WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic hydrogen gas

  1. Interaction of gas phase atomic hydrogen with Pt(111): Direct evidence for the formation of bulk hydrogen species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG ZhiQuan; HUANG WeiXin; BAO XinHe

    2007-01-01

    Employing hot tungsten filament to thermal dissociate molecular hydrogen, we generated gas phase atomic hydrogen under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions and investigated its interaction with Pt(111) surface. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) results demonstrate that adsorption of molecular hydrogen on Pt(111) forms surface Had species whereas adsorption of atomic hydrogen forms not only surface Had species but also bulk Had species. Bulk Had species is more thermal-unstable than surface Had species on Pt(111), suggesting that bulk Had species is more energetic. This kind of weakly- adsorbed bulk Had species might be the active hydrogen species in the Pt-catalyzed hydrogenation reactions.

  2. Interaction of gas phase atomic hydrogen with Pt(111):Direct evidence for the formation of bulk hydrogen species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Employing hot tungsten filament to thermal dissociate molecular hydrogen,we generated gas phase atomic hydrogen under ultra-high vacuum(UHV)conditions and investigated its interaction with Pt(111) surface.Thermal desorption spectroscopy(TDS)results demonstrate that adsorption of molecular hy- drogen on Pt(111)forms surface Had species whereas adsorption of atomic hydrogen forms not only surface Had species but also bulk Had species.Bulk Had species is more thermal-unstable than surface Had species on Pt(111),suggesting that bulk Had species is more energetic.This kind of weakly- adsorbed bulk Had species might be the active hydrogen species in the Pt-catalyzed hydrogenation reactions.

  3. Stable atomic hydrogen: Polarized atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out experiments with stable atomic hydrogen with a view to possible applications in polarized targets or polarized atomic beam sources. Recent results from the stabilization apparatus are described. The first stable atomic hydrogen beam source based on the microwave extraction method (which is being tested ) is presented. The effect of the stabilized hydrogen gas density on the properties of the source is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Solar wind heating beyond 1 AU. [interplanetary atomic hydrogen gas effect on protons and electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, T. E.; Leer, E.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of an interplanetary atomic hydrogen gas on solar wind proton, electron and alpha-particle temperatures beyond 1 AU is considered. It is shown that the proton temperature (and probably also the alpha-particle temperature) reaches a minimum between 2 AU and 4 AU, depending on values chosen for solar wind and interstellar gas parameters. Heating of the electron gas depends primarily on the thermal coupling of the protons and electrons. For strong coupling, the electron temperature reaches a minimum between 4 AU and 8 AU, but for weak coupling (Coulomb collisions only), the electron temperature continues to decrease throughout the inner solar system. A spacecraft travelling to Jupiter should be able to observe the heating effect of the solar wind-interplanetary hydrogen interaction, and from such observations it may be possible of infer some properties of the interstellar neutral gas.

  5. Inside the Hydrogen Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Nowakowski, M; Fierro, D Bedoya; Manjarres, A D Bermudez

    2016-01-01

    We apply the non-linear Euler-Heisenberg theory to calculate the electric field inside the hydrogen atom. We will demonstrate that the electric field calculated in the Euler-Heisenberg theory can be much smaller than the corresponding field emerging from the Maxwellian theory. In the hydrogen atom this happens only at very small distances. This effect reduces the large electric field inside the hydrogen atom calculated from the electromagnetic form-factors via the Maxwell equations. The energy content of the field is below the pair production threshold.

  6. Evaluation of Atomic Layer Deposition coating as gas barrier against hydrogen gas and humidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: ALD coating can provide a continuous and conformal barrier between the substrate and ambient atmosphere. - Abstract: Effectiveness of HfO2 Atomic Layer Deposition coatings has been studied on ZnO varistors by I–V tests, impedance spectroscopy, and highly accelerated life test. Based on impedance spectroscopy analyses, the proton diffusion coefficient was measured to be 400 K times less in the coating. Transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that Atomic Layer Deposition films are continuous and conformal. After exposure to high temperature, partial crystallization was detected in the coating and increases proton diffusion coefficient by 150 times

  7. Laser-induced reaction of Yb atoms with hydrogen chloride in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are presented of an investigation of the reaction of ytterbium atoms with hydrogen chloride initiated by laser radiation resonant with the 1S/sub O/-3P1 intercombination transition. The rate constant of extinction of the excited state of the ytterbium atom by a molecular reagent was measured: k/sub d/ = (6.4 +- 1.5) x 10-10 cm3sec

  8. Diffusion radius of muonic hydrogen atoms in H-D gas

    OpenAIRE

    Adamczak, Andrzej; Gronowski, Jakub

    2006-01-01

    The diffusion radius of the 1S muonic hydrogen atoms in gaseous H_2 targets with various deuterium admixtures has been determined for temperatures T=30 and 300 K. The Monte Carlo calculations have been performed using the partial differential crosssections for $p\\mu$ and $d\\mu$ atom scattering from the molecules H$_2$, HD and D$_2$. These cross sections include hyperfine transitions in the muonic atoms, the muon exchange between the nuclei $p$ and $d$, and rotational-vibrational transitions i...

  9. Diffusion radius of muonic hydrogen atoms in H-D gas

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczak, A; Adamczak, Andrzej; Gronowski, Jakub

    2006-01-01

    The diffusion radius of the 1S muonic hydrogen atoms in gaseous H_2 targets with various deuterium admixtures has been determined for temperatures T=30 and 300 K. The Monte Carlo calculations have been performed using the partial differential crosssections for $p\\mu$ and $d\\mu$ atom scattering from the molecules H$_2$, HD and D$_2$. These cross sections include hyperfine transitions in the muonic atoms, the muon exchange between the nuclei $p$ and $d$, and rotational-vibrational transitions in the target molecules. The Monte Carlo results have been used for preparing the time-projection chamber for the high-precision measurement of the nuclear $\\mu^{-}$ capture in the ground-state $p\\mu$ atom, which is now underway at the Paul Scherrer Institute.

  10. Antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms have recently made great progress following the commissioning of the low energy antiproton facility (LEAR) at CERN in 1983. At the same time our understanding of the atomic cascade has increased considerably through measurements of the X-ray spectra. The life history of the p-bar-p atom is considered in some detail, from the initial capture of the antiproton when stopping in hydrogen, through the atomic cascade with the emission of X-rays, to the final antiproton annihilation and production of mesons. The experiments carried out at LEAR are described and the results compared with atomic cascade calculations and predictions of strong interaction effects. (author)

  11. Polarized atomic hydrogen beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, N.; Crowe, D.M.; Lubell, M.S.; Tang, F.C.; Vasilakis, A.; Mulligan, F.J.; Slevin, J.

    1988-12-01

    We describe the design and operating characteristics of a simple polarized atomic hydrogen beam particularly suitable for applications to crossed beams experiments. In addition to experimental measurements, we present the results of detailed computer models, using Monte-Carlo ray tracing techniques, optical analogs, and phase-space methods, that not only provide us with a confirmation of our measurement, but also allow us to characterize the density, polarization, and atomic fraction of the beam at all points along its path. As a subsidiary result, we also present measurements of the relative and absolute efficiencies of the V/G Supavac mass analyzer for masses 1 and 2.

  12. Sampling the Hydrogen Atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graves N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A model is proposed for the hydrogen atom in which the electron is an objectively real particle orbiting at very near to light speed. The model is based on the postulate that certain velocity terms associated with orbiting bodies can be considered as being af- fected by relativity. This leads to a model for the atom in which the stable electron orbits are associated with orbital velocities where Gamma is n /α , leading to the idea that it is Gamma that is quantized and not angular momentum as in the Bohr and other models. The model provides a mechanism which leads to quantization of energy levels within the atom and also provides a simple mechanical explanation for the Fine Struc- ture Constant. The mechanism is closely associated with the Sampling theorem and the related phenomenon of aliasing developed in the mid-20th century by engineers at Bell labs.

  13. Stereodynamics in the Collisional Autoionization of Water, Ammonia, and Hydrogen Sulfide with Metastable Rare Gas Atoms: Competition Between Intermolecular Halogen and Hydrogen Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcinelli, Stefano; Bartocci, Alessio; Cavalli, Simonetta; Pirani, Fernando; Vecchiocattivi, Franco

    2016-01-11

    Recent experiments on the title subject, performed with a high-resolution crossed-beam apparatus, have provided the total ionization cross sections as a function of the collision energy between noble gas atoms, electronically excited in their metastable states (Ng*), and H2 O, H2 S, and NH3 reagents, as well as the emitted electron energy spectra. This paper presents a rationalization of all the experimental findings in a unifying picture to cast light on the basic chemical properties of Ng* under conditions of great relevance both from a fundamental and from an applied point of view. The importance of this investigation is that it isolates the selective role of the intermolecular halogen and hydrogen bonds, to assess their anisotropic effects on the stereodynamics of the promoted ionization reactions, and to model energy transfer and reactivity in systems of applied interest, such as planetary atmospheres, plasmas, lasers, and flames. PMID:26633846

  14. Hydrogen gas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A differential thermocouple hydrogen gas detector has one thermocouple junction coated with an activated palladium or palladium-silver alloy catalytic material to allow heated hydrogen gas to react with the catalyst and raise the temperature of that junction. The other juction is covered with inert glass or epoxy resin, and does not experience a rise in temperature in the presence of hydrogen gas. A coil heater may be mounted around the thermocouple junctions to heat the hydrogen, or the gas may be passed through a heated block prior to exposing it to the thermocouples

  15. Bose-Einstein Condensation of Atomic Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Fried, Dale G.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes the observation and study of Bose-Einstein condensation of a trapped, dilute gas of atomic hydrogen. The condensate and normal gas are studied by two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition. We condense over 10^9 atoms per second for several seconds, and the peak condensate density is around 5x10^15 cm^-3. Topics covered in the thesis include a theoretical analysis of Bose-condensed hydrogen, a description of the cryogenic trapping cell and the evaporative cooling te...

  16. Positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G.O.; Charlton, M.; Slevin, J.; Laricchia, G.; Kover, A.; Poulsen, M.R.; Chormaic, S.N. (University Coll., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1993-08-14

    Ionization cross sections for positrons impacting on atomic hydrogen have been measured for kinetic energies in the range 15-700 eV. This has been done in a crossed-beam geometry where a magnetically guided positron beam intersects a hydrogen gas jet emanating from a radio frequency discharge tube. Electron impact ionization cross sections were also measured with the same apparatus thus facilitating comparison with, and normalization to, published results. (author).

  17. Positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization cross sections for positrons impacting on atomic hydrogen have been measured for kinetic energies in the range 15-700 eV. This has been done in a crossed-beam geometry where a magnetically guided positron beam intersects a hydrogen gas jet emanating from a radio frequency discharge tube. Electron impact ionization cross sections were also measured with the same apparatus thus facilitating comparison with, and normalization to, published results. (author)

  18. Gas distribution in the central region of the galaxy. I. Atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple model of the distribution and kinematics of gas within 1.5 pc of the galactic center is described, the model refers to all such gas, whether at apparently permitted or anomalous velocities. The inner-Galaxy material is confined in a layer of scale height 0.1 kpc to a disk of 3 kpc diameter, tilted 220 with respect to the plane b = 00 and 780 with respect to the plane of the sky. Within this disk the kinematics involve rotation and expansion of approx. 170 km s-1. Detailed specification of the model parameters arises from comparison of synthetic 21-cm emission profiles with a new set of high-sensitivity H I data. The resultant model accounts in a coherent way for many observed spectral features which were previously studied separately and variously identified with bars, spiral arms, or isolated ejecta. In particular, the model subsumes the individual features E, J2, J4, J5, VII, X, and XII, which were previously considered as evidence of recurring, collimated ejections from the galactic nucleus. The model accounts for the rotating nuclear disk feature, the principal source of the inner-Galaxy gravitational field, and subsumes several other extended spectral features (such as III, the connecting arm) at velocities which are permitted by pure rotation. The H I mass of the disk is 1 x 107 M sub solar, and the expansion flux across its outer boundary is 4 M sub solar yr-1. No evidence is seen of important density enhancements or kinematic perturbations associated with particular observed spectral features, nor of anisotropic ejection from the nucleus. The complete axial symmetry shared by all parameters of the synthesis suggests that a steady state prevails. The large-scale consequences of the fundamental inner-Galaxy distribution depend on the total mass. With no dynamical foundation, the principal use of the phenomenological model is the constraint of other interpretations of the inner-Galaxy gas. 11 figures, 2 tables

  19. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A.; Parthey, Ch G.; Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Khabarova, K.; Pohl, R.; Peters, E.; Yost, D. C.; Matveev, A.; Predehl, K.; Droste, S.; Wilken, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.; Abgrall, M.; Rovera, D.; Salomon, Ch; Laurent, Ph; Udem, Th

    2013-12-01

    Precise determinations of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference [1]. A recent measurement of the 2S - 2P3/2 transition frequency in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct [2, 3]. We hope to contribute to this so-called "proton size puzzle" by providing additional experimental input from hydrogen spectroscopy.

  20. Atomic hydrogen in planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors searched for neutral atomic hydrogen associated with 22 planetary nebulae and three evolved stars in the 21 cm line at the Arecibo Observatory. Objects whose radial velocities permitted discrimination from Galactic H I were chosen for observation. Hydrogen was detected in absorption from IC 4997. From the measurements new low limits are derived to the mass of atomic hydrogen associated with the undetected nebulae. Radio continuum observations were also made of several of the nebulae at 12.6 cm. The authors reexamine previous measurements of H I in planetary nebulae, and present the data on a consistent footing. The question of planetary nebula distances is considered at length. Finally, implications of the H I measurements for nebular evolution are discussed and it is suggested that atomic hydrogen seen in absorption was expelled from the progenitor star during the final 1000 yr prior to the onset of ionization. 68 references

  1. A polarized atomic hydrogen beam

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, N; Crowe, D.M.; Lubell, M. S.; Tang, F.C.; Vasilakis, A.; Mulligan, F. J.; Slevin, J.

    1988-01-01

    We describe the design and operating characteristics of a simple polarized atomic hydrogen beam particularly suitable for applications to crossed beams experiments. In addition to experimental measurements, we present the results of detailed computer models, using Monte-Carlo ray tracing techniques, optical analogs, and phase-space methods, that not only provide us with a confirmation of our measurement, but also allow us to characterize the density, polarization, and atomic fraction of the b...

  2. Two-dimensional hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the region of continuous spectrum the expansions of the parabolic basis of a two-dimensional hydrogen atom on the polar basis and the inverse expansion have been found. The connection between these expansions and the corresponding expansions in the discrete spectrum is also analysed. The group-theoretical meaning of the two-dimensional Coulomb scattering phase is established

  3. Hydrogen atom donors: recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansäuer, Andreas; Shi, Lei; Otte, Matthias; Huth, Inga; Rosales, Antonio; Sancho-Sanz, Iris; Padial, Natalia M; Oltra, J Enrique

    2012-01-01

    This review highlights recent developments in the field of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reagents that circumvent the disadvantages of classical group 14 reagents, such as Bu₃SnH. Special emphasis is laid on the lowering of bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of molecules that could, as yet, not be used as HAT reagents and on the use of organometallic HAT reagents. PMID:21452081

  4. Atomic hydrogen in a magnetic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the construction and application of a static magnetic trap for atomic hydrogen. It is demonstrated that densities of up to 3*1014 cm-3 at temperatures of 80 to 200 mK can be achieved with a technically simple method of filling the trap. Double polarization is shown to occur spontaneously in the trapped gas, and the dipolar relaxation rate and its field dependance are measured confirming theoretical predictions. These results show that atomic hydrogen is a promising material for the achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation, provided that apart from the present method of cooling the gas, which is shown to impose a lower limit on the temperature, another cooling mechanism is supplied to reach lower temperatures. The density reached was two orders of magnitude higher than that of trapping experiments done at MIT where the technique of evaporate cooling was used to reach a temperature lower than 3 mK. (author). 138 refs.; 27 figs

  5. A polarized atomic hydrogen beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the design and operating characteristics of a simple polarized atomic hydrogen beam particularly suitable for applications to crossed beams experiments. In addition to experimental measurements, we present the results of detailed computer models, using Monte-Carlo ray tracing techniques, optical analogs, and phase-space methods, that not only provide us with a confirmation of our measurement, but also allow us to characterize the density, polarization, and atomic fraction of the beam at all points along its path. As a subsidiary result, we also present measurements of the relative and absolute efficiencies of the V/G Supavac mass analyzer for masses 1 and 2. (orig.)

  6. Measurement of the Analyzing Power $A_N$ in $pp$ Elastic Scattering in the CNI Region with a Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, H.; Alekseev, I. G.; Bravar, A; Bunce, G.; Dhawan, S.; Gill, R; Haeberli, W.; Jinnouchi, O.; Khodinov, A.; Makdisi, Y.; Nass, A.; Saito, N; Stephenson, E. J.; D.N. Svirida; Wise, T.

    2005-01-01

    A precise measurement of the analyzing power $A_N$ in proton-proton elastic scattering in the region of 4-momentum transfer squared $0.001 < |t| < 0.032 ({\\rm GeV}/c)^2$ has been performed using a polarized atomic hydrogen gas jet target and the 100 GeV/$c$ RHIC proton beam. The interference of the electromagnetic spin-flip amplitude with a hadronic spin-nonflip amplitude is predicted to generate a significant $A_N$ of 4--5%, peaking at $-t \\simeq 0.003 ({\\rm GeV}/c)^2$. This kinematic region...

  7. Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Xiao, Jian

    2016-04-01

    The cascade [1,n]-hydrogen transfer/cyclization, recognized as the tert-amino effect one century ago, has received considerable interest in recent decades, and great achievements have been made. With the aid of this strategy, the inert C(sp(3))-H bonds can be directly functionalized into C-C, C-N, C-O bonds under catalysis of Lewis acids, Brønsted acids, as well as organocatalysts, and even merely under thermal conditions. Hydrogen can be transferred intramolecularly from hydrogen donor to acceptor in the form of hydride, or proton, followed by cyclization to furnish the cyclic products in processes featuring high atom economy. Methylene/methine adjacent to heteroatoms, e.g., nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, can be exploited as hydride donor as well as methylene/methine without heteroatom assistance. Miscellaneous electrophilic subunits or intermediates, e.g., alkylidene malonate, carbophilic metal activated alkyne or allene, α,β-unsaturated aldehydes/ketone, saturated aldehydes/iminium, ketenimine/carbodiimide, metal carbenoid, electron-withdrawing groups activated allene/alkyne, in situ generated carbocation, can serve as hydride acceptors. This methodology has shown preeminent power to construct 5-, 6-, or 7-membered heterocyclic as well as carbon rings. In this chapter, various hydrogen donors and acceptors are adequately discussed. PMID:27573142

  8. Precision spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Thesis reports on three measurements involving the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and deuterium conducted on a 5.8 K atomic beam. The transition is excited Doppler-free via two counter-propagating photons near 243 nm. The H/D isotope shift has been determined as Δ∫exp=670 994 334 606(15) Hz. Comparing with the theoretical value for the isotope shift, excluding the leading nuclear size effect, Δ∫th=670 999 566.90(66)(60) kHz we confirm, twice more accurate, the rms charge radius difference of the deuteron and the proton as left angle r2 right angle d- left angle r2 right angle p=3.82007(65) fm2 and the deuteron structure radius rstr=1.97507(78) fm. The frequency ratio of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen to the cesium ground state hyperfine transition provided by the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM is measured to be ∫1S-2S=2 466 061 413 187 035 (10) Hz which presents a fractional frequency uncertainty of 4.2 x 10-15. The second absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen presents the first application of a 900 km fiber link between MPQ and Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig which we have used to calibrate the MPQ hydrogen maser with the stationary cesium fountain clock CSF1 at PTB. With the result of ∫1S-2S=2 466 061 413 187 017 (11) Hz we can put a constraint on the electron Lorentz boost violating coefficients 0.95c(TX)-0.29c(TY)-0.08 c(TZ)=(2.2±1.8) x 10-11 within the framework of minimal standard model extensions. We limit a possible drift of the strong coupling constant through the ratio of magnetic moments at a competitive level (∂)/(∂t)ln (μCs)/(μB)=-(3.0±1.2) x 10-15 yr-1.

  9. Precision spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthey, Christian Godehard

    2011-12-15

    This Thesis reports on three measurements involving the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and deuterium conducted on a 5.8 K atomic beam. The transition is excited Doppler-free via two counter-propagating photons near 243 nm. The H/D isotope shift has been determined as {delta}{integral}{sub exp}=670 994 334 606(15) Hz. Comparing with the theoretical value for the isotope shift, excluding the leading nuclear size effect, {delta}{integral}{sub th}=670 999 566.90(66)(60) kHz we confirm, twice more accurate, the rms charge radius difference of the deuteron and the proton as left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub d}- left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub p}=3.82007(65) fm{sup 2} and the deuteron structure radius r{sub str}=1.97507(78) fm. The frequency ratio of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen to the cesium ground state hyperfine transition provided by the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM is measured to be {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 035 (10) Hz which presents a fractional frequency uncertainty of 4.2 x 10{sup -15}. The second absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen presents the first application of a 900 km fiber link between MPQ and Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig which we have used to calibrate the MPQ hydrogen maser with the stationary cesium fountain clock CSF1 at PTB. With the result of {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 017 (11) Hz we can put a constraint on the electron Lorentz boost violating coefficients 0.95c{sub (TX)}-0.29c{sub (TY)}-0.08 c{sub (TZ)}=(2.2{+-}1.8) x 10{sup -11} within the framework of minimal standard model extensions. We limit a possible drift of the strong coupling constant through the ratio of magnetic moments at a competitive level ({partial_derivative})/({partial_derivative}t)ln ({mu}{sub Cs})/({mu}{sub B})=-(3.0{+-}1.2) x 10{sup -15} yr{sup -1}.

  10. The Star Formation Rate Efficiency of Neutral Atomic-dominated Hydrogen Gas in the Outskirts of Star Forming Galaxies from z~1 to z~3

    CERN Document Server

    Rafelski, Marc; Fumagalli, Michele; Neeleman, Marcel; Teplitz, Harry I; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M; Scarlata, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Current observational evidence suggests that the star formation rate (SFR) efficiency of neutral atomic hydrogen gas measured in Damped Ly-alpha Systems (DLAs) at z~3 is more than 10 times lower than predicted by the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation. To understand the origin of this deficit, and to investigate possible evolution with redshift and galaxy properties, we measure the SFR efficiency of atomic gas at z~1, z~2, and z~3 around star-forming galaxies. We use new robust photometric redshifts in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to create galaxy stacks in these three redshift bins, and measure the SFR efficiency by combining DLA absorber statistics with the observed rest-frame UV emission in the galaxies' outskirts. We find that the SFR efficiency of HI gas at z>1 is ~1-3% of that predicted by the KS relation. Contrary to simulations and models that predict a reduced SFR efficiency with decreasing metallicity and thus with increasing redshift, we find no significant evolution in the SFR efficiency with redshift...

  11. Stabilization of spin-polarized atomic hydrogen at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cryostat for stabilization of gaseous atomic hydrogen at low tamperatures and in high magnetic fields was built up. Gas densities of ≅1013 atoms/cm3, which remain stable for more than one hour, were achieved in the first experiments

  12. Halo Tracing with Atomic Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Merrifield, M R

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews the constraints that can be placed on the shapes of disk galaxies' dark halos using the distribution and kinematics of atomic hydrogen. These data indicate that dark halos are close to axisymmetric, with their axes of symmetry co-aligned with their disk axes. They also appear to be oblate, with shortest-to-longest axis ratios displaying quite a broad range of values from ~0.2 to ~0.8. These results are consistent with the predicted shapes of halos in cold dark matter scenarios, but rule out some of the more exotic dark matter candidates. However, the total number of measurements is still depressingly small, and more data are required if halo shape is to become a powerful diagnostic for theories of galaxy formation and evolution.

  13. Stabilization of atomic hydrogen and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with the first of a series of experiments done at the University of Amsterdam to study the properties of spin polarized atomic hydrogen (spa H) and deuterium (spa D) at very low temperatures (T approximately 0.3 K) and in high magnetic fields (B approximately 10 T). The experiments show that spa H and spa D may be subjected to experimental investigation like any normal (i.e. stable) gas. Chapter 2 deals with the experimental apparatus and in particular the development of a reliable method to cool atomic hydrogen to very low temperatures which turned out to be decisive for the experiments. An account of the first experiments with spa H can be found in chapter 3. These experiments showed that spa H can be stabilized for extended periods of time (at low temperature and in high magnetic fields) by covering all surfaces with a superfluid film of 4He. The gas was detected by triggering recombination by locally breaking the helium film and measuring the heat of recombination. This method turned out to be very sensitive and easy to implement. In chapter 4 the physical picture of the gas is discussed. This includes a discussion of the density profile and the phenomenon of thermal leakage from the open structured sample cell. The density profile may be used to detect Bose-Einstein condensation. A second series of experiments is discussed in chapter 5. These measurements were aimed at achieving high densities and to study the limiting processes. They demonstrate that spa H behaves as a gas. Recombination measurements with spa D at low temperatures are discussed in chapter 6 and show that recombination predominantly occurs on the surface of the helium film. (Auth.)

  14. Studies in Composing Hydrogen Atom Wavefunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putnam, Lance Jonathan; Kuchera-Morin, JoAnn; Peliti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present our studies in composing elementary wavefunctions of a hydrogen-like atom and identify several relationships between physical phenomena and musical composition that helped guide the process. The hydrogen-like atom accurately describes some of the fundamental quantum mechanical phenomen...

  15. Determination of atomic hydrogen density in non-thermal hydrogen plasmas via emission actinometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Weiguo [Laboratory of Plasmas Physical Chemistry, PO Box 288, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Xu Yong [Laboratory of Plasmas Physical Chemistry, PO Box 288, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Geng Zicai [Laboratory of Plasmas Physical Chemistry, PO Box 288, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu Zhongwei [Laboratory of Plasmas Physical Chemistry, PO Box 288, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhu Aimin [Laboratory of Plasmas Physical Chemistry, PO Box 288, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2007-07-21

    Atomic hydrogen plays an important role in the chemical vapour deposition of diamond and other functional materials. This paper reports the experimental determinations of atomic hydrogen density in dielectric barrier discharge hydrogen plasmas via optical emission spectrometry using Ar as an actinometer. At certain discharge conditions (ac 24 kHz, 28 kV of peak-to-peak voltage), the approximate hydrogen dissociation fractions calculated from the emission intensities with respect to electron temperatures obtained with the Langmuir probe, are decreased from 0.099 to 0.01 as the gas pressure increases from 2 to 4 Torr. The relative H atom mole fractions as a function of discharge parameters (spatial position and gas flow rate) have been investigated. It is shown that the discharge characteristics strongly depend on the spatial position but not on the gas flow rate. The influences of the above operating parameters on the emission intensities have been discussed.

  16. Determination of atomic hydrogen density in non-thermal hydrogen plasmas via emission actinometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic hydrogen plays an important role in the chemical vapour deposition of diamond and other functional materials. This paper reports the experimental determinations of atomic hydrogen density in dielectric barrier discharge hydrogen plasmas via optical emission spectrometry using Ar as an actinometer. At certain discharge conditions (ac 24 kHz, 28 kV of peak-to-peak voltage), the approximate hydrogen dissociation fractions calculated from the emission intensities with respect to electron temperatures obtained with the Langmuir probe, are decreased from 0.099 to 0.01 as the gas pressure increases from 2 to 4 Torr. The relative H atom mole fractions as a function of discharge parameters (spatial position and gas flow rate) have been investigated. It is shown that the discharge characteristics strongly depend on the spatial position but not on the gas flow rate. The influences of the above operating parameters on the emission intensities have been discussed

  17. Production of hyperthermal hydrogen atoms by an arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A magnetically confined thermal electric arc gas heater has been designed and built as a suitable source of heat for dissociating hydrogen molecules with energy in the range of a few eV. Specifically, the average beam kinetic energy is determined to be 1.5 eV, the dissociation rate is 0.5 atoms per molecule and the atom beam intensity in the forward direction is 1018 atoms/sr-sec. The working pressure in the arc discharge region is from 15 to 25 torr. This novel atom source has been successfully ignited and operated with pure hydrogen during several hours of continuous performance, maintaining its characteristics. The hyperthermal hydrogen atom beam, which is obtained from this source is analyzed and characterized in a high vacuum system, the characterization of the atom beam is accomplished by two different methods: calorimetry and surface ionization. Calorimetic sensor were used for detecting the atom beam by measuring the delivered power of the impinging atoms on the sensor surface. In the second approach an H-surface production backscattering experiment from a low work function surface was conducted. The validity of these two methods is discussed, and the results are compared. The different collision mechanisms to dissociate and ionize hydrogen molecules in the arch discharge are reviewed, as well as the physics of electric arcs. Finally, a Monte Carlo simulation program is used to calculate the ionization probability of low energy atoms perpendicularly reflected from a surface converter, as a model for atom surface ionization

  18. Muonium/muonic hydrogen formation in atomic hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Kulhar

    2004-09-01

    The muonium/muonic hydrogen atom formation in ± –H collisions is investigated, using a two-state approximation in a time dependent formalism. It is found that muonium cross-section results are similar to the cross-section results obtained for positronium formation in + –H collision. Muonic hydrogen atom formation cross-sections in - –H collision are found to be significant in a narrow range of energy (5 eV–25 eV).

  19. Measurement of the analyzing power A{sub N} in pp elastic scattering in the CNI region with a polarized atomic hydrogen gas jet target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, H. [Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, (Japan); Alekseev, I.G. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 117259 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bravar, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)]. E-mail: bravar@bnl.gov; Bunce, G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Dhawan, S. [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Gill, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Haeberli, W. [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Jinnouchi, O. [RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Khodinov, A. [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Makdisi, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Nass, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Saito, N. [Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Stephenson, E.J. [Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Svirida, D.N. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 117259 Moscow (Russian Federation); Wise, T. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Zelenski, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2006-07-20

    Precise measurement of the analyzing power A{sub N} in proton-proton elastic scattering in the region of 4-momentum transfer squared 0.001< vertical bar t vertical bar <0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2} has been performed using a polarized atomic hydrogen gas jet target and the 100 GeV/c RHIC proton beam. The interference of the electromagnetic spin-flip amplitude with a hadronic spin-nonflip amplitude is predicted to generate a significant A{sub N} of 4-5%, peaking at -t{approx}0.003 (GeV/c){sup 2}. This kinematic region is known as the Coulomb nuclear interference region. A possible hadronic spin-flip amplitude modifies this calculable prediction. We present the first precise result of the CNI asymmetry and shape as a function of t. Our data are well described by the CNI prediction with the electromagnetic spin-flip alone and do not support the presence of a large hadronic spin-flip amplitude.

  20. Measurements of single and double spin asymmetry in pp elastic scattering in the CNI region with a polarized atomic hydrogen gas jet target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise measurements of the single spin asymmetry AN, and the double spin asymmetry ANN, in proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering in the region of four-momentum transfer squared 0.0012 have been performed using a polarized atomic hydrogen gas jet target and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) polarized proton beam. We present measurements of AN and ANN at center-of-mass energies √(s)=6.8 and 13.7 GeV. These spin-dependent observables are sensitive to the poorly known hadronic spin-dependent amplitudes. Comparing AN at different energies, a √(s) dependence of the hadronic single spin-flip amplitude is suggested. A hadronic double spin-flip amplitude from the ANN data is consistent with zero within a 2-σ level. We also present ΔσT, estimated from the measured ANN data. The results for ΔσT are consistent with zero. Our results provide significant constraints toward a comprehensive understanding of the reaction mechanism for pp elastic scattering.

  1. Quantum gases: spin-polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties of atomic gases, spin-polarized hydrogen and deuterium, are discussed. The underlying ideas required for stabilizing these gases against recombination to the molecular form are presented and experimental techniques are briefly described. The consequences of the presence of a helium surface for Bose Einstein Condensation (BEC) are discussed. It is shown that interactions between atoms on the surface are required to achieve sufficiently high gas phase densities for BEC to occur. (Auth.)

  2. Atomic hydrogen and fundamental physical constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques are described which allow the study, in undergraduate laboratories, of the spectrum of atomic hydrogen. The Rydberg constant, the electron-proton mass ratio, and the fine-structure constant are evaluated from the measurements. The key to the series of experiments is a discharge tube in which atomic lines dominate over the molecular lines. (author)

  3. Theoretical aspects of the stabilization of atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes a theoretical study of processes leading to recombination of hydrogen atoms into molecular form. A relaxation process, due to the transition among the lowest two hyperfine levels of atomic hydrogen, turns out to be of fundamental importance for the recombination rate. Models have been formulated to calculate the relaxation rate by means of quantum mechanical scattering theory. For processes in the bulk of the gas the results of an almost exact coupled-channels calculation have been compared with approximate models. In these models first-order approximations are applied, as well as approximations connected with the large distance of closest approach of the colliding hydrogen atoms. The assumptions turned out to be correct to the promille level, except for the so-called high-temperature limit. (Auth.)

  4. On the energy of electric field in hydrogen atom

    OpenAIRE

    Kornyushin, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that hydrogen atom is a unique object in physics having negative energy of electric field, which is present in the atom. This refers also to some hydrogen-type atoms: hydrogen anti-atom, atom composed of proton and antiproton, and positronium.

