupling between magnetic degrees of freedom in these systems. Atomic gating enables control not only on the direct interaction between magnetic adatoms, but also over superpositions of many-body states which can then control long distance interactions. We illustrate this effect by considering the competition between direct exchange between magnetic impurities and the Kondo screening mediated by the host electrons, and how this is affected by gating. These results suggest that both magnetic and nonmagnetic single-atom gating may be used to investigate magnetic impurity systems with tailored interactions, and may allow the control of entanglement of different spin states.

  19. The role of thermal motion in free-space light-atom interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Yue Sum; Steiner, Matthias; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2017-04-01

    The prospects of distributed quantum networks have triggered much interest in developing light-matter interfaces. While this is usually realized by optical resonators, tightly focused free-space interfaces offer a complementary alternative. Our version of free-space light-matter interface is formed by a pair of high numerical aperture (NA=0.75) lenses and a single atom held in an optical tweezer. Operating near the diffraction limit, we demonstrate 17.7% extinction of a weak coherent field by a single atom. The thermal motion of the atom is commonly suspected to be one of the limiting factors of the interaction. Here we verify quantitatively this effect by measuring in-situ the interaction strength as the atom heats up. Ministry of Education in Singapore; National Research Foundation.

  20. Network biomarkers, interaction networks and dynamical network biomarkers in respiratory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiaodan; Chen, Luonan; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Identification and validation of interaction networks and network biomarkers have become more critical and important in the development of disease-specific biomarkers, which are functionally changed during disease development, progression or treatment. The present review headlined the definition, significance, research and potential application for network biomarkers, interaction networks and dynamical network biomarkers (DNB). Disease-specific interaction networks, network biomarkers, or DNB...

  1. Identification of Conserved Moieties in Metabolic Networks by Graph Theoretical Analysis of Atom Transition Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsdóttir, Hulda S.; Fleming, Ronan M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Conserved moieties are groups of atoms that remain intact in all reactions of a metabolic network. Identification of conserved moieties gives insight into the structure and function of metabolic networks and facilitates metabolic modelling. All moiety conservation relations can be represented as nonnegative integer vectors in the left null space of the stoichiometric matrix corresponding to a biochemical network. Algorithms exist to compute such vectors based only on reaction stoichiometry but their computational complexity has limited their application to relatively small metabolic networks. Moreover, the vectors returned by existing algorithms do not, in general, represent conservation of a specific moiety with a defined atomic structure. Here, we show that identification of conserved moieties requires data on reaction atom mappings in addition to stoichiometry. We present a novel method to identify conserved moieties in metabolic networks by graph theoretical analysis of their underlying atom transition networks. Our method returns the exact group of atoms belonging to each conserved moiety as well as the corresponding vector in the left null space of the stoichiometric matrix. It can be implemented as a pipeline of polynomial time algorithms. Our implementation completes in under five minutes on a metabolic network with more than 4,000 mass balanced reactions. The scalability of the method enables extension of existing applications for moiety conservation relations to genome-scale metabolic networks. We also give examples of new applications made possible by elucidating the atomic structure of conserved moieties. PMID:27870845

  2. Statistical Mechanics of Temporal and Interacting Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun

    In the last ten years important breakthroughs in the understanding of the topology of complexity have been made in the framework of network science. Indeed it has been found that many networks belong to the universality classes called small-world networks or scale-free networks. Moreover it was found that the complex architecture of real world networks strongly affects the critical phenomena defined on these structures. Nevertheless the main focus of the research has been the characterization of single and static networks. Recently, temporal networks and interacting networks have attracted large interest. Indeed many networks are interacting or formed by a multilayer structure. Example of these networks are found in social networks where an individual might be at the same time part of different social networks, in economic and financial networks, in physiology or in infrastructure systems. Moreover, many networks are temporal, i.e. the links appear and disappear on the fast time scale. Examples of these networks are social networks of contacts such as face-to-face interactions or mobile-phone communication, the time-dependent correlations in the brain activity and etc. Understanding the evolution of temporal and multilayer networks and characterizing critical phenomena in these systems is crucial if we want to describe, predict and control the dynamics of complex system. In this thesis, we investigate several statistical mechanics models of temporal and interacting networks, to shed light on the dynamics of this new generation of complex networks. First, we investigate a model of temporal social networks aimed at characterizing human social interactions such as face-to-face interactions and phone-call communication. Indeed thanks to the availability of data on these interactions, we are now in the position to compare the proposed model to the real data finding good agreement. Second, we investigate the entropy of temporal networks and growing networks , to provide

  3. Common Physical Framework Explains Phase Behavior and Dynamics of Atomic, Molecular, and Polymeric Network Formers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Whitelam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that the self-assembly of a diverse collection of building blocks can be understood within a common physical framework. These building blocks, which form periodic honeycomb networks and nonperiodic variants thereof, range in size from atoms to micron-scale polymers and interact through mechanisms as different as hydrogen bonds and covalent forces. A combination of statistical mechanics and quantum mechanics shows that one can capture the physics that governs the assembly of these networks by resolving only the geometry and strength of building-block interactions. The resulting framework reproduces a broad range of phenomena seen experimentally, including periodic and nonperiodic networks in thermal equilibrium, and nonperiodic supercooled and glassy networks away from equilibrium. Our results show how simple “design criteria” control the assembly of a wide variety of networks and suggest that kinetic trapping can be a useful way of making functional assemblies.

  4. The quantum measurement effect of interaction without interaction for an atomic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Yi

    When an atomic beam collectively and harmonically vibrates perpendicular to the wave vector of the beam, the number of atoms reaching the atomic detector will have a vibrant factor Δt / T if the measurement time interval Δt is shorter than the period T. This new quantum mechanical measurement effect for an atomic beam is called interaction without interaction: though the translational motion of the atomic beam does not interact with its collective and transverse harmonic vibration, the latter will have an effect on the measured number of atoms associated with the former. From the new measurement effect the classical harmonic vibration's period is evaluated. We give a clear physical picture and a satisfactory physical interpretation for the measurement effect based on the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. We present an experimental proposal to verify this measurement effect for an ion beam instead of an atomic beam.

  5. Scalar-pseudoscalar interaction in the francium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripnikov, L. V.; Maison, D. E.; Mosyagin, N. S.

    2017-02-01

    Fr atom can be successively used to search for the atomic permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) [Hyperfine Interact. 236, 53 (2015), 10.1007/s10751-015-1193-1; J. Phys.: Conference Series 691, 012017 (2016), 10.1088/1742-6596/691/1/012017]. It can be induced by the permanent electron EDM predicted by modern extensions of the standard model to be nonzero at the level accessible by the new generation of EDM experiments. We consider another mechanism of the atomic EDM generation in Fr. This is caused by the scalar-pseudoscalar nucleus-electron neutral current interaction with the dimensionless strength constant kT ,P. Similar to the electron EDM this interaction violates both spatial parity and time-reversal symmetries and can also induce permanent atomic EDM. It was shown in [Phys. Rev. D 89, 056006 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.056006] that the scalar-pseudoscalar contribution to the atomic EDM can dominate over the direct contribution from the electron EDM within the standard model. We report high-accuracy combined all-electron and two-step relativistic coupled cluster treatment of the effect from the scalar-pseudoscalar interaction in the Fr atom. Up to the quadruple cluster amplitudes within the coupled cluster method with single, double, triple, and noniterative quadruple amplitudes, CCSDT(Q), were included in correlation treatment. This calculation is required for the interpretation of the experimental data in terms of kT ,P. The resulted EDM of the Fr atom expressed in terms of kT ,P is dFr=kT ,P4.50 ×10-18e cm , where e is the (negative) charge of the electron. The value of the ionization potential of the 2S1 /2 ground state of Fr calculated within the same methods is in very good agreement with the experimental datum.

  6. Monte Carlo Computational Modeling of Atomic Oxygen Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Miller, Sharon K.; De Groh, Kim K.

    2017-01-01

    Computational modeling of the erosion of polymers caused by atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit (LEO) is useful for determining areas of concern for spacecraft environment durability. Successful modeling requires that the characteristics of the environment such as atomic oxygen energy distribution, flux, and angular distribution be properly represented in the model. Thus whether the atomic oxygen is arriving normal to or inclined to a surface and whether it arrives in a consistent direction or is sweeping across the surface such as in the case of polymeric solar array blankets is important to determine durability. When atomic oxygen impacts a polymer surface it can react removing a certain volume per incident atom (called the erosion yield), recombine, or be ejected as an active oxygen atom to potentially either react with other polymer atoms or exit into space. Scattered atoms can also have a lower energy as a result of partial or total thermal accommodation. Many solutions to polymer durability in LEO involve protective thin films of metal oxides such as SiO2 to prevent atomic oxygen erosion. Such protective films also have their own interaction characteristics. A Monte Carlo computational model has been developed which takes into account the various types of atomic oxygen arrival and how it reacts with a representative polymer (polyimide Kapton H) and how it reacts at defect sites in an oxide protective coating, such as SiO2 on that polymer. Although this model was initially intended to determine atomic oxygen erosion behavior at defect sites for the International Space Station solar arrays, it has been used to predict atomic oxygen erosion or oxidation behavior on many other spacecraft components including erosion of polymeric joints, durability of solar array blanket box covers, and scattering of atomic oxygen into telescopes and microwave cavities where oxidation of critical component surfaces can take place. The computational model is a two dimensional model

  7. Oriented Molecule Interactions with Atoms and Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, R. Scott

    Mutual orientation of reagents is second only to the energy requirement for a chemical reaction to take place. Since the introduction of the hexapole field focusing and orientation of symmetric-top molecules in 1965, considerable insight has been gained on the role of orientation in reactive scattering dynamics. The degree of laboratory orientation has been measured for (CH_3) _3CBr and has been found to follow the sequence (CH_3)_3CBr > (CH_3) _3CI > CH_3 I for previous measurements. Oriented molecule beams of thirteen different molecules have been scattered by a graphite(0001) surface. The results show a large diversity in the sign and magnitude of the steric effect (i.e., "heads" vs. "tails"). It appears from the bulk of data that the origin of the steric effect is the anisotropic molecule-graphite interaction potential, which is governed by the charge density distribution of the molecule. The steric effects have been quantitatively measured for seven of the molecules and have been analyzed in terms of a two component model which yields estimates for the anisotropy of the trapping probability. An effusive oven of Sr was used in a crossed beam reaction of Sr + CH_3I. In order to detect weak product signal, a sensitive detection technique utilizing single photon ionization of the reaction product was developed. By changing the relative velocity of the reactants, the excitation function (reactive cross section vs. collision energy) was measured. The experimental results were simulated by a modified angle dependent line -of-centers model, which gives the reaction potential energy surface. Excitation functions of other alkyl halides reactions, Sr + RX (R = H, CH_3, C_2H _5,C_3H_7, C_4H_9; X = Br, I), were also explored.

  8. 2004 Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Paul J. Dagdigian

    2004-10-25

    The 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Atomic and Molecular Interactions was held July 11-16 at Colby-Sawyer College, New London, New Hampshire. This latest edition in a long-standing conference series featured invited talks and contributed poster papers on dynamics and intermolecular interactions in a variety of environments, ranging from the gas phase through surfaces and condensed media. A total of 90 conferees participated in the conference.

  9. Atomic Structure and Dynamics of Single Platinum Atom Interactions with Monolayer MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huashan; Wang, Shanshan; Sawada, Hidetake; Han, Grace G D; Samuels, Thomas; Allen, Christopher S; Kirkland, Angus I; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Warner, Jamie H

    2017-03-28

    We have studied atomic level interactions between single Pt atoms and the surface of monolayer MoS2 using aberration-corrected annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy at an accelerating voltage of 60 kV. Strong contrast from single Pt atoms on the atomically resolved monolayer MoS2 lattice enables their exact position to be determined with respect to the MoS2 lattice, revealing stable binding sites. In regions of MoS2 free from surface contamination, the Pt atoms are localized in S vacancy sites and exhibit dynamic hopping to nearby vacancy sites driven by the energy supplied by the electron beam. However, in areas of MoS2 contaminated with carbon surface layers, the Pt atoms appear at various positions with respect to the underlying MoS2 lattice, including on top of Mo and in off-axis positions. These variations are due to the Pt bonding with the surrounding amorphous carbon layer, which disrupts the intrinsic Pt-MoS2 interactions, leading to more varied positions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that Pt atoms on the surface of MoS2 have a small barrier for migration and are stabilized when bound to either a single or double sulfur vacancies. DFT calculations have been used to understand how the catalytic activity of the MoS2 basal plane for hydrogen evolution reaction is influenced by Pt dopants by variation of the hydrogen adsorption free energy. This strong dependence of catalytic effect on interfacial configurations is shown to be common for a series of dopants, which may provide a means to create and optimize reaction centers.

  10. Discovering functional interaction patterns in protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Tolga

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, a considerable amount of research effort has been directed to the analysis of biological networks with the availability of genome-scale networks of genes and/or proteins of an increasing number of organisms. A protein-protein interaction (PPI network is a particular biological network which represents physical interactions between pairs of proteins of an organism. Major research on PPI networks has focused on understanding the topological organization of PPI networks, evolution of PPI networks and identification of conserved subnetworks across different species, discovery of modules of interaction, use of PPI networks for functional annotation of uncharacterized proteins, and improvement of the accuracy of currently available networks. Results In this article, we map known functional annotations of proteins onto a PPI network in order to identify frequently occurring interaction patterns in the functional space. We propose a new frequent pattern identification technique, PPISpan, adapted specifically for PPI networks from a well-known frequent subgraph identification method, gSpan. Existing module discovery techniques either look for specific clique-like highly interacting protein clusters or linear paths of interaction. However, our goal is different; instead of single clusters or pathways, we look for recurring functional interaction patterns in arbitrary topologies. We have applied PPISpan on PPI networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identified a number of frequently occurring functional interaction patterns. Conclusion With the help of PPISpan, recurring functional interaction patterns in an organism's PPI network can be identified. Such an analysis offers a new perspective on the modular organization of PPI networks. The complete list of identified functional interaction patterns is available at http://bioserver.ceng.metu.edu.tr/PPISpan/.

  11. Strongly interacting atom lasers in three-dimensional optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Itay; Rigol, Marcos

    2010-10-29

    We show that the dynamical melting of a Mott insulator in a three-dimensional lattice leads to condensation at nonzero momenta, a phenomenon that can be used to generate strongly interacting atom lasers in optical lattices. For infinite on-site repulsion, the case considered here, the momenta at which bosons condense are determined analytically and found to have a simple dependence on the hopping amplitudes. The occupation of the condensates is shown to scale linearly with the total number of atoms in the initial Mott insulator. Our results are obtained by using a Gutzwiller-type mean-field approach, gauged against exact-diagonalization solutions of small systems.

  12. van der Waals interaction potential between Rydberg atoms near surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Johannes; Scheel, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    van der Waals interactions, as a result of the exchange of photons between particles, can be altered by modifying the environment through which these photons propagate. As a consequence, phenomena such as the Rydberg blockade mechanism between highly excited atoms or excitons can be controlled by adding reflecting surfaces. We provide the quantum electrodynamic framework for the van der Waals interaction in the nonretarded limit that is relevant for long-wavelength transitions, such as those between Rydberg systems, and show its intimate connection with common static dipole-dipole interactions, thereby providing a generalization to include macroscopic bodies.

  13. Mutually-Antagonistic Interactions in Baseball Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit interesting structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the network and examine their sensitivity to baseball's rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to compare the ...

  14. Superfluidity in an Atomic Gas of Strongly Interacting Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    What is the benefit of realizing superfluidity in a gas a million times more dilute than air? Such systems consist of well-separated atoms which can be observed and manipulated with the control and precision of atomic physics, and which can be treated with first-principles calculations. By implementing scattering resonances, we have realized the strong-coupling limit of the Bardeen Schrieffer-Cooper (BCS) mechanism and observed a normalized transition temperature of 15% of the Fermi temperature, higher than in any superconductor. By tuning the strength of the interactions, the BEC-BCS crossover is realized. When the population of the two spin states is imbalanced, pairing is frustrated; and superfluidity is quenched at the Chandrasekhar-Clogston limit. These studies illustrate a new approach to condensed-matter physics where many-body Hamiltonians are realized in dilute atomic gases.

  15. A Waveguide Platform for Collective Light-Atom Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Heidi Lundgaard

    In this work a tapered optical fiber is studied as a waveguide platform for efficient collective light-atom interaction. We present an allcomputer controlled heat-and-pull setup with which a standard optical fiber can reproducible be tapered down to sub-micron waist size. The resulting fiber shape...... is compared against a prediction derived from a numerical model build upon an easy experimental calibration of the viscosity profile within the heater. Very good agreement between the modeled and measured fiber shape is found. We next study the coherent back-scattering off atoms confined as two one......-dimensional strings in the evanescent field of a tapered optical fiber. By applying a near-resonant standing wave field, the atoms are arranged into a periodic Bragg structure in close analogy to a photo-refractive medium with a refractive index grating. We observe more than 10% power reflection off about 1000...

  16. The quantum measurement effect of interaction without interaction for an atomic beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yi Huang

    Full Text Available When an atomic beam collectively and harmonically vibrates perpendicular to the wave vector of the beam, the number of atoms reaching the atomic detector will have a vibrant factor Δt/T if the measurement time interval Δt is shorter than the period T. This new quantum mechanical measurement effect for an atomic beam is called interaction without interaction: though the translational motion of the atomic beam does not interact with its collective and transverse harmonic vibration, the latter will have an effect on the measured number of atoms associated with the former. From the new measurement effect the classical harmonic vibration’s period is evaluated. We give a clear physical picture and a satisfactory physical interpretation for the measurement effect based on the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. We present an experimental proposal to verify this measurement effect for an ion beam instead of an atomic beam. Keywords: The quantum measurement effect of interaction without interaction, The Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics

  17. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny P Bartsch

    Full Text Available We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS, we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  18. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny P; Liu, Kang K L; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  19. D-state Rydberg electrons interacting with ultracold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupp, Alexander Thorsten

    2014-10-02

    This thesis was established in the field of ultracold atoms where the interaction of highly excited D-state electrons with rubidium atoms was examined. This work is divided into two main parts: In the first part we study D-state Rydberg molecules resulting from the binding of a D-state Rydberg electron to a ground state rubidium atom. We show that we can address specific rovibrational molecular states by changing our laser detuning and thus create perfectly aligned axial or antialigned toroidal molecules, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Furthermore the influence of the electric field on the Rydberg molecules was investigated, creating novel states which show a different angular dependence and alignment. In the second part of this thesis we excite single D-state Rydberg electrons in a Bose-Einstein condensate. We study the lifetime of these Rydberg electrons, the change of the shape of our condensate and the atom losses in the condensate due to this process. Moreover, we observe quadrupolar shape oscillations of the whole condensate created by the consecutive excitation of Rydberg atoms and compare all results to previous S-state measurements. In the outlook we propose a wide range of further experiments including the proposal of imaging a single electron wavefunction by the imprint of its orbit into the Bose-Einstein condensate.

  20. Mining protein networks for synthetic genetic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Shan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The local connectivity and global position of a protein in a protein interaction network are known to correlate with some of its functional properties, including its essentiality or dispensability. It is therefore of interest to extend this observation and examine whether network properties of two proteins considered simultaneously can determine their joint dispensability, i.e., their propensity for synthetic sick/lethal interaction. Accordingly, we examine the predictive power of protein interaction networks for synthetic genetic interaction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an organism in which high confidence protein interaction networks are available and synthetic sick/lethal gene pairs have been extensively identified. Results We design a support vector machine system that uses graph-theoretic properties of two proteins in a protein interaction network as input features for prediction of synthetic sick/lethal interactions. The system is trained on interacting and non-interacting gene pairs culled from large scale genetic screens as well as literature-curated data. We find that the method is capable of predicting synthetic genetic interactions with sensitivity and specificity both exceeding 85%. We further find that the prediction performance is reasonably robust with respect to errors in the protein interaction network and with respect to changes in the features of test datasets. Using the prediction system, we carried out novel predictions of synthetic sick/lethal gene pairs at a genome-wide scale. These pairs appear to have functional properties that are similar to those that characterize the known synthetic lethal gene pairs. Conclusion Our analysis shows that protein interaction networks can be used to predict synthetic lethal interactions with accuracies on par with or exceeding that of other computational methods that use a variety of input features, including functional annotations. This indicates that protein

  1. Data Mining on Social Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Atzmueller, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Social media and social networks have already woven themselves into the very fabric of everyday life. This results in a dramatic increase of social data capturing various relations between the users and their associated artifacts, both in online networks and the real world using ubiquitous devices. In this work, we consider social interaction networks from a data mining perspective - also with a special focus on real-world face-to-face contact networks: We combine data mining and social netwo...

  2. Interaction network among functional drug groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background More attention has been being paid to combinatorial effects of drugs to treat complex diseases or to avoid adverse combinations of drug cocktail. Although drug interaction information has been increasingly accumulated, a novel approach like network-based method is needed to analyse that information systematically and intuitively Results Beyond focussing on drug-drug interactions, we examined interactions between functional drug groups. In this work, functional drug groups were defined based on the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) Classification System. We defined criteria whether two functional drug groups are related. Then we constructed the interaction network of drug groups. The resulting network provides intuitive interpretations. We further constructed another network based on interaction sharing ratio of the first network. Subsequent analysis of the networks showed that some features of drugs can be well described by this kind of interaction even for the case of structurally dissimilar drugs. Conclusion Our networks in this work provide intuitive insights into interactions among drug groups rather than those among single drugs. In addition, information on these interactions can be used as a useful source to describe mechanisms and features of drugs. PMID:24555875

  3. Understanding complex interactions using social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pow, Janette; Gayen, Kaberi; Elliott, Lawrie; Raeside, Robert

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to raise the awareness of social network analysis as a method to facilitate research in nursing research. The application of social network analysis in assessing network properties has allowed greater insight to be gained in many areas including sociology, politics, business organisation and health care. However, the use of social networks in nursing has not received sufficient attention. Review of literature and illustration of the application of the method of social network analysis using research examples. First, the value of social networks will be discussed. Then by using illustrative examples, the value of social network analysis to nursing will be demonstrated. The method of social network analysis is found to give greater insights into social situations involving interactions between individuals and has particular application to the study of interactions between nurses and between nurses and patients and other actors. Social networks are systems in which people interact. Two quantitative techniques help our understanding of these networks. The first is visualisation of the network. The second is centrality. Individuals with high centrality are key communicators in a network. Applying social network analysis to nursing provides a simple method that helps gain an understanding of human interaction and how this might influence various health outcomes. It allows influential individuals (actors) to be identified. Their influence on the formation of social norms and communication can determine the extent to which new interventions or ways of thinking are accepted by a group. Thus, working with key individuals in a network could be critical to the success and sustainability of an intervention. Social network analysis can also help to assess the effectiveness of such interventions for the recipient and the service provider. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Construction of high-dimensional neural network potentials using environment-dependent atom pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, K V Jovan; Artrith, Nongnuch; Behler, Jörg

    2012-05-21

    An accurate determination of the potential energy is the crucial step in computer simulations of chemical processes, but using electronic structure methods on-the-fly in molecular dynamics (MD) is computationally too demanding for many systems. Constructing more efficient interatomic potentials becomes intricate with increasing dimensionality of the potential-energy surface (PES), and for numerous systems the accuracy that can be achieved is still not satisfying and far from the reliability of first-principles calculations. Feed-forward neural networks (NNs) have a very flexible functional form, and in recent years they have been shown to be an accurate tool to construct efficient PESs. High-dimensional NN potentials based on environment-dependent atomic energy contributions have been presented for a number of materials. Still, these potentials may be improved by a more detailed structural description, e.g., in form of atom pairs, which directly reflect the atomic interactions and take the chemical environment into account. We present an implementation of an NN method based on atom pairs, and its accuracy and performance are compared to the atom-based NN approach using two very different systems, the methanol molecule and metallic copper. We find that both types of NN potentials provide an excellent description of both PESs, with the pair-based method yielding a slightly higher accuracy making it a competitive alternative for addressing complex systems in MD simulations.

  5. Construction of high-dimensional neural network potentials using environment-dependent atom pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, K. V. Jovan; Artrith, Nongnuch; Behler, Jörg

    2012-05-01

    An accurate determination of the potential energy is the crucial step in computer simulations of chemical processes, but using electronic structure methods on-the-fly in molecular dynamics (MD) is computationally too demanding for many systems. Constructing more efficient interatomic potentials becomes intricate with increasing dimensionality of the potential-energy surface (PES), and for numerous systems the accuracy that can be achieved is still not satisfying and far from the reliability of first-principles calculations. Feed-forward neural networks (NNs) have a very flexible functional form, and in recent years they have been shown to be an accurate tool to construct efficient PESs. High-dimensional NN potentials based on environment-dependent atomic energy contributions have been presented for a number of materials. Still, these potentials may be improved by a more detailed structural description, e.g., in form of atom pairs, which directly reflect the atomic interactions and take the chemical environment into account. We present an implementation of an NN method based on atom pairs, and its accuracy and performance are compared to the atom-based NN approach using two very different systems, the methanol molecule and metallic copper. We find that both types of NN potentials provide an excellent description of both PESs, with the pair-based method yielding a slightly higher accuracy making it a competitive alternative for addressing complex systems in MD simulations.

  6. Effective oscillator strength distributions of spherically symmetric atoms for calculating polarizabilities and long-range atom–atom interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jun, E-mail: phyjiang@yeah.net [Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Functional Materials of Gansu Province, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, 0909 (Australia); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, 0909 (Australia); Cheng, Yongjun, E-mail: cyj83mail@gmail.com [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, 0909 (Australia); Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Science, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Bromley, M.W.J., E-mail: brom@physics.uq.edu.au [School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4075 (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Effective oscillator strength distributions are systematically generated and tabulated for the alkali atoms, the alkaline-earth atoms, the alkaline-earth ions, the rare gases and some miscellaneous atoms. These effective distributions are used to compute the dipole, quadrupole and octupole static polarizabilities, and are then applied to the calculation of the dynamic polarizabilities at imaginary frequencies. These polarizabilities can be used to determine the long-range C{sub 6}, C{sub 8} and C{sub 10} atom–atom interactions for the dimers formed from any of these atoms and ions, and we present tables covering all of these combinations.

  7. Geometric evolutionary dynamics of protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przulj, Natasa; Kuchaiev, Oleksii; Stevanović, Aleksandar; Hayes, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the evolution and structure of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks is a central problem of systems biology. Since most processes in the cell are carried out by groups of proteins acting together, a theoretical model of how PPI networks develop based on duplications and mutations is an essential ingredient for understanding the complex wiring of the cell. Many different network models have been proposed, from those that follow power-law degree distributions and those that model complementarity of protein binding domains, to those that have geometric properties. Here, we introduce a new model for PPI network (and thus gene) evolution that produces well-fitting network models for currently available PPI networks. The model integrates geometric network properties with evolutionary dynamics of PPI network evolution.

  8. Atom-scale molecular interactions in lipid raft mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemelä, Perttu S; Hyvönen, Marja T; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    We review the relationship between molecular interactions and the properties of lipid environments. A specific focus is given on bilayers which contain sphingomyelin (SM) and sterols due to their essential role for the formation of lipid rafts. The discussion is based on recent atom-scale molecular....... As a particularly intriguing example of this, the lateral pressure profiles of raft-like and non-raft systems indicate that the lipid composition of membrane domains may have a major impact on membrane protein activation....

  9. Interactivity vs. fairness in networked linux systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenji; Crawford, Matt; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    In general, the Linux 2.6 scheduler can ensure fairness and provide excellent interactive performance at the same time. However, our experiments and mathematical analysis have shown that the current Linux interactivity mechanism tends to incorrectly categorize non-interactive network applications as interactive, which can lead to serious fairness or starvation issues. In the extreme, a single process can unjustifiably obtain up to 95% of the CPU! The root cause is due to the facts that: (1) network packets arrive at the receiver independently and discretely, and the 'relatively fast' non-interactive network process might frequently sleep to wait for packet arrival. Though each sleep lasts for a very short period of time, the wait-for-packet sleeps occur so frequently that they lead to interactive status for the process. (2) The current Linux interactivity mechanism provides the possibility that a non-interactive network process could receive a high CPU share, and at the same time be incorrectly categorized as 'interactive.' In this paper, we propose and test a possible solution to address the interactivity vs. fairness problems. Experiment results have proved the effectiveness of the proposed solution.

  10. The electron-atom interaction in partially ionized dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omarbakiyeva, Yu A; Ramazanov, T S; Roepke, G [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: yultuz@physics.kz

    2009-05-29

    The electron-atom interaction is considered in dense partially ionized plasmas. The separable potential is constructed from scattering data using effective radius theory. Parameters of the interaction potential were obtained from phase shifts, scattering length and effective radius. The binding energy of the electron in the H{sup -} ion is determined for the singlet channel on the basis of the reconstructed separable potential. In dense plasmas, the influence of the Pauli exclusion principle on the phase shifts and the binding energy is considered. Due to the Pauli blocking, the binding energy vanishes at the Mott density. At that density the behavior of the phase shifts is drastically changed. This leads to modifications of macroscopic properties such as composition and transport coefficients.

  11. The interaction of atoms with LiF(001) revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Miraglia, J E

    2016-01-01

    Pairwise additive potentials for multielectronic atoms interacting with a LiF(001) surface are revisited by including an improved description of the electron density associated with the different lattice sites, as well as non-local electron density contributions. Within this model, the electron distribution around each ionic site of the crystal is described by means of an onion approach that accounts for the influence of the Madelung potential. From such densities, binary interatomic potentials are then derived by using well-known non-local functionals for the kinetic, exchange and correlation terms. Rumpling and long-range contributions due to projectile polarization and van der Waals forces are also included in an analogous fashion. We apply this pairwise additive approximation to evaluate the interaction potential between closed-shell - He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe - and open-shell - N, S, and Cl - atoms and the LiF surface, analyzing the relative importance of the different contributions. The performance of the...

  12. Dynamics of interacting information waves in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mirshahvalad, Atieh; Lizana, Ludvig; Rosvall, Martin

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the inner workings of information spreading, network researchers often use simple models to capture the spreading dynamics. But most models only highlight the effect of local interactions on the global spreading of a single information wave, and ignore the effects of interactions between multiple waves. Here we take into account the effect of multiple interacting waves by using an agent-based model in which the interaction between information waves is based on their novelty. We analyzed the global effects of such interactions and found that information that actually reaches nodes reaches them faster. This effect is caused by selection between information waves: slow waves die out and only fast waves survive. As a result, and in contrast to models with non-interacting information dynamics, the access to information decays with the distance from the source. Moreover, when we analyzed the model on various synthetic and real spatial road networks, we found that the decay rate also depends on ...

  13. Long-range interactions of excited He atoms with ground-state noble-gas atoms

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, J.-Y.

    2013-10-09

    The dispersion coefficients C6, C8, and C10 for long-range interactions of He(n1,3S) and He(n1,3P), 2≤n≤10, with the ground-state noble-gas atoms Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe are calculated by summing over the reduced matrix elements of multipole transition operators. The large-n expansions for the sums over the He oscillator strength divided by the corresponding transition energy are presented for these series. Using the expansions, the C6 coefficients for the systems involving He(131,3S) and He(131,3P) are calculated and found to be in good agreement with directly calculated values.

  14. Interaction of laser-cooled $^{87}$Rb atoms with higher order modes of an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ravi; Maimaiti, Aili; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary C; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    Optical nanofibers can be used to confine light to submicron regions and are very promising for the realization of optical fiber-based quantum networks using cold, neutral atoms. Light propagating in the higher order modes of a nanofiber has a greater evanescent field extension around the waist in comparison with the fundamental mode, leading to a stronger interaction with the surrounding environment. In this work, we report on the integration of a few-mode, optical nanofiber, with a waist diameter of ~700 nm, into a magneto-optical trap for $^{87}$Rb atoms. The nanofiber is fabricated from 80 $\\mu$m diameter fiber using a brushed hydrogen-oxygen flame pulling rig. We show that absorption by laser-cooled atoms around the waist of the nanofiber is stronger when probe light is guided in the higher order modes than in the fundamental mode. As predicted by Masalov and Minogin*, fluorescent light from the atoms coupling in to the nanofiber through the waist has a higher pumping rate (5.8 times) for the higher-orde...

  15. Unlocking higher harmonics in atomic force microscopy with gentle interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Santos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In dynamic atomic force microscopy, nanoscale properties are encoded in the higher harmonics. Nevertheless, when gentle interactions and minimal invasiveness are required, these harmonics are typically undetectable. Here, we propose to externally drive an arbitrary number of exact higher harmonics above the noise level. In this way, multiple contrast channels that are sensitive to compositional variations are made accessible. Numerical integration of the equation of motion shows that the external introduction of exact harmonic frequencies does not compromise the fundamental frequency. Thermal fluctuations are also considered within the detection bandwidth of interest and discussed in terms of higher-harmonic phase contrast in the presence and absence of an external excitation of higher harmonics. Higher harmonic phase shifts further provide the means to directly decouple the true topography from that induced by compositional heterogeneity.

  16. Half-Collision Studies of Excited Metal Atom - Molecule Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiber, P. D.; Chen, J.; Wong, T. H.

    1998-05-01

    We report on state-resolved studies of excited state molecular dynamics, including both reactive and nonreactive (energy transfer) processes using half-collision techniques. Scattering state spectroscopy is used to investigate electronic orbital alignment effects on the reactive quenching of excited p-state alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms in collisions with hydrogen and methane. These experiments give information about the shape of the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces for the collision complex, and about the nonadiabatic interactions that couple the surfaces. Experimental results indicate two distinct reaction mechanisms are operative in the alkali metal-hydrogen quenching system. In complementary experiments, the spectroscopy and dissociation dynamics of weakly bound metal ion-hydrocarbon bimolecular complexes are studied using photofragmentation spectroscopic techniques in a tandem time-of- flight mass spectrometer. Results suggest that the quenching mechanism involves metal ion activation of the hydrocarbon bonds througha bond- stretch insertion process.

  17. Interaction between polystyrene spheres by atomic force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Looi, L

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between a single polystyrene particle and a polystyrene substrate has been previously reported by a number of investigators. However, the effects of relative humidity, applied load and contact time on the adhesion of polystyrene surfaces have not been investigated and these effects are poorly understood. It is the primary aim of the current work to characterise the effect of the aforementioned parameters on the adhesion of polystyrene surfaces using atomic force microscopy. The polystyrene used in this study contained 1% of di-vinyl benzene as a cross-linking agent. From the work conducted using the custom-built instrument, the dependency of adhesion forces on the relative humidity is greatest at relative humidities above 60% where capillary forces cause a sharp increase in adhesion with increasing relative humidity. Hysteresis was observed in the solid-solid contact gradient of the accompanying force curves, suggesting non-elastic behaviour at the contact area of the surfaces

  18. A simple model for studying interacting networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjia; Jolad, Shivakumar; Schmittmann, Beate; Zia, R. K. P.

    2011-03-01

    Many specific physical networks (e.g., internet, power grid, interstates), have been characterized in considerable detail, but in isolation from each other. Yet, each of these networks supports the functions of the others, and so far, little is known about how their interactions affect their structure and functionality. To address this issue, we consider two coupled model networks. Each network is relatively simple, with a fixed set of nodes, but dynamically generated set of links which has a preferred degree, κ . In the stationary state, the degree distribution has exponential tails (far from κ), an attribute which we can explain. Next, we consider two such networks with different κ 's, reminiscent of two social groups, e.g., extroverts and introverts. Finally, we let these networks interact by establishing a controllable fraction of cross links. The resulting distribution of links, both within and across the two model networks, is investigated and discussed, along with some potential consequences for real networks. Supported in part by NSF-DMR-0705152 and 1005417.

  19. A conserved mammalian protein interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Pérez-Bercoff

    Full Text Available Physical interactions between proteins mediate a variety of biological functions, including signal transduction, physical structuring of the cell and regulation. While extensive catalogs of such interactions are known from model organisms, their evolutionary histories are difficult to study given the lack of interaction data from phylogenetic outgroups. Using phylogenomic approaches, we infer a upper bound on the time of origin for a large set of human protein-protein interactions, showing that most such interactions appear relatively ancient, dating no later than the radiation of placental mammals. By analyzing paired alignments of orthologous and putatively interacting protein-coding genes from eight mammals, we find evidence for weak but significant co-evolution, as measured by relative selective constraint, between pairs of genes with interacting proteins. However, we find no strong evidence for shared instances of directional selection within an interacting pair. Finally, we use a network approach to show that the distribution of selective constraint across the protein interaction network is non-random, with a clear tendency for interacting proteins to share similar selective constraints. Collectively, the results suggest that, on the whole, protein interactions in mammals are under selective constraint, presumably due to their functional roles.

  20. Comparing species interaction networks along environmental gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellissier, Loïc; Albouy, Camille; Bascompte, Jordi; Farwig, Nina; Graham, Catherine; Loreau, Michel; Maglianesi, Maria Alejandra; Melián, Carlos J; Pitteloud, Camille; Roslin, Tomas; Rohr, Rudolf; Saavedra, Serguei; Thuiller, Wilfried; Woodward, Guy; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Gravel, Dominique

    2017-09-22

    Knowledge of species composition and their interactions, in the form of interaction networks, is required to understand processes shaping their distribution over time and space. As such, comparing ecological networks along environmental gradients represents a promising new research avenue to understand the organization of life. Variation in the position and intensity of links within networks along environmental gradients may be driven by turnover in species composition, by variation in species abundances and by abiotic influences on species interactions. While investigating changes in species composition has a long tradition, so far only a limited number of studies have examined changes in species interactions between networks, often with differing approaches. Here, we review studies investigating variation in network structures along environmental gradients, highlighting how methodological decisions about standardization can influence their conclusions. Due to their complexity, variation among ecological networks is frequently studied using properties that summarize the distribution or topology of interactions such as number of links, connectance, or modularity. These properties can either be compared directly or using a procedure of standardization. While measures of network structure can be directly related to changes along environmental gradients, standardization is frequently used to facilitate interpretation of variation in network properties by controlling for some co-variables, or via null models. Null models allow comparing the deviation of empirical networks from random expectations and are expected to provide a more mechanistic understanding of the factors shaping ecological networks when they are coupled with functional traits. As an illustration, we compare approaches to quantify the role of trait matching in driving the structure of plant-hummingbird mutualistic networks, i.e. a direct comparison, standardized by null models and hypothesis

  1. Atom interaction propensities of oxygenated chemical functions in crystal packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsch, Christian; Bibila Mayaya Bisseyou, Yvon

    2017-01-01

    The crystal contacts of several families of hydrocarbon compounds substituted with one or several types of oxygenated chemical groups were analyzed statistically using the Hirshfeld surface methodology. The propensity of contacts to occur between two chemical types is described with the contact enrichment descriptor. The systematic large enrichment ratios of some interactions like the O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds suggests that these contacts are a driving force in the crystal packing formation. The same statement holds for the weaker C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds in ethers, esters and ketones, in the absence of polar H atoms. The over-represented contacts in crystals of oxygenated hydrocarbons are generally of two types: electrostatic attractions (hydrogen bonds) and hydrophobic interactions. While Cl⋯O interactions are generally avoided, in a minority of chloro-oxygenated hydrocarbons, significant halogen bonding does occur. General tendencies can often be derived for many contact types, but outlier compounds are instructive as they display peculiar or rare features. The methodology also allows the detection of outliers which can be structures with errors. For instance, a significant number of hydroxylated molecules displaying over-represented non-favorable oxygen–oxygen contacts turned out to have wrongly oriented hydroxyl groups. Beyond crystal packings with a single molecule in the asymmetric unit, the behavior of water in monohydrate compounds and of crystals with Z′ = 2 (dimers) are also investigated. It was found in several cases that, in the presence of several oxygenated chemical groups, cross-interactions between different chemical groups (e.g. water/alcohols; alcohols/phenols) are often favored in the crystal packings. While some trends in accordance with common chemical principles are retrieved, some unexpected results can however appear. For example, in crystals of alcohol–phenol compounds, the strong O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between two phenol groups

  2. Atom interaction propensities of oxygenated chemical functions in crystal packings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jelsch

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The crystal contacts of several families of hydrocarbon compounds substituted with one or several types of oxygenated chemical groups were analyzed statistically using the Hirshfeld surface methodology. The propensity of contacts to occur between two chemical types is described with the contact enrichment descriptor. The systematic large enrichment ratios of some interactions like the O—H...O hydrogen bonds suggests that these contacts are a driving force in the crystal packing formation. The same statement holds for the weaker C—H...O hydrogen bonds in ethers, esters and ketones, in the absence of polar H atoms. The over-represented contacts in crystals of oxygenated hydrocarbons are generally of two types: electrostatic attractions (hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. While Cl...O interactions are generally avoided, in a minority of chloro-oxygenated hydrocarbons, significant halogen bonding does occur. General tendencies can often be derived for many contact types, but outlier compounds are instructive as they display peculiar or rare features. The methodology also allows the detection of outliers which can be structures with errors. For instance, a significant number of hydroxylated molecules displaying over-represented non-favorable oxygen–oxygen contacts turned out to have wrongly oriented hydroxyl groups. Beyond crystal packings with a single molecule in the asymmetric unit, the behavior of water in monohydrate compounds and of crystals with Z′ = 2 (dimers are also investigated. It was found in several cases that, in the presence of several oxygenated chemical groups, cross-interactions between different chemical groups (e.g. water/alcohols; alcohols/phenols are often favored in the crystal packings. While some trends in accordance with common chemical principles are retrieved, some unexpected results can however appear. For example, in crystals of alcohol–phenol compounds, the strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds between

  3. Introduction to the theory of laser-atom interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Mittleman, Marvin H

    1993-01-01

    In response to the explosion of theories and experiments since the appearance of the first edition, the author has revised and expanded his basic text New sections include up-to-date discussions of multiphoton ionization, and electron-atom and atom-atom scattering in laser fields, reaffirming the work's position as the standard introduction to the field

  4. Effect of pairwise dipole–dipole interaction among three-atom systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-18

    Jul 18, 2014 ... We present an analysis of a system of three two-level atoms interacting with one another through dipole–dipole interaction. The interaction manifests between the excited state of one of the atoms and the ground state of its nearest neighbour. Steady-state populations of the density matrix elements are ...

  5. Predicting network structure using unlabeled interaction information

    OpenAIRE

    Nasim, Mehwish; Brandes, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    We are interested in the question whether interactions in online social networks (OSNs) can serve as a proxy for more persistent social relation. With Facebook as the context of our analysis, we look at commenting on wall posts as a form of interaction, and friendship ties as social relations. Findings from a pretest suggest that others’ joint commenting patterns on someone’s status posts are indeed indicative of friendship ties between them, independent of the contents. This would have impli...

  6. From networks of protein interactions to networks of functional dependencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciani Davide

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As protein-protein interactions connect proteins that participate in either the same or different functions, networks of interacting and functionally annotated proteins can be converted into process graphs of inter-dependent function nodes (each node corresponding to interacting proteins with the same functional annotation. However, as proteins have multiple annotations, the process graph is non-redundant, if only proteins participating directly in a given function are included in the related function node. Results Reasoning that topological features (e.g., clusters of highly inter-connected proteins might help approaching structured and non-redundant understanding of molecular function, an algorithm was developed that prioritizes inclusion of proteins into the function nodes that best overlap protein clusters. Specifically, the algorithm identifies function nodes (and their mutual relations, based on the topological analysis of a protein interaction network, which can be related to various biological domains, such as cellular components (e.g., peroxisome and cellular bud or biological processes (e.g., cell budding of the model organism S. cerevisiae. Conclusions The method we have described allows converting a protein interaction network into a non-redundant process graph of inter-dependent function nodes. The examples we have described show that the resulting graph allows researchers to formulate testable hypotheses about dependencies among functions and the underlying mechanisms.

  7. Structure of the human chromosome interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Sarnataro

    Full Text Available New Hi-C technologies have revealed that chromosomes have a complex network of spatial contacts in the cell nucleus of higher organisms, whose organisation is only partially understood. Here, we investigate the structure of such a network in human GM12878 cells, to derive a large scale picture of nuclear architecture. We find that the intensity of intra-chromosomal interactions is power-law distributed. Inter-chromosomal interactions are two orders of magnitude weaker and exponentially distributed, yet they are not randomly arranged along the genomic sequence. Intra-chromosomal contacts broadly occur between epigenomically homologous regions, whereas inter-chromosomal contacts are especially associated with regions rich in highly expressed genes. Overall, genomic contacts in the nucleus appear to be structured as a network of networks where a set of strongly individual chromosomal units, as envisaged in the 'chromosomal territory' scenario derived from microscopy, interact with each other via on average weaker, yet far from random and functionally important interactions.

  8. The Networking of Interactive Bibliographic Retrieval Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Richard S.; Reintjes, J. Francis

    Research in networking of heterogeneous interactive bibliographic retrieval systems is being conducted which centers on the concept of a virtual retrieval system. Such a virtual system would be created through a translating computer interface that would provide access to the different retrieval systems and data bases in a uniform and convenient…

  9. Designing Networked Adaptive Interactive Hybrid Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, L.J.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in network technologies enable distributed systems, operating in complex physical environments, to coordinate their activities over larger areas within shorter time intervals. In these systems humans and intelligent machines will, in close interaction, be able to reach their goals under

  10. Dynamical and bursty interactions in social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehlé, Juliette; Barrat, Alain; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2010-03-01

    We present a modeling framework for dynamical and bursty contact networks made of agents in social interaction. We consider agents’ behavior at short time scales in which the contact network is formed by disconnected cliques of different sizes. At each time a random agent can make a transition from being isolated to being part of a group or vice versa. Different distributions of contact times and intercontact times between individuals are obtained by considering transition probabilities with memory effects, i.e., the transition probabilities for each agent depend both on its state (isolated or interacting) and on the time elapsed since the last change in state. The model lends itself to analytical and numerical investigations. The modeling framework can be easily extended and paves the way for systematic investigations of dynamical processes occurring on rapidly evolving dynamical networks, such as the propagation of an information or spreading of diseases.

  11. Network compression as a quality measure for protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loic Royer

    Full Text Available With the advent of large-scale protein interaction studies, there is much debate about data quality. Can different noise levels in the measurements be assessed by analyzing network structure? Because proteomic regulation is inherently co-operative, modular and redundant, it is inherently compressible when represented as a network. Here we propose that network compression can be used to compare false positive and false negative noise levels in protein interaction networks. We validate this hypothesis by first confirming the detrimental effect of false positives and false negatives. Second, we show that gold standard networks are more compressible. Third, we show that compressibility correlates with co-expression, co-localization, and shared function. Fourth, we also observe correlation with better protein tagging methods, physiological expression in contrast to over-expression of tagged proteins, and smart pooling approaches for yeast two-hybrid screens. Overall, this new measure is a proxy for both sensitivity and specificity and gives complementary information to standard measures such as average degree and clustering coefficients.

  12. Network Compression as a Quality Measure for Protein Interaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Loic; Reimann, Matthias; Stewart, A. Francis; Schroeder, Michael

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of large-scale protein interaction studies, there is much debate about data quality. Can different noise levels in the measurements be assessed by analyzing network structure? Because proteomic regulation is inherently co-operative, modular and redundant, it is inherently compressible when represented as a network. Here we propose that network compression can be used to compare false positive and false negative noise levels in protein interaction networks. We validate this hypothesis by first confirming the detrimental effect of false positives and false negatives. Second, we show that gold standard networks are more compressible. Third, we show that compressibility correlates with co-expression, co-localization, and shared function. Fourth, we also observe correlation with better protein tagging methods, physiological expression in contrast to over-expression of tagged proteins, and smart pooling approaches for yeast two-hybrid screens. Overall, this new measure is a proxy for both sensitivity and specificity and gives complementary information to standard measures such as average degree and clustering coefficients. PMID:22719828

  13. Charge transfer for slow H atoms interacting with Al: Atomic levels and linewidths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, J.; Lorente, N.; Pou, P.; Flores, F.

    1996-10-01

    The charge transfer of slow H atoms colliding with an Al(100) surface is studied by means of a linear combination of atomic orbitals method with local-density many-body contributions. The method is developed in order to calculate atomic levels and associated linewidths. Unlike previous theories, the present method is able to study the effect of the corrugation of the surface, together with the self-consistent potentials involved. This leads to a shift of atomic levels nonlinear on the external charge, contrary to the traditionally assumed image shift. The method works best at very short distances, where the strong coupling between atom and surface promotes molecular orbitals. Thus, the theory expounded in this work can describe the charge-transfer processes of systems in which the atomic levels are near the band edges, as protons scattered off aluminum.

  14. Photon-Mediated Interactions: A Scalable Tool to Create and Sustain Entangled States of N Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Aron

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose and study the use of photon-mediated interactions for the generation of long-range steady-state entanglement between N atoms. Through the judicious use of coherent drives and the placement of the atoms in a network of cavity QED systems, a balance between their unitary and dissipative dynamics can be precisely engineered to stabilize a long-range correlated state of qubits in the steady state. We discuss the general theory behind such a scheme and present an example of how it can be used to drive a register of N atoms to a generalized W state and how the entanglement can be sustained indefinitely. The achievable steady-state fidelities for entanglement and its scaling with the number of qubits are discussed for presently existing superconducting quantum circuits. While the protocol is primarily discussed for a superconducting circuit architecture, it is ideally realized in any cavity QED platform that permits controllable delivery of coherent electromagnetic radiation to specified locations.

  15. Controlling interactions between highly magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic (7)S3 chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on dysprosium and erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P-states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  16. A protein interaction network associated with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Son, Seung-Woo; Kim, Sang Cheol; Kim, Young Joo; Jeong, Hawoong; Lee, Doheon

    2008-06-21

    Identifying candidate genes related to complex diseases or traits and mapping their relationships require a system-level analysis at a cellular scale. The objective of the present study is to systematically analyze the complex effects of interrelated genes and provide a framework for revealing their relationships in association with a specific disease (asthma in this case). We observed that protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks associated with asthma have a power-law connectivity distribution as many other biological networks have. The hub nodes and skeleton substructure of the result network are consistent with the prior knowledge about asthma pathways, and also suggest unknown candidate target genes associated with asthma, including GNB2L1, BRCA1, CBL, and VAV1. In particular, GNB2L1 appears to play a very important role in the asthma network through frequent interactions with key proteins in cellular signaling. This network-based approach represents an alternative method for analyzing the complex effects of candidate genes associated with complex diseases and suggesting a list of gene drug targets. The full list of genes and the analysis details are available in the following online supplementary materials: http://biosoft.kaist.ac.kr:8080/resources/asthma_ppi.

  17. Evolutionarily conserved herpesviral protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Even Fossum

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses constitute a family of large DNA viruses widely spread in vertebrates and causing a variety of different diseases. They possess dsDNA genomes ranging from 120 to 240 kbp encoding between 70 to 170 open reading frames. We previously reported the protein interaction networks of two herpesviruses, varicella-zoster virus (VZV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. In this study, we systematically tested three additional herpesvirus species, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1, murine cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus, for protein interactions in order to be able to perform a comparative analysis of all three herpesvirus subfamilies. We identified 735 interactions by genome-wide yeast-two-hybrid screens (Y2H, and, together with the interactomes of VZV and KSHV, included a total of 1,007 intraviral protein interactions in the analysis. Whereas a large number of interactions have not been reported previously, we were able to identify a core set of highly conserved protein interactions, like the interaction between HSV-1 UL33 with the nuclear egress proteins UL31/UL34. Interactions were conserved between orthologous proteins despite generally low sequence similarity, suggesting that function may be more conserved than sequence. By combining interactomes of different species we were able to systematically address the low coverage of the Y2H system and to extract biologically relevant interactions which were not evident from single species.

  18. Structural host-microbiota interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven-Maiorov, Emine; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2017-10-01

    Hundreds of different species colonize multicellular organisms making them "metaorganisms". A growing body of data supports the role of microbiota in health and in disease. Grasping the principles of host-microbiota interactions (HMIs) at the molecular level is important since it may provide insights into the mechanisms of infections. The crosstalk between the host and the microbiota may help resolve puzzling questions such as how a microorganism can contribute to both health and disease. Integrated superorganism networks that consider host and microbiota as a whole-may uncover their code, clarifying perhaps the most fundamental question: how they modulate immune surveillance. Within this framework, structural HMI networks can uniquely identify potential microbial effectors that target distinct host nodes or interfere with endogenous host interactions, as well as how mutations on either host or microbial proteins affect the interaction. Furthermore, structural HMIs can help identify master host cell regulator nodes and modules whose tweaking by the microbes promote aberrant activity. Collectively, these data can delineate pathogenic mechanisms and thereby help maximize beneficial therapeutics. To date, challenges in experimental techniques limit large-scale characterization of HMIs. Here we highlight an area in its infancy which we believe will increasingly engage the computational community: predicting interactions across kingdoms, and mapping these on the host cellular networks to figure out how commensal and pathogenic microbiota modulate the host signaling and broadly cross-species consequences.

  19. Perturbation calculations of the interaction energies between non-bonded hydrogen atoms - Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laidlaw, W.G.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Wieser, H.

    1971-01-01

    Calculations of the interaction energy between non-bonded hydrogen atoms in the fragments A—H---H'—A' for selected displacements of the hydrogen atoms enable one to evaluate corrections to the force field due to the non-bonded interactions and to discuss the changes in the stretching vibration

  20. The influence of atomic coherence and dipole–dipole interaction on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Considering two artificial identical atoms interacting with two-mode thermal field through non-degenerate two-photon transitions, this paper studies the influence of atomic coherence and dipole–dipole interaction on the entanglement of two qubits. It is found that the entanglement is greatly enhanced by these mechanisms.