  5. Hydrogen negative ions and collisions of atomic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will be an overview presenting some of the basic atomic collisions processes (gas phase) which are fundamental to production and destruction of H-(D-). More detailed discussions of the most important processes will be left to other papers at this Symposium, and primarily new results since the 1977 Symposium will be discussed. Recent results provide insight into mechanisms responsible for the high H-(D-) ion fractions in hydrogen gas discharges, and the ion-atom collision processes important for double capture negative ion sources are better understood than in 1977

  6. ESR and related experiments in spin-polarized atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with some experiments in (gaseous) spin-polarized atomic hydrogen. One uses the expression 'stabilized' atomic hydrogen, meaning that by choosing suitable conditions one can suppress the tendency of atoms to recombine into H2 molecules, such that the lifetime of the atomic state is extended by many orders of magnitude. Research is focused at the study of processes that determine the decay rate of polarized H samples, with the ultimate goal of preparing samples of sufficiently high density and at low enough temperature to observe experimentally the behaviour of the (degenerate) quantum gas. ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) appears to be a very suitable measurement technique to study the properties of polarized H. This work describes the introduction of ESR as detection technique, and the first results of an experiment in polarized H using this technique. (orig.)

  7. Software for Hydrogenic Atoms and Orbitals Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowit KITTIWUTTHISAKDI

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A program was developed in java for hydrogenic atoms and orbitals visualization. The first 18 atoms in the periodic table were approximated with a hydrogenic wave-function. This simple hydrogenic wave-function allowed quick calculation for real-time interactive visualization. Electron cloud based models were employed and displayed by a ray-tracing technique. One or more orbitals that defined an atom could be selected and displayed. A user could zoom in, zoom out, and rotate the displayed cloud in real time. The approximation method for probability integrals was summation. The intensity of color at each point on the screen directly related to the integrated probability in finding the electron across the viewer%s eye path.

  8. Thermodynamics of Bose-Condensed Atomic Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    B. Pozzi; Salasnich, L.; A. Parola; Reatto, L.

    2000-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics of the Bose-condensed atomic hydrogen confined in the Ioffe-Pritchard potential. Such a trapping potential, that models the magnetic trap used in recent experiments with hydrogen, is anharmonic and strongly anisotropic. We calculate the ground-state properties, the condensed and non-condensed fraction and the Bose-Einstein transition temperature. The thermodynamics of the system is strongly affected by the anharmonicity of this external trap. Finally, we consider t...

  9. A 400 MHz Atomic Hydrogen Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hydrogen maser is a frequency standard with the highest frequency stability. The atomic Hydrogen beam for the maser is realized with a RF discharge (400 MHz) produced between the plates of the condenser of a capacitively loaded coaxial cavity. The molecular Hydrogen is stored in a FeTi hydrure bottle at a pressure of 0.2 MPa. After the passage of a Palladium leak the pressure is reduced in the range of 0.1 Torr, ie the pressure in the discharge tube, where the molecular Hydrogen is dissociated, resulting the atomic Hydrogen beam. The electronic part controls the pressure in the discharge in order to control the atomic beam intensity.We studied the dependence of the maser level and the discharge luminosity against the power in the discharge. We found that for a given pressure, the maser oscillation level is constant after a certain power level is exceeded. We concluded that a RF discharge is very convenient to use because: -The cavity ensures a good shielding which limit the parasitic field in the maser room at a very low value. -The cavity allows us to know the discharge parameters -The cavity ensure a good cooling of the discharge tube -The dissociation rate increases with frequency and the breakdown is very easy to obtain

  10. Radio frequency atomic hydrogen beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple, convenient rf discharge source for the production of an intense beam of hydrogen atoms is described. The design and operation is such that the discharge tube can be operated over a period of several thousand hours, producing an intense beam with dissociation approx.95%

  11. From lattice gauge theories to hydrogen atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Mathur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We construct canonical transformations to obtain a complete and most economical realization of the physical Hilbert space Hp of pure SU(22+1 lattice gauge theory in terms of Wigner coupled Hilbert spaces of hydrogen atoms. One hydrogen atom is assigned to every plaquette of the lattice. A complete orthonormal description of the Wilson loop basis in Hp is obtained by all possible angular momentum Wigner couplings of hydrogen atom energy eigenstates |n l m〉 describing electric fluxes on the loops. The SU(2 gauge invariance implies that the total angular momenta of all hydrogen atoms vanish. The canonical transformations also enable us to rewrite the Kogut–Susskind Hamiltonian in terms of fundamental Wilson loop operators and their conjugate electric fields. The resulting loop Hamiltonian has a global SU(2 invariance and a simple weak coupling (g2→0 continuum limit. The canonical transformations leading to the loop Hamiltonian are valid for any SU(N. The ideas and techniques can also be extended to higher dimension.

  12. Hydrogen Atom Spectrum in Noncommutative Phase Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Kang; CHAMOUN Nidal

    2006-01-01

    @@ We study the energy levels of the hydrogen atom in the noncommutative phase space with simultaneous spacespace and momentum-momentum noncommutative relations. We find new terms compared to the case that only noncommutative space-space relations are assumed. We also present some comments on a previous paper [Alavi S A hep-th/0501215].

  13. Atom-hydrogen energy and influence of transport pollution to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : The justification of feasibility of atomic-hydrogen energy is important to take into consideration of the results of comparative analysis of environmental impact of combustion of organic fuels and hydrogen. The use of gasoline, natural gas and hydrogen in the transport sector leads to various impacts on environment. The assessment of environmental impact

  14. Interaction of a slow monopole with a hydrogen atom

    OpenAIRE

    Shnir, Ya. M.

    1996-01-01

    The electric dipole moment of the hydrogen-like atom induced by a monopole moving outside the electron shell is calculated. The correction to the energy of the ground state of the hydrogen atom due to this interaction is calculated.

  15. Atomic hydrogen in the Orion star-forming region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large-scale survey of atomic hydrogen in Orion reveals low-density material with a total mass comparable to that in dense molecular clouds. The atomic gas is sufficiently dense that it can shield the molecular material from photodissociative radiation and provide a pressure link to the low-density intercloud medium. An excess of H I emission comes from photodissociation fronts near the bright stars and from a giant shell in the Orion Belt region. This shell may have caused the apparent bifurcation between the Orion A and B clouds, and the associated pressures may have induced peculiar motions and star formation in NGC 2023 and 2024. 49 refs

  16. Effect of atomization gas pressure variation on gas flow field in supersonic gas atomization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a computational fluid flow model was adopted to investigate the effect of varying atomization gas pressure (P0) on the gas flow field in supersonic gas atomization. The influence of P0 on static pressure and velocity magnitude of the central axis of the flow field was also examined. The numerical results indicate that the maximum gas velocity within the gas field increases with increasing P0. The aspiration pressure (ΔP) is found to decrease as P0 increases at a lower atomization gas pressure. However, at a higher atomization gas pressure increasing P0 causes the opposite: the higher atomization gas pressure, the higher aspiration pressure. The alternation of ΔP is caused by the variations of stagnation point pressure and location of Mach disk, while hardly by the location of stagnation point. A radical pressure gradient is formed along the tip of the delivery tube and increases as P0 increases.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of gaseous atomic hydrogen interactions with hydrocarbon grains

    OpenAIRE

    Papoular, Renaud

    2004-01-01

    Semi-empirical molecular dynamics is used to simulate several gaseous atomic hydrogen interactions with hydrocarbon grains in space: recoil, adsorption, diffusion, chemisorption and recombination into molecular hydrogen. Their probabilities are determined by multiple numerical experiments, as a function of initial velocity of gas atoms. The equilibrium hydrogen coverage of free grains is then derived. These data can be used in calculations of material and energy balance as well as rates of hy...

  18. Absorption spectrum of very low pressure atomic hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Moret-Bailly, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Spectra of quasars result primarily from interactions of natural light with atomic hydrogen. A visible absorption of a sharp and saturated spectral line in a gas requires a low pressure, so a long path without blushing as a cosmological redshift. Burbidge and Karlsson observed that redshifts of quasars result from fundamental redshifts, written 3K and 4K, that cause a shift of absorbed beta and gamma lines of H to alpha gas line. Thus absorbed spectrum is shifted until an absorbed line overla...

  19. Sympathetic cooling of fluorine atoms with ultracold atomic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    González-Martínez, Maykel L

    2013-01-01

    We consider the prospect of using ultracold hydrogen atoms for sympathetic cooling of fluorine atoms to microkelvin temperatures. We carry out quantum-mechanical calculations on collisions between cold F and H atoms in magnetically trappable states and show that the ratio of elastic to inelastic cross sections remains high across a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields. For F atoms initially in the spin-stretched state ($^2$P$_{3/2}$, $f=m_f=+2$), sympathetic cooling appears likely to succeed from starting temperatures around 1 K or even higher. This occurs because inelastic collisions are suppressed by p-wave and d-wave barriers that are 600 mK and 3.2 K high, respectively. In combination with recent results on H + NH and H + OH collisions [M. L. Gonz\\'alez-Mart\\'{\\i}nez and J. M. Hutson, arXiv:1305.6282 (2013)], this establishes ultracold H atoms as a very promising and versatile coolant for atoms and molecules that cannot be laser-cooled.

  20. Semiclassical treatment of laser excitation of the hydrogen atom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billing, Gert D.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Leforestier, C.

    1992-01-01

    We present an alternative method for studying excitation of atoms in intense laser fields. In the present paper we focus upon the optical harmonic generation by hydrogen atoms.......We present an alternative method for studying excitation of atoms in intense laser fields. In the present paper we focus upon the optical harmonic generation by hydrogen atoms....

  1. Classical theory of the hydrogen atom

    CERN Document Server

    Rashkovskiy, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that all of the basic properties of the hydrogen atom can be consistently described in terms of classical electrodynamics instead of taking the electron to be a particle; we consider an electrically charged classical wave field, an "electron wave", which is held in a limited region of space by the electrostatic field of the proton. It is shown that quantum mechanics must be considered to be not a theory of particles but a classical field theory in the spirit of classical electrodynamics. In this case, we are not faced with difficulties in interpreting the results of the theory. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, all of the well-known regularities of the spontaneous emission of the hydrogen atom are obtained, which is usually derived in the framework of quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that there are no discrete states and discrete energy levels of the atom: the energy of the atom and its states change continuously. An explanation of the conventional corpuscular-statistical interpre...

  2. Absorption spectrum of very low pressure atomic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Moret-Bailly, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Spectra of quasars result primarily from interactions of natural light with atomic hydrogen. A visible absorption of a sharp and saturated spectral line in a gas requires a low pressure, so a long path without blushing as a cosmological redshift. Burbidge and Karlsson observed that redshifts of quasars result from fundamental redshifts, written 3K and 4K, that cause a shift of absorbed beta and gamma lines of H to alpha gas line. Thus absorbed spectrum is shifted until an absorbed line overlaps with Lyman alpha line of gas: redshift only occurs if an alpha absorption pumps atoms to 2P state. Thus, space is divided into spherical shells centered on the quasar, containing or not 2P atoms. Neglecting collisional de-excitations in absorbing shells, more and more atoms are excited until amplification of a beam having a long path in a shell, thus perpendicular to the observed ray, is large enough for a superradiant flash at alpha frequency. Energy is provided by atoms and observed ray, absorbing a line at local Lym...

  3. Two-dimensional hydrogen atom. Elliptic basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is devoted to analysis of a two-dimensional hydrogen atom in elliptic coordinates. By the method of separation of variables the problem is redUced to the solution of Ince equation in the complex plane under certain boundary conditions. It is shown that solutions obtained in the limits R→0 and R→ infinity (R is a parameter defining the eliptic coordinates) change into the polar and parabolic bases, respectively. An explicit form of the elliptic basis is given for lowest quantum states

  4. Parity nonconservation in the hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of experiments to detect parity nonconserving (PNC) mixing of the 2s/sub a/2/ and 2p/sub 1/2/ levels of the hydrogen atom in a 570 Gauss magnetic field is described. The technique involves observation of an asymmetry in the rate of microwave induced transitions at 1608 MHz due to the interference of two amplitudes, one produced by applied microwave and static electric fields and the other produced by an applied microwave field and the 2s/sub 1/2/-2p/sub 1/2/ mixing inducd by a PNC Hamiltonian

  5. Hydrogen atoms in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energies and wave functions of the 14 lowest states of a Hydrogen atom in a strong magnetic field are calculated, using a variational scheme. The equivalence between the atomic problem and the problems related with excitons and impurities in semiconductors in the presence of a strong magnetic field are shown. The calculations of the energies and wave functions have been divided in two regions: the first, for the magnetic field ranging between zero and 109G; in the second the magnetic field ranges between 109 and 1011G. The results have been compared with those obtained by previous authors. The computation time necessary for the calculations is small. Therefore this is a convenient scheme to obtain the energies and wave functions for the problem. Transition probabilities, wavelengths and oscillator strengths for some allowed transitions are also calculated. (Author)

  6. Research with a cold atomic hydrogen maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency stability of the hydrogen maser is limited by thermal noise within the atomic line-width and by additive noise at the receiver. By lowering the maser's temperature its stability can be improved both through reduced thermal noise and more favorable kinetic effects in the storage process. Predicted values of the fractional frequency stability are in the range of 10 to the -17th to 10 to the -18th power for averaging intervals of 100 to 1000 seconds. The wall shift and atomic line of an oscillating maser have been measured at temperatures of 77 to 25 K. Below 50 K this was accomplished by coating the storage bulb with tetrafluoromethane (CF4) applied through the dissociator. The results of these experiments are presented and directions for future research are discussed

  7. Wave mechanics of the hydrogen atom

    CERN Document Server

    Ogilvie, J F

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen atom is a system amenable to an exact treatment within Schroedinger's formulation of quantum mechanics according to coordinates in four systems -- spherical polar, paraboloidal, ellipsoidal and spheroconical coordinates; the latter solution is reported for the first time. Applications of these solutions include angular momenta, a quantitative calculation of the absorption spectrum and accurate plots of surfaces of amplitude functions. The shape of an amplitude function, and even the quantum numbers in a particular set to specify such an individual function, depend on the coordinates in a particular chosen system, and are therefore artefacts of that particular coordinate representation within wave mechanics. All discussion of atomic or molecular properties based on such shapes or quantum numbers therefore lacks general significance

  8. Interaction of atomic hydrogen with charcoal at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charcoal is a working material of sorption cryopumps in the ITER project. The interaction of thermal hydrogen molecules and atoms with charcoal has been analyzed by TDS (77-300 K) and sorption measurements at 77 K. A stream quartz reactor with an H2 RF discharge was used for the production of H atoms. The ratio of H and H2 in the gas mixture in the afterglow zone was ∼10-4, hydrogen flow and inlet pressure were 6.9 sccm and 30 Pa, respectively. After exposure in the H/H2 mixture during 1 hour the marked change in the shape of the TD spectra and decrease of the charcoal sorption capacity for hydrogen and nitrogen were detected. A wide spectrum of hydrocarbon fragments formed at 77 K was registered by mass-spectrometry at charcoal heating up to 700 K. The specific adsorption volume of charcoal, which was measured by N2 adsorption at 77 K, decreased directly as amount of H atoms passed through the section with charcoal. (author)

  9. Negative hydrogen ion conversion into atoms in a plasma hydrogen target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To verufy the feasibility of economic hydrogen plasma target and its efficiency a hydrogen plasma target for the conversion of a beam of negative ions of hydrogen isotopes to atoms has been developed and investigated experimentally. Jet of hydrogen or deuterium plasma of 1.5 m total length and 0.8 m length of a target part had approximately 4 cm in diameter. Plasma of 1013 cm-3 density and 5-6 eV electron temperature was generated at source discharge power of tens of kW at 1.5 ms pulse duration. H- ion beam of 0.3 ms pulse duration and 500 keV energy at the Van de Graaf accelerator outlet was analyzed by a magnet and collimated with a diaphragm having 0.5-1 cm aperture installed along one axis with the plasma target solenoid. After passing the target the beam was separated in a magnetic field of a bend solenoid part into three beams: H-, H0 and H+. Each beam was passed a lavsan stripping film of 3500 A thickness and in the form of a proton beam was received by the Faradey cylinder. An experimental value of atom yield is equal to 84.5+-0.5% at 500 keV H- ion energy and for a target thickness nsub(e)L=2x1015 cm-2. It is established that the plasma jet not only well screens itself from an external flow of nonionized gas but also pumps out it ionizing and carrying out to a receiving volume. A sufficiently high value of the conversion ratio of high-energy negative hydrogen ions to atoms as well as high screening and pumping out properties of the hydrogen plasma target permits to hope for its successful application in injectors of high-energy atoms

  10. Correlation of spiral arm molecular clouds with cold atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between molecular clouds and the cold atomic hydrogen gas seen in self-absorption has been examined in the longitude range 36-40 deg. The results confirm what the authors found previously in another region of the Galaxy. By reanalyzing both sets of data, the authors show that those cold clouds which are detected both in H I self-absorption at 21 cm against a hotter background and in CO emission at 2.6 mm are confined to the Sagittarius spiral arm feature in velocity-longitude space. Outside of this arm feature, clouds which show both H I absorption and CO emission are very rare. 14 references

  11. Quantum mechanical tunneling reaction in solid hydrogen and solid alkane at low temperature, tunneling of hydrogen atom and hydrogen molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunneling reactions of hydrogen-atom-transfer and hydrogen-molecule-transfer were studied by use of γ-irradiation and ESR in solid hydrogen at 4 K and solid 2,3-dimethylbutane at 77 K, respectively. (author)

  12. Hydrogen atomic pair-ion production on catalyst surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To generate a hydrogen pair-ion plasma consisting of only hydrogen atomic pair ions, i.e., H+ and H- ions, the efficient production of pair ions is required. When discharged hydrogen plasma is irradiated to a Ni catalyst, pair ions are produced on the catalyst surface. It is clarified that hydrogen chemisorption on the catalyst affects pair-ion production.

  13. Drift diffusion model of hydrogen atoms for hydrogen embrittlement in polycrystalline Ni3Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that single crystals of Ni3Al are ductile, whereas polycrystalline Ni3Al has very low ductility at room temperature due to the intrinsic brittleness of its grain boundaries, which results in premature intergranular fracture. Since Aoki and Izumi found that adding a small amount of boron to polycrystalline Ni3Al could suppress intergranular fracture and improve its ambient temperature ductility dramatically, many studies have been carried out on the effects of boron on the structure and chemical composition of grain boundaries in polycrystalline Ni3Al. At present, there have been several explanations for the beneficial effect of boron, but its origin has not yet been clearly established. Recently, environmental embrittlement of grain boundaries has been observed in polycrystalline Ni3Al with and without boron in air involving moisture and in hydrogen gas. The initiation of intergranular crack in polycrystalline Ni3Al relates to the local stress concentration induced by a piled up of edge super dislocation [111] at grain boundary, while hydrogen atoms in the Ni3Al superlattice would diffuse toward the end of the edge super dislocation pile-up under the action of the local stress concentration. Considering the relationships of intergranular crack initiation with both of the edge super dislocation pile-up at the grain boundary and the drift diffusion of hydrogen atoms in the superlattice toward the grain boundary, a drift diffusion model of hydrogen atoms for hydrogen embrittlement in polycrystalline Ni3Al is proposed to explain the effects of boron content, grain size in polycrystalline Ni3Al and test environment, tensile rate as well as test temperature on the degree of hydrogen embrittlement in polycrystalline Ni3Al

  14. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in the particulate and gas phase from smoldering mosquito coils containing various atomic hydrogen/carbon ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Tzu-Ting, E-mail: d89844001@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering and Health, Yuanpei University, No. 306, Yuanpei St., Hsin Chu 30015, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shaw-Tao [Department of Applied Chemistry, Providence University, No. 200 Chung-Chi Rd., Salu Dist., Taichung City 43301, Taiwan (China); Lin, Tser-Sheng [Department of Safety, Health, and Environmental Engineering, National United University, 2 Lien Da, Maioli 360, Taiwan (China); Chung, Hua-Yi [Department of Environmental Engineering and Health, Yuanpei University, No. 306, Yuanpei St., Hsin Chu 30015, Taiwan (China)

    2015-02-15

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in particulate and gas phases generated from smoldering mosquito coils containing various atomic H/C ratios were examined. Five types of mosquito coils were burned in a test chamber with a total airflow rate of 8.0 L/min at a constant relative humidity and temperature. The concentrations of individual PAHs were determined using the GC/MS technique. Among the used mosquito coils, the atomic H/C ratio ranged from 1.23 to 1.57, yielding total mass, gaseous, and particulate PAH emission factors of 28.17–78.72 mg/g, 26,139.80–35,932.98 and 5735.22–13,431.51 ng/g, respectively. The various partitions of PAHs in the gaseous and particulate phases were in the ranges, 70.26–83.70% and 16.30–29.74% for the utilized mosquito coils. The carcinogenic potency of PAH emissions in the particulate phase (203.82–797.76 ng/g) was approximately 6.92–25.08 times higher than that of the gaseous phase (26.27–36.07 ng/g). Based on the analyses of PAH emissions, mosquito coils containing the lowest H/C ratio, a low oxygen level, and additional additives (i.e., CaCO{sub 3}) are recommended for minimizing the production of total PAH emission factors and carcinogenic potency. - Highlights: • PAHs emissions are influenced by mosquito coils containing various atomic H/C ratios. • The PAHs generated by burning mosquito coils mainly occur in the gaseous phase. • Total TEQ emission factors of PAHs mainly consisted of the particulate phase (> 87%). • The BaP and BaA accounted for 71.13–77.28% of the total TEQ emission factors. • Special PAH ratios were regarded as characteristic ratios for burning mosquito coil.

  15. Chemical reaction between single hydrogen atom and graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study chemical reaction between a single hydrogen atom and a graphene, which is the elemental reaction between hydrogen and graphitic carbon materials. In the present work, classical molecular dynamics simulation is used with modified Brenner's empirical bond order potential. The three reactions, that is, absorption reaction, reflection reaction and penetration reaction, are observed in our simulation. Reaction rates depend on the incident energy of the hydrogen atom and the graphene temperature. The dependence can be explained by the following mechanisms: (1) The hydrogen atom receives repulsive force by π-electrons in addition to nuclear repulsion. (2) Absorbing the hydrogen atom, the graphene transforms its structure to the 'overhand' configuration such as sp3 state. (3) The hexagonal hole of the graphene is expanded during the penetration of the hydrogen atom. (author)

  16. The hydrogen atom between two metallic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present calculations of the time of life and the displacements of the hydrogenic atomic levels in the vacuum between two metallic parallel surfaces. An approximation is considered in which the electron interacts with the nucleus of infinite mass and with the two metallic media. In the vacuum the interaction is calculated with the method of electrostatic images. In the region near to the surfaces and inside the metal the approximations given by Borisov for the interaction of the electron with a Cu(111) surface are used. The system is described with a non Hermitic Hamiltonian that is obtained on having applied the method of the transformations of dilatation. Finally, the resultant Schroedinger equation is solved by means of the method of finite elements. The presence of the second metallic medium gives place to an important decrease of the times of life in comparison to the case of the only surface reported elsewhere. (author)

  17. Possibility of obtaining atomic metallic hydrogen by electrochemical method

    OpenAIRE

    Galushkin, Nikolay E.; Yazvinskaya, Nataliya N.; Galushkin, Dmitriy N.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we show, that atomic metallic hydrogen (AMH) is formed inside of sintered oxide-nickel electrodes of nickel-cadmium battery over a long period of electrochemical hydrogenation (more than five years). It was established that density AMH is 12 times higher, than the density of liquid molecular hydrogen, the specific energy of hydrogen recombination is 20 times higher than of liquid hydrogen-oxygen fuel. At the room temperature AMH is a good conductor, but not a superconductor.

  18. Molecular beam studies of oxide reduction by atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The graphite and oxide internals of a CTR are susceptible to chemical corrosion as well as to physical degradation by high-energy particles. Reactions of thermal atomic hydrogen with oxides are being studied. The hydrogen used is at thermal energy (0.22 eV). Typical data are reported for the H/UO2 system. The reaction probability is plotted as a function of solid temperature at fixed beam intensity and moculation frequency. The reaction probability increases from low temperature to a high-temperature plateau at about 13000C. Here the reaction rate is limited solely by the sticking probability of H on the surface; about one in seven of the incident atoms is chemisorbed by the surface and ultimately returns to the gas phase as water vapor. A reaction model comprising sticking, recombination to H2, solution and diffusion of H in the bulk of the UO2, surface reaction of adsorbed H with lattice oxygen atoms to produce the hydroxyl radical, and production of water is constructed. The rate constants for the elementary steps in the mechanism are tabulated. 2 figures, 2 tables

  19. Selective hydrogen atom abstraction by hydrogen atoms in photolysis and radiolysis of alkane mixtures at 770 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction by H atoms, has been found in Isobutane, 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane(TMB), cyclopropane matrices besides neopentane matrix. The selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction in neopentane-isobutane mixture is affected by the difference of kinetic energies of H atoms. The reaction occurs more favorably with decreasing the kinetic energy of H atoms. Competitive reaction between c-C6H12 and Hi for H atoms has been studied in the radiolysis and photolysis of neo-C5H12HI mixture at 77 K. The rate constants of these reactions in neopentane matrix are quite different from these of thermal H atom reaction, but similar to those of hot H atom reaction. Importance of the selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction by H atoms is pointed out in the radical formation in the radiolysis of pure TMB at 77 K

  20. A Quantum Gas Microscope for Fermionic Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Cheuk, Lawrence W.; Nichols, Matthew A.; Okan, Melih; Gersdorf, Thomas; Ramasesh, Vinay V.; Bakr, Waseem S.; Lompe, Thomas; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Strongly interacting fermions define the properties of complex matter at all densities, from atomic nuclei to modern solid state materials and neutron stars. Ultracold atomic Fermi gases have emerged as a pristine platform for the study of many-fermion systems. Here we realize a quantum gas microscope for fermionic $^{40}$K atoms trapped in an optical lattice, which allows one to probe strongly correlated fermions at the single atom level. We combine 3D Raman sideband cooling with high-resolu...

  1. Relativistic dynamical polarizability of hydrogen-like atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the operator representation of the Dirac Coulomb Green function the analytical method in perturbation theory is employed in obtaining solutions of the Dirac equation for a hydrogen-like atom in a time-dependent electric field. The relativistic dynamical polarizability of hydrogen-like atoms is calculated and analysed. (Author)

  2. Transport of a relativistic electron beam through hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the author describes the transport properties of an electron beam through vacuum and through hydrogen gas with pressure ranging from 25 to 1000 Pa. Maximum beam energy and current are 0.8 MeV and 6 kA, respectively. The pulse length is around 150 ns. A description is given of the experimental device. Also the diagnostics for probing the beam and the plasma, produced by the beam, are discussed, as well as the data acquisition system. The interaction between the beam and hydrogen gas with a pressure around 200 Pa is considered. A plasma with density around 1019 m-3 is produced within a few nanoseconds. Measurements yield the atomic hydrogen temperature, electron density, beam energy loss, and induced plasma current and these are compared with the results of a model combining gas ionization and dissociation, and turbulent plasma heating. The angular distribution of the beam electrons about the magnetic field axis is discussed. (Auth.)

  3. Electron capture by slow highly-charged neon and argon ions from molecular and atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron capture cross sections for low velocity (106-107 cm/s) highly charged Ne/sup q+/ (2 less than or equal to q less than or equal to 7) and Ar/sup q+/ (2 less than or equal to q less than or equal to 10) projectiles incident on molecular and atomic hydrogen targets have been measured. A recoil ion source that uses the collisions of fast heavy (1 MeV/amu) ions with target gas atoms was utilized to produce slow highly charged ions. Atomic hydrogen was produced by dissociating hydrogen molecules in a thermal oven. Measurements and analysis of the data for the atomic hydrogen oven target are discussed in detail. The measured absolute cross sections were compared with the published data and the predictions of theoretical models

  4. Three modes of diffusion migration of hydrogen atoms in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classical diffusion theory failed to explain the temperature break of the activation energy and the anomalous isotropic effect observed at hydrogen atom migration in the bcc-metals. One introduces a theory based on the quantum statistical mechanics equations enabling to interpret both mentioned phenomena in detail. One studies three possible mechanisms of hydrogen diffusion in metals: over-the-barrier jump, thermally activated tunnel transition and tunnelling caused by decomposition of the local deformation near hydrogen atom

  5. Atomic-scale control of graphene magnetism by using hydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Herrero, Héctor; Gómez-Rodríguez, José M; Mallet, Pierre; Moaied, Mohamed; Palacios, Juan José; Salgado, Carlos; Ugeda, Miguel M; Veuillen, Jean-Yves; Yndurain, Félix; Brihuega, Iván

    2016-04-22

    Isolated hydrogen atoms absorbed on graphene are predicted to induce magnetic moments. Here we demonstrate that the adsorption of a single hydrogen atom on graphene induces a magnetic moment characterized by a ~20-millielectron volt spin-split state at the Fermi energy. Our scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments, complemented by first-principles calculations, show that such a spin-polarized state is essentially localized on the carbon sublattice opposite to the one where the hydrogen atom is chemisorbed. This atomically modulated spin texture, which extends several nanometers away from the hydrogen atom, drives the direct coupling between the magnetic moments at unusually long distances. By using the STM tip to manipulate hydrogen atoms with atomic precision, it is possible to tailor the magnetism of selected graphene regions. PMID:27102478

  6. Gas-driven hydrogen permeation through tungsten-coated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubeva, A.V., E-mail: anna-golubeva@yandex.ru [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation); Spitsyn, A.V., E-mail: spitsyn@nfi.kiae.ru [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation); Mayer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Cherkez, D.I. [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation); Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Koch, F.; Lindig, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Skovoroda, A.A. [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-01

    Hydrogen gas-driven permeation through graphite coated with different types of tungsten coatings with thicknesses up to 200 {mu}m has been investigated. The substrate material was fine-grain graphite R5710 and R6710, which properties with respect to hydrogen transport are well known . Magnetron-sputtered W coatings of thicknesses 1 and 3 {mu}m and two coatings of ASDEX Upgrade were investigated: A 3 {mu}m thick layer of tungsten deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD-W) and 200 {mu}m thick layers of tungsten deposited by plasma-spaying in vacuum (VPS-W). The gas-driven permeation was investigated at a pressure gradient of 10{sup -2}-150 Pa. The gas-driven permeation occurs through the carbon base-materials by hydrogen molecular gas flow through the internal porosity network rather than hydrogen atom diffusion through the graphite lattice. It was found that W coatings with thicknesses up to 3 {mu}m are transparent for hydrogen gas penetration and do not influence the permeability of coated fine-grain graphite, because the open porosity system of graphite remains open. Even a 200 {mu}m thick layer of VPS-W has an open system of connected pores, which connects the front and rear surfaces of the deposited layer.

  7. Photolytic Decomposition Of Hydrogen Sulfide In The Gas Mixtures And Formation Of Molecular Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : The chemical conversions of organic fuels during the refining processes complex gas mixtures containing hydrogen sulfide generate as a by-product. In accordance with the environmental safety requirements these gas mixtures have to be purified from hydrogen sulfide before use or environmental discharge. As it is known because of combustion gases containing hydrogen-sulfide oxides of sulfide emit into the atmosphere and they combine with water vapors in the air and this process consequently results in pH change of H2SO3 precipitations and acid rains. The processes of purification of gas mixtures being the product of oil refining processes and mainly containing hydrocarbons from hydrogen sulfide by a photochemical method and molecular hydrogen generation have been under this investigation.The model gas mixture under investigation has been prepared at a vacuum plant in the laboratory. During the researches the partial pressure of H2S capable of completely absorbing the given wave-length of the radiation has been first specified. It has been established that temperature and irradiation time have their influence on the progress rate of the processes.At this wave-length hydrocarbons undergo no photochemical conversions. This is manifested with the absence of excitation levels causing dissociation due to radiation absorption at the wave-length used in hydrocarbon gases . The fact that these levels belong to hydrogen sulfide contained in gas mixtures has been experimentally proved.The role of hot hydrogen atoms and the mechanism of the processes under progress within the process of molecular hydrogen generation due to the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen sulfide have been discussed.

  8. Similarities of natural gas and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future prospects for the development of the uses of hydrogen confirms the importance of this fuel for now and in the long term, but concrete action needs to be taken to reduce the emission of gases in order to reduce the greenhouse effect and to sustain a durable economic development. Technological advancements in fuel cells will improve electricity production and will be of added benefit to transport in industrial applications. Hydrocarbons are the principal source of matter needed for the production of hydrogen. Natural gas consists primarily of pure methane. The hydrocarbons possess the largest ratio of hydrogen-carbon by molecule less carbon dioxide in the process of conversion. Natural gas has been the first choice of all fuels due to it's weak environmental impact. Natural gas and hydrogen have many similarities for utilization of storage. In the long term as natural gas provisioning will be reduced, the infrastructures for natural gas could be reconverted, with adaptations for hydrogen. This paper details the similarities of natural gas and hydrogen and their perspective associates

  9. Effects of hydrogen atoms on surface conductivity of diamond film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fengbin, E-mail: fbliu@ncut.edu.cn; Cui, Yan; Qu, Min; Di, Jiejian [College of Mechanical and Electric Engineering, North China University of Technology, Beijing (China)

    2015-04-15

    To investigate the effects of surface chemisorbed hydrogen atoms and hydrogen atoms in the subsurface region of diamond on surface conductivity, models of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on diamond with (100) orientation and various concentrations of hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond were built. By using the first-principles method based on density functional theory, the equilibrium geometries and densities of states of the models were studied. The results showed that the surface chemisorbed hydrogen alone could not induce high surface conductivity. In addition, isolated hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond prefer to exist at the bond centre site of the C-C bond. However, such a structure would induce deep localized states, which could not improve the surface conductivity. When the hydrogen concentration increases, the C-H-C-H structure and C-3H{sub bc}-C structure in the subsurface region are more stable than other configurations. The former is not beneficial to the increase of the surface conductivity. However, the latter would induce strong surface states near the Fermi level, which would give rise to high surface conductivity. Thus, a high concentration of subsurface hydrogen atoms in diamond would make significant contributions to surface conductivity.

  10. Effects of hydrogen atoms on surface conductivity of diamond film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the effects of surface chemisorbed hydrogen atoms and hydrogen atoms in the subsurface region of diamond on surface conductivity, models of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on diamond with (100) orientation and various concentrations of hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond were built. By using the first-principles method based on density functional theory, the equilibrium geometries and densities of states of the models were studied. The results showed that the surface chemisorbed hydrogen alone could not induce high surface conductivity. In addition, isolated hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond prefer to exist at the bond centre site of the C-C bond. However, such a structure would induce deep localized states, which could not improve the surface conductivity. When the hydrogen concentration increases, the C-H-C-H structure and C-3Hbc-C structure in the subsurface region are more stable than other configurations. The former is not beneficial to the increase of the surface conductivity. However, the latter would induce strong surface states near the Fermi level, which would give rise to high surface conductivity. Thus, a high concentration of subsurface hydrogen atoms in diamond would make significant contributions to surface conductivity

  11. Effect of atomic ordering on environmental embrittlement of (Co, Fe)3V alloy in gaseous hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程晓英; 万晓景

    2002-01-01

    The diffusible hydrogen contents in precharged (Co,Fe)3V alloy were measured. It is found that atomic ordering can not promote hydrogen penetration in the (Co,Fe)3V alloy. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and ductilities in various condition were also investigated. The results show that the UTS and elongation of disordered alloy are higher than that of ordered one with fixed diffusible hydrogen content and (Co,Fe)3V alloy with ordered structure is highly susceptible to the embrittlement in hydrogen gas. The factor which may affect the susceptibility to the embrittlement of (Co,Fe)3V alloy in h ydrogen gas is mainly due to that the atomic ordering may accelerate the kinetics of the catalytic reaction for the dissociation of molecular hydrogen into atomic hydrogen. However, it can not be roled out that atomic ordering intensifies planar slip and restricts cross-slip at the grain boundaries and enhances the susceptibility of the alloy to hydrogen embrittlement.

  12. The hydrogen economy - an opportunity for gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural gas could play a pivotal role in any transition to a hydrogen economy-that is one of the findings of the recently-released National Hydrogen Study, commissioned by the Commonwealth Department of Industry, Tourism and Resources, and undertaken by the consulting firms ACIL Tasman and Parsons Brinckerhoff. The key benefits of hydrogen include zero emissions at the point of combustion (water is the main by-product) and its abundance Hydrogen can be produced from a range of primary energy sources including gas and coal, or through the electrolysis of water. Depending on the process used to manufacture hydrogen (especially the extent to which any associated carbon can be captured and sequestered), life-cycle emissions associated with its production and use can be reduced or entirely eliminated

  13. Effects of carbon coating on interaction of hydrogen atoms and molecules with palladium surface and on permeation of hydrogen through palladium membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshin, A.Yu.; Livshits, A.I.; Samartsev, A.A.

    1985-08-01

    Studies were conducted on the interaction and permeation of hydrogen atoms and molecules with carbon-coated and uncoated 20 ..mu..-thick palladium films, since such studies may contribute to a better understanding of heterogeneous catalysis involving hydrogen. The data showed that carbonization of the palladium surface markedly decreases the rate of dissociative diffusion of hydrogen molecules and that, in distinction to noncoated surfaces, the rate constants show a strong dependence on the temperature of palladium. As a result of passivation by carbon, the permeability of palladium membranes to hydrogen shows a pronounced drop at low hydrogen pressures. Concomitantly, the probability of diffusion of hydrogen atoms striking the surface remains high (ca. 10/sup -2/) and is unaffected by the temperature of the metal. In view of this, the membranes show high selectivity for hydrogen atoms vis-a-vis hydrogen molecules. The putative mechanism proposed to account for this selectivity assumes that chemically active hydrogen atoms bind more strongly to the surface, and that their desorption into the gas phase is virtually an impossibility. Migrating on the surface, such atoms are more likely to encounter active sites and diffuse into the metal rather than encounter other hydrogen atoms and recombine to yield hydrogen molecules. 29 references, 3 figures.

  14. Sensitive detection of fast, neutral hydrogen atoms for the Bound Beta-Decay (BoB) experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are currently exploring methods to detect hydrogen atoms with 325.7 eV kinetic energy. These atoms form the decay signature of the theoretically-predicted three-body decay of the neutron into a hydrogen atom and an anti-neutrino. The challenge in designing and building such a hydrogen detector lies in the small predicted branching ratio for this decay (10-6 of the three-body decay), the low energy of the atoms and the requirement to identify them over background hydrogen. This talk describes our preliminary work investigating three possible detection schemes: quenching of H(2s) atoms and subsequent detection of the resulting Lyman-α photon, charge-exchange of hydrogen atoms in argon gas and laser ionisation.

  15. A new exact path integral treatment of the hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a recently developed general new-time transformation method, free of operator ordering ambiguities by construction we reconsider the hydrogen atom problem. We solve the problem direcly without any dimension raising trick. (author)

  16. Radial Matrix Elements of Hydrogen Atom and the Correspondence Principle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. N. Chakrabarty

    2004-03-01

    Radial dipole matrix elements having astrophysical importance have been computed for highly excited states of hydrogen atom. Computation is based on Heisenberg’s form of correspondence principle for Coulomb potential. Particular attention has been paid to the choice of classical analogue (c) of principal quantum number (). The computed radial matrix elements are in good agreement with quantum mechanical results. Further, radial matrix elements for few transitions involving high neighboring states of hydrogen atom are presented.

  17. Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of μ-p atoms in each target. The rates λppμ and λpd can be extracted

  18. Determination of the Relative Atomic Masses of Metals by Liberation of Molecular Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghorne, W. Earle; Rous, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Students determine the relative atomic masses of calcium, magnesium, and aluminum by reaction with hydrochloric acid and measurement of the volume of hydrogen gas liberated. The experiment demonstrates stoichiometry and illustrates clearly that mass of the reagent is not the determinant of the amounts in chemical reactions. The experiment is…

  19. Topics in atomic hydrogen standard research and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    Hydrogen maser based frequency and time standards have been in continuous use at NASA tracking stations since February 1970, while laboratory work at Goddard has continued in the further development and improvement of hydrogen masers. Concurrently, experimental work has been in progress with a new frequency standard based upon the hydrogen atom using the molecular beam magnetic resonance method. Much of the hydrogen maser technology is directly applicable to the new hydrogen beam standard, and calculations based upon realistic data indicate that the accuracy potential of the hydrogen atomic beam exceeds that of either the cesium beam tube or the hydrogen maser, possibly by several orders of magnitude. In addition, with successful development, the hydrogen beam standard will have several other performance advantages over other devices, particularly exceptional stability and long continuous operating life. Experimental work with a new laboratory hydrogen beam device has recently resulted in the first resonance transition curves, measurements of relative state populations, beam intensities, etc. The most important aspects of both the hydrogen maser and the hydrogen beam work are covered.

  20. Strain field of interstitial hydrogen atom in body-centered cubic iron and its effect on hydrogen-dislocation interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shuai; Takahashi, Keisuke; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Isobe, Shigehito; Ohnuki, Somei

    2013-01-01

    Effect of hydrogen in body-centered cubic iron is explored by using the density function theory. Hydrogen atoms increase the concentration of free electrons in the simulation cell and have bonding interaction with Fe atom. Caused by anisotropic strain components of hydrogen atoms in the tetrahedral sites, elastic interaction for hydrogen with screw dislocation has been found. The dependence of hydrogen-screw dislocation interaction on hydrogen concentration is confirmed by repeated stress rel...

  1. Excited states of muonium in atomic hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Kulhar

    2006-06-01

    Muonium formation in excited states in muon-hydrogen charge-exchange collision is investigated using a method developed in a previous paper. Differential cross-section results are found to resemble positronium formation cross-section results of positron-hydrogen charge-exchange problem. Forward differential and integrated cross-sections are computed for muon energy of 2 keV and higher. Total muonium formation cross-sections are computed using Jackson and Schiff scaling rules. Muonium formation cross-section results obtained from proton-hydrogen charge-exchange cross-section results, using velocity scaling are compared with the results of the present calculation.

  2. A quantum gas microscope for ytterbium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-05-01

    In this talk, I report on the development of a quantum gas microscope for ytterbium (Yb) atoms. By using a dual molasses technique in which 399 nm molasses beams of the broad singlet transition are applied for fluorescence imaging and 556 nm molasses beams of the narrow intercombination transition are applied for cooling during the imaging, we successfully demonstrate site-resolved imaging of individual bosonic 174 Yb atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice with a lattice constant of 266 nm.We also apply a high resolution laser spectroscopy using the ultranarrow intercombination transition between the 1 S0 and 3 P2 states to manipulate an atom distribution in an optical lattice. We expect the demonstrated technique will similarly work for other isotopes of Yb atoms. We are also developing a different mode of an Yb quantum gas microscope.

  3. Recombination of atomic oxygen and hydrogen on amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposit buildup and fuel entrapment due to amorphous carbon are relevant issues in fusion devices with carbon based plasma facing components. Neutral atomic species play a significant role – atomic hydrogen facilitates the formation of amorphous carbon while atomic oxygen could be used to remove carbon deposits. The kinetics of either reaction depends on the density of neutral species, which in turn is influenced by recombination on the vessel walls. In this work, we measured the probability of heterogeneous recombination of atomic hydrogen and oxygen on amorphous carbon deposits. The recombination coefficients were determined by observing density profiles of atomic species in a closed side-arm of a plasma vessel with amorphous carbon deposit-lined walls. Density profiles were measured with fiber optics catalytic probes. The source of atomic species was inductively coupled radiofrequency plasma. The measured recombination coefficient values were of the order of 10−3 for both species

  4. Atomic hydrogen effects on high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic hydrogen effects on the properties of bulk high-temperature superconductors were investigated. It is shown that the insertion of the atomic hydrogen into the bulk of these materials from a DC plasma leads to the increase of the critical current density Jc for YBaCuO(123) as well as for BiSrCaCuO(2223) high-temperature superconductors. It is found that the hydrogenation of the He implanted samples with following annealing leads to the optically detected blistering on the surface. It means that the textured thin subsurface layers of high-temperature superconductors can be formed by this method. The improvement of superconductivity by atomic hydrogen can be explained by the passivation of dangling bonds and defects on grain boundaries of these materials

  5. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen and the Proton Size Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udem, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Precise determination of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference. A recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct. We hope to contribute to the resolution of this so called `proton size puzzle' by providing additional experimental input from the hydrogen side.

  6. Vacuum polarization in hydrogen-like relativistic atom: superfine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One studies contribution of vacuum polarization into superfine splitting of hydrogen-like atom principal state. One presents the general expressions for a single-potential and for bi-potential contributions of vacuum polarization into superfine splitting of hydrogen-like principal state. The expression for correction to energy was derived in the form of Zα parameter explicit function. The final expression derived in terms of the generalized hypergeometrical functions and their derivatives represents the function of particle mass ratio both at the orbit and in a vacuum loop and, thus, is true both for ordinary and for muon atoms. Paper presents, as well, various asymptotics for muon atoms

  7. Atomic-scale observation of hydrogen-induced crack growth by atom-probe FIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation and propagation of a microcrack due to hydrogen in a Fe-0.29 wt.% Ti alloy was observed at the atomic scale by field ion microscopy. A microcrack (-20 nm in length) formed and became noticeably large when the tip was heated at 9500C in the presence of about 1 torr of Hg. Propagation was reported several times by reheating, until a portion of the tip ruptured and became detached from the tip. Compositional analysis, performed in situ using a high performance atom-probe, identified atomic hydrogen in quantity and some hydrogen molecules and FEH in the crack, but not elsewhere on the surface

  8. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: Counting noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe new work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions). When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. We show that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective. (orig./FKS)

  9. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases....

  10. Hydrogen gas embrittlement of selected stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen gas embrittlement of selected stainless steels: metastable 18-8, (α+γ) IN 744 and γ' or N-hardened austenites, has been investigated means of the triaxial disk pressure test at various pressure increase rates, at RT or sometimes -500C and +1000C. Test are supplemented with SEM and magnetic phase determination

  11. Nuclear delocalisation of hydrogen atoms in strong hydrogen bonds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dračínský, Martin; Procházková, Eliška; Čechová, Lucie; Janeba, Zlatko

    Brno: Stuare, 2015 - (Novotný, J.). C30 ISBN 978-80-86441-46-7. [NMR Valtice. Central European NMR Meeting /30./. 19.04.2015-22.04.2015, Valtice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11223S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR spectroscopy * hydrogen bonds * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  12. Fast automated placement of polar hydrogen atoms in protein-ligand complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Lippert Tobias; Rarey Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Hydrogen bonds play a major role in the stabilization of protein-ligand complexes. The ability of a functional group to form them depends on the position of its hydrogen atoms. An accurate knowledge of the positions of hydrogen atoms in proteins is therefore important to correctly identify hydrogen bonds and their properties. The high mobility of hydrogen atoms introduces several degrees of freedom: Tautomeric states, where a hydrogen atom alters its binding partner, torsi...

  13. Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of neutral atomic hydrogen gas in the COSMOS field at z˜ 0.37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Jonghwan; Lah, Philip; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Briggs, Frank H.; Colless, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of HI spectral stacking analysis of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations targeting the COSMOS field. The GMRT data cube contains 474 field galaxies with redshifts known from the zCOSMOS-bright 10k catalogue. Spectra for the galaxies are co-added and the stacked spectrum allows us to make a $\\sim 3\\sigma$ measurement of the average HI mass. Using this average HI mass along with the integral optical $B$-band luminosity of the galaxies and the luminosity density of the COSMOS field, a volume normalisation is applied to obtain the cosmic HI mass density ($\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$). We find a cosmic HI mass density of $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$ = (0.42 $\\pm$ 0.16) $\\times$ 10$^{-3}$ at $z \\sim 0.37$, which is the highest-redshift measurement of $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$ ever made using HI spectral stacking. The value we obtained for $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$ at $z \\sim 0.37$ is consistent with that measured from large blind 21-cm surveys at $z = 0$ as well as measurements from other HI stacking experiments at lower redshifts. Our measurement in conjunction with earlier measurements indicates that there has been no significant evolution of HI gas abundance over the last 4 Gyr. A weighted mean of $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$ from all 21-cm measurements at redshifts $z \\lesssim 0.4$ gives $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$ = (0.35 $\\pm$ 0.01) $\\times$ 10$^{-3}$. The $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$ measured (from HI 21-cm emission measurements) at $z \\lesssim 0.4$ is however approximately half that measured from Damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ Absorption (DLA) systems at $z \\gtrsim 2$. Deeper surveys with existing and upcoming instruments will be critical to understand the evolution of $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$ in the redshift range intermediate between $z \\sim 0.4$ and the range probed by DLA observations.

  14. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-05-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  15. Compressorless Gas Storage and Regenerative Hydrogen Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microwave regenerative sorption media gas storage/delivery techniques are proposed to address both compressed gas management and hydrogen purification requirements...

  16. Understanding atomic hydrogen behaviour in pumped divertor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to set up a data base and diagnostic capability for understanding atomic hydrogen behaviour in pumped divertor plasmas, an experiment and a feasibility study using a novel laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique were performed. For the former, combined measurements of LIF tuned to Hα and emission intensities at Hα/Hβ were carried out on the compact helical system (CHS). The comparison of the measured data and a particle simulation code revealed atomic hydrogen behaviour quantitatively, providing a full estimate of toroidally and poloidally asymmetric distributions of hydrogen atoms. In order to supplement data base around the pumped divertor region, the applicability of an LIF technique which uses two-photon excitation from the ground state examined, based on the real optical constraints of the envisaged JET pumped divertor. It was concluded that ii is feasible and the only remaining problem is not a serious one. (orig.)

  17. Atomic displacements due to interstitial hydrogen in Cu and Pd

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hitesh Sharma; S Prakash

    2007-08-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) is used to study the atomic interactions in transition metal-based interstitial alloys. The strain field is calculated in the discrete lattice model using Kanzaki method. The total energy and hence atomic forces between interstitial hydrogen and transition metal hosts are calculated using DFT. The norm-conserving pseudopotentials for H, Cu and Pd are generated self-consistently. The dynamical matrices are evaluated considering interaction up to first nearest neighbors whereas impurity-induced forces are calculated with M32H shell (where M = Cu and Pd). The atomic displacements produced by interstitial hydrogen at the octahedral site in Cu and Pd show displacements of 7.36% and 4.3% of the first nearest neighbors respectively. Both Cu and Pd lattices show lattice expansion due to the presence of hydrogen and the obtained average lattice expansion / = 0.177 for Cu and 0.145 for Pd.

  18. Molecular hydrogen formation by excited atom radiative association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latter, William B.; Black, John H.

    1991-01-01

    The results from a semiclassical calculation of the thermal rate coefficient for the radiative association process H(n = 2) + H(n = 1) - H2 + hv are presented (n is the principal quantum number of the separated hydrogen atoms). The relative importance of this reaction in various environments is briefly discussed. Models of the early universe around the epoch of recombination and protostellar winds have been calculated which include the excited atom process. Not surprisingly, it is shown that the excited atom process will not be important in the general interstellar medium, except possibly in environments where the amount of Ly-alpha photon trapping is large. Examples may be the material surrounding quasars, active galactic nuclei, and bright H II regions. The most likely application of this process might be within rapidly evolving systems where a large transient n = 2 population of neutral hydrogen could result in a burst of molecular hydrogen formation.

  19. Quantization of black holes by analogy with hydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang; Wu, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Yu-Hao

    2015-01-01

    We suggest a proposal of quantization for black holes that is based on an analogy between a black hole and a hydrogen atom. A self-regular Schwarzschild-AdS black hole is investigated, where the mass density of the extreme black hole is given by the probability density of the ground state of hydrogen atoms and the mass densities of non-extreme black holes are chosen to be the probability densities of excited states with no angular momenta. Consequently, it is logical to accept quantization of mean radii of hydrogen atoms as that of black hole horizons. In this way, quantization of total black hole masses is deduced. Furthermore, the quantum hoop conjecture and the Correspondence Principle are discussed.

  20. Atomic hydrogen on Mars - Measurements at solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Anderson, D. E., Jr.; Barker, E. S.

    1978-01-01

    The Copernicus Orbiting Astronomical Observatory was used to obtain measurements of Mars Lyman-alpha (1215.671-angstrom) emission at the solar minimum, which has resulted in the first information on atomic hydrogen concentrations in the upper atmosphere of Mars at the solar minimum. The Copernicus measurements, coupled with the Viking in situ measurements of the temperature (170 plus or minus 30 K) of the upper atmosphere of Mars, indicate that the atomic hydrogen number density at the exobase of Mars (250 kilometers) is about 60 times greater than that deduced from Mariner 6 and 7 Lyman-alpha measurements obtained during a period of high solar activity. The Copernicus results are consistent with Hunten's hypothesis of the diffusion-limited escape of atomic hydrogen from Mars.

  1. Time-dependent electron interference prior to ionization in the hydrogen atom and hydrogen molecular ion

    OpenAIRE

    de la Calle Negro, A.; Dundas, D.; Taylor, K. T.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate electron dynamics in the hydrogen atom and the hydrogen molecular ion when exposed to long wavelength laser pulses yet having intensity insufficient to ionize the system. We find that the field is still able to drive the electron, leading to time-dependent interference effects.

  2. Properties of Dense Fluid Hydrogen and Helium in Giant Gas Planets

    OpenAIRE

    Vorberger, Jan; Tamblyn, Isaac; Bonev, Stanimir A.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2007-01-01

    Equilibrium properties of hydrogen-helium mixtures under thermodynamic conditions found in the interior of giant gas planets are studied by means of density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations. Special emphasis is placed on the molecular-to-atomic transition in the fluid phase of hydrogen in the presence of helium. Helium has a substantial influence on the stability of hydrogen molecules. The molecular bond is strengthened and its length is shortened as a result of the increased ...

  3. Michigan ultra-cold polarized atomic hydrogen jet target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, B. B.; Gladycheva, S. E.; Kageya, T.; Kantsyrev, D. Yu.; Krisch, A. D.; Luppov, V. G.; Morozov, V. S.; Murray, J. R.; Raymond, R. S.; Borisov, N. S.; Fimushkin, V. V.; Grishin, V. N.; Mysnik, A. I.; Kleppner, D.

    2001-06-01

    To study spin effects in high energy collisions, we are developing an ultra-cold high-density jet target of proton-spin-polarized hydrogen atoms. The target uses a 12 Tesla magnetic field and a 0.3 K separation cell coated with superfluid helium-4 to produce a slow monochromatic electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam, which is then focused by a superconducting sextupole into the interaction region. In recent tests, we studied a polarized beam of hydrogen atoms focused by the superconducting sextupole into a compression tube detector, which measured the polarized atoms' intensity. The Jet produced, at the detector, a spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam with a measured intensity of about 2.8.1015 H s-1 and a FWHM area of less than 0.13 cm2. This intensity corresponds to a free jet density of about 1.1012 H cm-3 with a proton polarization of about 50%. When the transition RF unit is installed, we expect a proton polarization higher than 90%. .

  4. A momentum filter for atomic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Wei; Yue, Xuguang; Zhai, Yueyang; Chen, Xuzong

    2013-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a momentum filter for atomic gas based on a designed Talbot-Lau interferometer. It consists in two identical optical standing wave pulses separated by a delay equal to odd multiples of the half Talbot time. The one dimensional momentum width along the long direction of a cigar shape condensate is rapidly and greatly purified to a minimum, which corresponds to the ground state energy of the confining trap in our experiment. We find good agreement between theoretical analysis and experimental results. The filter is also effective for non-condensed cold atoms and could be applied widely.

  5. On the stability of the hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Making reference to the solution of the Schroedinger equation does not give much physical insight into the problem of stability because it is far from obvious how the conclusion follows from the equation. It is pointed out that the common arguments derived from the Heisenberg uncertainty principle are not sufficient to establish the existence of a stable ground state. It is shown how the proof for a lower bound of the hydrogen hamiltonian may be recast into physical terms by introducing an effective localisation potential. (author)

  6. Multiphoton resonance ionization for hydrogen atom in laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Schroedinger equation of hydrogen atom in laser field is expanded by Floquet wave and can be solved by the iterative method. The atomic ionization by laser field is a complex eigenvalue problem, which is formed from differential equation and boundary condition. Then the formula of the multiphoton resonance ionization in a linear polarization laser field was obtained and it is compared with the experiment

  7. Gravitational Corrections to Energy-Levels of a Hydrogen Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhen-Hua; LIU Yu-Xiao; LI Xi-Guo

    2007-01-01

    The first-order perturbations of the energy levels of a hydrogen atom in central internal gravitational field are investigated.The internal gravitational field is produced by the mass of the atomic nucleus.The energy shifts are calculated for the relativistic 1S,2S,2P,3S,3P,3D,4S,and 4P levels with Schwarzschild metric.The calculated results show that the gravitational corrections are sensitive to the total angular momentum quantum number.

  8. Formation and Transport of Atomic Hydrogen in Hot-Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we focus on diamond film hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactors where the only reactant ishydrogen so as to study the formation and transport of hydrogen atoms. Analysis of dimensionless numbers forheat and mass transfer reveals that thermal conduction and diffusion are the dominant mechanisms for gas-phaseheat and mass transfer, respectively. A simplified model has been established to simulate gas-phase temperature andH concentration distributions between the filament and the substrate. Examination of the relative importance ofhomogeneous and heterogeneous production of H atoms indicates that filament-surface decomposition of molecularhydrogen is the dominant source of H and gas-phase reaction plays a negligible role. The filament-surface dissociationrates of H2 for various filament temperatures were calculated to match H-atom concentrations observed in the liter-ature or derived from power consumption by filaments. Arrhenius plots of the filament-surface hydrogen dissociationrates suggest that dissociation of H2 at refractory filament surface is a catalytic process, which has a rather lowereffective activation energy than homogeneous thermal dissociation. Atomic hydrogen, acting as an important heattransfer medium to heat the substrate, can freely diffuse from the filament to the substrate without recombination.

  9. Slowing-down of negative muons and formation of muonic hydrogen in hydrogen gas below 1 Torr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muonic hydrogen atoms were produced at 1.0, 0.5 and 0.25 Torr H2 gas pressure using the magnetic bottle technique. The energy-time correlation of the muonic K-X-rays was determined. The moderation time tausub(m) of the muon needed for the last stage of energy loss (from approx. 2 keV until atomic capture) was measured and is compared with predictions. (orig.)

  10. Hydrogen atom mechanism of residuum conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of converting Athabaska bitumen to crude oil by heating it in an inert atmosphere (coking), or with hydrogen (hydrocracking), was described. The differences between the two processes were explained, with emphasis on the hydrocracking, a process which prevents coke formation.'Capping' of the carbon radicals and preventing them from undergoing a series of complex reactions which result in the production of coke, is the conventional explanation for the mechanism of hydrocracking. An alternative mechanism, involving the aromatic radicals interacting with the hydrogen to form a cyclohexadienyl radical intermediate, and thereby providing the pathway by which the large condensed aromatic centers can decompose to form gases and distillable liquids, was proposed as a more complete explanation for this complex process. An improved understanding of the mechanism should result in improvements to the process, either in the form of increased yield of desirable products, higher overall process conversion, lower severity or lower pressure. All of these would lead to better process economics. 6 refs., 4 figs

  11. Quantum Gas Microscope for Fermionic Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okan, Melih; Cheuk, Lawrence; Nichols, Matthew; Lawrence, Katherine; Zhang, Hao; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Strongly interacting fermions define the properties of complex matter throughout nature, from atomic nuclei and modern solid state materials to neutron stars. Ultracold atomic Fermi gases have emerged as a pristine platform for the study of many-fermion systems. In this poster we demonstrate the realization of a quantum gas microscope for fermionic 40 K atoms trapped in an optical lattice and the recent experiments which allows one to probe strongly correlated fermions at the single atom level. We combine 3D Raman sideband cooling with high- resolution optics to simultaneously cool and image individual atoms with single lattice site resolution at a detection fidelity above 95%. The imaging process leaves the atoms predominantly in the 3D motional ground state of their respective lattice sites, inviting the implementation of a Maxwell's demon to assemble low-entropy many-body states. Single-site resolved imaging of fermions enables the direct observation of magnetic order, time resolved measurements of the spread of particle correlations, and the detection of many-fermion entanglement. NSF, AFOSR-PECASE, AFOSR-MURI on Exotic Phases of Matter, ARO-MURI on Atomtronics, ONR, a Grant from the Army Research Office with funding from the DARPA OLE program, and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

  12. Hydrogen bonding tunes the early stage of hydrogen-atom abstracting reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Lei; Chen, Junsheng; Han, Keli

    2014-09-01

    The spontaneous and collision-assisted hydrogen-atom abstracting reaction (HA) dynamics of triplet benzil are investigated through the combination of transient absorption spectroscopy with TD-DFT calculations. HA dynamics exhibit a remarkable dependence on the hydrogen donor properties. The effects of the triplet-state hydrogen bonding on the reaction dynamics are illustrated. In particular, it is experimentally observed that strengthened triplet-state hydrogen bonding could accelerate the HA, whereas weakened triplet-state hydrogen bonding would postpone the HA. The triplet-state hydrogen bonding has great influences on the early stage of the HA reaction, while the bond dissociation energy of the hydrogen donors determines the subsequent reaction pathways. Protic solvents could sustain longer lifetimes of the excited-state intermediate formed after HA than non-protic solvents by 10 μs. This investigation provides insights into the HA dynamics and guidance to improve the product efficiency of photochemical reactions. PMID:25036436

  13. Extensive Atrophic Gastritis Increases Intraduodenal Hydrogen Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumasa Miki

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Gastric acid plays an important part in the prevention of bacterial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. If these bacteria have an ability of hydrogen (H2 fermentation, intraluminal H2 gas might be detected. We attempted to measure the intraluminal H2 concentrations to determine the bacterial overgrowth in the gastrointestinal tract. Patients and methods. Studies were performed in 647 consecutive patients undergoing upper endoscopy. At the time of endoscopic examination, we intubated the stomach and the descending part of the duodenum without inflation by air, and 20 mL of intraluminal gas samples of both sites was collected through the biopsy channel. Intraluminal H2 concentrations were measured by gas chromatography. Results. Intragastric and intraduodenal H2 gas was detected in 566 (87.5% and 524 (81.0% patients, respectively. The mean values of intragastric and intraduodenal H2 gas were 8.5±15.9 and 13.2±58.0 ppm, respectively. The intraduodenal H2 level was increased with the progression of atrophic gastritis, whereas the intragastric H2 level was the highest in patients without atrophic gastritis. Conclusions. The intraduodenal hydrogen levels were increased with the progression of atrophic gastritis. It is likely that the influence of hypochlorhydria on bacterial overgrowth in the proximal small intestine is more pronounced, compared to that in the stomach.

  14. Positronium collisions with rare-gas atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gribakin, G F; Wilde, R S; Fabrikant, I I

    2015-01-01

    We calculate elastic scattering of positronium (Ps) by the Xe atom using the recently developed pseudopotential method [Fabrikant I I and Gribakin G F 2014 Phys. Rev. A 90 052717] and review general features of Ps scattering from heavier rare-gas atoms: Ar, Kr and Xe. The total scattering cross section is dominated by two contributions: elastic scattering and Ps ionization (break-up). To calculate the Ps ionization cross sections we use the binary-encounter method for Ps collisions with an atomic target. Our results for the ionization cross section agree well with previous calculations carried out in the impulse approximation. Our total Ps-Xe cross section, when plotted as a function of the projectile velocity, exhibits similarity with the electron-Xe cross section for the collision velocities higher than 0.8 a.u., and agrees very well with the measurements at Ps velocities above 0.5 a.u.

  15. Force Density Balance inside the Hydrogen Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Himpsel, F J

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the long-debated question about the internal stability of the electron, the force densities acting on the charge density of the 1s electron in the H atom are investigated. The problem is mapped onto the canonical formalism for a classical Dirac field coupled to the electric field of an external point charge. An explicit calculation shows that the attractive Coulomb force density is balanced exactly at every point in space by the repulsive confinement force density. The latter requires evaluating the divergence of the stress tensor for the 1s solution of the Dirac equation. Such a local force balance goes beyond the global stability criteria that are usually given for the H atom. This concept is extended to the internal stability of any charged particle by investigating the force densities acting on its surrounding vacuum polarization. At large distances one has to consider only the charge density of virtual electrons and positrons, induced by a point charge in the vacuum of quantum electrodynamic...

  16. On elliptic basis of a two-dimensional hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An explicit form is found the elliptic basis of a two-dimensional hydrogen atom and elliptic separation constant at large and small values of the product Rsub(ω) (ω=√-2E and R is a free parameter entering into the definition of elliptic coordinates)

  17. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  18. Quantum-Classical Connection for Hydrogen Atom-Like Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syam, Debapriyo; Roy, Arup

    2011-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum theory specifies the rules of quantization for circular and elliptical orbits for a one-electron hydrogen atom-like system. This article illustrates how a formula connecting the principal quantum number "n" and the length of the major axis of an elliptical orbit may be arrived at starting from the quantum…

  19. Modelling spectral properties of non-equilibrium atomic hydrogen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ammando, G.; Pietanza, L. D.; Colonna, G.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2010-02-01

    A model to predict the emissivity and absorption coefficient of atomic hydrogen plasma is presented in detail. Non-equilibrium plasma is studied through coupling of the model with a collisional-radiative code for the excited states population as well as with the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function.

  20. Modelling spectral properties of non-equilibrium atomic hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model to predict the emissivity and absorption coefficient of atomic hydrogen plasma is presented in detail. Non-equilibrium plasma is studied through coupling of the model with a collisional-radiative code for the excited states population as well as with the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function.

  1. Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Niering, M

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the present thesis the internal structure of the hydrogen atom is studied by means of optical spectroscopic methods. The main interest is thereby devoted to the transition of the 1S ground-state into the metastable 2S-state.

  2. Positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen at low energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Chakrabarti

    2001-04-01

    Low energy positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen is studies theoretically using the hyperspherical partial wave method of Das [1] in constant 12, equal energy sharing geometry. The TDCS reveal considerable differences in physics compared to electron impact ionization under the same geometry.