  1. Atom–atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Jonathan D.; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E.; Kimble, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields E(x)∝e±ikxx outside the bandgap to localized fields E(x)∝e−κx|x| within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom–atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom–atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the D1 line of atomic cesium for N¯=3.0±0.5 atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom–atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode. PMID:27582467

  2. I.I. Rabi in Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics Prize Talk: Strongly Interacting Fermi Gases of Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierlein, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Strongly interacting fermions govern physics at all length scales, from nuclear matter to modern electronic materials and neutron stars. The interplay of the Pauli principle with strong interactions can give rise to exotic properties that we do not understand even at a qualitative level. In recent years, ultracold Fermi gases of atoms have emerged as a new type of strongly interacting fermionic matter that can be created and studied in the laboratory with exquisite control. Feshbach resonances allow for unitarity limited interactions, leading to scale invariance, universal thermodynamics and a superfluid phase transition already at 17 Trapped in optical lattices, fermionic atoms realize the Fermi-Hubbard model, believed to capture the essence of cuprate high-temperature superconductors. Here, a microscope allows for single-atom, single-site resolved detection of density and spin correlations, revealing the Pauli hole as well as anti-ferromagnetic and doublon-hole correlations. Novel states of matter are predicted for fermions interacting via long-range dipolar interactions. As an intriguing candidate we created stable fermionic molecules of NaK at ultralow temperatures featuring large dipole moments and second-long spin coherence times. In some of the above examples the experiment outperformed the most advanced computer simulations of many-fermion systems, giving hope for a new level of understanding of strongly interacting fermions.

  3. Data management of protein interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cannataro, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Interactomics: a complete survey from data generation to knowledge extraction With the increasing use of high-throughput experimental assays, more and more protein interaction databases are becoming available. As a result, computational analysis of protein-to-protein interaction (PPI) data and networks, now known as interactomics, has become an essential tool to determine functionally associated proteins. From wet lab technologies to data management to knowledge extraction, this timely book guides readers through the new science of interactomics, giving them the tools needed to: Generate

  4. Temporal stability in human interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Renato; Fabbri, Ricardo; Antunes, Deborah Christina; Pisani, Marilia Mello; de Oliveira, Osvaldo Novais

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports on stable (or invariant) properties of human interaction networks, with benchmarks derived from public email lists. Activity, recognized through messages sent, along time and topology were observed in snapshots in a timeline, and at different scales. Our analysis shows that activity is practically the same for all networks across timescales ranging from seconds to months. The principal components of the participants in the topological metrics space remain practically unchanged as different sets of messages are considered. The activity of participants follows the expected scale-free trace, thus yielding the hub, intermediary and peripheral classes of vertices by comparison against the Erdös-Rényi model. The relative sizes of these three sectors are essentially the same for all email lists and the same along time. Typically, 45% are peripheral vertices. Similar results for the distribution of participants in the three sectors and for the relative importance of the topological metrics were obtained for 12 additional networks from Facebook, Twitter and ParticipaBR. These properties are consistent with the literature and may be general for human interaction networks, which has important implications for establishing a typology of participants based on quantitative criteria.

  5. Van der Waals and resonance interactions between accelerated atoms in vacuum and the Unruh effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattuca, M.; Marino, J.; Noto, A.; Passante, R.; Rizzuto, L.; Spagnolo, S.; Zhou, W.

    2017-08-01

    We discuss different physical effects related to the uniform acceleration of atoms in vacuum, in the framework of quantum electrodynamics. We first investigate the van der Waals/Casimir-Polder dispersion and resonance interactions between two uniformly accelerated atoms in vacuum. We show that the atomic acceleration significantly affects the van der Waals force, yielding a different scaling of the interaction with the interatomic distance and an explicit time dependence of the interaction energy. We argue how these results could allow for an indirect detection of the Unruh effect through dispersion interactions between atoms. We then consider the resonance interaction between two accelerated atoms, prepared in a correlated Bell-type state, and interacting with the electromagnetic field in the vacuum state, separating vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction contributions, both in the free-space and in the presence of a perfectly reflecting plate. We show that nonthermal effects of acceleration manifest in the resonance interaction, yielding a change of the distance dependence of the resonance interaction energy. This suggests that the equivalence between temperature and acceleration does not apply to all radiative properties of accelerated atoms. To further explore this aspect, we evaluate the resonance interaction between two atoms in non inertial motion in the coaccelerated (Rindler) frame and show that in this case the assumption of an Unruh temperature for the field is not required for a complete equivalence of locally inertial and coaccelerated points of views.

  6. Graphene as a flexible template for controlling magnetic interactions between metal atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungwoo; Kim, Dongwook; Robertson, Alex W; Yoon, Euijoon; Hong, Suklyun; Ihm, Jisoon; Yu, Jaejun; Warner, Jamie H; Lee, Gun-Do

    2017-03-01

    Metal-doped graphene produces magnetic moments that have potential application in spintronics. Here we use density function theory computational methods to show how the magnetic interaction between metal atoms doped in graphene can be controlled by the degree of flexure in a graphene membrane. Bending graphene by flexing causes the distance between two substitutional Fe atoms covalently bonded in graphene to gradually increase and these results in the magnetic moment disappearing at a critical strain value. At the critical strain, a carbon atom can enter between the two Fe atoms and blocks the interaction between relevant orbitals of Fe atoms to quench the magnetic moment. The control of interactions between doped atoms by exploiting the mechanical flexibility of graphene is a unique approach to manipulating the magnetic properties and opens up new opportunities for mechanical-magnetic 2D device systems.

  7. Van der Waals interactions and the limits of isolated atom models at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shigeki; Foster, Adam S.; Björkman, Torbjörn; Nowakowska, Sylwia; Björk, Jonas; Canova, Filippo Federici; Gade, Lutz H.; Jung, Thomas A.; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    Van der Waals forces are among the weakest, yet most decisive interactions governing condensation and aggregation processes and the phase behaviour of atomic and molecular matter. Understanding the resulting structural motifs and patterns has become increasingly important in studies of the nanoscale regime. Here we measure the paradigmatic van der Waals interactions represented by the noble gas atom pairs Ar–Xe, Kr–Xe and Xe–Xe with a Xe-functionalized tip of an atomic force microscope at low temperature. Individual rare gas atoms were fixed at node sites of a surface-confined two-dimensional metal–organic framework. We found that the magnitude of the measured force increased with the atomic radius, yet detailed simulation by density functional theory revealed that the adsorption induced charge redistribution strengthened the van der Waals forces by a factor of up to two, thus demonstrating the limits of a purely atomic description of the interaction in these representative systems. PMID:27174162

  8. Long-range interactions of excited He atoms with the alkaline earth atoms Mg, Ca, and Sr

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, J.-Y.

    2013-04-05

    Dispersion coefficients for the long-range interactions of the first four excited states of He, i.e., He(2 1, 3 S) and He(2 1, 3 P), with the low-lying states of the alkaline earth atoms Mg, Ca, and Sr are calculated by summing over the reduced matrix elements of multipole transition operators.

  9. Interaction between an icosahedron Li(13) cluster and a graphene layer doped with a hydrogen atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Eduardo; Vázquez, Gerardo; Magaña, Fernando; Sansores, Enrique

    2012-12-01

    It is known that graphene reacts with atomic hydrogen to form a hydrogenated sheet of graphene. In order to understand the nature of the interaction between hydrogen and lithium in hydrogenated samples, we have carried out first principle calculations. Density functional theory and molecular dynamics were used to study the interaction between an icosahedron Li(13) cluster, and a graphene layer doped with a hydrogen atom. It was found that a hydrogen atom is levitated from the graphene layer and absorbed into the cluster of Li at 300 K and atmospheric pressure, with a binding energy far exceeding that of the adsorption energy of a hydrogen atom on the graphene layer.

  10. Interaction of intense laser pulses with atomic clusters: Measurements of ion emission, simulations and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisch, J.W.G. E-mail: john.tisch@ic.ac.uk; Hay, N.; Mendham, K.J.; Springate, E.; Symes, D.R.; Comley, A.J.; Mason, M.B.; Gumbrell, E.T.; Ditmire, T.; Smith, R.A.; Marangos, J.P.; Hutchinson, M.H.R

    2003-05-01

    This review paper provides a general introduction to the interaction of intense (>10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}), femtosecond laser pulses with atomic clusters in the size range 500-10{sup 5} atoms. A nanoplasma model of the laser-cluster interaction is used to elucidate the underlying physics. Measurements of ion emission from the laser-cluster interaction are presented together with numerical simulations. Emerging applications are described.

  11. Progress towards realization of quantum networks using atomic ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew, Eisaman

    2005-05-01

    We report on our progress towards generation, storage and communication of single photon states using atomic memory. Specifically, we describe proof-of principle experiments demonstrating generation of single photon pulses of light with controllable propagation direction, timing, and pulse shapes [1]. The approach is based on preparation of an atomic ensemble in a state with a desired number of atomic spin excitations, which is later converted into a photon pulse by exploiting long-lived coherent memory for photon states and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We describe our efforts to optimize the performance of such a novel single photon source. Specifically we propose and demonstrate a novel propagation geometry that optimizes mode matching and signal to noise ratio. We discuss our progress towards transmitting single photon states between two atomic memory nodes connected by photonic channels and outline the prospects for long-distance quantum communication using these techniques. [1] M. D. Eisaman, L. Childress, A. Andr'e, F. Massou, A. S. Zibrov, and M. D. Lukin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 233602 (2004).

  12. Scattering approach to dispersive atom-surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalvit, Diego [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Messina, Riccardo [LAB KASTLER BROSSEL; Maia Neto, Paulo [INSTITUTO DE FISICA UFRJ; Lambrecht, Astrid [LAB KASTLER BROSSEL; Reynaud, Serge [LAB KASTLER BROSSEL

    2009-01-01

    We develop the scattering approach for the dispersive force on a ground state atom on top of a corrugated surface. We present explicit results to first order in the corrugation amplitude. A variety of analytical results are derived in different limiting cases, including the van der Waals and Casimir-Polder regimes. We compute numerically the exact first-order dispersive potential for arbitrary separation distances and corrugation wavelengths, for a Rubidium atom on top of a silicon or gold corrugated surface. We consider in detail the correction to the proximity force approximation, and present a very simple approximation algorithm for computing the potential.

  13. Effect of dipole-dipole interaction in two atom systems : A steady state analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Shaik; Lakshmi, P Anantha

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour of a system of two two-level atoms, both identical as well as non-identical, under the influence of a continuously varying dipole-dipole coupling parameter for a wide range of other parameters such as the atomic level separations and the coupling strength of the external radiation field is explored. A detailed analysis of the behaviour of various level populations and some of the atomic coherences is presented. The influence of the competing effects between the Rabi field strength and the dipole dipole interaction on the two photon absorption probability is explored in detail both for identical as well as non-identical atoms. There are significant variations in the behaviour of identical and non-identical atoms as a function of the dipole coupling strength, even for small amounts of non-identity of the atoms, which in this study is incorporated through the atomic level separations.

  14. Dark Entangled Steady States of Interacting Rydberg Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasari, Durga; Mølmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    their short-lived excited states lead to rapid, dissipative formation of an entangled steady state. We show that for a wide range of physical parameters, this entangled state is formed on a time scale given by the strengths of coherent Raman and Rabi fields applied to the atoms, while it is only weakly...

  15. An interaction switch predicts the nested architecture of mutualistic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Hui, Cang; Terblanche, John S

    2011-08-01

    Nested architecture is distinctive in plant-animal mutualistic networks. However, to date an integrative and quantitative explanation has been lacking. It is evident that species often switch their interactive partners in real-world mutualistic networks such as pollination and seed-dispersal networks. By incorporating an interaction switch into a novel multi-population model, we show that the nested architecture rapidly emerges from an initially random network. The model allowing interaction switches between partner species produced predictions which fit remarkably well with observations from 81 empirical networks. Thus, the nested architecture in mutualistic networks could be an intrinsic physical structure of dynamic networks and the interaction switch is likely a key ecological process that results in nestedness of real-world networks. Identifying the biological processes responsible for network structures is thus crucial for understanding the architecture of ecological networks. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  16. QUANTUM NETWORKS WITH SINGLE ATOMS, PHOTONS AND PHONONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    position above the surface of the alligator PCW. Our calculations and measurements of Γ1D agree with COMSOL simulations (38) of the trap position, and...Version 8.12. http://www.lumerical.com/tcad-products/ fdtd/. 38. COMSOL Inc. (2009) COMSOL Multiphysics ( COMSOL AB, Stockholm), Version 3.5a. 39...for the infinite structure with COMSOL . The trap depth is calibrated with the 12-MHz AC Stark shift measured from the atomic spectra. Fig. S5B shows

  17. Random matrix analysis for gene interaction networks in cancer cells

    CERN Document Server

    Kikkawa, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The investigation of topological modifications of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells is essential for understanding the desease. We study gene interaction networks in various human cancer cells with the random matrix theory. This study is based on the Cancer Network Galaxy (TCNG) database which is the repository of huge gene interactions inferred by Bayesian network algorithms from 256 microarray experimental data downloaded from NCBI GEO. The original GEO data are provided by the high-throughput microarray expression experiments on various human cancer cells. We apply the random matrix theory to the computationally inferred gene interaction networks in TCNG in order to detect the universality in the topology of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells. Results: We found the universal behavior in almost one half of the 256 gene interaction networks in TCNG. The distribution of nearest neighbor level spacing of the gene interaction matrix becomes the Wigner distribution when the net...

  18. Upper Secondary Students' Understanding of the Basic Physical Interactions in Analogous Atomic and Solar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Keith S.

    2013-01-01

    Comparing the atom to a "tiny solar system" is a common teaching analogy, and the extent to which learners saw the systems as analogous was investigated. English upper secondary students were asked parallel questions about the physical interactions between the components of a simple atomic system and a simple solar system to investigate…

  19. Measuring exchange interactions between atomic spins using electron spin resonance STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian; Choi, Taeyoung; Heinrich, Andreas; Lutz, Christopher

    Exchange interactions between neighboring atoms give rise to magnetic order in magnetic materials. As the size of the electronic device is miniaturized toward the limit of single atoms, magnetic nanostructures such as coupled atomic dimers and clusters are explored more as prototypes for possible data storage, spintronics as well as quantum computing applications. Characterizing inter-atom exchange interactions calls for increasing spatial resolution and higher energy sensitivity to better understand this fundamental interaction. Here, using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we studied a magnetically coupled atomic dimer consisting of two 3d transition metal atoms, with one adsorbed on an insulating layer (MgO) and the other attached to the STM tip. We demonstrate the ability to measure the short-range exchange interaction between the two atomic spins with orders-of-magnitude variation ranging from milli-eV all the way to micro-eV. This is realized by the successful combination of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) and electron spin resonance (ESR) techniques in STM implemented at different energy scales. We unambiguously confirm the exponential decay behavior of the direct exchange interaction.

  20. A constructive model potential method for atomic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottcher, C.; Dalgarno, A.

    1974-01-01

    A model potential method is presented that can be applied to many electron single centre and two centre systems. The development leads to a Hamiltonian with terms arising from core polarization that depend parametrically upon the positions of the valence electrons. Some of the terms have been introduced empirically in previous studies. Their significance is clarified by an analysis of a similar model in classical electrostatics. The explicit forms of the expectation values of operators at large separations of two atoms given by the model potential method are shown to be equivalent to the exact forms when the assumption is made that the energy level differences of one atom are negligible compared to those of the other.

  1. Electron quantum dynamics in atom-ion interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzyan, H; Jenabi, M J

    2016-04-07

    Electron transfer (ET) process and its dependence on the system parameters are investigated by solving two-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation numerically using split operator technique. Evolution of the electron wavepacket occurs from the one-electron species hydrogen atom to another bare nucleus of charge Z > 1. This evolution is quantified by partitioning the simulation box and defining regional densities belonging to the two nuclei of the system. It is found that the functional form of the time-variations of these regional densities and the extent of ET process depend strongly on the inter-nuclear distance and relative values of the nuclear charges, which define the potential energy surface governing the electron wavepacket evolution. Also, the initial electronic state of the single-electron atom has critical effect on this evolution and its consequent (partial) electron transfer depending on its spreading extent and orientation with respect to the inter-nuclear axis.

  2. An atomic force microscopy study of the interactions between indolicidin and supported planar bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askou, Hans Jakob; Jakobsen, Rasmus Neergaard; Fojan, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Indolicidin, a tryptophane-rich antimicrobial peptide , was used to investigate the interactions with a zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine as a model membrane system. In situ atomic force microscopy in liquid medium and phosphatidylcholine supported planar bilayers enabled the study...

  3. Superfluid state of repulsively interacting three-component fermionic atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Sei-Ichiro; Inaba, Kensuke

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the superfluid state of repulsively interacting three-component (color) fermionic atoms in optical lattices using Feynman diagrammatic approaches and the dynamical mean field theory. When the anisotropy of the three repulsive interactions is strong, atoms of two of the three colors form Cooper pairs and atoms of the third color remain a Fermi liquid. This superfluid emerges close to half filling at which the Mott insulating state characteristic of the three-component repulsive fermions appears. An effective attractive interaction is induced by density fluctuations of the third-color atoms. The superfluid state is stable against the phase separation that occurs in the strongly repulsive region. We determine the phase diagrams in terms of temperature, filling, and the anisotropy of the repulsive interactions. This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) (No. 23540467) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  4. Molecular Articulation in Response to Interactive Atomic Forces in Docker

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-01

    than the calculations.4-15 Figure 5-1: The number of CPU cycles used by the articulation functions for six test case consisting of 13, 92,154,272,397...and 608 atoms .............................................................. 5-3 Figure 5-2: The percentage of the total number of CPU cycles in...The ARM server is run on an Intel 80386 and is responsible for controlling the PER-Force force-reflective arm which is the interface allowing the

  5. Competing dynamical processes on two interacting networks

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Zuzek, L G; Braunstein, L A; Vazquez, F

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study a model for the competition between two different dynamical processes, one for opinion formation and the other for decision making, on two interconnected networks. The networks represent two interacting social groups, the society and the Congress. An opinion formation process takes place on the society, where the opinion S of each individual can take one of four possible values (S=-2,-1,1,2), describing its level of agreement on a given issue, from totally against (S=-2) to totally in favor (S=2). The dynamics is controlled by a reinforcement parameter r, which measures the ratio between the likelihood to become an extremist or a moderate. The dynamics of the Congress is akin to that of the Abrams-Strogatz model, where congressmen can adopt one of two possible positions, to be either in favor (+) or against (-) the issue. The probability that a congressman changes his decision is proportional to the fraction of interacting neighbors that hold the opposite opinion raised to a power $\\beta$...

  6. Fast interaction of atoms with crystal surfaces: coherent lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravielle, M. S.

    2017-11-01

    Quantum coherence of incident waves results essential for the observation of interference patterns in grazing incidence fast atom diffraction (FAD). In this work we investigate the influence of the impact energy and projectile mass on the transversal length of the surface area that is coherently illuminated by the atomic beam, after passing through a collimating aperture. Such a transversal coherence length controls the general features of the interference structures, being here derived by means of the Van Cittert-Zernike theorem. The coherence length is then used to build the initial coherent wave packet within the Surface Initial Value Representation (SIVR) approximation. The SIVR approach is applied to fast He and Ne atoms impinging grazingly on a LiF(001) surface along a low-indexed crystallographic direction. We found that with the same collimating setup, by varying the impact energy we would be able to control the interference mechanism that prevails in FAD patterns, switching between inter-cell and unit-cell interferences. These findings are relevant to use FAD spectra adequately as a surface analysis tool, as well as to choose the appropriate collimating scheme for the observation of interference effects in a given collision system.

  7. Potential Energy Curves and Collisions Integrals of Air Components. 2; Interactions Involving Ionized Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Collision integrals are fundamental quantities required to determine the transport properties of the environment surrounding aerospace vehicles in the upper atmosphere. These collision integrals can be determined as a function of temperature from the potential energy curves describing the atomic and molecular collisions. Ab initio calculations provide a practical method of computing the required interaction potentials. In this work we will discuss recent advances in scattering calculations with an emphasis on the accuracy that is obtainable. Results for interactions of the atoms and ionized atoms of nitrogen and oxygen will be reviewed and their application to the determination of transport properties, such as diffusion and viscosity coefficients, will be examined.

  8. Engineering the Dynamics of Effective Spin-Chain Models for Strongly Interacting Atomic Gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volosniev, A. G.; Petrosyan, D.; Valiente, M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional gas of cold atoms with strong contact interactions and construct an effective spin-chain Hamiltonian for a two-component system. The resulting Heisenberg spin model can be engineered by manipulating the shape of the external confining potential of the atomic gas. We...... find that bosonic atoms offer more flexibility for tuning independently the parameters of the spin Hamiltonian through interatomic (intra-species) interaction which is absent for fermions due to the Pauli exclusion principle. Our formalism can have important implications for control and manipulation...

  9. Investigating physics learning with layered student interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Traxler, Adrienne

    Centrality in student interaction networks (SINs) can be linked to variables like grades [1], persistence [2], and participation [3]. Recent efforts in the field of network science have been done to investigate layered - or multiplex - networks as mathematical objects [4]. These networks can...

  10. Estimation of atomic interaction parameters by quantum measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Alexander Holm; Mølmer, Klaus

    Quantum systems, ranging from atomic systems to field modes and mechanical devices are useful precision probes for a variety of physical properties and phenomena. Measurements by which we extract information about the evolution of single quantum systems yield random results and cause a back actio...... strategies, we address the Fisher information and the Cramér-Rao sensitivity bound. We investigate monitoring by photon counting, homodyne detection and frequent projective measurements respectively, and exemplify by Rabi frequency estimation in a driven two-level system....

  11. Engineering thermal reservoirs for ultracold dipole–dipole-interacting Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönleber, D. W.; Bentley, C. D. B.; Eisfeld, A.

    2018-01-01

    We consider an open quantum system of ultracold Rydberg atoms. The system part consists of resonant dipole–dipole-interacting Rydberg states. The environment part is formed by ‘three-level atoms’: each atom has a ground state, a short-lived excited state, and a Rydberg state that interacts with the system states. The two transitions in the environment atoms are optically driven, and provide control over the environment dynamics. Appropriate choice of the laser parameters allows us to prepare a Boltzmann distribution of the system’s eigenstates. By tuning the laser parameters and system-environment interaction, we can change the temperature associated with this Boltzmann distribution, and also the thermalization dynamics. Our method provides novel opportunities for quantum simulation of thermalization dynamics using ultracold Rydberg atoms.

  12. Energetic analysis of conjugated hydrocarbons using the interacting quantum atoms method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Cortés, Jesús; Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús

    2017-10-26

    A number of aromatic, antiaromatic, and nonaromatic organic molecules was analyzed in terms of the contributions to the electronic energy defined in the quantum theory of atoms in molecules and the interacting quantum atoms method. Regularities were found in the exchange and electrostatic interatomic energies showing trends that are closely related to those of the delocalization indices defined in the theory. In particular, the CC interaction energies between bonded atoms allow to rationalize the energetic stabilization associated with the bond length alternation in conjugated polyenes. This approach also provides support to Clar's sextet rules devised for aromatic systems. In addition, the H⋯H bonding found in some of the aromatic molecules studied was of an attractive nature, according to the stabilizing exchange interaction between the bonded H atoms. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The kinetochore interaction network (KIN) of ascomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome segregation relies on coordinated activity of a large assembly of proteins, the kinetochore interaction network (KIN). How conserved the underlying mechanisms driving the epigenetic phenomenon of centromere and kinetochore assembly and maintenance are remains unclear, even though various eukaryotic models have been studied. More than 50 different proteins, many in multiple copies, comprise the KIN or are associated with fungal centromeres and kinetochores. Proteins isolated from immune sera recognized centromeric regions on chromosomes and thus were named centromere proteins (CENPs). CENP-A, sometimes called centromere-specific H3 (CenH3), is incorporated into nucleosomes within or near centromeres. The constitutive centromere-associated network (CCAN) assembles on this specialized chromatin, likely based on specific interactions with and requiring presence of CENP-C. The outer kinetochore comprises the Knl1-Mis12-Ndc80 (KMN) protein complexes that connect CCAN to spindles, accomplished by binding and stabilizing microtubules (MTs) and in the process generating load-bearing assemblies for chromatid segregation. In most fungi the Dam1/DASH complex connects the KMN complexes to MTs. Fungi present a rich resource to investigate mechanistic commonalities but also differences in kinetochore architecture. While ascomycetes have sets of CCAN and KMN proteins that are conserved with those of budding yeast or metazoans, searching other major branches of the fungal kingdom revealed that CCAN proteins are poorly conserved at the primary sequence level. Several conserved binding motifs or domains within KMN complexes have been described recently, and these features of ascomycete KIN proteins are shared with most metazoan proteins. In addition, several ascomycete-specific domains have been identified here. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  14. Metal-graphene interaction studied via atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Ramasse, Quentin; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2011-03-09

    Distributions and atomic sites of transition metals and gold on suspended graphene were investigated via high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, especially using atomic resolution high angle dark field imaging. All metals, albeit as singular atoms or atom aggregates, reside in the omni-present hydrocarbon surface contamination; they do not form continuous films, but clusters or nanocrystals. No interaction was found between Au atoms and clean single-layer graphene surfaces, i.e., no Au atoms are retained on such surfaces. Au and also Fe atoms do, however, bond to clean few-layer graphene surfaces, where they assume T and B sites, respectively. Cr atoms were found to interact more strongly with clean monolayer graphene, they are possibly incorporated at graphene lattice imperfections and have been observed to catalyze dissociation of C-C bonds. This behavior might explain the observed high frequency of Cr-cluster nucleation, and the usefulness as wetting layer, for depositing electrical contacts on graphene.

  15. Unfavorable regions in the ramachandran plot: Is it really steric hindrance? The interacting quantum atoms perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Peter I; Popelier, Paul L A

    2017-11-05

    Accurate description of the intrinsic preferences of amino acids is important to consider when developing a biomolecular force field. In this study, we use a modern energy partitioning approach called Interacting Quantum Atoms to inspect the cause of the φ and ψ torsional preferences of three dipeptides (Gly, Val, and Ile). Repeating energy trends at each of the molecular, functional group, and atomic levels are observed across both (1) the three amino acids and (2) the φ/ψ scans in Ramachandran plots. At the molecular level, it is surprisingly electrostatic destabilization that causes the high-energy regions in the Ramachandran plot, not molecular steric hindrance (related to the intra-atomic energy). At the functional group and atomic levels, the importance of key peptide atoms (O i -1 , C i , N i , N i +1 ) and some sidechain hydrogen atoms (H γ ) are identified as responsible for the destabilization seen in the energetically disfavored Ramachandran regions. Consistently, the O i -1 atoms are particularly important for the explanation of dipeptide intrinsic behavior, where electrostatic and steric destabilization unusually complement one another. The findings suggest that, at least for these dipeptides, it is the peptide group atoms that dominate the intrinsic behavior, more so than the sidechain atoms. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A piecewise lookup table for calculating nonbonded pairwise atomic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jinping; Liu, Lijun; Su, Peng; Duan, Pengbo; Lu, Daihui

    2015-11-01

    A critical challenge for molecular dynamics simulations of chemical or biological systems is to improve the calculation efficiency while retaining sufficient accuracy. The main bottleneck in improving the efficiency is the evaluation of nonbonded pairwise interactions. We propose a new piecewise lookup table method for rapid and accurate calculation of interatomic nonbonded pairwise interactions. The piecewise lookup table allows nonuniform assignment of table nodes according to the slope of the potential function and the pair interaction distribution. The proposed method assigns the nodes more reasonably than in general lookup tables, and thus improves the accuracy while requiring fewer nodes. To obtain the same level of accuracy, our piecewise lookup table accelerates the calculation via the efficient usage of cache memory. This new method is straightforward to implement and should be broadly applicable. Graphical Abstract Illustration of piecewise lookup table method.

  17. Game theory in communication networks cooperative resolution of interactive networking scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniou, Josephina

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical tool for scientists and researchers who work with computer and communication networks, Game Theory in Communication Networks: Cooperative Resolution of Interactive Networking Scenarios addresses the question of how to promote cooperative behavior in interactive situations between heterogeneous entities in communication networking scenarios. It explores network design and management from a theoretical perspective, using game theory and graph theory to analyze strategic situations and demonstrate profitable behaviors of the cooperative entities. The book promotes the use of Game T

  18. Influence of biosurfactant on interactive forces between mutans streptococci and enamel measured by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoogmoed, CG; Dijkstra, RJB; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    Although interactive forces, influenced by environmental conditions, between oral bacteria and tooth surfaces are important for the development of plaque, they have never been estimated. It is hypothesized that interactive forces, as measured by atomic force microscopy, between enamel with or

  19. Continuous atom laser with Bose-Einstein condensates involving three-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpentier, A V; Michinel, H; Novoa, D [Area de Optica, Facultade de Ciencias de Ourense, Universidade de Vigo, As Lagoas s/n, Ourense, ES-32004 (Spain); Olivieri, D N, E-mail: avcarpentier@uvigo.e [Area de Linguaxes e sistemas informaticos, Escola Superior de EnxenerIa Informatica, Universidade de Vigo, As Lagoas s/n, Ourense, ES-32004 (Spain)

    2010-05-28

    We demonstrate, through numerical simulations, the emission of a coherent continuous matter wave of constant amplitude from a Bose-Einstein condensate in a shallow optical dipole trap. The process is achieved by spatial control of the variations of the scattering length along the trapping axis, including elastic three-body interactions due to dipole interactions. In our approach, the outcoupling mechanism is atomic interactions, and thus, the trap remains unaltered. We calculate analytically the parameters for the experimental implementation of this continuous wave atom laser.

  20. Interactions between C and Cu atoms in single-layer graphene: direct observation and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Emi; Hashimoto, Ayako; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Tajima, Nobuo; Ohno, Takahisa; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2016-01-07

    Metal doping into the graphene lattice has been studied recently to develop novel nanoelectronic devices and to gain an understanding of the catalytic activities of metals in nanocarbon structures. Here we report the direct observation of interactions between Cu atoms and single-layer graphene by transmission electron microscopy. We document stable configurations of Cu atoms in the graphene sheet and unique transformations of graphene promoted by Cu atoms. First-principles calculations based on density functional theory reveal a reduction of energy barrier that caused rotation of C-C bonds near Cu atoms. We discuss two driving forces, electron irradiation and in situ heating, and conclude that the observed transformations were mainly promoted by electron irradiation. Our results suggest that individual Cu atoms can promote reconstruction of single-layer graphene.

  1. Interaction-induced transport of ultra-cold atoms in 1D optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruss, Daniel; Chien, Chih-Chun; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Zwolak, Michael

    2013-03-01

    The study of time-dependent, many-body transport phenomena is increasingly within reach of ultra-cold atom experiments. These systems not only allow experimental emulation of solid state systems, but allow us to probe the dynamics of transport at a previously unreachable level of detail. We will discuss computational results for the dynamics of electronic/atomic transport and, in particular, simulation of interacting fermionic atoms via a micro-canonical transport formalism using approximations that go beyond mean-field. We will discuss applications of this in terms of simulating particle currents under the influence of applied current and potentials, differing spin-spin interactions, and inhomogeneous lattice impurities. Finally, we will discuss these results in the context of present-day cold atom experiments. This project was partially funded by DOE.

  2. Long-range interactions between excited helium and alkali-metal atoms

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, J.-Y.

    2012-12-03

    The dispersion coefficients for the long-range interaction of the first four excited states of He, i.e., He(2 1,3S) and He(2 1,3P), with the low-lying states of the alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb are calculated by summing over the reduced matrix elements of the multipole transition operators. For the interaction between He and Li the uncertainty of the calculations is 0.1–0.5%. For interactions with other alkali-metal atoms the uncertainty is 1–3% in the coefficient C5, 1–5% in the coefficient C6, and 1–10% in the coefficients C8 and C10. The dispersion coefficients Cn for the interaction of He(2 1,3S) and He(2 1,3P) with the ground-state alkali-metal atoms and for the interaction of He(2 1,3S) with the alkali-metal atoms in their first 2P states are presented in this Brief Report. The coefficients for other pairs of atomic states are listed in the Supplemental Material.

  3. Controlling the interactions of very-high-n strontium Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, R. G.; Dunning, F. B.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2017-04-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated that high n, n- 300 , Rydberg states can be manipulated with remarkable precision using one, or more, short half-cycle pulsed electric fields (HCPs). In the present work many body dynamics of interacting Rydberg systems is exploited to create an initial train of approximately equispaced high n Rydberg atoms in an atomic beam. Their mutual interactions are then increased using HCPs to excite them to states of much higher n, the degree of coupling being tuned by varying the final target state. Interest centers on energy exchange and ionization, and their dependence on the degree of interaction. The effects of interactions are monitored through changes in the atomic field ionization spectra and through the loss of Rydberg atoms from the beam. Understanding the details of Rydberg-Rydberg interactions promises to allow creation of long-lived Rydberg atom ensembles where, due to their correlated motions, the excited electrons remain far apart. Research supported by the NSF and Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  4. Enhancing the functional content of eukaryotic protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Pandey

    Full Text Available Protein interaction networks are a promising type of data for studying complex biological systems. However, despite the rich information embedded in these networks, these networks face important data quality challenges of noise and incompleteness that adversely affect the results obtained from their analysis. Here, we apply a robust measure of local network structure called common neighborhood similarity (CNS to address these challenges. Although several CNS measures have been proposed in the literature, an understanding of their relative efficacies for the analysis of interaction networks has been lacking. We follow the framework of graph transformation to convert the given interaction network into a transformed network corresponding to a variety of CNS measures evaluated. The effectiveness of each measure is then estimated by comparing the quality of protein function predictions obtained from its corresponding transformed network with those from the original network. Using a large set of human and fly protein interactions, and a set of over 100 GO terms for both, we find that several of the transformed networks produce more accurate predictions than those obtained from the original network. In particular, the HC.cont measure and other continuous CNS measures perform well this task, especially for large networks. Further investigation reveals that the two major factors contributing to this improvement are the abilities of CNS measures to prune out noisy edges and enhance functional coherence in the transformed networks.

  5. "Material interactions": from atoms & bits to entangled practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna

    This panel addresses some of the core aspects of the theme "It's the experience", for the CHI2012 conference by focusing on the materials that constitute the foundation for interaction with computers. We take a series of questions as a joint point of departure to consider the nature and character......, Daniela Rosner, Petra Sundström, Anna Vallgårda and Tobie Kerridge. This panel also features Mark Rolston, Chief Creative Officer at Frog design, Inc....

  6. Inelastic transitions of atoms and molecules induced by van der Waals interaction with a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudon, J.; Hamamda, M.; Boustimi, M.; Bocvarski, V.; Taillandier-Loize, T.; Dutier, G.; Perales, F.; Ducloy, M.

    2012-05-01

    Inelastic processes occuring in thermal-velocity metastable atoms and molecules passing at a mean distance (1-100 nm) are investigated. These processes are caused by the quadrupolar part of the van der Waals interaction: fine-structure transitions in atoms (Ar∗, Kr∗), rovibrational transitions in N2∗(3Σu+), transitions among magnetic sub-levels in the presence of a magnetic field.

  7. A neural network potential-energy surface for the water dimer based on environment-dependent atomic energies and charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawietz, Tobias; Sharma, Vikas; Behler, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the unique properties of water still represents a significant challenge for theory and experiment. Computer simulations by molecular dynamics require a reliable description of the atomic interactions, and in recent decades countless water potentials have been reported in the literature. Still, most of these potentials contain significant approximations, for instance a frozen internal structure of the individual water monomers. Artificial neural networks (NNs) offer a promising way for the construction of very accurate potential-energy surfaces taking all degrees of freedom explicitly into account. These potentials are based on electronic structure calculations for representative configurations, which are then interpolated to a continuous energy surface that can be evaluated many orders of magnitude faster. We present a full-dimensional NN potential for the water dimer as a first step towards the construction of a NN potential for liquid water. This many-body potential is based on environment-dependent atomic energy contributions, and long-range electrostatic interactions are incorporated employing environment-dependent atomic charges. We show that the potential and derived properties like vibrational frequencies are in excellent agreement with the underlying reference density-functional theory calculations.

  8. DFT Modeling of Cross-Linked Polyethylene: Role of Gold Atoms and Dispersion Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaško, Martin; Mach, Pavel; Antušek, Andrej; Urban, Miroslav

    2018-02-08

    Using DFT modeling, we analyze the concerted action of gold atoms and dispersion interactions in cross-linked polyethylene. Our model consists of two oligomer chains (PEn) with 7, 11, 15, 19, or 23 carbon atoms in each oligomer cross-linked with one to three Au atoms through C-Au-C bonds. In structures with a single gold atom the C-Au-C bond is located in the central position of the oligomer. Binding energies (BEs) with respect to two oligomer radical fragments and Au are as high as 362-489 kJ/mol depending on the length of the oligomer chain. When the dispersion contribution in PEn-Au-PEn oligomers is omitted, BE is almost independent of the number of carbon atoms, lying between 293 and 296 kJ/mol. The dispersion energy contributions to BEs in PEn-Au-PEn rise nearly linearly with the number of carbon atoms in the PEn chain. The carbon-carbon distance in the C-Au-C moiety is around 4.1 Å, similar to the bond distance between saturated closed shell chains in the polyethylene crystal. BEs of pure saturated closed shell PEn-PEn oligomers are 51-187 kJ/mol. Both Au atoms and dispersion interactions contribute considerably to the creation of nearly parallel chains of oligomers with reasonably high binding energies.

  9. Quantum Entanglement and Correlation of Two Qubit Atoms Interacting with the Coherent State Optical Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tang-Kun; Tao, Yu; Shan, Chuan-Jia; Liu, Ji-bing

    2017-10-01

    Using the three criterions of the concurrence, the negative eigenvalue and the geometric quantum discord, we investigate the quantum entanglement and quantum correlation dynamics of two two-level atoms interacting with the coherent state optical field. We discuss the influence of different photon number of the mean square fluctuations on the temporal evolution of the concurrence, the negative eigenvalue and the geometric quantum discord between two atoms when the two atoms are initially in specific three states. The results show that different photon number of the mean square fluctuations can lead to different effects of quantum entanglement and quantum correlation dynamics.

  10. Discerning molecular interactions: A comprehensive review on biomolecular interaction databases and network analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miryala, Sravan Kumar; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2017-11-09

    Computational analysis of biomolecular interaction networks is now gaining a lot of importance to understand the functions of novel genes/proteins. Gene interaction (GI) network analysis and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis play a major role in predicting the functionality of interacting genes or proteins and gives an insight into the functional relationships and evolutionary conservation of interactions among the genes. An interaction network is a graphical representation of gene/protein interactome, where each gene/protein is a node, and interaction between gene/protein is an edge. In this review, we discuss the popular open source databases that serve as data repositories to search and collect protein/gene interaction data, and also tools available for the generation of interaction network, visualization and network analysis. Also, various network analysis approaches like topological approach and clustering approach to study the network properties and functional enrichment server which illustrates the functions and pathway of the genes and proteins has been discussed. Hence the distinctive attribute mentioned in this review is not only to provide an overview of tools and web servers for gene and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis but also to extract useful and meaningful information from the interaction networks. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. MDM2-MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2-MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ) in the micromolar range for the MDM2-MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2-MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation.

  12. Nonperturbative theory of atom-surface interaction: corrections at short separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordag, M.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2018-02-01

    The nonperturbative expressions for the free energy and force of interaction between a ground-state atom and a real-material surface at any temperature are presented. The transition to the Matsubara representation is performed, whereupon the comparison is made with the commonly used perturbative results based on the standard Lifshitz theory. It is shown that the Lifshitz formulas for the free energy and force of an atom-surface interaction follow from the nonperturbative ones in the lowest order of the small parameter. Numerical computations of the free energy and force for the atoms of He{\\hspace{0pt}}\\ast and Na interacting with a surface of an Au plate have been performed using the frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity of Au and highly accurate dynamic atomic polarizabilities in the framework of both the nonperturbative and perturbative theories. According to our results, the maximum deviations between the two theories are reached at the shortest atom-surface separations of about 1 nm. Simple analytic expressions for the atom-surface free energy are derived in the classical limit and for an ideal-metal plane. In the lowest order of the small parameter, they are found in agreement with the perturbative ones following from the standard Lifshitz theory. Possible applications of the obtained results in the theory of van der Waals adsorption are discussed.

  13. Nonperturbative theory of atom-surface interaction: Corrections at short separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordag, Michael; Klimchitskaya, Galina L; Mostepanenko, Vladimir M

    2017-12-29

    The nonperturbative expressions for the free energy and force of interaction between a ground-state atom and a real-material surface at any temperature are presented. The transition to the Matsubara representation is performed, whereupon the comparison is made with the commonly used perturbative results based on the standard Lifshitz theory. It is shown that the Lifshitz formulas for the free energy and force of an atom-surface interaction follow from the nonperturbative ones in the lowest order of the small parameter. Numerical computations of the free energy and force for the atoms of He${}^{\\ast}$ and Na interacting with a surface of an Au plate have been performed using the frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity of Au and highly accurate dynamic atomic polarizabilities in the framework of both the nonperturbative and perturbative theories. According to our results, the maximum deviations between the two theories are reached at the shortest atom-surface separations of about 1\\,nm. Simple analytic expressions for the atom-surface free energy are derived in the classical limit and for an ideal-metal plane. In the lowest order of the small parameter, they are found in agreement with the perturbative ones following from the standard Lifshitz theory. Possible applications of the obtained results in the theory of van der Waals adsorption are discussed. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Probing Magnetism in 2D Molecular Networks after in Situ Metalation by Transition Metal Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouteden, K; Ivanova, Ts; Li, Z; Iancu, V; Janssens, E; Van Haesendonck, C

    2015-03-19

    Metalated molecules are the ideal building blocks for the bottom-up fabrication of, e.g., two-dimensional arrays of magnetic particles for spintronics applications. Compared to chemical synthesis, metalation after network formation by an atom beam can yield a higher degree of control and flexibility and allows for mixing of different types of magnetic atoms. We report on successful metalation of tetrapyridyl-porphyrins (TPyP) by Co and Cr atoms, as demonstrated by scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. For the metalation, large periodic networks formed by the TPyP molecules on a Ag(111) substrate are exposed in situ to an atom beam. Voltage-induced dehydrogenation experiments support the conclusion that the porphyrin macrocycle of the TPyP molecule incorporates one transition metal atom. The newly synthesized Co-TPyP and Cr-TPyP complexes exhibit striking differences in their electronic behavior, leading to a magnetic character for Cr-TPyP only as evidenced by Kondo resonance measurements.

  15. Structural principles within the human-virus protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzosa, Eric A; Xia, Yu

    2011-06-28

    General properties of the antagonistic biomolecular interactions between viruses and their hosts (exogenous interactions) remain poorly understood, and may differ significantly from known principles governing the cooperative interactions within the host (endogenous interactions). Systems biology approaches have been applied to study the combined interaction networks of virus and human proteins, but such efforts have so far revealed only low-resolution patterns of host-virus interaction. Here, we layer curated and predicted 3D structural models of human-virus and human-human protein complexes on top of traditional interaction networks to reconstruct the human-virus structural interaction network. This approach reveals atomic resolution, mechanistic patterns of host-virus interaction, and facilitates systematic comparison with the host's endogenous interactions. We find that exogenous interfaces tend to overlap with and mimic endogenous interfaces, thereby competing with endogenous binding partners. The endogenous interfaces mimicked by viral proteins tend to participate in multiple endogenous interactions which are transient and regulatory in nature. While interface overlap in the endogenous network results largely from gene duplication followed by divergent evolution, viral proteins frequently achieve interface mimicry without any sequence or structural similarity to an endogenous binding partner. Finally, while endogenous interfaces tend to evolve more slowly than the rest of the protein surface, exogenous interfaces--including many sites of endogenous-exogenous overlap--tend to evolve faster, consistent with an evolutionary "arms race" between host and pathogen. These significant biophysical, functional, and evolutionary differences between host-pathogen and within-host protein-protein interactions highlight the distinct consequences of antagonism versus cooperation in biological networks.

  16. ATOMES ET LUMIÈRE INTERACTION MATIÈRE RAYONNEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Fabre, Claude

    2017-01-01

    National audience; Ce cours, donné dans le parcours de deuxième année Physique Quantiquedu Master ENS-ICFP : Concepts fondamentaux de la Physique, est consacréà une présentation générale de l’interaction entre la matière et le rayonnementélectromagnétique. On appelle souvent Optique Quantique ce domaine de la physique, carla matière, ou la lumière, ou les deux, sont traitées au niveau des phénomènesmicroscopiques donc quantiques. Les systèmes étudiés sont souventcomplexes. On cherche donc à l...

  17. Online experimentation and interactive learning resources for teaching network engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Mikroyannidis, Alexander; Gomez-Goiri, Aitor; Smith, Andrew; Domingue, John

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a case study on teaching network engineering in conjunction with interactive learning resources. This case study has been developed in collaboration with the Cisco Networking Academy in the context of the FORGE project, which promotes online learning and experimentation by offering access to virtual and remote labs. The main goal of this work is allowing learners and educators to perform network simulations within a web browser or an interactive eBook by using any type of ...

  18. The RING 2.0 web server for high quality residue interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Damiano; Minervini, Giovanni; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2016-07-08

    Residue interaction networks (RINs) are an alternative way of representing protein structures where nodes are residues and arcs physico-chemical interactions. RINs have been extensively and successfully used for analysing mutation effects, protein folding, domain-domain communication and catalytic activity. Here we present RING 2.0, a new version of the RING software for the identification of covalent and non-covalent bonds in protein structures, including π-π stacking and π-cation interactions. RING 2.0 is extremely fast and generates both intra and inter-chain interactions including solvent and ligand atoms. The generated networks are very accurate and reliable thanks to a complex empirical re-parameterization of distance thresholds performed on the entire Protein Data Bank. By default, RING output is generated with optimal parameters but the web server provides an exhaustive interface to customize the calculation. The network can be visualized directly in the browser or in Cytoscape. Alternatively, the RING-Viz script for Pymol allows visualizing the interactions at atomic level in the structure. The web server and RING-Viz, together with an extensive help and tutorial, are available from URL: http://protein.bio.unipd.it/ring. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Specification and Estimation of Network Formation and Network Interaction Models with the Exponential Probability Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Chih-Sheng; Lee, Lung fei

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we model network formation and network interactions under a unified framework. The key feature of our model is to allow individuals to respond to incentives stemming from interaction benefits on certain activities when they choose friends (network links), while capturing homophily in terms of unobserved characteristic variables in network formation and activities. There are two advantages of this modeling approach: first, one can evaluate whether incentives from certain interac...

  20. The architecture of functional interaction networks in the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganmor, Elad; Segev, Ronen; Schneidman, Elad

    2011-02-23

    Sensory information is represented in the brain by the joint activity of large groups of neurons. Recent studies have shown that, although the number of possible activity patterns and underlying interactions is exponentially large, pairwise-based models give a surprisingly accurate description of neural population activity patterns. We explored the architecture of maximum entropy models of the functional interaction networks underlying the response of large populations of retinal ganglion cells, in adult tiger salamander retina, responding to natural and artificial stimuli. We found that we can further simplify these pairwise models by neglecting weak interaction terms or by relying on a small set of interaction strengths. Comparing network interactions under different visual stimuli, we show the existence of local network motifs in the interaction map of the retina. Our results demonstrate that the underlying interaction map of the retina is sparse and dominated by local overlapping interaction modules.

  1. Interaction of epitaxial silicene with overlayers formed by exposure to Al atoms and O2 molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlein, R; Van Bui, H; Wiggers, F B; Yamada-Takamura, Y; Kovalgin, A Y; de Jong, M P

    2014-05-28

    As silicene is not chemically inert, the study and exploitation of its electronic properties outside of ultrahigh vacuum environments require the use of insulating capping layers. In order to understand if aluminum oxide might be a suitable encapsulation material, we used high-resolution synchrotron photoelectron spectroscopy to study the interactions of Al atoms and O2 molecules, as well as the combination of both, with epitaxial silicene on thin ZrB2(0001) films grown on Si(111). The deposition of Al atoms onto silicene, up to the coverage of about 0.4 Al per Si atoms, has little effect on the chemical state of the Si atoms. The silicene-terminated surface is also hardly affected by exposure to O2 gas, up to a dose of 4500 L. In contrast, when Al-covered silicene is exposed to the same dose, a large fraction of the Si atoms becomes oxidized. This is attributed to dissociative chemisorption of O2 molecules by Al atoms at the surface, producing reactive atomic oxygen species that cause the oxidation. It is concluded that aluminum oxide overlayers prepared in this fashion are not suitable for encapsulation since they do not prevent but actually enhance the degradation of silicene.

  2. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-05-12

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons.

  3. Long-range dispersion interactions between Li and rare-gas atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deng-Hong; Xu, Ya-Bin; Jiang, Jun; Jiang, Li; Xie, Lu-You; Dong, Chen-Zhong

    2017-06-01

    The energy levels, oscillator strength and dipole scalar polarizabilities of Li atoms are calculated by using the relativistic semiempirical-core-potential method (RCICP). The dispersion coefficients C6 between ground 2s1/2 2p1/2,2p3/2 states of Li atom and the ground state of rare gas atoms (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) are calculated in JJ coupled states, in which the spin-orbital interactions are included. Present results are in good agreement with other available results. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications", edited by Gordon W.F. Drake, Jung-Sik Yoon, Daiji Kato, Grzegorz Karwasz.

  4. Interaction and dynamics of add-atoms with 2-dimensional structures

    CERN Multimedia

    The interaction and dynamics of add-atoms with graphene, graphene-derivate structures and, later, MoSi$_2$, two-dimensional – single and few – atomic layers will be studied with the Perturbed Angular Correlation – PAC – technique. Graphene is also envisaged as new platform for growing semiconductor nanostructure devices, such as quantum dots and as a particularly powerful catalyst. Understanding nucleation of nanostructures and clusters on graphene and related phases in wet conditions as they are used in chemical methods in research and industry require complementary studies. These systems will therefore be studied systematically using radioactive probe atoms attaching via a transfer media (e.g., water in catalysis process) or being deposited with soft-landing techniques under vacuum and UHV conditions, as put in place at the ASPIC setup at ISOLDE. The hyperfine fields obtained under different environments are expected to reveal basic information on the rich atomic and physical mechanisms associated w...

  5. Interactions of condensate atoms in the process of velocity-selective coherent population trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'ichev, L. V.

    2011-06-01

    The properties of a one-dimensional atomic Bose condensate are studied under the assumption that the condensation leads to a state of velocity-selective coherent population trapping. This state is characterized by the quantum correlation (entanglement) between the intrinsic angular momentum of an atom and its translational motion underlying nontrivial features of the condensate. The effects of weak interatomic interaction are taken into account. The steady state of above-condensate atoms corresponding to the slow decay of the state with coherent population trapping is found. The dynamic problem concerning the evolution of the system of above-condensate atoms after switching off the optical field forming the state with coherent population trapping is solved. The solution is found by the diagonalization of the Hamiltonian based on introducing the Bogoliubov quasiparticles with the unusual dispersion law.

  6. A facility for investigating interactions of energetic atomic oxygen with solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, G. S.; Peplinski, D. R.

    A facility for the investigation of the interactions of energetic atomic oxygen with solids is described. The facility is comprised of a four-chambered, differentially pumped molecular beam apparatus which can be equipped with one of a variety of sources of atomic oxygen. The primary source is a dc arch-heated supersonic nozzle source which produces a flux of atomic oxygen in excess of 10 to the 15th power/cu cm/sec at the target, at a velocity of 3.5 km/sec. Results of applications of this facility to the study of the reactions of atomic oxygen with carbon and polyimide films are briefly reviewed and compared to data obtained on various flights of the space shuttle.

  7. Study of the scalar-pseudoscalar interaction in the francium atom

    CERN Document Server

    Skripnikov, L V; Mosyagin, N S

    2016-01-01

    Fr atom can be successively used to search for the atomic permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) [Hyperfine Interactions 236, 53 (2015); Journal of Physics: Conference Series 691, 012017 (2016)]. It can be induced by the permanent electron EDM predicted by modern extensions of the standard model to be nonzero at the level accessible by the new generation of EDM experiments. We consider another mechanism of the atomic EDM generation in Fr. This is caused by the scalar-pseudoscalar nucleus-electron neutral current interaction with the dimensionless strength constant, $k_{T,P}$. Similar to the electron EDM this interaction violates both spatial parity and time-reversal symmetries and can also induce permanent atomic EDM. It was shown in [Phys. Rev. D 89, 056006 (2014)] that the scalar-pseudoscalar contribution to the atomic EDM can dominate over the direct contribution from the electron EDM within the standard model. We report high-accuracy combined all-electron and two-step relativistic coupled cluster treatmen...

  8. Missing and spurious interactions and the reconstruction of complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Guimera, R; 10.1073/pnas.0908366106

    2010-01-01

    Network analysis is currently used in a myriad of contexts: from identifying potential drug targets to predicting the spread of epidemics and designing vaccination strategies, and from finding friends to uncovering criminal activity. Despite the promise of the network approach, the reliability of network data is a source of great concern in all fields where complex networks are studied. Here, we present a general mathematical and computational framework to deal with the problem of data reliability in complex networks. In particular, we are able to reliably identify both missing and spurious interactions in noisy network observations. Remarkably, our approach also enables us to obtain, from those noisy observations, network reconstructions that yield estimates of the true network properties that are more accurate than those provided by the observations themselves. Our approach has the potential to guide experiments, to better characterize network data sets, and to drive new discoveries.

  9. Applied Graph-Mining Algorithms to Study Biomolecular Interaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks carry vital information on the organization of molecular interactions in cellular systems. The identification of functionally relevant modules in PPI networks is one of the most important applications of biological network analysis. Computational analysis is becoming an indispensable tool to understand large-scale biomolecular interaction networks. Several types of computational methods have been developed and employed for the analysis of PPI networks. Of these computational methods, graph comparison and module detection are the two most commonly used strategies. This review summarizes current literature on graph kernel and graph alignment methods for graph comparison strategies, as well as module detection approaches including seed-and-extend, hierarchical clustering, optimization-based, probabilistic, and frequent subgraph methods. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of the major algorithms employed under each theme, including our recently published frequent subgraph method, for detecting functional modules commonly shared across multiple cancer PPI networks. PMID:24800226

  10. Interactive Naive Bayesian network: A new approach of constructing gene-gene interaction network for cancer classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xue W; Lim, Joon S

    2015-01-01

    Naive Bayesian (NB) network classifier is a simple and well-known type of classifier, which can be easily induced from a DNA microarray data set. However, a strong conditional independence assumption of NB network sometimes can lead to weak classification performance. In this paper, we propose a new approach of interactive naive Bayesian (INB) network to weaken the conditional independence of NB network and classify cancers using DNA microarray data set. We selected the differently expressed genes (DEGs) to reduce the dimension of the microarray data set. Then, an interactive parent which has the biggest influence among all DEGs is searched for each DEG. And then we calculate a weight to represent the interactive relationship between a DEG and its parent. Finally, the gene-gene interaction network is constructed. We experimentally test the INB network in terms of classification accuracy using leukemia and colon DNA microarray data sets, then we compare it with the NB network. The INB network can get higher classification accuracies than NB network. And INB network can show the gene-gene interactions visually.

  11. Application Interaction Model for Opportunistic Networking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Souza Schwartz, Ramon; van Dijk, H.W.; Scholten, Johan

    In Opportunistic Networks, autonomous nodes discover, assess and potentially seize opportunities for communication and distributed processing whenever these emerge. In this paper, we consider prerequisites for a successful implementation of such a way of processing in networks that consist mainly of

  12. Atom Core Interactive Electronic Book to Develop Self Efficacy and Critical Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradina, Luthfia Puspa; Suyatna, Agus

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop interactive atomic electronic school book (IESB) to cultivate critical thinking skills and confidence of students grade 12. The method used in this research was the ADDIE (Analyze Design Development Implementation Evaluation) development procedure which is limited to the test phase of product design…

  13. Dynamic evolution of double five-level atom interacting with one ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N H Abdel-Wahab

    2017-11-23

    Nov 23, 2017 ... Abstract. In this paper, the model describing a double five-level atom interacting with a single mode electromagnetic cavity field in the (off) non-resonate case is studied. We obtained the constants of motion for the considered model. Also, the state vector of the wave function is given by using the ...

  14. Fundamental symmetries and interactions studied with radioactive isotopes in atom traps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilschut, H.W.E.M.; Gacsi, Z; Dombradi, Z; Krasznahorkay, A

    2005-01-01

    The structure of certain nuclei and atoms allow one to study fundamental symmetries and interactions. In this review we consider the search for Time-Reversal invariance Violation (TRV). We consider two options: TRV in beta decay or the search for the forbidden Electric Dipole Moment (EDM). In both

  15. Atomic force microscopy cantilever dynamics in liquid in the presence of tip sample interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mugele, Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever oscillating in liquid at subnanometer amplitude in the presence of tip-sample interaction. We present AFM measurements of oscillatory solvation forces for octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite and

  16. Structural and chemical evolution of single-wall carbon nanotubes under atomic and molecular deuterium interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisowski, W.F.; Keim, Enrico G.; van den Berg, A.H.J.; Smithers, M.A.; Smithers, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of atomic (D) and molecular (D2) deuterium, as present in a (D + D2) gas mixture, with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been studied by means of a combination of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The SWNT

  17. Predicting and validating protein interactions using network structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Yang Chen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein interactions play a vital part in the function of a cell. As experimental techniques for detection and validation of protein interactions are time consuming, there is a need for computational methods for this task. Protein interactions appear to form a network with a relatively high degree of local clustering. In this paper we exploit this clustering by suggesting a score based on triplets of observed protein interactions. The score utilises both protein characteristics and network properties. Our score based on triplets is shown to complement existing techniques for predicting protein interactions, outperforming them on data sets which display a high degree of clustering. The predicted interactions score highly against test measures for accuracy. Compared to a similar score derived from pairwise interactions only, the triplet score displays higher sensitivity and specificity. By looking at specific examples, we show how an experimental set of interactions can be enriched and validated. As part of this work we also examine the effect of different prior databases upon the accuracy of prediction and find that the interactions from the same kingdom give better results than from across kingdoms, suggesting that there may be fundamental differences between the networks. These results all emphasize that network structure is important and helps in the accurate prediction of protein interactions. The protein interaction data set and the program used in our analysis, and a list of predictions and validations, are available at http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/bioinfo/resources/PredictingInteractions.

  18. Specific non-monotonous interactions increase persistence of ecological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chuan; Zhang, Zhibin

    2014-03-22

    The relationship between stability and biodiversity has long been debated in ecology due to opposing empirical observations and theoretical predictions. Species interaction strength is often assumed to be monotonically related to population density, but the effects on stability of ecological networks of non-monotonous interactions that change signs have not been investigated previously. We demonstrate that for four kinds of non-monotonous interactions, shifting signs to negative or neutral interactions at high population density increases persistence (a measure of stability) of ecological networks, while for the other two kinds of non-monotonous interactions shifting signs to positive interactions at high population density decreases persistence of networks. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of network stabilization caused by specific non-monotonous interaction types through either increasing stable equilibrium points or reducing unstable equilibrium points (or both). These specific non-monotonous interactions may be important in maintaining stable and complex ecological networks, as well as other networks such as genes, neurons, the internet and human societies.

  19. Investigations of Memory, Entanglement, and Long-Range Interactions Using Ultra-Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudin, Yaroslav

    2013-05-01

    Long-term storage of quantum information has diverse applications in quantum information science. I have employed ultra-cold rubidium atoms confined in one-dimensional optical lattices to demonstrate entanglement between a light field and a long-lived spin wave, to develop light-shift compensated quantum memories, to create entanglement between a telecom-band light field and a light-shift compensated memory qubit of a 0.1 s lifetime, and to store coherent light pulses with 1/e lifetime of 16 s in a magnetically-compensated lattice augmented by dynamic decoupling. Highly excited Rydberg atoms offer a unique platform for study of strongly correlated systems and quantum information, because of their enormous dipole moments and consequent strong, long-range interactions. I will present experimental studies of single collective Rydberg excitations created in a cold atomic gas including first realization of a Rydberg-atom-based single photon source, measurement of entanglement between a Rydberg spin wave and light, investigations of long-range correlations of strongly interacting Rydberg spin waves, and initial observations of coherent many-body Rabi oscillations between the ground level and a Rydberg level using several hundred cold rubidium atoms.

  20. Do networks of social interactions reflect patterns of kinship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joah R. MADDEN, Johanna F. NIELSEN, Tim H. CLUTTON-BROCK

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The underlying kin structure of groups of animals may be glimpsed from patterns of spatial position or temporal association between individuals, and is presumed to facilitate inclusive fitness benefits. Such structure may be evident at a finer, behavioural, scale with individuals preferentially interacting with kin. We tested whether kin structure within groups of meerkats Suricata suricatta matched three forms of social interaction networks: grooming, dominance or foraging competitions. Networks of dominance interactions were positively related to networks of kinship, with close relatives engaging in dominance interactions with each other. This relationship persisted even after excluding the breeding dominant pair and when we restricted the kinship network to only include links between first order kin, which are most likely to be able to discern kin through simple rules of thumb. Conversely, we found no relationship between kinship networks and either grooming networks or networks of foraging competitions. This is surprising because a positive association between kin in a grooming network, or a negative association between kin in a network of foraging competitions offers opportunities for inclusive fitness benefits. Indeed, the positive association between kin in a network of dominance interactions that we did detect does not offer clear inclusive fitness benefits to group members. We conclude that kin structure in behavioural interactions in meerkats may be driven by factors other than indirect fitness benefits, and that networks of cooperative behaviours such as grooming may be driven by direct benefits accruing to individuals perhaps through mutualism or manipulation [Current Zoology 58 (2: 319-328, 2012].

  1. Manipulating the tunneling of ultracold atoms through a mazer cavity via vacuum-multiparticle interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badshah, Fazal; Basit, Abdul; Ali, Hamad; Ge, Guo-Qin

    2017-02-01

    We study the tunneling and traversal time of ultracold two-level atoms through a high quality microwave cavity containing N  -  1 ground state atoms. The phase time of tunneling may be considered as a measure of the time required to traverse the cavity which exhibits both super and subclassical traversal behaviors. Here we examine that superclassical phase time behavior suppresses with the increase in the number of motionless ground state atoms inside the cavity. It happens due to the multipartite influence in the interaction that traps the incident atom into its upper state such that it does not observe any induced potential. Accordingly, for larger atomic samples, the incident atoms in the initial excited states get perfect transmission and tunnel through the cavity nearly with the same speed as they would have moved through a free space. This is true for any width of potential and the particle’s speed provided that the center-of-mass energy of the incident particle lies in the classically forbidden range.

  2. Real-Time Nanoparticle-Cell Interactions in Physiological Media by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Blattmann, Christoph O; Demokritou, Philip

    2014-07-07

    Particle-cell interactions in physiological media are important in determining the fate and transport of nanoparticles and biological responses to them. In this work, these interactions are assessed in real time using a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) based platform. Industry-relevant CeO2 and Fe2O3 engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) of two primary particle sizes were synthesized by the flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) based Harvard Versatile Engineering Nanomaterials Generation System (Harvard VENGES) and used in this study. The ENPs were attached on AFM tips, and the atomic force between the tip and lung epithelia cells (A549), adhered on a substrate, was measured in biological media, with and without the presence of serum proteins. Two metrics were used to assess the nanoparticle cell: the detachment force required to separate the ENP from the cell and the number of bonds formed between the cell and the ENPs. The results indicate that these atomic level ENP-cell interaction forces strongly depend on the physiological media. The presence of serum proteins reduced both the detachment force and the number of bonds by approximately 50% indicating the important role of the protein corona on the particle cell interactions. Additionally, it was shown that particle to cell interactions were size and material dependent.

  3. Tunable-Range, Photon-Mediated Atomic Interactions in Multimode Cavity QED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun D. Vaidya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical cavity QED provides a platform with which to explore quantum many-body physics in driven-dissipative systems. Single-mode cavities provide strong, infinite-range photon-mediated interactions among intracavity atoms. However, these global all-to-all couplings are limiting from the perspective of exploring quantum many-body physics beyond the mean-field approximation. The present work demonstrates that local couplings can be created using multimode cavity QED. This is established through measurements of the threshold of a superradiant, self-organization phase transition versus atomic position. Specifically, we experimentally show that the interference of near-degenerate cavity modes leads to both a strong and tunable-range interaction between Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs trapped within the cavity. We exploit the symmetry of a confocal cavity to measure the interaction between real BECs and their virtual images without unwanted contributions arising from the merger of real BECs. Atom-atom coupling may be tuned from short range to long range. This capability paves the way toward future explorations of exotic, strongly correlated systems such as quantum liquid crystals and driven-dissipative spin glasses.

  4. Tunable-Range, Photon-Mediated Atomic Interactions in Multimode Cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Varun D.; Guo, Yudan; Kroeze, Ronen M.; Ballantine, Kyle E.; Kollár, Alicia J.; Keeling, Jonathan; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2018-01-01

    Optical cavity QED provides a platform with which to explore quantum many-body physics in driven-dissipative systems. Single-mode cavities provide strong, infinite-range photon-mediated interactions among intracavity atoms. However, these global all-to-all couplings are limiting from the perspective of exploring quantum many-body physics beyond the mean-field approximation. The present work demonstrates that local couplings can be created using multimode cavity QED. This is established through measurements of the threshold of a superradiant, self-organization phase transition versus atomic position. Specifically, we experimentally show that the interference of near-degenerate cavity modes leads to both a strong and tunable-range interaction between Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) trapped within the cavity. We exploit the symmetry of a confocal cavity to measure the interaction between real BECs and their virtual images without unwanted contributions arising from the merger of real BECs. Atom-atom coupling may be tuned from short range to long range. This capability paves the way toward future explorations of exotic, strongly correlated systems such as quantum liquid crystals and driven-dissipative spin glasses.

  5. Exploring Interacting Topological Insulators with Ultracold Atoms: The Synthetic Creutz-Hubbard Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jünemann

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the robustness of topological phases of matter in the presence of strong interactions and synthesizing novel strongly correlated topological materials lie among the most important and difficult challenges of modern theoretical and experimental physics. In this work, we present a complete theoretical analysis of the synthetic Creutz-Hubbard ladder, which is a paradigmatic model that provides a neat playground to address these challenges. We give special attention to the competition of correlated topological phases and orbital quantum magnetism in the regime of strong interactions. These results are, furthermore, confirmed and extended by extensive numerical simulations. Moreover, we propose how to experimentally realize this model in a synthetic ladder made of two internal states of ultracold fermionic atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Our work paves the way towards quantum simulators of interacting topological insulators with cold atoms.

  6. Entanglement of a nonlinear two two-level atoms interacting with deformed fields in Kerr medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Khalek, S.; El-Saman, Y. S.; Abdel-Aty, M.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the entanglement dynamics between two two-level atoms interacting with two coherent fields in two spatially separated cavities which are filled with a Kerr-like medium. We examine the effect of nonlinear medium on the dynamical properties of entanglement and atomic occupation probabilities in the case of even and odd deformed coherent states. The results show that the deformed fields play important roles in the evolution of entanglement. Also, the results demonstrate that entanglement sudden death, sudden birth and long-distance can be controlled by the deformation and nonlinear parameters.

  7. Interaction of slow and highly charged ions with surfaces: formation of hollow atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolterfoht, N.; Grether, M.; Spieler, A.; Niemann, D. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Berlin (Germany). Bereich Festkoerperphysik; Arnau, A.

    1997-03-01

    The method of Auger spectroscopy was used to study the interaction of highly charged ions with Al and C surfaces. The formation of hollow Ne atoms in the first surface layers was evaluated by means of a Density Functional theory including non-linear screening effects. The time-dependent filling of the hollow atom was determined from a cascade model yielding information about the structure of the K-Auger spectra. Variation of total intensities of the L- and K-Auger peaks were interpreted by the cascade model in terms of attenuation effects on the electrons in the solid. (author)

  8. Atom-Resonant Heralded Single Photons by Interaction-Free Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgramm, Florian; Astiz, Yannick A. de Icaza; Beduini, Federica A.; Cere, Alessandro; Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the generation of rubidium-resonant heralded single photons for quantum memories. Photon pairs are created by cavity-enhanced down-conversion and narrowed in bandwidth to 7 MHz with a novel atom-based filter operating by "interaction-free measurement" principles. At least 94% of the heralded photons are atom-resonant as demonstrated by a direct absorption measurement with rubidium vapor. A heralded auto-correlation measurement shows $g_c^{(2)}(0)=0.040 \\pm 0.012$, i.e., suppres...

  9. Anisotropic atom-surface interactions in the Casimir-Polder regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillandier-Loize, T.; Baudon, J.; Dutier, G.; Perales, F.; Boustimi, M.; Ducloy, M.

    2014-05-01

    The distance dependence of the anisotropic atom-wall interaction is studied. The central result is the 1/z6 quadrupolar anisotropy decay in the retarded Casimir-Polder regime. Analysis of the transition region between nonretarded van der Waals regime (in 1/z3) and Casimir-Polder regime shows that the anisotropy crossover occurs at very short distances from the surface, on the order of 0.03λ, where λ is the atom characteristic wavelength. Possible experimental verifications of this distance dependence using surface-induced inelastic transitions are discussed.

  10. Anisotropic Atom-Surface Interactions in the Casimir-Polder Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Taillandier-Loize, T; Dutier, G; Perales, F; Boustimi, M; Ducloy, M

    2014-01-01

    The distance-dependence of the anisotropic atom-wall interaction is studied. The central result is the 1/z^6 quadrupolar anisotropy decay in the retarded Casimir-Polder regime. Analysis of the transition region between non-retarded van der Waals regime (in 1/z^3) and Casimir-Polder regime shows that the anisotropy cross-over occurs at very short distances from the surface, on the order of 0.03 Lambda, where Lambda is the atom characteristic wavelength. Possible experimental verifications of this distance dependence are discussed.

  11. Inelastic transitions of atoms and molecules induced by van der Waals interaction with a surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudon, J., E-mail: jacques.baudon@univ-paris13.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, CNRS-UMR 7538, Universite Paris 13, Villetaneuse (France); Hamamda, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, CNRS-UMR 7538, Universite Paris 13, Villetaneuse (France); Boustimi, M. [Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah (Saudi Arabia); Bocvarski, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade (Serbia); Taillandier-Loize, T.; Dutier, G.; Perales, F.; Ducloy, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, CNRS-UMR 7538, Universite Paris 13, Villetaneuse (France)

    2012-05-15

    Inelastic processes occuring in thermal-velocity metastable atoms and molecules passing at a mean distance (1-100 nm) are investigated. These processes are caused by the quadrupolar part of the van der Waals interaction: fine-structure transitions in atoms (Ar{sup Asterisk-Operator }, Kr{sup Asterisk-Operator }), rovibrational transitions in N{sub 2}{sup Asterisk-Operator }({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}), transitions among magnetic sub-levels in the presence of a magnetic field.

  12. Precision X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms as a probe of low-energy kaon-nucleus interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the exotic atoms where one atomic 1s electron is replaced by a K−, the strong interaction between the K− and the nucleus introduces an energy shift and broadening of the low-lying kaonic atomic levels which are determined by only the electromagnetic interaction. By performing X-ray spectroscopy for Z = 1,2 kaonic atoms, the SIDDHARTA experiment determined with high precision the shift and width for the 1s state of K− p and the 2p state of kaonic helium-3 and kaonic helium-4. These results provided unique information of the kaon-nucleus interaction in the low energy limit.

  13. Atom-centered symmetry functions for constructing high-dimensional neural network potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behler, Jörg

    2011-02-01

    Neural networks offer an unbiased and numerically very accurate approach to represent high-dimensional ab initio potential-energy surfaces. Once constructed, neural network potentials can provide the energies and forces many orders of magnitude faster than electronic structure calculations, and thus enable molecular dynamics simulations of large systems. However, Cartesian coordinates are not a good choice to represent the atomic positions, and a transformation to symmetry functions is required. Using simple benchmark systems, the properties of several types of symmetry functions suitable for the construction of high-dimensional neural network potential-energy surfaces are discussed in detail. The symmetry functions are general and can be applied to all types of systems such as molecules, crystalline and amorphous solids, and liquids.

  14. Engaging the Terminal: Promoting Halogen Bonding Interactions with Uranyl Oxo Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Korey P; Kalaj, Mark; Surbella, Robert G; Ducati, Lucas C; Autschbach, Jochen; Cahill, Christopher L

    2017-11-02

    Engaging the nominally terminal oxo atoms of the linear uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) cation in non-covalent interactions represents both a significant challenge and opportunity within the field of actinide hybrid materials. An approach has been developed for promoting oxo atom participation in a range of non-covalent interactions, through judicious choice of electron donating equatorial ligands and appropriately polarizable halogen-donor atoms. As such, a family of uranyl hybrid materials was generated based on a combination of 2,5-dihalobenzoic acid and aromatic, chelating N-donor ligands. Delineation of criteria for oxo participation in halogen bonding interactions has been achieved by preparing materials containing 2,5-dichloro- (25diClBA) and 2,5-dibromobenzoic acid (25diBrBA) coupled with 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) (1 and 2), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (3-5), 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (terpy) (6-8), or 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (Cl-terpy) (9-10), which have been characterized through single crystal X-ray diffraction, Raman, Infrared (IR), and luminescence spectroscopy, as well as through density functional calculations of electrostatic potentials. Looking comprehensively, these results are compared with recently published analogues featuring 2,5-diiodobenzoic acid which indicate that although inclusion of a capping ligand in the uranyl first coordination sphere is important, it is the polarizability of the selected halogen atom that ultimately drives halogen bonding interactions with the uranyl oxo atoms. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Personal Profiles: Enhancing Social Interaction in Learning Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlanga, Adriana; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter; Fetter, Sibren

    2009-01-01

    Berlanga, A. J., Bitter-Rijpkema, M., Brouns, F., Sloep, P. B., & Fetter, S. (2011). Personal Profiles: Enhancing Social Interaction in Learning Networks. International Journal of Web Based Communities, 7(1), 66-82.

  16. An Evolutionarily Conserved Innate Immunity Protein Interaction Network*

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Arras, Lesly; Seng, Amara; Lackford, Brad; Keikhaee, Mohammad R.; Bowerman, Bruce; Freedman, Jonathan H.; Schwartz, David A.; Alper, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune response plays a critical role in fighting infection; however, innate immunity also can affect the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including sepsis, asthma, cancer, and atherosclerosis. To identify novel regulators of innate immunity, we performed comparative genomics RNA interference screens in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and mouse macrophages. These screens have uncovered many candidate regulators of the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), several of which interact physically in multiple species to form an innate immunity protein interaction network. This protein interaction network contains several proteins in the canonical LPS-responsive TLR4 pathway as well as many novel interacting proteins. Using RNAi and overexpression studies, we show that almost every gene in this network can modulate the innate immune response in mouse cell lines. We validate the importance of this network in innate immunity regulation in vivo using available mutants in C. elegans and mice. PMID:23209288

  17. Atomes et lumière, interactions matière-rayonnement

    OpenAIRE

    Fabre, Claude

    2006-01-01

    I - Les outils de l'optique quantique 1 - Les approches phénoménologiques 2 - L'approche semi-classique 3 - Description quantique du champ électromagnétique libre 4 - Interaction entre atome et champ quantique II - Quelques phénomènes de l'optique quantique 5 - Emission spontanée 6 - Interactions quasi-résonnantes dans les systèmes à deux niveaux 7 - Systèmes à deux niveaux; DEA; Cours sur l'interactions entre la matière et le rayonnement électromagnétique (129 pages).

  18. Interacting Social Processes on Interconnected Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucila G Alvarez-Zuzek

    Full Text Available We propose and study a model for the interplay between two different dynamical processes -one for opinion formation and the other for decision making- on two interconnected networks A and B. The opinion dynamics on network A corresponds to that of the M-model, where the state of each agent can take one of four possible values (S = -2,-1, 1, 2, describing its level of agreement on a given issue. The likelihood to become an extremist (S = ±2 or a moderate (S = ±1 is controlled by a reinforcement parameter r ≥ 0. The decision making dynamics on network B is akin to that of the Abrams-Strogatz model, where agents can be either in favor (S = +1 or against (S = -1 the issue. The probability that an agent changes its state is proportional to the fraction of neighbors that hold the opposite state raised to a power β. Starting from a polarized case scenario in which all agents of network A hold positive orientations while all agents of network B have a negative orientation, we explore the conditions under which one of the dynamics prevails over the other, imposing its initial orientation. We find that, for a given value of β, the two-network system reaches a consensus in the positive state (initial state of network A when the reinforcement overcomes a crossover value r*(β, while a negative consensus happens for r βc. We develop an analytical mean-field approach that gives an insight into these regimes and shows that both dynamics are equivalent along the crossover line (r*, β*.

  19. A Topological Description of Hubs in Amino Acid Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Gaci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We represent proteins by amino acid interaction networks. This is a graph whose vertices are the proteins amino acids and whose edges are the interactions between them. Once we have compared this type of graphs to the general model of scale-free networks, we analyze the existence of nodes which highly interact, the hubs. We describe these nodes taking into account their position in the primary structure to study their apparition frequency in the folded proteins. Finally, we observe that their interaction level is a consequence of the general rules which govern the folding process.

  20. Defaunation leads to interaction deficits, not interaction compensation, in an island seed dispersal network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Evan C; Tewksbury, Joshua J; Rogers, Haldre S

    2017-07-20

    Following defaunation, the loss of interactions with mutualists such as pollinators or seed dispersers may be compensated through increased interactions with remaining mutualists, ameliorating the negative cascading impacts on biodiversity. Alternatively, remaining mutualists may respond to altered competition by reducing the breadth or intensity of their interactions, exacerbating negative impacts on biodiversity. Despite the importance of these responses for our understanding of the dynamics of mutualistic networks and their response to global change, the mechanism and magnitude of interaction compensation within real mutualistic networks remains largely unknown. We examined differences in mutualistic interactions between frugivores and fruiting plants in two island ecosystems possessing an intact or disrupted seed dispersal network. We determined how changes in the abundance and behavior of remaining seed dispersers either increased mutualistic interactions (contributing to "interaction compensation") or decreased interactions (causing an "interaction deficit") in the disrupted network. We found a "rich-get-richer" response in the disrupted network, where remaining frugivores favored the plant species with highest interaction frequency, a dynamic that worsened the interaction deficit among plant species with low interaction frequency. Only one of five plant species experienced compensation and the other four had significant interaction deficits, with interaction frequencies 56-95% lower in the disrupted network. These results do not provide support for the strong compensating mechanisms assumed in theoretical network models, suggesting that existing network models underestimate the prevalence of cascading mutualism disruption after defaunation. This work supports a mutualist biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationship, highlighting the importance of mutualist diversity for sustaining diverse and resilient ecosystems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The IRIS Network of Excellence: Future Directions in Interactive Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazza, Marc; Champagnat, Ronan; Leonardi, Riccardo

    The IRIS Network of Excellence started its work in January 2009. In this paper we highlight some new research directions developing within the network: one is revisiting narrative formalisation through the use of Linear Logic and the other is challenging the conventional framework of basing Interactive Storytelling on computer graphics to explore the content-based recombination of video sequences.

  2. Functional Interaction Network Construction and Analysis for Disease Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guanming; Haw, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Network-based approaches project seemingly unrelated genes or proteins onto a large-scale network context, therefore providing a holistic visualization and analysis platform for genomic data generated from high-throughput experiments, reducing the dimensionality of data via using network modules and increasing the statistic analysis power. Based on the Reactome database, the most popular and comprehensive open-source biological pathway knowledgebase, we have developed a highly reliable protein functional interaction network covering around 60 % of total human genes and an app called ReactomeFIViz for Cytoscape, the most popular biological network visualization and analysis platform. In this chapter, we describe the detailed procedures on how this functional interaction network is constructed by integrating multiple external data sources, extracting functional interactions from human curated pathway databases, building a machine learning classifier called a Naïve Bayesian Classifier, predicting interactions based on the trained Naïve Bayesian Classifier, and finally constructing the functional interaction database. We also provide an example on how to use ReactomeFIViz for performing network-based data analysis for a list of genes.

  3. Unveiling protein functions through the dynamics of the interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Sendiña-Nadal

    Full Text Available Protein interaction networks have become a tool to study biological processes, either for predicting molecular functions or for designing proper new drugs to regulate the main biological interactions. Furthermore, such networks are known to be organized in sub-networks of proteins contributing to the same cellular function. However, the protein function prediction is not accurate and each protein has traditionally been assigned to only one function by the network formalism. By considering the network of the physical interactions between proteins of the yeast together with a manual and single functional classification scheme, we introduce a method able to reveal important information on protein function, at both micro- and macro-scale. In particular, the inspection of the properties of oscillatory dynamics on top of the protein interaction network leads to the identification of misclassification problems in protein function assignments, as well as to unveil correct identification of protein functions. We also demonstrate that our approach can give a network representation of the meta-organization of biological processes by unraveling the interactions between different functional classes.

  4. The role of protein interaction networks in systems biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Sevimoglu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The challenging task of studying and modeling complex dynamics of biological systems in order to describe various human diseases has gathered great interest in recent years. Major biological processes are mediated through protein interactions, hence there is a need to understand the chaotic network that forms these processes in pursuance of understanding human diseases. The applications of protein interaction networks to disease datasets allow the identification of genes and proteins associated with diseases, the study of network properties, identification of subnetworks, and network-based disease gene classification. Although various protein interaction network analysis strategies have been employed, grand challenges are still existing. Global understanding of protein interaction networks via integration of high-throughput functional genomics data from different levels will allow researchers to examine the disease pathways and identify strategies to control them. As a result, it seems likely that more personalized, more accurate and more rapid disease gene diagnostic techniques will be devised in the future, as well as novel strategies that are more personalized. This mini-review summarizes the current practice of protein interaction networks in medical research as well as challenges to be overcome.

  5. Development of Novel Random Network Theory-Based Approaches to Identify Network Interactions among Nitrifying Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Cindy

    2015-07-17

    The interactions among different microbial populations in a community could play more important roles in determining ecosystem functioning than species numbers and their abundances, but very little is known about such network interactions at a community level. The goal of this project is to develop novel framework approaches and associated software tools to characterize the network interactions in microbial communities based on high throughput, large scale high-throughput metagenomics data and apply these approaches to understand the impacts of environmental changes (e.g., climate change, contamination) on network interactions among different nitrifying populations and associated microbial communities.

  6. Specialization for resistance in wild host-pathogen interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke eBarrett

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Properties encompassed by host-pathogen interaction networks have potential to give valuable insight into the evolution of specialization and coevolutionary dynamics in host-pathogen interactions. However, network approaches have been rarely utilized in previous studies of host and pathogen phenotypic variation. Here we applied quantitative analyses to eight networks derived from spatially and temporally segregated host (Linum marginale and pathogen (Melampsora lini populations. First, we found that resistance strategies are highly variable within and among networks, corresponding to a spectrum of specialist and generalist resistance types being maintained within all networks. At the individual level, specialization was strongly linked to partial resistance, such that partial resistance was effective against a greater number of pathogens compared to full resistance. Second, we found that all networks were significantly nested. There was little support for the hypothesis that temporal evolutionary dynamics may lead to the development of nestedness in host-pathogen infection networks. Rather, the common patterns observed in terms of nestedness suggests a universal driver (or multiple drivers that may be independent of spatial and temporal structure. Third, we found that resistance networks were significantly modular in two spatial networks, clearly reflecting spatial and ecological structure within one of the networks. We conclude that (1 overall patterns of specialization in the networks we studied mirror evolutionary trade-offs with the strength of resistance; (2 that specific network architecture can emerge under different evolutionary scenarios; and (3 network approaches offer great utility as a tool for probing the evolutionary and ecological genetics of host-pathogen interactions.

  7. Interaction-induced decay of a heteronuclear two-atom system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Yang, Jiaheng; Liu, Min; He, Xiaodong; Zeng, Yong; Wang, Kunpeng; Wang, Jin; Papoular, D. J.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Two-atom systems in small traps are of fundamental interest for understanding the role of interactions in degenerate cold gases and for the creation of quantum gates in quantum information processing with single-atom traps. One of the key quantities is the inelastic relaxation (decay) time when one of the atoms or both are in a higher hyperfine state. Here we measure this quantity in a heteronuclear system of 87Rb and 85Rb in a micro optical trap and demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the presence of both fast and slow relaxation processes, depending on the choice of the initial hyperfine states. This experimental method allows us to single out a particular relaxation process thus provides an extremely clean platform for collisional physics studies. Our results have also implications for engineering of quantum states via controlled collisions and creation of two-qubit quantum gates. PMID:26199051

  8. Molecular dynamics study of the interactions of incident N or Ti atoms with the TiN(001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhenhai [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Centre for Precision Manufacturing, Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management, The University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Zeng, Quanren [Centre for Precision Manufacturing, Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management, The University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Yuan, Lin [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Qin, Yi [Centre for Precision Manufacturing, Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management, The University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Chen, Mingjun [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Shan, Debin, E-mail: d.b.shan@gmail.com [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Interactions of incident N or Ti atoms with TiN(001) surface are studied by CMD. • The impact position of incident N on the surface determines the interaction modes. • Adsorption could occur due to the atomic exchange process. • Resputtering and reflection may simultaneously occur. • The initial sticking coefficient of N on TiN(001) is much smaller than that of Ti. - Abstract: The interaction processes between incident N or Ti atoms and the TiN(001) surface are simulated by classical molecular dynamics based on the second nearest-neighbor modified embedded-atom method potentials. The simulations are carried out for substrate temperatures between 300 and 700 K and kinetic energies of the incident atoms within the range of 0.5–10 eV. When N atoms impact against the surface, adsorption, resputtering and reflection of particles are observed; several unique atomic mechanisms are identified to account for these interactions, in which the adsorption could occur due to the atomic exchange process while the resputtering and reflection may simultaneously occur. The impact position of incident N atoms on the surface plays an important role in determining the interaction modes. Their occurrence probabilities are dependent on the kinetic energy of incident N atoms but independent on the substrate temperature. When Ti atoms are the incident particles, adsorption is the predominant interaction mode between particles and the surface. This results in the much smaller initial sticking coefficient of N atoms on the TiN(001) surface compared with that of Ti atoms. Stoichiometric TiN is promoted by N/Ti flux ratios larger than one.

  9. Modularity in the evolution of yeast protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogishima, Soichi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakaya, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Protein interaction networks are known to exhibit remarkable structures: scale-free and small-world and modular structures. To explain the evolutionary processes of protein interaction networks possessing scale-free and small-world structures, preferential attachment and duplication-divergence models have been proposed as mathematical models. Protein interaction networks are also known to exhibit another remarkable structural characteristic, modular structure. How the protein interaction networks became to exhibit modularity in their evolution? Here, we propose a hypothesis of modularity in the evolution of yeast protein interaction network based on molecular evolutionary evidence. We assigned yeast proteins into six evolutionary ages by constructing a phylogenetic profile. We found that all the almost half of hub proteins are evolutionarily new. Examining the evolutionary processes of protein complexes, functional modules and topological modules, we also found that member proteins of these modules tend to appear in one or two evolutionary ages. Moreover, proteins in protein complexes and topological modules show significantly low evolutionary rates than those not in these modules. Our results suggest a hypothesis of modularity in the evolution of yeast protein interaction network as systems evolution.

  10. Building a glaucoma interaction network using a text mining approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Maha; Nasraoui, Olfa; Cooper, Nigel G F

    2016-01-01

    The volume of biomedical literature and its underlying knowledge base is rapidly expanding, making it beyond the ability of a single human being to read through all the literature. Several automated methods have been developed to help make sense of this dilemma. The present study reports on the results of a text mining approach to extract gene interactions from the data warehouse of published experimental results which are then used to benchmark an interaction network associated with glaucoma. To the best of our knowledge, there is, as yet, no glaucoma interaction network derived solely from text mining approaches. The presence of such a network could provide a useful summative knowledge base to complement other forms of clinical information related to this disease. A glaucoma corpus was constructed from PubMed Central and a text mining approach was applied to extract genes and their relations from this corpus. The extracted relations between genes were checked using reference interaction databases and classified generally as known or new relations. The extracted genes and relations were then used to construct a glaucoma interaction network. Analysis of the resulting network indicated that it bears the characteristics of a small world interaction network. Our analysis showed the presence of seven glaucoma linked genes that defined the network modularity. A web-based system for browsing and visualizing the extracted glaucoma related interaction networks is made available at http://neurogene.spd.louisville.edu/GlaucomaINViewer/Form1.aspx. This study has reported the first version of a glaucoma interaction network using a text mining approach. The power of such an approach is in its ability to cover a wide range of glaucoma related studies published over many years. Hence, a bigger picture of the disease can be established. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first glaucoma interaction network to summarize the known literature. The major findings were a set of

  11. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Laser Interactions with Atoms, Solids,and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this NATO Advanced Study Institute was to bring together scientists and students working in the field of laser matter interactions in order to review and stimulate developmentoffundamental science with ultra-short pulse lasers. New techniques of pulse compression and colliding-pulse mode-locking have made possible the construction of lasers with pulse lengths in the femtosecond range. Such lasers are now in operation at several research laboratories in Europe and the United States. These laser facilities present a new and exciting research direction with both pure and applied science components. In this ASI the emphasis is on fundamental processes occurring in the interaction of short laser pulses with atoms, molecules, solids, and plasmas. In the case of laser-atom (molecule) interactions, high power lasers provide the first access to extreme high-intensity conditions above 10'8 Watts/em', a new frontier for nonlinear interaction of photons with atoms and molecules. New phenomena observed include ...

  12. Spatial Multiplexing of Atom-Photon Entanglement Sources using Feedforward Control and Switching Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Long; Xu, Zhongxiao; Chen, Lirong; Ge, Wei; Yuan, Haoxiang; Wen, Yafei; Wang, Shengzhi; Li, Shujing; Wang, Hai

    2017-09-01

    The light-matter quantum interface that can create quantum correlations or entanglement between a photon and one atomic collective excitation is a fundamental building block for a quantum repeater. The intrinsic limit is that the probability of preparing such nonclassical atom-photon correlations has to be kept low in order to suppress multiexcitation. To enhance this probability without introducing multiexcitation errors, a promising scheme is to apply multimode memories to the interface. Significant progress has been made in temporal, spectral, and spatial multiplexing memories, but the enhanced probability for generating the entangled atom-photon pair has not been experimentally realized. Here, by using six spin-wave-photon entanglement sources, a switching network, and feedforward control, we build a multiplexed light-matter interface and then demonstrate a ˜sixfold (˜fourfold ) probability increase in generating entangled atom-photon (photon-photon) pairs. The measured compositive Bell parameter for the multiplexed interface is 2.49 ±0.03 combined with a memory lifetime of up to ˜51 μ s .

  13. Interaction of 3d transition metal atoms with charged ion projectiles from Electron Nuclear Dynamics computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2003-03-01

    Computational results on atomic scattering between charged projectiles and transition metal target atoms are presented. This work aims at obtaining detailed information about charge, spin and energy transfer processes that occur between the interacting particles. An in-depth understanding of these phenomena is expected to provide a theoretical basis for the interpretation of various types of ion beam experiments, ranging from gas phase chromatography to spectroscopic observations of fast ions in ferromagnetic media. This contribution focuses on the scattering of light projectiles ranging from He to O, that are prepared in various initial charge states, by 3d transition metal atoms. The presented computations are performed in the framework of Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END)^1 theory which incorporates the coupling between electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom without reliance on the computationally cumbersome and frequently intractable determination of potential energy surfaces. In the present application of END theory to ion - transition metal atom scattering, a supermolecule approach is utilized in conjunction with a spin-unrestricted single determinantal wave function describing the electronic system. Integral scattering, charge and spin exchange cross sections are discussed as functions of the elementary parameters of the problem, such as projectile and target atomic numbers as well as projectile charge and initial kinetic energy. ^1 E.Deumens, A.Diz, R.Longo, Y.Oehrn, Rev.Mod.Phys. 66, 917 (1994)

  14. Entanglement Criteria of Two Two-Level Atoms Interacting with Two Coupled Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghshahi, Hamid Reza; Tavassoly, Mohammad Kazem; Faghihi, Mohammad Javad

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we study the interaction between two two-level atoms and two coupled modes of a quantized radiation field in the form of parametric frequency converter injecting within an optical cavity enclosed by a medium with Kerr nonlinearity. It is demonstrated that, by applying the Bogoliubov-Valatin canonical transformation, the introduced model is reduced to a well-known form of the generalized Jaynes-Cummings model. Then, under particular initial conditions for the atoms (in a coherent superposition of its ground and upper states) and the fields (in a standard coherent state) which may be prepared, the time evolution of state vector of the entire system is analytically evaluated. In order to understand the degree of entanglement between subsystems (atom-field and atom-atom), the dynamics of entanglement through different measures, namely, von Neumann reduced entropy, concurrence and negativity is evaluated. In each case, the effects of Kerr nonlinearity and detuning parameter on the above measures are numerically analyzed, in detail. It is illustrated that the amount of entanglement can be tuned by choosing the evolved parameters, appropriately.

  15. Mean field interaction in biochemical reaction networks

    KAUST Repository

    Tembine, Hamidou

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we establish a relationship between chemical dynamics and mean field game dynamics. We show that chemical reaction networks can be studied using noisy mean field limits. We provide deterministic, noisy and switching mean field limits and illustrate them with numerical examples. © 2011 IEEE.

  16. Layered vanadyl (IV) nitroprusside: Magnetic interaction through a network of hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, D.M. [Instituto de Química Física, Facultad de Bioquímica, Química y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Lorenzo 456, T4000CAN San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Osiry, H. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México (Mexico); Pomiro, F.; Varetti, E.L. [CEQUINOR (CONICET-UNLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 47 and 115, 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Carbonio, R.E. [INFIQC – CONICET, Departamento de Físico Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Haya de la Torre esq, Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina); Alejandro, R.R. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México (Mexico); Ben Altabef, A. [INQUINOA-UNT-CONICET, Instituto de Química Física, Facultad de Bioquímica, Química y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Lorenzo 456, T4000CAN San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); and others

    2016-07-15

    The hydrogen bond and π-π stacking are two non-covalent interactions able to support cooperative magnetic ordering between paramagnetic centers. This contribution reports the crystal structure and related magnetic properties for VO[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]·2H{sub 2}O, which has a layered structure. This solid crystallizes with an orthorhombic unit cell, in the Pna2{sub 1} space group, with cell parameters a=14.1804(2), b=10.4935(1), c=7.1722(8) Å and four molecules per unit cell (Z=4). Its crystal structure was solved and refined from powder X-ray diffraction data. Neighboring layers remain linked through a network of hydrogen bonds involving a water molecule coordinated to the axial position for the V atom and the unbridged axial NO and CN ligands. An uncoordinated water molecule is found forming a triple bridge between these last two ligands and the coordinated water molecule. The magnetic measurements, recorded down to 2 K, shows a ferromagnetic interaction between V atoms located at neighboring layers, with a Curie-Weiss constant of 3.14 K. Such ferromagnetic behavior was interpreted as resulting from a superexchange interaction through the network of strong OH····O{sub H2O}, OH····N{sub CN}, and OH····O{sub NO} hydrogen bonds that connects neighboring layers. The interaction within the layer must be of antiferromagnetic nature and it was detected close to 2 K. - Graphical abstract: Coordination environment for the metals in vanadyl (II) nitroprusside dihydrate. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystal structure of vanadyl nitroprusside dehydrate. • Network of hydrogen bonds. • Magnetic interactions through a network of hydrogen bonds. • Layered transition metal nitroprussides.

  17. Angular momentum-induced delays in solid-state photoemission enhanced by intra-atomic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siek, Fabian; Neb, Sergej; Bartz, Peter; Hensen, Matthias; Strüber, Christian; Fiechter, Sebastian; Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Silkin, Vyacheslav M; Krasovskii, Eugene E; Kabachnik, Nikolay M; Fritzsche, Stephan; Muiño, Ricardo Díez; Echenique, Pedro M; Kazansky, Andrey K; Müller, Norbert; Pfeiffer, Walter; Heinzmann, Ulrich

    2017-09-22

    Attosecond time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy reveals that photoemission from solids is not yet fully understood. The relative emission delays between four photoemission channels measured for the van der Waals crystal tungsten diselenide (WSe 2 ) can only be explained by accounting for both propagation and intra-atomic delays. The intra-atomic delay depends on the angular momentum of the initial localized state and is determined by intra-atomic interactions. For the studied case of WSe 2 , the photoemission events are time ordered with rising initial-state angular momentum. Including intra-atomic electron-electron interaction and angular momentum of the initial localized state yields excellent agreement between theory and experiment. This has required a revision of existing models for solid-state photoemission, and thus, attosecond time-resolved photoemission from solids provides important benchmarks for improved future photoemission models. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  18. NetworkAnalyst--integrative approaches for protein-protein interaction network analysis and visual exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jianguo; Benner, Maia J; Hancock, Robert E W

    2014-07-01

    Biological network analysis is a powerful approach to gain systems-level understanding of patterns of gene expression in different cell types, disease states and other biological/experimental conditions. Three consecutive steps are required--identification of genes or proteins of interest, network construction and network analysis and visualization. To date, researchers have to learn to use a combination of several tools to accomplish this task. In addition, interactive visualization of large networks has been primarily restricted to locally installed programs. To address these challenges, we have developed NetworkAnalyst, taking advantage of state-of-the-art web technologies, to enable high performance network analysis with rich user experience. NetworkAnalyst integrates all three steps and presents the results via a powerful online network visualization framework. Users can upload gene or protein lists, single or multiple gene expression datasets to perform comprehensive gene annotation and differential expression analysis. Significant genes are mapped to our manually curated protein-protein interaction database to construct relevant networks. The results are presented through standard web browsers for network analysis and interactive exploration. NetworkAnalyst supports common functions for network topology and module analyses. Users can easily search, zoom and highlight nodes or modules, as well as perform functional enrichment analysis on these selections. The networks can be customized with different layouts, colors or node sizes, and exported as PNG, PDF or GraphML files. Comprehensive FAQs, tutorials and context-based tips and instructions are provided. NetworkAnalyst currently supports protein-protein interaction network analysis for human and mouse and is freely available at http://www.networkanalyst.ca. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Long-range interactions of hydrogen atoms in excited states. III. n S -1 S interactions for n ≥3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, C. M.; Debierre, V.; Jentschura, U. D.

    2017-09-01

    The long-range interaction of excited neutral atoms has a number of interesting and surprising properties such as the prevalence of long-range oscillatory tails and the emergence of numerically large van der Waals C6 coefficients. Furthermore, the energetically quasidegenerate n P states require special attention and lead to mathematical subtleties. Here we analyze the interaction of excited hydrogen atoms in n S states (3 ≤n ≤12 ) with ground-state hydrogen atoms and find that the C6 coefficients roughly grow with the fourth power of the principal quantum number and can reach values in excess of 240 000 (in atomic units) for states with n =12 . The nonretarded van der Waals result is relevant to the distance range R ≪a0/α , where a0 is the Bohr radius and α is the fine-structure constant. The Casimir-Polder range encompasses the interatomic distance range a0/α ≪R ≪ℏ c /L , where L is the Lamb shift energy. In this range, the contribution of quasidegenerate excited n P states remains nonretarded and competes with the 1 /R2 and 1 /R4 tails of the pole terms, which are generated by lower-lying m P states with 2 ≤m ≤n -1 , due to virtual resonant emission. The dominant pole terms are also analyzed in the Lamb shift range R ≫ℏ c /L . The familiar 1 /R7 asymptotics from the usual Casimir-Polder theory is found to be completely irrelevant for the analysis of excited-state interactions. The calculations are carried out to high precision using computer algebra in order to handle a large number of terms in intermediate steps of the calculation for highly excited states.

  20. Mapping of protein-protein interaction network of Alexander disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, A K; Saxena, V L; Dixit, S

    2016-05-30

    Alexander disease (ALXD) is slowly progressive neurodegenerative disorder which affects white matter of the central nervous system. The main cause of disorder is mutation in GFAP gene and mutation in some other genes were also reported. This study was aimed at getting a better insight into ALXD pathogenesis and identifying the important functional and highly interconnected nodes in human protein interaction network, identifying the important sub-networks in the system could be helpful in understanding the underlying molecular mechanism. The topological analysis of human protein interaction network strategy to identify highly interconnected sub-network modules from which six proteins are found i.e. GFAP, PLEC, CRYAB, NDUFV1, CASP3 and MAPK14 plays important role in disease. Further, the enrichment analysis of interaction network identifies crucial pathways in which most of the diseased proteins overlaps. Through system biology approach, the undirected human protein interaction network of ALXD is buildup with the help of Cytoscape tool and its various plugins helps to investigate network further. The systematic approach suggests the finding of previously known proteins, GFAP, PLEC, CRYAB, NDUFV1, CASP3 and MAPK14 can be used as a drug targets and potential treatment discovered also enrichment analysis will provide guidance for the future study on Alexander disease.

  1. Species traits and interaction rules shape a species-rich seed-dispersal interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián-González, Esther; Pires, Mathias M; Donatti, Camila I; Guimarães, Paulo R; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2017-06-01

    Species phenotypic traits affect the interaction patterns and the organization of seed-dispersal interaction networks. Understanding the relationship between species characteristics and network structure help us understand the assembly of natural communities and how communities function. Here, we examine how species traits may affect the rules leading to patterns of interaction among plants and fruit-eating vertebrates. We study a species-rich seed-dispersal system using a model selection approach to examine whether the rules underlying network structure are driven by constraints in fruit resource exploitation, by preferential consumption of fruits by the frugivores, or by a combination of both. We performed analyses for the whole system and for bird and mammal assemblages separately, and identified the animal and plant characteristics shaping interaction rules. The structure of the analyzed interaction network was better explained by constraints in resource exploitation in the case of birds and by preferential consumption of fruits with specific traits for mammals. These contrasting results when looking at bird-plant and mammal-plant interactions suggest that the same type of interaction is organized by different processes depending on the assemblage we focus on. Size-related restrictions of the interacting species (both for mammals and birds) were the most important factors driving the interaction rules. Our results suggest that the structure of seed-dispersal interaction networks can be explained using species traits and interaction rules related to simple ecological mechanisms.

  2. End of Interactive Emailing from the Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    According to the CNIC Security Policy for Control Systems (EDMS #584092), interactive emailing on PCs (and other devices) connected to the Technical Network is prohibited. Please note that from November 6th, neither reading emails nor sending emails interactively using e.g. Outlook or Pine mail clients on PCs connected to the Technical Network will be possible anymore. However, automatically generated emails will not be blocked and can still be sent off using CERNMX.CERN.CH as mail server. These restrictions DO NOT apply to PCs connected to any other network, like the General Purpose (or office) network. If you have questions, please do not hesitate to contact Uwe Epting, Pierre Charrue or Stefan Lueders (Technical-Network.Administrator@cern.ch). Your CNIC Working Group

  3. Quantum interference effects in a Λ-type atom interacting with two short laser pulse trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buica, Gabriela

    2014-10-01

    We study the quantum interference between the excitation pathways in a three-level Λ-type atom interacting with two short laser pulse trains under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency. The probability amplitude equations which describe the interaction of a three-level Λ-type atom with two laser pulse trains are numerically solved. We derive analytical expressions for the population of the upper excited state for resonant laser pulse trains with a rectangular temporal profile. By varying the parameters of the laser pulse trains such as area of a single pulse, detuning, repetition period, and number of individual pulses, we analyze the quantum interference between the excitation pathways in terms of the upper excited state population.

  4. Quantum nonlinear optics with single photons enabled by strongly interacting atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyronel, Thibault; Firstenberg, Ofer; Liang, Qi-Yu; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Gorshkov, Alexey V; Pohl, Thomas; Lukin, Mikhail D; Vuletić, Vladan

    2012-08-02

    The realization of strong nonlinear interactions between individual light quanta (photons) is a long-standing goal in optical science and engineering, being of both fundamental and technological significance. In conventional optical materials, the nonlinearity at light powers corresponding to single photons is negligibly weak. Here we demonstrate a medium that is nonlinear at the level of individual quanta, exhibiting strong absorption of photon pairs while remaining transparent to single photons. The quantum nonlinearity is obtained by coherently coupling slowly propagating photons to strongly interacting atomic Rydberg states in a cold, dense atomic gas. Our approach paves the way for quantum-by-quantum control of light fields, including single-photon switching, all-optical deterministic quantum logic and the realization of strongly correlated many-body states of light.

  5. Quantum nonlinear optics with single photons enabled by strongly interacting atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peyronel, Thibault; Firstenberg, Ofer; Liang, Qi Yu

    2012-01-01

    The realization of strong nonlinear interactions between individual light quanta (photons) is a long-standing goal in optical science and engineering, being of both fundamental and technological significance. In conventional optical materials, the nonlinearity at light powers corresponding...... to single photons is negligibly weak. Here we demonstrate a medium that is nonlinear at the level of individual quanta, exhibiting strong absorption of photon pairs while remaining transparent to single photons. The quantum nonlinearity is obtained by coherently coupling slowly propagating photons...... to strongly interacting atomic Rydberg states in a cold, dense atomic gas. Our approach paves the way for quantum-by-quantum control of light fields, including single-photon switching, all-optical deterministic quantum logic and the realization of strongly correlated many-body states of light....

  6. EVALUATING AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE PLAYER CONTRIBUTIONS USING INTERACTIVE NETWORK SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Sargent

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the contribution of Australian Football League (AFL players to their team's on-field network by simulating player interactions within a chosen team list and estimating the net effect on final score margin. A Visual Basic computer program was written, firstly, to isolate the effective interactions between players from a particular team in all 2011 season matches and, secondly, to generate a symmetric interaction matrix for each match. Negative binomial distributions were fitted to each player pairing in the Geelong Football Club for the 2011 season, enabling an interactive match simulation model given the 22 chosen players. Dynamic player ratings were calculated from the simulated network using eigenvector centrality, a method that recognises and rewards interactions with more prominent players in the team network. The centrality ratings were recorded after every network simulation and then applied in final score margin predictions so that each player's match contribution-and, hence, an optimal team-could be estimated. The paper ultimately demonstrates that the presence of highly rated players, such as Geelong's Jimmy Bartel, provides the most utility within a simulated team network. It is anticipated that these findings will facilitate optimal AFL team selection and player substitutions, which are key areas of interest to coaches. Network simulations are also attractive for use within betting markets, specifically to provide information on the likelihood of a chosen AFL team list "covering the line".

  7. Bilingual Lexical Interactions in an Unsupervised Neural Network Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Li, Ping

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present an unsupervised neural network model of bilingual lexical development and interaction. We focus on how the representational structures of the bilingual lexicons can emerge, develop, and interact with each other as a function of the learning history. The results show that: (1) distinct representations for the two lexicons…

  8. Hydrogen sulphide in cardiovascular system: A cascade from interaction between sulphur atoms and signalling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Jie; Cai, Wen-Jie; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-05-15

    As a gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulphide exerts its extensive physiological and pathophysiological effects in mammals. The interaction between sulphur atoms and signalling molecules forms a cascade that modulates cellular functions and homeostasis. In this review, we focus on the signalling mechanism underlying the effect of hydrogen sulphide in the cardiovascular system and metabolism as well as the biological relevance to human diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Interaction between single gold atom and the graphene edge: A study via aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between single noble metal atoms and graphene edges has been investigated via aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscopy. A collective motion of the Au atom and the nearby carbon atoms is observed in transition between energy-favorable configurations. Most trapping and detrapping processes are assisted by the dangling carbon atoms, which are more susceptible to knock-on displacements by electron irradiation. Thermal energy is lower than the activation barriers in transition among different energy-favorable configurations, which suggests electron-beam irradiation can be an efficient way of engineering the graphene edge with metal atoms. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Network traffic intelligence using a low interaction honeypot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamugudza, Tendai; Rajasekar, Venkatesh; Sen, Prasad; Nirmala, M.; Madhu Viswanatham, V.