  3. Variational Perturbation Treatment of the Confined Hydrogen Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, H. E., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Schrodinger equation for the ground state of a hydrogen atom confined at the centre of an impenetrable cavity is treated using variational perturbation theory. Energies calculated from variational perturbation theory are comparable in accuracy to the results from a direct numerical solution. The goal of this exercise is to introduce the…

  4. Concerted hydrogen-atom abstraction in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, K L; Tommos, C; Cukier, R I; Babcock, G T

    2000-06-01

    Photosystem II evolves oxygen by using water in the unlikely role of a reductant. The absorption of sunlight by chlorophyll produces highly oxidizing equivalents that are filled with electrons stripped from water. This proton-coupled redox chemistry occurs at the oxygen-evolving complex, which contains a tetramanganese cluster, a redox-active tyrosine amino acid hydrogen-bonded to a histidine amino acid, a calcium ion and chloride. Hydrogen-atom abstraction by the tyrosyl radical from water bound to the manganese cluster is now widely held to occur in this process, at least for some of the steps in the catalytic cycle. We discuss kinetic and energetic constraints on the hydrogen-atom abstraction process. PMID:10837268

  5. Cooperative triple-proton/hydrogen atom relay in 7-azaindole(CH3OH)2 in the gas phase: remarkable change in the reaction mechanism from vibrational-mode specific to statistical fashion with increasing internal energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakota, Kenji; Inoue, Naomi; Komoto, Yusuke; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2007-05-31

    The 7-azaindole-methanol 1:2 cluster [7AI(CH(3)OH)2] undergoes excited-state triple-proton/hydrogen atom transfer (ESTPT/HT) along the hydrogen-bonded network in the gas phase. The measurements of the resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of 7AI(CH(3)OH)2-d(n) (n = 0-3), where subscript n indicates the number of deuterium, and the fluorescence excitation spectrum of 7AI(CH(3)OH)2-d(0) allowed us to investigate the ESTPT/HT dynamics. By comparing the intensity ratios of the vibronic bands between 7AI(CH(3)OH)2-d(0) and 7AI(CH(3)OH)2-d(3) in REMPI spectra, we obtained the lower limit of an acceleration factor (f(a)(low)) of 7AI(CH(3)OH)2-d(0), which is the ratio of the reaction rate for the excitation of a vibronic state to that of the zero-point state in S(1). The f(a)(low) values are 2.7 +/- 0.83 and 4.0 +/- 1.2 for an in-phase intermolecular stretching vibration (sigma(1)) and its overtone (2sigma(1)) observed at 181 cm(-1) and 359 cm(-1) in the excitation spectrum, respectively, while that of the vibration (nu(2)/sigma(1) or nu(3)/sigma(1)) at 228 cm(-1) is 1.1 +/- 0.83. Thus, vibrational-mode-specific ESTPT/HT occurs in the low-energy region (600 cm(-1)). The excitation of an intramolecular ring mode (nu(intra)) of 7AI at 744 cm(-1) substantially enhances the reaction rate (f(a)(low) = 4.4 +/- 0.98), but the increase of f(a)(low) is not prominent for the excitation of v(intra) + sigma(1) at 926 cm(-1) (f(a)(low) = 5.0 +/- 1.6), although the sigma(1) mode is excited. These results suggest that the ESTPT/HT reaction in 7AI(CH(3)OH)2-d(0) directly proceeds from the photoexcited states with the internal energy less than approximately 600 cm(-1), but it occurs from the isoenergetically vibrational-energy redistributed states when the internal energy is large. This shows a remarkable feature of ESTPT/HT in 7AI(CH(3)OH)2; the nature of the reaction mechanism changes from vibrational-mode specific to statistical fashion with increasing the internal

  6. Density of neutral hydrogen atoms in a microwave hydrogen plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nickel fiber optics catalytic probe (FOCP) was used to determine the density of neutral hydrogen atoms in a hydrogen postglow reactor. The reactor was a Pyrex cylinder. Plasma was created in a side quartz tube by a surfatron microwave generator. The H-atom density in the postglow reactor was measured at different output power of the MW generator and different flow of hydrogen through the vacuum system. The H-atom density increased linearly with increasing microwave power, and it did not depend much on the hydrogen flow. At the lowest power tested, i.e. 40 W, the H-atom density was 5x1020 m-3, while at highest power, i.e. 145 W, it was about 2x1021 m-3. The degree of dissociation of hydrogen molecules, on the other hand, was found to be strongly dependent on the hydrogen flow. The lower the flow the higher the dissociation degree was. At the flow of 80 sccm/min the degree of dissociation was between 4% (at 40 W) and 14% (at 145 W), while at 300 sccm/min it dropped to between 1.5% (at 40 W) and 5% (at 145 W). The results were explained taking into account the collision phenomena in ionized gases. (author)

  7. Study of atomic hydrogen influence on oxygen diffusion in indium phosphide subsurface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One introduces a technique enabling to apply layer-by-layer etching by inert gas ions to study the effect of the external conditions on the relative variation of diffusion factor of impurities from gaseous phase into the crystalline specimen body. Paper contains the results of technique application to study the influence of hydrogen atoms on oxygen diffusion from gaseous phase into single-crystal indium phosphide body

  8. Plasma effective field theory advertised, then illustrated by e, p, H-atom gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part is a lightning fast overview of the application of ideas of modern effective quantum field theory (which originated in elementary particle theory) to plasma physics. An exhaustive account is presented in a long report with L. G. Yaffe which contains all the details set out in a self-contained and pedagogical fashion. The second part shows how the low temperature but dilute limit of the partition function at two-loop order describes a gas of electrons, protons, and hydrogen atoms in their ground state. Hydrogen atoms emerge automatically from the general framework which does not begin with any explicit consideration of atoms. (orig.)

  9. Electron-impact ionization of atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the invention of quantum mechanics, even the simplest example of collisional breakup in a system of charged particles, e- + H -> H+ + e- + e-, has stood as one of the last unsolved fundamental problems in atomic physics. A complete solution requires calculating the energies and directions for a final state in which three charged particles are moving apart. Advances in the formal description of three-body breakup have yet to lead to a viable computational method. Traditional approaches, based on two-body formalisms, have been unable to produce differential cross sections for the three-body final state. Now, by using a mathematical transformation of the Schrodinger equation that makes the final state tractable, a complete solution has finally been achieved, Under this transformation, the scattering wave function can be calculated without imposing explicit scattering boundary conditions. This approach has produced the first triple differential cross sections that agree on an absolute scale with experiment as well as the first ab initio calculations of the single differential cross section

  10. Hydrogen atom adsorption on aluminum icosahedral clusters: A DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Energy barriers for H atom migrating from the interstitial sites to surface adsorption sites for f.c.c. Al(1 1 1) surface and icosahedral surface. The icosahedral surface lowers the migration barriers of H atom both within the subsurface and between the surface and the subsurface. Research highlights: → Energetic properties of aluminum clusters absorbed with hydrogen atoms were investigated for the 'magic' clusters with icosahedral symmetry based on the first-principles calculation. → The slab model is made for representing the surface of icosahedral clusters by deforming the f.c.c. surface model. → The hydrogen diffusion barriers are calculated for interstitial sites of aluminum clusters and compared to those of bulk aluminum system. → The icosahedral surface lowers the migration barriers to H atoms between the surface and subsurface compared to the f.c.c. surface. - Abstract: Properties of hydrogenated, icosahedral aluminum clusters were investigated using density functional theory in comparison with those of aluminum bulk systems. The most stable site for H adsorption to Al13 was the hollow HCP site. The H binding energy suggests that the top and the bridge configurations are transition states. Results for Al13H were compared with those obtained for two surface models simulating f.c.c. and icosahedral (1 1 1) surfaces. Results show that the H atom interacts weakly with surface of clusters when the cluster size is increased. The migration energy of H atom between neighboring T and O sites becomes smaller for icosahedral subsurface than for either bulk material or the f.c.c. subsurface. A similar relation between the two surface models was found for the migration energy between surface and subsurface sites. These results indicate that the icosahedral surface lowers the migration barriers of H atom both within the subsurface and between the surface and the subsurface.

  11. Carbon dust formation under heavy atomic hydrogen irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dust formation mechanism in plasma-material surface interactions has been investigated by using high pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), which have a feature of high atomic particle flux (atomic hydrogen flux: ∼1024 m-2s-1, ion flux: ∼1021 m-2s-1). Experiments have been conducted in argon/hydrogen mixture plasma irradiation to graphite targets. In the present experiments, physical sputtering is not expected and the dominant erosion process of graphite target is chemical sputtering by atomic hydrogen irradiation. Carbon dust particles with various shapes have been observed on the graphite target irradiated by argon/hydrogen plasma. It is found that the shapes of the dust particles are strongly related to the target surface temperature, graphite spherical particle when the surface temperature is below ∼1100 K and polyhedral particle like diamond when above ∼1100 K. It is also shown that the carbon dust formation and growth does not choose the surface materials. The number density of dust formed decreases as the plasma input power decreases or the distance between the target and induction coil increases, while the weight loss remains almost the same even though the input power and distance between the target and induction coil are varied. The size of dust particles increases as increasing surface temperature. These experimental results indicate that the dust growth is strongly related to surface temperature. (author)

  12. Desulfurization of chalcopyrite and molybdenite by atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenite (MoS2) desulfurization by monatomic hydrogen in 625-800 K range was studied using helium as diluent gas. Desulfurization degree at 680 K equals 9%. Temperature growth elevates sulfur content in molybdenite. The effect of initial molybdenite enrichment with temperature growth up to 800 K is probably caused by removal of reduced molybdenum capable to form oxide in the presence of traces of oxygen contained in inert diluent gas

  13. Advanced IGCC/Hydrogen Gas Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    York, William [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Hughes, Michael [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Berry, Jonathan [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Russell, Tamara [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Lau, Y. C. [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Liu, Shan [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Arnett, Michael [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Peck, Arthur [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Tralshawala, Nilesh [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Weber, Joseph [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Benjamin, Marc [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Iduate, Michelle [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Kittleson, Jacob [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Garcia-Crespo, Andres [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Delvaux, John [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Casanova, Fernando [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Lacy, Ben [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Brzek, Brian [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Wolfe, Chris [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Palafox, Pepe [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Ding, Ben [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Badding, Bruce [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); McDuffie, Dwayne [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Zemsky, Christine [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2015-07-30

    The objective of this program was to develop the technologies required for a fuel flexible (coal derived hydrogen or syngas) gas turbine for IGCC that met DOE turbine performance goals. The overall DOE Advanced Power System goal was to conduct the research and development (R&D) necessary to produce coal-based IGCC power systems with high efficiency, near-zero emissions, and competitive capital cost. To meet this goal, the DOE Fossil Energy Turbine Program had as an interim objective of 2 to 3 percentage points improvement in combined cycle (CC) efficiency. The final goal is 3 to 5 percentage points improvement in CC efficiency above the state of the art for CC turbines in IGCC applications at the time the program started. The efficiency goals were for NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm NOx (@15 % O2). As a result of the technologies developed under this program, the DOE goals were exceeded with a projected 8 point efficiency improvement. In addition, a new combustion technology was conceived of and developed to overcome the challenges of burning hydrogen and achieving the DOE’s NOx goal. This report also covers the developments under the ARRA-funded portion of the program that include gas turbine technology advancements for improvement in the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of gas turbines for industrial applications with carbon capture and sequestration. Example applications could be cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, steel and aluminum plants, manufacturing facilities, etc. The DOE’s goal for more than 5 percentage point improvement in efficiency was met with cycle analyses performed for representative IGCC Steel Mill and IGCC Refinery applications. Technologies were developed in this program under the following areas: combustion, larger latter stage buckets, CMC and EBC, advanced materials and coatings, advanced configurations to reduce cooling, sealing and rotor purge flows, turbine aerodynamics, advanced sensors, advancements in first

  14. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M.; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J.

    2016-02-01

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in the total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. These multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments.

  15. Studies on the interaction of hydrogen atoms with diamond surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vibration modes of hydrogen-atom adsorption on the diamond surface were studied with high resolution-electron energy loss spectroscopy. Two main losses were observed at 360 MeV and 160 MeV. They are assigned to the C-H stretch vibrations and the angle-changing deformation vibrations respectively. Replacing H-atom with D-atom, isotopic shifts were observed in the loss spectra. Heating the diamond surface to 900 deg C, all of the loss features disappear, but an inelastic continuous loss-structure was observed. Due to H-atom desorption, the dangling-bonds became horizontal bonds on the diamond surface, resulting in the graphitization of diamond surface. The appearance of the inelastic continuous loss-structure was the characteristic of graphite π-band. The graphitization of the diamond surface was affirmed further by UPS and AES studies

  16. Laser stripping of hydrogen atoms by direct ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct ionization of hydrogen atoms by laser irradiation is investigated as a potential new scheme to generate proton beams without stripping foils. The time-dependent Schroedinger equation describing the atom-radiation interaction is numerically solved obtaining accurate ionization cross-sections for a broad range of laser wavelengths, durations and energies. Parameters are identified where the Doppler frequency up-shift of radiation colliding with relativistic particles can lead to efficient ionization over large volumes and broad bandwidths using currently available lasers

  17. Arbitrary excitation of atomic hydrogen at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the growing need of excitation cross-section data of atomic hydrogen by fully stripped heavy ions for the preparation of an atomic database for neutral-beam penetration in large tokamaks, we have calculated these data in the framework of the first-order Born approximation for n≤20 in the energy range of 0.1 to 1.5 MeV/amu. The present computed results are found to be in agreement with the existing observed results. From the present calculation it also appears that the contribution from subshells characterized by l>3 is always less than 2%

  18. Unparticle contribution to the hydrogen atom ground state energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondrak, Michael F.; Nicolini, Piero; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    In the present work we study the effect of unparticle modified static potentials on the energy levels of the hydrogen atom. By using Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory, we obtain the energy shift of the ground state and compare it with experimental data. Bounds on the unparticle energy scale ΛU as a function of the scaling dimension dU and the coupling constant λ are derived. We show that there exists a parameter region where bounds on ΛU are stringent, signaling that unparticles could be tested in atomic physics experiments.

  19. The FILTEX/HERMES polarized hydrogen atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FILTEX/HERMES atomic beam source (ABS) for polarized hydrogen is described. Recent improvements concern mainly the optimization of the beam forming system and a new design of the sextupole magnet system. For a precise measurement (error 5%) of the output flow a calibrated compression tube was installed. The output flow of 0.81x1017 H atoms per second in two hyperfine substates was constant within 2% in a long-term measurement over 16 h. At the FILTEX test experiment, the target density in the storage cell fed by the ABS was constant within the experimental error of 4% over a period of four months. (orig.)

  20. Charge exchange between hydrogen atoms and fully stripped heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge exchange between multicharged ions and background atomic and molecular gases represents one of the limitations to the attainment of high charge states in heavy ion sources, particularly containment sources. An attempt is made to study systematically a particularly simple but in many respects representative class of such reactions, namely charge transfer between atomic hydrogen and fully stripped heavy ions. Approximate cross sections for these processes in the low keV range of collision energies were obtained using a multistate Landau--Zener method. The energy and Z dependences of the cross sections are discussed

  1. A New Pseudospectral Method for Calculations of Hydrogen Atom in Arbitrary External Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Hao-Xue; LI Bai-Wen1

    2002-01-01

    A new pseudospectral method was introduced to calculate wavefunctions and energy levels of hydrogen atom in arbitrary potential. Some results of hydrogen atom in uniform magnetic fields were presented, high accuracy of results was obtained with simple calculations, and our calculations show very fast convergence. It suggests a new methodfor calculations of hydrogen atom in external fields.

  2. A discrete variable representation for electron-hydrogen atom scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaucher, L.F.

    1994-08-01

    A discrete variable representation (DVR) suitable for treating the quantum scattering of a low energy electron from a hydrogen atom is presented. The benefits of DVR techniques (e.g. the removal of the requirement of calculating multidimensional potential energy matrix elements and the availability of iterative sparse matrix diagonalization/inversion algorithms) have for many years been applied successfully to studies of quantum molecular scattering. Unfortunately, the presence of a Coulomb singularity at the electrically unshielded center of a hydrogen atom requires high radial grid point densities in this region of the scattering coordinate, while the presence of finite kinetic energy in the asymptotic scattering electron also requires a sufficiently large radial grid point density at moderate distances from the nucleus. The constraints imposed by these two length scales have made application of current DVR methods to this scattering event difficult.

  3. Electron capture in collisions of S4+ with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge transfer processes due to collisions of ground state S4+(3s21S) ions with atomic hydrogen are investigated for energies between 1 meV u-1 and 10 MeV u-1 using the quantum mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC), atomic-orbital close-coupling, classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) and continuum distorted wave methods. The MOCC calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial coupling matrix elements obtained with the spin-coupled valence-bond approach. A number of variants of the CTMC approach were explored, including different momentum and radial distributions for the initial state, as well as effective charge and quantum-defect models to determine the corresponding quantum state after capture into final partially stripped S3+ excited classical states. Hydrogen target isotope effects are explored and rate coefficients for temperatures between 100 and 106 K are also presented. (author)

  4. A discrete variable representation for electron-hydrogen atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A discrete variable representation (DVR) suitable for treating the quantum scattering of a low energy electron from a hydrogen atom is presented. The benefits of DVR techniques (e.g. the removal of the requirement of calculating multidimensional potential energy matrix elements and the availability of iterative sparse matrix diagonalization/inversion algorithms) have for many years been applied successfully to studies of quantum molecular scattering. Unfortunately, the presence of a Coulomb singularity at the electrically unshielded center of a hydrogen atom requires high radial grid point densities in this region of the scattering coordinate, while the presence of finite kinetic energy in the asymptotic scattering electron also requires a sufficiently large radial grid point density at moderate distances from the nucleus. The constraints imposed by these two length scales have made application of current DVR methods to this scattering event difficult

  5. Hydrogen-Enhanced Natural Gas Vehicle Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, Dan; Collier, Kirk

    2009-01-22

    The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of HCNG fuel (30 to 50% hydrogen by volume and the remainder natural gas) to reduce emissions from light-duty on-road vehicles with no loss in performance or efficiency. The City of Las Vegas has an interest in alternative fuels and already has an existing hydrogen refueling station. Collier Technologies Inc (CT) supplied the latest design retrofit kits capable of converting nine compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled, light-duty vehicles powered by the Ford 5.4L Triton engine. CT installed the kits on the first two vehicles in Las Vegas, trained personnel at the City of Las Vegas (the City) to perform the additional seven retrofits, and developed materials for allowing other entities to perform these retrofits as well. These vehicles were used in normal service by the City while driver impressions, reliability, fuel efficiency and emissions were documented for a minimum of one year after conversion. This project has shown the efficacy of operating vehicles originally designed to operate on compressed natural gas with HCNG fuel incorporating large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). There were no safety issues experienced with these vehicles. The only maintenance issue in the project was some rough idling due to problems with the EGR valve and piping parts. Once the rough idling was corrected no further maintenance issues with these vehicles were experienced. Fuel economy data showed no significant changes after conversion even with the added power provided by the superchargers that were part of the conversions. Driver feedback for the conversions was very favorable. The additional power provided by the HCNG vehicles was greatly appreciated, especially in traffic. The drivability of the HCNG vehicles was considered to be superior by the drivers. Most of the converted vehicles showed zero oxides of nitrogen throughout the life of the project using the State of Nevada emissions station.

  6. Investigation of the high-order harmonic generation and ionization of model hydrogen atom and real hydrogen atom in intense laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solving time-dependent Schroedinger equation numerically, we investigate the high-order harmonic generation and ionization probability of one dimensional, two dimensional and three dimensional hydrogen atom exposed to intense laser field. In the tunneling ionization regime, our results show that the HHG plateau features and cutoff positions of model hydrogen atoms are well agreement with those of real hydrogen atom, and the trend of changing of the ionization probabilities with time is similar, but the values of ionization probabilities for model atoms are different from ones for three dimensional hydrogen atom. We explain the reason for the difference of ionization probabilities between model atoms and real hydrogen atom according to the semiclassical three-step model. (author)

  7. Identification of new, well-populated amino-acid sidechain rotamers involving hydroxyl-hydrogen atoms and sulfhydryl-hydrogen atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Bosco K.; Agard, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Background An important element in homology modeling is the use of rotamers to parameterize the sidechain conformation. Despite the many libraries of sidechain rotamers that have been developed, a number of rotamers have been overlooked, due to the fact that they involve hydrogen atoms. Results We identify new, well-populated rotamers that involve the hydroxyl-hydrogen atoms of Ser, Thr and Tyr, and the sulfhydryl-hydrogen atom of Cys, using high-resolution crystal structures (

  8. Identification of new, well-populated amino-acid sidechain rotamers involving hydroxyl-hydrogen atoms and sulfhydryl-hydrogen atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Agard David A; Ho Bosco K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background An important element in homology modeling is the use of rotamers to parameterize the sidechain conformation. Despite the many libraries of sidechain rotamers that have been developed, a number of rotamers have been overlooked, due to the fact that they involve hydrogen atoms. Results We identify new, well-populated rotamers that involve the hydroxyl-hydrogen atoms of Ser, Thr and Tyr, and the sulfhydryl-hydrogen atom of Cys, using high-resolution crystal structures (

  9. Variable scaling method and Stark effect in hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By relating the Stark effect problem in hydrogen-like atoms to that of the spherical anharmonic oscillator we have found simple formulas for energy eigenvalues for the Stark effect. Matrix elements have been calculated using 0(2,1) algebra technique after Armstrong and then the variable scaling method has been used to find optimal solutions. Our numerical results are compared with those of Hioe and Yoo and also with the results obtained by Lanczos. (author)

  10. Phase Space Structures Explain Hydrogen Atom Roaming in Formaldehyde Decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Mauguiere, Frederic A L; Collins, Peter R C; Kramer, Zeb C.; Carpenter, Barry K.; Ezra, Gregory S.; Farantos, Stavros; Wiggins, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    We re-examine the prototypical roaming reaction—hydrogen atom roaming in formaldehyde decomposition—from a phase space perspective. Specifically, we address the question “why do trajectories roam, rather than dissociate through the radical channel?” We describe and compute the phase space structures that define and control all possible reactive events for this reaction, as well as provide a dynamically exact description of the roaming region in phase space. Using these phase space constructs,...

  11. Relativistic Ionization of Hydrogen Atoms by Positron Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Amal Chahboune; Bouzid Manaut; Elmostafa Hrour; Souad Taj

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic triple differential cross-sections (TDCS) for ionization of hydrogen atoms by positron impact have been calculated in the symmetric coplanar geometry. We have used Dirac wave functions to describe free electron’s and positron’s sates. The relativistic formalism is examined by taking the non relativistic limit. Present results are compared with those for the corresponding electron-impact case. In the first Born approximation, we found that the TDCS for positron impact ionization e...

  12. The treatment of wasted gas in GC hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ways used to treat wasted gas in GC hydrogen isotope separation were introduced. Catalytic oxidation and cryogenic absorption which can be applied to circle run separation system were introduced emphatically. The result of experiment shows that in catalytic oxidation system without air or oxygen, little hydrogen in helium was deleted, but 99.99%-99.999% helium can be produced when a mass of air was added to the gas flow and that in cryogenic absorption system, 98% hydrogen and 99% helium was produced without any additional treatment, such hydrogen can be used in hydrogen-oxygen combination reaction, after next treatment, such helium can be used as transferring gas. (authors)

  13. Interaction of atomic hydrogen with charcoal at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: When the inner surface of the ITER pumping duct is covered with a thin αN-tilde:H film, the hydrogen recombination coefficient can be reduced. In this case, atomic hydrogen can reach the cryopump region and interact with charcoal cryosorbent. The interaction of thermal hydrogen molecules and atoms with charcoal has been analyzed by sorption measurements and TDS at 77 K. A stream quartz reactor with H2 RF discharge was used for the production of H atoms. The ratio of H and H2 in mixture in the afterglow zone was 1/10000. After exposure in H/H2 mixture the tube section with charcoal was warmed up to 300 K. In reference experiments the same sample of charcoal was exposed successively in H2 and CH4. After sample exposure in H/H2 mixture, the TD peak shifted to higher temperatures from 125 K (peak temperature after exposure in H2) to 150 K. The high temperature shoulder of this peak coincided with the temperature of methane release. The wide spectrum of heavy hydrocarbons formed at 77 K was registered by mass-spectrometry at charcoal heating up to 700 K. The specific adsorption volume of charcoal measured by N2 adsorption at 77 K decreased by 10-15%. (author)

  14. Muonium as a probe of hydrogen-atom reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muonium is a light isotope of hydrogen and can be used as a tracer substitute for hydrogen to investigate liquid-phase hydrogen-atom reactions not amenable to study by more conventional means. The residual polarization method of muon spin rotation is illustrated by an investigation of the reaction of muonium with sodium thiosulphate in aqueous solution. The rate constant has been determined directly from measurements of muonium decay rates in very dilute solutions, ksub(M) =(1.5 +-0.4) x 1010 dm3 mol-1 s-1. Possible reaction mechanisms have been explored by analysis of the field and concentration dependence of the diamagnetic signal amplitude in concentrated solutions. The conclusion is that hydrogen atoms react with thiosulphate, probably first forming a radical adduct HSSO32- which decomposes in 1 ns or less to give HS- + SO3-, or possibly H+ + .S- + SO32-. The consequences of time-dependent rate constants on the residual-polarization analysis are discussed in an appendix. (author)

  15. The atomic hydrogen cloud in the saturnian system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, W.-L.; Johnson, R. E.; Ip, W.-H.

    2013-09-01

    The importance of Titan's H torus shaped by solar radiation pressure and of hydrogen atoms flowing out of Saturn's atmosphere in forming the broad hydrogen cloud in Saturn's magnetosphere is still debated. Since the Saturnian system also contains a water product torus which originates from the Enceladus plumes, the icy ring particles, and the inner icy satellites, as well as Titan's H2 torus, we have carried out a global investigation of the atomic hydrogen cloud taking into account all sources. We show that the velocity and angle distributions of the hot H ejected from Saturn's atmosphere following electron-impact dissociation of H2 are modified by collisions with the ambient atmospheric H2 and H. This in turn affects the morphology of the escaping hydrogen from Saturn, as does the morphology of the ionospheric electron distribution. Although an exact agreement with the Cassini observations is not obtained, our simulations show that H directly escaping from Titan is the dominant contributor in the outer magnetosphere. Of the total number of H observed by Cassini from 1 to 5RS, ∼5.7×1034, our simulations suggest ∼20% is from dissociation in the Enceladus torus, ∼5-10% is from dissociation of H2 in the atmosphere of the main rings, and ∼50% is from Titan's H torus, implying that ∼20% comes from Saturn atmosphere.

  16. Massive stars formed in atomic hydrogen reservoirs: HI observations of gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Michałowski, Michał J; Hjorth, J; Krumholz, M R; Tanvir, N R; Kamphuis, P; Burlon, D; Baes, M; Basa, S; Berta, S; Ceron, J M Castro; Crosby, D; D'Elia, V; Elliott, J; Greiner, J; Hunt, L K; Klose, S; Koprowski, M P; Floc'h, E Le; Malesani, D; Murphy, T; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Palazzi, E; Rasmussen, J; Rossi, A; Savaglio, S; Schady, P; Sollerman, J; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Watson, D; van der Werf, P; Vergani, S D; Xu, D

    2015-01-01

    Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), among the most energetic events in the Universe, are explosions of massive and short-lived stars, so they pinpoint locations of recent star formation. However, several GRB host galaxies have recently been found to be deficient in molecular gas (H2), believed to be the fuel of star formation. Moreover, optical spectroscopy of GRB afterglows implies that the molecular phase constitutes only a small fraction of the gas along the GRB line-of-sight. Here we report the first ever 21 cm line observations of GRB host galaxies, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, implying high levels of atomic hydrogen (HI), which suggests that the connection between atomic gas and star formation is stronger than previously thought, with star formation being potentially directly fuelled by atomic gas (or with very efficient HI-to-H2 conversion and rapid exhaustion of molecular gas), as has been theoretically shown to be possible. This can happen in low metallicity gas near the onset of star forma...

  17. Measurement of hydrogen content in carbon steel exposed to hydrogen gas environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon steel overpacks for high level radioactive waste disposal would be attacked corrosion due to water reduction under reducing condition and the hydrogen would be generated by the corrosion reaction. When the hydrogen is absorbed into metal in the solution or in the hydrogen gas environment, the metal is sometimes damaged by the hydrogen embrittlement. In this study, hydrogen content in carbon steel specimens were measured after the exposure to hydrogen gas environment of 10 MPa, 100degC which is regarded as the most severe case under repository condition. As the results of measurement, the absorbed hydrogen concentration in carbon steel was 0.02∼0.03 ppm and it was concluded that the hydrogen embrittlement due to the contact with hydrogen gas would not be likely to occur on carbon steel overpack under the repository condition. (author)

  18. Pressure of a partially ionized hydrogen gas : numerical results from exact low temperature expansions

    OpenAIRE

    Alastuey, Angel; Ballenegger, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    8 pages International audience We consider a partially ionized hydrogen gas at low densities, where it reduces almost to an ideal mixture made with hydrogen atoms in their ground-state, ionized protons and ionized electrons. By performing systematic low-temperature expansions within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential, exact formulae for the first five leading corrections to the ideal Saha equat...

  19. Action of Mercaptan and Disulfide in Hydrogen Atom Exchange Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free- radical, photochemical, and high-energy radiation-induced reactions may be catalysed or inhibited by rapid hydrogen atom exchange reactions of mercaptans and disulfides. The radical-induced, light-initiated, and benzophenone-sensitized decarbonylations of aldehydes are catalysed by mercaptans. The chain-propagating hydrogen transfer reaction, R' + RCH = O -> RH + RC = O , is made more rapid by a similar sequence of hydrogen atom transfers involving the sulfur compound: R' + C6H5CH2SH -> RH + C6H5CH2S'; C6H5CH2S + RCH = 0 -> C6H5CH2SH + RC = 0. The photoreduction of benzophenone in 2-propanol leads to benzpinacol by a non-chain reaction via the radicals (C6H5)2C-OH and (CH3)2COH. The reaction is retarded and inhibited by mercaptan and disulfide, which reconvert the radicals to the starting materials by rapid hydrogen transfer reactions and are themselves regenerated in their alternate valence states, each molecule of sulfur compound negating the chemical consequences of many quanta: (C6H5)2C-OH + AS' -> (C6H5)2C = O + ASH; (CH3)2C-OH + ASH -> (CH3)2C = 0 + AS'. Proof of the mechanism is found in: equilibration of initially present mercaptan or disulfide during inhibition; in racemization of optically active alcohol during inhibition; in deuterium exchange during inhibition. Similar inhibition is seen when only one intermediate radical is formed, as in the benzophenone- benzhydrol and acetophenone-α-methyl-benzyl alcohol systems. Inhibition by sulfur compounds, by the same mechanism, is found in the 60Co γ-ray induced conversion of benzophenone to benzpinacol; naphthalene has no protecting effect on benzophenone in the 60Co system, while quenching the photochemical reaction. The protection by sulfur compounds of solutes against radiation damage thus results from hydrogen atom transfer reactions. The photoreduction of benzophenone in an ether is also inhibited by the sulfur compounds, by hydrogen atom transfer reactions. A mechanism exists in this system

  20. $K$-series X-rays yield measurement of kaonic hydrogen atoms in gaseous target

    CERN Document Server

    Bazzi, M; Bellotti, G; Berucci, C; Bragadireanu, A M; Bosnar, D; Cargnelli, M; Curceanu, C; Butt, A D; d'Uffizi, A; Fiorini, C; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Hayanao, R S; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Iwasaki, M; Sandri, P Levi; Marton, J; Okada, S; Pietreanu, D; Piscicchia, K; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Shi, H; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Tatsuno, H; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    We measured the $K$-series X-rays of the $K^{-}p$ exotic atom in the SIDDHARTA experiment with a gaseous hydrogen target of 1.3 g/l, which is about 15 times the $\\rho_{\\rm STP}$ of hydrogen gas. At this density, the absolute yields of kaonic X-rays, when a negatively charged kaon stopped inside the target, were determined to be 0.012$^{+0.004}_{-0.003}$ for $K_{\\alpha}$ and 0.043$^{+0.012}_{-0.011}$ for all the $K$-series transitions $K_{tot}$. These results, together with the KEK E228 experiment results, confirm for the first time a target density dependence of the yield predicted by the cascade models, and provide valuable information to refine the parameters used in the cascade models for the kaonic atoms.

  1. Possible Coexistence of Antihydrogen with Hydrogen, Deuterium and Tritium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Raouf, Mohamed Assad

    2007-01-01

    Recent productions of large numbers of cold antiprotons as well as the formation of antihydrogens at CERN and Fermilab have raised basic questions about possible coexistence of matter and antimatter in nature. In the present work, previous mathematical considerations are revisited which support the possible coexistence of Antihydrogen with Hydrogen, Deuterium and Tritium atoms. In particular, the main objective of the present work is to present computational treatments which confirm the possible formation of these quasi molecules in laboratory. These treatments are based on a nonadiabatic picture of the system in which generalized basis functions are adjusted within the framework of Rayleigh-Ritz' variational method. Thus, the Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic picture of the system, which implies the formation of exotic molecules composed explicitly of fixed quasi heavy atoms (containing at least two leptons, e.g. protonium) and quasi light atoms (e.g. positronium), is ruled out in the present work. In other words, ...

  2. The long-range interaction of relativistic hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A treatment is given of long-range interatomic forces that exhibits the following features: (a) the result is valid both at small separations and in the retarded (long range) regime, (b) all atomic multipole moments are taken into account and (c) the treatment includes relativistic effects up to any desired order. The third requirement can be met for hydrogen atoms of which electrons are described by the relativistic Dirac theory. The interaction energy of two such atoms is broken up in a retarded dispersion energy and a nonretarded induction energy using a multipole expansion in the spherical-tensor formalism which contain orbital and spin contributions. Fourth order perturbation theory is used, and special attention is paid to the asymptotic behavior of the dispersion energy at very large interatomic separations. Finally, semi and nonrelativistic approximations are discussed

  3. THE DYNAMICS OF HYDROGEN ATOM ABSTRACTION FROM POLYATOMIC MOLECULES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIU,X.; SUITS,A.G.

    2002-11-21

    The hydrogen atom abstraction reaction is an important fundamental process that is extensively involved in atmospheric and combustion chemistry. The practical significance of this type of reaction with polyatomic hydrocarbons is manifest, which has led to many kinetics studies. The detailed understanding of these reactions requires corresponding dynamics studies. However, in comparison to the A + HX {radical} AH + X reactions, the study of the dynamics of A + HR {yields} AH + R reactions is much more difficult, both experimentally and theoretically (here and in the following, A stands for an atom, X stands for a halogen atom, and R stands for a polyatomic hydrocarbon radical). The complication stems from the structured R, in contrast to the structureless X. First of all, there are many internal degrees of freedom in R that can participate in the reaction. In addition, there are different carbon sites from which an H atom can be abstracted, and the dynamics are correspondingly different; there are also multiple identical carbon sites in HR and in the picture of a local reaction, there exist competitions between neighboring H atoms, and so on. Despite this complexity, there have been continuing efforts to obtain insight into the dynamics of these reactions. In this chapter, some examples are presented, including the reactions of ground state H, Cl, and O atoms, with particular focus on our recent work using imaging to obtain the differential cross sections for these reactions.

  4. Hydrogen atom density in narrow-gap microwave hydrogen plasma determined by calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takahiro; Ohmi, Hiromasa; Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    The density of hydrogen (H) atoms in the narrow-gap microwave hydrogen plasma generated under high-pressure conditions is expected to be very high because of the high input power density of the order of 104 W/cm3. For measuring the H atom density in such a high-pressure and high-density plasma, power-balance calorimetry is suited since a sufficient signal to noise ratio is expected. In this study, H atom density in the narrow-gap microwave hydrogen plasma has been determined by the power-balance calorimetry. The effective input power to the plasma is balanced with the sum of the powers related to the out-going energy per unit time from the plasma region via heat conduction, outflow of high-energy particles, and radiation. These powers can be estimated by simple temperature measurements using thermocouples and optical emission spectroscopy. From the power-balance data, the dissociation fraction of H2 molecules is determined, and the obtained maximum H atom density is (1.3 ± 0.2) × 1018 cm-3. It is found that the H atom density increases monotonically with increasing the energy invested per one H2 molecule within a constant plasma volume.