    2017-11-01

    Advancements in networking technology have seen more and more devices becoming connected day by day. This has given organizations capacity to extend their networks beyond their boundaries to remote offices and remote employees. However as the network grows security becomes a major challenge since the attack surface also increases. There is need to guard the network against different types of attacks like intrusion and malware through using different tools at different networking levels. This paper describes how network intelligence can be acquired through implementing a low-interaction honeypot which detects and track network intrusion. Honeypot allows an organization to interact and gather information about an attack earlier before it compromises the network. This process is important because it allows the organization to learn about future attacks of the same nature and allows them to develop counter measures. The paper further shows how honeypot-honey net based model for interruption detection system (IDS) can be used to get the best valuable information about the attacker and prevent unexpected harm to the network.

  11. Artificial neural networks modeling gene-environment interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Frauke

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-environment interactions play an important role in the etiological pathway of complex diseases. An appropriate statistical method for handling a wide variety of complex situations involving interactions between variables is still lacking, especially when continuous variables are involved. The aim of this paper is to explore the ability of neural networks to model different structures of gene-environment interactions. A simulation study is set up to compare neural networks with standard logistic regression models. Eight different structures of gene-environment interactions are investigated. These structures are characterized by penetrance functions that are based on sigmoid functions or on combinations of linear and non-linear effects of a continuous environmental factor and a genetic factor with main effect or with a masking effect only. Results In our simulation study, neural networks are more successful in modeling gene-environment interactions than logistic regression models. This outperfomance is especially pronounced when modeling sigmoid penetrance functions, when distinguishing between linear and nonlinear components, and when modeling masking effects of the genetic factor. Conclusion Our study shows that neural networks are a promising approach for analyzing gene-environment interactions. Especially, if no prior knowledge of the correct nature of the relationship between co-variables and response variable is present, neural networks provide a valuable alternative to regression methods that are limited to the analysis of linearly separable data.

  12. Gene essentiality and the topology of protein interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulomb, Stéphane; Bauer, Michel; Bernard, Denis; Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude

    2005-01-01

    The mechanistic bases for gene essentiality and for cell mutational resistance have long been disputed. The recent availability of large protein interaction databases has fuelled the analysis of protein interaction networks and several authors have proposed that gene dispensability could be strongly related to some topological parameters of these networks. However, many results were based on protein interaction data whose biases were not taken into account. In this article, we show that the essentiality of a gene in yeast is poorly related to the number of interactants (or degree) of the corresponding protein and that the physiological consequences of gene deletions are unrelated to several other properties of proteins in the interaction networks, such as the average degrees of their nearest neighbours, their clustering coefficients or their relative distances. We also found that yeast protein interaction networks lack degree correlation, i.e. a propensity for their vertices to associate according to their degrees. Gene essentiality and more generally cell resistance against mutations thus seem largely unrelated to many parameters of protein network topology. PMID:16087428

  13. RAIN: RNA-protein Association and Interaction Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Alexander; Refsgaard, Jan Christian; Garde, Christian

    2017-01-01

    is challenging due to data heterogeneity. Here, we present a database of ncRNA-RNA and ncRNA-protein interactions and its integration with the STRING database of protein-protein interactions. These ncRNA associations cover four organisms and have been established from curated examples, experimental data...... web interface and all interaction data can be downloaded.......Protein association networks can be inferred from a range of resources including experimental data, literature mining and computational predictions. These types of evidence are emerging for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) as well. However, integration of ncRNAs into protein association networks...

  14. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  15. Geometric de-noising of protein-protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksii Kuchaiev

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding complex networks of protein-protein interactions (PPIs is one of the foremost challenges of the post-genomic era. Due to the recent advances in experimental bio-technology, including yeast-2-hybrid (Y2H, tandem affinity purification (TAP and other high-throughput methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI detection, huge amounts of PPI network data are becoming available. Of major concern, however, are the levels of noise and incompleteness. For example, for Y2H screens, it is thought that the false positive rate could be as high as 64%, and the false negative rate may range from 43% to 71%. TAP experiments are believed to have comparable levels of noise.We present a novel technique to assess the confidence levels of interactions in PPI networks obtained from experimental studies. We use it for predicting new interactions and thus for guiding future biological experiments. This technique is the first to utilize currently the best fitting network model for PPI networks, geometric graphs. Our approach achieves specificity of 85% and sensitivity of 90%. We use it to assign confidence scores to physical protein-protein interactions in the human PPI network downloaded from BioGRID. Using our approach, we predict 251 interactions in the human PPI network, a statistically significant fraction of which correspond to protein pairs sharing common GO terms. Moreover, we validate a statistically significant portion of our predicted interactions in the HPRD database and the newer release of BioGRID. The data and Matlab code implementing the methods are freely available from the web site: http://www.kuchaev.com/Denoising.

  16. Geometric de-noising of protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchaiev, Oleksii; Rasajski, Marija; Higham, Desmond J; Przulj, Natasa

    2009-08-01

    Understanding complex networks of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is one of the foremost challenges of the post-genomic era. Due to the recent advances in experimental bio-technology, including yeast-2-hybrid (Y2H), tandem affinity purification (TAP) and other high-throughput methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI) detection, huge amounts of PPI network data are becoming available. Of major concern, however, are the levels of noise and incompleteness. For example, for Y2H screens, it is thought that the false positive rate could be as high as 64%, and the false negative rate may range from 43% to 71%. TAP experiments are believed to have comparable levels of noise.We present a novel technique to assess the confidence levels of interactions in PPI networks obtained from experimental studies. We use it for predicting new interactions and thus for guiding future biological experiments. This technique is the first to utilize currently the best fitting network model for PPI networks, geometric graphs. Our approach achieves specificity of 85% and sensitivity of 90%. We use it to assign confidence scores to physical protein-protein interactions in the human PPI network downloaded from BioGRID. Using our approach, we predict 251 interactions in the human PPI network, a statistically significant fraction of which correspond to protein pairs sharing common GO terms. Moreover, we validate a statistically significant portion of our predicted interactions in the HPRD database and the newer release of BioGRID. The data and Matlab code implementing the methods are freely available from the web site: http://www.kuchaev.com/Denoising.

  17. Synthesizing complex spin networks with spin-motion coupled neutral atoms in photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ying

    2017-04-01

    We develop a toolbox for realizing ``fully programmable'' d-dimensional pairwise interacting lattice spin systems with spin-motion coupled neutral atoms in the vicinity of 1D photonic crystal waveguides. The enabling platform thereby allows to synthesize a wide range of strongly interacting quantum materials by way of vacuum-engineered interatomic kinetic interactions. We demonstrate the versatility of our assembly language approach towards arbitrary SU(2)-lattice spin models with explicit constructions of familiar Hamiltonians for perfect state transfer in 1D spin chains, lattice gauge theories, and topologicallyquantum spin liquids. We further construct Dzyaloshinski-Moriya interaction for the realization ofspin liquids and long-range random quantum magnets with spin-glass phase.

  18. Modeling human dynamics of face-to-face interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Starnini, Michele; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2013-01-01

    Face-to-face interaction networks describe social interactions in human gatherings, and are the substrate for processes such as epidemic spreading and gossip propagation. The bursty nature of human behavior characterizes many aspects of empirical data, such as the distribution of conversation lengths, of conversations per person, or of inter-conversation times. Despite several recent attempts, a general theoretical understanding of the global picture emerging from data is still lacking. Here we present a simple model that reproduces quantitatively most of the relevant features of empirical face-to-face interaction networks. The model describes agents which perform a random walk in a two dimensional space and are characterized by an attractiveness whose effect is to slow down the motion of people around them. The proposed framework sheds light on the dynamics of human interactions and can improve the modeling of dynamical processes taking place on the ensuing dynamical social networks.

  19. Intrinsic decoherence in the interaction of two fields with a two-level atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez-Amaro, R. [Universidad Tecnologica de la Mixteca, Mexico (Mexico); INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Escudero-Jimenez, J.L. [INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Moya-Cessa, H.

    2009-06-15

    We study the interaction of a two-level atom and two fields, one of them classical. We obtain an effective Hamiltonian for this system by using a method recently introduced that produces a small rotation to the Hamiltonian that allows to neglect some terms in the rotated Hamiltonian. Then we solve a variation of the Schroedinger equation that models decoherence as the system evolves through intrinsic mechanisms beyond conventional quantum mechanics rather than dissipative interaction with an environment. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Spin Diffusion in Trapped Clouds of Cold Atoms with Resonant Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Georg Morten; Pethick, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    We show that puzzling recent experimental results on spin diffusion in a strongly interacting atomic gas may be understood in terms of the predicted spin diffusion coefficient for a generic strongly interacting system. Three important features play a central role: (a) Fick’s law for diffusion mus...... be modified to allow for the trapping potential; (b) the diffusion coefficient is inhomogeneous, due to the density variations in the cloud; and (c) the diffusion approximation fails in the outer parts of the cloud, where the mean free path is long....

  1. How people interact in evolving online affiliation networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gallos, Lazaros K; Liljeros, Fredrik; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernan A

    2011-01-01

    The study of human interactions is of central importance for understanding the behavior of individuals, groups and societies. Here, we observe the formation and evolution of networks by monitoring the addition of all new links and we analyze quantitatively the tendencies used to create ties in these evolving online affiliation networks. We first show that an accurate estimation of these probabilistic tendencies can only be achieved by following the time evolution of the network. For example, actions that are attributed to the usual friend of a friend mechanism through a static snapshot of the network are overestimated by a factor of two. A detailed analysis of the dynamic network evolution shows that half of those triangles were generated through other mechanisms, in spite of the characteristic static pattern. We start by characterizing every single link when the tie was established in the network. This allows us to describe the probabilistic tendencies of tie formation and extract sociological conclusions as...

  2. UROX 2.0: an interactive tool for fitting atomic models into electron-microscopy reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Xavier; Navaza, Jorge

    2009-07-01

    Electron microscopy of a macromolecular structure can lead to three-dimensional reconstructions with resolutions that are typically in the 30-10 A range and sometimes even beyond 10 A. Fitting atomic models of the individual components of the macromolecular structure (e.g. those obtained by X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance) into an electron-microscopy map allows the interpretation of the latter at near-atomic resolution, providing insight into the interactions between the components. Graphical software is presented that was designed for the interactive fitting and refinement of atomic models into electron-microscopy reconstructions. Several characteristics enable it to be applied over a wide range of cases and resolutions. Firstly, calculations are performed in reciprocal space, which results in fast algorithms. This allows the entire reconstruction (or at least a sizeable portion of it) to be used by taking into account the symmetry of the reconstruction both in the calculations and in the graphical display. Secondly, atomic models can be placed graphically in the map while the correlation between the model-based electron density and the electron-microscopy reconstruction is computed and displayed in real time. The positions and orientations of the models are refined by a least-squares minimization. Thirdly, normal-mode calculations can be used to simulate conformational changes between the atomic model of an individual component and its corresponding density within a macromolecular complex determined by electron microscopy. These features are illustrated using three practical cases with different symmetries and resolutions. The software, together with examples and user instructions, is available free of charge at http://mem.ibs.fr/UROX/.

  3. Probing the interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingyu; Qian, Yong, E-mail: qianyong86@163.com; Deng, Yonghong; Liu, Di; Li, Hao; Qiu, Xueqing, E-mail: xueqingqiu66@163.com

    2016-12-30

    Graphical abstract: The interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides are quantitatively probed by atomic force microscopy, which is fundamental but beneficial for understanding and optimizing the absorption-dispersion and catalytic degradation processes of lignin. - Highlights: • The interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides are measured using AFM. • The adhesion forces between lignin and metal oxides are larger than that in nonmetal systems. • Hydrogen bond plays an important role in lignin-inorganic oxides system. - Abstract: Understanding the interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides has both fundamental and practical importance in industrial and energy fields. In this work, the specific interactions between alkali lignin (AL) and three inorganic oxide substrates in aqueous environment are quantitatively measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the average adhesion force between AL and metal oxide such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or MgO is nearly two times bigger than that between AL and nonmetal oxide such as SiO{sub 2} due to the electrostatic difference and cation-π interaction. When 83% hydroxyl groups of AL is blocked by acetylation, the adhesion forces between AL and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO and SiO{sub 2} decrease 43, 35 and 75% respectively, which indicate hydrogen bonds play an important role between AL and inorganic oxides, especially in AL-silica system.

  4. Specificity and evolvability in eukaryotic protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Beltrao

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Progress in uncovering the protein interaction networks of several species has led to questions of what underlying principles might govern their organization. Few studies have tried to determine the impact of protein interaction network evolution on the observed physiological differences between species. Using comparative genomics and structural information, we show here that eukaryotic species have rewired their interactomes at a fast rate of approximately 10(-5 interactions changed per protein pair, per million years of divergence. For Homo sapiens this corresponds to 10(3 interactions changed per million years. Additionally we find that the specificity of binding strongly determines the interaction turnover and that different biological processes show significantly different link dynamics. In particular, human proteins involved in immune response, transport, and establishment of localization show signs of positive selection for change of interactions. Our analysis suggests that a small degree of molecular divergence can give rise to important changes at the network level. We propose that the power law distribution observed in protein interaction networks could be partly explained by the cell's requirement for different degrees of protein binding specificity.

  5. Atoms in optical networks. A simple tridimensional model; Atomos en redes opticas. Un modelo tridimensional sencillo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balleza D, E

    2004-07-01

    In the first chapter of this work we will show a detailed analysis of the one cooling Doppler phenomenon that appears when a laser induces a dipolar moment to the atoms in such a way that these may interact with him to transfer moment to the field with the subsequent decrease of kinetic energy that macroscopically it is translated in cooling of the atomic cloud. When the experiments of atomic cooling were carried out it was observed that the temperature was smaller to the one than it predicted the cooling Doppler, this originates the creation of a theory but it dies in which the over simplification is eliminated that the alone atom consists of two energy levels and levels are introduced of it structures fine that are able to explain the extra cooling. To this phenomenon it is called Sisifo effect and it is studied detailedly in the chapter two. The first two chapters talk each other about the atomic cooling, but it stops that the atomic cloud can be manipulated, before being confined, problem that we will expose in the chapter three with experimental solutions that at the moment they are implemented in the laboratories around the world. In particular we will concentrate on the traps FORT (Far Off Resonance Trap, trap very outside of resonance) that confine to the atoms in optic nets. The lasers gaussianos originate a potential sinusoidal along the propagation address and gaussiano in the perpendicular plane to this. In the I surrender four he/she intends a three-dimensional model that substitutes To the variation sinusoidal for a function crenel and he/she makes an approach To first order in the radial dependence to obtain an oscillator potential Harmonic instead of the gaussiano that you taenia. The pattern is solved in a similar way To the pattern unidimensional of bands: they are the functions of wave solution For every period and they are coupled among if so that they satisfy conditions of rhythm, When making this you arrives to a womb that couples the

  6. Network motifs in integrated cellular networks of transcription-regulation and protein-protein interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Sattath, Shmuel; Kashtan, Nadav; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Milo, Ron; Pinter, Ron Y.; Alon, Uri; Margalit, Hanah

    2004-04-01

    Genes and proteins generate molecular circuitry that enables the cell to process information and respond to stimuli. A major challenge is to identify characteristic patterns in this network of interactions that may shed light on basic cellular mechanisms. Previous studies have analyzed aspects of this network, concentrating on either transcription-regulation or protein-protein interactions. Here we search for composite network motifs: characteristic network patterns consisting of both transcription-regulation and protein-protein interactions that recur significantly more often than in random networks. To this end we developed algorithms for detecting motifs in networks with two or more types of interactions and applied them to an integrated data set of protein-protein interactions and transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found a two-protein mixed-feedback loop motif, five types of three-protein motifs exhibiting coregulation and complex formation, and many motifs involving four proteins. Virtually all four-protein motifs consisted of combinations of smaller motifs. This study presents a basic framework for detecting the building blocks of networks with multiple types of interactions.

  7. Experimental evolution of protein–protein interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaçar, Betül; Gaucher, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    The modern synthesis of evolutionary theory and genetics has enabled us to discover underlying molecular mechanisms of organismal evolution. We know that in order to maximize an organism's fitness in a particular environment, individual interactions among components of protein and nucleic acid networks need to be optimized by natural selection, or sometimes through random processes, as the organism responds to changes and/or challenges in the environment. Despite the significant role of molecular networks in determining an organism's adaptation to its environment, we still do not know how such inter- and intra-molecular interactions within networks change over time and contribute to an organism's evolvability while maintaining overall network functions. One way to address this challenge is to identify connections between molecular networks and their host organisms, to manipulate these connections, and then attempt to understand how such perturbations influence molecular dynamics of the network and thus influence evolutionary paths and organismal fitness. In the present review, we discuss how integrating evolutionary history with experimental systems that combine tools drawn from molecular evolution, synthetic biology and biochemistry allow us to identify the underlying mechanisms of organismal evolution, particularly from the perspective of protein interaction networks. PMID:23849056

  8. Experimental evolution of protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaçar, Betül; Gaucher, Eric A

    2013-08-01

    The modern synthesis of evolutionary theory and genetics has enabled us to discover underlying molecular mechanisms of organismal evolution. We know that in order to maximize an organism's fitness in a particular environment, individual interactions among components of protein and nucleic acid networks need to be optimized by natural selection, or sometimes through random processes, as the organism responds to changes and/or challenges in the environment. Despite the significant role of molecular networks in determining an organism's adaptation to its environment, we still do not know how such inter- and intra-molecular interactions within networks change over time and contribute to an organism's evolvability while maintaining overall network functions. One way to address this challenge is to identify connections between molecular networks and their host organisms, to manipulate these connections, and then attempt to understand how such perturbations influence molecular dynamics of the network and thus influence evolutionary paths and organismal fitness. In the present review, we discuss how integrating evolutionary history with experimental systems that combine tools drawn from molecular evolution, synthetic biology and biochemistry allow us to identify the underlying mechanisms of organismal evolution, particularly from the perspective of protein interaction networks.

  9. Exploring function prediction in protein interaction networks via clustering methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivodaliev, Kire; Bogojeska, Aleksandra; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2014-01-01

    Complex networks have recently become the focus of research in many fields. Their structure reveals crucial information for the nodes, how they connect and share information. In our work we analyze protein interaction networks as complex networks for their functional modular structure and later use that information in the functional annotation of proteins within the network. We propose several graph representations for the protein interaction network, each having different level of complexity and inclusion of the annotation information within the graph. We aim to explore what the benefits and the drawbacks of these proposed graphs are, when they are used in the function prediction process via clustering methods. For making this cluster based prediction, we adopt well established approaches for cluster detection in complex networks using most recent representative algorithms that have been proven as efficient in the task at hand. The experiments are performed using a purified and reliable Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction network, which is then used to generate the different graph representations. Each of the graph representations is later analysed in combination with each of the clustering algorithms, which have been possibly modified and implemented to fit the specific graph. We evaluate results in regards of biological validity and function prediction performance. Our results indicate that the novel ways of presenting the complex graph improve the prediction process, although the computational complexity should be taken into account when deciding on a particular approach.

  10. Exploring function prediction in protein interaction networks via clustering methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kire Trivodaliev

    Full Text Available Complex networks have recently become the focus of research in many fields. Their structure reveals crucial information for the nodes, how they connect and share information. In our work we analyze protein interaction networks as complex networks for their functional modular structure and later use that information in the functional annotation of proteins within the network. We propose several graph representations for the protein interaction network, each having different level of complexity and inclusion of the annotation information within the graph. We aim to explore what the benefits and the drawbacks of these proposed graphs are, when they are used in the function prediction process via clustering methods. For making this cluster based prediction, we adopt well established approaches for cluster detection in complex networks using most recent representative algorithms that have been proven as efficient in the task at hand. The experiments are performed using a purified and reliable Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction network, which is then used to generate the different graph representations. Each of the graph representations is later analysed in combination with each of the clustering algorithms, which have been possibly modified and implemented to fit the specific graph. We evaluate results in regards of biological validity and function prediction performance. Our results indicate that the novel ways of presenting the complex graph improve the prediction process, although the computational complexity should be taken into account when deciding on a particular approach.

  11. Protein interaction networks--more than mere modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Pinkert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely believed that the modular organization of cellular function is reflected in a modular structure of molecular networks. A common view is that a "module" in a network is a cohesively linked group of nodes, densely connected internally and sparsely interacting with the rest of the network. Many algorithms try to identify functional modules in protein-interaction networks (PIN by searching for such cohesive groups of proteins. Here, we present an alternative approach independent of any prior definition of what actually constitutes a "module". In a self-consistent manner, proteins are grouped into "functional roles" if they interact in similar ways with other proteins according to their functional roles. Such grouping may well result in cohesive modules again, but only if the network structure actually supports this. We applied our method to the PIN from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD and found that a representation of the network in terms of cohesive modules, at least on a global scale, does not optimally represent the network's structure because it focuses on finding independent groups of proteins. In contrast, a decomposition into functional roles is able to depict the structure much better as it also takes into account the interdependencies between roles and even allows groupings based on the absence of interactions between proteins in the same functional role. This, for example, is the case for transmembrane proteins, which could never be recognized as a cohesive group of nodes in a PIN. When mapping experimental methods onto the groups, we identified profound differences in the coverage suggesting that our method is able to capture experimental bias in the data, too. For example yeast-two-hybrid data were highly overrepresented in one particular group. Thus, there is more structure in protein-interaction networks than cohesive modules alone and we believe this finding can significantly improve automated function

  12. Dynamic Interactions for Network Visualization and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 GUI Graphical User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MVC Model-View...applications, and web applets. Comprising a library of design algorithms, navigation and interaction techniques, prefuse aims to significantly sim- plify the...Information Visualization Reference Model of the Prefuse toolkit [15]. The prefuse toolkit is suitable for the Model-View-Controller ( MVC ) [15] soft- ware

  13. Predicting genetic interactions with random walks on biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Ambuj K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have demonstrated that synthetic lethal genetic interactions between gene mutations provide an indication of functional redundancy between molecular complexes and pathways. These observations help explain the finding that organisms are able to tolerate single gene deletions for a large majority of genes. For example, system-wide gene knockout/knockdown studies in S. cerevisiae and C. elegans revealed non-viable phenotypes for a mere 18% and 10% of the genome, respectively. It has been postulated that the low percentage of essential genes reflects the extensive amount of genetic buffering that occurs within genomes. Consistent with this hypothesis, systematic double-knockout screens in S. cerevisiae and C. elegans show that, on average, 0.5% of tested gene pairs are synthetic sick or synthetic lethal. While knowledge of synthetic lethal interactions provides valuable insight into molecular functionality, testing all combinations of gene pairs represents a daunting task for molecular biologists, as the combinatorial nature of these relationships imposes a large experimental burden. Still, the task of mapping pairwise interactions between genes is essential to discovering functional relationships between molecular complexes and pathways, as they form the basis of genetic robustness. Towards the goal of alleviating the experimental workload, computational techniques that accurately predict genetic interactions can potentially aid in targeting the most likely candidate interactions. Building on previous studies that analyzed properties of network topology to predict genetic interactions, we apply random walks on biological networks to accurately predict pairwise genetic interactions. Furthermore, we incorporate all published non-interactions into our algorithm for measuring the topological relatedness between two genes. We apply our method to S. cerevisiae and C. elegans datasets and, using a decision tree

  14. Attractive interaction between Mn atoms on the GaAs(110) surface observed by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taninaka, Atsushi; Yoshida, Shoji; Kanazawa, Ken; Hayaki, Eiko; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2016-06-16

    Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) was carried out to investigate the structures of Mn atoms deposited on a GaAs(110) surface at room temperature to directly observe the characteristics of interactions between Mn atoms in GaAs. Mn atoms were paired with a probability higher than the random distribution, indicating an attractive interaction between them. In fact, re-pairing of unpaired Mn atoms was observed during STS measurement. The pair initially had a new structure, which was transformed during STS measurement into one of those formed by atom manipulation at 4 K. Mn atoms in pairs and trimers were aligned in the direction, which is theoretically predicted to produce a high Curie temperature.

  15. Study of Li atom diffusion in amorphous Li3PO4 with neural network potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenwen; Ando, Yasunobu; Minamitani, Emi; Watanabe, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    To clarify atomic diffusion in amorphous materials, which is important in novel information and energy devices, theoretical methods having both reliability and computational speed are eagerly anticipated. In the present study, we applied neural network (NN) potentials, a recently developed machine learning technique, to the study of atom diffusion in amorphous materials, using Li3PO4 as a benchmark material. The NN potential was used together with the nudged elastic band, kinetic Monte Carlo, and molecular dynamics methods to characterize Li vacancy diffusion behavior in the amorphous Li3PO4 model. By comparing these results with corresponding DFT calculations, we found that the average error of the NN potential is 0.048 eV in calculating energy barriers of diffusion paths, and 0.041 eV in diffusion activation energy. Moreover, the diffusion coefficients obtained from molecular dynamics are always consistent with those from ab initio molecular dynamics simulation, while the computation speed of the NN potential is 3-4 orders of magnitude faster than DFT. Lastly, the structure of amorphous Li3PO4 and the ion transport properties in it were studied with the NN potential using a large supercell model containing more than 1000 atoms. The formation of P2O7 units was observed, which is consistent with the experimental characterization. The Li diffusion activation energy was estimated to be 0.55 eV, which agrees well with the experimental measurements.

  16. Properties of kinetic transition networks for atomic clusters and glassy solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John W R; Mehta, Dhagash; Wales, David J

    2017-09-27

    A database of minima and transition states corresponds to a network where the minima represent nodes and the transition states correspond to edges between the pairs of minima they connect via steepest-descent paths. Here we construct networks for small clusters bound by the Morse potential for a selection of physically relevant parameters, in two and three dimensions. The properties of these unweighted and undirected networks are analysed to examine two features: whether they are small-world, where the shortest path between nodes involves only a small number or edges; and whether they are scale-free, having a degree distribution that follows a power law. Small-world character is present, but statistical tests show that a power law is not a good fit, so the networks are not scale-free. These results for clusters are compared with the corresponding properties for the molecular and atomic structural glass formers ortho-terphenyl and binary Lennard-Jones. These glassy systems do not show small-world properties, suggesting that such behaviour is linked to the structure-seeking landscapes of the Morse clusters.

  17. Strategy selection in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shaolin; Feng, Shasha; Wang, Pei; Chen, Yao

    2014-11-01

    Evolutionary game theory provides an appropriate tool for investigating the competition and diffusion of behavioral traits in biological or social populations. A core challenge in evolutionary game theory is the strategy selection problem: Given two strategies, which one is favored by the population? Recent studies suggest that the answer depends not only on the payoff functions of strategies but also on the interaction structure of the population. Group interactions are one of the fundamental interactive modes within populations. This work aims to investigate the strategy selection problem in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks. In detail, the strategy selection conditions are obtained for some typical networks with group interactions. Furthermore, the obtained conditions are applied to investigate selection between cooperation and defection in populations. The conditions for evolution of cooperation are derived for both the public goods game and volunteer's dilemma game. Numerical experiments validate the above analytical results.

  18. From a network of computed reaction enthalpies to atom-based thermochemistry (NEAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Császár, Attila G; Furtenbacher, Tibor

    2010-04-26

    A simple and fast, weighted, linear least-squares refinement protocol and code is presented for inverting the information contained in a network of quantum chemically computed 0 K reaction enthalpies. This inversion yields internally consistent 0 K enthalpies of formation for the species of the network. The refinement takes advantage of the fact that the accuracy of computed enthalpies depends strongly on the quantum-chemical protocol employed for their determination. Different protocols suffer from different sources of error; thus, the reaction enthalpies computed by them have "random" residual errors. Since it is much more natural for quantum-chemical energy and enthalpy results, including reaction enthalpies, to be based on the electronic ground states of the atoms and not on the historically preferred elemental states, and since these two possible protocols can be converted into each other straightforwardly, it is proposed that first-principles thermochemistry should employ the ground electronic states of atoms. In this scheme, called atom-based thermochemistry (AT), the enthalpy of formation of a gaseous compound corresponds simply to the total atomization energy of the species; it is always positive, and it reflects the bonding strength within the molecule. The inversion protocol developed and based on AT is termed NEAT, which represents the fact that the protocol proceeds from a network of computed reaction enthalpies toward atom-based thermochemistry, most directly to atom-based enthalpies of formation. After assembling a database that consisted of 361 ab initio reactions and reaction enthalpies involving 188 species, collected from 31 literature sources, the following dependable 0 K atom-based enthalpies of formation, Delta(f)${H{{{\\rm AT}\\hfill \\atop 0\\hfill}}}$, all in kJ mol(-1), have been obtained by means of NEAT: H(2)=432.07(0), CH=334.61(15), NH=327.69(25), OH=425.93(21), HF=566.13(31), CO=1072.08(28), O(2)=493.51(34), CH(2)=752.40(21), H(2)O

  19. Screened Coulomb interactions in metallic alloys. II. Screening beyond the single-site and atomic-sphere approximations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Simak, S.I.; Korzhavyi, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    A quantitative description of the configurational part of the total energy of metallic alloys with substantial atomic size difference cannot be achieved in the atomic-sphere approximation: It needs to be corrected at least for the multipole-moment interactions in the Madelung part of the one......-electron potential and energy. In the case of a random alloy such interactions can be accounted for only by lifting the atomic-sphere and single-site approximations, in order to include the polarization due to local environment effects. Nevertheless, a simple parametrization of the screened Coulomb interactions...

  20. Detecting Friendship Within Dynamic Online Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Merritt, Sears; Jacobs, Abigail Z.; Mason, Winter; Clauset, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    In many complex social systems, the timing and frequency of interactions between individuals are observable but friendship ties are hidden. Recovering these hidden ties, particularly for casual users who are relatively less active, would enable a wide variety of friendship-aware applications in domains where labeled data are often unavailable, including online advertising and national security. Here, we investigate the accuracy of multiple statistical features, based either purely on temporal...

  1. Human cancer protein-protein interaction network: a structural perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozde Kar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interaction networks provide a global picture of cellular function and biological processes. Some proteins act as hub proteins, highly connected to others, whereas some others have few interactions. The dysfunction of some interactions causes many diseases, including cancer. Proteins interact through their interfaces. Therefore, studying the interface properties of cancer-related proteins will help explain their role in the interaction networks. Similar or overlapping binding sites should be used repeatedly in single interface hub proteins, making them promiscuous. Alternatively, multi-interface hub proteins make use of several distinct binding sites to bind to different partners. We propose a methodology to integrate protein interfaces into cancer interaction networks (ciSPIN, cancer structural protein interface network. The interactions in the human protein interaction network are replaced by interfaces, coming from either known or predicted complexes. We provide a detailed analysis of cancer related human protein-protein interfaces and the topological properties of the cancer network. The results reveal that cancer-related proteins have smaller, more planar, more charged and less hydrophobic binding sites than non-cancer proteins, which may indicate low affinity and high specificity of the cancer-related interactions. We also classified the genes in ciSPIN according to phenotypes. Within phenotypes, for breast cancer, colorectal cancer and leukemia, interface properties were found to be discriminating from non-cancer interfaces with an accuracy of 71%, 67%, 61%, respectively. In addition, cancer-related proteins tend to interact with their partners through distinct interfaces, corresponding mostly to multi-interface hubs, which comprise 56% of cancer-related proteins, and constituting the nodes with higher essentiality in the network (76%. We illustrate the interface related affinity properties of two cancer-related hub

  2. Interacting epidemics and coinfection on contact networks

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, M E J

    2013-01-01

    The spread of certain diseases can be promoted, in some cases substantially, by prior infection with another disease. One example is that of HIV, whose immunosuppressant effects significantly increase the chances of infection with other pathogens. Such coinfection processes, when combined with nontrivial structure in the contact networks over which diseases spread, can lead to complex patterns of epidemiological behavior. Here we consider a mathematical model of two diseases spreading through a single population, where infection with one disease is dependent on prior infection with the other. We solve exactly for the sizes of the outbreaks of both diseases in the limit of large population size, along with the complete phase diagram of the system. Among other things, we use our model to demonstrate how diseases can be controlled not only by reducing the rate of their spread, but also by reducing the spread of other infections upon which they depend.

  3. Interactively Evolving Compositional Sound Synthesis Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Björn Þór; Hoover, Amy K.; Risi, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    While the success of electronic music often relies on the uniqueness and quality of selected timbres, many musicians struggle with complicated and expensive equipment and techniques to create their desired sounds. Instead, this paper presents a technique for producing novel timbres that are evolved......, CPPNs can theoretically compute any function and can build on those present in traditional synthesizers (e.g. square, sawtooth, triangle, and sine waves functions) to produce completely novel timbres. Evolved with NeuroEvolution of Augmenting Topologies (NEAT), the aim of this paper is to explore...... the space of potential sounds that can be generated through such compositional sound synthesis networks (CSSNs). To study the effect of evolution on subjective appreciation, participants in a listener study ranked evolved timbres by personal preference, resulting in preferences skewed toward the first...

  4. Interacting epidemics and coinfection on contact networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M E J Newman

    Full Text Available The spread of certain diseases can be promoted, in some cases substantially, by prior infection with another disease. One example is that of HIV, whose immunosuppressant effects significantly increase the chances of infection with other pathogens. Such coinfection processes, when combined with nontrivial structure in the contact networks over which diseases spread, can lead to complex patterns of epidemiological behavior. Here we consider a mathematical model of two diseases spreading through a single population, where infection with one disease is dependent on prior infection with the other. We solve exactly for the sizes of the outbreaks of both diseases in the limit of large population size, along with the complete phase diagram of the system. Among other things, we use our model to demonstrate how diseases can be controlled not only by reducing the rate of their spread, but also by reducing the spread of other infections upon which they depend.

  5. Ecology 2.0: Coexistence and Domination of Interacting Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kleineberg, Kaj-Kolja

    2014-01-01

    The overwhelming success of the web 2.0, with online social networks as key actors, has induced a paradigm shift in the nature of human interactions. The user-driven character of these services for the first time has allowed researchers to quantify large-scale social patterns. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of networks at a system level are still poorly understood. For instance, the simultaneous existence of numerous digital services naturally raises the question under which conditions these services can coexist. In analogy to population dynamics, the digital world is forming a complex ecosystem of interacting networks whose fitnesses depend on their ability to attract and maintain users' attention, which constitutes a limited resource. In this paper, we introduce an ecological theory of the digital world which exhibits a stable coexistence of several networks as well as the domination of a single one, in contrast to the principle of competitive exclusion. Interestingly, our model also predic...

  6. Inferring biomolecular interaction networks based on convex optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Soohee; Yoon, Yeoin; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2007-10-01

    We present an optimization-based inference scheme to unravel the functional interaction structure of biomolecular components within a cell. The regulatory network of a cell is inferred from the data obtained by perturbation of adjustable parameters or initial concentrations of specific components. It turns out that the identification procedure leads to a convex optimization problem with regularization as we have to achieve the sparsity of a network and also reflect any a priori information on the network structure. Since the convex optimization has been well studied for a long time, a variety of efficient algorithms were developed and many numerical solvers are freely available. In order to estimate time derivatives from discrete-time samples, a cubic spline fitting is incorporated into the proposed optimization procedure. Throughout simulation studies on several examples, it is shown that the proposed convex optimization scheme can effectively uncover the functional interaction structure of a biomolecular regulatory network with reasonable accuracy.

  7. Probing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate)/cell interactions by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalia, Becerra; Henry, Andrade; Betty, López; Marina, Restrepo Luz; Roberto, Raiteri

    2015-01-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) based hydrogels have been proposed as cell culture supports in cell sheet engineering. Toward this goal, we characterized the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate) copolymer thermo-sensitivity and the cell/copolymer interactions above and below the copolymer lower critical solution temperature. We did that by direct force measurements at different temperatures using an atomic force microscope with either a polystyrene or a glass microbead as probes. We used a copolymer-coated microbead to measure adhesion after a short contact time with a single fibroblast in culture. Statistical analysis of the maximum adhesion force and the mechanical work necessary to separate the probe from the cell surface confirmed the hydrophilic/hydrophobic behavior of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate) as a function of temperature in the range 20-37°C and, consequently, a reversible increase/decrease in cell adhesion with the copolymer. As control experiments we measured interactions between uncoated microbeads with the copolymer hydrogel or cells as well as interaction of the Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) homopolymer with cells. These results show the potential of an assay based on atomic force microscopy for an in situ and quantitative assessment of cell/substrate interactions and support the use of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate) copolymer as an efficient culture substrate in cell sheet engineering. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Atomic force microscopy: a multifaceted tool to study membrane proteins and their interactions with ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, Allison M; Park, Paul S-H

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins are embedded in lipid bilayers and facilitate the communication between the external environment and the interior of the cell. This communication is often mediated by the binding of ligands to the membrane protein. Understanding the nature of the interaction between a ligand and a membrane protein is required to both understand the mechanism of action of these proteins and for the development of novel pharmacological drugs. The highly hydrophobic nature of membrane proteins and the requirement of a lipid bilayer for native function have hampered the structural and molecular characterizations of these proteins under physiologically relevant conditions. Atomic force microscopy offers a solution to studying membrane proteins and their interactions with ligands under physiologically relevant conditions and can provide novel insights about the nature of these critical molecular interactions that facilitate cellular communication. In this review, we provide an overview of the atomic force microscopy technique and discuss its application in the study of a variety of questions related to the interaction between a membrane protein and a ligand. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Structural and biophysical characterization of membrane protein-ligand binding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. NetworkViewer: visualizing biochemical reaction networks with embedded rendering of molecular interaction rules

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Hsueh-Chien; Angermann, Bastian R.; Zhang, Fengkai; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Network representations of cell-biological signaling processes frequently contain large numbers of interacting molecular and multi-molecular components that can exist in, and switch between, multiple biochemical and/or structural states. In addition, the interaction categories (associations, dissociations and transformations) in such networks cannot satisfactorily be mapped onto simple arrows connecting pairs of components since their specifications involve information such as reac...

  10. Synchronization of fractional fuzzy cellular neural networks with interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weiyuan; Li, Changpin; Wu, Yujiang; Wu, Yongqing

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce fuzzy theory into the fractional cellular neural networks to dynamically enhance the coupling strength and propose a fractional fuzzy neural network model with interactions. Using the Lyapunov principle of fractional differential equations, we design the adaptive control schemes to realize the synchronization and obtain the synchronization criteria. Finally, we provide some numerical examples to show the effectiveness of our obtained results.

  11. Concentration dependent model of protein-protein interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jingshan

    2007-01-01

    The scale free structure p(k)~k^{-gamma} of protein-protein interaction networks can be produced by a static physical model. We find the earlier study of deterministic threshold models with exponential fitness distributions can be generalized to explain the apparent scale free degree distribution of the physical model, and this explanation provides a generic mechanism of "scale free" networks. We predict the dependence of gamma on experimental protein concentrations. The clustering coefficient distribution of the model is also studied.

  12. Characterizing interactions in online social networks during exceptional events

    CERN Document Server

    Omodei, Elisa; Arenas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, millions of people interact on a daily basis on online social media like Facebook and Twitter, where they share and discuss information about a wide variety of topics. In this paper, we focus on a specific online social network, Twitter, and we analyze multiple datasets each one consisting of individuals' online activity before, during and after an exceptional event in terms of volume of the communications registered. We consider important events that occurred in different arenas that range from policy to culture or science. For each dataset, the users' online activities are modeled by a multilayer network in which each layer conveys a different kind of interaction, specifically: retweeting, mentioning and replying. This representation allows us to unveil that these distinct types of interaction produce networks with different statistical properties, in particular concerning the degree distribution and the clustering structure. These results suggests that models of online activity cannot discard the...

  13. Observation of the Borromean Three-Body Förster Resonances for Three Interacting Rb Rydberg Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, D B; Beterov, I I; Yakshina, E A; Entin, V M; Ryabtsev, I I; Cheinet, P; Pillet, P

    2017-10-27

    Three-body Förster resonances at long-range interactions of Rydberg atoms were first predicted and observed in Cs Rydberg atoms by Faoro et al. [Nat. Commun. 6, 8173 (2015)NCAOBW2041-172310.1038/ncomms9173]. In these resonances, one of the atoms carries away an energy excess preventing the two-body resonance, leading thus to a Borromean type of Förster energy transfer. But they were in fact observed as the average signal for the large number of atoms N≫1. In this Letter, we report on the first experimental observation of the three-body Förster resonances 3×nP_{3/2}(|M|)→nS_{1/2}+(n+1)S_{1/2}+nP_{3/2}(|M^{*}|) in a few Rb Rydberg atoms with n=36, 37. We have found here clear evidence that there is no signature of the three-body Förster resonance for exactly two interacting Rydberg atoms, while it is present for N=3-5 atoms. This demonstrates the assumption that three-body resonances can generalize to any Rydberg atom. As such resonance represents an effective three-body operator, it can be used to directly control the three-body interactions in quantum simulations and quantum information processing with Rydberg atoms.

  14. Mixed Rabi Jaynes-Cummings model of a three-level atom interacting with two quantized fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torosov, Boyan T.; Longhi, Stefano; Della Valle, Giuseppe

    2015-07-01

    The quantum Rabi model describes the ultrastrong interaction of a two-level atom coupled to a single quantized bosonic mode. As compared to the Jaynes-Cummings model, in the Rabi model the absorption and emission processes do not need to satisfy energy conservation and the usual rotating wave approximation (RWA) breaks down. As a result, the atom-field dynamics in the Hilbert space splits into two independent parity chains, exhibiting a collapse-revival pattern and exact periodic dynamics in the limit of degenerate atomic levels. Here we introduce a mixed Rabi Jaynes-Cummings model by considering a three-level atom interacting with two quantized bosonic fields, in which the RWA is made for one transition (with a weak atom-field coupling) but not for the other one (with an ultrastrong atom-field coupling). As a result, we show that the field in the weak coupled atomic transition can be used as a tool to control the atom-field dynamics of the other (strong coupled) transition, thus realizing an effective two-level quantum Rabi model with a controllable field. In particular, a periodic temporal dynamics of the atom-field state can be realized by appropriate tuning of the weak control field, even for non-degenerate atomic levels. A photonic simulator of the mixed Rabi Jaynes-Cummings model, based on light transport in evanescently coupled optical waveguide lattices, is also briefly discussed.

  15. Protein complexes predictions within protein interaction networks using genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Emad; Naef, Ahmed; Ahmed, Moataz

    2016-07-25

    Protein-protein interaction networks are receiving increased attention due to their importance in understanding life at the cellular level. A major challenge in systems biology is to understand the modular structure of such biological networks. Although clustering techniques have been proposed for clustering protein-protein interaction networks, those techniques suffer from some drawbacks. The application of earlier clustering techniques to protein-protein interaction networks in order to predict protein complexes within the networks does not yield good results due to the small-world and power-law properties of these networks. In this paper, we construct a new clustering algorithm for predicting protein complexes through the use of genetic algorithms. We design an objective function for exclusive clustering and overlapping clustering. We assess the quality of our proposed clustering algorithm using two gold-standard data sets. Our algorithm can identify protein complexes that are significantly enriched in the gold-standard data sets. Furthermore, our method surpasses three competing methods: MCL, ClusterOne, and MCODE in terms of the quality of the predicted complexes. The source code and accompanying examples are freely available at http://faculty.kfupm.edu.sa/ics/eramadan/GACluster.zip .

  16. The evolution of generalized reciprocity on social interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Gerrit Sander; Taborsky, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Generalized reciprocity (help anyone, if helped by someone) is a minimal strategy capable of supporting cooperation between unrelated individuals. Its simplicity makes it an attractive model to explain the evolution of reciprocal altruism in animals that lack the information or cognitive skills needed for other types of reciprocity. Yet, generalized reciprocity is anonymous and thus defenseless against exploitation by defectors. Recognizing that animals hardly ever interact randomly, we investigate whether social network structure can mitigate this vulnerability. Our results show that heterogeneous interaction patterns strongly support the evolution of generalized reciprocity. The future probability of being rewarded for an altruistic act is inversely proportional to the average connectivity of the social network when cooperators are rare. Accordingly, sparse networks are conducive to the invasion of reciprocal altruism. Moreover, the evolutionary stability of cooperation is enhanced by a modular network structure. Communities of reciprocal altruists are protected against exploitation, because modularity increases the mean access time, that is, the average number of steps that it takes for a random walk on the network to reach a defector. Sparseness and community structure are characteristic properties of vertebrate social interaction patterns, as illustrated by network data from natural populations ranging from fish to primates. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. FACETS: multi-faceted functional decomposition of protein interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Boon-Siew; Bhowmick, Sourav S.; Forbes Dewey, C.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: The availability of large-scale curated protein interaction datasets has given rise to the opportunity to investigate higher level organization and modularity within the protein–protein interaction (PPI) network using graph theoretic analysis. Despite the recent progress, systems level analysis of high-throughput PPIs remains a daunting task because of the amount of data they present. In this article, we propose a novel PPI network decomposition algorithm called FACETS in order to make sense of the deluge of interaction data using Gene Ontology (GO) annotations. FACETS finds not just a single functional decomposition of the PPI network, but a multi-faceted atlas of functional decompositions that portray alternative perspectives of the functional landscape of the underlying PPI network. Each facet in the atlas represents a distinct interpretation of how the network can be functionally decomposed and organized. Our algorithm maximizes interpretative value of the atlas by optimizing inter-facet orthogonality and intra-facet cluster modularity. Results: We tested our algorithm on the global networks from IntAct, and compared it with gold standard datasets from MIPS and KEGG. We demonstrated the performance of FACETS. We also performed a case study that illustrates the utility of our approach. Contact: seah0097@ntu.edu.sg or assourav@ntu.edu.sg Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at the Bioinformatics online. Availability: Our software is available freely for non-commercial purposes from: http://www.cais.ntu.edu.sg/∼assourav/Facets/ PMID:22908217

  18. Evaluating Australian football league player contributions using interactive network simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Jonathan; Bedford, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the contribution of Australian Football League (AFL) players to their team's on-field network by simulating player interactions within a chosen team list and estimating the net effect on final score margin. A Visual Basic computer program was written, firstly, to isolate the effective interactions between players from a particular team in all 2011 season matches and, secondly, to generate a symmetric interaction matrix for each match. Negative binomial distributions were fitted to each player pairing in the Geelong Football Club for the 2011 season, enabling an interactive match simulation model given the 22 chosen players. Dynamic player ratings were calculated from the simulated network using eigenvector centrality, a method that recognises and rewards interactions with more prominent players in the team network. The centrality ratings were recorded after every network simulation and then applied in final score margin predictions so that each player's match contribution-and, hence, an optimal team-could be estimated. The paper ultimately demonstrates that the presence of highly rated players, such as Geelong's Jimmy Bartel, provides the most utility within a simulated team network. It is anticipated that these findings will facilitate optimal AFL team selection and player substitutions, which are key areas of interest to coaches. Network simulations are also attractive for use within betting markets, specifically to provide information on the likelihood of a chosen AFL team list "covering the line ". Key pointsA simulated interaction matrix for Australian Rules football players is proposedThe simulations were carried out by fitting unique negative binomial distributions to each player pairing in a sideEigenvector centrality was calculated for each player in a simulated matrix, then for the teamThe team centrality measure adequately predicted the team's winning marginA player's net effect on margin could hence be estimated by replacing him in

  19. Quantum interaction of SU(1,1) Lie group with entangled a two 2-level atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqannas, Haifa S.; Khalil, E. M.

    2018-01-01

    In present contribution, we consider a two two-level atoms in non-resonance case interacting with a quantum system. The wave function is obtained via solving the Schrödinger equation. The initial density operator is assumed, with respect to the quantum system starts in a Barut-Girardello state. We use the numerical results to describe the entanglement between the subsystem. Some statistical aspects, the atomic inversion, the squeezing phenomena and negatively are discussed in details. We study the effective of the detuning parameter on the population inversion and the squeezing phenomenon. Finally the negativity for different values of the detuning parameter are examined. It is shown that the effects of the detuning parameter changes the region of the entanglement sudden death and sudden birth phenomena.

  20. Jet atomization and cavitation induced by interactions between focused ultrasound and a water surfacea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Atomization of a jet produced by the interaction of 1 MHz focused ultrasound with a water surface was investigated using high-speed photography. Viewing various aspects of jet behavior, threshold conditions were obtained necessary for water surface elevation and jet breakup, including drop separation and spray formation. In addition, the position of drop atomization, where a single drop separates from the tip of a jet without spraying, showed good correlation with the jet Weber number. For a set of specified conditions, multiple beaded water masses were formed, moving upwards to produce a vigorous jet. Cavitation phenomena occurred near the center of the primary drop-shaped water mass produced at the leading part of the jet; this was accompanied by fine droplets at the neck between the primary and secondary drop-shaped water masses, due to the collapse of capillary waves.

  1. Ising models of strongly coupled biological networks with multivariate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchan, Lina; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    Biological networks consist of a large number of variables that can be coupled by complex multivariate interactions. However, several neuroscience and cell biology experiments have reported that observed statistics of network states can be approximated surprisingly well by maximum entropy models that constrain correlations only within pairs of variables. We would like to verify if this reduction in complexity results from intricacies of biological organization, or if it is a more general attribute of these networks. We generate random networks with p-spin (p > 2) interactions, with N spins and M interaction terms. The probability distribution of the network states is then calculated and approximated with a maximum entropy model based on constraining pairwise spin correlations. Depending on the M/N ratio and the strength of the interaction terms, we observe a transition where the pairwise approximation is very good to a region where it fails. This resembles the sat-unsat transition in constraint satisfaction problems. We argue that the pairwise model works when the number of highly probable states is small. We argue that many biological systems must operate in a strongly constrained regime, and hence we expect the pairwise approximation to be accurate for a wide class of problems. This research has been partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No.220020321.

  2. Energy of van der Waals and dipole-dipole interactions between atoms in Rydberg states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenski, A. A.; Manakov, N. L.; Mokhnenko, S. N.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.

    2017-09-01

    The van der Waals coefficient C6(θ ;n l J M ) of two like Rydberg atoms in their identical Rydberg states |n l J M 〉 is resolved into four irreducible components called scalar Rs s, axial (vector) Ra a, scalar-tensor Rs T=RT s , and tensor-tensor RT T parts in analogy with the components of dipole polarizabilities. The irreducible components determine the dependence of C6(θ ;n l J M ) on the angle θ between the interatomic and the quantization axes of atoms. The spectral resolution for the biatomic Green's function with account of the most contributing terms is used for evaluating the components Rα β of atoms in their Rydberg series of doublet states of the low angular momenta (2S , 2P , 2D , 2F ). The polynomial presentations in powers of the Rydberg-state principal quantum number n taking into account the asymptotic dependence C6(θ ;n l J M ) ∝n11 are derived for simplified evaluations of irreducible components. Numerical values of the polynomial coefficients are determined for Rb atoms in their n 2S1 /2 , n 2P1 /2 ,3 /2 , n 2D3 /2 ,5 /2 , and n 2F5 /2 ,7 /2 Rydberg states of arbitrary high n . The transformation of the van der Waals interaction law -C6/R6 into the dipole-dipole law C3/R3 in the case of close dipole-connected two-atomic states (the Förster resonance) is considered and the dependencies on the magnetic quantum numbers M and on the angle θ of the constant C3(θ ;n l J M ) are determined together with the ranges of interatomic distances R , where the transformation appears.

  3. College Chemistry Students' Understanding of Potential Energy in the Context of Atomic-Molecular Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Nicole M.; Cooper, Melanie M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the energy changes that occur as atoms and molecules interact forms the foundation for understanding the macroscopic energy changes that accompany chemical processes. In order to identify ways to scaffold students' understanding of the connections between atomic-molecular and macroscopic energy perspectives, we conducted a…

  4. Probing the interaction between air bubble and sphalerite mineral surface using atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lei; Shi, Chen; Wang, Jingyi; Huang, Jun; Lu, Qiuyi; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-03-03

    The interaction between air bubbles and solid surfaces plays important roles in many engineering processes, such as mineral froth flotation. In this work, an atomic force microscope (AFM) bubble probe technique was employed, for the first time, to directly measure the interaction forces between an air bubble and sphalerite mineral surfaces of different hydrophobicity (i.e., sphalerite before/after conditioning treatment) under various hydrodynamic conditions. The direct force measurements demonstrate the critical role of the hydrodynamic force and surface forces in bubble-mineral interaction and attachment, which agree well with the theoretical calculations based on Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effect of disjoining pressure. The hydrophobic disjoining pressure was found to be stronger for the bubble-water-conditioned sphalerite interaction with a larger hydrophobic decay length, which enables the bubble attachment on conditioned sphalerite at relatively higher bubble approaching velocities than that of unconditioned sphalerite. Increasing the salt concentration (i.e., NaCl, CaCl2) leads to weakened electrical double layer force and thereby facilitates the bubble-mineral attachment, which follows the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory by including the effects of hydrophobic interaction. The results provide insights into the basic understanding of the interaction mechanism between bubbles and minerals at nanoscale in froth flotation processes, and the methodology on probing the interaction forces of air bubble and sphalerite surfaces in this work can be extended to many other mineral and particle systems.

  5. Well-ordered ZnO nanotube arrays and networks grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yijun [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education & International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Liu, Ming, E-mail: mingliu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education & International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Ren, Wei, E-mail: wren@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education & International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Ye, Zuo-Guang, E-mail: zye@sfu.ca [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education & International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Department of Chemistry and 4D LABS, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanotube networks and well-ordered ZnO nanotube arrays are fabricated by ALD. • The wall thickness of the ZnO nanotubes can be well-controlled at the angstrom level. • The fishing net-like networks of ZnO nanotubes with an ultra thin wall thickness are fabricated. • The ZnO nanotube arrays have an aspect ratio as high as 1000:1. - Abstract: Semiconductor ZnO, possessing a large exciton binding energy and wide band gap, has received a great deal of attention because it shows great potential for applications in optoelectronics. Precisely controlling the growth of three-dimensional ZnO nanotube structures with a uniform morphology constitutes an important step forward toward integrating ZnO nanostructures into microelectronic devices. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, featured with self-limiting surface reactions, is an ideal approach to the fabrication of ZnO nanostructures, because it allows for accurate control of the thickness at atomic level and conformal coverage in complex 3D structures. In this work, well-ordered ZnO nanotube arrays and networks are prepared by ALD. The morphology, crystallinity and wall thickness of these nanotube structures are examined for different growth conditions. The microstructure of the ZnO nanotubes is investigated by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The high aspect ratio of ZnO nanotubes provides a large specific area which could enhance the kinetics of chemical reactions taking place between the ZnO and its surroundings, making the potential devices more efficient and compact.

  6. A Novel Graphene Oxide-Based Protein Interaction Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung-Woong; Morita, Kyohei; Adachi, Taiji

    2015-02-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising material for biological applications because of its excellent physical/chemical properties such as aqueous processability, amphiphilicity, and surface functionalizability. Here we introduce a new biological application of GO, a novel GO-based technique for probing protein interactions using atomic force microscopy (AFM). GO sheets were intercalated between the protein-modified AFM probe and the polymer substrate in order to reduce the non-specific adhesion force observed during single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). In this study, we used SMFS to probe the interaction of the actin filament and actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3), an actin-binding protein. Our results confirm that the GO sheet reduces nonspecific adhesion of the probe to the substrate. Using the GO-based technique, we succeeded in estimating the dissociation constant of the actin filament-binding protein interaction.

  7. Systematics of ground state multiplets of atomic nuclei in the delta-interaction approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imasheva, L. T.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Stepanov, M. E., E-mail: stepanov@depni.sinp.msu.ru [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation); Tretyakova, T. Yu. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Pairing forces between nucleons in an atomic nucleus strongly influence its structure. One of the manifestations of pair interaction is the ground state multiplet (GSM) formation in the spectrum of low-lying excited states of even–even nuclei. The value of GSM splitting is determined by the value of pair interaction of nucleons; for each isotope, it can be estimated on the basis of experimental nuclear masses. The quality of this estimate is characterized by the degree of reproduction of GSM levels in the nucleus. The GSM systematics in even–even nuclei with a pair of identical nucleons in addition to the filled nuclear core is considered on the basis of delta interaction.

  8. Atomic resolution description of the interaction between the nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein of Hendra virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Communie

    Full Text Available Hendra virus (HeV is a recently emerged severe human pathogen that belongs to the Henipavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. The HeV genome is encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (N within a helical nucleocapsid. Recruitment of the viral polymerase onto the nucleocapsid template relies on the interaction between the C-terminal domain, N(TAIL, of N and the C-terminal X domain, XD, of the polymerase co-factor phosphoprotein (P. Here, we provide an atomic resolution description of the intrinsically disordered N(TAIL domain in its isolated state and in intact nucleocapsids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Using electron microscopy, we show that HeV nucleocapsids form herringbone-like structures typical of paramyxoviruses. We also report the crystal structure of XD of P that consists of a three-helix bundle. We study the interaction between N(TAIL and XD using NMR titration experiments and provide a detailed mapping of the reciprocal binding sites. We show that the interaction is accompanied by α-helical folding of the molecular recognition element of N(TAIL upon binding to a hydrophobic patch on the surface of XD. Finally, using solution NMR, we investigate the interaction between intact nucleocapsids and XD. Our results indicate that monomeric XD binds to N(TAIL without triggering an additional unwinding of the nucleocapsid template. The present results provide a structural description at the atomic level of the protein-protein interactions required for transcription and replication of HeV, and the first direct observation of the interaction between the X domain of P and intact nucleocapsids in Paramyxoviridae.

  9. Atomic resolution description of the interaction between the nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein of Hendra virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communie, Guillaume; Habchi, Johnny; Yabukarski, Filip; Blocquel, David; Schneider, Robert; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Jamin, Marc; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Longhi, Sonia; Blackledge, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a recently emerged severe human pathogen that belongs to the Henipavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. The HeV genome is encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (N) within a helical nucleocapsid. Recruitment of the viral polymerase onto the nucleocapsid template relies on the interaction between the C-terminal domain, N(TAIL), of N and the C-terminal X domain, XD, of the polymerase co-factor phosphoprotein (P). Here, we provide an atomic resolution description of the intrinsically disordered N(TAIL) domain in its isolated state and in intact nucleocapsids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Using electron microscopy, we show that HeV nucleocapsids form herringbone-like structures typical of paramyxoviruses. We also report the crystal structure of XD of P that consists of a three-helix bundle. We study the interaction between N(TAIL) and XD using NMR titration experiments and provide a detailed mapping of the reciprocal binding sites. We show that the interaction is accompanied by α-helical folding of the molecular recognition element of N(TAIL) upon binding to a hydrophobic patch on the surface of XD. Finally, using solution NMR, we investigate the interaction between intact nucleocapsids and XD. Our results indicate that monomeric XD binds to N(TAIL) without triggering an additional unwinding of the nucleocapsid template. The present results provide a structural description at the atomic level of the protein-protein interactions required for transcription and replication of HeV, and the first direct observation of the interaction between the X domain of P and intact nucleocapsids in Paramyxoviridae.

  10. Hazard interactions and interaction networks (cascades) within multi-hazard methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Joel C.; Malamud, Bruce D.

    2016-08-01

    This paper combines research and commentary to reinforce the importance of integrating hazard interactions and interaction networks (cascades) into multi-hazard methodologies. We present a synthesis of the differences between multi-layer single-hazard approaches and multi-hazard approaches that integrate such interactions. This synthesis suggests that ignoring interactions between important environmental and anthropogenic processes could distort management priorities, increase vulnerability to other spatially relevant hazards or underestimate disaster risk. In this paper we proceed to present an enhanced multi-hazard framework through the following steps: (i) description and definition of three groups (natural hazards, anthropogenic processes and technological hazards/disasters) as relevant components of a multi-hazard environment, (ii) outlining of three types of interaction relationship (triggering, increased probability, and catalysis/impedance), and (iii) assessment of the importance of networks of interactions (cascades) through case study examples (based on the literature, field observations and semi-structured interviews). We further propose two visualisation frameworks to represent these networks of interactions: hazard interaction matrices and hazard/process flow diagrams. Our approach reinforces the importance of integrating interactions between different aspects of the Earth system, together with human activity, into enhanced multi-hazard methodologies. Multi-hazard approaches support the holistic assessment of hazard potential and consequently disaster risk. We conclude by describing three ways by which understanding networks of interactions contributes to the theoretical and practical understanding of hazards, disaster risk reduction and Earth system management. Understanding interactions and interaction networks helps us to better (i) model the observed reality of disaster events, (ii) constrain potential changes in physical and social vulnerability

  11. NetworkViewer: visualizing biochemical reaction networks with embedded rendering of molecular interaction rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsueh-Chien; Angermann, Bastian R; Zhang, Fengkai; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin

    2014-06-16

    Network representations of cell-biological signaling processes frequently contain large numbers of interacting molecular and multi-molecular components that can exist in, and switch between, multiple biochemical and/or structural states. In addition, the interaction categories (associations, dissociations and transformations) in such networks cannot satisfactorily be mapped onto simple arrows connecting pairs of components since their specifications involve information such as reaction rates and conditions with regard to the states of the interacting components. This leads to the challenge of having to reconcile competing objectives: providing a high-level overview without omitting relevant information, and showing interaction specifics while not overwhelming users with too much detail displayed simultaneously. This problem is typically addressed by splitting the information required to understand a reaction network model into several categories that are rendered separately through combinations of visualizations and/or textual and tabular elements, requiring modelers to consult several sources to obtain comprehensive insights into the underlying assumptions of the model. We report the development of an application, the Simmune NetworkViewer, that visualizes biochemical reaction networks using iconographic representations of protein interactions and the conditions under which the interactions take place using the same symbols that were used to specify the underlying model with the Simmune Modeler. This approach not only provides a coherent model representation but, moreover, following the principle of "overview first, zoom and filter, then details-on-demand," can generate an overview visualization of the global network and, upon user request, presents more detailed views of local sub-networks and the underlying reaction rules for selected interactions. This visual integration of information would be difficult to achieve with static network representations or

  12. Prediction of protein retention times in hydrophobic interaction chromatography by robust statistical characterization of their atomic-level surface properties.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanke, A.T.; Klijn, M.E.; Verhaert, P.D.; Wielen, van der L.; Ottens, M.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Sandt, van de E.J.A.X.

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between the dimensionless retention times (DRT) of proteins in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and their surface properties were investigated. A ternary atomic-level hydrophobicity scale was used to calculate the distribution of local average hydrophobicity across the

  13. GINI: from ISH images to gene interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kriti Puniyani

    Full Text Available Accurate inference of molecular and functional interactions among genes, especially in multicellular organisms such as Drosophila, often requires statistical analysis of correlations not only between the magnitudes of gene expressions, but also between their temporal-spatial patterns. The ISH (in-situ-hybridization-based gene expression micro-imaging technology offers an effective approach to perform large-scale spatial-temporal profiling of whole-body mRNA abundance. However, analytical tools for discovering gene interactions from such data remain an open challenge due to various reasons, including difficulties in extracting canonical representations of gene activities from images, and in inference of statistically meaningful networks from such representations. In this paper, we present GINI, a machine learning system for inferring gene interaction networks from Drosophila embryonic ISH images. GINI builds on a computer-vision-inspired vector-space representation of the spatial pattern of gene expression in ISH images, enabled by our recently developed [Formula: see text] system; and a new multi-instance-kernel algorithm that learns a sparse Markov network model, in which, every gene (i.e., node in the network is represented by a vector-valued spatial pattern rather than a scalar-valued gene intensity as in conventional approaches such as a Gaussian graphical model. By capturing the notion of spatial similarity of gene expression, and at the same time properly taking into account the presence of multiple images per gene via multi-instance kernels, GINI is well-positioned to infer statistically sound, and biologically meaningful gene interaction networks from image data. Using both synthetic data and a small manually curated data set, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in network building. Furthermore, we report results on a large publicly available collection of Drosophila embryonic ISH images from the Berkeley Drosophila Genome

  14. Causal interactions in resting-state networks predict perceived loneliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yin; Yang, Li; Chen, Sifan; Guo, Daqing; Ding, Zechao; Tam, Kin Yip; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-01-01

    Loneliness is broadly described as a negative emotional response resulting from the differences between the actual and desired social relations of an individual, which is related to the neural responses in connection with social and emotional stimuli. Prior research has discovered that some neural regions play a role in loneliness. However, little is known about the differences among individuals in loneliness and the relationship of those differences to differences in neural networks. The current study aimed to investigate individual differences in perceived loneliness related to the causal interactions between resting-state networks (RSNs), including the dorsal attentional network (DAN), the ventral attentional network (VAN), the affective network (AfN) and the visual network (VN). Using conditional granger causal analysis of resting-state fMRI data, we revealed that the weaker causal flow from DAN to VAN is related to higher loneliness scores, and the decreased causal flow from AfN to VN is also related to higher loneliness scores. Our results clearly support the hypothesis that there is a connection between loneliness and neural networks. It is envisaged that neural network features could play a key role in characterizing the loneliness of an individual.

  15. Systems understanding of plant—pathogen interactions through genome-wide protein—protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong LI,Ziding ZHANG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants are frequently affected by pathogen infections. To effectively defend against such infections, two major modes of innate immunity have evolved in plants; pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity and effector-triggered immunity. Although the molecular components as well as the corresponding pathways involved in these two processes have been identified, many aspects of the molecular mechanisms of the plant immune system remain elusive. Recently, the rapid development of omics techniques (e.g., genomics, proteomics and transcriptomics has provided a great opportunity to explore plant—pathogen interactions from a systems perspective and studies on protein—protein interactions (PPIs between plants and pathogens have been carried out and characterized at the network level. In this review, we introduce experimental and computational identification methods of PPIs, popular PPI network analysis approaches, and existing bioinformatics resources/tools related to PPIs. Then, we focus on reviewing the progress in genome-wide PPI networks related to plant—pathogen interactions, including pathogen-centric PPI networks, plant-centric PPI networks and interspecies PPI networks between plants and pathogens. We anticipate genome-wide PPI network analysis will provide a clearer understanding of plant—pathogen interactions and will offer some new opportunities for crop protection and improvement.

  16. Bacteria-polymeric membrane interactions: atomic force microscopy and XDLVO predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwala, Justice M; Li, Minghua; Wong, Mavis C Y; Kang, Seoktae; Hoek, Eric M V; Mamba, Bhekie B

    2013-11-12

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in conjunction with a bioprobe developed using a polydopamine wet adhesive was used to directly measure the adhesive force between bacteria and different polymeric membrane surfaces. Bacterial cells of Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis were immobilized onto the tip of a standard AFM cantilever, and force measurements made using the modified cantilever on various membranes. Interaction forces measured with the bacterial probe were compared, qualitatively, to predictions by the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory with steric interactions included. The XDLVO theory predicted attractive interactions between low energy hydrophobic membranes with high energy hydrophilic bacterium (P. putida). It also predicted a shallow primary maximum with the most hydrophilic bacterium, B. subtilis . Discrepancies between predictions using the XDLVO theory and theory require involvement of factors such as bridging effects. Differences in interaction between P. putida and B. subtilis are attributed to acid-base interactions and steric interactions. P. putida is Gram negative with lipopolysaccharides present in the outer cell membrane. A variation in forces of adhesion for bacteria on polymeric membranes studied was interpreted in terms of hydrophilicity and interfacial surface potential calculated from physicochemical properties.

  17. Modularity detection in protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Tejaswini; Gersten, Merril; Subramaniam, Shankar; Grama, Ananth

    2011-12-29

    Many recent studies have investigated modularity in biological networks, and its role in functional and structural characterization of constituent biomolecules. A technique that has shown considerable promise in the domain of modularity detection is the Newman and Girvan (NG) algorithm, which relies on the number of shortest-paths across pairs of vertices in the network traversing a given edge, referred to as the betweenness of that edge. The edge with the highest betweenness is iteratively eliminated from the network, with the betweenness of the remaining edges recalculated in every iteration. This generates a complete dendrogram, from which modules are extracted by applying a quality metric called modularity denoted by Q. This exhaustive computation can be prohibitively expensive for large networks such as Protein-Protein Interaction Networks. In this paper, we present a novel optimization to the modularity detection algorithm, in terms of an efficient termination criterion based on a target edge betweenness value, using which the process of iterative edge removal may be terminated. We validate the robustness of our approach by applying our algorithm on real-world protein-protein interaction networks of Yeast, C.Elegans and Drosophila, and demonstrate that our algorithm consistently has significant computational gains in terms of reduced runtime, when compared to the NG algorithm. Furthermore, our algorithm produces modules comparable to those from the NG algorithm, qualitatively and quantitatively. We illustrate this using comparison metrics such as module distribution, module membership cardinality, modularity Q, and Jaccard Similarity Coefficient. We have presented an optimized approach for efficient modularity detection in networks. The intuition driving our approach is the extraction of holistic measures of centrality from graphs, which are representative of inherent modular structure of the underlying network, and the application of those measures to

  18. Guest-cage atomic interactions in a clathrate-based phase-change material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Desmond; Skelton, Jonathan M; Law, Leong-Tat; Wang, Wei-Jie; Li, Ming-Hua; Song, Wen-Dong; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Elliott, Stephen R

    2014-03-19

    New clathrate-based phase-change materials with cage-like structures incorporating Cs and Ba guest atoms, are reported as a means of altering crystallization and amorphization behavior by controlling 'guest-cage' interactions via intra-complex guest vibrational effects. Both a high resistance to spontaneous crystallization, and long retention of the amorphous phase are achieved, as well as a low melting energy. This approach provides a route for achieving cage-controlled semiconductor devices. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Protein-Protein Interaction Site Predictions with Three-Dimensional Probability Distributions of Interacting Atoms on Protein Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Tai; Peng, Hung-Pin; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Yang, Ei-Wen; Chen, Jun-Bo; Ho, Shinn-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to many biological processes. Computational methodologies devised to predict protein-protein interaction (PPI) sites on protein surfaces are important tools in providing insights into the biological functions of proteins and in developing therapeutics targeting the protein-protein interaction sites. One of the general features of PPI sites is that the core regions from the two interacting protein surfaces are complementary to each other, similar to the interior of proteins in packing density and in the physicochemical nature of the amino acid composition. In this work, we simulated the physicochemical complementarities by constructing three-dimensional probability density maps of non-covalent interacting atoms on the protein surfaces. The interacting probabilities were derived from the interior of known structures. Machine learning algorithms were applied to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the PPI sites. The trained predictors for PPI sites were cross-validated with the training cases (consisting of 432 proteins) and were tested on an independent dataset (consisting of 142 proteins). The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient for the independent test set was 0.423; the accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity were 0.753, 0.519, 0.677, and 0.779 respectively. The benchmark results indicate that the optimized machine learning models are among the best predictors in identifying PPI sites on protein surfaces. In particular, the PPI site prediction accuracy increases with increasing size of the PPI site and with increasing hydrophobicity in amino acid composition of the PPI interface; the core interface regions are more likely to be recognized with high prediction confidence. The results indicate that the physicochemical complementarity patterns on protein surfaces are important determinants in PPIs, and a substantial portion of the PPI sites can be predicted correctly with

  20. Protein-protein interaction site predictions with three-dimensional probability distributions of interacting atoms on protein surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Tai Chen

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are key to many biological processes. Computational methodologies devised to predict protein-protein interaction (PPI sites on protein surfaces are important tools in providing insights into the biological functions of proteins and in developing therapeutics targeting the protein-protein interaction sites. One of the general features of PPI sites is that the core regions from the two interacting protein surfaces are complementary to each other, similar to the interior of proteins in packing density and in the physicochemical nature of the amino acid composition. In this work, we simulated the physicochemical complementarities by constructing three-dimensional probability density maps of non-covalent interacting atoms on the protein surfaces. The interacting probabilities were derived from the interior of known structures. Machine learning algorithms were applied to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the PPI sites. The trained predictors for PPI sites were cross-validated with the training cases (consisting of 432 proteins and were tested on an independent dataset (consisting of 142 proteins. The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient for the independent test set was 0.423; the accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity were 0.753, 0.519, 0.677, and 0.779 respectively. The benchmark results indicate that the optimized machine learning models are among the best predictors in identifying PPI sites on protein surfaces. In particular, the PPI site prediction accuracy increases with increasing size of the PPI site and with increasing hydrophobicity in amino acid composition of the PPI interface; the core interface regions are more likely to be recognized with high prediction confidence. The results indicate that the physicochemical complementarity patterns on protein surfaces are important determinants in PPIs, and a substantial portion of the PPI sites can be predicted

  1. Interlog protein network: an evolutionary benchmark of protein interaction networks for the evaluation of clustering algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohieddin; Mirzaie, Mehdi; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2015-10-05

    In the field of network science, exploring principal and crucial modules or communities is critical in the deduction of relationships and organization of complex networks. This approach expands an arena, and thus allows further study of biological functions in the field of network biology. As the clustering algorithms that are currently employed in finding modules have innate uncertainties, external and internal validations are necessary. Sequence and network structure alignment, has been used to define the Interlog Protein Network (IPN). This network is an evolutionarily conserved network with communal nodes and less false-positive links. In the current study, the IPN is employed as an evolution-based benchmark in the validation of the module finding methods. The clustering results of five algorithms; Markov Clustering (MCL), Restricted Neighborhood Search Clustering (RNSC), Cartographic Representation (CR), Laplacian Dynamics (LD) and Genetic Algorithm; to find communities in Protein-Protein Interaction networks (GAPPI) are assessed by IPN in four distinct Protein-Protein Interaction Networks (PPINs). The MCL shows a more accurate algorithm based on this evolutionary benchmarking approach. Also, the biological relevance of proteins in the IPN modules generated by MCL is compatible with biological standard databases such as Gene Ontology, KEGG and Reactome. In this study, the IPN shows its potential for validation of clustering algorithms due to its biological logic and straightforward implementation.

  2. Embedded-atom method potential for modeling hydrogen and hydrogen-defect interaction in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Fang; Shu, Xiaolin; Lu, Guang-Hong; Gao, Fei

    2017-11-01

    An embedded-atom method potential has been developed for modeling hydrogen in body-centered-cubic (bcc) tungsten by fitting to an extensive database of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Comprehensive evaluations of the new potential are conducted by comparing various hydrogen properties with DFT calculations and available experimental data, as well as all the other tungsten–hydrogen potentials. The new potential accurately reproduces the point defect properties of hydrogen, the interaction among hydrogen atoms, the interplay between hydrogen and a monovacancy, and the thermal diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten. The successful validation of the new potential confirms its good reliability and transferability, which enables large-scale atomistic simulations of tungsten–hydrogen system. The new potential is afterward employed to investigate the interplay between hydrogen and other defects, including [1 1 1] self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and vacancy clusters in tungsten. It is found that both the [1 1 1] SIAs and the vacancy clusters exhibit considerable attraction for hydrogen. Hydrogen solution and diffusion in strained tungsten are also studied using the present potential, which demonstrates that tensile (compressive) stress facilitates (impedes) hydrogen solution, and isotropic tensile (compressive) stress impedes (facilitates) hydrogen diffusion while anisotropic tensile (compressive) stress facilitates (impedes) hydrogen diffusion.

  3. Dispersion C3 coefficients for the alkali-metal atoms interacting with a graphene layer and with a carbon nanotube

    CERN Document Server

    Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B K

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate separation dependent van der Waal dispersion ($C_3$) coefficients for the interactions of the Li, Na, K and Rb alkali atoms with a graphene layer and with a single walled carbon nanotube (CNT) using the hydrodynamic and Dirac models. The results from both the models are evaluated using accurate values of the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atoms. Accountability of these accurate values of dynamical polarizabilities of the alkali atoms in determination of the above $C_3$ coefficients are accentuated by comparing them with the coefficients evaluated using the dynamic dipole polarizabilities estimated from the single oscillator approximation which are typically employed in the earlier calculations. For practical description of the atom-surface interaction potentials the radial dependent $C_3$ coefficients are given for a wide range of separation distances between the ground states of the considered atoms and the wall surfaces and also for different values of nanotube radii. The coefficients for...

  4. Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing of Biorecognition Interactions within the Tumor Suppressor p53 Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Cannistraro, Salvatore; Bizzarri, Anna Rita

    2017-11-20

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique to study the kinetics of biomolecules undergoing biorecognition processes, particularly suited for protein-protein interactions of biomedical interest. The potentiality of SPR was exploited to sense the interactions occurring within the network of the tumor suppressor p53, which is crucial for maintaining genome integrity and whose function is inactivated, mainly by down regulation or by mutation, in the majority of human tumors. This study includes p53 down-regulators, p53 mutants and also the p53 family members, p63 and p73, which could vicariate p53 protective function. Furthermore, the application of SPR was extended to sense the interaction of p53 with anti-cancer drugs, which might restore p53 function. An extended review of previous published work and unpublished kinetic data is provided, dealing with the interaction between the p53 family members, or their mutants and two anticancer molecules, Azurin and its cell-penetrating peptide, p28. All the kinetic results are discussed in connection with those obtained by a complementary approach operating at the single molecule level, namely Atomic Force Spectroscopy and the related literature data. The overview of the SPR kinetic results may significantly contribute to a deeper understanding of the interactions within p53 network, also in the perspective of designing suitable anticancer drugs.

  5. Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing of Biorecognition Interactions within the Tumor Suppressor p53 Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Moscetti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR is a powerful technique to study the kinetics of biomolecules undergoing biorecognition processes, particularly suited for protein-protein interactions of biomedical interest. The potentiality of SPR was exploited to sense the interactions occurring within the network of the tumor suppressor p53, which is crucial for maintaining genome integrity and whose function is inactivated, mainly by down regulation or by mutation, in the majority of human tumors. This study includes p53 down-regulators, p53 mutants and also the p53 family members, p63 and p73, which could vicariate p53 protective function. Furthermore, the application of SPR was extended to sense the interaction of p53 with anti-cancer drugs, which might restore p53 function. An extended review of previous published work and unpublished kinetic data is provided, dealing with the interaction between the p53 family members, or their mutants and two anticancer molecules, Azurin and its cell-penetrating peptide, p28. All the kinetic results are discussed in connection with those obtained by a complementary approach operating at the single molecule level, namely Atomic Force Spectroscopy and the related literature data. The overview of the SPR kinetic results may significantly contribute to a deeper understanding of the interactions within p53 network, also in the perspective of designing suitable anticancer drugs.

  6. Communicating, Networking: Interacting: The International Year of Global Understanding - IYGU

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Margaret E. Robertson

    2016-01-01

    ... for the world’s people, and the health of the planet, is an ongoing project.IYGU recognises the integral roles of networking and communication systems, as well as interactions between people, near and far, as fundamental for building better futures...

  7. Learning Neuroscience: An Interactive Case-Based Online Network (ICON).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, James J.; Pasquale, Susan; Cerva, Barbara; Lester, John E.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interactive, case-based online network (ICON) that provides a learning environment that integrates student thinking across different concentration tracks and allows students to get away from interpreting vast amounts of available information, move toward selecting useful information, recognize discriminating findings, and build a…

  8. Signed Networks, Triadic Interactions and the Evolution of Cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Károly Takács

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We outline a model to study the evolution of cooperation in a population of agents playing the prisoner's dilemma in signed networks. We highlight that if only dyadic interactions are taken into account, cooperation never evolves. However, when triadic considerations are introduced, a window of opportunity for emergence of cooperation as a stable behaviour emerges.

  9. Characterizing interactions in online social networks during exceptional events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omodei, Elisa; De Domenico, Manlio; Arenas, Alex

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, millions of people interact on a daily basis on online social media like Facebook and Twitter, where they share and discuss information about a wide variety of topics. In this paper, we focus on a specific online social network, Twitter, and we analyze multiple datasets each one consisting of individuals' online activity before, during and after an exceptional event in terms of volume of the communications registered. We consider important events that occurred in different arenas that range from policy to culture or science. For each dataset, the users' online activities are modeled by a multilayer network in which each layer conveys a different kind of interaction, specifically: retweeting, mentioning and replying. This representation allows us to unveil that these distinct types of interaction produce networks with different statistical properties, in particular concerning the degree distribution and the clustering structure. These results suggests that models of online activity cannot discard the information carried by this multilayer representation of the system, and should account for the different processes generated by the different kinds of interactions. Secondly, our analysis unveils the presence of statistical regularities among the different events, suggesting that the non-trivial topological patterns that we observe may represent universal features of the social dynamics on online social networks during exceptional events.

  10. Effect of Finite-Range Interactions on Rapidly Rotating Ultracold Bosonic Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Nobukuni

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the effects of the finite-range interactions of six rotating ultracold bosonic atoms using a Gaussian-type interatomic interaction model. The model is analyzed numerically by exact diagonalization within the Lowest Landau Level (LLL) approximation and semiclassical approximation. The result of exact diagonalization shows that the ground-state angular momentum changes discretely with increasing angular velocity. For the short-range limit, the ground-state angular momentum and wavefunctions agree with those of the delta interaction evaluated by Bertsch and Papenbrock [https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevA.63.023616" xlink:type="simple">Phys. Rev. A 63, 023616 (2001)]. Different from the delta interaction, the ground-state angular momenta higher than 30, i.e., N(N - 1), are observed at a high angular frequency as a result of the finite-range two-body interactions. For the intermediate-range interaction, the sequence of ground-state angular momenta increases in steps of five, which was not found in previous works on the Gaussian interaction. For the long-range limit of Gaussian interaction, we find that the ground-state angular momenta increase in steps of six. These steps of the ground-state angular momentum according to the width of the Gaussian interactions are explained by semiclassical and classical analysis based on the rovibrating molecule picture. The increments of the ground-state angular momentum of five and six are explained by the semiclassical quantization condition of the rotational and vibrational modes of fivefold and sixfold molecules, respectively. Our analysis based on the classical model also confirms that the fivefold molecule picture is more stable than the sixfold molecule picture in the intermediate range of the Gaussian interaction. These results suggest that the Gaussian interaction model can be used to emulate and characterize interactions by their width as the model can reproduce various rotational states including the ground

  11. Aspects of the theory of atoms and coherent matter and their interaction with electromagnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, Halvor Moell

    2002-07-01

    In the present work I have outlined and contributed to the time-dependent theory of the interaction between atoms and electromagnetic fields and the theory of Bose-Einstein condensates. New numerical methods and algorithms have been developed and applied in practice. Calculations have exhibited certain new dynamical features. All these calculations are in a regime where the applied field is of the same magnitude as the atomic field. In the case of BEC we have investigated the use of time-dependent methods to calculate the excitation frequencies. We also investigated the possibility of nonlinear coupling for a scissors mode and found no such contributions to damping which is consistent with other studies . Special emphasis has also been paid to the gyroscopic motion of rotating BEC where several models were investigated. Briefly, the main conclusions are: (1) Rydberg wave packets appear for direct excitations of Rydberg atoms for long pulses. (2) The survival of just a few states is decided by symmetry of the Hamiltonian. (3) For few cycle intense pulses classical and quantum mechanics show remarkable similarity. (4) Time-dependent methods for finding excitation frequencies have been shown to be very efficient. (5) New dynamical features is shown in gyroscopic motion of BEC. (6) It was shown that no nonlinear mixing of scissors modes occur in the standard Gross-Pitaevskii regime. As mentioned in the introduction, this work is a part of very active research fields and new progress is constantly reported. Thus, the present work cannot be concluded as a closed loop. The fast development of grid based numerical solutions for atoms in intense fields will surely make great contribution to solve many of today's problems. It is a very important area of research to understand both nonperturbative atomic response and highly nonlinear optics. In the field of Bose-Einstein condensation the new experimental achievements constantly drive the field forward. The new

  12. Bayesian network model for identification of pathways by integrating protein interaction with genetic interaction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Changhe; Deng, Su; Jin, Guangxu; Wang, Xinxin; Yu, Zu-Guo

    2017-09-21

    Molecular interaction data at proteomic and genetic levels provide physical and functional insights into a molecular biosystem and are helpful for the construction of pathway structures complementarily. Despite advances in inferring biological pathways using genetic interaction data, there still exists weakness in developed models, such as, activity pathway networks (APN), when integrating the data from proteomic and genetic levels. It is necessary to develop new methods to infer pathway structure by both of interaction data. We utilized probabilistic graphical model to develop a new method that integrates genetic interaction and protein interaction data and infers exquisitely detailed pathway structure. We modeled the pathway network as Bayesian network and applied this model to infer pathways for the coherent subsets of the global genetic interaction profiles, and the available data set of endoplasmic reticulum genes. The protein interaction data were derived from the BioGRID database. Our method can accurately reconstruct known cellular pathway structures, including SWR complex, ER-Associated Degradation (ERAD) pathway, N-Glycan biosynthesis pathway, Elongator complex, Retromer complex, and Urmylation pathway. By comparing N-Glycan biosynthesis pathway and Urmylation pathway identified from our approach with that from APN, we found that our method is able to overcome its weakness (certain edges are inexplicable). According to underlying protein interaction network, we defined a simple scoring function that only adopts genetic interaction information to avoid the balance difficulty in the APN. Using the effective stochastic simulation algorithm, the performance of our proposed method is significantly high. We developed a new method based on Bayesian network to infer detailed pathway structures from interaction data at proteomic and genetic levels. The results indicate that the developed method performs better in predicting signaling pathways than previously

  13. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  14. Well-ordered ZnO nanotube arrays and networks grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Ren, Wei; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2015-06-01

    Semiconductor ZnO, possessing a large exciton binding energy and wide band gap, has received a great deal of attention because it shows great potential for applications in optoelectronics. Precisely controlling the growth of three-dimensional ZnO nanotube structures with a uniform morphology constitutes an important step forward toward integrating ZnO nanostructures into microelectronic devices. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, featured with self-limiting surface reactions, is an ideal approach to the fabrication of ZnO nanostructures, because it allows for accurate control of the thickness at atomic level and conformal coverage in complex 3D structures. In this work, well-ordered ZnO nanotube arrays and networks are prepared by ALD. The morphology, crystallinity and wall thickness of these nanotube structures are examined for different growth conditions. The microstructure of the ZnO nanotubes is investigated by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The high aspect ratio of ZnO nanotubes provides a large specific area which could enhance the kinetics of chemical reactions taking place between the ZnO and its surroundings, making the potential devices more efficient and compact.

  15. How People Interact in Evolving Online Affiliation Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallos, Lazaros K.; Rybski, Diego; Liljeros, Fredrik; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A.

    2012-07-01

    The study of human interactions is of central importance for understanding the behavior of individuals, groups, and societies. Here, we observe the formation and evolution of networks by monitoring the addition of all new links, and we analyze quantitatively the tendencies used to create ties in these evolving online affiliation networks. We show that an accurate estimation of these probabilistic tendencies can be achieved only by following the time evolution of the network. Inferences about the reason for the existence of links using statistical analysis of network snapshots must therefore be made with great caution. Here, we start by characterizing every single link when the tie was established in the network. This information allows us to describe the probabilistic tendencies of tie formation and extract meaningful sociological conclusions. We also find significant differences in behavioral traits in the social tendencies among individuals according to their degree of activity, gender, age, popularity, and other attributes. For instance, in the particular data sets analyzed here, we find that women reciprocate connections 3 times as much as men and that this difference increases with age. Men tend to connect with the most popular people more often than women do, across all ages. On the other hand, triangular tie tendencies are similar, independent of gender, and show an increase with age. These results require further validation in other social settings. Our findings can be useful to build models of realistic social network structures and to discover the underlying laws that govern establishment of ties in evolving social networks.

  16. Exact tensor network ansatz for strongly interacting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaletel, Michael P.

    It appears that the tensor network ansatz, while not quite complete, is an efficient coordinate system for the tiny subset of a many-body Hilbert space which can be realized as a low energy state of a local Hamiltonian. However, we don't fully understand precisely which phases are captured by the tensor network ansatz, how to compute their physical observables (even numerically), or how to compute a tensor network representation for a ground state given a microscopic Hamiltonian. These questions are algorithmic in nature, but their resolution is intimately related to understanding the nature of quantum entanglement in many-body systems. For this reason it is useful to compute the tensor network representation of various `model' wavefunctions representative of different phases of matter; this allows us to understand how the entanglement properties of each phase are expressed in the tensor network ansatz, and can serve as test cases for algorithm development. Condensed matter physics has many illuminating model wavefunctions, such as Laughlin's celebrated wave function for the fractional quantum Hall effect, the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer wave function for superconductivity, and Anderson's resonating valence bond ansatz for spin liquids. This thesis presents some results on exact tensor network representations of these model wavefunctions. In addition, a tensor network representation is given for the time evolution operator of a long-range one-dimensional Hamiltonian, which allows one to numerically simulate the time evolution of power-law interacting spin chains as well as two-dimensional strips and cylinders.

  17. [Novel Hyphenated Techniques of Atomic Spectrometry for Metal Species Interaction with Biomolecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yan, Xiu-ping

    2015-09-01

    Trace metals may be adopted by biological systems to assist in the syntheses and metabolic functions of genes (DNA and RNA) and proteins in the environment. These metals may be beneficial or may pose a risk to humans and other life forms. Novel hybrid techniques are required for studies on the interaction between different metal species and biomolecules, which is significant for biology, biochemistry, nutrition, agriculture, medicine, pharmacy, and environmental science. In recent years, our group dwells on new hyphenated techniques based on capillary electrophoresis (CE), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and their application for different metal species interaction with biomolecules such as DNA, HSA, and GSH. The CE-ETAAS assay and CE-ICP-MS assay allow sensitively probing the level of biomolecules such as DNA damage by different metal species and extracting the kinetic and thermodynamic information on the interactions of different metal species with biomolecules, provides direct evidences for the formation of different metal species--biomolecule adducts. In addition, the consequent structural information were extracted from circular dichroism (CD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The present works represent the most complete and extensive study to date on the interactions between different metal species with biomolecules, and also provide new evidences for and insights into the interactions of different metal species with biomolecules for further understanding of the toxicological effects of metal species.

  18. Application of atomic force microscopy for characteristics of single intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safenkova, I V; Zherdev, A V; Dzantievf, B B

    2012-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to make measurements in vacuum, air, and water. The method is able to gather information about intermolecular interaction forces at the level of single molecules. This review encompasses experimental and theoretical data on the characterization of ligand-receptor interactions by AFM. The advantage of AFM in comparison with other methods developed for the characterization of single molecular interactions is its ability to estimate not only rupture forces, but also thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the rupture of a complex. The specific features of force spectroscopy applied to ligand-receptor interactions are examined in this review from the stage of the modification of the substrate and the cantilever up to the processing and interpretation of the data. We show the specificities of the statistical analysis of the array of data based on the results of AFM measurements, and we discuss transformation of data into thermodynamic and kinetic parameters (kinetic dissociation constant, Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy). Particular attention is paid to the study of polyvalent interactions, where the definition of the constants is hampered due to the complex stoichiometry of the reactions.

  19. Learning Predictive Interactions Using Information Gain and Bayesian Network Scoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Jiang

    Full Text Available The problems of correlation and classification are long-standing in the fields of statistics and machine learning, and techniques have been developed to address these problems. We are now in the era of high-dimensional data, which is data that can concern billions of variables. These data present new challenges. In particular, it is difficult to discover predictive variables, when each variable has little marginal effect. An example concerns Genome-wide Association Studies (GWAS datasets, which involve millions of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs, where some of the SNPs interact epistatically to affect disease status. Towards determining these interacting SNPs, researchers developed techniques that addressed this specific problem. However, the problem is more general, and so these techniques are applicable to other problems concerning interactions. A difficulty with many of these techniques is that they do not distinguish whether a learned interaction is actually an interaction or whether it involves several variables with strong marginal effects.We address this problem using information gain and Bayesian network scoring. First, we identify candidate interactions by determining whether together variables provide more information than they do separately. Then we use Bayesian network scoring to see if a candidate interaction really is a likely model. Our strategy is called MBS-IGain. Using 100 simulated datasets and a real GWAS Alzheimer's dataset, we investigated the performance of MBS-IGain.When analyzing the simulated datasets, MBS-IGain substantially out-performed nine previous methods at locating interacting predictors, and at identifying interactions exactly. When analyzing the real Alzheimer's dataset, we obtained new results and results that substantiated previous findings. We conclude that MBS-IGain is highly effective at finding interactions in high-dimensional datasets. This result is significant because we have increasingly

  20. Atomic Ensemble Effects and Non-Covalent Interactions at the Electrode–Electrolyte Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Cuesta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide-modified Pt(111 electrodes have been recently employed to study atomic ensemble effects in electrocatalysis. This work, which will be briefly reviewed, reveals that the smallest site required for methanol dehydrogenation and formic acid dehydration is composed of three contiguous Pt atoms. By blocking these trigonal sites, the specific adsorption of anions, such as sulfate and phosphate, can be inhibited, thus increasing the rate of oxygen reduction reaction by one order of magnitude or more. Moreover, alkali metal cations affect hydrogen adsorption on cyanide-modified Pt(111. This effect is attributed to the non-covalent interactions at the electrical double layer between specifically adsorbed anions or dipoles and the alkali metal cations. A systematic investigation is conducted on the effect of the concentration of alkali metal cations. Accordingly, a simple model that reproduces the experimental observations accurately and enables the understanding of the trends in the strength of the interaction between M+ and CNad when moving from Li+ to Cs+, as well as the deviations from the expected trends, is developed. This simple model can also explain the occurrence of super-Nernstian shifts of the equilibrium potential of interfacial proton-coupled electron transfers. Therefore, the model can be generally applied to explain quantitatively the effect of cations on the properties of the electrical double layer. The recently reported effects of alkali metal cations on several electrocatalytic reactions must be mediated by the interaction between these cations and chemisorbed species. As these interactions seem to be adequately and quantitatively described by our model, we expect the model to also be useful to describe, explain, and potentially exploit these effects.

  1. Interactions between solute atoms in Fe-Si-Al-C alloys as studied by mechanical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinning, H.-R., E-mail: hr.sinning@tu-bs.de [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Golovin, I.S. [Physics of Metals Department, Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys, Moscow (Russian Federation); Physics of Metals and Materials Science Department, Tula State University, Tula (Russian Federation); Strahl, A. [Institut fuer Fachdidaktik der Naturwissenschaften, TU Braunschweig (Germany); Sokolova, O.A. [Physics of Metals and Materials Science Department, Tula State University, Tula (Russian Federation); Sazonova, T. [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    In Fe-Si-Al-C alloys, point-defect relaxation includes both the interstitial carbon Snoek-type relaxation, split into a 'pure iron' (Fe-C-Fe) Snoek peak and an 'interstitial-substitutional' (Fe-C-Me; Me = Al, Si) peak, and the substitutional Zener relaxation. The influence of Al and Si, with varying Al/Si ratio, on these effects is used to study the qualitative characteristics of substitutional-interstitial (Si-C, Al-C) and substitutional-substitutional (Al-Al, Si-Si, Al-Si) interactions in these alloys. Concerning the latter, there is a mutual compensation of the elastic distortion fields, produced in the Fe matrix by the relatively bigger Al and smaller Si atoms, respectively, which largely suppresses the Zener relaxation in the ternary Fe-Si-Al alloys, probably without affecting the elastic dipole strength of interstitial carbon. From the kinetic behavior of the two components of the Snoek-type relaxation, it is concluded that the substitutional-interstitial interaction is generally attractive and sufficient for modifying the distribution of the C atoms, but not for trapping to become dominant.

  2. Production of TEMPO by O atoms in atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma–liquid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elg, Daniel T.; Yang, I.-Wei; Graves, David B.

    2017-11-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas enable plasma treatment of surfaces without requiring a low-pressure environment. These plasmas are currently of interest for, among other things, their biomedical applications, many of which are enabled by production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). Plasma–liquid interactions are especially important due to the high amounts of water in biological materials. However, the chemistries of these plasmas are very complex and are not well-understood. One method to quantify plasma–liquid interactions is to dissolve a reactant into the liquid which, when exposed to plasma-created RONS, forms a measurable product. In particular, the oxidation of the spin trap TEMP to TEMPO has been used to track trends in reactive oxygen species. However, the effect of individual species on TEMP has not previously been determined. This paper differentiates the oxidation of TEMP due to various oxygen species produced by a He plasma jet operating in a controllable environment. Oxidation of TEMP is mainly to O atoms, with small or negligible contributions from other species. Thus, the TEMPO yield will also be used to illuminate trends in O atom production.

  3. Extended s-wave superfluid of repulsively interacting three-component fermionic atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Sei-Ichiro; Inaba, Kensuke

    2014-03-01

    We investigate pairing symmetry of the superfluid state in repulsively interacting three-component (colors) fermionic atoms in optical lattices. This superfluid state appears, when two of the color-dependent three repulsions are much stronger than the other close to half filling. We evaluate the effective pairing interaction by collecting random-phase-approximation-type diagrams and ladder diagrams, and solve the Eliashberg equation within weak-coupling theory in square optical lattices. We find that pairing symmetry is an extended s-wave, although in the phase diagram the superfluid state is adjacent to the color-density wave or paired Mott insulator at half filling. The k-dependence of the superfluid order parameter is caused by quantum fluctuations of the staggered color-density wave. When the difference in the three repulsions is decreased, paring symmetry changes from an extended s-wave to a d-wave. We expect 6Li, 171Yb, 173Yb atoms and their mixtures in optical lattices to be possible candidates for observing this superfluid state. This work was supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) (No. 23540467) and (B) (No. 25287104) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  4. Visualising the Micro World of Chemical/Geochemical Interactions Using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, G.M.; Sorbie, K.S.

    1996-12-31

    Scanning force microscopy, in particular AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy), provides a particular useful and interesting tool for the examination of surface structure at the near-atomic level. AFM is particularly well suited to the study of interactions at the surface in aqueous solutions using real time in-situ measurements. In this paper there is presented AFM images showing in situ crystal growth from supersaturated BaSO{sub 4} solutions onto the surface of barite. Growth structures in the form of spiral crystal growth features, presumably originating from screw dislocations, are illustrated. AFM images of novel scale crystal growth inhibition experiments are presented. Examination of the manner in which generically different species adsorb onto growth structures may help to explain mechanistic differences in the way which different inhibitor species perform against barium sulphate scale formation. Adsorption of polyacrylamide species onto mica surfaces have been viewed. The general utility of AFM to a number of other common surface interactions in oil field chemistry will be discussed. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  5. The interaction between atoms of Au and Cu with clean Si(111) surface: a study combining synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis and theoretical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Hudson W P; Batista, Ana P L; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Pérez, Carlos A; Gobbi, Angelo Luiz

    2009-09-15

    In order to evaluate the interactions between Au/Cu atoms and clean Si(111) surface, we used synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis and theoretical calculations. Optimized geometries and energies on different adsorption sites indicate that the binding energies at different adsorption sites are high, suggesting a strong interaction between metal atom and silicon surface. The Au atom showed higher interaction than Cu atom. The theoretical and experimental data showed good agreement.

  6. Interaction-induced conducting-non-conducting transition of ultra-cold atoms in one-dimensional optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chih-Chun; Gruss, Daniel; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Zwolak, Michael

    2013-06-01

    The study of time-dependent, many-body transport phenomena is increasingly within reach of ultra-cold atom experiments. We show that the introduction of spatially inhomogeneous interactions, e.g., generated by optically controlled collisions, induce negative differential conductance in the transport of atoms in one-dimensional optical lattices. Specifically, we simulate the dynamics of interacting fermionic atoms via a micro-canonical transport formalism within both a mean-field and a higher-order approximation, as well as with a time-dependent density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG). For weakly repulsive interactions, a quasi-steady-state atomic current develops that is similar to the situation occurring for electronic systems subject to an external voltage bias. At the mean-field level, we find that this atomic current is robust against the details of how the interaction is switched on. Further, a conducting-non-conducting transition exists when the interaction imbalance exceeds some threshold from both our approximate and time-dependent DMRG simulations. This transition is preceded by the atomic equivalent of negative differential conductivity observed in transport across solid-state structures.

  7. Evolutionary analysis and interaction prediction for protein-protein interaction network in geometric space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Liao, Li; Wu, Cathy H

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of protein-protein interaction (PPI) remains a central task in systems biology. With more PPIs identified, forming PPI networks, it has become feasible and also imperative to study PPIs at the network level, such as evolutionary analysis of the networks, for better understanding of PPI networks and for more accurate prediction of pairwise PPIs by leveraging the information gained at the network level. In this work we developed a novel method that enables us to incorporate evolutionary information into geometric space to improve PPI prediction, which in turn can be used to select and evaluate various evolutionary models. The method is tested with cross-validation using human PPI network and yeast PPI network data. The results show that the accuracy of PPI prediction measured by ROC score is increased by up to 14.6%, as compared to a baseline without using evolutionary information. The results also indicate that our modified evolutionary model DANEOsf-combining a gene duplication/neofunctionalization model and scale-free model-has a better fitness and prediction efficacy for these two PPI networks. The improved PPI prediction performance may suggest that our DANEOsf evolutionary model can uncover the underlying evolutionary mechanism for these two PPI networks better than other tested models. Consequently, of particular importance is that our method offers an effective way to select evolutionary models that best capture the underlying evolutionary mechanisms, evaluating the fitness of evolutionary models from the perspective of PPI prediction on real PPI networks.

  8. Precision Tests of the Electroweak Interaction using Trapped Atoms and Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melconian, Daniel George [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-06-21

    The objective of the proposed research is to study fundamental aspects of the electroweak interaction via precision measurements in beta decay to test our current understanding of fundamental particles and forces as contained in the so-called "Standard Model" of particle physics. By comparing elegant experiments to rigorous theoretical predictions, we will either confirm the Standard Model to a higher degree and rule out models which seek to extend it, or find evidence of new physics and help guide theorists in developing the New Standard Model. The use of ion and neutral atom traps at radioactive ion beam facilities has opened up a new vista in precision low-energy nuclear physics experiments. Traps provide an ideal source of decaying atoms: they can be extremely cold (~1 mK); they are compact (~1 mm^3); and perhaps most importantly, the daughter particles escape with negligible distortions to their momenta in a scattering-free, open environment. The project is taking advantage of these technologies and applying them to precision beta-decay studies at radioactive beam facilities. The program consists of two complementary efforts: 1) Ion traps are an extremely versatile tool for purifying, cooling and bunching low-energy beams of short-lived nuclei. A large-bore (210~mm) superconducting 7-Tesla solenoid is at the heart of a Penning trap system for which there is a dedicated beamline at T-REX, the upgraded radioactive beam facility at the Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University. In addition to providing a general-purpose decay station, the flagship program for this system is measuring the ft-values and beta-neutrino correlation parameters from isospin T=2 superallowed beta-delayed proton decays, complimenting and expanding the already strong program in fundamental interactions at the Institute. 2) A magneto-optical trap is being used at the TRIUMF Neutral Atom Trap facility to observe the (un)polarized angular distribution parameters of isotopes of potassium. We

  9. Nanophotonic cavity QED with individually trapped atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dordevic, Tamara; Samutpraphoot, Polnop; Bernien, Hannes; Ocola, Paloma; Schwartz, Sylvain; Vuletic, Vladan; Senko, Crystal; Lukin, Mikhail

    2017-04-01

    The realization of strong interactions between single photons and single atoms is a central theme in quantum optics and an essential prerequisite for future quantum applications such as quantum networks. We achieve such interactions by using a hybrid approach in which we couple individually trapped atoms to nanophotonic crystal cavities. Here we present our methods for trapping and cooling two atoms near a nanophotonic cavity and our progress towards preparing an entangled state of two atoms mediated by the cavity photons. Our experiment aims at demonstrating scalable and efficient quantum gates with applications in integrated quantum networks.

  10. Digital Ecology: Coexistence and Domination among Interacting Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleineberg, Kaj-Kolja; Boguñá, Marián

    2015-05-01

    The overwhelming success of Web 2.0, within which online social networks are key actors, has induced a paradigm shift in the nature of human interactions. The user-driven character of Web 2.0 services has allowed researchers to quantify large-scale social patterns for the first time. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of networks at the system level are still poorly understood. For instance, the simultaneous existence of multiple digital services naturally raises questions concerning which conditions these services can coexist under. Analogously to the case of population dynamics, the digital world forms a complex ecosystem of interacting networks. The fitness of each network depends on its capacity to attract and maintain users’ attention, which constitutes a limited resource. In this paper, we introduce an ecological theory of the digital world which exhibits stable coexistence of several networks as well as the dominance of an individual one, in contrast to the competitive exclusion principle. Interestingly, our theory also predicts that the most probable outcome is the coexistence of a moderate number of services, in agreement with empirical observations.

  11. [The interaction between nerve cells and carbon nanotube networks made by CVD process investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrinetskiĭ, I I; Seleznev, A S; Gaĭduchenko, I A; Fedorov, G E; Domantovskiĭ, A G; Presniakov, M Iu; Podcherniaeva, R Ia; Mikhaĭlova, G R; Suetina, I A

    2013-01-01

    In this research we investigate neuroblastoma cells cultivated on single-walled carbon nanotubes networks made by CVD method on silicon substrates. The complex analysis of grown cells made by atomic force, electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy was carried out and the effect of nanotube growth process on proliferation factor was investigated. It is shown that despite of a weak decrease in proliferation, cell morphology remains unchanged and no physical or chemical interaction between carbon nanotubes and cells is observed. The results of the research can be used to investigate the interaction between conductive nanomaterials and cells for the development of neural replacement implants. Also they can be useful in bio-electronic interface investigation of signal propagation in neurons.

  12. High Intensity Femtosecond XUV Pulse Interactions with Atomic Clusters: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditmire, Todd [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Center for High Energy Density Science

    2016-10-12

    We propose to expand our recent studies on the interactions of intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) femtosecond pulses with atomic and molecular clusters. The work described follows directly from work performed under BES support for the past grant period. During this period we upgraded the THOR laser at UT Austin by replacing the regenerative amplifier with optical parametric amplification (OPA) using BBO crystals. This increased the contrast of the laser, the total laser energy to ~1.2 J , and decreased the pulse width to below 30 fs. We built a new all reflective XUV harmonic beam line into expanded lab space. This enabled an increase influence by a factor of 25 and an increase in the intensity by a factor of 50. The goal of the program proposed in this renewal is to extend this class of experiments to available higher XUV intensity and a greater range of wavelengths. In particular we plan to perform experiments to confirm our hypothesis about the origin of the high charge states in these exploding clusters, an effect which we ascribe to plasma continuum lowering (ionization potential depression) in a cluster nano-­plasma. To do this we will perform experiments in which XUV pulses of carefully chosen wavelength irradiate clusters composed of only low-Z atoms and clusters with a mixture of this low-­Z atom with higher Z atoms. The latter clusters will exhibit higher electron densities and will serve to lower the ionization potential further than in the clusters composed only of low Z atoms. This should have a significant effect on the charge states produced in the exploding cluster. We will also explore the transition of explosions in these XUV irradiated clusters from hydrodynamic expansion to Coulomb explosion. The work proposed here will explore clusters of a wider range of constituents, including clusters from solids. Experiments on clusters from solids will be enabled by development we performed during the past grant period in which we constructed and

  13. 2008 Atomic and Molecular Interactions GRC-July 6-11, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur Suits

    2009-06-03

    The Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Conferences is justifiably recognized for its broad scope, touching on areas ranging from fundamental gas phase and gas-condensed matter collision dynamics, to laser-molecule interactions, photophysics, and unimolecular decay processes. The meeting has traditionally involved scientists engaged in fundamental research in gas and condensed phases and those who apply these concepts to systems of practical chemical and physical interest. A key tradition in this meeting is the strong mixing of theory and experiment throughout. The program for 2008 conference continues these traditions. At the 2008 AMI GRC, there will be talks in 5 broadly defined and partially overlapping areas of intermolecular interactions and chemical dynamics: (1) Photoionization and Photoelectron Spectroscopy; (2) Molecules in Strong Fields; (3) Photodissociation Dynamics; (4) Astrochemistry; and (5) Reaction Dynamics. These areas encompass many of the most productive and exciting areas of chemical physics, including both reactive and nonreactive processes, intermolecular and intramolecular energy transfer, and photodissociation and unimolecular processes. Gas phase dynamics, van der Waals and cluster studies, laser-matter interactions and multiple potential energy surface phenomena will all be discussed. Limited funds are available to support attendance for students and post-docs. Advisors should email the conference chair requesting such support, and the students should apply online as usual.