  5. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polarized gas targets of atomic hydrogen and deuterium have significant advantages over conventional polarized targets, e.g. chemical and isotopic purity, large polarization including deuteron tensor polarization, absence of strong magnetic fields, rapid polarization reversal. While in principle the beam of polarized atoms from an atomic beam source (Stern-Gerlach spin separation) can be used as a polarized target, the target thickness achieved is too small for most applications. We propose to increase the target thickness by injecting the polarized atoms into a storage cell. Provided the atoms survive several hundred wall collisions without losing their polarization, it will be possible to achieve a target thickness of 1013 to 1014 atoms/cm2 by injection of polarized atoms from an atomic-beam source into suitable cells. Such targets are very attractive as internal targets in storage rings

  6. The role of atomic hydrogen and hydrogen-induced martensites in hydrogen embrittlement of type 304L stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘川; 褚武扬; 李正邦; 梁东图; 宿彦京; 乔利杰

    2002-01-01

    The role of atomic hydrogen and hydrogen-induced martensites in hydrogen embrittlement in slow strain rate tensile tests and hydrogen-induced delayed cracking (HIC) in sustained load tests for type 304 L stainless steel was quantitatively studied.The results indicated that hydrogen-induced martensites formed when hydrogen concentration C0 exceeded 30 ppm,and increased with an increase in C0,i.e.M(vol%)=62-82.5exp(-C0/102).The relative plasticity loss caused by the martensites increased linearly with increasing amount of the martensites,i.e.Iδ(M),%=0.45M(vol %)=27.9-37.1 exp(-C0/102).The plasticity loss caused by atomic hydrogen Iδ(H) increased with an increase in C0 and reached a saturation value Iδ(H)max=40% when C0>100 ppm.Iδ(H) decreased with an increase in strain rate ,i.e.Iδ(H),%=-21.9-9.9,and was zero when ≥c=0.032/s.HIC under sustained load was due to atomic hydrogen,and the threshold stress intensity for HIC decreased linearly with lnC0,i.e.KIH(Mpam1/2)=91.7-10.1 lnC0(ppm).The fracture surface of HIC was dimple if KI was high or/and C0 was low,otherwise it was quasi-cleavage.The boundary line between ductile and brittle fracture surface was KI-54+25exp(-C0/153)=0.``

  7. Measurement of atomic-hydrogen spin-exchange parameters at 0.5 K using a cryogenic hydrogen maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a cryogenic hydrogen maser, suitably modified to have electronic control of both the resonance frequency and the quality factor of the external cavity, we have measured a number of spin-exchange parameters for an atomic-hydrogen (H) gas at a temperature of 0.5 K. These results are relevant to the ultimate achievable frequency stability for cryogenic H masers and, when coupled with accurate calculations of the spin-exchange parameters, serve as a sensitive test of the H-H interatomic potentials. We find evidence for a frequency shift not predicted by semiclassical theories of spin exchange. In the context of a fully quantum mechanical hydrogen-atom spin-exchange theory [B. J. Verhaar et al., Phys. Rev. A 35, 3825 (1987) and J. M. V. A. Koelman et al., Phys. Rev. A 38, 3535 (1988)], this frequency shift is attributed to the influence of hyperfine interactions during spin-exchange collisions. Our findings are generally in agreement with these predictions; however, the sign of the hyperfine-induced frequency shift appears to differ from theory. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  8. Effect of gas-film resistance on hydrogen permeation flux through Pd membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor, palladium diffuser purifies hydrogen isotopes. We have developed the numerical code of hydrogen permeation through palladium alloy membrane in consideration of each elementary reaction step and effect of external gas-film resistance of mass transfer on hydrogen permeation through palladium alloy membrane was quantitatively evaluated using the code. In the absence of external mass transfer resistance, the rate-controlling step of mass transfer through palladium alloy membrane is solid state atomic diffusion in the range of operating temperature and recombinative desorption at low partial pressure side at lower temperature. The temperature for shifting the rate-controlling step from solid state atomic diffusion to recombinative desorption at low partial pressure side becomes higher as the membrane thickness is thinner. The thinner membrane thickness is admittedly preferable for increasing in hydrogen permeation flux. However, the effect of external gas-film resistance of mass transfer on hydrogen permeation flux through palladium alloy membrane should be considered when the membrane thickness is less than 10μm. Especially in case of insufficient hydrogen pressure on high partial pressure side of membrane, hydrogen permeation flux remarkably decreases due to external gas-film resistance. (author)

  9. Photoionization of Rydberg hydrogen atom in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The ionization of Rydberg hydrogen atom in a magnetic field has been studied. • Oscillatory structures appear in the electron probability density distributions. • This study can guide the experimental research on the photoionization microscopy. - Abstract: The ionization of Rydberg hydrogen atom in a magnetic field has been studied on the basis of a semiclassical analysis of photoionization microscopy. The photoionization microscopy interference patterns of the photoelectron probability density distribution on a given detector plane are calculated at different scaled energies. We find that due to the interference effect of different types of electron trajectories arrived at a given point on the detector plane, oscillatory structures appear in the electron probability density distributions. The oscillatory structure of the interference pattern, which contains the spatial component of the electronic wave function, evolves sensitively on the scaled energy, through which we gain a deep understanding on the probability density distribution of the electron wave function. This study provides some reference values for the future experiment research on the photoionization microscopy of the Rydberg atom in the presence of magnetic field

  10. Hydrogen gas storage in fluorinated ultramicroporous tunnel crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Katagiri, Toshimasa

    2012-07-01

    We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder.We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. CCDC 246922. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30940h

  11. The EAGLE simulations: atomic hydrogen associated with galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Crain, Robert A; Lagos, Claudia del P; Rahmati, Alireza; Schaye, Joop; McCarthy, Ian G; Marasco, Antonino; Bower, Richard G; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom; van der Hulst, Thijs

    2016-01-01

    We examine the properties of atomic hydrogen (HI) associated with galaxies in the EAGLE simulations of galaxy formation. EAGLE's feedback parameters were calibrated to reproduce the stellar mass function and galaxy sizes at $z=0.1$, and we assess whether this calibration also yields realistic HI properties. We estimate the self-shielding density with a fitting function calibrated using radiation transport simulations, and correct for molecular hydrogen with empirical or theoretical relations. The `standard-resolution' simulations systematically underestimate HI column densities, leading to an HI deficiency in low-mass ($M_\\star < 10^{10}M_\\odot$) galaxies and poor reproduction of the observed HI mass function. These shortcomings are largely absent from EAGLE simulations featuring a factor of 8 (2) better mass (spatial) resolution, within which the HI mass of galaxies evolves more mildly from $z=1$ to $0$ than in the standard-resolution simulations. The largest-volume simulation reproduces the observed clus...

  12. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen in SiO2/SiN/SiO2 stacks using atom probe tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorinobu Kunimune

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated that it is possible to reproducibly quantify hydrogen concentration in the SiN layer of a SiO2/SiN/SiO2 (ONO stack structure using ultraviolet laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT. The concentration of hydrogen atoms detected using APT increased gradually during the analysis, which could be explained by the effect of hydrogen adsorption from residual gas in the vacuum chamber onto the specimen surface. The amount of adsorbed hydrogen in the SiN layer was estimated by analyzing another SiN layer with an extremely low hydrogen concentration (<0.2 at. %. Thus, by subtracting the concentration of adsorbed hydrogen, the actual hydrogen concentration in the SiN layer was quantified as approximately 1.0 at. %. This result was consistent with that obtained by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA, which confirmed the accuracy of the APT quantification. The present results indicate that APT enables the imaging of the three-dimensional distribution of hydrogen atoms in actual devices at a sub-nanometer scale.

  13. New directions in the theory of spin-polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three chapters of this thesis dealing with collisions between hydrogen (or deuterium) atoms in their ground state, each treat a different development in the theory of atomic hydrogen or deuterium gas. The decay due to interatomic collisions hindered till now all attempts to reach the low temperature, high-density regime where effects due to degeneracy are expected to show up. In ch. 2 a simple way out is presented for the case of Fermi gases: In spin-polarized Fermi systems at very low temperatures collisions are much effective than in Bose systems. For the Fermi gas, consisting of magnetically confined deuterium atoms, it appears that fast spin-exchange collisions automatically lead to a completely spin-polarized gas for which the spin-relaxation limited lifetime increases dramatically with decreasing temperature. As also the ratio of internal thermalization rate over decay rate increases with decreasing temperature, this gas can be cooled by forced evaporation down to very low temperatures. In ch. 3 it iis shown that the nuclear spin dynamics due to the hyperfine interaction during collisions, strongly limits the improvement in frequency stability attainable by H masers operating at low temperatures. In ch. 4 the phenomenon of spin waves is studied. It is shown that, despite the fact that interactions between two atoms are nuclear-spin independent, the outcome of a scattering event does not depend on the nuclear spins involved due to the particle indistinguishability effects at low collision energies. This effect gives rise to quantum phenomena on a macroscopic scale via the occurrence of spin waves. (author). 185 refs.; 34 figs

  14. Hydrogen isotopes separation by gas phase chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas chromatography on a Pd or PdAl2O3 column is commonly used for separation of hydrogen isotopes. This report presents recent related studies conducted in the Department of Chemistry at the Bruyeres-le-Chatel Research Center. They represent a first step in an optimization study of separation process. A simple thermodynamic model based on concentration-dependent separation factors and concentration front velocities is discussed. It allows the prediction of the separation evolution of ternary (H2, D2, T2) mixtures on an initially saturated Pd-Al2O3 column. Pressure-composition-temperature curves for Pd-Al2O3 (H2, D2, T2) systems were measured at temperatures ranging from 295 K to 353 K in order to get data for model validation. Next we performed chromatographic experiments with pure gases and binary (H2, D2) mixtures for different operating conditions (flow rate, temperature, isotope). Calculated values are consistent with experimental results. Finally we present a few applications showing the interest of our model for recovery of T2-rich gas

  15. Steam reforming of sunflower oil for hydrogen gas production

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont V.

    2007-01-01

    Methods of current hydrogen production for the petroleum refinery industry as well as future technologies under research and development in preparation for a global hydrogen-based economy are briefly reviewed. The advantages of biomass and of liquid biofuels, including vegetable oils as fuel sources in the sustainable production of hydrogen gas are then presented. The bulk of this lecture is thereafter concerned with the thermo-chemical means of hydrogen production which are suitable to the c...

  16. Interbasis expansions in a two-dimensional hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the expansion coefficients of parabolic sub-bases of a two-dimensional hydrogen atom over polar subbases are expressed in terms of a generalized hypergeometric function 3F2 at the argument x=1. Exapansions of an elliptic basis over the polar and parabolic ones are studied as well. The limits R → 0 and R → infinity (R is a parameter of the definition of elictic coordinates) are traced in elliptic-basis expansions, and formulas are found for the expansion coefficients of the elliptic basis in terms of the elliptic separation constant

  17. Comments on the Hydrogen Atom Spectrum in the Noncommutative Space

    CERN Document Server

    Chaichian, Masud; Tureanu, A

    2002-01-01

    There has been disagreement in the literature on whether the hydrogen atom spectrum receives any tree-level correction due to noncommutativity. Here we shall clarify the issue and show that indeed a general argument on the structure of proton as a nonelementary particle leads to the appearance of such corrections. As a showcase, we evaluate the corrections in a simple nonrelativistic quark model with a result in agreement with the previous one we had obtained by considering the electron moving in the external electric field of proton. Thus the previously obtained bound on the noncommutativity parameter, $\\theta < (10^4 GeV)^{-2}$, using the Lamb shift data, remains valid.

  18. Relativistic Ionization of Hydrogen Atoms by Positron Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Chahboune

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Relativistic triple differential cross-sections (TDCS for ionization of hydrogen atoms by positron impact have been calculated in the symmetric coplanar geometry. We have used Dirac wave functions to describe free electron’s and positron’s sates. The relativistic formalism is examined by taking the non relativistic limit. Present results are compared with those for the corresponding electron-impact case. In the first Born approximation, we found that the TDCS for positron impact ionization exceeds that for electron impact for all energies in accordance with the result obtained by several other theories.

  19. Process and device for separating hydrogen from a gas mixture by diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the invention, a process and a device are introduced, by which hydrogen can be effectively separated from gas mixtures, even if the hydrogen is only present in very small amounts and may be present in the form of a chemical compound. This is achieved by the hydrogen present in molecular and/or chemically bound form in the gas space of a chamber which can be closed on all sides, which is separated from a second chamber, which can also be closed on all sides, by a wall which is selectively permeable to hydrogen, being converted by contact dissociation, luminous current discharge, high frequency discharge, ionising radiation or in an arc into atomic hydrogen, and where the hydrogen is collected in the second chamber after permeation through the permeable wall restoring it to molecular hydrogen. By means of this procedure, the hydrogen diffusion is vastly improved (by several orders of magnitude) and becomes practically independent of any hydrogen pressure differences on both sides of the membrane, so that, without any mechanical moving parts, which would introduce (oil) contamination and sealing problems, a considerable compression of the separated hydrogen is achieved compared to its partial pressure in the initial mixture, where, for example pressures of up to 20 bar can be achieved in the separated gaseous hydrogen isotope mixture, and even if the partial pressure of the hydrogen in the gas mixture is only about 10-1 millibar. Diffusion separation is carried on for such a pressure increase until the required pressure is reached behind the wall permeable to hydrogen. (orig./MM)

  20. Endohedrally confined hydrogen atom with a moving nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Randazzo, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    We studied the hydrogen atom as a system of two quantum particles in different confinement conditions; a spherical-impenetrable-wall cavity and a fullerene molecule cage. The motion is referred to the center of spherical cavities, and the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation solved by means of a Generalized Sturmian Function expansion in spherical coordinates. The solutions present different properties from the ones described by the many models in the literature, where the proton is fixed in space and only the electron is considered as a quantum particle. Our results show that the position of the proton (i.e. the center of mas of the H atom) is very sensitive to the confinement condition, and could vary substantially from one state to another, from being sharply centered to being localized outside the fullerene molecule. Interchange of the localization characteristics between the states when varying the strength of the fullerene cage and mass occurred through crossing phenomena.

  1. The photon scattering cross-sections of atomic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Grunefeld, Swaantje J; Cheng, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    We present a unified view of the frequency dependence of the various scattering processes involved when a neutral hydrogen atom interacts with a monochromatic, linearly-polarized photon. A computational approach is employed of the atom trapped by a finite-sized-box due to a finite basis-set expansion, which generates a set of transition matrix elements between $E0$ pseudostates. We introduce a general computational methodology that enables the computation of the frequency-dependent dipole transition polarizability with one real and two different imaginary contributions. These dipole transition polarizabilities are related to the cross-sections of one-photon photoionization, Rayleigh, Raman, and Compton scattering. Our numerical calculations reveal individual Raman scattering cross-sections above threshold that can rapidly vanish and revive. Furthermore, our numerical Compton cross-sections do not overtly suffer from the infra-red divergence problem, and are three orders-of-magnitude higher than previous analy...

  2. Stiff Stability of the Hydrogen atom in dissipative Fokker electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, J

    2005-01-01

    We introduce an ad-hoc electrodynamics with advanced and retarded Lienard-Wiechert interactions plus the dissipative Lorentz-Dirac self-interaction force. We study the covariant dynamical system of the electromagnetic two-body problem, i.e., the hydrogen atom. We perform the linear stability analysis of circular orbits for oscillations perpendicular to the orbital plane. In particular we study the normal modes of the linearized dynamics that have an arbitrarily large imaginary eigenvalue. These large eigenvalues are fast frequencies that introduce a fast (stiff) timescale into the dynamics. As an application, we study the phenomenon of resonant dissipation, i.e., a motion where both particles recoil together in a drifting circular orbit (a bound state), while the atom dissipates center-of-mass energy only. This balancing of the stiff dynamics is established by the existence of a quartic resonant constant that locks the dynamics to the neighborhood of the recoiling circular orbit. The resonance condition quant...

  3. Hydrogen atom in 2s state in a laser field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučić Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogen atom in the 2s state exposed to a linearly polarized laser field is studied by using the non-perturbative non-Hermitian Floquet theory. The electronic density of the quasi-energy H(2s state versus the electron coordinate is analyzed. We conclude that the decay of an atom in a low-intensity non-resonant laser field occurs from the asymptotically distant part of the initial state. On the other hand, the process of electron emission in a resonant laser field is governed by the excited-bound-statepart of the resonance wave function. With an increase in the intensity and by increasing the degree of excitation of the initial state not too high, the electron is ionized at smaller distances from the nucleus. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 171020

  4. Ionization of hydrogen atoms by circularly polarized microwaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebarowski, R.; Zakrzewski, J. (Instytut Fizyki Uniwersytetu Jagiellonskiego, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland) Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, T12, E1, 4 place Jussieu, 75272 Paris Cedex 05 (France))

    1995-02-01

    Ionization of hydrogen Rydberg atoms by [ital circularly] polarized microwaves is studied numerically within the framework of classical mechanics. Both the simplified two-dimensional model (in which the plane of polarization coincides with the orbit plane) and a fully three-dimensional system are considered. It is shown that the ionization proceeds in the diffusive manner for all microwave frequencies except the low-frequency limit. The threshold for diffusive excitation as well as the diffusion speed is strongly dependent on the initial state of the system for smooth pulse excitation. In a high-frequency limit the ionization threshold rises sharply---the atom is much more resistant to the excitation. Two distinct regimes of stabilization windows (regions where the ionization decreases with increasing field amplitude), one in the strong short-laser-pulse domain and the other in the weak microwave domain, are identified and discussed.

  5. The distribution of atomic hydrogen in EAGLE galaxies: morphologies, profiles, and HI holes

    CERN Document Server

    Bahe, Yannick M; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Bower, Richard G; Schaye, Joop; Furlong, Michelle; Lagos, Claudia; Schaller, Matthieu; Trayford, James W; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Theuns, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We compare the mass and internal distribution of atomic hydrogen (HI) in 2200 present-day central galaxies with M_star > 10^10 M_Sun from the 100 Mpc EAGLE Reference simulation to observational data. Atomic hydrogen fractions are corrected for self-shielding using a fitting formula from radiative transfer simulations and for the presence of molecular hydrogen using an empirical or a theoretical prescription from the literature. The resulting neutral hydrogen fractions, M_(HI+H2)/M_star, agree with observations to better than 0.1 dex for galaxies with M_star between 10^10 and 10^11 M_Sun. Our fiducial, empirical H2 model based on gas pressure results in galactic HI mass fractions, M_HI/M_star, that agree with observations from the GASS survey to better than 0.3 dex, but the alternative theoretical H2 formula leads to a negative offset in M_HI/M_star of up to 0.5 dex. Visual inspection reveals that most HI disks in simulated HI-rich galaxies are vertically disturbed, plausibly due to recent accretion events. Ma...

  6. Coherent Atom Optics with fast metastable rare gas atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grucker, J.; Baudon, J.; Karam, J.-C.; Perales, F.; Bocvarski, V.; Vassilev, G.; Ducloy, M.

    2006-12-01

    Coherent atom optics experiments making use of an ultra-narrow beam of fast metastable atoms generated by metastability exchange are reported. The transverse coherence of the beam (coherence radius of 1.7 μm for He*, 1.2 μm for Ne*, 0.87 μm for Ar*) is demonstrated via the atomic diffraction by a non-magnetic 2μm-period reflection grating. The combination of the non-scalar van der Waals (vdW) interaction with the Zeeman interaction generated by a static magnetic field gives rise to "vdW-Zeeman" transitions among Zeeman sub-levels. Exo-energetic transitions of this type are observed with Ne*(3P2) atoms traversing a copper micro-slit grating. They can be used as a tunable beam splitter in an inelastic Fresnel bi-prism atom interferometer.

  7. Ionization of atomic hydrogen by 30 1000 keV antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, H.; Mikkelsen, U.; Paludan, K. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Kirsebom, K.; Moller, S.P.; Uggerhoj, E. [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Slevin, J. [Department of Experimental Physics, St. Patrick`s College, Maynooth (Ireland); Charlton, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Morenzoni, E. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH-4234 (Switzerland)

    1995-06-05

    Ionization in collisions between antiprotons and atomic hydrogen is perhaps the least complicated and most fundamental process that can be treated by atomic-collision theory. We present measurements of the ionization cross section for 30--1000 keV antiprotons colliding with atomic hydrogen.

  8. Hydrogen monitoring in sodium loops using the carrier gas technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis for hydrogen in liquid sodium is made by combination of membranes permeable to hydrogen and appropriate methods of hydrogen detection. Membranes are usually made of nickel. Hydrogen has been determined with a solid electrolyte cell consisting of a galvanic cell with zirconium oxide ceramic as the electrolyte and of an electrolytic oxygen dosage device with the same electrolyte. The oxygen stream has been controlled with the aid of the signal of the galvanic cell. Thus, a continuous coulometric control of hydrogen in the carrier gas stream has been achieved. A significant interfering factor in applying the carrier gas technique is the possible coverage of the nickel surface of the diffusion cell with oxide. High purity of the carrier gas is necessary for eliminating this effect, especially in the case of low hydrogen content of sodium. (author)

  9. Degenerate atom-molecule mixture in a cold Fermi gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the atom-molecule mixture formed in a degenerate atomic Fermi gas with interspecies repulsion near a Feshbach resonance constitutes a peculiar system where the atomic component is almost nondegenerate but quantum degeneracy of molecules is important. We develop a thermodynamic approach for studying this mixture, explain experimental observations, and predict optimal conditions for achieving molecular Bose-Einstein condensation

  10. Degenerate Atom-Molecule Mixture in a Cold Fermi Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.; Salomon, R.

    2004-01-01

    We show that the atom-molecule mixture formed in a degenerate atomic Fermi gas with interspecies repulsion near a Feshbach resonance, constitutes a peculiar system where the atomic component is almost non-degenerate but quantum degeneracy of molecules is important. We develop a thermodynamic approach for studying this mixture, explain experimental observations and predict optimal conditions for achieving molecular BEC.

  11. Development Of A Centrifugal Hydrogen Pipeline Gas Compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Bella, Francis A. [Concepts NREC, White River Junction, VY (United States)

    2015-04-16

    Concepts NREC (CN) has completed a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project to analyze, design, and fabricate a pipeline capacity hydrogen compressor. The pipeline compressor is a critical component in the DOE strategy to provide sufficient quantities of hydrogen to support the expected shift in transportation fuels from liquid and natural gas to hydrogen. The hydrogen would be generated by renewable energy (solar, wind, and perhaps even tidal or ocean), and would be electrolyzed from water. The hydrogen would then be transported to the population centers in the U.S., where fuel-cell vehicles are expected to become popular and necessary to relieve dependency on fossil fuels. The specifications for the required pipeline hydrogen compressor indicates a need for a small package that is efficient, less costly, and more reliable than what is available in the form of a multi-cylinder, reciprocating (positive displacement) compressor for compressing hydrogen in the gas industry.

  12. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-06-01

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  13. Test of the quantumness of atom-atom correlations in a bosonic gas

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, D.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown how the quantumness of atom-atom correlations in a trapped bosonic gas can be made observable. Application of continuous feedback control of the center of mass of the atomic cloud is shown to generate oscillations of the spatial extension of the cloud, whose amplitude can be directly used as a characterization of atom-atom correlations. Feedback parameters can be chosen such that the violation of a Schwarz inequality for atom-atom correlations can be tested at noise levels much hi...

  14. Y(sl(2)) Algebra Application in Extended Hydrogen Atom and Monopole Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Li-Jun; ZHANG Hong-Biao; JIN Shuo; XUE Kang

    2004-01-01

    We present the extended hydrogen atom and monopole-hydrogen atom theory through generalizing the usual hydrogen atom model and with a monopole model respectively, in which Y (sl(2) ) algebras are realized. We derive the Hamiltonians of the two models based on the Y(sl(2) ) and the generalized Pauli equation. The energy spectra of the systems are also given in terms of Yangian algebra and quantum mechanics.

  15. Fate of accidental symmetries of the relativistic hydrogen atom in a spherical cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Hashimi, M. H.; Shalaby, A. M.; Wiese, U. -J.

    2015-01-01

    The non-relativistic hydrogen atom enjoys an accidental $SO(4)$ symmetry, that enlarges the rotational $SO(3)$ symmetry, by extending the angular momentum algebra with the Runge-Lenz vector. In the relativistic hydrogen atom the accidental symmetry is partially lifted. Due to the Johnson-Lippmann operator, which commutes with the Dirac Hamiltonian, some degeneracy remains. When the non-relativistic hydrogen atom is put in a spherical cavity of radius $R$ with perfectly reflecting Robin bounda...

  16. The HERMES Polarized Hydrogen and Deuterium Gas Target in the HERA Electron Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Ammosov, V V; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Baturin, V; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V V; Capitani, G P; Chiang, H C; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E G; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G M; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Ely, J; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Felawka, L; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Gärber, Y; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Garutti, E; Gaskell, D; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Greeniaus, L G; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Königsmann, K C; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V A; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Lindemann, T; Lipka, K; Lorenzon, W; Lü, J; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaev, M A; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Orlandi, G; Pickert, N; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Yu I; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Schwind, A; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shanidze, R G; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V B; Simani, M C; Sinram, K; Stancari, M D; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Tkabladze, A V; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Vogel, C; Vogt, M; Volmer, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Ybeles-Smit, G V; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zohrabyan, H G; Zupranski, P

    2004-01-01

    The HERMES hydrogen and deuterium nuclear-polarized gas targets have been in use since 1996 with the polarized electron beam of HERA at DESY to study the spin structure of the nucleon. Polarized atoms from a Stern-Gerlach Atomic Beam Source are injected into a storage cell internal to the HERA electron ring. Atoms diffusing from the center of the storage cell into a side tube are analyzed to determine the atomic fraction and the atomic polarizations. The atoms have a nuclear polarization, the axis of which is defined by an external magnetic holding field. The holding field was longitudinal during 1996-2000, and was changed to transverse in 2001. The design of the target is described, the method for analyzing the target polarization is outlined, and the performance of the target in the various running periods is presented.

  17. Hydrogen atom position in hydrated iodide anion from x-ray absorption near edge structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen atom position in the hydrated iodide anion complex is determined from X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) of an aqueous iodide solution at both the K- and L-edges. The spectra are compared with the theoretical ones calculated by using the FEFF method for several model geometries having hydrogen atoms at different positions. Satisfactory agreements are obtained from models with an almost linear alignment of iodine-hydrogen-oxygen atoms, indicating the capability of the XANES analysis when it is combined with the multiple scattering calculations as a method to detect the positions of hydrogen atoms in the first coordination sphere. (author)

  18. Ab initio investigation of the adsorption of atomic and molecular hydrogen on AlN nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The adsorption characteristics of hydrogen inside the zigzag and armchair AlN nanotubes are explored. • The AlN nanotubes can store hydrogen up to 8.89 wt% with the average binding energies of 0.2–0.4 eV/H-2. - Abstract: The adsorption of atomic and molecular hydrogen on zigzag and armchair AlN nanotubes is investigated within the ab initio density functional theory. The adsorption configurations are magnetic when the H atom is adsorbed on the Al atom and the center of a hexagon. The total magnetic moment is 1.00 μB which comes from the H atom and the nearest neighbor N atoms. The barrier height of various adsorption configurations is very low, indicating that the adsorbed H atom can easily transform into other forms. The adsorption energies of hydrogen atoms to the zigzag and armchair AlN nanotubes are calculated at 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%, 133%, and 200% coverages, the most favorable adsorption configurations are 100% hydrogen coverages. The adsorption configuration of hydrogen molecule adsorbed on the Al atom is the most energetically favorable. Each Al atom is capable of binding one hydrogen molecule, corresponding to the hydrogen gravimetric density to 8.89 wt%. Our theoretical study demonstrates that AlN nanotube can be a potential candidate for the hydrogen storage materials

  19. Adsorption process to recover hydrogen from feed gas mixtures having low hydrogen concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Weist, Jr., Edward Landis; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Novosat, Paul Anthony

    2010-04-13

    A process for selectively separating hydrogen from at least one more strongly adsorbable component in a plurality of adsorption beds to produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from a low hydrogen concentration feed with a high recovery rate. Each of the plurality of adsorption beds subjected to a repetitive cycle. The process comprises an adsorption step for producing the hydrogen-rich product from a feed gas mixture comprising 5% to 50% hydrogen, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas withdrawal steps, a provide purge step resulting in a first pressure decrease, a blowdown step resulting in a second pressure decrease, a purge step, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas introduction steps, and a repressurization step. The second pressure decrease is at least 2 times greater than the first pressure decrease.

  20. Gas lasers applied atomic collision physics, v.3

    CERN Document Server

    McDaniel, E W

    1982-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 3: Gas Lasers describes the applications of atomic collision physics in the development of many types of gas lasers. Topics covered range from negative ion formation in gas lasers to high-pressure ion kinetics and relaxation of molecules exchanging vibrational energy. Ion-ion recombination in high-pressure plasmas is also discussed, along with electron-ion recombination in gas lasers and collision processes in chemical lasers.Comprised of 14 chapters, this volume begins with a historical summary of gas laser developments and an overview of the basic ope

  1. Matrix effect on hydrogen-atom tunneling of organic molecules in cryogenic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the tunneling of atoms through potential energy barriers separating the reactant and reaction systems is not paid much attention in organic reactions, this plays an important role in reactions including the transfer of light atoms. Atomic tunneling is especially important for chemical reactions at low temperatures, since the thermal activation of reactant systems is very slow process in comparison with the tunneling. One of the typical reactions of atomic tunneling is hydrogen-atom abstraction from alkanes in cryogenic solids exposed to high-energy radiation. Irradiation of alkane molecules causes the homolytic cleavage of C-H bonds, which results in the pairwise formation of free hydrogen atoms and organic free radicals. Since the activation energies for the abstraction of hydrogen atoms from alkane molecules by free hydrogen atoms are higher than 5 kcal/mol, the lifetime of free hydrogen atoms at 77 K is estimated from the Arrhenius equation of k=vexp(-Ea/RT) to be longer than 10 hrs. However, except for solid methane, free hydrogen atoms immediately convert to alkyl radicals even at 4.2 K by hydrogen-atom tunneling from alkane molecules to the free hydrogen atoms. The rate of hydrogen atom tunneling does not necessary increase with decreasing activation energy or the peak height of the potential energy barrier preventing the tunneling. Although the activation energy is the lowest at the tertiary carbon of alkanes, hydrogen atom tunneling from branched alkanes with tertiary carbon at the antepenultimate position of the carbon skeleton is the fastest at the secondary penultimate carbon. Based on our experimental results, we have proposed that the peculiarity of the hydrogen-atom abstraction in cryogenic solids comes from the steric hindrance by matrix molecules to the deformation of alkane molecules from the initial sp3 to the final sp2 configurations. The steric hindrance causes the increase of the height of the potential energy barrier for the tunneling

  2. Interaction of rare gas metastable atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical and chemical properties of metastable rare gas atoms are discussed and summarized. This is followed by a detailed examination of the various possible pathways whereby the metastable's excess electronic energy can be dissipated. The phenomenon of chemi-ionization is given special emphasis, and a theoretical treatment based on the use of complex (optical) potential is presented. This is followed by a discussion on the unique advantages offered by elastic differential cross section measurements in the apprehension of the fundamental forces governing the ionization process. The methodology generally adopted to extract information about the interaction potential for scattering data is also systematically outlined. Two widely studied chemi-ionization systems are then closely examined in the light of accurate differential cross section measurements obtained in this work. The first system is He(23S) + Ar for which one can obtain an interaction potential which is in good harmony with the experimental results of other investigators. The validity of using the first-order semiclassical approximation for the phase shifts calculation in the presence of significant opacities is also discussed. The second reaction studied is He*+D2 for which measurements were made on both spin states of the metastable helium. A self-consistent interaction potential is obtained for the triplet system, and reasons are given for not being able to do likewise for the singlet system. The anomalous hump proposed by a number of laboratories is analyzed. Total elastic and ionization cross sections as well as rate constants are calculated for the triplet case. Good agreement with experimental data is found. Finally, the construction and operation of a high power repetitively pulsed nitrogen laser pumped dye laser system is described in great details. Details for the construction and operation of a flashlamp pumped dye laser are likewise given

  3. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.W.; Bell, C.M.; Chow, P.; Louie, J.; Mohr, J.M.; Peinemann, K.V.; Pinnau, I.; Wijmans, J.G.; Gottschlich, D.E.; Roberts, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    The production of hydrogen from synthesis gas made by gasification of coal is expensive. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the total process. In this report we describe the results of a program aimed at the development of membranes and membrane modules for the separation and purification of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The performance properties of the developed membranes were used in an economic evaluation of membrane gas separation systems in the coal gasification process. Membranes tested were polyetherimide and a polyamide copolymer. The work began with an examination of the chemical separations required to produce hydrogen from synthesis gas, identification of three specific separations where membranes might be applicable. A range of membrane fabrication techniques and module configurations were investigated to optimize the separation properties of the membrane materials. Parametric data obtained were used to develop the economic comparison of processes incorporating membranes with a base-case system without membranes. The computer calculations for the economic analysis were designed and executed. Finally, we briefly investigated alternative methods of performing the three separations in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The three potential opportunities for membranes in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas are: (1) separation of hydrogen from nitrogen as the final separation in a air-blown or oxygen-enriched air-blown gasification process, (2) separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide to reduce or eliminate the conventional ethanolamine acid gas removal unit, and (3) separation of hydrogen and/or carbon dioxide form carbon monoxide prior to the shift reactor to influence the shift reaction. 28 refs., 54 figs., 40 tabs.