  14. SNP by SNP by environment interaction network of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollanvari, Amin; Alterovitz, Gil

    2017-03-14

    Alcoholism has a strong genetic component. Twin studies have demonstrated the heritability of a large proportion of phenotypic variance of alcoholism ranging from 50-80%. The search for genetic variants associated with this complex behavior has epitomized sequence-based studies for nearly a decade. The limited success of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), possibly precipitated by the polygenic nature of complex traits and behaviors, however, has demonstrated the need for novel, multivariate models capable of quantitatively capturing interactions between a host of genetic variants and their association with non-genetic factors. In this regard, capturing the network of SNP by SNP or SNP by environment interactions has recently gained much interest. Here, we assessed 3,776 individuals to construct a network capable of detecting and quantifying the interactions within and between plausible genetic and environmental factors of alcoholism. In this regard, we propose the use of first-order dependence tree of maximum weight as a potential statistical learning technique to delineate the pattern of dependencies underpinning such a complex trait. Using a predictive based analysis, we further rank the genes, demographic factors, biological pathways, and the interactions represented by our SNP [Formula: see text]SNP[Formula: see text]E network. The proposed framework is quite general and can be potentially applied to the study of other complex traits.

  15. Fractional Dynamics of Network Growth Constrained by Aging Node Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, Hadiseh; Zare Kamali, Milad; Shirazi, Amirhossein; Khalighi, Moein; Jafari, Gholamreza; Ausloos, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    In many social complex systems, in which agents are linked by non-linear interactions, the history of events strongly influences the whole network dynamics. However, a class of "commonly accepted beliefs" seems rarely studied. In this paper, we examine how the growth process of a (social) network is influenced by past circumstances. In order to tackle this cause, we simply modify the well known preferential attachment mechanism by imposing a time dependent kernel function in the network evolution equation. This approach leads to a fractional order Barabási-Albert (BA) differential equation, generalizing the BA model. Our results show that, with passing time, an aging process is observed for the network dynamics. The aging process leads to a decay for the node degree values, thereby creating an opposing process to the preferential attachment mechanism. On one hand, based on the preferential attachment mechanism, nodes with a high degree are more likely to absorb links; but, on the other hand, a node's age has a reduced chance for new connections. This competitive scenario allows an increased chance for younger members to become a hub. Simulations of such a network growth with aging constraint confirm the results found from solving the fractional BA equation. We also report, as an exemplary application, an investigation of the collaboration network between Hollywood movie actors. It is undubiously shown that a decay in the dynamics of their collaboration rate is found, even including a sex difference. Such findings suggest a widely universal application of the so generalized BA model.

  16. Influence of tip indentation on the adhesive behavior of viscoelastic polydimethylsiloxane networks studied by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickering, J.P.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2001-01-01

    A commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) outfitted with a custom control and data acquisition system was used to investigate the adhesive nature of a viscoelastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) network. Due to the complex dependence of the adhesion of this sample on factors such as indentation,

  17. Comparison and evaluation of network clustering algorithms applied to genetic interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lin; Wang, Lin; Berg, Arthur; Qian, Minping; Zhu, Yunping; Li, Fangting; Deng, Minghua

    2012-01-01

    The goal of network clustering algorithms detect dense clusters in a network, and provide a first step towards the understanding of large scale biological networks. With numerous recent advances in biotechnologies, large-scale genetic interactions are widely available, but there is a limited understanding of which clustering algorithms may be most effective. In order to address this problem, we conducted a systematic study to compare and evaluate six clustering algorithms in analyzing genetic interaction networks, and investigated influencing factors in choosing algorithms. The algorithms considered in this comparison include hierarchical clustering, topological overlap matrix, bi-clustering, Markov clustering, Bayesian discriminant analysis based community detection, and variational Bayes approach to modularity. Both experimentally identified and synthetically constructed networks were used in this comparison. The accuracy of the algorithms is measured by the Jaccard index in comparing predicted gene modules with benchmark gene sets. The results suggest that the choice differs according to the network topology and evaluation criteria. Hierarchical clustering showed to be best at predicting protein complexes; Bayesian discriminant analysis based community detection proved best under epistatic miniarray profile (EMAP) datasets; the variational Bayes approach to modularity was noticeably better than the other algorithms in the genome-scale networks.

  18. Consistent structures and interactions by density functional theory with small atomic orbital basis sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Bannwarth, Christoph; Hansen, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    A density functional theory (DFT) based composite electronic structure approach is proposed to efficiently compute structures and interaction energies in large chemical systems. It is based on the well-known and numerically robust Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhoff (PBE) generalized-gradient-approximation in a modified global hybrid functional with a relatively large amount of non-local Fock-exchange. The orbitals are expanded in Ahlrichs-type valence-double zeta atomic orbital (AO) Gaussian basis sets, which are available for many elements. In order to correct for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) and to account for the important long-range London dispersion effects, our well-established atom-pairwise potentials are used. In the design of the new method, particular attention has been paid to an accurate description of structural parameters in various covalent and non-covalent bonding situations as well as in periodic systems. Together with the recently proposed three-fold corrected (3c) Hartree-Fock method, the new composite scheme (termed PBEh-3c) represents the next member in a hierarchy of "low-cost" electronic structure approaches. They are mainly free of BSSE and account for most interactions in a physically sound and asymptotically correct manner. PBEh-3c yields good results for thermochemical properties in the huge GMTKN30 energy database. Furthermore, the method shows excellent performance for non-covalent interaction energies in small and large complexes. For evaluating its performance on equilibrium structures, a new compilation of standard test sets is suggested. These consist of small (light) molecules, partially flexible, medium-sized organic molecules, molecules comprising heavy main group elements, larger systems with long bonds, 3d-transition metal systems, non-covalently bound complexes (S22 and S66×8 sets), and peptide conformations. For these sets, overall deviations from accurate reference data are smaller than for various other tested DFT methods

  19. Reconstruction and Application of Protein–Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Hao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The protein-protein interaction network (PIN is a useful tool for systematic investigation of the complex biological activities in the cell. With the increasing interests on the proteome-wide interaction networks, PINs have been reconstructed for many species, including virus, bacteria, plants, animals, and humans. With the development of biological techniques, the reconstruction methods of PIN are further improved. PIN has gradually penetrated many fields in biological research. In this work we systematically reviewed the development of PIN in the past fifteen years, with respect to its reconstruction and application of function annotation, subsystem investigation, evolution analysis, hub protein analysis, and regulation mechanism analysis. Due to the significant role of PIN in the in-depth exploration of biological process mechanisms, PIN will be preferred by more and more researchers for the systematic study of the protein systems in various kinds of organisms.

  20. Computational analysis of protein interaction networks for infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Archana; Lahiri, Chandrajit; Rajendiran, Anjana; Shanmugham, Buvaneswari

    2016-05-01

    Infectious diseases caused by pathogens, including viruses, bacteria and parasites, pose a serious threat to human health worldwide. Frequent changes in the pattern of infection mechanisms and the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains among pathogens have weakened the current treatment regimen. This necessitates the development of new therapeutic interventions to prevent and control such diseases. To cater to the need, analysis of protein interaction networks (PINs) has gained importance as one of the promising strategies. The present review aims to discuss various computational approaches to analyse the PINs in context to infectious diseases. Topology and modularity analysis of the network with their biological relevance, and the scenario till date about host-pathogen and intra-pathogenic protein interaction studies were delineated. This would provide useful insights to the research community, thereby enabling them to design novel biomedicine against such infectious diseases. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Interaction of Ti and Cr atoms with point defects in bcc vanadium: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boev, A. O.; Aksyonov, D. A.; Kartamyshev, A. I.; Maksimenko, V. N.; Nelasov, I. V.; Lipnitskii, A. G.

    2017-08-01

    The development of low-swelling radiation-resistant alloys is vital for the creation of reliable fusion reactors. In this article, we revisit the long-standing problem of very low radiation swelling in V-Ti-Cr alloys by means of DFT calculations. In particular, we study double and triple interactions of point defects such as solutes, vacancies and self-interstitial atoms in bcc V. According to our results titanium atom and vacancy are strongly attracted and in addition to pairs form highly stable triple Ti-Vacancy-Ti complexes, which are absent in the case of chromium. By using an analytic model of void growth and using calculated binding energies of point defect complexes in bcc vanadium we obtain three orders of magnitude reduction of swelling rate due to the formation of Ti-Vacancy-Ti complexes, which allows to explain experimental observations. Finally, we explain the causes of the strong attraction between titanium and vacancy using geometry and electronic structure analysis.

  2. Dynamics of gas-surface interactions atomic-level understanding of scattering processes at surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Díez Muniño, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    This book gives a representative survey of the state of the art of research on gas-surface interactions. It provides an overview of the current understanding of gas surface dynamics and, in particular, of the reactive and non-reactive processes of atoms and small molecules at surfaces. Leading scientists in the field, both from the theoretical and the experimental sides, write in this book about their most recent advances. Surface science grew as an interdisciplinary research area over the last decades, mostly because of new experimental technologies (ultra-high vacuum, for instance), as well as because of a novel paradigm, the ‘surface science’ approach. The book describes the second transformation which is now taking place pushed by the availability of powerful quantum-mechanical theoretical methods implemented numerically. In the book, experiment and theory progress hand in hand with an unprecedented degree of accuracy and control. The book presents how modern surface science targets the atomic-level u...

  3. Dynamical networks of person to person interactions from RFID sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isella, Lorenzo; Cattuto, Ciro; Barrat, Alain

    2010-03-01

    We present a scalable experimental framework for gathering real-time data on face-to-face social interactions with tunable spatial and temporal resolution. We use active Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) devices that assess mutual proximity in a distributed fashion by exchanging low-power radio packets. We show results on the analysis of the dynamical networks of person-to-person interaction obtained in four high- resolution experiments carried out at different orders of magnitude in community size.

  4. Graphics processing unit-based alignment of protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiang; Zhou, Zhonghua; Ma, Jin; Xiang, Chaojuan; Nie, Qing; Zhang, Wu

    2015-08-01

    Network alignment is an important bridge to understanding human protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and functions through model organisms. However, the underlying subgraph isomorphism problem complicates and increases the time required to align protein interaction networks (PINs). Parallel computing technology is an effective solution to the challenge of aligning large-scale networks via sequential computing. In this study, the typical Hungarian-Greedy Algorithm (HGA) is used as an example for PIN alignment. The authors propose a HGA with 2-nearest neighbours (HGA-2N) and implement its graphics processing unit (GPU) acceleration. Numerical experiments demonstrate that HGA-2N can find alignments that are close to those found by HGA while dramatically reducing computing time. The GPU implementation of HGA-2N optimises the parallel pattern, computing mode and storage mode and it improves the computing time ratio between the CPU and GPU compared with HGA when large-scale networks are considered. By using HGA-2N in GPUs, conserved PPIs can be observed, and potential PPIs can be predicted. Among the predictions based on 25 common Gene Ontology terms, 42.8% can be found in the Human Protein Reference Database. Furthermore, a new method of reconstructing phylogenetic trees is introduced, which shows the same relationships among five herpes viruses that are obtained using other methods.

  5. Cytoscape Web: an interactive web-based network browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Christian T; Franz, Max; Kazi, Farzana; Donaldson, Sylva L; Morris, Quaid; Bader, Gary D

    2010-09-15

    Cytoscape Web is a web-based network visualization tool-modeled after Cytoscape-which is open source, interactive, customizable and easily integrated into web sites. Multiple file exchange formats can be used to load data into Cytoscape Web, including GraphML, XGMML and SIF. Cytoscape Web is implemented in Flex/ActionScript with a JavaScript API and is freely available at http://cytoscapeweb.cytoscape.org/.

  6. Consensus of Multiagent Networks with Intermittent Interaction and Directed Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent interaction control is introduced to solve the consensus problem for second-order multiagent networks due to the limited sensing abilities and environmental changes periodically. And, we get some sufficient conditions for the agents to reach consensus with linear protocol from the theoretical findings by using the Lyapunov control approach. Finally, the validity of the theoretical results is validated through the numerical example.

  7. Experimental evolution of protein?protein interaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ka?ar, Bet?l; Gaucher, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    The modern synthesis of evolutionary theory and genetics has enabled us to discover underlying molecular mechanisms of organismal evolution. We know that in order to maximize an organism's fitness in a particular environment, individual interactions among components of protein and nucleic acid networks need to be optimized by natural selection, or sometimes through random processes, as the organism responds to changes and/or challenges in the environment. Despite the significant role of molec...

  8. Probing anisotropic surface properties and interaction forces of chrysotile rods by atomic force microscopy and rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dingzheng; Xie, Lei; Bobicki, Erin; Xu, Zhenghe; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2014-09-16

    Understanding the surface properties and interactions of nonspherical particles is of both fundamental and practical importance in the rheology of complex fluids in various engineering applications. In this work, natural chrysotile, a phyllosilicate composed of 1:1 stacked silica and brucite layers which coil into cylindrical structure, was chosen as a model rod-shaped particle. The interactions of chrysotile brucite-like basal or bilayered edge planes and a silicon nitride tip were measured using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The force-distance profiles were fitted using the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, which demonstrates anisotropic and pH-dependent surface charge properties of brucite-like basal plane and bilayered edge surface. The points of zero charge (PZC) of the basal and edge planes were estimated to be around pH 10-11 and 6-7, respectively. Rheology measurements of 7 vol % chrysotile (with an aspect ratio of 14.5) in 10 mM NaCl solution showed pH-dependent yield stress with a local maximum around pH 7-9, which falls between the two PZC values of the edge and basal planes of the rod particles. On the basis of the surface potentials of the edge and basal planes obtained from AFM measurements, theoretical analysis of the surface interactions of edge-edge, basal-edge, and basal-basal planes of the chrysotile rods suggests the yield stress maximum observed could be mainly attributed to the basal-edge attractions. Our results indicate that the anisotropic surface properties (e.g., charges) of chrysotile rods play an important role in the particle-particle interaction and rheological behavior, which also provides insight into the basic understanding of the colloidal interactions and rheology of nonspherical particles.

  9. MDM2–MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2–MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) in the micromolar range for the MDM2–MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2–MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation. PMID:27621617

  10. KNOWNET: Exploring Interactive Knowledge Networking across Insurance Supply Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Grant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Social media has become an extremely powerful phenomenon with millions of users who post status updates, blog, links and pictures on social networking sites such as Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. However, social networking has so far spread mainly among consumers. Businesses are only now beginning to acknowledge the benefits of using social media to enhance employee and supplier collaboration to support new ideas and innovation through knowledge sharing across functions and organizational boundaries. Many businesses are still trying to understand the various implications of integrating internal communication systems with social media tools and private collaboration and networking platforms. Indeed, a current issue in organizations today is to explore the value of social media mechanisms across a range of functions within their organizations and across their supply chains.The KNOWNET project (an EC funded Marie Curie IAPP seeks to assess the value of social networking for knowledge exchange across Insurance supply chains. A key objective of the project being to develop and build a web based interactive environment - a Supplier Social Network or SSN, to support and facilitate exchange of good ideas, insights, knowledge, innovations etc across a diverse group of suppliers within a multi level supply chain within the Insurance sector.

  11. Network characteristics emerging from agent interactions in balanced distributed system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Mahdi Abed; Bertelle, Cyrille; Sanlaville, Eric

    2015-01-01

    A distributed computing system behaves like a complex network, the interactions between nodes being essential information exchanges and migrations of jobs or services to execute. These actions are performed by software agents, which behave like the members of social networks, cooperating and competing to obtain knowledge and services. The load balancing consists in distributing the load evenly between system nodes. It aims at enhancing the resource usage. A load balancing strategy specifies scenarios for the cooperation. Its efficiency depends on quantity, accuracy, and distribution of available information. Nevertheless, the distribution of information on the nodes, together with the initial network structure, may create different logical network structures. In this paper, different load balancing strategies are tested on different network structures using a simulation. The four tested strategies are able to distribute evenly the load so that the system reaches a steady state (the mean response time of the jobs is constant), but it is shown that a given strategy indeed behaves differently according to structural parameters and information spreading. Such a study, devoted to distributed computing systems (DCSs), can be useful to understand and drive the behavior of other complex systems.

  12. How People Interact in Evolving Online Affiliation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazaros K. Gallos

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of human interactions is of central importance for understanding the behavior of individuals, groups, and societies. Here, we observe the formation and evolution of networks by monitoring the addition of all new links, and we analyze quantitatively the tendencies used to create ties in these evolving online affiliation networks. We show that an accurate estimation of these probabilistic tendencies can be achieved only by following the time evolution of the network. Inferences about the reason for the existence of links using statistical analysis of network snapshots must therefore be made with great caution. Here, we start by characterizing every single link when the tie was established in the network. This information allows us to describe the probabilistic tendencies of tie formation and extract meaningful sociological conclusions. We also find significant differences in behavioral traits in the social tendencies among individuals according to their degree of activity, gender, age, popularity, and other attributes. For instance, in the particular data sets analyzed here, we find that women reciprocate connections 3 times as much as men and that this difference increases with age. Men tend to connect with the most popular people more often than women do, across all ages. On the other hand, triangular tie tendencies are similar, independent of gender, and show an increase with age. These results require further validation in other social settings. Our findings can be useful to build models of realistic social network structures and to discover the underlying laws that govern establishment of ties in evolving social networks.

  13. Interaction signatures stabilizing the NAD(P-binding Rossmann fold: a structure network approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moitrayee Bhattacharyya

    Full Text Available The fidelity of the folding pathways being encoded in the amino acid sequence is met with challenge in instances where proteins with no sequence homology, performing different functions and no apparent evolutionary linkage, adopt a similar fold. The problem stated otherwise is that a limited fold space is available to a repertoire of diverse sequences. The key question is what factors lead to the formation of a fold from diverse sequences. Here, with the NAD(P-binding Rossmann fold domains as a case study and using the concepts of network theory, we have unveiled the consensus structural features that drive the formation of this fold. We have proposed a graph theoretic formalism to capture the structural details in terms of the conserved atomic interactions in global milieu, and hence extract the essential topological features from diverse sequences. A unified mathematical representation of the different structures together with a judicious concoction of several network parameters enabled us to probe into the structural features driving the adoption of the NAD(P-binding Rossmann fold. The atomic interactions at key positions seem to be better conserved in proteins, as compared to the residues participating in these interactions. We propose a "spatial motif" and several "fold specific hot spots" that form the signature structural blueprints of the NAD(P-binding Rossmann fold domain. Excellent agreement of our data with previous experimental and theoretical studies validates the robustness and validity of the approach. Additionally, comparison of our results with statistical coupling analysis (SCA provides further support. The methodology proposed here is general and can be applied to similar problems of interest.

  14. Interaction Network Estimation: Predicting Problem-Solving Diversity in Interactive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Michael; Hicks, Drew; Barnes, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent tutoring systems and computer aided learning environments aimed at developing problem solving produce large amounts of transactional data which make it a challenge for both researchers and educators to understand how students work within the environment. Researchers have modeled student-tutor interactions using complex networks in…

  15. AtPIN: Arabidopsis thaliana Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva-Filho Marcio C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions (PPIs constitute one of the most crucial conditions to sustain life in living organisms. To study PPI in Arabidopsis thaliana we have developed AtPIN, a database and web interface for searching and building interaction networks based on publicly available protein-protein interaction datasets. Description All interactions were divided into experimentally demonstrated or predicted. The PPIs in the AtPIN database present a cellular compartment classification (C3 which divides the PPI into 4 classes according to its interaction evidence and subcellular localization. It has been shown in the literature that a pair of genuine interacting proteins are generally expected to have a common cellular role and proteins that have common interaction partners have a high chance of sharing a common function. In AtPIN, due to its integrative profile, the reliability index for a reported PPI can be postulated in terms of the proportion of interaction partners that two proteins have in common. For this, we implement the Functional Similarity Weight (FSW calculation for all first level interactions present in AtPIN database. In order to identify target proteins of cytosolic glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (Cyt-gluRS (AT5G26710 we combined two approaches, AtPIN search and yeast two-hybrid screening. Interestingly, the proteins glutamine synthetase (AT5G35630, a disease resistance protein (AT3G50950 and a zinc finger protein (AT5G24930, which has been predicted as target proteins for Cyt-gluRS by AtPIN, were also detected in the experimental screening. Conclusions AtPIN is a friendly and easy-to-use tool that aggregates information on Arabidopsis thaliana PPIs, ontology, and sub-cellular localization, and might be a useful and reliable strategy to map protein-protein interactions in Arabidopsis. AtPIN can be accessed at http://bioinfo.esalq.usp.br/atpin.

  16. Interactive control over a programmable computer network using a multi-touch surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkers, R.J.; Muller, L.; Cristea, M.L.; Belleman, R.; de Laat, C.; Sloot, P.; Meijer, R.

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces the Interactive Network concept and describes the design and implementation of the first prototype. In an Interactive Network humans become an integral part of the control system to manage programmable networks and grid networks. The implementation consists of a multi-touch

  17. Cavity QED with atomic mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D. E.; Jiang, L.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Kimble, H. J.

    2012-06-01

    A promising approach to merge atomic systems with scalable photonics has emerged recently, which consists of trapping cold atoms near tapered nanofibers. Here, we describe a novel technique to achieve strong, coherent coupling between a single atom and photon in such a system. Our approach makes use of collective enhancement effects, which allow a lattice of atoms to form a high-finesse cavity within the fiber. We show that a specially designated ‘impurity’ atom within the cavity can experience strongly enhanced interactions with single photons in the fiber. Under realistic conditions, a ‘strong coupling’ regime can be reached, wherein it becomes feasible to observe vacuum Rabi oscillations between the excited impurity atom and a single cavity quantum. This technique can form the basis for a scalable quantum information network using atom-nanofiber systems.

  18. Interaction techniques for selecting and manipulating subgraphs in network visualizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffin, Michael J; Jurisica, Igor

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel and extensible set of interaction techniques for manipulating visualizations of networks by selecting subgraphs and then applying various commands to modify their layout or graphical properties. Our techniques integrate traditional rectangle and lasso selection, and also support selecting a node's neighbourhood by dragging out its radius (in edges) using a novel kind of radial menu. Commands for translation, rotation, scaling, or modifying graphical properties (such as opacity) and layout patterns can be performed by using a hotbox (a transiently popped-up, semi-transparent set of widgets) that has been extended in novel ways to integrate specification of commands with 1D or 2D arguments. Our techniques require only one mouse button and one keyboard key, and are designed for fast, gestural, in-place interaction. We present the design and integration of these interaction techniques, and illustrate their use in interactive graph visualization. Our techniques are implemented in NAViGaTOR, a software package for visualizing and analyzing biological networks. An initial usability study is also reported.

  19. Protein function prediction using guilty by association from interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Damiano; Giollo, Manuel; Ferrari, Carlo; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2015-12-01

    Protein function prediction from sequence using the Gene Ontology (GO) classification is useful in many biological problems. It has recently attracted increasing interest, thanks in part to the Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA) challenge. In this paper, we introduce Guilty by Association on STRING (GAS), a tool to predict protein function exploiting protein-protein interaction networks without sequence similarity. The assumption is that whenever a protein interacts with other proteins, it is part of the same biological process and located in the same cellular compartment. GAS retrieves interaction partners of a query protein from the STRING database and measures enrichment of the associated functional annotations to generate a sorted list of putative functions. A performance evaluation based on CAFA metrics and a fair comparison with optimized BLAST similarity searches is provided. The consensus of GAS and BLAST is shown to improve overall performance. The PPI approach is shown to outperform similarity searches for biological process and cellular compartment GO predictions. Moreover, an analysis of the best practices to exploit protein-protein interaction networks is also provided.

  20. Atomic force imaging microscopy investigation of the interaction of ultraviolet radiation with collagen thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, A.; Yova, D.; Alexandratou, E.; Petri, A.

    2013-02-01

    Collagen is the major fibrous protein in the extracellular matrix and consists a significant component of skin, bone, cartilage and tendon. Due to its unique properties, it has been widely used as scaffold or culture substrate for tissue regeneration or/and cell-substrate interaction studies. The ultraviolet light-collagen interaction investigations are crucial for the improvement of many applications such as that of the UV irradiation in the field of biomaterials, as sterilizing and photo-cross-linking method. The aim of this paper was to investigate the mechanisms of UV-collagen interactions by developing a collagen-based, well characterized, surface with controlled topography of collagen thin films in the nanoscale range. The methodology was to quantify the collagen surface modification induced on ultraviolet radiation and correlate it with changes induced in cells. Surface nanoscale characterization was performed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) which is a powerful tool and offers quantitative and qualitative information with a non-destructive manner. In order to investigate cells behavior, the irradiated films were used for in vitro cultivation of human skin fibroblasts and the cells morphology, migration and alignment were assessed with fluorescence microscopy imaging and image processing methods. The clarification of the effects of UV light on collagen thin films and the way of cells behavior to the different modifications that UV induced to the collagen-based surfaces will contribute to the better understanding of cell-matrix interactions in the nanoscale and will assist the appropriate use of UV light for developing biomaterials.

  1. Lightweight Interactions for Reciprocal Cooperation in a Social Network Game

    CERN Document Server

    Takano, Masanori; Fukuda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The construction of reciprocal relationships requires cooperative interactions during the initial meetings. However, cooperative behavior with strangers is risky because the strangers may be exploiters. In this study, we show that people increase the likelihood of cooperativeness of strangers by using lightweight non-risky interactions in risky situations based on the analysis of a social network game (SNG). They can construct reciprocal relationships in this manner. The interactions involve low-cost signaling because they are not generated at any cost to the senders and recipients. Theoretical studies show that low-cost signals are not guaranteed to be reliable because the low-cost signals from senders can lie at any time. However, people used low-cost signals to construct reciprocal relationships in an SNG, which suggests the existence of mechanisms for generating reliable, low-cost signals in human evolution.

  2. Influence of Halide Solutions on Collagen Networks: Measurements of Physical Properties by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Spitzer-Sonnleitner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of aqueous halide solutions on collagen coatings was tested. The effects on resistance against indentation/penetration on adhesion forces were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM and the change of Young’s modulus of the coating was derived. Comparative measurements over time were conducted with halide solutions of various concentrations. Physical properties of the mesh-like coating generally showed large variability. Starting with a compact set of physical properties, data disperse after minutes. A trend of increase in elasticity and permeability was found for all halide solutions. These changes were largest in NaI, displaying a logical trend with ion size. However a correlation with concentration was not measured. Adhesion properties were found to be independent of mechanical properties. The paper also presents practical experience for AFM measurements of soft tissue under liquids, particularly related to data evaluation. The weakening in physical strength found after exposure to halide solutions may be interpreted as widening of the network structure or change in the chemical properties in part of the collagen fibres (swelling. In order to design customized surface coatings at optimized conditions also for medical applications, halide solutions might be used as agents with little impact on the safety of patients.

  3. Influence of Halide Solutions on Collagen Networks: Measurements of Physical Properties by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer-Sonnleitner, Birgit; Kempe, André; Lackner, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    The influence of aqueous halide solutions on collagen coatings was tested. The effects on resistance against indentation/penetration on adhesion forces were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the change of Young's modulus of the coating was derived. Comparative measurements over time were conducted with halide solutions of various concentrations. Physical properties of the mesh-like coating generally showed large variability. Starting with a compact set of physical properties, data disperse after minutes. A trend of increase in elasticity and permeability was found for all halide solutions. These changes were largest in NaI, displaying a logical trend with ion size. However a correlation with concentration was not measured. Adhesion properties were found to be independent of mechanical properties. The paper also presents practical experience for AFM measurements of soft tissue under liquids, particularly related to data evaluation. The weakening in physical strength found after exposure to halide solutions may be interpreted as widening of the network structure or change in the chemical properties in part of the collagen fibres (swelling). In order to design customized surface coatings at optimized conditions also for medical applications, halide solutions might be used as agents with little impact on the safety of patients.

  4. Exploring drug-target interaction networks of illicit drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Ravi V; Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-01-01

    Drug addiction is a complex and chronic mental disease, which places a large burden on the American healthcare system due to its negative effects on patients and their families. Recently, network pharmacology is emerging as a promising approach to drug discovery by integrating network biology and polypharmacology, allowing for a deeper understanding of molecular mechanisms of drug actions at the systems level. This study seeks to apply this approach for investigation of illicit drugs and their targets in order to elucidate their interaction patterns and potential secondary drugs that can aid future research and clinical care. In this study, we extracted 188 illicit substances and their related information from the DrugBank database. The data process revealed 86 illicit drugs targeting a total of 73 unique human genes, which forms an illicit drug-target network. Compared to the full drug-target network from DrugBank, illicit drugs and their target genes tend to cluster together and form four subnetworks, corresponding to four major medication categories: depressants, stimulants, analgesics, and steroids. External analysis of Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) second sublevel classifications confirmed that the illicit drugs have neurological functions or act via mechanisms of stimulants, opioids, and steroids. To further explore other drugs potentially having associations with illicit drugs, we constructed an illicit-extended drug-target network by adding the drugs that have the same target(s) as illicit drugs to the illicit drug-target network. After analyzing the degree and betweenness of the network, we identified hubs and bridge nodes, which might play important roles in the development and treatment of drug addiction. Among them, 49 non-illicit drugs might have potential to be used to treat addiction or have addictive effects, including some results that are supported by previous studies. This study presents the first systematic review of the network

  5. Fractional Dynamics of Network Growth Constrained by Aging Node Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiseh Safdari

    Full Text Available In many social complex systems, in which agents are linked by non-linear interactions, the history of events strongly influences the whole network dynamics. However, a class of "commonly accepted beliefs" seems rarely studied. In this paper, we examine how the growth process of a (social network is influenced by past circumstances. In order to tackle this cause, we simply modify the well known preferential attachment mechanism by imposing a time dependent kernel function in the network evolution equation. This approach leads to a fractional order Barabási-Albert (BA differential equation, generalizing the BA model. Our results show that, with passing time, an aging process is observed for the network dynamics. The aging process leads to a decay for the node degree values, thereby creating an opposing process to the preferential attachment mechanism. On one hand, based on the preferential attachment mechanism, nodes with a high degree are more likely to absorb links; but, on the other hand, a node's age has a reduced chance for new connections. This competitive scenario allows an increased chance for younger members to become a hub. Simulations of such a network growth with aging constraint confirm the results found from solving the fractional BA equation. We also report, as an exemplary application, an investigation of the collaboration network between Hollywood movie actors. It is undubiously shown that a decay in the dynamics of their collaboration rate is found, even including a sex difference. Such findings suggest a widely universal application of the so generalized BA model.

  6. Unraveling protein-protein interactions in clathrin assemblies via atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Albert J; Lafer, Eileen M; Peng, Jennifer Q; Smith, Paul D; Nossal, Ralph

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and single particle force spectroscopy (SPFS) are used to characterize intermolecular interactions and domain structures of clathrin triskelia and clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). The latter are involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) and other trafficking pathways. Here, we subject individual triskelia, bovine-brain CCVs, and reconstituted clathrin-AP180 coats to AFM-SMFS and AFM-SPFS pulling experiments and apply novel analytics to extract force-extension relations from very large data sets. The spectroscopic fingerprints of these samples differ markedly, providing important new information about the mechanism of CCV uncoating. For individual triskelia, SMFS reveals a series of events associated with heavy chain alpha-helix hairpin unfolding, as well as cooperative unraveling of several hairpin domains. SPFS of clathrin assemblies exposes weaker clathrin-clathrin interactions that are indicative of inter-leg association essential for RME and intracellular trafficking. Clathrin-AP180 coats are energetically easier to unravel than the coats of CCVs, with a non-trivial dependence on force-loading rate. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Single Molecule Science for Personalized Nanomedicine: Atomic Force Microscopy of Biopolymer-Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Carlin

    Nanotechnology has a unique and relatively untapped utility in the fields of medicine and dentistry at the level of single-biopolymer and -molecule diagnostics. In recent years atomic force microscopy (AFM) has garnered much interest due to its ability to obtain atomic-resolution of molecular structures and probe biophysical behaviors of biopolymers and proteins in a variety of biologically significant environments. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the nanoscale manipulation and observation of biopolymers to develop an innovative technology for personalized medicine while understanding complex biological systems. These studies described here primarily use AFM to observe biopolymer interactions with proteins and its surroundings with unprecedented resolution, providing a better understanding of these systems and interactions at the nanoscale. Transcriptional profiling, the measure of messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance in a single cell, is a powerful technique that detects "behavior" or "symptoms" at the tissue and cellular level. We have sought to develop an alternative approach, using our expertise in AFM and single molecule nanotechnology, to achieve a cost-effective high throughput method for sensitive detection and profiling of subtle changes in transcript abundance. The technique does not require amplification of the mRNA sample because the AFM provides three-dimensional views of molecules with unprecedented resolution, requires minimal sample preparation, and utilizes a simple tagging chemistry on cDNA molecules. AFM images showed collagen polymers in teeth and of Drebrin-A remodeling of filamentous actin structure and mechanics. AFM was used to image collagen on exposed dentine tubules and confirmed tubule occlusion with a desensitizing prophylaxis paste by Colgate-Palmolive. The AFM also superseded other microscopy tools in resolving F-actin helix remodeling and possible cooperative binding by a neuronal actin binding protein---Drebrin-A, an

  8. Network of interactions between ciliates and phytoplankton during spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas ePosch

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The annually recurrent spring phytoplankton blooms in freshwater lakes initiate pronounced successions of planktonic ciliate species. Although there is considerable knowledge on the taxonomic diversity of these ciliates, their species-specific interactions with other microorganisms are still not well understood. Here we present the succession patterns of 20 morphotypes of ciliates during spring in Lake Zurich, Switzerland, and we relate their abundances to phytoplankton genera, flagellates, heterotrophic bacteria, and abiotic parameters. Interspecific relationships were analyzed by contemporaneous correlations and time-lagged co-occurrence and visualized as association networks. The contemporaneous network pointed to the pivotal role of distinct ciliate species (e.g., Balanion planctonicum, Rimostrombidium humile as primary consumers of cryptomonads, revealed a clear overclustering of mixotrophic / omnivorous species, and highlighted the role of Halteria / Pelagohalteria as important bacterivores. By contrast, time-lagged statistical approaches (like local similarity analyses, LSA proved to be inadequate for the evaluation of high-frequency sampling data. LSA led to a conspicuous inflation of significant associations, making it difficult to establish ecologically plausible interactions between ciliates and other microorganisms. Nevertheless, if adequate statistical procedures are selected, association networks can be powerful tools to formulate testable hypotheses about the autecology of only recently described ciliate species.

  9. Enhancement of the quadrupole interaction of an atom with the guided light of an ultrathin optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Kien, Fam; Ray, Tridib; Nieddu, Thomas; Busch, Thomas; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the electric quadrupole interaction of an alkali-metal atom with guided light in the fundamental and higher-order modes of a vacuum-clad ultrathin optical fiber. We calculate the quadrupole Rabi frequency, the quadrupole oscillator strength, and their enhancement factors. In the example of a 87Rb atom, we study the dependencies of the quadrupole Rabi frequency on the quantum numbers of the transition, the mode type, the phase circulation direction, the propagation direction, the orientation of the quantization axis, the position of the atom, and the fiber radius. We find that the root-mean-square (rms) quadrupole Rabi frequency reduces quickly but the quadrupole oscillator strength varies slowly with increasing radial distance. We show that the enhancement factors of the rms Rabi frequency and the oscillator strength do not depend on any characteristics of the internal atomic states except for the atomic transition frequency. The enhancement factor of the oscillator strength can be significant even when the atom is far away from the fiber. We show that, in the case where the atom is positioned on the fiber surface, the oscillator strength for the quasicircularly polarized fundamental mode HE11 has a local minimum at the fiber radius a ≃107 nm, and is larger than that for quasicircularly polarized higher-order hybrid modes, transverse electric modes, and transverse magnetic modes in the region a <498.2 nm.

  10. Microscopic interactions lead to mutual synchronization in a network of networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yao-Chen

    2011-07-01

    This Letter proposes a stochastic coupling scheme to study the collective dynamics in a network that comprises random Boolean networks. Based on microscopic interactions, which are understood as the exchange of information among nodes, mutual synchronization can be achieved when the product of the assigning probability and influence probability exceeds a critical threshold. A mean field model is developed to approximate the dynamical behaviors of the original system. The effect of finite system size can be further mimicked by incorporating a noise term into the model. The dependence of the synchronization threshold on the degrees of connectivity and coupling configuration is analyzed.

  11. Supply Chain Management: from Linear Interactions to Networked Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doina FOTACHE

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Supply Chain Management is a distinctive product, with a tremendous impact on the software applications market. SCM applications are back-end solutions intended to link suppliers, manufacturers, distributors and resellers in a production and distribution network, which allows the enterprise to track and consolidate the flows of materials and data trough the process of manufacturing and distribution of goods/services. The advent of the Web as a major means of conducting business transactions and business-tobusiness communications, coupled with evolving web-based supply chain management (SCM technology, has resulted in a transition period from “linear” supply chain models to "networked" supply chain models. The technologies to enable dynamic process changes and real time interactions between extended supply chain partners are emerging and being deployed at an accelerated pace.

  12. Systematic discovery of new recognition peptides mediating protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Many aspects of cell signalling, trafficking, and targeting are governed by interactions between globular protein domains and short peptide segments. These domains often bind multiple peptides that share a common sequence pattern, or "linear motif" (e.g., SH3 binding to PxxP. Many domains are known, though comparatively few linear motifs have been discovered. Their short length (three to eight residues, and the fact that they often reside in disordered regions in proteins makes them difficult to detect through sequence comparison or experiment. Nevertheless, each new motif provides critical molecular details of how interaction networks are constructed, and can explain how one protein is able to bind to very different partners. Here we show that binding motifs can be detected using data from genome-scale interaction studies, and thus avoid the normally slow discovery process. Our approach based on motif over-representation in non-homologous sequences, rediscovers known motifs and predicts dozens of others. Direct binding experiments reveal that two predicted motifs are indeed protein-binding modules: a DxxDxxxD protein phosphatase 1 binding motif with a KD of 22 microM and a VxxxRxYS motif that binds Translin with a KD of 43 microM. We estimate that there are dozens or even hundreds of linear motifs yet to be discovered that will give molecular insight into protein networks and greatly illuminate cellular processes.

  13. Interactive forces between lignin and cellulase as determined by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Lignin is a complex polymer which inhibits the enzymatic conversion of cellulose to glucose in lignocellulose biomass for biofuel production. Cellulase enzymes irreversibly bind to lignin, deactivating the enzyme and lowering the overall activity of the hydrolyzing reaction solution. Within this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to compare the adhesion forces between cellulase and lignin with the forces between cellulase and cellulose, and to study the moiety groups involved in binding of cellulase to lignin. Results Trichoderma reesei, ATCC 26921, a commercial cellulase system, was immobilized onto silicon wafers and used as a substrate to measure forces involved in cellulase non-productive binding to lignin. Attraction forces between cellulase and lignin, and between cellulase and cellulose were compared using kraft lignin- and hydroxypropyl cellulose-coated tips with the immobilized cellulase substrate. The measured adhesion forces between kraft lignin and cellulase were on average 45% higher than forces between hydroxypropyl cellulose and cellulase. Specialized AFM tips with hydrophobic, -OH, and -COOH chemical characteristics were used with immobilized cellulase to represent hydrophobic, H-bonding, and charge-charge interactions, respectively. Forces between hydrophobic tips and cellulase were on average 43% and 13% higher than forces between cellulase with tips exhibiting OH and COOH groups, respectively. A strong attractive force during the AFM tip approach to the immobilized cellulase was observed with the hydrophobic tip. Conclusions This work shows that there is a greater overall attraction between kraft lignin and cellulase than between hydroxypropyl cellulose and cellulase, which may have implications during the enzymatic reaction process. Furthermore, hydrophobic interactions appear to be the dominating attraction force in cellulase binding to lignin, while a number of other interactions may establish the irreversible binding

  14. Interactive forces between lignin and cellulase as determined by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chengrong; Clarke, Kimberley; Li, Kecheng

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a complex polymer which inhibits the enzymatic conversion of cellulose to glucose in lignocellulose biomass for biofuel production. Cellulase enzymes irreversibly bind to lignin, deactivating the enzyme and lowering the overall activity of the hydrolyzing reaction solution. Within this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to compare the adhesion forces between cellulase and lignin with the forces between cellulase and cellulose, and to study the moiety groups involved in binding of cellulase to lignin. Trichoderma reesei, ATCC 26921, a commercial cellulase system, was immobilized onto silicon wafers and used as a substrate to measure forces involved in cellulase non-productive binding to lignin. Attraction forces between cellulase and lignin, and between cellulase and cellulose were compared using kraft lignin- and hydroxypropyl cellulose-coated tips with the immobilized cellulase substrate. The measured adhesion forces between kraft lignin and cellulase were on average 45% higher than forces between hydroxypropyl cellulose and cellulase. Specialized AFM tips with hydrophobic, -OH, and -COOH chemical characteristics were used with immobilized cellulase to represent hydrophobic, H-bonding, and charge-charge interactions, respectively. Forces between hydrophobic tips and cellulase were on average 43% and 13% higher than forces between cellulase with tips exhibiting OH and COOH groups, respectively. A strong attractive force during the AFM tip approach to the immobilized cellulase was observed with the hydrophobic tip. This work shows that there is a greater overall attraction between kraft lignin and cellulase than between hydroxypropyl cellulose and cellulase, which may have implications during the enzymatic reaction process. Furthermore, hydrophobic interactions appear to be the dominating attraction force in cellulase binding to lignin, while a number of other interactions may establish the irreversible binding.

  15. Network-theoretic approach to model vortex interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Aditya; Taira, Kunihiko

    2014-11-01

    We present a network-theoretic approach to describe a system of point vortices in two-dimensional flow. By considering the point vortices as nodes, a complete graph is constructed with edges connecting each vortex to every other vortex. The interactions between the vortices are captured by the graph edge weights. We employ sparsification techniques on these graph representations based on spectral theory to construct sparsified models of the overall vortical interactions. The edge weights are redistributed through spectral sparsification of the graph such that the sum of the interactions associated with each vortex is maintained constant. In addition, sparse configurations maintain similar spectral properties as the original setup. Through the reduction in the number of interactions, key vortex interactions can be highlighted. Identification of vortex structures based on graph sparsification is demonstrated with an example of clusters of point vortices. We also evaluate the computational performance of sparsification for large collection of point vortices. Work supported by US Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0386) and US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (YIP: FA9550-13-1-0183).

  16. Human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN): a systems biology perspective on topology, stability and functionality of the network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Avijit; Jatana, Nidhi; Latha, N

    2014-09-21

    Dopamine receptors (DR) are one of the major neurotransmitter receptors present in human brain. Malfunctioning of these receptors is well established to trigger many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Taking into consideration that proteins function collectively in a network for most of the biological processes, the present study is aimed to depict the interactions between all dopamine receptors following a systems biology approach. To capture comprehensive interactions of candidate proteins associated with human dopamine receptors, we performed a protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) analysis of all five receptors and their protein partners by mapping them into human interactome and constructed a human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN). We explored the topology of dopamine receptors as molecular network, revealing their characteristics and the role of central network elements. More to the point, a sub-network analysis was done to determine major functional clusters in human DRIN that govern key neurological pathways. Besides, interacting proteins in a pathway were characterized and prioritized based on their affinity for utmost drug molecules. The vulnerability of different networks to the dysfunction of diverse combination of components was estimated under random and direct attack scenarios. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is unique to put all five dopamine receptors together in a common interaction network and to understand the functionality of interacting proteins collectively. Our study pinpointed distinctive topological and functional properties of human dopamine receptors that have helped in identifying potential therapeutic drug targets in the dopamine interaction network. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Visualization of protein interaction networks: problems and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapito, Giuseppe; Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Visualization concerns the representation of data visually and is an important task in scientific research. Protein-protein interactions (PPI) are discovered using either wet lab techniques, such mass spectrometry, or in silico predictions tools, resulting in large collections of interactions stored in specialized databases. The set of all interactions of an organism forms a protein-protein interaction network (PIN) and is an important tool for studying the behaviour of the cell machinery. Since graphic representation of PINs may highlight important substructures, e.g. protein complexes, visualization is more and more used to study the underlying graph structure of PINs. Although graphs are well known data structures, there are different open problems regarding PINs visualization: the high number of nodes and connections, the heterogeneity of nodes (proteins) and edges (interactions), the possibility to annotate proteins and interactions with biological information extracted by ontologies (e.g. Gene Ontology) that enriches the PINs with semantic information, but complicates their visualization. In these last years many software tools for the visualization of PINs have been developed. Initially thought for visualization only, some of them have been successively enriched with new functions for PPI data management and PIN analysis. The paper analyzes the main software tools for PINs visualization considering four main criteria: (i) technology, i.e. availability/license of the software and supported OS (Operating System) platforms; (ii) interoperability, i.e. ability to import/export networks in various formats, ability to export data in a graphic format, extensibility of the system, e.g. through plug-ins; (iii) visualization, i.e. supported layout and rendering algorithms and availability of parallel implementation; (iv) analysis, i.e. availability of network analysis functions, such as clustering or mining of the graph, and the possibility to interact with external

  18. Self-alignment of Co adatoms on in atomic wires by quasi-one-dimensional electron-gas-meditated interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Canhua; Uchihashi, Takashi; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2008-10-03

    Low-density Co atoms are found to self-align on the Si(111)-(4 x 1)-In surface in the direction of In atomic wires at incommensurate adsorption sites. Indirect interaction between a pair of Co adatoms is investigated through a site distribution function of adatoms determined with scanning tunneling microscopy. In the direction of self-alignment, the potential of the mean force between two Co adatoms is long-range and oscillatory with multiple frequencies, which correlate strongly to the electronic scattering vectors of the surface-state bands at the Fermi level. We thus attribute the Co-Co interaction to that mediated by a quasi-one-dimensional electron gas confined within the In atomic wires.

  19. Energy Landscape of Alginate-Epimerase Interactions Assessed by Optical Tweezers and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håti, Armend Gazmeno; Aachmann, Finn Lillelund; Stokke, Bjørn Torger; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Sletmoen, Marit

    2015-01-01

    Mannuronan C-5 epimerases are a family of enzymes that catalyze epimerization of alginates at the polymer level. This group of enzymes thus enables the tailor-making of various alginate residue sequences to attain various functional properties, e.g. viscosity, gelation and ion binding. Here, the interactions between epimerases AlgE4 and AlgE6 and alginate substrates as well as epimerization products were determined. The interactions of the various epimerase–polysaccharide pairs were determined over an extended range of force loading rates by the combined use of optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. When studying systems that in nature are not subjected to external forces the access to observations obtained at low loading rates, as provided by optical tweezers, is a great advantage since the low loading rate region for these systems reflect the properties of the rate limiting energy barrier. The AlgE epimerases have a modular structure comprising both A and R modules, and the role of each of these modules in the epimerization process were examined through studies of the A- module of AlgE6, AlgE6A. Dynamic strength spectra obtained through combination of atomic force microscopy and the optical tweezers revealed the existence of two energy barriers in the alginate-epimerase complexes, of which one was not revealed in previous AFM based studies of these complexes. Furthermore, based on these spectra estimates of the locations of energy transition states (xβ), lifetimes in the absence of external perturbation (τ0) and free energies (ΔG#) were determined for the different epimerase–alginate complexes. This is the first determination of ΔG# for these complexes. The values determined were up to 8 kBT for the outer barrier, and smaller values for the inner barriers. The size of the free energies determined are consistent with the interpretation that the enzyme and substrate are thus not tightly locked at all times but are able to relocate. Together with the

  20. Energy Landscape of Alginate-Epimerase Interactions Assessed by Optical Tweezers and Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armend Gazmeno Håti

    Full Text Available Mannuronan C-5 epimerases are a family of enzymes that catalyze epimerization of alginates at the polymer level. This group of enzymes thus enables the tailor-making of various alginate residue sequences to attain various functional properties, e.g. viscosity, gelation and ion binding. Here, the interactions between epimerases AlgE4 and AlgE6 and alginate substrates as well as epimerization products were determined. The interactions of the various epimerase-polysaccharide pairs were determined over an extended range of force loading rates by the combined use of optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. When studying systems that in nature are not subjected to external forces the access to observations obtained at low loading rates, as provided by optical tweezers, is a great advantage since the low loading rate region for these systems reflect the properties of the rate limiting energy barrier. The AlgE epimerases have a modular structure comprising both A and R modules, and the role of each of these modules in the epimerization process were examined through studies of the A- module of AlgE6, AlgE6A. Dynamic strength spectra obtained through combination of atomic force microscopy and the optical tweezers revealed the existence of two energy barriers in the alginate-epimerase complexes, of which one was not revealed in previous AFM based studies of these complexes. Furthermore, based on these spectra estimates of the locations of energy transition states (xβ, lifetimes in the absence of external perturbation (τ0 and free energies (ΔG# were determined for the different epimerase-alginate complexes. This is the first determination of ΔG# for these complexes. The values determined were up to 8 kBT for the outer barrier, and smaller values for the inner barriers. The size of the free energies determined are consistent with the interpretation that the enzyme and substrate are thus not tightly locked at all times but are able to relocate

  1. Games as Actors - Interaction, Play, Design, and Actor Network Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Jari Due; Jessen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    data from a study of board games , computer games, and exergames, we conclude that games are actors that produce experiences by exercising power over the user’ s abilities, for example their cognitive functions. Games are designed to take advantage of the characteristics of the human players......When interacting with computer games, users are forced to follow the rules of the game in return for the excitement, joy, fun, or other pursued experiences. In this paper, we investigate how games a chieve these experiences in the perspective of Actor Network Theory (ANT). Based on a qualitative...

  2. Quantum logic gates based on off-resonant cavity-assisted interaction between three-level atoms and single photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, M.; Andrianov, S. N.; Kalachev, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    A scheme for implementing quantum gates on the basis of a hybrid system that consists of flying photons and a stationary three-level atom interacting with each other in a microring resonator is developed. By employing the Schrieffer-Wolf transformation, it is shown that various two-qubit gates can be implemented under conditions of dispersive interaction without the need for orthogonal Λ structure of optical transitions. As a promising system for implementation, NV centers are considered.

  3. Use of a PhET Interactive Simulation in General Chemistry Laboratory: Models of the Hydrogen Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ted M.; Chamberlain, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    An activity supporting the PhET interactive simulation, Models of the Hydrogen Atom, has been designed and used in the laboratory portion of a general chemistry course. This article describes the framework used to successfully accomplish implementation on a large scale. The activity guides students through a comparison and analysis of the six…

  4. Using Concept Maps as Instructional Materials to Foster the Understanding of the Atomic Model and Matter-Energy Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Joana G.; Correia, Paulo R. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the use of concept maps (Cmaps) as instructional materials prepared by teachers, to foster the understanding of chemistry. We choose fireworks as a macroscopic event to teach basic chemical principles related to the Bohr atomic model and matter-energy interaction. During teachers' Cmap navigation, students can experience…

  5. Messaging Performance of FIPA Interaction Protocols in Networked Embedded Controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Jehovani López Orozco

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Agent-based technologies in production control systems could facilitate seamless reconfiguration and integration of mechatronic devices/modules into systems. Advances in embedded controllers which are continuously improving computational capabilities allow for software modularization and distribution of decisions. Agent platforms running on embedded controllers could hide the complexity of bootstrap and communication. Therefore, it is important to investigate the messaging performance of the agents whose main motivation is the resource allocation in manufacturing systems (i.e., conveyor system. The tests were implemented using the FIPA-compliant JADE-LEAP agent platform. Agent containers were distributed through networked embedded controllers, and agents were communicating using request and contract-net FIPA interaction protocols. The test scenarios are organized in intercontainer and intracontainer communications. The work shows the messaging performance for the different test scenarios using both interaction protocols.