  4. Process for the production of hydrogen/deuterium-containing gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for the production of hydrogen/deuterium-containing gas is described in which the enriched condensate obtained from the production of a hydrogen/deuterium-containing gas mixture is collected and subjected to a direct exchange of isotopes with the feedsteam admitted to the process. Such condensate can be brought into direct exchange of isotopes with the gas water vapor mixture within the process, viz. ahead of the CO conversion section. The exchange of isotopes may be performed according to the counter-current principle. If it is intended to maintain in the hydrogen/deuterium-containing gas a certain definite content of water vapor whose phase condition is superior to the condition achieved when using normal cooling water, this gas, at least 0.6 kg/m3 of gas, is subjected to an exchange of isotopes with the water fed additionally into the process

  5. Atomic and molecular hydrogen from Titan in the Kronian magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eviatar, Aharon; Podolak, Morris; Richardson, John D.

    1990-01-01

    The question of the neutral gas and plasma population in the region of the Kronian magnetosphere, outside the plasma mantle and inside the magnetopause, dominated by the efflux of Titan's atmosphere is considered. A model that has been used successfully to describe the inner magnetosphere is applied to this region under constraints derived from the plasma science and ultraviolet spectrometer experiments on Voyager. It is shown that it is not possible to reconcile the results of these two experiments simultaneously with the values of the atomic and molecular source strengths of the atmosphere of Titan extant in the literature. The possible sources of the discrepancy are delineated.

  6. Resonance structure in elastic scattering of electrons from atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, C.D.; King, G.C.; Hammond, P.; Slevin, J.

    1986-10-28

    High-energy-resolution spectra of electrons scattered elastically from atomic hydrogen have been obtained for incident electron energies of 9.2-10.4 eV and at angles of 33/sup 0/, 54/sup 0/, 70/sup 0/ and 90/sup 0/. The energy spread of the incident electron beam is estimated to be typically 25 meV FWHM. In addition to the /sup 1/S and /sup 3/P resonances which have been reported in earlier studies, a /sup 1/D resonance can be clearly seen and there is some evidence of a resonance state at a higher energy, probably corresponding to a /sup 1/S resonance state. The energies and resonance widths of all these features have been determined.

  7. Inelastic cross sections for positron scattering from atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positronium formation (Ps) cross sections for positrons impinging on atomic hydrogen were measured in the impact energy range from 13eV to 255eV at the High Intensity Positron (HIP) beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Ps-formation cross section was found to rise rapidly from the threshold at 6.8eV to a maximum value of (2.98 ± 0.18) x 10-16 cm2 for ∼ 15eV positrons. By 75eV it drops below the detection limit of 0.17 x 10-16 cm2 which is the present level of statistical uncertainty. The experiment was modified to enable the measurement of doubly differential scattering cross sections

  8. Resonance structure in elastic scattering of electrons from atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-energy-resolution spectra of electrons scattered elastically from atomic hydrogen have been obtained for incident electron energies of 9.2-10.4 eV and at angles of 330, 540, 700 and 900. The energy spread of the incident electron beam is estimated to be typically 25 meV FWHM. In addition to the 1S and 3P resonances which have been reported in earlier studies, a 1D resonance can be clearly seen and there is some evidence of a resonance state at a higher energy, probably corresponding to a 1S resonance state. The energies and resonance widths of all these features have been determined. (author)

  9. Inelastic cross sections for positron scattering from atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M.; Hofmann, A.; Raith, W.; Sperber, W. [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Jacobsen, F.; Lynn, K.G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Positronium formation (Ps) cross sections for positrons impinging on atomic hydrogen were measured in the impact energy range from 13eV to 255eV at the High Intensity Positron (HIP) beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Ps-formation cross section was found to rise rapidly from the threshold at 6.8eV to a maximum value of (2.98 {plus_minus} 0.18) {times} 10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2} for {approx} 15eV positrons. By 75eV it drops below the detection limit of 0.17 {times} 10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2} which is the present level of statistical uncertainty. The experiment was modified to enable the measurement of doubly differential scattering cross sections.

  10. On the energy levels of the hydrogen atom

    CERN Document Server

    Fewster, C J

    1993-01-01

    We re-examine the justification for the imposition of regular boundary conditions on the wavefunction at the Coulomb singularity in the treatment of the hydrogen atom in non-relativistic quantum mechanics. We show that the issue of the correct boundary conditions is not independent of the physical structure of the proton. Under the physically reasonable assumption that the finite size and structure of the proton can be represented as a positive correction to the Coulomb potential, we give a justification for the regular boundary condition, which, in contrast to the usual treatments, is physically motivated and mathematically rigorous. We also describe how irregular boundary conditions can be used to model non-positive corrections to the Coulomb potential.

  11. Dirac equation in very special relativity for hydrogen atom

    CERN Document Server

    Maluf, R V; Cruz, W T; Almeida, C A S

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we study the modified Dirac equation in the framework of very special relativity (VSR). The low-energy regime is accessed and the nonrelativistic Hamiltonian is obtained. It turns out that this Hamiltonian is similar to that achieved from the Standard Model Extension (SME) via coupling of the spinor field to a Lorentz-violating term, but new features arise inherited from the non-local character of the VSR. In addition, the implications of the VSR-modified Lorentz symmetry on the spectrum of a hydrogen atom is determined by calculating the first-order energy corrections in the context of standard quantum mechanics. Among the results, we highlight that the modified Hamiltonian provides non-vanishing corrections which lift the degeneracy of the energy levels and allow us to find an upper bound upon the VSR-parameter.

  12. Dirac equation in very special relativity for hydrogen atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maluf, R.V., E-mail: r.v.maluf@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC), Departamento de Física, Campus do Pici, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Silva, J.E.G., E-mail: euclides@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC), Departamento de Física, Campus do Pici, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Cruz, W.T., E-mail: wilamicruz@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Ceará (IFCE), Campus Juazeiro do Norte, 63040-000 Juazeiro do Norte, Ceará (Brazil); Almeida, C.A.S., E-mail: carlos@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC), Departamento de Física, Campus do Pici, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil)

    2014-11-10

    In this work, we study the modified Dirac equation in the framework of very special relativity (VSR). The low-energy regime is accessed and the nonrelativistic Hamiltonian is obtained. It turns out that this Hamiltonian is similar to that achieved from the Standard Model Extension (SME) via coupling of the spinor field to a Lorentz-violating term, but new features arise inherited from the non-local character of the VSR. In addition, the implications of the VSR-modified Lorentz symmetry on the spectrum of a hydrogen atom are determined by calculating the first-order energy corrections in the context of standard quantum mechanics. Among the results, we highlight that the modified Hamiltonian provides non-vanishing corrections which lift the degeneracy of the energy levels and allow us to find an upper bound upon the VSR-parameter.

  13. Phase Space Structures Explain Hydrogen Atom Roaming in Formaldehyde Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauguière, Frédéric A L; Collins, Peter; Kramer, Zeb C; Carpenter, Barry K; Ezra, Gregory S; Farantos, Stavros C; Wiggins, Stephen

    2015-10-15

    We re-examine the prototypical roaming reaction--hydrogen atom roaming in formaldehyde decomposition--from a phase space perspective. Specifically, we address the question "why do trajectories roam, rather than dissociate through the radical channel?" We describe and compute the phase space structures that define and control all possible reactive events for this reaction, as well as provide a dynamically exact description of the roaming region in phase space. Using these phase space constructs, we show that in the roaming region, there is an unstable periodic orbit whose stable and unstable manifolds define a conduit that both encompasses all roaming trajectories exiting the formaldehyde well and shepherds them toward the H2···CO well. PMID:26499774

  14. Effects of atomic hydrogen and deuterium exposure on high polarization GaAs photocathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Baylac; P. Adderley; J. Brittian; J. Clark; T. Day; J. Grames; J. Hansknecht; M. Poelker; M. Stutzman; A. T. Wu; A. S. Terekhov

    2005-12-01

    Strained-layer GaAs and strained-superlattice GaAs photocathodes are used at Jefferson Laboratory to create high average current beams of highly spin-polarized electrons. High electron yield, or quantum efficiency (QE), is obtained only when the photocathode surface is atomically clean. For years, exposure to atomic hydrogen or deuterium has been the photocathode cleaning technique employed at Jefferson Laboratory. This work demonstrates that atomic hydrogen cleaning is not necessary when precautions are taken to ensure that clean photocathode material from the vendor is not inadvertently dirtied while samples are prepared for installation inside photoemission guns. Moreover, this work demonstrates that QE and beam polarization can be significantly reduced when clean high-polarization photocathode material is exposed to atomic hydrogen from an rf dissociator-style atomic hydrogen source. Surface analysis provides some insight into the mechanisms that degrade QE and polarization due to atomic hydrogen cleaning.

  15. Seasonal Storage of Hydrogen in a Depleted Natural Gas Reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Mignard, Dimitri; Wilkinson, Mark; Amid, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen storage in a depleted gas reservoir or in an aquifer offers the potential for the seasonal storage of inherently variable renewable energy, by the electrolysis of water during periods of excess energy production. Here we investigate whether such storage is technically feasible. We compared the respective capacities and deliverabilities of hydrogen to established natural gas in a seasonal storage facility, on the basis of an estimated total volumetric capacity of 48MMm3, delivery pres...

  16. Atomic scale simulations of hydrogen implantation defects in hydrogen implanted silicon - smart Cut technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topic of this thesis is related to the implantation step of the SmartCutTM technology. This technology uses hydrogen in order to transfer silicon layers on insulating substrates. The transfer is performed through a fracture induced by the formation of bidimensional defects well known in literature as 'platelets'. More exactly, we have studied within this thesis work the defects appearing in the post implant state and the evolution of the implantation damage towards a state dominated by platelets. The study is organised into two parts: in the first part we present the results obtained by atomic scale simulations while in the second part we present an infrared spectroscopy study of the evolution of defects concentrations after annealing at different temperatures. The atomic scale simulations have been performed within the density functional theory and they allowed us to compute the formation energies and the migration and recombination barriers. The defects included in our study are: the atomic and diatomic interstitials, the hydrogenated vacancies and multi-vacancies and the several platelets models. The obtained energies allowed us to build a stability hierarchy for these types of defects. This scheme has been confronted with some infrared analysis on hydrogen implanted silicon samples (37 keV) in a sub-dose regime which does not allow usually the formation of platelets during the implantation step. The analysis of the infrared data allowed the detailed description of the defects concentration based on the behaviour of peaks corresponding to the respective defects during annealing. The comparison between these evolutions and the energy scheme obtained previously allowed the validation of an evolution scenario of defects towards the platelet state. (author)

  17. Correlation of Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction Efficiencies for Aryl Radicals with their Vertical Electron Affinities and the Vertical Ionization Energies of the Hydrogen Atom Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Jing, Linhong; Nash, John J.; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2008-01-01

    The factors that control the reactivities of aryl radicals toward hydrogen-atom donors were studied by using a dual-cell Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT – ICR). Hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for two substrates, cyclohexane and isopropanol, were measured for twenty-three structurally different, positively-charged aryl radicals, which included dehydrobenzenes, dehydronaphthalenes, dehydropyridines, and dehydro(iso)quinolines. A logarithmic corre...

  18. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  19. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated

  20. Thermo-Gas Dynamics of Hydrogen Combustion and Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfand, Boris E; Medvedev, Sergey P; Khomik, Sergey V

    2012-01-01

    The potential of hydrogen as an important future energy source has generated fresh interest in the study of hydrogenous gas mixtures. Indeed, both its high caloricity and reactivity are unique properties, the latter underscoring safety considerations when handling such mixtures.   The present monograph is devoted to the various aspects of hydrogen combustion and explosion processes. In addition to theoretical and phenomenological considerations, this work also collates the results of many experiments from less well known sources. The text reviews the literature in this respect, thereby providing valuable information about the thermo-gas-dynamical parameters of combustion processes for selected experimental settings in a range of scientific and industrial applications.

  1. Scattering of electronically excited metastable rare gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low energy collisions of metastable rare gas atoms (mostly He) are reviewed. Principles of the experiment are presented as well as data analysis, excimer systems, excitation transfer collisions and Penning systems

  2. Schrodinger Equation Solutions that Lead to the Solution for the Hydrogen Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Paul F.; McGill, K.C.

    2004-01-01

    Two exercises that would provide beginning quantum theory students with an introduction to more advanced quantum mechanical treatments, especially the hydrogen atom are given. The exercises are stepwise in difficulty, leading naturally to the full hydrogen atom development and greatly extend the pedagogy of most multidimensional Cartesian systems…

  3. Photo-Ionization of Hydrogen Atom in a Circularly Polarized Standing Electromagnetic Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang-Tao; ZHANG Qi-Ren; WANG Wan-Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Applying time-independent non-perturbative formalism to the photo-ionization of hydrogen atom immersed in a strong circularly polarized standing electromagnetic wave, we calculate the shift of energy levels and the distortion of wave functions for the hydrogen atom, the ionization cross section induced by the standing wave, and the angular distribution of photoelectrons and obtain some interesting results.

  4. H\\'enon-Heiles Interaction for Hydrogen Atom in Phase Space

    CERN Document Server

    Filho, J S da Cruz; Ulhoa, S C; Khanna, F C; Santana, A E; Vianna, J D M

    2016-01-01

    Using elements of symmetry, as gauge invariance, several aspects of a Schr\\"odinger equation represented in phase-space are introduced and analyzed under physical basis. The Hydrogen atom is explored in the same context. Then we add a H\\'enon-Heiles potential to the Hydrogen atom in order to explore chaotic features.

  5. Visualization of hydrogen gas evolution during deformation and fracture in SCM 440 steel with different tempering conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horikawa, Keitaro, E-mail: horikawa@me.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Science and Bioengineering, School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); Ando, Nobuaki; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi [Department of Mechanical Science and Bioengineering, School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); Urushihara, Wataru [Surface Design and Corrosion Research Section, Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel, Ltd., Kobe 651-2271 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We visualize emission sites of hydrogen atoms on the microstructures during deformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen atoms are emitted from slip lines and inclusions when deformed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show the sequence of hydrogen gas evolution during deformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen evolution amount will increase if the steels with high strength are tested. - Abstract: In the present study, the hydrogen gas evolution behavior was investigated in SCM 440 steel by using a hydrogen microprint technique (HMT) and a testing machine equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) in a ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) atmosphere. SCM 440 steels prepared by varying the tempering temperature over the range 200-700 Degree-Sign C were evaluated in order to elucidate the relationship between the hydrogen gas evolution and the tempered microstructures in the deformation. Cathodic hydrogen charging was carried out with a current density of 100 A/m{sup 2} for 1 h at room temperature. For comparison, a tensile specimen was prepared without hydrogen charging. The HMT showed that silver particles, which are indicative of the hydrogen emission sites, were present mainly in the matrix as well as on the slip lines after the deformation. It is believed that the silver particles on the slip lines represent the effect of hydrogen transportation due to mobile dislocations. In addition, accumulation of silver particles around non-metallic inclusions such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was also identified. This tendency was observed for different tempering conditions. From the relationship between the stress-strain curves and the hydrogen evolution, determined by using QMS under a UHV atmosphere, it was found that the hydrogen gas evolution behavior varied with the deformation stage.

  6. Hydrogen Gas Sensors Based on Semiconductor Oxide Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming Hu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the hydrogen gas sensing properties of semiconductor oxide (SMO nanostructures have been widely investigated. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the research progress in the last five years concerning hydrogen gas sensors based on SMO thin film and one-dimensional (1D nanostructures. The hydrogen sensing mechanism of SMO nanostructures and some critical issues are discussed. Doping, noble metal-decoration, heterojunctions and size reduction have been investigated and proved to be effective methods for improving the sensing performance of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures. The effect on the hydrogen response of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures of grain boundary and crystal orientation, as well as the sensor architecture, including electrode size and nanojunctions have also been studied. Finally, we also discuss some challenges for the future applications of SMO nanostructured hydrogen sensors.

  7. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective

  8. Investigations of laser pumped gas cell atomic frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, C. H.; Camparo, J. C.; Fueholz, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a rubidium gas cell atomic frequency standard might be improved by replacing the standard rubidium discharge lamp with a single mode laser diode. Aspects of the laser pumped gas cell atomic clock studied include effects due to laser intensity, laser detuning, and the choice of the particular atomic absorption line. Results indicate that the performance of the gas cell clock may be improved by judicious choice of the operating parameters of the laser diode. The laser diode also proved to be a valuable tool in investigating the operation of the conventional gas cell clock. Results concerning linewidths, the light shift effect and the effect of isotopic spin exchange in the conventional gas cell clock are reported.

  9. Toroidal configuration of the orbit of the electron of the hydrogen atom under strong external magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Aringazin, A K

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we overview some results on the hydrogen atom in external static uniform magnetic fields. We focus on the case of very strong magnetic field, B>>B_0=2.3x10^9 Gauss, use various approximate models and, particularly, in the adiabatic approximation have calculated exactly the integral defining the effective potential. This potential appears to be finite at z=0. Our consideration of the problem of highly magnetized atoms and molecules is motivated by the recently developed MagneGas technology by Santilli (http://www.magnegas.com). The ground state electron charge distribution of the hydrogen atom in an intense magnetic field is of a toroidal form, in agreement with that studied by Santilli. This physical picture is at the foundation of the new chemical species of magnecules proposed by Santilli.

  10. Fast automated placement of polar hydrogen atoms in protein-ligand complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lippert Tobias

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrogen bonds play a major role in the stabilization of protein-ligand complexes. The ability of a functional group to form them depends on the position of its hydrogen atoms. An accurate knowledge of the positions of hydrogen atoms in proteins is therefore important to correctly identify hydrogen bonds and their properties. The high mobility of hydrogen atoms introduces several degrees of freedom: Tautomeric states, where a hydrogen atom alters its binding partner, torsional changes where the position of the hydrogen atom is rotated around the last heavy-atom bond in a residue, and protonation states, where the number of hydrogen atoms at a functional group may change. Also, side-chain flips in glutamine and asparagine and histidine residues, which are common crystallographic ambiguities must be identified before structure-based calculations can be conducted. Results We have implemented a method to determine the most probable hydrogen atom positions in a given protein-ligand complex. Optimality of hydrogen bond geometries is determined by an empirical scoring function which is used in molecular docking. This allows to evaluate protein-ligand interactions with an established model. Also, our method allows to resolve common crystallographic ambiguities such as as flipped amide groups and histidine residues. To ensure high speed, we make use of a dynamic programming approach. Conclusion Our results were checked against selected high-resolution structures from an external dataset, for which the positions of the hydrogen atoms have been validated manually. The quality of our results is comparable to that of other programs, with the advantage of being fast enough to be applied on-the-fly for interactive usage or during score evaluation.

  11. Neutral atom and negative hydrogen ion production with a Hall accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Hall accelerator was studied with the objective in mind of injecting its output into a cesium charge exchange cell and producing negative ions. Operation of the high current Hall accelerator resulted in the observation of an ionizational instability. Elimination of this instability is possible in one of two ways. Either the arc current can be decreased to a very low level or an extension can be placed in front of the anode and the arc current increased to such a value that the mean free path for ionization is approximately equal to the separation between this extension and the anode. This latter method preionizes the gas before it enters the accelerating stages. Also by nulling the axial magnetic field between the two stages the source efficiency is greatly increased. High current operation also results in the predominant number of particles ejected from the source being neutral. At 0.1 ms into the pulse the source output consists of 940 +- 340 equivalent amperes of atomic hydrogen neutrals with an average energy of 1000 +- 300 eV and 24 A of protons with an energy of 1300 +- 260 eV. At 1 ms the output decreases to 320 +- 110 equivalent amperes of atomic hydrogen neutrals with an average energy of 590 +- 180 eV and 16 A of protons with an average energy of 870 +- 170 eV. The arc currents and voltages at 0.1 ms and 1 ms are approximately 1 kA at 1700 V and 670 A at 1600 V respectively. Two possible explanations are set forth to describe the large flux of neutral particles observed. One is charge exchange of protons on atomic hydrogen within the source. The other is wall neutralization of the accelerated ions after they are driven to the walls via instabilities and normal trajectories

  12. Molecular Dynamics Study on the Diffusion Properties of Hydrogen Atoms in Bulk Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the diffusion behavior of hydrogen atoms in body-centered cubic(bcc) tungsten(W). The energy distribution of a single hydrogen atom in the (001) plane of tungsten lattice was computed. The values of diffusion barriers agree well with other theoretical and experimental results. The interaction between an H atom and a vacancy was simulated, which shows evidence of strong binding effect. The temperature effect on the diffusion behavior of hydrogen atoms was investigated. The critical temperature for an H atom to diffuse in bulk W with and without vacancies were calculated to be 950 K and 450 K, respectively, which is supported by several experimental results. In addition, the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen atoms in tungsten was evaluated and analyzed

  13. Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, A.; Mann, M.

    2009-02-01

    This paper estimates the quantity of hydrogen that could be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power by county in the United States. The study estimates that more than 72 million tonnes of hydrogen can be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power per year in the country (considering only 30% of their total annual production). The United States consumed about 396 million tonnes of gasoline in 2007; therefore, the report suggests the amount of hydrogen from these sources could displace about 80% of this consumption.

  14. Collisions at thermal energy between metastable hydrogen atoms and hydrogen molecules: total and differential cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilev, G.; Perales, F.; Miniatura, Ch.; Robert, J.; Reinhardt, J.; Vecchiocattivi, F.; Baudon, J.

    1990-06-01

    A metastable hydrogen (deuterium) atom source in which groundstate atoms produced by a RF discharge dissociator are bombarded by electrons, provides a relatively large amount of slow metastable atoms (velocity 3 5 km/s). Total integral cross sections for H*(D*)(2 s) + H2( X 1Σ{g/+}, v=0) collisions have been measured in a wide range of relative velocity (2,5 30 km/s), by using the attenuation method. A significant improvement of accuracy is obtained, with respect to previous measurements, at low relative velocities. Total cross sections for H* and D*, as functions of the relative velocity, are different, especially in the low velocity range. H* + H2 total differential cross sections have also been measured, with an angular spread of 3.6°, for two different collision energy distributions, centered respectively at 100 meV and 390 meV. A first attempt of theoretical analysis of the cross sections, by means of an optical potential, is presented.

  15. Adsorption of hydrogen gas and redox processes in clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess the adsorption properties of hydrogen gas and reactivity of adsorbed hydrogen, we measured H2(g) adsorption on Na synthetic montmorillonite-type clays and Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay-rock using gas chromatography. Synthetic montmorillonites with increasing structural Fe(III) substitution (0 wt %, 3.2 wt %, and 6.4 wt % Fe) were used. Fe in the synthetic montmorillonites is principally present as structural Fe(III) ions. We studied the concomitant reduction of structural Fe(III) in the clays using 57Fe Moessbauer spectrometry. The COx, which mainly contains smectite/illite and calcite minerals, is also studied together with the pure clay fraction of this clay-rock. Experiments were performed with dry clay samples which were reacted with hydrogen gas at 90 and 120 degrees C for 30 to 45 days at a hydrogen partial pressure close to 0.45 bar. Results indicate that up to 0.11 wt % of hydrogen is adsorbed on the clays at 90 degrees C under 0.45 bar of relative pressure. Fe-57 Moessbauer spectrometry shows that up to 6% of the total structural Fe(III) initially present in these synthetic clays is reduced upon adsorption of hydrogen gas. No reduction is observed with the COx sample in the present experimental conditions. (authors)

  16. Optimization of buffer gas pressure for Rb atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang; Liu, Xiaohu; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong

    2015-08-01

    The optimization of buffer gas pressure is very important to improve the performance of the rubidium (Rb) atomic magnetometer. In this paper we briefly introduce the basic principle and the experimental method of the rubidium magnetometer based on Faraday rotation effect, and describe the factors affecting the magnetometer sensitivity, then analyze and summarize the mechanism of the influence of spin-exchange, spin-destruction collisions, radiation trapping and the spin diffusion on spin relaxation of Rb atoms. Based on this, the relationship between the rubidium magnetometer sensitivity, the spin relaxation rate and the gas chamber conditions (buffer gas pressure, the bubble radius, measuring temperature) is established. Doing calculations by the simulation software, how the magnetometer sensitivity and the relaxation rate vary with the gas chamber conditions can be seen; finally, the optimal values of the buffer gas pressure under certain gas chamber conditions are obtained. The work is significant for the engineering development of rubidium magnetometer.

  17. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, N.Z. [Univ. of Central Florida, Cape Canaveral, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    It is universally accepted that in the next few decades hydrogen production will continue to rely on fossil fuels (primarily, natural gas). On the other hand, the conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming) are complex multi-step processes. These processes also result in the emission of large quantities of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere that produce adverse ecological effects. One alternative is the one-step thermocatalytic cracking (TCC) (or decomposition) of natural gas into hydrogen and carbon. Preliminary analysis indicates that the cost of hydrogen produced by thermal decomposition of natural gas is somewhat lower than the conventional processes after by-product carbon credit is taken. In the short term, this process can be used for on-site production of hydrogen-methane mixtures in gas-filling stations and for CO{sub x}-free production of hydrogen for fuel cell driven prime movers. The experimental data on the thermocatalytic cracking of methane over various catalysts and supports in a wide range of temperatures (500-900{degrees}C) are presented in this paper. Two types of reactors were designed and built at FSEC: continuous flow and pulse fix bed catalytic reactors. The temperature dependence of the hydrogen production yield using oxide type catalysts was studied. Alumina-supported Ni- and Fe-catalysts demonstrated relatively high efficiency in the methane cracking reaction at moderate temperatures (600-800{degrees}C). Kinetic curves of hydrogen production over metal and metal oxide catalysts at different temperatures are presented in the paper. Fe-catalyst demonstrated good stability (for several hours), whereas alumina-supported Pt-catalyst rapidly lost its catalytic activity.

  18. Experiments to examine the contribution of gas atoms to void formation in irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of vacuum melting has been employed to demonstrate that residual gases, especially hydrogen, strongly influence void nucleation of copper, copper binary alloys and various Fe-Cr-Ni base alloys during either neutron or electron irradiation. Void nucleation in nickel appears not to be strongly affected by residual gases, however. Solute-free and solute-bearing Fe-Cr-Ni alloys appear to respond differently to differences in gas content. When contamination of specimens with sodium occurs during neutron irradiation, void nucleation in both as-fabricated and vacuum-melted specimens is similar, suggesting that gas atoms re-enter the specimens during irradiation. ((orig.))

  19. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste -- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Stone; Michael Benson; Christopher Orme; Thomas Luther; Eric Peterson

    2005-09-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB, characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds. Carbon may, in the presence of suitable precious metal catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with and bind hydrogen. In the presence of oxygen, the precious metal may also eliminate hydrogen by catalyzing the formation of water. This reaction is called catalytic recombination. DEB has the needed binding rate and capacity for hydrogen that potentially could be generated in the TRUPACT II. Phases 1 and 2 of this project showed that uncoated DEB performed satisfactorily in lab scale tests. Based upon these results, Phase 3, the final project phase, included larger scale testing. Test vessels were scaled to replicate the ratio between void space in the inner containment vessel of a TRUPACT-II container and a payload of seven 55-gallon drums. The tests were run with an atmosphere of air for 63.9 days at ambient temperature (15-27°C) and a scaled hydrogen generation rate of 2.60E-07 moles per second (0.35 cc/min). A second type of getter known as VEI, a proprietary polymer hydrogen getter characterized by carbon-carbon double bonds, was also tested in Phase 3. Hydrogen was successfully “gettered” by both getter systems. Hydrogen concentrations remained below 5 vol% (in

  20. The dynamical properties of a Rydberg hydrogen atom between two parallel metal surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wei; Li Hong-Yun; Yang Shan-Ying; Lin Sheng-Lu

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the dynamical properties of a Rydberg hydrogen atom between two metal surfaces using phase space analysis methods. The dynamical behaviour of the excited hydrogen atom depends sensitively on the atom-surface distance d. There exists a critical atom-surface distance dc = 1586 a.u. When the atom-surface distance d is larger than the critical distance dc, the image charge potential is less important than the Coulomb potential, the system is near-integrable and the electron motion is regular. As the distance d decreases, the system will tend to be non-integrable and unstable, and the electron might be captured by the metal surfaces.

  1. Search for parity non-conservation in the hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A search for parity non-conservation was made in the hydrogen atom by looking for a small admixture of the 2P/sub 1/2/ state in the 2S/sub 1/2/ state. Since the predicted effect due to neutral current interaction is exceedingly small an interference technique was used. The two 2S/sub 1/2/(m;sub J/ = 1/2) → 2S/sub 1/2/(m/sub J/ = -1/2) parity conserving and parity non-conserving amplitudes were driven in two separate microwave cavities. A cylindrical geometry is chosen for the apparatus for a great reduction of the contributions from spurious amplitudes. The difference in the transition rate, when the relative sign of the two amplitudes are changed, is the PNC signal. The apparatus, control system and the different measurement techniques are discussed. The present results are limited by the systematic errors due to the presence of stray electric fields. The observed asymmetry when expressed in terms of C2/sub p/ was found to be equal to 430 +- 500. Possible modifications for further improvement and the feasibility of an experiment in zero magnetic field is discussed in the context of future use of a thermal beam

  2. Atomic mechanism and prediction of hydrogen embrittlement in iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun; Curtin, W A

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement in metals has posed a serious obstacle to designing strong and reliable structural materials for many decades, and predictive physical mechanisms still do not exist. Here, a new H embrittlement mechanism operating at the atomic scale in α-iron is demonstrated. Direct molecular dynamics simulations reveal a ductile-to-brittle transition caused by the suppression of dislocation emission at the crack tip due to aggregation of H, which then permits brittle-cleavage failure followed by slow crack growth. The atomistic embrittlement mechanism is then connected to material states and loading conditions through a kinetic model for H delivery to the crack-tip region. Parameter-free predictions of embrittlement thresholds in Fe-based steels over a range of H concentrations, mechanical loading rates and H diffusion rates are found to be in excellent agreement with experiments. This work provides a mechanistic, predictive framework for interpreting experiments, designing structural components and guiding the design of embrittlement-resistant materials. PMID:23142843

  3. Separation of hydrogen isotopes/helium using gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the hydrogen isotope facility and the fuel cycle of the fusion reactor, an effective means for analyzing hydrogen isotopes and decay product (helium) of tritium is very important from the viewpoint of system operation and control. Chromatographic separation of the hydrogen isotopes/helium mixture was carried out by gas chromatograph at -196 .deg. C for quantitative analytical purpose. Neon and partially deactivated alumina were employed as the carrier gas and the fixed column, respectively. The chromatogram with complete separation was observed in order of He, H2 and D2 by the thermal conductivity detector. In addition, fairly good separation conditions were obtained in a shorter retention time without any appearance of nuclear spin isomers for the practical applications of the hydrogen isotope separation and analysis

  4. Confinement induced binding of noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of Ngn@B12N12 and Ngn@B16N16 systems is assessed through a density functional study and ab initio simulation. Although they are found to be thermodynamically unstable with respect to the dissociation of individual Ng atoms and parent cages, ab initio simulation reveals that except Ne2@B12N12 they are kinetically stable to retain their structures intact throughout the simulation time (500 fs) at 298 K. The Ne2@B12N12 cage dissociates and the Ne atoms get separated as the simulation proceeds at this temperature but at a lower temperature (77 K) it is also found to be kinetically stable. He-He unit undergoes translation, rotation and vibration inside the cavity of B12N12 and B16N16 cages. Electron density analysis shows that the He-He interaction in He2@B16N16 is of closed-shell type whereas for the same in He2@B12N12 there may have some degree of covalent character. In few cases, especially for the heavier Ng atoms, the Ng-N/B bonds are also found to have some degree of covalent character. But the Wiberg bond indices show zero bond order in He-He bond and very low bond order in cases of Ng-N/B bonds. The energy decomposition analysis further shows that the ΔEorb term contributes 40.9% and 37.3% towards the total attraction in the He2 dimers having the same distances as in He2@B12N12 and He2@B16N16, respectively. Therefore, confinement causes some type of orbital interaction between two He atoms, which akins to some degree of covalent character

  5. General model of depolarization and transfer of polarization of singly ionized atoms by collisions with hydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Derouich, Moncef

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of the generation of the atomic polarization is necessary for interpreting the second solar spectrum. For this purpose, it is important to rigorously determine the effects of the isotropic collisions with neutral hydrogen on the atomic polarization of the neutral atoms, ionized atoms and molecules. Our aim is to treat in generality the problem of depolarizing isotropic collisions between singly ionized atoms and neutral hydrogen in its ground state. Using our numerical code, we computed the collisional depolarization rates of the $p$-levels of ions for large number of values of the effective principal quantum number $n^{*}$ and the Uns\\"old energy $E_p$. Then, genetic programming has been utilized to fit the available depolarization rates. As a result, strongly non-linear relationships between the collisional depolarization rates, $n^{*}$ and $E_p$ are obtained, and are shown to reproduce the original data with accuracy clearly better than 10\\%. These relationships allow quick calculations of the ...

  6. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks. A Review of Key Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Antonia, O. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Penev, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipelines. Blending hydrogen into the existing natural gas pipeline network has also been proposed as a means of increasing the output of renewable energy systems such as large wind farms.

  7. Detection of gas atoms via vibration of graphenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of single-layered graphene sheets as mass sensors in detection of noble gases via a vibration analysis of graphenes is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. An index based on frequency shifts of the graphenes attached by the distinct noble gas atoms is defined and examined to measure the sensitivity of the sensors. The dependence of number and location of gas atoms, size of graphene sheets, and type of restrained boundary of the sheets on the sensitivity is particularly studied. The simulation results indicate the resolution of a mass sensor made of a square graphene sheet with a size of 10 nm can achieve an order of 10-6 femtograms and the mass sensitivity can be enhanced with a decrease in sizes of graphenes. -- Highlights: → The potential application of graphenes as sensors in detection of gas atoms is revealed. → A resolution around 10-6 femtograms of gas atoms by graphene sensors is reported. → The sensitivity of the sensors is found to be increased with shorter graphenes with stiffer ends. → The random locations of gas atoms have less effect on the detection effect.

  8. Detection of gas atoms via vibration of graphenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arash, Behrouz [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 5V6 (Canada); Wang, Quan, E-mail: q_wang@umanitoba.ca [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 5V6 (Canada); Duan, Wen Hui [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3168 (Australia)

    2011-06-13

    The application of single-layered graphene sheets as mass sensors in detection of noble gases via a vibration analysis of graphenes is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. An index based on frequency shifts of the graphenes attached by the distinct noble gas atoms is defined and examined to measure the sensitivity of the sensors. The dependence of number and location of gas atoms, size of graphene sheets, and type of restrained boundary of the sheets on the sensitivity is particularly studied. The simulation results indicate the resolution of a mass sensor made of a square graphene sheet with a size of 10 nm can achieve an order of 10{sup -6} femtograms and the mass sensitivity can be enhanced with a decrease in sizes of graphenes. -- Highlights: → The potential application of graphenes as sensors in detection of gas atoms is revealed. → A resolution around 10{sup -6} femtograms of gas atoms by graphene sensors is reported. → The sensitivity of the sensors is found to be increased with shorter graphenes with stiffer ends. → The random locations of gas atoms have less effect on the detection effect.

  9. High-speed cinematography of gas-metal atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, Jason [ALCOA Specialty Metals Division, 100 Technical Drive, Alcoa Center, PA 15069 (United States)]. E-mail: jason.ting@alcoa.com; Connor, Jeffery [Material Science Engineering Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Ridder, Stephen [Metallurgical Processing Group, NIST, 100 Bureau Dr. Stop 8556, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2005-01-15

    A high-speed cinematographic footage of a 304L stainless steel gas atomization, recorded at the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST), was analyzed using a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) algorithm. The analysis showed the gas atomization process possesses two prominent frequency ranges of melt oscillation (pulsation). A low-frequency oscillation in the melt flow occurring between 5.41 and 123 Hz, with a dominant frequency at 9.93 Hz, was seen in the recirculation zone adjacent to the melt orifice. A high-frequency melt oscillation range was observed above 123 Hz, and was more prominent one melt-tip-diameter downstream in the melt atomization image than upstream near the melt tip. This high-frequency range may reflect the melt atomization frequency used to produce finely atomized powder. This range also included a prominent high frequency at 1273 Hz, which dominated in the image further away downstream from the melt tip. This discrete high-frequency oscillation is most probably caused by the aeroacoustic ''screech'' phenomenon, intrasound (<20 kHz), a result of the atomizing gas jets undergoing flow resonance. It is hypothesized that this discrete intrinsic aeroacoustic tone may enhance melt breakup in the atomization process with evidence of this fact in the melt images.

  10. Hydrogen Gas as a Fuel in Direct Injection Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekaran, Chinnathambi; Mohankumar, Gabriael

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen is expected to be one of the most important fuels in the near future for solving the problem caused by the greenhouse gases, for protecting environment and saving conventional fuels. In this study, a dual fuel engine of hydrogen and diesel was investigated. Hydrogen was conceded through the intake port, and simultaneously air and diesel was pervaded into the cylinder. Using electronic gas injector and electronic control unit, the injection timing and duration varied. In this investigation, a single cylinder, KIRLOSKAR AV1, DI Diesel engine was used. Hydrogen injection timing was fixed at TDC and injection duration was timed for 30°, 60°, and 90° crank angles. The injection timing of diesel was fixed at 23° BTDC. When hydrogen is mixed with inlet air, emanation of HC, CO and CO2 decreased without any emission (exhaustion) of smoke while increasing the brake thermal efficiency.

  11. Absolute Doubly Differential Cross Sections for Ejection of Electrons in - and Five-Body Collisions of 20 TO 114-KEV Protons on Atomic and Molecular Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerby, George W., III

    A crossed-beam experiment was performed to detect ejected electrons from ground-state atomic and molecular hydrogen after collisions with 20- to 114-keV protons. Because a pure atomic hydrogen target is not readily attainable, a method has been devised which yields atomic to molecular hydrogen doubly differential cross section (DDCS) ratios. Since the molecular hydrogen DDCS's were independently measured, the atomic cross sections could be directly calculated. Absolute cross sections differential in electron energy and angle were measured for electron energies ranging from 1.5 to 400 eV and scattering angles from 15^circ to 165^circ with respect to the fast beam. Electrons and ions were energy analyzed by an electrostatic hemispherical analyzer, which has an energy resolution of 5% and is rotatable in the scattering plane about the collision center. Atomic hydrogen is produced by a radio-frequency discharge of the type devised by J. Slevin. Hydrogen gas effuses from a 1 mm diameter nozzle in a nearly cos theta distribution. The projectile beam intersects the thermal gas targets 4 mm below the tip of the nozzle. Dissociation fractions of 74% and atomic hydrogen densities of 7 times 10 ^{11} cm^ {-3} were typical. The fraction of dissociated hydrogen was measured by detecting the reduced 9-eV ion signal from the molecular target when the RF is on. This characteristic ion signal originates from the coulomb breakup of the molecule and dissociative channels of excited H _sp{2}{+}. An auxiliary experiment was performed to determine the target densities with the aid of a low-resolution magnetic mass spectrometer after the slow recoil ions were extracted from the collision volume by a weak electric field. Comparisons of the atomic cross sections are made with theories such as the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method, the plane-wave Born approximation (PWBA) and the continuum-distorted-wave eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) approximation.

  12. Combustion gas properties. Part 3: Hydrogen gas fuel and dry air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, J. D.; Jones, R. E.; Mcbride, B. J.; Beyerle, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    A series of computations has been made to produce the equilibrium temperature and gas composition for hydrogen gas fuel and dry air. The computed tables and figures provide combustion gas property data for pressures from 0.5 to 50 atmospheres and equivalence ratios from 0 to 2.0. Only sample tables and figures are provided in this report.

  13. Hydrogen internal friction and interaction of solute atoms in niobium- and vanadium-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer model has been proposed to be used to calculate the internal friction spectrum, caused by the ''diffusion under stress'' of hydrogen atoms in a solid solution with a b.c.c. lattice containing substitutional atoms. The model takes into account the long-range pair interaction of dissolved atoms. It is suggested that such interaction acts on diffusion by producing short-range order of mobile hydrogen atoms and by changing their energy. These changes occur in the tetrahedral (before the jump) as well as in the octahedral (at the saddle point of the diffusion barrier) interstitial sites and, therefore, produce local changes of the hydrogen diffusion activation energy (the activation energy of internal friction). The relaxation strength is calculated from the local fields of atomic displacements around every atom that participates in diffusion. The model has been used to study the nature of hydrogen relaxation in Ti- and Zr-containing Nb- and V-based alloys and to calculate the ''chemical'' interaction energy of the H(D)-Ti(Zr) pairs. It was shown that the hydrogen relaxation mechanism in Nb(V)-Ti(Zr)-H(D) alloys consists in diffusion under stress of hydrogen or deuterium atoms in the vicinity of single substitutional atoms at low concentration of substitutional atoms and high hydrogen or deuterium concentration, and in the vicinity of substitutional pairs - at high concentration of substitutional atoms and low hydrogen or deuterium concentration. The ''chemical'' interaction H(D)-Ti(Zr) in niobium and vanadium is stronger or is of the same order, as the strain-induced (elastic) interaction. (orig.)

  14. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-02-01

    To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. An atomic hydrogen beam to test ASACUSA’s apparatus for antihydrogen spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diermaier, M., E-mail: martin.diermaier@oeaw.ac.at; Caradonna, P.; Kolbinger, B. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics (Austria); Malbrunot, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Massiczek, O.; Sauerzopf, C.; Simon, M. C.; Wolf, M.; Zmeskal, J.; Widmann, E. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    The ASACUSA collaboration aims to measure the ground state hyperfine splitting (GS-HFS) of antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart to atomic hydrogen. Comparisons of the corresponding transitions in those two systems will provide sensitive tests of the CPT symmetry, the combination of the three discrete symmetries charge conjugation, parity, and time reversal. For offline tests of the GS-HFS spectroscopy apparatus we constructed a source of cold polarised atomic hydrogen. In these proceedings we report the successful observation of the hyperfine structure transitions of atomic hydrogen with our apparatus in the earth’s magnetic field.

  16. A theoretical molecular orbital approach to the adsorption and absorption of atomic hydrogen on Ni(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferullo, R.M. (Planta Piloto de Ingenieria Quimica (UNS-CONICET), Bahia Blanca (Argentina)); Castellani, N.J. (Planta Piloto de Ingenieria Quimica (UNS-CONICET), Bahia Blanca (Argentina))

    1993-02-19

    A semiempirical molecular orbital approach to the H-Ni interaction for a hydrogen atom adsorbed on the (111) surface or immersed in the bulk of Ni is given. The results show that the chemisorptive surface sites are more stable than the subsurface interstitials and that the bulk octahedral sites are more stable than the tetrahedral sites, in agreement with earlier models. The repulsive influence on hydrogen atom adsorption due to other hydrogen atoms residing in the nearer subsurface interstitials is also considered and discussed in terms of electronic arguments. (orig.)

  17. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  18. Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Generator Cycle with a Reciprocating Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J C

    2002-06-11

    A four-chamber piston pump is powered by decomposed 85% hydrogen peroxide. The performance envelope of the evolving 400 gram pump has been expanded to 172 cc/s water flow at discharge pressures near 5 MPa. A gas generator cycle system using the pump has been tested under similar conditions of pressure and flow. The powerhead gas is derived from a small fraction of the pumped hydrogen peroxide, and the system starts from tank pressures as low as 0.2 MPa. The effects of steam condensation on performance have been evaluated.

  19. Carrier-envelope phase effects in above-threshold ionization of atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments in ultrafast physics have established the importance of above-threshold ionization (ATI) experiments in measuring and controlling the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of few-cycle laser pulses. We have performed an investigation of atomic hydrogen subjected to intense CEP-stable few-cycle laser pulses. The experimental ATI spectra have been compared to predictions from an ab initio numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in three dimensions. Good agreement between experiment and theory has been achieved without using any free fit parameters. Our results provide an important step towards obtaining calibrated reference data for a direct comparison of ATI electron yields for a range of gas species and experimental conditions. (paper)

  20. Electron capture into the 4s state of atomic hydrogen by H+ impact on noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross sections for electron capture into the 4s state of hydrogen have been measured for 10--150-keV protons incident upon He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The cross-section curves for each gas reach an apparent maximum in this projectile-energy range. The values for Kr and Xe are consistent with an n-3 scaling in previous 3s capture-cross-section measurements in this projectile range. The He, Ne, and Ar values are in excellent agreement with previously reported measurements above 60 keV but give consistently higher values than those measurements at the lower energies. There are no comparable Kr and Xe values in the literature. The shape and magnitude of the excitation functions for these gases indicate that the internal structure of the target atom is an important factor in the charge-transfer process

  1. Changes in the morphology of interstellar ice analogues after hydrogen atom exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Accolla, Mario; Dulieu, François; Manicò, Giulio; Chaabouni, Henda; Matar, Elie; Mokrane, Hakima; Lemaire, Jean Louis; Pirronello, Valerio

    2010-01-01

    The morphology of water ice in the interstellar medium is still an open question. Although accretion of gaseous water could not be the only possible origin of the observed icy mantles covering dust grains in cold molecular clouds, it is well known that water accreted from the gas phase on surfaces kept at 10 K forms ice films that exhibit a very high porosity. It is also known that in the dark clouds H2 formation occurs on the icy surface of dust grains and that part of the energy (4.48 eV) released when adsorbed atoms react to form H2 is deposited in the ice. The experimental study described in the present work focuses on how relevant changes of the ice morphology result from atomic hydrogen exposure and subsequent recombination. Using the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique and a method of inversion analysis of TPD spectra, we show that there is an exponential decrease in the porosity of the amorphous water ice sample following D-atom irradiation. This decrease is inversely proportional to the...

  2. Simulation of powder metal fabrication with high pressure gas atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, D.W.; Payne, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    A computational/analytical technique has been developed which models the physics of high pressure gas atomization. The technique uses an uncoupled approach, such that the gas flowfield is initially calculated with a commercially-available Navier-Stokes code. The liquid metal droplet breakup, dynamics, and thermodynamics, are then calculated using the pre-computed flowfield by a separate computer program written by the authors. The atomization code models the primary breakup of the liquid metal stream, tracks the droplets resulting from primary breakup through the flowfield until they undergo secondary breakup, and then tracks the subdroplets until they breakup, solidify, or leave the flowfield region of interest. The statistical properties of the metal powder produced are then computed from the characteristics of these droplets. Comparisons between experimental measurements and computations indicate that the Navier-Stokes code is predicting the gas flowfield well, and that the atomization code is properly modeling the physics of the droplet dynamics and breakup.

  3. Non-LTE Balmer line formation in late-type spectra: Effects of atomic processes involving hydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Barklem, P S

    2007-01-01

    (*** abridged ***) Context: The wings of Balmer lines are often used as effective temperature diagnostics for late-type stars under the assumption they form in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Aims: Our goal is to investigate the non-LTE formation of Balmer lines in late-type stellar atmospheres, to establish if the assumption of LTE is justified. Furthermore, we aim to determine which collision processes are important for the problem; in particular, the role of collision processes with hydrogen atoms is investigated. Method: A model hydrogen atom for non-LTE calculations has been constructed accounting for various collision processes using the best available data from the literature. The processes included are inelastic collisions with electrons and hydrogen atoms, mutual neutralisation and Penning ionisation. Non-LTE calculations are performed, and the relative importance of the collision processes is investigated. Results: Our calculations show electron collisions alone are not sufficient to establish LTE ...

  4. Self-consistent collisional-radiative model for hydrogen atoms: Atom–atom interaction and radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Self-consistent coupling between radiation, state-to-state kinetics, electron kinetics and fluid dynamics. Highlight: ► A CR model of shock-wave in hydrogen plasma has been presented. ► All equations have been coupled self-consistently. ► Non-equilibrium electron and level distributions are obtained. ► The results show non-local effects and non-equilibrium radiation. - Abstract: A collisional-radiative model for hydrogen atom, coupled self-consistently with the Boltzmann equation for free electrons, has been applied to model a shock tube. The kinetic model has been completed considering atom–atom collisions and the vibrational kinetics of the ground state of hydrogen molecules. The atomic level kinetics has been also coupled with a radiative transport equation to determine the effective adsorption and emission coefficients and non-local energy transfer.

  5. Characterization of intramolecular hydrogen bonds by atomic charges and charge fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranović, Goran; Biliškov, Nikola; Vojta, Danijela

    2012-08-16

    The electronic charge redistribution and the infrared intensities of the two types of intramolecular hydrogen bonds, O-H···O and O-H···π, of o-hydroxy- and o-ethynylphenol, respectively, together with a set of related intermolecular hydrogen bond complexes are described in terms of atomic charges and charge fluxes derived from atomic polar tensors calculated at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The polarizable continuum model shows that both the atomic charges and charge fluxes are strongly dependent on solvent. It is shown that their values for the OH bond in an intramolecular hydrogen bond are not much different from those for the "free" OH bond, but the changes are toward the values found for an intermolecular hydrogen bond. The intermolecular hydrogen bond is characterized not only by the decreased atomic charge but also by the enlarged charge flux term of the same sign producing thus an enormous increase in IR intensity. The overall behavior of the charges and fluxes of the hydrogen atom in OH and ≡CH bonds agree well with the observed spectroscopic characteristics of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The main reason for the differences between the two types of the hydrogen bond lies in the molecular structure because favorable linear proton donor-acceptor arrangement is not possible to achieve within a small molecule. The calculated intensities (in vacuo and in polarizable continuum) are only in qualitative agreement with the measured data. PMID:22809455

  6. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. W.; Antonia, O.; Penev, M.

    2013-03-01

    The United States has 11 distinct natural gas pipeline corridors: five originate in the Southwest, four deliver natural gas from Canada, and two extend from the Rocky Mountain region. This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipelines.

  7. Determination of atom percent deuterium in deuterium gas using a vibrating-probe density meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom percent deuterium may be effectively analyzed in a mixture of hydrogen and deuterium gases from the density determination of the mixture of water-heavy water which is formed after the gas sample is converted to an oxide and condensed. The density can be accurately measured by using a vibrating-tube density meter which is standardized with air and pure water or other density standards. This deuterium determination requires no empirical standardization against known deuterium standards. The sample gas in a helium carrier is passed through a hot copper oxide tube; the hydrogen and deuterium oxides are condensed in a liquid-nitrogen cooled collection bulb, which was designed for effective entrapment and prevention of sample exposure to the atmosphere

  8. The effects of atomic hydrogen and flake on mechanical properties of a tyre steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of hydrogen and flake on the fracture toughness, hydrogen-induced delayed cracking (HIDC), impact toughness and fatigue properties of a tyre steel have been investigated. The results showed that there was no effect of flake and atomic hydrogen on the fracture toughness KIC. Atomic hydrogen could induce delayed failure under constant displacement. The threshold stress intensity factor of hydrogen-induced delayed cracking, KIH, decreased linearly with diffusible hydrogen concentration C0, i.e., KIH (MPa m1/2) = KIC - 4.0C0 (ppm) (C0 > 0.5 ppm). Atomic hydrogen had no effect on impact toughness and fatigue properties when the C0 was low (C0 ≤ 0.5 ppm). The flakes decreased impact toughness and caused it to fluctuate. Atomic hydrogen increased the fatigue crack growth rate when the diffusible hydrogen concentration was high enough (C0 ≥ 2.5 ppm). The flakes increased and undulated the fatigue crack growth rate

  9. Hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schastlivtsev, A. I.; Nazarova, O. V.

    2016-02-01

    A hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine unit is considered that can be used in both nuclear and centralized power industries. However, it is the most promising when used for power-generating plants based on renewable energy sources (RES). The basic feature of the energy storage system in question is combination of storing the energy in compressed air and hydrogen and oxygen produced by the water electrolysis. Such a process makes the energy storage more flexible, in particular, when applied to RES-based power-generating plants whose generation of power may considerably vary during the course of a day, and also reduces the specific cost of the system by decreasing the required volume of the reservoir. This will allow construction of such systems in any areas independent of the local topography in contrast to the compressed-air energy storage gas-turbine plants, which require large-sized underground reservoirs. It should be noted that, during the energy recovery, the air that arrives from the reservoir is heated by combustion of hydrogen in oxygen, which results in the gas-turbine exhaust gases practically free of substances hazardous to the health and the environment. The results of analysis of a hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are presented. Its layout and the principle of its operation are described and the basic parameters are computed. The units of the system are analyzed and their costs are assessed; the recovery factor is estimated at more than 60%. According to the obtained results, almost all main components of the hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are well known at present; therefore, no considerable R&D costs are required. A new component of the system is the H2-O2 combustion chamber; a difficulty in manufacturing it is the necessity of ensuring the combustion of hydrogen in oxygen as complete as possible and preventing formation of nitric oxides.

  10. Signatures of Quantum-Tunneling Diffusion of Hydrogen Atoms on Water Ice at 10 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahata, K; Hama, T; Kouchi, A; Watanabe, N

    2015-09-25

    Reported here is the first observation of the tunneling surface diffusion of a hydrogen (H) atom on water ice. Photostimulated desorption and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization methods were used to determine the diffusion rates at 10 K on amorphous solid water and polycrystalline ice. H-atom diffusion on polycrystalline ice was 2 orders of magnitude faster than that of deuterium atoms, indicating the occurrence of tunneling diffusion. Whether diffusion is by tunneling or thermal hopping also depends on the diffusion length of the atoms and the morphology of the surface. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of elementary physicochemical processes of hydrogen on cosmic ice dust. PMID:26451552

  11. Field test of hydrogen in the natural gas grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskov, H.

    2010-08-15

    In order to prepare for a future use of hydrogen as a fuel gas it became evident that very little information existed regarding the compatibility between long-term exposure and transportation of hydrogen in natural gas pipelines. A program was therefore set to study the transportation in a small-scale pilot grid at the research centre in Hoersholm, Denmark. The test program included steel pipes from the Danish gas transmission grid and polymer pipes from the Danish and Swedish gas distribution grid. The test of polymer pipes was devised so that samples of all test pipes were cut out of the grid each year and analysis performed on these pipe samples; in this way any form of influence on the integrity of the polyethylene pipe would be detected. The analytical program for polymer was devised in order to detect any influence on the additivation of the polyethylene as this has an influence on oxidative resistance, as well as checking already encountered possible degradation caused by extrusion of the material. Further tools as rheology and melt flow rate were used for detecting any structural changes on the material. On the mechanical property side the tensile strength and modulus were followed as well as the most important property for the pipe line, namely slow crack growth. The results of the polymer pipe tests show no degradations of any kind related to the continuous hydrogen exposure for more than 4 years. This is a strong indication of the compatibility to hydrogen of the tested polymer materials PE 80 and PE 100. The object of the steel pipe test was to see the effect on fatigue life of existing natural gas transmission lines with hydrogen replacing the natural gas. Full-scale dynamic tests were performed using randomly selected cut-out API 5L X70 pipe sections with a diameter of 20 inches and a wall thickness of 7 millimetres from the Danish natural gas transmission system. The pipe sections contained field girth weld made during the installation of the pipe

  12. Formation of muonic hydrogen at extremely low gas pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earlier measurements with the magnetic bottle technique showed, that the lifetime of the metastable 2s state of muonic hydrogen is drastically shortened by external Stark collisions at 150 torr H2-pressure. Since the technique works even at gas pressures below 1 torr, where the 2s-lifetime is several hundred ns, it was necessary to plan the intended laser-resonance experiment (to measure the 2s-2p energy difference) for such an extremely low gas pressure. (Auth.)

  13. Hydrogen Gas Production by an Ectothiorhodospira vacuolata Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Laurie J.; Irgens, Roar L.

    1991-01-01

    A hydrogen gas (H2)-producing strain of Ectothiorhodospira vacuolata isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, possessed nitrogenase activity. Increasing evolution of H2 with decreasing ammonium chloride concentrations provided evidence that nitrogenase was the catalyst in gas production. Cells were grown in a mineral medium plus 0.2% acetate with sodium sulfide as an electron donor. Factors increasing H2 production included addition of reduced carbon compounds such as propionate and succinate, in...

  14. Elastic, charge transfer, and related transport cross sections for proton impact of atomic hydrogen for astrophysical and laboratory plasma modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D. R.; Ovchinnikov, S. Yu; Stancil, P. C.; Zaman, T.

    2016-04-01

    Updating and extending previous work (Krstić and Schultz 1999 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 3458 and other references) comprehensive calculations were performed for elastic scattering and charge transfer in proton—atomic hydrogen collisions. The results, obtained for 1301 collision energies in the center-of-mass energy range of 10‑4–104 eV, are provided for integral and differential cross sections relevant to transport modeling in astrophysical and other plasma environments, and are made available through a website. Use of the data is demonstrated through a Monte Carlo transport simulation of solar wind proton propagation through atomic hydrogen gas representing a simple model of the solar wind interaction with heliospheric neutrals.

  15. Analysis of mechanism of carbon removal from GaAs(1 0 0) surface by atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etching of carbon contaminations from the GaAs(1 0 0) surface by irradiating with atomic hydrogen, which is one of the key reactions to promote high-quality thin films growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), has been investigated by mass spectrometry (MS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is shown that during the cleaning process at room temperature a total reduction of the Auger carbon signal, accompanied by desorption of methane as major reaction product, can be observed. The reaction pathways as well as the processes responsible for the observed carbon removal are discussed in detail to give a support for etching and growth quality enhancement not only in thin films epitaxy but in all atomic hydrogen promoted gas-phase III-V semiconductor processes

  16. Atom-molecule collisions in an optically trapped gas

    OpenAIRE

    Zahzam, Nassim; Vogt, Thibault; Mudrich, Marcel; Comparat, Daniel; Pillet, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Cold inelastic collisions between confined cesium (Cs) atoms and Cs$\\_2$ molecules are investigated inside a CO$\\_2$ laser dipole trap. Inelastic atom-molecule collisions can be observed and measured with a rate coefficient of $\\sim 2.5 \\times 10^{-11} $cm$^3$ s$^{-1}$, mainly independent of the molecular ro-vibrational state populated. Lifetimes of purely atomic and molecular samples are essentially limited by rest gas collisions. The pure molecular trap lifetime ranges 0,3-1 s, four times s...

  17. Power to gas. The final breakthrough for the hydrogen economy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler-Goldstein, Raphael [Germany Trade and Invest (GTAI), Paris (France); Rastetter, Aline [Alphea Hydrogene, Forbach (France)

    2013-04-01

    In Germany more than 20% of the energy mix is made up of renewable energy and its share is rapidly increasing. The federal government expects renewables to account for 35% of Germany's electricity consumption by 2020, 50% by 2030 and 80% by 2050. According to the German Energy Agency, multi-billion euro investments in energy storage are expected by 2020 in order to reach these goals. The growth of this fluctuating energy supply has created demand for innovative storage options in Germany and it is accelerating the development of technologies in this field. Along with batteries and smart grids, hydrogen is expected to be one of the lead technologies. 2010 a commercialization roadmap for wind hydrogen was set up by the two northern federal states of Hamburg and Schleswig-Holstein with the goal of utilizing surplus wind power for the electrolytic production of hydrogen. With the creation of the 'performing energy initiative', 2011, Brandenburg and Lower Saxony joined this undertaking. The aim of this initiative is to set up demonstration projects in order to develop and optimize wind-hydrogen hybrid systems and prepare their commercialization for the time after 2020. Beside the conversion of hydrogen into electricity and fuel for cars, further markets like raw material for the chemical, petrochemical, metallurgy and food industry are going to be addressed. Considering the fact there are over 40 caves currently used for natural gas storage with a total volume of 23.5 billion cubic meters and 400 000 km gas grid available in Germany, the German Technical and Scientific Association for Gas and Water sees opportunities for hydrogen to be fed into the existing natural gas grid network. The name of this concept is power-to-gas. According to the current DVGW-Standards natural gas in Germany can contain up to 5% hydrogen. The GERG, European Group on the Gas Research sees potential to increase this amount up to 6% to 20%. Power-to-gas could serve both for fuel and for the

  18. Tritium removal by hydrogen isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water on hydrophobic catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many kinds of the hydrophobic catalysts for hydrogen isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water have been prepared. The carriers are the hydrophobic organic materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE), monofluorocarbon-PTFE mixture(PTFE-FC), and styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer(SDB). 0.1 to 2 wt % Pt is deposited on the carriers. The Pt/SDB catalyst has much higher activity than the Pt/PTFE catalyst and the Pt/PTFE-FC catalyst shows the intermediate value of catalytic activity. The observation of electron microscope shows that the degrees of dispersion of Pt particles on the hydrophobic carriers result in the difference of catalytic activities. A gas-liquid separated type column containing ten stages is constructed. Each stage is composed of both the hydrophobic catalyst bed for the hydrogen gas/water vapor isotopic exchange and the packed column type bed for the water vapor/liquid water isotopic exchange. In the column hydrogen gas and water flow countercurrently and hydrogen isotopes are separated

  19. Influence of hydrogen patterning gas on electric and magnetic properties of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the degradation mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using hydrogen, the properties of the MTJs were measured by applying an additional hydrogen etch process and a hydrogen plasma process to the patterned MTJs. In these studies, an additional 50 s hydrogen etch process caused the magnetoresistance (MR) to decrease from 103% to 14.7% and the resistance (R) to increase from 6.5 kΩ to 39 kΩ. Moreover, an additional 500 s hydrogen plasma process decreased the MR from 103% to 74% and increased R from 6.5 kΩ to 13.9 kΩ. These results show that MTJs can be damaged by the hydrogen plasma process as well as by the hydrogen etch process, as the atomic bonds in MgO may break and react with the exposed hydrogen gas. Compounds such as MgO hydrate very easily. We also calculated the damaged layer width (DLW) of the patterned MTJs after the hydrogen etching and plasma processes, to evaluate the downscaling limitations of spin-transfer-torque magnetic random-access memory (STT-MRAM) devices. With these calculations, the maximum DLWs at each side of the MTJ, generated by the etching and plasma processes, were 23.8 nm and 12.8 nm, respectively. This result validates that the hydrogen-based MTJ patterning processes cannot be used exclusively in STT-MRAMs beyond 20 nm

  20. Influence of hydrogen patterning gas on electric and magnetic properties of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, J. H., E-mail: juno@fris.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Semiconductor R and D Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Hwasung (Korea, Republic of); Endoh, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Center for Innovative Integrated Electronic Systems, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Kim, Y.; Kim, W. K.; Park, S. O. [Semiconductor R and D Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Hwasung (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-07

    To identify the degradation mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using hydrogen, the properties of the MTJs were measured by applying an additional hydrogen etch process and a hydrogen plasma process to the patterned MTJs. In these studies, an additional 50 s hydrogen etch process caused the magnetoresistance (MR) to decrease from 103% to 14.7% and the resistance (R) to increase from 6.5 kΩ to 39 kΩ. Moreover, an additional 500 s hydrogen plasma process decreased the MR from 103% to 74% and increased R from 6.5 kΩ to 13.9 kΩ. These results show that MTJs can be damaged by the hydrogen plasma process as well as by the hydrogen etch process, as the atomic bonds in MgO may break and react with the exposed hydrogen gas. Compounds such as MgO hydrate very easily. We also calculated the damaged layer width (DLW) of the patterned MTJs after the hydrogen etching and plasma processes, to evaluate the downscaling limitations of spin-transfer-torque magnetic random-access memory (STT-MRAM) devices. With these calculations, the maximum DLWs at each side of the MTJ, generated by the etching and plasma processes, were 23.8 nm and 12.8 nm, respectively. This result validates that the hydrogen-based MTJ patterning processes cannot be used exclusively in STT-MRAMs beyond 20 nm.

  1. Schwinger variational calculation of ionization of hydrogen atoms for large momentum transfers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Chakrabarti

    2002-03-01

    Schwinger variational principle is used here to study large momentum transfer cases of electron and positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen from the ground state at intermediate and moderately high energies. The results appear somewhat better compared to other theories.

  2. Membrane reforming in converting natural gas to hydrogen (part one)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barba, D.; Giacobbe, F.; De Cesaris, A. [Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Materials, University of L' Aquila (Italy); Farace, A.; Iaquaniello, G.; Pipino, A. [TECHNIP-KTI S.p.a., Rome (Italy)

    2008-07-15

    Membrane reforming reactors (MRR) could play a key role in converting natural gas into hydrogen. The major advantage of MRR architecture is the possibility to shift the chemical equilibrium toward the right-hand side of the reaction, improving hydrogen production and allowing, the same time high methane conversion at relatively low temperatures such as 650 C. Such a low operating temperature makes it possible to locate the MRR downstream of a gas turbine, achieving an efficient hybrid system (power+hydrogen) with a significant reduction in energy consumption (around 10%). This paper discusses the whole innovative architecture where conventional tubular reforming is integrated with hydrogen permeable palladium membrane separators. The fundamental concepts are analyzed and integrated into a process scheme; the structural effects of variables design such as reactor temperature outlet, S/C ratio and recycle ratio throughout pinch and sensitivity analysis are described, and a comparison of the process economics with conventional hydrogen technology is presented at the end of the second part of this paper. The production of highly reliable, defect-free and reproducible, Pd-alloy membranes for selective hydrogen separation is a key issue in the proposed hybrid architecture. (author)

  3. The Atomic and Molecular Gas Around Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, D.; Meixner, M.; Sutton, E. C.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Bujarrabal, V.; Latter, W. B.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Kelly, D. M.; Welch, W. J.

    2001-12-01

    We present ISO LWS and SWS observations of far-infrared atomic fine structure lines of 24 evolved stars including asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe) and planetary nebulae (PNe). The spectra include grating and Fabry-Perot measurements of the line emission from [OI], [CII], [SiI], [SiII], [SI], [FeI], [FeII], [NeII] and [NII] which trace the low-excitation atomic gas. Atomic emission was only found in those sources where Teff >= 10000 K. Above this cutoff, the number of detectable lines and the intensity of the line emission increase as Teff increases. These trends suggest that the atomic lines originate from photodissociation regions (PDRs). In general, the kinematics of the atomic gas, derived from line fits to the Fabry-Perot data, are comparable to the molecular expansion velocities. These kinematics are expected for atomic cooling lines associated with circumstellar PDRs. A new PDR code which properly treats enhanced carbon abundances was used to model the observations. The predicted line intensities agree reasonably well with the observations. Shock models, however, do not compare well with the observed line intensities. PDR mass estimates ranging from ~0.01-0.2 Msun were derived from the [CII] 158 μ m line emission. The atomic gas only occupies a small fraction of the total mass for young planetary nebulae, but grows significantly as they evolve. To compliment our atomic gas study we also present CO J=1-0 observations of 7 objects in our ISO sample to investigate the evolution of the molecular envelope. By combining data from the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland-Association (BIMA) Millimeter Array and the NRAO 12m, we have constructed full synthesis data cubes for MIRA, IRC +10216, IRAS 17436+5003 (HD 161796), AFGL 2688, IRAS 22272+5435 (HD 235858), AFGL 2343 (IRAS 19114+0002) and NGC 7027. The history of the circumstellar gas is imprinted on the circumstellar envelope itself, such as the record of its molecular mass loss, and its

  4. Hydrogen Gas Presents a Promising Therapeutic Strategy for Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keliang Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is characterized by a severe inflammatory response to infection. It remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients despite developments in monitoring devices, diagnostic tools, and new therapeutic options. Recently, some studies have found that molecular hydrogen is a new therapeutic gas. Our studies have found that hydrogen gas can improve the survival and organ damage in mice and rats with cecal ligation and puncture, zymosan, and lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis. The mechanisms are associated with the regulation of oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and apoptosis, which might be through NF-κB and Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway. In this paper, we summarized the progress of hydrogen treatment in sepsis.