  6. In vivo dynamics of the cortical actin network revealed by fast-scanning atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanshu; Yoshida, Aiko; Sakai, Nobuaki; Uekusa, Yoshitsugu; Kumeta, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Shige H

    2017-08-01

    Together with lamellipodia and stress fibers, a dynamic network of actin filaments in the cell cortex plays a major role in the maintenance of cell morphology and motility. In contrast to lamellipodia, which have been well studied in various motile cells, the dynamics of actin filaments in the cell cortex have not yet been clarified due to a lack of proper imaging techniques. Here, we utilized high-speed atomic force microscopy for live-cell imaging and analyzed cortical actin dynamics in living cells. We successfully measured the polymerization rate and the frequency of filament synthesis in living COS-7 cells, and examined the associated effects of various inhibitors and actin-binding proteins. Actin filaments are synthesized beneath the plasma membrane and eventually descend into the cytoplasm. The inhibitors, cytochalasin B inhibited the polymerization, while jasplakinolide, inhibited the turnover of actin filaments as well as descension of the newly synthesized filaments, suggesting that actin polymerization near the membrane drives turnover of the cortical actin meshwork. We also determined how actin turnover is maintained and regulated by the free G-actin pool and G-actin binding proteins such as profilin and thymosin β4, and found that only a small amount of free G-actin was present in the cortex. Finally, we analyzed several different cell types, and found that the mesh size and the orientation of actin filaments were highly divergent, indicating the involvement of various actin-binding proteins in the maintenance and regulation of cortical actin architecture in each cell type. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Comparison of all-atom and coarse-grained normal mode analysis in the elastic network model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ming Wen; O' Riordan, Brian; Kim, Byung [University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst (United States); Kim, Moon Ki [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Elastic network-based normal mode analyses (EN-NMA) of four pairs of open-closed proteins (Lactoferrin, Maltodextrin-binding protein, LAO-binding protein, and Adenylate kinase) were conducted using both all-atom and coarse-grained models. The results indicated that the performance of the all-atom model was similar to that of the coarse-grained model in terms of predicting the conformational changes of backbones. Moreover, dynamic behavior was examined by studying relative atomic displacements and shapes of the dominant mode. For instance, for Maltodextrin-binding protein, the results from the all-atom model differed from those of the coarse-grained model, especially for residues that are biologically relevant. The coarse-grained model has better computational efficiency than the allatom model. However, the former may misrepresent the key dynamics of a protein related to biological functions as a consequence of excessive coarse approximation. Considering that the current power even in a high-end personal computer is sufficient to handle most of protein structures with up to 1,000 residues in a reasonable manner, which can only be used with supercomputers a few decades ago, an all-atom-based EN-NMA may deserve more attention as a reliable and powerful computational tool for protein dynamics study over the conventional coarse-graining approach.

  8. Exchange and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions in bulk FeGe: Effects of atomic vacancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Loh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We examine the effects of atomic vacancies on the (1 spin interaction, and (2 electronic character in the cubic B20 chiral magnet FeGe. For the former, Heisenberg exchange and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM interactions are studied. The latter is done via a particular Wannier flavor of the Hamiltonian in the form of maximally-localized Wannier functions (MLWFs. Using first-principles calculations based on full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FLAPW-based density functional theory (DFT, the spin order of bulk FeGe, in its pristine form, and with a Fe (Fe75%Ge100% or Ge vacancy (Fe100%Ge75% is investigated. Despite the presence of vacancies, the ground state of FeGe remains helimagnetic, i.e. spin spirals in FeGe are fairly robust. The energetic stability of FeGe increases in the presence of the vacancies. The spiral size is increased by approximately 40%, suggesting that vacancies can be introduced to manipulate the chiral order. The vacancies lift the band degeneracy in the valence manifold of the Wannier-interpolated band structures. Only the spin-down Fermi surfaces are substantially different between the pristine and defective FeGe; it is electron-like in the pristine case, but largely hole-like in the defective ones. The Ge vacancy splits the Fermi surface more than the Fe vacancy. The Heisenberg exchange between nearest Fe pairs is ferromagnetic in pristine FeGe. This Fe-Fe interaction remains ferromagnetic, albeit a slight decrease in strength, in the presence of a Fe vacancy. In contrast, a Ge vacancy in FeGe induces anti-ferromagnetism between nearest Fe pairs. By including spin-orbit coupling effects, we find that the DM interaction of defective FeGe is reversed in sign, and it is more uniform in strength along the three highly symmetric directions, relative to that in pristine FeGe. All in all, the versatility of FeGe makes it an excellent functional material, especially in data storage and spintronics applications.

  9. Exchange and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions in bulk FeGe: Effects of atomic vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, G. C.; Gan, C. K.

    2017-05-01

    We examine the effects of atomic vacancies on the (1) spin interaction, and (2) electronic character in the cubic B20 chiral magnet FeGe. For the former, Heisenberg exchange and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interactions are studied. The latter is done via a particular Wannier flavor of the Hamiltonian in the form of maximally-localized Wannier functions (MLWFs). Using first-principles calculations based on full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FLAPW)-based density functional theory (DFT), the spin order of bulk FeGe, in its pristine form, and with a Fe (Fe75%Ge100%) or Ge vacancy (Fe100%Ge75%) is investigated. Despite the presence of vacancies, the ground state of FeGe remains helimagnetic, i.e. spin spirals in FeGe are fairly robust. The energetic stability of FeGe increases in the presence of the vacancies. The spiral size is increased by approximately 40%, suggesting that vacancies can be introduced to manipulate the chiral order. The vacancies lift the band degeneracy in the valence manifold of the Wannier-interpolated band structures. Only the spin-down Fermi surfaces are substantially different between the pristine and defective FeGe; it is electron-like in the pristine case, but largely hole-like in the defective ones. The Ge vacancy splits the Fermi surface more than the Fe vacancy. The Heisenberg exchange between nearest Fe pairs is ferromagnetic in pristine FeGe. This Fe-Fe interaction remains ferromagnetic, albeit a slight decrease in strength, in the presence of a Fe vacancy. In contrast, a Ge vacancy in FeGe induces anti-ferromagnetism between nearest Fe pairs. By including spin-orbit coupling effects, we find that the DM interaction of defective FeGe is reversed in sign, and it is more uniform in strength along the three highly symmetric directions, relative to that in pristine FeGe. All in all, the versatility of FeGe makes it an excellent functional material, especially in data storage and spintronics applications.

  10. Modes of Escherichia coli Dps Interaction with DNA as Revealed by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav V Melekhov

    Full Text Available Multifunctional protein Dps plays an important role in iron assimilation and a crucial role in bacterial genome packaging. Its monomers form dodecameric spherical particles accumulating ~400 molecules of oxidized iron ions within the protein cavity and applying a flexible N-terminal ends of each subunit for interaction with DNA. Deposition of iron is a well-studied process by which cells remove toxic Fe2+ ions from the genetic material and store them in an easily accessible form. However, the mode of interaction with linear DNA remained mysterious and binary complexes with Dps have not been characterized so far. It is widely believed that Dps binds DNA without any sequence or structural preferences but several lines of evidence have demonstrated its ability to differentiate gene expression, which assumes certain specificity. Here we show that Dps has a different affinity for the two DNA fragments taken from the dps gene regulatory region. We found by atomic force microscopy that Dps predominantly occupies thermodynamically unstable ends of linear double-stranded DNA fragments and has high affinity to the central part of the branched DNA molecule self-assembled from three single-stranded oligonucleotides. It was proposed that Dps prefers binding to those regions in DNA that provide more contact pads for the triad of its DNA-binding bundle associated with one vertex of the protein globule. To our knowledge, this is the first study revealed the nucleoid protein with an affinity to branched DNA typical for genomic regions with direct and inverted repeats. As a ubiquitous feature of bacterial and eukaryotic genomes, such structural elements should be of particular care, but the protein system evolutionarily adapted for this function is not yet known, and we suggest Dps as a putative component of this system.

  11. Compositional mapping of bitumen using local electrostatic force interactions in atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magonov, Sergei; Alexander, John; Surtchev, Marko; Hung, Albert M; Fini, Elham H

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, many researchers have investigated bitumen surface morphology, especially the so-called bee-like structures, in an attempt to relate the chemical composition and molecular conformation to bitumen micromechanics and ultimately performance properties. Even though recent studies related surface morphology and its evolution to stiffness and stress localization, the complex chemical nature of bitumen and its time- and temperature-dependent properties still engender significant questions about the nature and origin of the observed morphological features and how they evolve due to exposure to various environmental and loading conditions. One such question is whether the observed surface features are formed from wax or from the coprecipitation of wax and asphaltene. Our prior work was mainly theoretical; it used density functional theory and showed that the coprecipitation theory may not stand, mainly because wax-asphaltene interactions are not thermodynamically favourable compared to wax-wax interactions. This paper presents a comprehensive approach based on experiments to study surface morphology of bitumen and conduct compositional mapping to shed light on the origin of the bee-like surface morphological features. We used Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), with the main focus being on single-pass detection and mapping of local electric properties, as a novel approach to enhance existing compositional mapping techniques. This method was found to be highly effective in differentiating various domains with respect to their polarity. The results of our study favour the hypothesis that the bee-like features are mainly composed of wax, including a variety of alkanes. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  12. Measurement of the parity nonconserving neutral weak interaction in atomic thallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucksbaum, P.H.

    1980-11-01

    This thesis describes an experiment to measure parity nonconservation in atomic thallium. A frequency doubled, flashlamp pumped tunable dye laser is used to excite the 6P/sub 1/2/(F = 0) ..-->.. 7P/sub 1/2/(F = 1) transition at 292.7 nm, with circularly polarized light. An electrostatic field E of 100 to 300 V/cm causes this transition to occur via Stark induced electric dipole. Two field free transitions may also occur: a highly forbidden magnetic dipole M, and a parity nonconserving electric dipole epsilon/sub P/. The latter is presumed to be due to the presence of a weak neutral current interaction between the 6p valence electron and the nucleus, as predicted by gauge theories which unite the electromagnetic and weak interactions. Both M and epsilon/sub P/ interfere with the Stark amplitude ..beta..E to produce a polarization of the 7P/sub 1/2/ state. This is measured with a circularly polarized infrared laser beam probe, tuned to the 7P/sub 1/2/ ..-->.. 8S/sub 1/2/ transition. This selectively excites m/sub F/ = +1 or -1 components of the 7P/sub 1/2/ state, and the polarization is seen as an asymmetry in 8S ..-->.. 6P/sub 3/2/ fluorescence when the probe helicity is reversed. The polarization due to M is ..delta../sub M/ = -2M/(BETAE). It is used to calibrate the analyzing efficiency. The polarization due to epsilon/sub P/ is ..delta../sub P/ = 2i epsilon/sub P//(..beta..E), and can be distinguished from ..delta../sub M/ by its properties under reversal of the 292.7 nm photon helicity and reversal of the laser direction. A preliminary measurement yielded a parity violation in agreement with the gauge theory of Weinberg and Salam.

  13. Low-Altitude Emission of Energetic Neutral Atoms: Multiple Interactions and Energy Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    LLera, K.; Goldstein, J.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P. W.

    2017-10-01

    Low-altitude emissions (LAEs) are the energetic neutral atom (ENA) signature of ring current ions precipitating along the magnetic field to an altitude of 200-800 km. This altitude region is considered to be "optically thick" because ring current ions undergo multiple charge changing interactions (MCCIs) with Earth's dense oxygen exosphere. While each interaction involves an energy loss of 36 eV, no prior study has determined the accumulated energy lost by 1-100 keV H+ emerging as LAEs. We have developed a 2-D model with a geomagnetic dipole that captures the net effects in energy loss and pitch angle evolution as a result of MCCIs without the computational requirements of a full Monte Carlo simulation. Dependent on the amount of latitudinal migration, the energy loss is greater than 20% for ions below 60 keV for equatorward moving particles (30 keV for poleward). Since the ENA travels ballistically across a geomagnetic dipole, upon reionization, ion velocity along the local field increases (antiparallel in the northern hemisphere). Redirecting the particle upward through MCCIs is most effective during poleward ENA motion. The net effect is to redirect precipitating ions (below 2,500 km) to eventually emerge from the optically thick region either as an ion or ENA. Precipitation is a joint ion-neutral process, affecting both the energy and pitch angle distribution through the transverse motion of ENA segments in a converging field. For particles that enter the MCCI regime, the energy loss and evolution of the pitch angle distribution must be considered within a realistic magnetic field.

  14. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  15. Surface properties and interaction forces of biopolymer-doped conductive polypyrrole surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelto, Jani M; Haimi, Suvi P; Siljander, Aliisa S; Miettinen, Susanna S; Tappura, Kirsi M; Higgins, Michael J; Wallace, Gordon G

    2013-05-21

    Surface properties and electrical charges are critical factors elucidating cell interactions on biomaterial surfaces. The surface potential distribution and the nanoscopic and microscopic surface elasticity of organic polypyrrole-hyaluronic acid (PPy-HA) were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in a fluid environment in order to explain the observed enhancement in the attachment of human adipose stem cells on positively charged PPy-HA films. The electrostatic force between the AFM tip and a charged PPy-HA surface, the tip-sample adhesion force, and elastic moduli were estimated from the AFM force curves, and the data were fitted to electrostatic double-layer and elastic contact models. The surface potential of the charged and dried PPy-HA films was assessed with Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), and the KPFM data were correlated to the fluid AFM data. The surface charge distribution and elasticity were both found to correlate well with the nodular morphology of PPy-HA and to be sensitive to the electrochemical charging conditions. Furthermore, a significant change in the adhesion was detected when the surface was electrochemically charged positive. The results highlight the potential of positively charged PPy-HA as a coating material to enhance the stem cell response in tissue-engineering scaffolds.

  16. Quantitative analyses of RAG-RSS interactions and conformations revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlicek, Jeffrey W; Lyubchenko, Yuri L; Chang, Yung

    2008-10-28

    During V(D)J recombination, site specific DNA excision is dictated by the binding of RAG1/2 proteins to the conserved recombination signal sequence (RSS) within the genome. The interaction between RAG1/2 and RSS is thought to involve a large DNA distortion that is permissive for DNA cleavage. In this study, using atomic force microscopy imaging (AFM), we analyzed individual RAG-RSS complexes, in which the bending angle of RAG-associated RSS substrates could be visualized and quantified. We provided the quantitative measurement on the conformations of specific RAG-12RSS complexes. Previous data indicating the necessity of RAG2 for recombination implies a structural role in the RAG-RSS complex. Surprisingly, however, no significant difference was observed in conformational bending with AFM between RAG1-12RSS and RAG1/2-12RSS. RAG1 was found sufficient to induce DNA bending, and the addition of RAG2 did not change the bending profile. In addition, a prenicked 12RSS bound by RAG1/2 proteins displayed a conformation similar to the one observed with the intact 12RSS, implying that no greater DNA bending occurs after the nicking step in the signal complex. Taken together, the quantitative AFM results on the components of the recombinase emphasize a tightly held complex with a bend angle value near 60 degrees , which may be a prerequisite step for the site-specific nicking by the V(D)J recombinase.

  17. Probing new spin-independent interactions through precision spectroscopy in atoms with few electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, Cédric; Frugiuele, Claudia; Fuchs, Elina; Soreq, Yotam

    2017-12-01

    The very high precision of current measurements and theory predictions of spectral lines in few-electron atoms allows us to efficiently probe the existence of exotic forces between electrons, neutrons and protons. We investigate the sensitivity to new spin-independent interactions in transition frequencies (and their isotopic shifts) of hydrogen, helium and some heliumlike ions. We find that present data probe new regions of the force-carrier couplings to electrons and neutrons around the MeV mass range. We also find that, below few keV, the sensitivity to the electron coupling in precision spectroscopy of helium and positronium is comparable to that of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron. Finally, we interpret our results in the dark-photon model where a new gauge boson is kinetically mixed with the photon. There, we show that helium transitions, combined with the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron, provide the strongest indirect bound from laboratory experiments above 100 keV.

  18. Blastocyst-endometrium interaction: intertwining a cytokine network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.A. Castro-Rendón

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The successful implantation of the blastocyst depends on adequate interactions between the embryo and the uterus. The development of the embryo begins with the fertilized ovum, a single totipotent cell which undergoes mitosis and gives rise to a multicellular structure named blastocyst. At the same time, increasing concentrations of ovarian steroid hormones initiate a complex signaling cascade that stimulates the differentiation of endometrial stromal cells to decidual cells, preparing the uterus to lodge the embryo. Studies in humans and in other mammals have shown that cytokines and growth factors are produced by the pre-implantation embryo and cells of the reproductive tract; however, the interactions between these factors that converge for successful implantation are not well understood. This review focuses on the actions of interleukin-1, leukemia inhibitory factor, epidermal growth factor, heparin-binding epidermal growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor, and on the network of their interactions leading to early embryo development, peri-implantatory endometrial changes, embryo implantation and trophoblast differentiation. We also propose therapeutical approaches based on current knowledge on cytokine interactions.

  19. Disease candidate gene identification and prioritization using protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aronow Bruce J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although most of the current disease candidate gene identification and prioritization methods depend on functional annotations, the coverage of the gene functional annotations is a limiting factor. In the current study, we describe a candidate gene prioritization method that is entirely based on protein-protein interaction network (PPIN analyses. Results For the first time, extended versions of the PageRank and HITS algorithms, and the K-Step Markov method are applied to prioritize disease candidate genes in a training-test schema. Using a list of known disease-related genes from our earlier study as a training set ("seeds", and the rest of the known genes as a test list, we perform large-scale cross validation to rank the candidate genes and also evaluate and compare the performance of our approach. Under appropriate settings – for example, a back probability of 0.3 for PageRank with Priors and HITS with Priors, and step size 6 for K-Step Markov method – the three methods achieved a comparable AUC value, suggesting a similar performance. Conclusion Even though network-based methods are generally not as effective as integrated functional annotation-based methods for disease candidate gene prioritization, in a one-to-one comparison, PPIN-based candidate gene prioritization performs better than all other gene features or annotations. Additionally, we demonstrate that methods used for studying both social and Web networks can be successfully used for disease candidate gene prioritization.

  20. Motifs, themes and thematic maps of an integrated Saccharomyces cerevisiae interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Brenda

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale studies have revealed networks of various biological interaction types, such as protein-protein interaction, genetic interaction, transcriptional regulation, sequence homology, and expression correlation. Recurring patterns of interconnection, or 'network motifs', have revealed biological insights for networks containing either one or two types of interaction. Results To study more complex relationships involving multiple biological interaction types, we assembled an integrated Saccharomyces cerevisiae network in which nodes represent genes (or their protein products and differently colored links represent the aforementioned five biological interaction types. We examined three- and four-node interconnection patterns containing multiple interaction types and found many enriched multi-color network motifs. Furthermore, we showed that most of the motifs form 'network themes' – classes of higher-order recurring interconnection patterns that encompass multiple occurrences of network motifs. Network themes can be tied to specific biological phenomena and may represent more fundamental network design principles. Examples of network themes include a pair of protein complexes with many inter-complex genetic interactions – the 'compensatory complexes' theme. Thematic maps – networks rendered in terms of such themes – can simplify an otherwise confusing tangle of biological relationships. We show this by mapping the S. cerevisiae network in terms of two specific network themes. Conclusion Significantly enriched motifs in an integrated S. cerevisiae interaction network are often signatures of network themes, higher-order network structures that correspond to biological phenomena. Representing networks in terms of network themes provides a useful simplification of complex biological relationships.

  1. Potential Energy Curves and Transport Properties for the Interaction of He with Other Ground-state Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Harry; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The interactions of a He atom with a heavier atom are examined for 26 different elements, which are consecutive members selected from three rows (Li - Ne, Na - Ar, and K,Ca, Ga - Kr) and column 12 (Zn,Cd) of the periodic table. Interaction energies are determined wing high-quality ab initio calculations for the states of the molecule that would be formed from each pair of atoms in their ground states. Potential energies are tabulated for a broad range of Interatomic separation distances. The results show, for example, that the energy of an alkali interaction at small separations is nearly the same as that of a rare-gas interaction with the same electron configuration for the dosed shells. Furthermore, the repulsive-range parameter for this region is very short compared to its length for the repulsion dominated by the alkali-valence electron at large separations (beyond about 3-4 a(sub 0)). The potential energies in the region of the van der Waals minimum agree well with the most accurate results available. The ab initio energies are applied to calculate scattering cross sections and obtain the collision integrals that are needed to determine transport properties to second order. The theoretical values of Li-He total scattering cross sections and the rare-gas atom-He transport properties agree well (to within about 1%) with the corresponding measured data. Effective potential energies are constructed from the ab initio energies; the results have been shown to reproduce known transport data and can be readily applied to predict unknown transport properties for like-atom interactions.

  2. Coevolving complex networks in the model of social interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducha, Tomasz; Gubiec, Tomasz

    2017-04-01

    We analyze Axelrod's model of social interactions on coevolving complex networks. We introduce four extensions with different mechanisms of edge rewiring. The models are intended to catch two kinds of interactions-preferential attachment, which can be observed in scientists or actors collaborations, and local rewiring, which can be observed in friendship formation in everyday relations. Numerical simulations show that proposed dynamics can lead to the power-law distribution of nodes' degree and high value of the clustering coefficient, while still retaining the small-world effect in three models. All models are characterized by two phase transitions of a different nature. In case of local rewiring we obtain order-disorder discontinuous phase transition even in the thermodynamic limit, while in case of long-distance switching discontinuity disappears in the thermodynamic limit, leaving one continuous phase transition. In addition, we discover a new and universal characteristic of the second transition point-an abrupt increase of the clustering coefficient, due to formation of many small complete subgraphs inside the network.

  3. Accessing Wireless Sensor Networks Via Dynamically Reconfigurable Interaction Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Gomes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs technology is already perceived as fundamental for science across many domains, since it provides a low cost solution for environment monitoring. WSNs representation via the service concept and its inclusion in Web environments, e.g. through Web services, supports particularly their open/standard access and integration. Although such Web enabled WSNs simplify data access, network parameterization and aggregation, the existing interaction models and run-time adaptation mechanisms available to clients are still scarce. Nevertheless, applications increasingly demand richer and more flexible accesses besides the traditional client/server. For instance, applications may require a streaming model in order to avoid sequential data requests, or the asynchronous notification of subscribed data through the publish/subscriber. Moreover, the possibility to automatically switch between such models at runtime allows applications to define flexible context-based data acquisition. To this extent, this paper discusses the relevance of the session and pattern abstractions on the design of a middleware prototype providing richer and dynamically reconfigurable interaction models to Web enabled WSNs.

  4. Disentangling the co-structure of multilayer interaction networks: degree distribution and module composition in two-layer bipartite networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astegiano, Julia; Altermatt, Florian; Massol, François

    2017-11-13

    Species establish different interactions (e.g. antagonistic, mutualistic) with multiple species, forming multilayer ecological networks. Disentangling network co-structure in multilayer networks is crucial to predict how biodiversity loss may affect the persistence of multispecies assemblages. Existing methods to analyse multilayer networks often fail to consider network co-structure. We present a new method to evaluate the modular co-structure of multilayer networks through the assessment of species degree co-distribution and network module composition. We focus on modular structure because of its high prevalence among ecological networks. We apply our method to two Lepidoptera-plant networks, one describing caterpillar-plant herbivory interactions and one representing adult Lepidoptera nectaring on flowers, thereby possibly pollinating them. More than 50% of the species established either herbivory or visitation interactions, but not both. These species were over-represented among plants and lepidopterans, and were present in most modules in both networks. Similarity in module composition between networks was high but not different from random expectations. Our method clearly delineates the importance of interpreting multilayer module composition similarity in the light of the constraints imposed by network structure to predict the potential indirect effects of species loss through interconnected modular networks.

  5. Light-Matter Interaction Atoms and Molecules in External Fields and Nonlinear Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Wendell T

    2006-01-01

    This book draws together the principal ideas that form the basis of atomic, molecular, and optical science and engineering. It covers the basics of atoms, diatomic molecules, atoms and molecules in static and electromagnetic fields and nonlinear optics. Exercises and bibliographies supplement each chapter, while several appendices present such important background information as physics and math definitions, atomic and molecular data, and tensor algebra. Accessible to advanced undergraduates, graduate students, or researchers who have been trained in one of the conventional curricula of physic

  6. Identification of genetic interaction networks via an evolutionary algorithm evolved Bayesian network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruowang; Dudek, Scott M; Kim, Dokyoon; Hall, Molly A; Bradford, Yuki; Peissig, Peggy L; Brilliant, Murray H; Linneman, James G; McCarty, Catherine A; Bao, Le; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2016-01-01

    The future of medicine is moving towards the phase of precision medicine, with the goal to prevent and treat diseases by taking inter-individual variability into account. A large part of the variability lies in our genetic makeup. With the fast paced improvement of high-throughput methods for genome sequencing, a tremendous amount of genetics data have already been generated. The next hurdle for precision medicine is to have sufficient computational tools for analyzing large sets of data. Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have been the primary method to assess the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and disease traits. While GWAS is sufficient in finding individual SNPs with strong main effects, it does not capture potential interactions among multiple SNPs. In many traits, a large proportion of variation remain unexplained by using main effects alone, leaving the door open for exploring the role of genetic interactions. However, identifying genetic interactions in large-scale genomics data poses a challenge even for modern computing. For this study, we present a new algorithm, Grammatical Evolution Bayesian Network (GEBN) that utilizes Bayesian Networks to identify interactions in the data, and at the same time, uses an evolutionary algorithm to reduce the computational cost associated with network optimization. GEBN excelled in simulation studies where the data contained main effects and interaction effects. We also applied GEBN to a Type 2 diabetes (T2D) dataset obtained from the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project (PMRP). We were able to identify genetic interactions for T2D cases and controls and use information from those interactions to classify T2D samples. We obtained an average testing area under the curve (AUC) of 86.8 %. We also identified several interacting genes such as INADL and LPP that are known to be associated with T2D. Developing the computational tools to explore genetic associations beyond main

  7. Analysing Health Professionals' Learning Interactions in an Online Social Network: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Verspoor, Karin; Gray, Kathleen; Barnett, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarises a longitudinal analysis of learning interactions occurring over three years among health professionals in an online social network. The study employs the techniques of Social Network Analysis (SNA) and statistical modeling to identify the changes in patterns of interaction over time and test associated structural network effects. SNA results indicate overall low participation in the network, although some participants became active over time and even led discussions. In particular, the analysis has shown that a change of lead contributor results in a change in learning interaction and network structure. The analysis of structural network effects demonstrates that the interaction dynamics slow down over time, indicating that interactions in the network are more stable. The health professionals may be reluctant to share knowledge and collaborate in groups but were interested in building personal learning networks or simply seeking information.

  8. Limitations of gene duplication models: evolution of modules in protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Emmert-Streib

    Full Text Available It has been generally acknowledged that the module structure of protein interaction networks plays a crucial role with respect to the functional understanding of these networks. In this paper, we study evolutionary aspects of the module structure of protein interaction networks, which forms a mesoscopic level of description with respect to the architectural principles of networks. The purpose of this paper is to investigate limitations of well known gene duplication models by showing that these models are lacking crucial structural features present in protein interaction networks on a mesoscopic scale. This observation reveals our incomplete understanding of the structural evolution of protein networks on the module level.

  9. Storage of Quantum Variables in Atomic Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cviklinski, J.; Ortalo, J.; Josse, V.

    2007-01-01

    Storage and read-out of non classical states of light is a critical element for quantum information networks. Simultaneous storage of two non-commuting variables carried by light and subsequent read-out is shown to be possible in atomic ensembles. Interaction of light fields with three......-level systems allows direct mapping the quantum state of light into long lived coherences in the atomic ground state. We show that excess noise linked to atomic transitions can be made negligible. Experimental developments are discussed for atomic vapours and cold atoms....

  10. Evaluation of clustering algorithms for protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Helden Jacques

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein interactions are crucial components of all cellular processes. Recently, high-throughput methods have been developed to obtain a global description of the interactome (the whole network of protein interactions for a given organism. In 2002, the yeast interactome was estimated to contain up to 80,000 potential interactions. This estimate is based on the integration of data sets obtained by various methods (mass spectrometry, two-hybrid methods, genetic studies. High-throughput methods are known, however, to yield a non-negligible rate of false positives, and to miss a fraction of existing interactions. The interactome can be represented as a graph where nodes correspond with proteins and edges with pairwise interactions. In recent years clustering methods have been developed and applied in order to extract relevant modules from such graphs. These algorithms require the specification of parameters that may drastically affect the results. In this paper we present a comparative assessment of four algorithms: Markov Clustering (MCL, Restricted Neighborhood Search Clustering (RNSC, Super Paramagnetic Clustering (SPC, and Molecular Complex Detection (MCODE. Results A test graph was built on the basis of 220 complexes annotated in the MIPS database. To evaluate the robustness to false positives and false negatives, we derived 41 altered graphs by randomly removing edges from or adding edges to the test graph in various proportions. Each clustering algorithm was applied to these graphs with various parameter settings, and the clusters were compared with the annotated complexes. We analyzed the sensitivity of the algorithms to the parameters and determined their optimal parameter values. We also evaluated their robustness to alterations of the test graph. We then applied the four algorithms to six graphs obtained from high-throughput experiments and compared the resulting clusters with the annotated complexes. Conclusion This

  11. User-Centric Secure Cross-Site Interaction Framework for Online Social Networking Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Moo Nam

    2011-01-01

    Social networking service is one of major technological phenomena on Web 2.0. Hundreds of millions of users are posting message, photos, and videos on their profiles and interacting with other users, but the sharing and interaction are limited within the same social networking site. Although users can share some content on a social networking site…

  12. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  13. Different combinations of atomic interactions predict protein-small molecule and protein-DNA/RNA affinities with similar accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Raquel; Kolazckowski, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between proteins and other molecules play essential roles in all biological processes. Although it is widely held that a protein's ligand specificity is determined primarily by its three-dimensional structure, the general principles by which structure determines ligand binding remain poorly understood. Here we use statistical analyses of a large number of protein-ligand complexes with associated binding-affinity measurements to quantitatively characterize how combinations of atomic interactions contribute to ligand affinity. We find that there are significant differences in how atomic interactions determine ligand affinity for proteins that bind small chemical ligands, those that bind DNA/RNA and those that interact with other proteins. Although protein-small molecule and protein-DNA/RNA binding affinities can be accurately predicted from structural data, models predicting one type of interaction perform poorly on the others. Additionally, the particular combinations of atomic interactions required to predict binding affinity differed between small-molecule and DNA/RNA data sets, consistent with the conclusion that the structural bases determining ligand affinity differ among interaction types. In contrast to what we observed for small-molecule and DNA/RNA interactions, no statistical models were capable of predicting protein-protein affinity with >60% correlation. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of protein-DNA/RNA binding prediction as a possible tool for high-throughput virtual screening to guide laboratory investigations, suggesting that quantitative characterization of diverse molecular interactions may have practical applications as well as fundamentally advancing our understanding of how molecular structure translates into function. © 2015 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Interactions Affected by Arginine Methylation in the Yeast Protein–Protein Interaction Network*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erce, Melissa A.; Abeygunawardena, Dhanushi; Low, Jason K. K.; Hart-Smith, Gene; Wilkins, Marc R.

    2013-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions can be modulated by the methylation of arginine residues. As a means of testing this, we recently described a conditional two-hybrid system, based on the bacterial adenylate cyclase (BACTH) system. Here, we have used this conditional two-hybrid system to explore the effect of arginine methylation in modulating protein–protein interactions in a subset of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginine methylproteome network. Interactions between the yeast hub protein Npl3 and yeast proteins Air2, Ded1, Gbp2, Snp1, and Yra1 were first validated in the absence of methylation. The major yeast arginine methyltransferase Hmt1 was subsequently included in the conditional two-hybrid assay, initially to determine the degree of methylation that occurs. Proteins Snp1 and Yra1 were confirmed as Hmt1 substrates, with five and two novel arginine methylation sites mapped by ETD LC-MS/MS on these proteins, respectively. Proteins Ded1 and Gbp2, previously predicted but not confirmed as substrates of Hmt1, were also found to be methylated with five and seven sites mapped respectively. Air2 was found to be a novel substrate of Hmt1 with two sites mapped. Finally, we investigated the interactions of Npl3 with the five interaction partners in the presence of active Hmt1 and in the presence of Hmt1 with a G68R inactivation mutation. We found that the interaction between Npl3 and Air2, and Npl3 and Ded1, were significantly increased in the presence of active Hmt1; the interaction of Npl3 and Snp1 showed a similar degree of increase in interaction but this was not statistically significant. The interactions of Npl3 and Gbp2, along with Npl3 and Yra1, were not significantly increased or decreased by methylation. We conclude that methylarginine may be a widespread means by which the interactions of proteins are modulated. PMID:23918811

  15. Interactions affected by arginine methylation in the yeast protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erce, Melissa A; Abeygunawardena, Dhanushi; Low, Jason K K; Hart-Smith, Gene; Wilkins, Marc R

    2013-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions can be modulated by the methylation of arginine residues. As a means of testing this, we recently described a conditional two-hybrid system, based on the bacterial adenylate cyclase (BACTH) system. Here, we have used this conditional two-hybrid system to explore the effect of arginine methylation in modulating protein-protein interactions in a subset of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginine methylproteome network. Interactions between the yeast hub protein Npl3 and yeast proteins Air2, Ded1, Gbp2, Snp1, and Yra1 were first validated in the absence of methylation. The major yeast arginine methyltransferase Hmt1 was subsequently included in the conditional two-hybrid assay, initially to determine the degree of methylation that occurs. Proteins Snp1 and Yra1 were confirmed as Hmt1 substrates, with five and two novel arginine methylation sites mapped by ETD LC-MS/MS on these proteins, respectively. Proteins Ded1 and Gbp2, previously predicted but not confirmed as substrates of Hmt1, were also found to be methylated with five and seven sites mapped respectively. Air2 was found to be a novel substrate of Hmt1 with two sites mapped. Finally, we investigated the interactions of Npl3 with the five interaction partners in the presence of active Hmt1 and in the presence of Hmt1 with a G68R inactivation mutation. We found that the interaction between Npl3 and Air2, and Npl3 and Ded1, were significantly increased in the presence of active Hmt1; the interaction of Npl3 and Snp1 showed a similar degree of increase in interaction but this was not statistically significant. The interactions of Npl3 and Gbp2, along with Npl3 and Yra1, were not significantly increased or decreased by methylation. We conclude that methylarginine may be a widespread means by which the interactions of proteins are modulated.

  16. A coarse-grained elastic network atom contact model and its use in the simulation of protein dynamics and the prediction of the effect of mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frappier, Vincent; Najmanovich, Rafael J

    2014-04-01

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) methods are widely used to study dynamic aspects of protein structures. Two critical components of NMA methods are coarse-graining in the level of simplification used to represent protein structures and the choice of potential energy functional form. There is a trade-off between speed and accuracy in different choices. In one extreme one finds accurate but slow molecular-dynamics based methods with all-atom representations and detailed atom potentials. On the other extreme, fast elastic network model (ENM) methods with Cα-only representations and simplified potentials that based on geometry alone, thus oblivious to protein sequence. Here we present ENCoM, an Elastic Network Contact Model that employs a potential energy function that includes a pairwise atom-type non-bonded interaction term and thus makes it possible to consider the effect of the specific nature of amino-acids on dynamics within the context of NMA. ENCoM is as fast as existing ENM methods and outperforms such methods in the generation of conformational ensembles. Here we introduce a new application for NMA methods with the use of ENCoM in the prediction of the effect of mutations on protein stability. While existing methods are based on machine learning or enthalpic considerations, the use of ENCoM, based on vibrational normal modes, is based on entropic considerations. This represents a novel area of application for NMA methods and a novel approach for the prediction of the effect of mutations. We compare ENCoM to a large number of methods in terms of accuracy and self-consistency. We show that the accuracy of ENCoM is comparable to that of the best existing methods. We show that existing methods are biased towards the prediction of destabilizing mutations and that ENCoM is less biased at predicting stabilizing mutations.

  17. A coarse-grained elastic network atom contact model and its use in the simulation of protein dynamics and the prediction of the effect of mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Frappier

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal mode analysis (NMA methods are widely used to study dynamic aspects of protein structures. Two critical components of NMA methods are coarse-graining in the level of simplification used to represent protein structures and the choice of potential energy functional form. There is a trade-off between speed and accuracy in different choices. In one extreme one finds accurate but slow molecular-dynamics based methods with all-atom representations and detailed atom potentials. On the other extreme, fast elastic network model (ENM methods with Cα-only representations and simplified potentials that based on geometry alone, thus oblivious to protein sequence. Here we present ENCoM, an Elastic Network Contact Model that employs a potential energy function that includes a pairwise atom-type non-bonded interaction term and thus makes it possible to consider the effect of the specific nature of amino-acids on dynamics within the context of NMA. ENCoM is as fast as existing ENM methods and outperforms such methods in the generation of conformational ensembles. Here we introduce a new application for NMA methods with the use of ENCoM in the prediction of the effect of mutations on protein stability. While existing methods are based on machine learning or enthalpic considerations, the use of ENCoM, based on vibrational normal modes, is based on entropic considerations. This represents a novel area of application for NMA methods and a novel approach for the prediction of the effect of mutations. We compare ENCoM to a large number of methods in terms of accuracy and self-consistency. We show that the accuracy of ENCoM is comparable to that of the best existing methods. We show that existing methods are biased towards the prediction of destabilizing mutations and that ENCoM is less biased at predicting stabilizing mutations.

  18. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  19. Phage-bacteria interaction network in human oral microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Gao, Yuan; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-07-01

    Although increasing knowledge suggests that bacteriophages play important roles in regulating microbial ecosystems, phage-bacteria interaction in human oral cavities remains less understood. Here we performed a metagenomic analysis to explore the composition and variation of oral dsDNA phage populations and potential phage-bacteria interaction. A total of 1,711 contigs assembled with more than 100 Gb shotgun sequencing data were annotated to 104 phages based on their best BLAST matches against the NR database. Bray-Curtis dissimilarities demonstrated that both phage and bacterial composition are highly diverse between periodontally healthy samples but show a trend towards homogenization in diseased gingivae samples. Significantly, according to the CRISPR arrays that record infection relationship between bacteria and phage, we found certain oral phages were able to invade other bacteria besides their putative bacterial hosts. These cross-infective phages were positively correlated with commensal bacteria while were negatively correlated with major periodontal pathogens, suggesting possible connection between these phages and microbial community structure in oral cavities. By characterizing phage-bacteria interaction as networks rather than exclusively pairwise predator-prey relationships, our study provides the first insight into the participation of cross-infective phages in forming human oral microbiota. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  1. Protein interaction network constructing based on text mining and reinforcement learning with application to prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Zhang, Xiaofang; Shen, Bairong

    2015-08-01

    Constructing interaction network from biomedical texts is a very important and interesting work. The authors take advantage of text mining and reinforcement learning approaches to establish protein interaction network. Considering the high computational efficiency of co-occurrence-based interaction extraction approaches and high precision of linguistic patterns approaches, the authors propose an interaction extracting algorithm where they utilise frequently used linguistic patterns to extract the interactions from texts and then find out interactions from extended unprocessed texts under the basic idea of co-occurrence approach, meanwhile they discount the interaction extracted from extended texts. They put forward a reinforcement learning-based algorithm to establish a protein interaction network, where nodes represent proteins and edges denote interactions. During the evolutionary process, a node selects another node and the attained reward determines which predicted interaction should be reinforced. The topology of the network is updated by the agent until an optimal network is formed. They used texts downloaded from PubMed to construct a prostate cancer protein interaction network by the proposed methods. The results show that their method brought out pretty good matching rate. Network topology analysis results also demonstrate that the curves of node degree distribution, node degree probability and probability distribution of constructed network accord with those of the scale-free network well.

  2. Generalized space-translated Dirac and Pauli equations for superintense laser-atom interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca, Madalina; Florescu, Viorica; Gavrila, Mihai

    2012-02-01

    We obtain a generalization of the nonrelativistic space-translation transformation to the Dirac equation in the case of a unidirectional laser pulse. This is achieved in a quantum-mechanical representation connected to the standard Dirac representation by a unitary operator T transforming the Foldy-Wouthuysen free-particle basis into the Volkov spinor basis. We show that a solution of the transformed Dirac equation containing initially low momenta p (p/mc≪1) will maintain this property at all times, no matter how intense the field or how rapidly it varies (within present experimental capabilities). As a consequence, the transformed four-component equation propagates independently electron and positron wave packets, and in fact the latter are propagated via two two-component Pauli equations, one for the electron, the other for the positron. These we shall denote as the Pauli low-momentum regime (LMR) equations, equivalent to the Dirac equation for the laser field. Successive levels of dynamical accuracy appear depending on how accurately the operator T is approximated. At the level of accuracy considered in this paper, the Pauli LMR equations contain no spin matrices and are in fact two-component Schrödinger equations containing generalized time-dependent potentials. The effects of spin are nevertheless included in the theory because, in the calculation of observables which are formulated in the laboratory frame, use is made of the spin-dependent transformation operator T. In addition, the nonrelativistic limit of our results reproduces known results for the laboratory frame with spin included. We show that in intense laser pulses the generalized potentials can undergo extreme distortion from their unperturbed form. The Pauli LMR equation for the electron is applicable to one-electron atoms of small nuclear charge(αZ≪1) interacting with lasers of all intensities and frequencies ω≪mc2.

  3. Theoretical investigation of the coupling between hydrogen-atom transfer and stacking interaction in adenine-thymine dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Giovanni

    2013-04-15

    Three different dimers of the adenine-thymine (A-T) base pair are studied to point out the changes of important properties (structure, atomic charge, energy and so on) induced by coupling between the movement of the atoms in the hydrogen bonds and the stacking interaction. The comparison of these results with those for the A-T monomer system explains the role of the stacking interaction in the hydrogen-atom transfer in this biologically important base pair. The results support the idea that this coupling depends on the exact dimer considered and is different for the N-N and N-O hydrogen bonds. In particular, the correlation between the hydrogen transfer and the stacking interaction is more relevant for the N-N bridge than for the N-O one. Also, the two different mechanisms of two-hydrogen transfer (step by step and concerted) can be modified by the stacking interaction between the base pairs. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Influence of Halide Solutions on Collagen Networks: Measurements of Physical Properties by Atomic Force Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer-Sonnleitner, Birgit; Kempe, André; Lackner, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

      The influence of aqueous halide solutions on collagen coatings was tested. The effects on resistance against indentation/penetration on adhesion forces were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM...

  5. Interacting Bose gas, the logistic law, and complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowa, A.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a mathematical link between the Quantum Statistical Mechanics and the logistic growth and decay processes. It is based on an observation that a certain nonlinear operator evolution equation, which we refer to as the Logistic Operator Equation (LOE), provides an extension of the standard model of noninteracting bosons. We discuss formal solutions (asymptotic formulas) for a special calibration of the LOE, which sets it in the number-theoretic framework. This trick, in the tradition of Julia and Bost-Connes, makes it possible for us to tap into the vast resources of classical mathematics and, in particular, to construct explicit solutions of the LOE via the Dirichlet series. The LOE is applicable to a range of modeling and simulation tasks, from characterization of interacting boson systems to simulation of some complex man-made networks. The theoretical results enable numerical simulations, which, in turn, shed light at the unique complexities of the rich and multifaceted models resulting from the LOE.

  6. Determine point-to-point networking interactions using regular expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin S. Deev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As Internet growth and becoming more popular, the number of concurrent data flows start to increasing, which makes sense in bandwidth requested. Providers and corporate customers need ability to identify point-to-point interactions. The best is to use special software and hardware implementations that distribute the load in the internals of the complex, using the principles and approaches, in particular, described in this paper. This paper represent the principles of building system, which searches for a regular expression match using computing on graphics adapter in server station. A significant computing power and capability to parallel execution on modern graphic processor allows inspection of large amounts of data through sets of rules. Using the specified characteristics can lead to increased computing power in 30…40 times compared to the same setups on the central processing unit. The potential increase in bandwidth capacity could be used in systems that provide packet analysis, firewalls and network anomaly detectors.

  7. Drug-Drug Interaction Extraction via Convolutional Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyu Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interaction (DDI extraction as a typical relation extraction task in natural language processing (NLP has always attracted great attention. Most state-of-the-art DDI extraction systems are based on support vector machines (SVM with a large number of manually defined features. Recently, convolutional neural networks (CNN, a robust machine learning method which almost does not need manually defined features, has exhibited great potential for many NLP tasks. It is worth employing CNN for DDI extraction, which has never been investigated. We proposed a CNN-based method for DDI extraction. Experiments conducted on the 2013 DDIExtraction challenge corpus demonstrate that CNN is a good choice for DDI extraction. The CNN-based DDI extraction method achieves an F-score of 69.75%, which outperforms the existing best performing method by 2.75%.

  8. Moral foundations in an interacting neural networks society

    CERN Document Server

    Vicente, Renato; Jericó, João Pedro; Caticha, Nestor

    2013-01-01

    The moral foundations theory supports that people, across cultures, tend to consider a small number of dimensions when classifying issues on a moral basis. The data also show that the statistics of weights attributed to each moral dimension is related to self-declared political affiliation, which in turn has been connected to cognitive learning styles by recent literature in neuroscience and psychology. Inspired by these data, we propose a simple statistical mechanics model with interacting neural networks classifying vectors and learning from members of their social neighborhood about their average opinion on a large set of issues. The purpose of learning is to reduce dissension among agents even when disagreeing. We consider a family of learning algorithms parametrized by \\delta, that represents the importance given to corroborating (same sign) opinions. We define an order parameter that quantifies the diversity of opinions in a group with homogeneous learning style. Using Monte Carlo simulations and a mean...

  9. QPROP: A Schrödinger-solver for intense laser atom interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Dieter; Koval, Peter

    2006-03-01

    The QPROP package is presented. QPROP has been developed to study laser-atom interaction in the nonperturbative regime where nonlinear phenomena such as above-threshold ionization, high order harmonic generation, and dynamic stabilization are known to occur. In the nonrelativistic regime and within the single active electron approximation, these phenomena can be studied with QPROP in the most rigorous way by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in three spatial dimensions. Because QPROP is optimized for the study of quantum systems that are spherically symmetric in their initial, unperturbed configuration, all wavefunctions are expanded in spherical harmonics. Time-propagation of the wavefunctions is performed using a split-operator approach. Photoelectron spectra are calculated employing a window-operator technique. Besides the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in single active electron approximation, QPROP allows to study many-electron systems via the solution of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations. Program summaryProgram title:QPROP Catalogue number:ADXB Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXB Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer on which program has been tested:PC Pentium IV, Athlon Operating system:Linux Program language used:C++ Memory required to execute with typical data:Memory requirements depend on the number of propagated orbitals and on the size of the orbitals. For instance, time-propagation of a hydrogenic wavefunction in the perturbative regime requires about 64 KB RAM (4 radial orbitals with 1000 grid points). Propagation in the strongly nonperturbative regime providing energy spectra up to high energies may need 60 radial orbitals, each with 30000 grid points, i.e. about 30 MB. Examples are given in the article. No. of bits in a word:Real and complex valued numbers of double precision are used No. of lines in distributed program

  10. The long-range interaction in the scattering of positronium by hydrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, D. G.; Fraser, P. A.

    2018-03-01

    Elastic scattering of positronium by hydrogen atoms is investigated. A method is devised wherein the effects of the long-range van der Waals attraction between the two atoms are accurately incorporated into a trial wave function in the form of a pseudo-state. The properly adjusted trial function yields a van der Waals coefficient that is within 0.03% of the known value. Improved phase shifts in the absence of exchange are reported.

  11. Imaging contrast and tip-sample interaction of non-contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy with Q-control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuai; Guo, Dan; Luo, Jianbin

    2017-10-01

    Active quality factor (Q) exhibits many promising properties in dynamic atomic force microscopy. Energy dissipation and image contrasts are investigated in the non-contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) with an active Q-control circuit in the ambient air environment. Dissipated power and virial were calculated to compare the highly nonlinear interaction of tip-sample and image contrasts with different Q gain values. Greater free amplitudes and lower effective Q values show better contrasts for the same setpoint ratio. Active quality factor also can be employed to change tip-sample interaction force in non-contact regime. It is meaningful that non-destructive and better contrast images can be realized in non-contact AM-AFM by applying an active Q-control to the dynamic system.

  12. Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems – i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, – play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist. PMID:24861995

  13. Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-05-27

    The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems - i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, - play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist.

  14. Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems - i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, - play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist.

  15. Opportunities for protein interaction network-guided cellular engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Phillip C; Jaffe, Stephen; Noirel, Josselin; Zou, Xin

    2013-01-01

    As we move further into the postgenomics age where the mountain of systems biology-generated data keeps growing, as does the number of genomes that have been sequenced, we have the exciting opportunity to understand more deeply the biology of important systems, those that are amenable to genetic manipulation and metabolic engineering. This is, of course, if we can make 'head or tail' of what we have measured and use this for robust predictions. The use of modern mass spectrometry tools has greatly facilitated our understanding of which proteins are present in a particular phenotype, their relative and absolute abundances and their state of modifications. Coupled with modern bioinformatics and systems biology modelling tools, this has the opportunity of not just providing information and understanding but also to provide targets for engineering and suggest new genetic/metabolic designs. Cellular engineering, whether it be via metabolic engineering, synthetic biology or a combination of both approaches, offers exciting potential for biotechnological exploitation in fields as diverse as medicine and energy as well as fine and bulk chemicals production. At the heart of such effective designs, proteins' interactions with other proteins or with DNA will become increasingly important. In this work, we examine the work done until now in protein-protein interactions and how this network knowledge can be used to inform ambitious cellular engineering strategies. Some examples demonstrating small molecules/biofuels and biopharmaceuticals applications are presented. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Characterizing Social Interaction in Tobacco-Oriented Social Networks: An Empirical Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liang, Yunji; Zheng, Xiaolong; Zeng, Daniel Dajun; Zhou, Xingshe; Leischow, Scott James; Chung, Wingyan

    2015-01-01

    .... To reveal the impact of tobacco-related user-generated content, this paper characterizes user interaction and social influence utilizing social network analysis and information theoretic approaches...

  17. Tunable self-assembled spin chains of strongly interacting cold atoms for demonstration of reliable quantum state transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, N. J. S.; Marchukov, O. V.; Petrosyan, D.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an efficient computational method to treat long, one-dimensional systems of strongly-interacting atoms forming self-assembled spin chains. Such systems can be used to realize many spin chain model Hamiltonians tunable by the external confining potential. As a concrete demonstrat...... demonstration, we consider quantum state transfer in a Heisenberg spin chain and we show how to determine the confining potential in order to obtain nearly-perfect state transfer....

  18. Atomic Force Microscopy Protocol for Measurement of Membrane Plasticity and Extracellular Interactions in Single Neurons in Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xin; Muthuchamy, Mariappan; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2016-01-01

    Physiological interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and membrane integrin receptors play a crucial role in neuroplasticity in the hippocampus, a key region involved in epilepsy. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a cutting-edge technique to study structural and functional measurements at nanometer resolution between the AFM probe and cell surface under liquid. AFM has been incrementally employed in living cells including the nervous system. AFM is a unique technique that ...

  19. Wave-function Visualization of Core-induced Interaction of Non-hydrogenic Rydberg Atom in Electric Field

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, W; Cheng, H; Zhang, S S; Liu, H P

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the wave-function feature of Rydberg sodium in a uniform electric field and found that the core-induced interaction of non-hydrogenic atom in electric field can be directly visualized in the wave-function. As is well known, the hydrogen atom in electric field can be separated in parabolic coordinates (\\eta, \\xi), whose eigen-function can show a clear pattern towards negative and positive directions corresponding to the so-called red and blue states without ambiguity, respectively. It can be served as a complete orthogonal basis set to study the core-induced interaction of non-hydrogenic atom in electric field. Owing to complete different patterns of the probability distribution for red and blue states, the interaction can be visualized in the wave-function directly via superposition. Moreover, the constructive and destructive interferences between red and blue states are also observed in the wave-function, explicitly explaining the experimental measurement for the spectral oscillator stre...

  20. Predicting Pharmacodynamic Drug-Drug Interactions through Signaling Propagation Interference on Protein-Protein Interaction Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyunghyun; Kim, Docyong; Ha, Suhyun; Lee, Doheon

    2015-01-01

    As pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (PD DDIs) could lead to severe adverse effects in patients, it is important to identify potential PD DDIs in drug development. The signaling starting from drug targets is propagated through protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. PD DDIs could occur by close interference on the same targets or within the same pathways as well as distant interference through cross-talking pathways. However, most of the previous approaches have considered only close interference by measuring distances between drug targets or comparing target neighbors. We have applied a random walk with restart algorithm to simulate signaling propagation from drug targets in order to capture the possibility of their distant interference. Cross validation with DrugBank and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG shows that the proposed method outperforms the previous methods significantly. We also provide a web service with which PD DDIs for drug pairs can be analyzed at http://biosoft.kaist.ac.kr/targetrw.

  1. Detection of Percolating Paths in PMMA/CB Segregated Network Composites Using Electrostatic Force Microscopy and Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddell, J. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ou, R. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Gupta, S. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Parker, A. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Gerhardt, Dr. Rosario [Georgia Institute of Technology; Seal, Katyayani [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Baddorf, Arthur P [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Composite specimens possessing polyhedral segregated network microstructures require a very small amount of nanosize filler, <1 vol %, to reach percolation because percolation occurs by accumulation of the fillers along the edges of the deformed polymer matrix particles. In this paper, electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) were used to confirm the location of the nanosize fillers and the corresponding percolating paths in polymethyl methacrylate/carbon black composites. The EFM and C-AFM images revealed that the polyhedral polymer particles were coated with filler, primarily on the edges as predicted by the geometric models provided.

  2. Potential energy curves for the interaction of Ag(5s) and Ag(5p) with noble gas atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreau, J; Sadeghpour, H R; Dalgarno, A

    2013-02-28

    We investigate the interaction of ground and excited states of a silver atom with noble gases (NG), including helium. Born-Oppenheimer potential energy curves are calculated with quantum chemistry methods and spin-orbit effects in the excited states are included by assuming a spin-orbit splitting independent of the internuclear distance. We compare our results with experimentally available spectroscopic data, as well as with previous calculations. Because of strong spin-orbit interactions, excited Ag-NG potential energy curves cannot be fitted to Morse-like potentials. We find that the labeling of the observed vibrational levels has to be shifted by one unit.

  3. Frequency-specific directed interactions in the human brain network for language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoffelen, J.M.; Hultén, A.H.; Lam, N.H.L.; Marquand, A.F.; Uddén, J.U.; Hagoort, P.

    2017-01-01

    The brain's remarkable capacity for language requires bidirectional interactions between functionally specialized brain regions. We used magnetoencephalography to investigate interregional interactions in the brain network for language while 102 participants were reading sentences. Using Granger

  4. Entanglement Evolution Between Various Subsystems of Two Three-level Atoms Interacting with a Two-mode Quantized Field in the Presence of Converter Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Elham; Tavassoly, Mohammad Kazem; Baghshahi, Hamid Reza

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study the interaction between two Λ-type three-level atoms (a typical qutrit-qutrit system) and two coupled modes of a quantized radiation field in the presence of field-field interaction (parametric down conversion) which are simultaneously injected within an optical cavity. Then, by applying an appropriate canonical transformation, the introduced model is reduced to a well-known form of the generalized Jaynes-Cummings model. Under particular initial conditions for atoms (in some possible states) and the fields (in the finite dimensional pair coherent state) which may be prepared, the explicit form of the state vector of the whole system is analytically evaluated. In order to find the degree of entanglement between different parts of subsystems ("atom+atom"-field, "atom+field"-atom and atom-atom) the dynamics of entanglement through different measures, namely, linear entropy and negativity is evaluated. In each case, the effect of various types of initial atomic states on the above measures are numerically analyzed, in detail. It is indicated that the amount of entanglement can be tuned by choosing appropriate initial states of atoms. Particularly, it is shown that the entanglement sudden death (ESD) can be controlled by adjusting the initial state of the atoms.

  5. The role of protein interaction domains in the human cancer network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shady S. Ibrahim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interaction networks provide a global picture of cellular function and biological processes. Proteins interact largely through specific domains which constitute the main building blocks of an interaction network. Perturbed or dysfunctional protein interactions are linked to many diseases, including cancer. In this study we describe the major pathways and connections within the human cancer network by a novel approach in which we overlay the human cancer network with all protein interaction domain (PID superfamilies. Based on 38,777 experimentally derived interactions, we constructed a cancer network with 8 different levels and identified all major protein hubs within this cancer interactome. Only one percent of the cancer genes constitute over 50 percent of all interactions within the network. In addition, we mapped 56 PID superfamilies onto the cancer network, and discovered that over 10% of protein interaction domains are overrepresented within the cancer interactome when compared to the normal protein network. We present here a comprehensive list of all PIDs in the cancer network, identify the most important hubs within it and discover several individual genes which had previously not been linked to cancer. These proteins constitute excellent targets for the development of novel cancer therapeutics. Our results further hint to a partial molecular commonality between cancer and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's.

  6. Refining ensembles of predicted gene regulatory networks based on characteristic interaction sets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Windhager

    Full Text Available Different ensemble voting approaches have been successfully applied for reverse-engineering of gene regulatory networks. They are based on the assumption that a good approximation of true network structure can be derived by considering the frequencies of individual interactions in a large number of predicted networks. Such approximations are typically superior in terms of prediction quality and robustness as compared to considering a single best scoring network only. Nevertheless, ensemble approaches only work well if the predicted gene regulatory networks are sufficiently similar to each other. If the topologies of predicted networks are considerably different, an ensemble of all networks obscures interesting individual characteristics. Instead, networks should be grouped according to local topological similarities and ensemble voting performed for each group separately. We argue that the presence of sets of co-occurring interactions is a suitable indicator for grouping predicted networks. A stepwise bottom-up procedure is proposed, where first mutual dependencies between pairs of interactions are derived from predicted networks. Pairs of co-occurring interactions are subsequently extended to derive characteristic interaction sets that distinguish groups of networks. Finally, ensemble voting is applied separately to the resulting topologically similar groups of networks to create distinct group-ensembles. Ensembles of topologically similar networks constitute distinct hypotheses about the reference network structure. Such group-ensembles are easier to interpret as their characteristic topology becomes clear and dependencies between interactions are known. The availability of distinct hypotheses facilitates the design of further experiments to distinguish between plausible network structures. The proposed procedure is a reasonable refinement step for non-deterministic reverse-engineering applications that produce a large number of candidate

  7. Refining Ensembles of Predicted Gene Regulatory Networks Based on Characteristic Interaction Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhager, Lukas; Zierer, Jonas; Küffner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Different ensemble voting approaches have been successfully applied for reverse-engineering of gene regulatory networks. They are based on the assumption that a good approximation of true network structure can be derived by considering the frequencies of individual interactions in a large number of predicted networks. Such approximations are typically superior in terms of prediction quality and robustness as compared to considering a single best scoring network only. Nevertheless, ensemble approaches only work well if the predicted gene regulatory networks are sufficiently similar to each other. If the topologies of predicted networks are considerably different, an ensemble of all networks obscures interesting individual characteristics. Instead, networks should be grouped according to local topological similarities and ensemble voting performed for each group separately. We argue that the presence of sets of co-occurring interactions is a suitable indicator for grouping predicted networks. A stepwise bottom-up procedure is proposed, where first mutual dependencies between pairs of interactions are derived from predicted networks. Pairs of co-occurring interactions are subsequently extended to derive characteristic interaction sets that distinguish groups of networks. Finally, ensemble voting is applied separately to the resulting topologically similar groups of networks to create distinct group-ensembles. Ensembles of topologically similar networks constitute distinct hypotheses about the reference network structure. Such group-ensembles are easier to interpret as their characteristic topology becomes clear and dependencies between interactions are known. The availability of distinct hypotheses facilitates the design of further experiments to distinguish between plausible network structures. The proposed procedure is a reasonable refinement step for non-deterministic reverse-engineering applications that produce a large number of candidate predictions for a gene

  8. Measuring the interaction forces between protein inclusion bodies and an air bubble using an atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangsa-Wirawan, N D; Ikai, A; O'Neill, B K; Middelberg, A P

    2001-01-01

    Interaction forces between protein inclusion bodies and an air bubble have been quantified using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The inclusion bodies were attached to the AFM tip by covalent bonds. Interaction forces measured in various buffer concentrations varied from 9.7 nN to 25.3 nN (+/- 4-11%) depending on pH. Hydrophobic forces provide a stronger contribution to overall interaction force than electrostatic double layer forces. It also appears that the ionic strength affects the interaction force in a complex way that cannot be directly predicted by DLVO theory. The effects of pH are significantly stronger for the inclusion body compared to the air bubble. This study provides fundamental information that will subsequently facilitate the rational design of flotation recovery system for inclusion bodies. It has also demonstrated the potential of AFM to facilitate the design of such processes from a practical viewpoint.

  9. Topological insulators in cold-atom gases with non-Abelian gauge fields: the role of interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, Peter Philipp [Institut fuer Theorie der Kondensierten Materie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Cocks, Daniel; Buchhold, Michael; Hofstetter, Walter [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Goethe Universitaet, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Rachel, Stephan [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Le Hur, Karyn [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Center for Theoretical Physics, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2012-07-01

    With the recent technological advance of creating (non)-Abelian gauge fields for ultracold atoms in optical lattices, it becomes possible to study the interplay of topological phases and interactions in these systems. Specifically, we consider a spinful and time-reversal invariant version of the Hofstadter problem. In addition, we allow for a hopping term which does not preserve S{sub z} spin symmetry and a staggered sublattice potential. Without interactions, the parameters can be tuned such that the system is a topological insulator. Using a combination of analytical techniques and the powerful real-space dynamical mean-field (R-DMFT) method, we discuss the effect of interactions and determine the interacting phase diagram.

  10. Topology-function conservation in protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Darren; Yaveroğlu, Ömer Nebil; Malod-Dognin, Noël; Stojmirovic, Aleksandar; Pržulj, Nataša

    2015-05-15

    Proteins underlay the functioning of a cell and the wiring of proteins in protein-protein interaction network (PIN) relates to their biological functions. Proteins with similar wiring in the PIN (topology around them) have been shown to have similar functions. This property has been successfully exploited for predicting protein functions. Topological similarity is also used to guide network alignment algorithms that find similarly wired proteins between PINs of different species; these similarities are used to transfer annotation across PINs, e.g. from model organisms to human. To refine these functional predictions and annotation transfers, we need to gain insight into the variability of the topology-function relationships. For example, a function may be significantly associated with specific topologies, while another function may be weakly associated with several different topologies. Also, the topology-function relationships may differ between different species. To improve our understanding of topology-function relationships and of their conservation among species, we develop a statistical framework that is built upon canonical correlation analysis. Using the graphlet degrees to represent the wiring around proteins in PINs and gene ontology (GO) annotations to describe their functions, our framework: (i) characterizes statistically significant topology-function relationships in a given species, and (ii) uncovers the functions that have conserved topology in PINs of different species, which we term topologically orthologous functions. We apply our framework to PINs of yeast and human, identifying seven biological process and two cellular component GO terms to be topologically orthologous for the two organisms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. Information interaction in the network the internet as object of scientific and pedagogical researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анна Илясовна Готская

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In article specificity of information interaction in a network the Internet is considered. The consideration purpose is specification of the concept «information interaction» with reference to interaction in a network the Internet. And also definition of its features for the subsequent designing of educational programs of additional preparation of teachers. Thus information interaction in the Internet is considered as object of scientific and pedagogical researches.

  12. The interaction of excited atoms and few-cycle laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Calvert, J E; Palmer, A J; Glover, R D; Tong, X M; Dolmatov, V K; Kheifets, A S; Bartschat, K; Litvinyuk, I V; Kielpinski, D; Sang, R T

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the first observations of the ionisation of neon in a metastable atomic state utilising a strong-field, few-cycle light pulse. We compare the observations to theoretical predictions based on the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (ADK) theory and a solution to the time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE). The TDSE provides better agreement with the experimental data than the ADK theory. We optically pump the target atomic species and demonstrate that the ionisation rate depends on the spin state of the target atoms and provide physically transparent interpretation of such a spin dependence in the frameworks of the spin-polarised Hartree-Fock and random-phase approximations.

  13. Communication: Surface-to-bulk diffusion of isolated versus interacting C atoms in Ni(111) and Cu(111) substrates: A first principle investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpale, Abhilash; Panesi, Marco; Chew, Huck Beng

    2015-02-14

    Using first principle calculations, we study the surface-to-bulk diffusion of C atoms in Ni(111) and Cu(111) substrates, and compare the barrier energies associated with the diffusion of an isolated C atom versus multiple interacting C atoms. We find that the preferential Ni-C bonding over C-C bonding induces a repulsive interaction between C atoms located at diagonal octahedral voids in Ni substrates. This C-C interaction accelerates C atom diffusion in Ni with a reduced barrier energy of ∼1 eV, compared to ∼1.4-1.6 eV for the diffusion of isolated C atoms. The diffusion barrier energy of isolated C atoms in Cu is lower than in Ni. However, bulk diffusion of interacting C atoms in Cu is not possible due to the preferential C-C bonding over C-Cu bonding, which results in C-C dimer pair formation near the surface. The dramatically different C-C interaction effects within the different substrates explain the contrasting growth mechanisms of graphene on Ni(111) and Cu(111) during chemical vapor deposition.

  14. Topology and weights in a protein domain interaction network – a novel way to predict protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuchty Stefan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the analysis of unweighted biological webs as diverse as genetic, protein and metabolic networks allowed spectacular insights in the inner workings of a cell, biological networks are not only determined by their static grid of links. In fact, we expect that the heterogeneity in the utilization of connections has a major impact on the organization of cellular activities as well. Results We consider a web of interactions between protein domains of the Protein Family database (PFAM, which are weighted by a probability score. We apply metrics that combine the static layout and the weights of the underlying interactions. We observe that unweighted measures as well as their weighted counterparts largely share the same trends in the underlying domain interaction network. However, we only find weak signals that weights and the static grid of interactions are connected entities. Therefore assuming that a protein interaction is governed by a single domain interaction, we observe strong and significant correlations of the highest scoring domain interaction and the confidence of protein interactions in the underlying interactions of yeast and fly. Modeling an interaction between proteins if we find a high scoring protein domain interaction we obtain 1, 428 protein interactions among 361 proteins in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Assessing their quality by a logistic regression method we observe that increasing confidence of predicted interactions is accompanied by high scoring domain interactions and elevated levels of functional similarity and evolutionary conservation. Conclusion Our results indicate that probability scores are randomly distributed, allowing to treat static grid and weights of domain interactions as separate entities. In particular, these finding confirms earlier observations that a protein interaction is a matter of a single interaction event on domain level. As an immediate application, we

  15. l- and n-changing collisions during interaction of a pulsed beam of Li Rydberg atoms with CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, B.; Harnafi, M.

    1989-07-01

    The pulsed Li atomic beam produced in our experiment is based on controlled transversely-excited-atmospheric CO2 laser-induced ablation of a Li metal target. The atomic beam is propagated in vacuum or in CO2 gas at low pressure. Atoms in the beam are probed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. This allows the determination of time-of-flight and velocity distributions. Li Rydberg states (n=5-13) are populated in the beam by two-step pulsed-laser excitation. The excited atoms interact with CO2 molecules. l- and n-changing cross sections are deduced from the time evolution of the resonant or collision-induced fluorescence following this selective excitation. l-changing cross sections of the order of 104 AṦ are measured; they increase with n as opposed to the plateau observed for Li* colliding with a diatomic molecule. This behavior is qualitatively well explained in the framework of the free-electron model. n-->n' changing processes with large cross sections (10-100 AṦ) are also observed even in the case of large electronic energy change (ΔEnn'>103 cm-1). These results can be interpreted in terms of resonant-electronic to vibrational energy transfers between Li Rydberg states and CO2 vibrational modes.

  16. Simulation of multi-atomic interactions in H-O-W system with the MD code CADAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landman, I.S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. E-mail: igor.landman@ihm.fzk.de

    2005-11-15

    For future tokamak reactors, chemical erosion of tungsten armour surfaces under impact of hot deuterium-tritium plasma that contains impurities, for instance oxygen, is an important issue. Oxygen can form volatile molecular complexes O {sub x}W {sub y} at the surface, and the retained H-atoms form the volatile complexes H {sub x}O {sub y}, which mitigates the erosion (H states for hydrogen isotopes). The plasma impact can substantially destroy the complexes. To describe this H-O-W system, the molecular dynamics (MD) code CADAC was earlier developed using only pair-atomic interactions. Now CADAC is extended for multi-body forces to simulate molecular organization of atoms near the tungsten surface. The approach uses the Abell's model of empirical bond-order potentials in addition combined, for the first time, with a valence concept. CADAC simulates chemical features using atomic valences and the Morse potentials. The new model is introduced and model parameters are estimated.

  17. Cooperation in networks where the learning environment differs from the interaction environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianlei Zhang

    Full Text Available We study the evolution of cooperation in a structured population, combining insights from evolutionary game theory and the study of interaction networks. In earlier studies it has been shown that cooperation is difficult to achieve in homogeneous networks, but that cooperation can get established relatively easily when individuals differ largely concerning the number of their interaction partners, such as in scale-free networks. Most of these studies do, however, assume that individuals change their behaviour in response to information they receive on the payoffs of their interaction partners. In real-world situations, subjects do not only learn from their interaction partners, but also from other individuals (e.g. teachers, parents, or friends. Here we investigate the implications of such incongruences between the 'interaction network' and the 'learning network' for the evolution of cooperation in two paradigm examples, the Prisoner's Dilemma game (PDG and the Snowdrift game (SDG. Individual-based simulations and an analysis based on pair approximation both reveal that cooperation will be severely inhibited if the learning network is very different from the interaction network. If the two networks overlap, however, cooperation can get established even in case of considerable incongruence between the networks. The simulations confirm that cooperation gets established much more easily if the interaction network is scale-free rather than random-regular. The structure of the learning network has a similar but much weaker effect. Overall we conclude that the distinction between interaction and learning networks deserves more attention since incongruences between these networks can strongly affect both the course and outcome of the evolution of cooperation.

  18. Development and implementation of an algorithm for detection of protein complexes in large interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaya Shigehiko

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After complete sequencing of a number of genomes the focus has now turned to proteomics. Advanced proteomics technologies such as two-hybrid assay, mass spectrometry etc. are producing huge data sets of protein-protein interactions which can be portrayed as networks, and one of the burning issues is to find protein complexes in such networks. The enormous size of protein-protein interaction (PPI networks warrants development of efficient computational methods for extraction of significant complexes. Results This paper presents an algorithm for detection of protein complexes in large interaction networks. In a PPI network, a node represents a protein and an edge represents an interaction. The input to the algorithm is the associated matrix of an interaction network and the outputs are protein complexes. The complexes are determined by way of finding clusters, i. e. the densely connected regions in the network. We also show and analyze some protein complexes generated by the proposed algorithm from typical PPI networks of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A comparison between a PPI and a random network is also performed in the context of the proposed algorithm. Conclusion The proposed algorithm makes it possible to detect clusters of proteins in PPI networks which mostly represent molecular biological functional units. Therefore, protein complexes determined solely based on interaction data can help us to predict the functions of proteins, and they are also useful to understand and explain certain biological processes.

  19. A study of effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some vitamins for electron, H, He and C ion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükyıldız, M.

    2017-09-01

    The radiological properties of some vitamins such as Retinol, Beta-carotene, Riboflavin, Niacin, Niacinamide, Pantothenic acid, Pyridoxine, Pyridoxamine, Pyridoxal, Biotin, Folic acid, Ascorbic acid, Cholecalciferol, Alpha-tocopherol, Gamma-tocopherol, Phylloquinone have been investigated with respect to total electron interaction and some heavy charged particle interaction as means of effective atomic numbers (Z_{eff}) and electron densities (N_{eff}) for the first time. Calculations were performed for total electron interaction and heavy ions such as H, He and C ion interactions in the energy region 10keV-10MeV by using a logarithmic interpolation method. Variations in Z_{eff}'s and N_{eff}'s of given vitamins have been studied according to the energy of electron or heavy charged particles, and significant variations have been observed for all types of interaction in the given energy region. The maximum values of Z_{eff} have been found in the different energy regions for different interactions remarkably and variations in N_{eff} seem approximately to be the same with variation in Z_{eff} for the given vitamins as expected. Z_{eff} values of some vitamins were plotted together and compared with each other for electron, H, He and C interactions and the ratios of Z_{eff}/ have been changed in the range of 0.25-0.36, 0.20-0.36, 0.22-0.35 and 0.20-0.35 for electron, H, He and C interactions, respectively.

  20. Effects of three-body atomic interaction and optical lattice on solitons ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kolokolov criterion for stability analysis in order to study the effects of three-body atomic recombi- nation and lattice potential on the matter–wave bright solitons formed in Bose–Einstein condensates. We analytically demonstrate that (i) the critical ...

  1. Entanglement of a nonlinear two two-level atoms interacting with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... medium on the dynamical properties of entanglement and atomic occupation probabilities in the case of even and odd deformed coherent states. The results show that the deformed fields play important roles in the evolution of entanglement. Also, the results demonstrate that entanglement sudden death, sudden birth and ...

  2. Effects of three-body atomic interaction and optical lattice on solitons ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We make use of a coordinate-free approach to implement Vakhitov–Kolokolov criterion for stability analysis in order to study the effects of three-body atomic recombination and lattice potential on the matter–wave bright solitons formed in Bose–Einstein condensates. We analytically demonstrate that. the critical number of ...

  3. Effect of pairwise dipole–dipole interaction among three-atom systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Steady-state solutions for the Liouville equation in the density matrix formalism are obtained for different values of field strength – represented by the corresponding Rabi frequency α and the dipole–dipole cou- pling factor g. As the detailed results for the two-atom case are published in [13], only the highlights are recounted ...

  4. Effects of halogens on interactions between a reduced TiO{sub 2} (110) surface and noble metal atoms: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Kohei, E-mail: k-tada@aist.go.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); Research Institute of Electrochemical Energy, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31, Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka, 563-8577 (Japan); Koga, Hiroaki [Element Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries (ESICB), Kyoto University, 1-30 Goryo Ohara, Nishikyo, Kyoto, 615-8245 (Japan); Hayashi, Akihide; Kondo, Yudai; Kawakami, Takashi; Yamanaka, Shusuke [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); Okumura, Mitsutaka [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); Element Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries (ESICB), Kyoto University, 1-30 Goryo Ohara, Nishikyo, Kyoto, 615-8245 (Japan)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • We investigated the halogen effect on the interactions of noble metals with TiO{sub 2}. • Halogen atoms inhibit electron transfer from TiO{sub 2} to noble metals. • Iodine stabilizes the adsorption of noble metals especially for Ag and Cu. • Electron transfer from the TiO{sub 2} is effective in anchoring Au and Pt atoms. • Covalent interaction with the support is effective in anchoring Ag and Cu atoms. - Abstract: Using DFT calculation, we investigate the effects of halogens on the interactions between rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) and noble metal atoms (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, and Pd). Fluorine, chlorine, and bromine atoms occupy the oxygen defect sites of TiO{sub 2}, decreasing the stability of noble metal atoms on the surface. This decrease occurs because the halogens inhibit electron transfer from TiO{sub 2} to the noble metal atoms; the electron transfer from reduced TiO{sub 2} to the noble metal atom stabilizes the noble metal atom adsorption. In contrast, iodine strengthens the interactions between TiO{sub 2} and some noble metal atoms, namely Ag and Cu. This stabilization occurs because of the covalent interaction between iodine-doped TiO{sub 2} and the noble metal atom. Therefore, the stabilization is explained well by chemical hardness. This result suggests that iodine-doping of a TiO{sub 2} surface would be an effective method for the preparation of highly stabilized noble metal clusters.

  5. Incremental and unifying modelling formalism for biological interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Képès François

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An appropriate choice of the modeling formalism from the broad range of existing ones may be crucial for efficiently describing and analyzing biological systems. Results We propose a new unifying and incremental formalism for the representation and modeling of biological interaction networks. This formalism allows automated translations into other formalisms, thus enabling a thorough study of the dynamic properties of a biological system. As a first illustration, we propose a translation into the R. Thomas' multivalued logical formalism which provides a possible semantics; a methodology for constructing such models is presented on a classical benchmark: the λ phage genetic switch. We also show how to extract from our model a classical ODE description of the dynamics of a system. Conclusion This approach provides an additional level of description between the biological and mathematical ones. It yields, on the one hand, a knowledge expression in a form which is intuitive for biologists and, on the other hand, its representation in a formal and structured way.

  6. Interactive neural-network-assisted screening. An economic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radensky, P W; Mango, L J

    1998-01-01

    To apply clinical effectiveness estimates of interactive, neural network-assisted (INNA) screening to economic cervical cancer screening models to assess the economic impact of using this technology. Estimates of the sensitivity of INNA screening were drawn from a recently completed comprehensive synthesis of the INNA literature and applied to the Computer Model for Designing CANcer ConTROL Programs-based Cervical Cancer Screen economic model. The economic analysis was conducted from a modified payer perspective using costs borne by payers combined with patient deductibles and copayments. Costs of treating cervical cancer were updated to 1997 values using the medical care component of the Consumer Price Index. The model was run for a cohort of women starting at age 20 and screened on a triennial schedule through age 75. In the primary analysis (sensitivity of unassisted manual examination assumed to be 85%), the ratios found in this investigation varied from approximately $35,000 to $80,000 per life year saved, with the preponderance of ratios sensitive to estimates of sensitivity of unassisted manual screening but not to estimates of treatment costs. This investigation applied accuracy data on INNA rescreening to a model of the cost-effectiveness of cervical cancer screening. The results support the use of INNA rescreening as an appropriate expenditure of resources to identify missed cases of cervical epithelial abnormalities and potential cervical cancer.

  7. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks by means of annotated graph mining algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahmani, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    This thesis discusses solutions to several open problems in Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) networks with the aid of Knowledge Discovery. PPI networks are usually represented as undirected graphs, with nodes corresponding to proteins and edges representing interactions among protein pairs. A large

  8. A nanoscale quantum interface for single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiecke, Tobias; Thompson, Jeff; Feist, Johannes; Yu, Chun; Akimov, Alexey; Chang, Darrick; Zibrov, Alexander; Vuletic, Vladan; Park, Hongkun; Lukin, Mikhail

    2012-02-01

    Neutral atoms are ideal quantum systems: they have long ground-state coherence times and strong optical cycling transitions that enable state detection and preparation. Building quantum networks of atoms interacting through photons is challenging, however, as many schemes for atom-photon interaction are inefficient or hard to scale. We propose a scheme to trap neutral atoms near silver nanowires, which are tightly confining waveguides for surface plasmons. The nanowire tip is used to generate a near-field optical trapping potential, and to enhance and efficiently collect spontaneous emission from the atom. We present experimental results on using the atom to sense the optical field at submicron distances from the wire and our current efforts towards loading the nanotrap.

  9. Topology association analysis in weighted protein interaction network for gene prioritization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shunyao; Shao, Fengjing; Zhang, Qi; Ji, Jun; Xu, Shaojie; Sun, Rencheng; Sun, Gengxin; Du, Xiangjun; Sui, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Although lots of algorithms for disease gene prediction have been proposed, the weights of edges are rarely taken into account. In this paper, the strengths of topology associations between disease and essential genes are analyzed in weighted protein interaction network. Empirical analysis demonstrates that compared to other genes, disease genes are weakly connected with essential genes in protein interaction network. Based on this finding, a novel global distance measurement for gene prioritization with weighted protein interaction network is proposed in this paper. Positive and negative flow is allocated to disease and essential genes, respectively. Additionally network propagation model is extended for weighted network. Experimental results on 110 diseases verify the effectiveness and potential of the proposed measurement. Moreover, weak links play more important role than strong links for gene prioritization, which is meaningful to deeply understand protein interaction network.

  10. Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation: artificial neural networks inference from atomic bomb survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sasaki, Masao S; Tachibana, Akira; Takeda, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    .... To deal with these difficulties, a novel nonparametric statistics based on the ‘integrate-and-fire’ algorithm of artificial neural networks was developed and tested in cancer databases established by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation...

  11. Ion-atom interaction potential effects on the shape of energy spectra of ions backscattered by a thick target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urmanov, A.R.; Bazhukov, S.I.; Puzanov, A.A.

    1986-06-01

    Based on the general Gaudsmit-Saunderson-Lewis model for multiple scattering in a semi-infinite medium, an expression accounting for the effects of multiple scattering on the shape of the backscattering energy spectrum has been obtained. This expression is represented by a series of ion angular distribution moments. The limits of the applicability of the small-angle approximation to the description of multiple scattering are defined. It is shown that the sensitivity of the angular distribution moments of multiple scattered ions to the type of ion-atom potential increases with an increase in the moment order. The possibility of investigation of the ion-atom interaction potential experimentally over a wide range of impact parameters by the backscattering method is discussed.

  12. Protein interaction networks as metric spaces: a novel perspective on distribution of hubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhal, Emad; Gamieldien, Junaid; Mwambene, Eric C

    2014-01-18

    In the post-genomic era, a central and overarching question in the analysis of protein-protein interaction networks continues to be whether biological characteristics and functions of proteins such as lethality, physiological malfunctions and malignancy are intimately linked to the topological role proteins play in the network as a mathematical structure. One of the key features that have implicitly been presumed is the existence of hubs, highly connected proteins considered to play a crucial role in biological networks. We explore the structure of protein interaction networks of a number of organisms as metric spaces and show that hubs are non randomly positioned and, from a distance point of view, centrally located. By analysing how the human functional protein interaction network, the human signalling network, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana and Escherichia coli protein-protein interaction networks from various databases are distributed as metric spaces, we found that proteins interact radially through a central node, high degree proteins coagulate in the centre of the network, and those far away from the centre have low degree. We further found that the distribution of proteins from the centre is in some hierarchy of importance and has biological significance. We conclude that structurally, protein interaction networks are mathematical entities that share properties between organisms but not necessarily with other networks that follow power-law. We therefore conclude that (i) if there are hubs defined by degree, they are not distributed randomly; (ii) zones closest to the centre of the network are enriched for critically important proteins and are also functionally very specialised for specific 'house keeping' functions; (iii) proteins closest to the network centre are functionally less dispensable and may present good targets for therapy development; and (iv) network biology requires its own network theory modelled on actual biological evidence

  13. Spatio-temporal modeling of connectome-scale brain network interactions via time-evolving graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Jinhe; Luo, Liao; Dong, Qinglin; Lv, Jinglei; Zhao, Yu; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Shu; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Tianming

    2017-11-09

    Many recent literature studies have revealed interesting dynamics patterns of functional brain networks derived from fMRI data. However, it has been rarely explored how functional networks spatially overlap (or interact) and how such connectome-scale network interactions temporally evolve. To explore these unanswered questions, this paper presents a novel framework for spatio-temporal modeling of connectome-scale functional brain network interactions via two main effective computational methodologies. First, to integrate, pool and compare brain networks across individuals and their cognitive states under task performances, we designed a novel group-wise dictionary learning scheme to derive connectome-scale consistent brain network templates that can be used to define the common reference space of brain network interactions. Second, the temporal dynamics of spatial network interactions is modeled by a weighted time-evolving graph, and then a data-driven unsupervised learning algorithm based on the dynamic behavioral mixed-membership model (DBMM) is adopted to identify behavioral patterns of brain networks during the temporal evolution process of spatial overlaps/interactions. Experimental results on the Human Connectome Project (HCP) task fMRI data showed that our methods can reveal meaningful, diverse behavior patterns of connectome-scale network interactions. In particular, those networks' behavior patterns are distinct across HCP tasks such as motor, working memory, language and social tasks, and their dynamics well correspond to the temporal changes of specific task designs. In general, our framework offers a new approach to characterizing human brain function by quantitative description for the temporal evolution of spatial overlaps/interactions of connectome-scale brain networks in a standard reference space. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of Halide Solutions on Collagen Networks: Measurements of Physical Properties by Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Birgit Spitzer-Sonnleitner; André Kempe; Maximilian Lackner

    2016-01-01

    The influence of aqueous halide solutions on collagen coatings was tested. The effects on resistance against indentation/penetration on adhesion forces were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the change of Young's modulus of the coating was derived. Comparative measurements over time were conducted with halide solutions of various concentrations. Physical properties of the mesh-like coating generally showed large variability. Starting with a compact set of physical properties, data...

  15. Interactions between Ground State Oxygen Atoms and Molecules: O - O and O (sub2) - O (sub2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderslice, Joseph T.; Mason, Edward A.; Maisch, William G.

    1960-01-01

    Potential energy curves for O - O interactions corresponding to the X (sup 3) Sigma - g, 1 delta g, 1 Sigma plus g, 3 delta u, A3 Sigma plus u, 1 Sigma - u, and B3 Sigma states of O (sub 2) have been calculated from spectroscopic data by the Rydberg-Klein-Rees method. Curves for the remaining twelve states of O (sub 2) dissociating to ground state atoms have been obtained from relations derived from approximate quantum-mechanical calculations, and checked against the meager experimental information available. Two semi-independent calculations have been made, and are in good agreement with each other. The quantum-mechanical relations also lead to an approximate O (sub 2) - O (sub 2) interaction, which is consistent with interactions derived from vibrational relaxation times and from high-temperature gas viscosity data.

  16. Evaluating the spatio-temporal factors that structure network parameters of plant-herbivore interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio López-Carretero

    Full Text Available Despite the dynamic nature of ecological interactions, most studies on species networks offer static representations of their structure, constraining our understanding of the ecological mechanisms involved in their spatio-temporal stability. This is the first study to evaluate plant-herbivore interaction networks on a small spatio-temporal scale. Specifically, we simultaneously assessed the effect of host plant availability, habitat complexity and seasonality on the structure of plant-herbivore networks in a coastal tropical ecosystem. Our results revealed that changes in the host plant community resulting from seasonality and habitat structure are reflected not only in the herbivore community, but also in the emergent properties (network parameters of the plant-herbivore interaction network such as connectance, selectiveness and modularity. Habitat conditions and periods that are most stressful favored the presence of less selective and susceptible herbivore species, resulting in increased connectance within networks. In contrast, the high degree of selectivennes (i.e. interaction specialization and modularity of the networks under less stressful conditions was promoted by the diversification in resource use by herbivores. By analyzing networks at a small spatio-temporal scale we identified the ecological factors structuring this network such as habitat complexity and seasonality. Our research offers new evidence on the role of abiotic and biotic factors in the variation of the properties of species interaction networks.

  17. Simulated evolution of protein-protein interaction networks with realistic topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, G Jack; Pressé, Steve; Peterson, Kristin S; Dill, Ken A

    2012-01-01

    We model the evolution of eukaryotic protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. In our model, PPI networks evolve by two known biological mechanisms: (1) Gene duplication, which is followed by rapid diversification of duplicate interactions. (2) Neofunctionalization, in which a mutation leads to a new interaction with some other protein. Since many interactions are due to simple surface compatibility, we hypothesize there is an increased likelihood of interacting with other proteins in the target protein's neighborhood. We find good agreement of the model on 10 different network properties compared to high-confidence experimental PPI networks in yeast, fruit flies, and humans. Key findings are: (1) PPI networks evolve modular structures, with no need to invoke particular selection pressures. (2) Proteins in cells have on average about 6 degrees of separation, similar to some social networks, such as human-communication and actor networks. (3) Unlike social networks, which have a shrinking diameter (degree of maximum separation) over time, PPI networks are predicted to grow in diameter. (4) The model indicates that evolutionarily old proteins should have higher connectivities and be more centrally embedded in their networks. This suggests a way in which present-day proteomics data could provide insights into biological evolution.

  18. Investigating the properties and interaction mechanism of nano-silica in polyvinyl alcohol/polyacrylamide blends at an atomic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qinghua; Wang, Yanen; Wang, Shuzhi; Zhang, Yingfeng; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2017-11-01

    The nano-silica can be incorporated into polymers for improved mechanical properties. Notably, the interaction between nano-silica and polymer is of a microscopic phenomenon and thus, hard to observe and study by using experimental methods. Based on molecular dynamics, this paper presents a study on the properties and the interaction mechanism of nano-silica in the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/polyacrylamide (PAM) blends at an atomic level. Specifically, six blends of PVA/PAM with varying concentrations of nano-silica (0-13wt%) and two interfacial interaction models of polymers on the silica surface were designed and analyzed at an atomic level in terms of concentration profile, mechanical properties, fractional free volume (FFV), dynamic properties of polymers and X-ray diffraction patterns. The concentration profile results and micromorphologies of equilibrium models suggest PAM molecular chains are easier to be adsorbed on the silica surface than PVA molecular chains in blends. The incorporation of nano-silica into the PVA/PAM blends can increase the blend mechanical properties, densities, and semicrystalline character. Meanwhile, the FFV and the mobility of polymer chain decrease with the silica concentration, which agrees with the results of mechanical properties, densities, and semicrystalline character. Our results also illustrate that an analysis of binding energies and pair correlation functions (PCF) allows for the discovery of the interaction mechanism of nano-silica in PVA/PAM blends; and that hydrogen bond interactions between polar functional groups of polymer molecular chains and the hydroxyl groups of the silica surface are involved in adsorption of the polymers on the silica surface, thus affecting the interaction mechanism of nano-silica in PVA/PAM blend systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Semantic integration to identify overlapping functional modules in protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Murali

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions can enable a better understanding of cellular organization, processes and functions. Functional modules can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of functional module detection algorithms. Results We have developed novel metrics, called semantic similarity and semantic interactivity, which use Gene Ontology (GO annotations to measure the reliability of protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction networks can be converted into a weighted graph representation by assigning the reliability values to each interaction as a weight. We presented a flow-based modularization algorithm to efficiently identify overlapping modules in the weighted interaction networks. The experimental results show that the semantic similarity and semantic interactivity of interacting pairs were positively correlated with functional co-occurrence. The effectiveness of the algorithm for identifying modules was evaluated using functional categories from the MIPS database. We demonstrated that our algorithm had higher accuracy compared to other competing approaches. Conclusion The integration of protein interaction networks with GO annotation data and the capability of detecting overlapping modules substantially improve the accuracy of module identification.

  20. The effective atomic number for gamma ray interactions with heavy metal oxide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2010-01-01

    The effective atomic number, Z(eff), and the effective electron density, N-el,N-eff, have been calculated at photon energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV for CaO-SrO-B2O3, ZnO-PbO-B2O3, and CdO-PbO-B2O3 glasses with potential applications as gamma ray shielding materials. Appreciable variations are noted...... for all parameters by changing the chemical composition and the photon energy. The calculated parameters are compared with experimental data wherever possible. Comparisons are also made with the single-valued effective atomic number given by the program XMuDat. Finally, it is concluded that lead oxide...... glasses have gamma ray shielding properties comparable with standard shielding materials, such as concrete....

  1. Atomicrex—a general purpose tool for the construction of atomic interaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukowski, Alexander; Fransson, Erik; Mock, Markus; Erhart, Paul

    2017-07-01

    We introduce atomicrex, an open-source code for constructing interatomic potentials as well as more general types of atomic-scale models. Such effective models are required to simulate extended materials structures comprising many thousands of atoms or more, because electronic structure methods become computationally too expensive at this scale. atomicrex covers a wide range of interatomic potential types and fulfills many needs in atomistic model development. As inputs, it supports experimental property values as well as ab initio energies and forces, to which models can be fitted using various optimization algorithms. The open architecture of atomicrex allows it to be used in custom model development scenarios beyond classical interatomic potentials while thanks to its Python interface it can be readily integrated e.g., with electronic structure calculations or machine learning algorithms.

  2. Interacting sources for high-precision atom interferometry - a theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posso Trujillo, Katerine; Ahlers, Holger; Schubert, Christian; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst; Gaaloul, Naceur

    2014-05-01

    We theoretically study the possibilities to use binary quantum mixtures as sources for high-precision atom interferometers with interferometry times ranging over several seconds. Such schemes are of timely interest in the context of inertial navigation or fundamental physics laws tests. The mixture expansion dynamics are solved by integrating a set of two coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations. In order to satisfy the severe requirements of a precise differential interferometer, a common delta-kick cooling stage is applied to the two ensembles simultaneously to induce ultra-slow expansion (~ 50 pk regime). Other systematic effects are analysed and mitigation strategies identified. To illustrate this study, we consider the case of three mixtures of 87Rb/85Rb, 87Rb/39Kand87Rb/41K widely used in atom interferometry measurements. The advantages and drawbacks of every pair are highlighted and discussed. K. Posso-Trujillo. thanks the German Academic Exchange Service - DAAD (research grant No. A/10/74250).

  3. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interacting Sites: How to Bridge Molecular Events to Large Scale Protein Interaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Lisa; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Rossi, Ivan; Fariselli, Piero; Casadio, Rita

    Most of the cellular functions are the result of the concerted action of protein complexes forming pathways and networks. For this reason, efforts were devoted to the study of protein-protein interactions. Large-scale experiments on whole genomes allowed the identification of interacting protein pairs. However residues involved in the interaction are generally not known and the majority of the interactions still lack a structural characterization. A crucial step towards the deciphering of the interaction mechanism of proteins is the recognition of their interacting surfaces, particularly in those structures for which also the most recent interaction network resources do not contain information. To this purpose, we developed a neural network-based method that is able to characterize protein complexes, by predicting amino acid residues that mediate the interactions. All the Protein Data Bank (PDB) chains, both in the unbound and in the complexed form, are predicted and the results are stored in a database of interaction surfaces (http://gpcr.biocomp.unibo.it/zenpatches). Finally, we performed a survey on the different computational methods for protein-protein interaction prediction and on their training/testing sets in order to highlight the most informative properties of protein interfaces.

  4. Role of support-nanoalloy interactions in the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering for tuning catalytic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lefu; Shan, Shiyao; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Petkov, Valeri; Ren, Yang; Wanjala, Bridgid N; Engelhard, Mark H; Luo, Jin; Yin, Jun; Chen, Yongsheng; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2012-09-12

    The understanding of the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering in supported nanosized alloy particles is fundamental for achieving active catalysts by design. This report shows how such knowledge can be obtained by a combination of techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation based X-ray fine structure absorption spectroscopy and high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis, and how the support-nanoalloy interaction influences the catalytic activity of ternary nanoalloy (platinum-nickel-cobalt) particles on three different supports: carbon, silica, and titania. The reaction of carbon monoxide with oxygen is employed as a probe to the catalytic activity. The thermochemical processing of this ternary composition, in combination with the different support materials, is demonstrated to be capable of fine-tuning the catalytic activity and stability. The support-nanoalloy interaction is shown to influence structural and chemical ordering in the nanoparticles, leading to support-tunable active sites on the nanoalloys for oxygen activation in the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide. A nickel/cobalt-tuned catalytic site on the surface of nanoalloy is revealed for oxygen activation, which differs from the traditional oxygen-activation sites known for oxide-supported noble metal catalysts. The discovery of such support-nanoalloy interaction-enabled oxygen-activation sites introduces a very promising strategy for designing active catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis.

  5. Many-particle interactions and rainbow effects in grazing scattering of Ar atoms on the Al(1 1 1), Ag(1 1 1) crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko, P. Yu.; Meluzova, D. S.; Shergin, A. P.; Zinoviev, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    Computer simulation of rainbow and ;ion focusing; effects taking place in scattering of Ar atoms on Al(1 1 1) and Ag(1 1 1) crystal surfaces have been performed. The trajectory calculation and vector summation of forces of the projectile atom interaction with crystal atoms have been shown to provide good fitting of the available experimental data. The thermal vibration amplitude for atoms located on the surface of crystals under study has been determined. A functional form of the potential has been proposed that fits well the experimental data.

  6. Entanglement and four-wave mixing effects in the dissipation-free nonlinear interaction of two photons at a single atom

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Holger Friedrich; Kojima, Kunihiro; Takeuchi, Shigeki; Sasaki, Keiji

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the nonlinear interaction between two photons in a single-input pulse at an atomic two-level nonlinearity. A one-dimensional model for the propagation of light to and from the atom is used to describe the precise spatiotemporal coherence of the two-photon state. It is shown that the interaction generates spatiotemporal entanglement in the output state similar to the entanglement observed in parametric down-conversion. A method of generating photon pairs from coherent pump light...

  7. Atomic detail brownian dynamics simulations of concentrated protein solutions with a mean field treatment of hydrodynamic interactions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-07-26

    High macromolecular concentrations are a distinguishing feature of living organisms. Understanding how the high concentration of solutes affects the dynamic properties of biological macromolecules is fundamental for the comprehension of biological processes in living systems. In this paper, we describe the implementation of mean field models of translational and rotational hydrodynamic interactions into an atomically detailed many-protein brownian dynamics simulation method. Concentrated solutions (30-40% volume fraction) of myoglobin, hemoglobin A, and sickle cell hemoglobin S were simulated, and static structure factors, oligomer formation, and translational and rotational self-diffusion coefficients were computed. Good agreement of computed properties with available experimental data was obtained. The results show the importance of both solvent mediated interactions and weak protein-protein interactions for accurately describing the dynamics and the association properties of concentrated protein solutions. Specifically, they show a qualitative difference in the translational and rotational dynamics of the systems studied. Although the translational diffusion coefficient is controlled by macromolecular shape and hydrodynamic interactions, the rotational diffusion coefficient is affected by macromolecular shape, direct intermolecular interactions, and both translational and rotational hydrodynamic interactions.

  8. Novel Visualizations and Interactions for Social Networks Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riche, Nathalie Henry; Fekete, Jean-Daniel

    In the last decade, the popularity of social networking applications has dramatically increased. Social networks are collection of persons or organizations connected by relations. Members of Facebook listed as friends or persons connected by family ties in genealogical trees are examples of social networks. Today's web surfers are often part of many online social networks: they communicate in groups or forums on topics of interests, exchange emails with their friends and colleagues, express their ideas on public blogs, share videos on YouTube, exchange and comment photos on Flickr, participate to the edition of the online encyclopedia Wikipedia or contribute to daily news by collaborating to Wikinews or Agoravox.

  9. REMO: A new protocol to refine full atomic protein models from C-alpha traces by optimizing hydrogen-bonding networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunqi; Zhang, Yang

    2009-08-15

    Protein structure prediction approaches usually perform modeling simulations based on reduced representation of protein structures. For biological utilizations, it is an important step to construct full atomic models from the reduced structure decoys. Most of the current full atomic model reconstruction procedures have defects which either could not completely remove the steric clashes among backbone atoms or generate final atomic models with worse topology similarity relative to the native structures than the reduced models. In this work, we develop a new protocol, called REMO, to generate full atomic protein models by optimizing the hydrogen-bonding network with basic fragments matched from a newly constructed backbone isomer library of solved protein structures. The algorithm is benchmarked on 230 nonhomologous proteins with reduced structure decoys generated by I-TASSER simulations. The results show that REMO has a significant ability to remove steric clashes, and meanwhile retains good topology of the reduced model. The hydrogen-bonding network of the final models is dramatically improved during the procedure. The REMO algorithm has been exploited in the recent CASP8 experiment which demonstrated significant improvements of the I-TASSER models in both atomic-level structural refinement and hydrogen-bonding network construction. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Dynamics of Moment Neuronal Networks with Intra- and Inter-Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuyan Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A framework of moment neuronal networks with intra- and inter-interactions is presented. It is to show how the spontaneous activity is propagated across the homogeneous and heterogeneous network. The input-output firing relationship and the stability are first explored for a homogeneous network. For heterogeneous network without the constraint of the correlation coefficients between neurons, a more sophisticated dynamics is then explored. With random interactions, the network gets easily synchronized. However, desynchronization is produced by a lateral interaction such as Mexico hat function. It is the external intralayer input unit that offers a more sophisticated and unexpected dynamics over the predecessors. Hence, the work further opens up the possibility of carrying out a stochastic computation in neuronal networks.

  11. Storage of Quantum Variables in Atomic Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cviklinski, J.; Ortalo, J.; Josse, V.

    2007-01-01

    Storage and read-out of non classical states of light is a critical element for quantum information networks. Simultaneous storage of two non-commuting variables carried by light and subsequent read-out is shown to be possible in atomic ensembles. Interaction of light fields with three-level syst......Storage and read-out of non classical states of light is a critical element for quantum information networks. Simultaneous storage of two non-commuting variables carried by light and subsequent read-out is shown to be possible in atomic ensembles. Interaction of light fields with three...

  12. The long-range non-additive three-body dispersion interactions for the rare gases, alkali and alkaline-earth atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Li-Yan; Shi, Ting-Yun; Babb, James F; Mitroy, J

    2012-01-01

    The long-range non-additive three-body dispersion interaction coefficients $Z_{111}$, $Z_{112}$, $Z_{113}$, and $Z_{122}$ are computed for many atomic combinations using standard expressions. The atoms considered include hydrogen, the rare gases, the alkali atoms (up to Rb) and the alkaline-earth atoms (up to Sr). The term $Z_{111}$, arising from three mutual dipole interactions is known as the Axilrod-Teller-Muto coefficient or the DDD (dipole-dipole-dipole) coefficient. Similarly, the terms $Z_{112}$, $Z_{113}$, and $Z_{122}$ arise from the mutual combinations of dipole (1), quadrupole (2), and octupole (3) interactions between atoms and they are sometimes known, respectively, as DDQ, DDO, and DQQ coefficients. Results for the four $Z$ coefficients are given for the homonuclear trimers, for the trimers involving two like-rare-gas atoms, and for the trimers with all combinations of the H, He, Li atoms. An exhaustive compilation of all coefficients between all possible atomic combinations is presented as supp...

  13. Dynamic functional modules in co-expressed protein interaction networks of dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyang Yen-Jen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular networks represent the backbone of molecular activity within cells and provide opportunities for understanding the mechanism of diseases. While protein-protein interaction data constitute static network maps, integration of condition-specific co-expression information provides clues to the dynamic features of these networks. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of heart failure. Although previous studies have identified putative biomarkers or therapeutic targets for heart failure, the underlying molecular mechanism of dilated cardiomyopathy remains unclear. Results We developed a network-based comparative analysis approach that integrates protein-protein interactions with gene expression profiles and biological function annotations to reveal dynamic functional modules under different biological states. We found that hub proteins in condition-specific co-expressed protein interaction networks tended to be differentially expressed between biological states. Applying this method to a cohort of heart failure patients, we identified two functional modules that significantly emerged from the interaction networks. The dynamics of these modules between normal and disease states further suggest a potential molecular model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Conclusions We propose a novel framework to analyze the interaction networks in different biological states. It successfully reveals network modules closely related to heart failure; more importantly, these network dynamics provide new insights into the cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. The revealed molecular modules might be used as potential drug targets and provide new directions for heart failure therapy.

  14. Bridging between NMA and Elastic Network Models: Preserving All-Atom Accuracy in Coarse-Grained Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuntae Na

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics can provide deep insights into the functional mechanisms of proteins and protein complexes. For large protein complexes such as GroEL/GroES with more than 8,000 residues, obtaining a fine-grained all-atom description of its normal mode motions can be computationally prohibitive and is often unnecessary. For this reason, coarse-grained models have been used successfully. However, most existing coarse-grained models use extremely simple potentials to represent the interactions within the coarse-grained structures and as a result, the dynamics obtained for the coarse-grained structures may not always be fully realistic. There is a gap between the quality of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures given by all-atom models and that by coarse-grained models. In this work, we resolve an important question in protein dynamics computations--how can we efficiently construct coarse-grained models whose description of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures remains as accurate as that given by all-atom models? Our method takes advantage of the sparseness of the Hessian matrix and achieves a high efficiency with a novel iterative matrix projection approach. The result is highly significant since it can provide descriptions of normal mode motions at an all-atom level of accuracy even for the largest biomolecular complexes. The application of our method to GroEL/GroES offers new insights into the mechanism of this biologically important chaperonin, such as that the conformational transitions of this protein complex in its functional cycle are even more strongly connected to the first few lowest frequency modes than with other coarse-grained models.

  15. Amino acid interaction networks provide a new lens for therapeutic antibody discovery and anti-viral drug optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Karthik; Shriver, Zachary; Babcock, Gregory J

    2015-04-01

    Identification of epitopes on viral proteins for the design/identification of broadly-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnAbs) or specific immunogens for vaccine development is hampered by target amino acid diversity. Recently, bnAbs have been isolated for variable viruses by screening B cells from infected individuals for neutralization breadth. Epitope mapping and structural analysis of bnAbs revealed, while some of these bnAbs target glycan moieties, most target protein regions that are conserved in sequence and/or structure. However, almost universally viruses develop mutations that allow escape from neutralization suggesting protein function may not be dependent on the observed conservation. An alternative method for identification of conserved amino acid sequences utilizes an amino acid network-based approach. Calculation of a significant interaction network (SIN) score allows for selection of amino acids that are conserved and constrained within the protein system. Amino acids with high SIN scores are predicted to mutate at lower frequency due to the impact mutation has on the structure/function of a protein. By ascertaining regions of high SIN score, therapeutics can be appropriately designed to target these regions of low mutability. Further, the use of atomic interaction networks to examine protein structure and protein-protein interfaces can complement existing structure-based computational approaches for therapeutic engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Interactive effects of elevation, species richness and extreme climatic events on plant-pollinator networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoiss, Bernhard; Krauss, Jochen; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2015-11-01

    Plant-pollinator interactions are essential for the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, but are increasingly affected by global change. The risks to such mutualistic interactions from increasing temperature and more frequent extreme climatic events such as drought or advanced snow melt are assumed to depend on network specialization, species richness, local climate and associated parameters such as the amplitude of extreme events. Even though elevational gradients provide valuable model systems for climate change and are accompanied by changes in species richness, responses of plant-pollinator networks to climatic extreme events under different environmental and biotic conditions are currently unknown. Here, we show that elevational climatic gradients, species richness and experimentally simulated extreme events interactively change the structure of mutualistic networks in alpine grasslands. We found that the degree of specialization in plant-pollinator networks (H2') decreased with elevation. Nonetheless, network specialization increased after advanced snow melt at high elevations, whereas changes in network specialization after drought were most pronounced at sites with low species richness. Thus, changes in network specialization after extreme climatic events depended on climatic context and were buffered by high species richness. In our experiment, only generalized plant-pollinator networks changed in their degree of specialization after climatic extreme events. This indicates that contrary to our assumptions, network generalization may not always foster stability of mutualistic interaction networks. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Reuse of structural domain–domain interactions in protein networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster-Böckler, Benjamin; Bateman, Alex

    2007-01-01

    Background Protein interactions are thought to be largely mediated by interactions between structural domains. Databases such as iPfam relate interactions in protein structures to known domain families. Here, we investigate how the domain interactions from the iPfam database are distributed in protein interactions taken from the HPRD, MPact, BioGRID, DIP and IntAct databases. Results We find that known structural domain interactions can only explain a subset of 4–19% of the available protein interactions, nevertheless this fraction is still significantly bigger than expected by chance. There is a correlation between the frequency of a domain interaction and the connectivity of the proteins it occurs in. Furthermore, a large proportion of protein interactions can be attributed to a small number of domain interactions. We conclude that many, but not all, domain interactions constitute reusable modules of molecular recognition. A substantial proportion of domain interactions are conserved between E. coli, S. cerevisiae and H. sapiens. These domains are related to essential cellular functions, suggesting that many domain interactions were already present in the last universal common ancestor. Conclusion Our results support the concept of domain interactions as reusable, conserved building blocks of protein interactions, but also highlight the limitations currently imposed by the small number of available protein structures. PMID:17640363

  18. Brain connectivity dynamics during social interaction reflect social network structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmälzle, Ralf; Brook O'Donnell, Matthew; Garcia, Javier O; Cascio, Christopher N; Bayer, Joseph; Bassett, Danielle S; Vettel, Jean M; Falk, Emily B

    2017-05-16

    Social ties are crucial for humans. Disruption of ties through social exclusion has a marked effect on our thoughts and feelings; however, such effects can be tempered by broader social network resources. Here, we use fMRI data acquired from 80 male adolescents to investigate how social exclusion modulates functional connectivity within and across brain networks involved in social pain and understanding the mental states of others (i.e., mentalizing). Furthermore, using objectively logged friendship network data, we examine how individual variability in brain reactivity to social exclusion relates to the density of participants' friendship networks, an important aspect of social network structure. We find increased connectivity within a set of regions previously identified as a mentalizing system during exclusion relative to inclusion. These results are consistent across the regions of interest as well as a whole-brain analysis. Next, examining how social network characteristics are associated with task-based connectivity dynamics, we find that participants who showed greater changes in connectivity within the mentalizing system when socially excluded by peers had less dense friendship networks. This work provides insight to under