  5. Detection of hot muonic hydrogen atoms emitted in vacuum using x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. (Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland)); Bailey, J.M. (Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom)); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. (Victoria Univ., BC (Canada)); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M. (TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Huber, T.M. (Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States)); Kammel, P

    1992-01-01

    Negative muons are stopped in solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. It was found that the time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law where the rate is the same as the disappearance rate of [mu][sup -]p atoms. The pp[mu]-formation rate and the muon transfer rate to deuterium are deduced.

  6. Detection of hot muonic hydrogen atoms emitted in vacuum using x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negative muons are stopped in solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. It was found that the time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law where the rate is the same as the disappearance rate of μ-p atoms. The ppμ-formation rate and the muon transfer rate to deuterium are deduced

  7. Detection of hot muonic hydrogen atoms emitted in vacuum using x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland); Bailey, J.M. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Mittelenergiephysik; Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1992-12-31

    Negative muons are stopped in solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. It was found that the time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law where the rate is the same as the disappearance rate of {mu}{sup -}p atoms. The pp{mu}-formation rate and the muon transfer rate to deuterium are deduced.

  8. Evidence of wave-particle duality for single fast hydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H T; Fischer, D; Berenyi, Z; Cocke, C L; Gudmundsson, M; Haag, N; Johansson, H A B; Källberg, A; Levin, S B; Reinhed, P; Sassenberg, U; Schuch, R; Simonsson, A; Støchkel, K; Cederquist, H

    2008-08-22

    We report the direct observation of interference effects in a Young's double-slit experiment where the interfering waves are two spatially separated components of the de Broglie wave of single 1.3 MeV hydrogen atoms formed close to either target nucleus in H++H2 electron-transfer collisions. Quantum interference strongly influences the results even though the hydrogen atoms have a de Broglie wavelength, lambda_{dB}, as small as 25 fm. PMID:18764612

  9. A novel three-electrode solid electrolyte hydrogen gas sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Min; Yang, Chunling; Zhang, Yan [Harbin Insitute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Computer Science and Technology; Jia, Zheng [Harbin Insitute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2013-07-01

    A three-electrode solid electrolyte hydrogen gas sensor is explored in this paper. The sensor utilized phosphotungstic acid as the electrolyte material and adopted platinum, nickel and tungsten as the three-electrode materials respectively. In real applications, platinum was used as the measuring electrode, nickel was used as the adjusting electrode and tungsten was used as the reference electrode. In order to compare the performance of the new sensor with that of the traditional two-electrode sensor, the hydrogen concentrations were adjusted so as to detect the output of the two-electrode sensor and the three-electrode sensor. The dynamic range between the measuring electrode and the reference electrode is about 0.65V and the highest detectable limit is 12% for the three-electrode solid hydrogen gas sensor. While the dynamic range is about 0.25V and and the highest detectable limit is 1% for the two-electrode solid electrolyte gas sensor. The results demonstrate that the three-electrode solid hydrogen gas sensor has a higher resolution and detectable limit than the two-electrode sensor. abstract environment.

  10. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the

  11. Design and evaluation of a Laval-type supersonic atomizer for low-pressure gas atomization of molten metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-run Si; Xian-jie Zhang; Jun-biao Wang; Yu-jun Li

    2014-01-01

    A Laval-type supersonic gas atomizer was designed for low-pressure gas atomization of molten metals. The principal design ob-jectives were to produce small-particle uniform powders at lower operating pressures by improving the gas inlet and outlet structures and op-timizing structural parameters. A computational fluid flow model was developed to study the flow field characteristics of the designed atom-izer. Simulation results show that the maximum gas velocity in the atomization zone can reach 440 m·s-1;this value is independent of the atomization gas pressure P0 when P0>0.7 MPa. When P0=1.1 MPa, the aspiration pressure at the tip of the delivery tube reaches a mini-mum, indicating that the atomizer can attain the best atomization efficiency at a relatively low atomization pressure. In addition, atomization experiments with pure tin at P0=1.0 MPa and with 7055Al alloy at P0=0.8 and 0.4 MPa were conducted to evaluate the atomization capa-bility of the designed atomizer. Nearly spherical powders were obtained with the mass median diameters of 28.6, 43.4, and 63.5μm, respec-tively. Compared with commonly used atomizers, the designed Laval-type atomizer has a better low-pressure gas atomization capability.

  12. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, N. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming and partial oxidation) are complex, multi-step processes that produce large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The main goal of this project is to develop a technologically simple process for hydrogen production from natural gas (NG) and other hydrocarbon fuels via single-step decomposition of hydrocarbons. This approach eliminates or significantly reduces CO{sub 2} emission. Carbon is a valuable by-product of this process, whereas conventional methods of hydrogen production from NG produce no useful by-products. This approach is based on the use of special catalysts that reduce the maximum temperature of the process from 1400-1500{degrees}C (thermal non-catalytic decomposition of methane) to 500-900{degrees}C. Transition metal based catalysts and various forms of carbon are among the candidate catalysts for the process. This approach can advantageously be used for the development of compact NG reformers for on-site production of hydrogen-methane blends at refueling stations and, also, for the production of hydrogen-rich gas for fuel cell applications. The author extended the search for active methane decomposition catalysts to various modifications of Ni-, Fe-, Mo- and Co-based catalysts. Variation in the operational parameters makes it possible to produce H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} blends with a wide range of hydrogen concentrations that vary from 15 to 98% by volume. The author found that Ni-based catalysts are more effective at temperatures below 750{degrees}C, whereas Fe-based catalysts are effective at temperatures above 800{degrees}C for the production of hydrogen with purity of 95% v. or higher. The catalytic pyrolysis of liquid hydrocarbons (pentane, gasoline) over Fe-based catalyst was conducted. The author observed the production of a hydrogen-rich gas (hydrogen concentration up to 97% by volume) at a rate of approximately 1L/min.mL of hydrocarbon fuel.

  13. Cucurbit[6]uril: A Possible Host for Noble Gas Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sudip; Mandal, Subhajit; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2015-08-27

    Density functional and ab initio molecular dynamics studies are carried out to investigate the stability of noble gas encapsulated cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) systems. Interaction energy, dissociation energy and dissociation enthalpy are calculated to understand the efficacy of CB[6] in encapsulating noble gas atoms. CB[6] could encapsulate up to three Ne atoms having dissociation energy (zero-point energy corrected) in the range of 3.4-4.1 kcal/mol, whereas due to larger size, only one Ar or Kr atom encapsulated analogues would be viable. The dissociation energy value for the second Ar atom is only 1.0 kcal/mol. On the other hand, the same for the second Kr is -0.5 kcal/mol, implying the instability of the system. The noble gas dissociation processes are endothermic in nature, which increases gradually along Ne to Kr. Kr encapsulated analogue is found to be viable at room temperature. However, low temperature is needed for Ne and Ar encapsulated analogues. The temperature-pressure phase diagram highlights the region in which association and dissociation processes of Kr@CB[6] would be favorable. At ambient temperature and pressure, CB[6] may be used as an effective noble gas carrier. Wiberg bond indices, noncovalent interaction indices, electron density, and energy decomposition analyses are used to explore the nature of interaction between noble gas atoms and CB[6]. Dispersion interaction is found to be the most important term in the attraction energy. Ne and Ar atoms in one Ng entrapped analogue are found to stay inside the cavity of CB[6] throughout the simulation at 298 K. However, during simulation Ng2 units in Ng2@CB[6] flip toward the open faces of CB[6]. After 1 ps, one Ne atom of Ne3@CB[6] almost reaches the open face keeping other two Ne atoms inside. At lower temperature (77 K), all the Ng atoms in Ngn@CB[6] remain well inside the cavity of CB[6] throughout the simulation time (1 ps). PMID:25989462

  14. Fracture mechanism of TiAl intermetallics caused by hydride and atomic hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高克玮; 王燕斌; 林志; 乔利杰; 褚武扬

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of TiAl intermetallics was studied at room temperature. The results showed that there were two forms of HE in TiAl intermetallics, i.e. hydride HE and atomic HE. Most of hydrogen in TiAl intermetallics was transformed into hydrides at room temperature. The hydride exists as (TiAl)Hx for a low hydrogen concentration while it exists in several forms for a higher hydrogen concentration. Stress intensity factor KIC decreased with increase in hydride concentration. KIC decreased further when TiAl intermetallics were charged cathodically with hydrogen in 1 mol/L H2SO4 solution. Stress intensity factor during hydrogen charging KIH was about 50% KIC. 20% of the decrease was caused by hydrides while 30% was caused by atomic hydrogen. Mechanism of HE caused hydrides was the same as any other second phase in nature. Delayed fracture caused by atomic hydrogen resulted from hydrogen induced local plastic deformation.

  15. Performance of a CVD grown graphene-based planar device for a hydrogen gas sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multilayer graphene (MLG) film was grown on thermally oxidized silicon (SiO2/Si) substrate by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD). The formation of the MLG and the presence of the oxide on the graphene surface were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. An energy gap of 0.234 eV was determined by the optical transmission method. The surface morphology of the graphene film was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A planar device with lateral Pd metal contacts was used for the hydrogen sensor studies. The sensor performance in the temperature range (110 °C–150 °C) revealed a relatively fast response (∼12 s) and recovery (∼24 s) for hydrogen sensing. The reproducibility, the selectivity, and the stability of the device were also studied. The sensor was found to be selective for hydrogen relative to methane in the temperature range studied. The gas sensing mechanism has been suggested on the basis of the interaction of palladium with hydrogen, the change in the interface barrier, and the adsorption–desorption processes related to the change in the hydrogen partial pressure and temperature. The AFM study indicates the reorientation of the graphene surface after the sensing operation, most probably due to hydrogen passivation. (paper)

  16. Research and development program of hydrogen production system with high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been developing a hydrogen production system with a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). While the HTGR hydrogen production system has the following advantages compared with a fossil-fired hydrogen production system; low operation cost (economical fuel cost), low CO2 emission and saving of fossil fuel by use of nuclear heat, it requires some items to be solved as follows; cost reduction of facility such as a reactor, coolant circulation system and so on, development of control and safety technologies. As for the control and safety technologies, JAERI plans demonstration test with hydrogen production system by steam reforming of methane coupling to 30 Wt HTGR, named high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). Prior to the demonstration test, a 1/30-scale out-of-pile test facility is in construction for safety review and detailed design of the HTTR hydrogen production system. Also, design study will start for reduction of facility cost. Moreover, basic study on hydrogen production process without CO2 emission is in progress by thermochemical water splitting. (orig.)

  17. Study on hydrogen atom adsorption and diffusion properties on Mg (0001) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen atom adsorption and diffusion properties on clean and vacancy defective Mg (0001) surface have been investigated systematically by using a first-principles calculations method based on the density functional theory. The calculation results of adsorption energy and diffusion energy barrier show that hydrogen atom is apt to be adsorbed at fcc and hcp sites on clean Mg (0001) surface, and fcc adsorption site is found to be more preferred. The highest diffusion energy barrier is estimated as 0.6784 eV for the diffusion of hydrogen from clean Mg (0001) surface into its bulk. Surface effects, which affect hydrogen diffusion obviously, results in a slow diffusion velocity of hydrogen from surface to subsurface, while a fast one from subsurface to bulk, indicating the range of surface effects is only restricted within two topmost layers of Mg (0001) surface. Comparatively, Mg atom vacancy on Mg (0001) surface not only enhances the chemisorption interaction between H and Mg surface, but also benefits H atom diffusion in Mg bulk with relatively more diffusion paths compared with that of clean surface. Besides, hydrogen atom is found to occupy mostly the tetrahedral interstice when it diffuses into the Mg bulk. Further analysis of the density of states (DOS) shows that the system for hydrogen atom to be adsorbed at fcc site has a lower DOS value (N (EF)) at Fermi level and more bonding elec- trons at the energy range blow the Fermi level of H/Mg (0001) system as compared with that at hcp site. On the other hand, the enhanced chemisorption interaction between hydrogen and defective surface should be attributed to the fact that the electronic structures of Mg (0001) surface are modified by an Mg vacancy, and the bonding electrons of the topmost layer Mg atoms are transferred from low energy range to Fermi level, which is in favor of improving the surface activity of Mg (0001) surface.

  18. Study on hydrogen atom adsorption and diffusion properties on Mg (0001) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG dian; ZHOU DianWu; LIU dinShui

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen atom adsorption and diffusion properties on clean and vacancy defective Mg (0001) surface have been investigated systematically by using a first-principles calculations method based on the density functional theory. The calculation results of adsorption energy and diffusion energy barrier show that hydrogen atom is apt to be adsorbed at fcc and hcp sites on clean Mg (0001) surface, and fcc adsorption site is found to be more preferred. The highest diffusion energy barrier is estimated as 0.6784 eV for the diffusion of hydrogen from clean Mg (0001) surface into its bulk. Surface effects,which affect hydrogen diffusion obviously, results in a slow diffusion velocity of hydrogen from surface to subsurface, while a fast one from subsurface to bulk, indicating the range of surface effects is only restricted within two topmost layers of Mg (0001) surface. Comparatively, Mg atom vacancy on Mg(0001) surface not only enhances the chemisorption interaction between H and Mg surface, but also benefits H atom diffusion in Mg bulk with relatively more diffusion paths compared with that of clean surface. Besides, hydrogen atom is found to occupy mostly the tetrahedral interstice when it diffuses into the Mg bulk. Further analysis of the density of states (DOS) shows that the system for hydrogen atom to be adsorbed at fcc site has a lower DOS value (N (EF)) at Fermi level and more bonding electrons at the energy range blow the Fermi level of H/Mg (0001) system as compared with that at hcp site.On the other hand, the enhanced chemisorption interaction between hydrogen and defective surface should be attributed to the fact that the electronic structures of Mg (0001) surface are modified by an Mg vacancy, and the bonding electrons of the topmost layer Mg atoms are transferred from low energy range to Fermi level, which is in favor of improving the surface activity of Mg (0001) surface.

  19. Solid-phase microextraction may catalize hydrogenation when using hydrogen as carrier in gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, D; Boarelli, M C

    2016-07-01

    When hydrogen is used as carrier gas, carbon-carbon double bonds may be hydrogenated in the hot gas chromatograph (GC) injector if introduced by solid-phase microextraction (SPME). SPME fibers coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/carboxen/divinylbenzene (DVB), PDMS/carboxen, polyacrylate, PDMS/DVB and PDMS on fused silica, stableflex or metal alloy core have been tested with fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from olive oil. Using coatings containing DVB, hydrogenation took place with high conversion rates (82.0-92.9%) independently of the core material. With all fibers having a metal core, hydrogenation was observed to a certain extent (27.4-85.3%). PDMS, PDMS/carboxen and polyacrylate coated fibers with a fused silica or stableflex core resulted in negligible hydrogenation (0.2-2.5%). The occurrence of hydrogenation was confirmed also with other substances containing carbon-carbon double bonds (n-alkenes, alkenoic acids, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl and ethyl esters). PMID:27236484

  20. Hydrogen atoms can be located accurately and precisely by x-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woińska, Magdalena; Grabowsky, Simon; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Precise and accurate structural information on hydrogen atoms is crucial to the study of energies of interactions important for crystal engineering, materials science, medicine, and pharmacy, and to the estimation of physical and chemical properties in solids. However, hydrogen atoms only scatter x-radiation weakly, so x-rays have not been used routinely to locate them accurately. Textbooks and teaching classes still emphasize that hydrogen atoms cannot be located with x-rays close to heavy elements; instead, neutron diffraction is needed. We show that, contrary to widespread expectation, hydrogen atoms can be located very accurately using x-ray diffraction, yielding bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms (A–H) that are in agreement with results from neutron diffraction mostly within a single standard deviation. The precision of the determination is also comparable between x-ray and neutron diffraction results. This has been achieved at resolutions as low as 0.8 Å using Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR). We have applied HAR to 81 crystal structures of organic molecules and compared the A–H bond lengths with those from neutron measurements for A–H bonds sorted into bonds of the same class. We further show in a selection of inorganic compounds that hydrogen atoms can be located in bridging positions and close to heavy transition metals accurately and precisely. We anticipate that, in the future, conventional x-radiation sources at in-house diffractometers can be used routinely for locating hydrogen atoms in small molecules accurately instead of large-scale facilities such as spallation sources or nuclear reactors.

  1. ESR study on hydrogen-atom abstraction in cryogenic organic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper summarizes our recent results on the hydrogen-atom abstraction from protiated alkane molecule by deuterium atoms in cryogenic deuterated organic solids, obtained by the X-band ESR and electron spin-echo measurements of the product alkyl radicals at cryogenic temperatures. (J.P.N.)

  2. Derivation of the dipole approximation from the exact transition probabilities for hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usual dipole approximation for the transition probabilities for hydrogen atoms is derived from the exact transition probabilities by considering j = 1 photons only, neglecting retardation, and using an identity derived from the wave equation for the radial wave function for the atom

  3. Ionization of highly excited hydrogen atoms by a circularly polarized microwave field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakrzewski, J.; Delande, D.; Gay, J. (Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Hertzienne de l' Ecole Normale Superieure, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Tour 12, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris CEDEX 05 (France)); Rzazewski, K. (Centrum Fizyki Teoretycznej, Polskiej Akademii Nauk, Aleja Lotnikow 32/46, 02668 Warsaw (Poland))

    1993-04-01

    Some quantum-mechanical results describing the ionization of initially highly excited hydrogen atoms by a strong, circularly polarized microwave field are presented. A simplified two-dimensional model of the atom is used. Discrepancies between various classical estimates for the low-frequency ionization threshold are resolved.

  4. Biomass & Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Fuel For Gas Turbine (Power Generation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant progress has been made by major power generation equipment manufacturers in the development of market applications for hydrogen fuel use in gas turbines in recent years. Development of a new application using gas turbines for significant reduction of power plant CO2 e...

  5. Low-damage processing of CdTe(110) surfaces using atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of an AES, XPS, and LEED study of the reaction of oxide and contaminant overlayers on the CdTe(110) surface with atomic hydrogen. Exposure of an oxidized surface to a flux of atomic hydrogen produced by ''cracking'' ambient molecular hydrogen on a hot tungsten filament results in a rapid, quantitative removal of the oxide overlayer with substrate temperatures as low as 300 K to produce a stoichiometric surface free of contaminants which has sufficient surface order to produce a sharp (1x1) LEED pattern. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  6. Low-damage processing of CdTe(110) surfaces using atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Slater, D. A.; Osgood, R. M., Jr.

    1995-07-01

    We present the results of an AES, XPS, and LEED study of the reaction of oxide and contaminant overlayers on the CdTe(110) surface with atomic hydrogen. Exposure of an oxidized surface to a flux of atomic hydrogen produced by ``cracking'' ambient molecular hydrogen on a hot tungsten filament results in a rapid, quantitative removal of the oxide overlayer with substrate temperatures as low as 300 K to produce a stoichiometric surface free of contaminants which has sufficient surface order to produce a sharp (1×1) LEED pattern.

  7. Behavior of hydrogen ions, atoms, and molecules in alpha-boron studied using density functional calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Philipp; Ewels, Christopher P.; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Guiot, Vincent; Cox, Stephen F. J.; Lord, James S.; Briddon, Patrick R.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the behaviour of hydrogen ions, atoms and molecules in alpha-boron using density functional calculations. Hydrogen behaves as a negative-U centre, with positive H ions preferring to sit off-center on inter-layer bonds and negative H ions sitting preferably at in-plane sites between three B12 icosahedra. Hydrogen atoms inside B12 icosahedral cages are unstable, drifting off-center and leaving the cage with only a 0.09 eV barrier. While H0 is extremely mobile (diffusion barrier 0.25 ...

  8. The distribution of atomic hydrogen in EAGLE galaxies: morphologies, profiles, and H I holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahé, Yannick M.; Crain, Robert A.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Bower, Richard G.; Schaye, Joop; Furlong, Michelle; Lagos, Claudia; Schaller, Matthieu; Trayford, James W.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Theuns, Tom

    2016-02-01

    We compare the mass and internal distribution of atomic hydrogen (H I) in 2200 present-day central galaxies with Mstar > 1010 M⊙ from the 100 Mpc EAGLE `Reference' simulation to observational data. Atomic hydrogen fractions are corrected for self-shielding using a fitting formula from radiative transfer simulations and for the presence of molecular hydrogen using an empirical or a theoretical prescription from the literature. The resulting neutral hydrogen fractions, M_{H_I+H_2} / M_star, agree with observations to better than 0.1 dex for galaxies with Mstar between 1010 and 1011 M⊙. Our fiducial, empirical H2 model based on gas pressure results in galactic H I mass fractions, M_{H I/ M_star, that agree with observations from the GASS survey to better than 0.3 dex, but the alternative theoretical H2 formula from high-resolution simulations leads to a negative offset in M_{H I}/ M_star of up to 0.5 dex. Visual inspection of mock H I images reveals that most H I discs in simulated H I-rich galaxies are vertically disturbed, plausibly due to recent accretion events. Many galaxies (up to 80 per cent) contain spuriously large H I holes, which are likely formed as a consequence of the feedback implementation in EAGLE. The H I mass-size relation of all simulated galaxies is close to (but 16 per cent steeper than) observed, and when only galaxies without large holes in the H I disc are considered, the agreement becomes excellent (better than 0.1 dex). The presence of large H I holes also makes the radial H I surface density profiles somewhat too low in the centre, at Σ _{H I} > 1 M_{⊙} pc^{-2} (by a factor of ≲ 2 compared to data from the Bluedisk survey). In the outer region (Σ _{H I} 10^{9.8} M_{⊙}) and control galaxies (10^{9.1} M_{⊙}> M_{H I} > 10^{9.8} M_{⊙}) follow each other closely, as observed.

  9. Hydrogen storage on high-surface-area carbon monoliths for Adsorb hydrogen Gas Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Yuchoong; Pfeifer, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Carbon briquetting can increase hydrogen volumetric storage capacity by reducing the useless void volume resulting in a better packing density. It is a robust and efficient space-filling form for an adsorbed hydrogen gas vehicle storage tank. To optimize hydrogen storage capacity, we studied three fabrication process parameters: carbon-to-binder ratio, compaction temperature, and pyrolysis atmosphere. We found that carbon-to-binder ratio and pyrolysis atmosphere have influences on gravimetric excess adsorption. Compaction temperature has large influences on gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity. We have been able to optimize these parameters for high hydrogen storage. All monolith uptakes (up to 260 bar) were measured by a custom-built, volumetric, reservoir-type instrument.

  10. Hydrogen gas embrittlement and the disc pressure test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelet, E. J.; Troiano, A. R.

    1973-01-01

    A disc pressure test has been used to study the influenced of a hydrogen gas environment on the mechanical properties of three high strength superalloys, Inconel 718, L-605 and A-286, in static and dynamic conditions. The influence of the hydrogen pressure, loading rate, temperature, mechanical and thermal fatigue has investigated. The permeation characteristics of Inconel 718 have been determined in collaboration with the French AEC. The results complemented by a fractographic study are consistent either with a stress-sorption or with an internal embrittlement type of mechanism.

  11. Characterization of hot hydrogen-atom reactions by kinetic spectrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomalesky, R. E.; Sturm, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    The flash photolysis of hydrogen iodide in the presence of nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, and water has been investigated by kinetic spectroscopy. Although the fraction of hydrogen iodide dissociated was very large, the only observable intermediate was imidogen. It was demonstrated that the rapid removal of imidogen and the apparent absence of hydroxyl radicals in each case is a result of the following two reactions, respectively: (1) NH + HI yields NH2 + I; and (2) OH + HI yields H2O + I.

  12. Fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor utilizing surface plasmon resonance and native defects of zinc oxide by palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an experimental study on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor employing a palladium doped zinc oxide nanocomposite (ZnO(1−x)Pdx, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.85) layer over the silver coated unclad core of the fiber. Palladium doped zinc oxide nanocomposites (ZnO(1−x)Pdx)  are prepared by a chemical route for different composition ratios and their structural, morphological and hydrogen sensing properties are investigated experimentally. The sensing principle involves the absorption of hydrogen gas by ZnO(1−x)Pdx, altering its dielectric function. The change in the dielectric constant is analyzed in terms of the red shift of the resonance wavelength in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. To check the sensing capability of sensing probes fabricated with varying composition ratio (x) of nanocomposite, the SPR curves are recorded typically for 0% H2 and 4% H2 in N2 atmosphere for each fabricated probe. On changing the concentration of hydrogen gas from 0% to 4%, the red shift in the SPR spectrum confirms the change in dielectric constant of ZnO(1−x)Pdx on exposure to hydrogen gas. It is noted that the shift in the SPR spectrum increases monotonically up to a certain fraction of Pd in zinc oxide, beyond which it starts decreasing. SEM images and the photoluminescence (PL) spectra reveal that Pd dopant atoms substitutionally incorporated into the ZnO lattice profoundly affect its defect levels; this is responsible for the optimal composition of ZnO(1−x)Pdx to sense the hydrogen gas. The sensor is highly selective to hydrogen gas and possesses high sensitivity. Since optical fiber sensing technology is employed along with the SPR technique, the present sensor is capable of remote sensing and online monitoring of hydrogen gas. (paper)

  13. Fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor utilizing surface plasmon resonance and native defects of zinc oxide by palladium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D.

    2016-01-01

    We present an experimental study on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor employing a palladium doped zinc oxide nanocomposite (ZnO(1-x)Pd x , 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.85) layer over the silver coated unclad core of the fiber. Palladium doped zinc oxide nanocomposites (ZnO(1-x)Pd x ) are prepared by a chemical route for different composition ratios and their structural, morphological and hydrogen sensing properties are investigated experimentally. The sensing principle involves the absorption of hydrogen gas by ZnO(1-x)Pd x , altering its dielectric function. The change in the dielectric constant is analyzed in terms of the red shift of the resonance wavelength in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. To check the sensing capability of sensing probes fabricated with varying composition ratio (x) of nanocomposite, the SPR curves are recorded typically for 0% H2 and 4% H2 in N2 atmosphere for each fabricated probe. On changing the concentration of hydrogen gas from 0% to 4%, the red shift in the SPR spectrum confirms the change in dielectric constant of ZnO(1-x)Pd x on exposure to hydrogen gas. It is noted that the shift in the SPR spectrum increases monotonically up to a certain fraction of Pd in zinc oxide, beyond which it starts decreasing. SEM images and the photoluminescence (PL) spectra reveal that Pd dopant atoms substitutionally incorporated into the ZnO lattice profoundly affect its defect levels; this is responsible for the optimal composition of ZnO(1-x)Pd x to sense the hydrogen gas. The sensor is highly selective to hydrogen gas and possesses high sensitivity. Since optical fiber sensing technology is employed along with the SPR technique, the present sensor is capable of remote sensing and online monitoring of hydrogen gas.

  14. Ionization of hydrogen atom by electron impact in the presence of elliptically polarized laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of ionization in electron hydrogen atom collision in the presence of elliptically polarized laser field, is investigated. The use of the higher order modification of the atomic bound state wave function shows that there is a strong enhancement in the cross section when the laser frequency is half the atomic transition frequency. The dependence of the cross section on the polarization of the laser field is also discussed. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs

  15. New results in the theory of muonic atom formation in molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muonic atom formation in molecular hydrogen proceeds in two stages. In the first stage, the mu-molecular complex (abμe)* is formed due to Coulomb capture of a muon by a hydrogen molecule (abee), and, in the second stage, the decay of the complex leads to exotic-atom formation. We consider various channels for the decay of the complex. The main competition channels are direct dissociation and Auger decay. The primary distribution of muonic atoms over quantum states and kinetic energy has been obtained taking into account the competition of the decay channels. (orig.)

  16. Hydrogen plasma and atomic oxygen treatments of diamond: Chemical versus morphological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical bonding and morphology of chemical vapor deposited diamond films were studied using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, following hydrogen plasma and atomic oxygen exposures. The hydrogen plasma exposure resulted in preferential etching of nondiamond carbon phases, selective etching of diamond facets, and termination of the diamond surfaces by sp3-C-H species. Exposure to atomic oxygen, on the other hand, produced significant chemical changes resulting in oxidized hydrocarbon ill defined top layer, while the morphology of the surface remained almost unchanged

  17. Disposal pathway for tritiated reactive metals and tritiated hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinectrics and its predecessor company Ontario Hydro Research Div. (a division of Ontario Hydro) had a fully operational tritium laboratory on site since the early 1980's. During those years numerous projects and experiments were undertaken using hydrogen and tritium for the most part. Metals with an affinity for hydrogen are commonly employed as scavengers of hydrogenic gases from process streams or as hydrogen storage mediums. The two most common of these metals used were depleted uranium and a zirconium-iron alloy (SAES St198). The break-up of Ontario Hydro through deregulation activities resulted in the building of a new, smaller, tritium laboratory and the decommissioning of the original tritium laboratory. Decommissioning activities resulted in the need to safely dispose of these reactive metals. Disposal of these metals is not straight forward. For safe, long term, disposal it has been decided to oxidize the metals in a controlled fashion. The oxidized beds, containing the metals, will be sent to a radioactive waste site for long term storage. Options for disposal of tritiated hydrogen gas are presented and discussed. This paper provides a disposal pathway for tritiated reactive metals and hydrogen thereby closing the loop in tritium handling. (authors)

  18. 有序度对Ni4Mo合金在氢气中脆性的影响%Effect of Ordering on Embrittlement of Ni4Mo Alloy in Hydrogen Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程晓英; 李慧改

    2005-01-01

    The fracture behavior of disordered and ordered Ni4 Mo alloy was investigated by tensile tests in hydrogen gas or during hydrogen charging. The results show that the ductility of the disordered alloy decreased slightly with the hydrogen pressure increasing, while that of the ordered alloy decreased rapidly with the hydrogen pressure increasing. However, the ductility of both disordered and ordered alloys reduced similarly seriously with the charging current density increasing. Therefore, the mechanism of order-induced embrittlement of Ni4 Mo alloy in hydrogen gas is supposed to be that atomic order accelerates the kinetics of the catalytic reaction for the dissociation of molecular H2 into atomic H.

  19. Novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen: reduction of microbial-contaminants and OH radicals in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen has been developed. This device has specific properties such as (1) deactivation of airborne microbial-contaminants, (2) neutralization of indoor OH radicals and (3) being harmless to the human body. It consists of a ceramic plate as a positive ion generation electrode and a needle-shaped electrode as an electron emission electrode. Release of atomic hydrogen from the device has been investigated by the spectroscopic method. Optical emission of atomic hydrogen probably due to recombination of positive ions, H+(H2O)n, generated from the ceramic plate electrode and electrons emitted from the needle-shaped electrode have been clearly observed in the He gas (including water vapour) environment. The efficacy of the device to reduce airborne concentrations of influenza virus, bacteria, mould fungi and allergens has been evaluated. 99.6% of airborne influenza virus has been deactivated with the operation of the device compared with the control test in a 1 m3 chamber after 60 min. The neutralization of the OH radical has been investigated by spectroscopic and biological methods. A remarkable reduction of the OH radical in the air by operation of the device has been observed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The cell protection effects of the device against OH radicals in the air have been observed. Furthermore, the side effects have been checked by animal experiments. The harmlessness of the device has been confirmed

  20. Novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen: reduction of microbial-contaminants and OH radicals in the air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Hideo; Park, Rae-Eun; Kwon, Jun-Hyoun; Suh, Inseon; Jeon, Junsang; Ha, Eunju; On, Hyeon-Ki; Kim, Hye-Ryung; Choi, Kyoung Hui; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Seong, Baik-Lin; Jung, Hoon; Kang, Shin Jung; Namba, Shinichi; Takiyama, Ken

    2007-01-01

    A novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen has been developed. This device has specific properties such as (1) deactivation of airborne microbial-contaminants, (2) neutralization of indoor OH radicals and (3) being harmless to the human body. It consists of a ceramic plate as a positive ion generation electrode and a needle-shaped electrode as an electron emission electrode. Release of atomic hydrogen from the device has been investigated by the spectroscopic method. Optical emission of atomic hydrogen probably due to recombination of positive ions, H+(H2O)n, generated from the ceramic plate electrode and electrons emitted from the needle-shaped electrode have been clearly observed in the He gas (including water vapour) environment. The efficacy of the device to reduce airborne concentrations of influenza virus, bacteria, mould fungi and allergens has been evaluated. 99.6% of airborne influenza virus has been deactivated with the operation of the device compared with the control test in a 1 m3 chamber after 60 min. The neutralization of the OH radical has been investigated by spectroscopic and biological methods. A remarkable reduction of the OH radical in the air by operation of the device has been observed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The cell protection effects of the device against OH radicals in the air have been observed. Furthermore, the side effects have been checked by animal experiments. The harmlessness of the device has been confirmed.

  1. Atomically isolated nickel species anchored on graphitized carbon for efficient hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lili; Liu, Peng Fei; Yan, Xuecheng; Gu, Lin; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Yang, Hua Gui; Qiu, Shilun; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen production through electrochemical process is at the heart of key renewable energy technologies including water splitting and hydrogen fuel cells. Despite tremendous efforts, exploring cheap, efficient and durable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution still remains as a great challenge. Here we synthesize a nickel-carbon-based catalyst, from carbonization of metal-organic frameworks, to replace currently best-known platinum-based materials for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution. This nickel-carbon-based catalyst can be activated to obtain isolated nickel atoms on the graphitic carbon support when applying electrochemical potential, exhibiting highly efficient hydrogen evolution performance with high exchange current density of 1.2 mA cm-2 and impressive durability. This work may enable new opportunities for designing and tuning properties of electrocatalysts at atomic scale for large-scale water electrolysis.

  2. A compact design for a magnetic synchrotron to store beams of hydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    van der Poel, Aernout P P; Softley, Timothy P; Bethlem, Hendrick L

    2015-01-01

    We present a design for an atomic synchrotron consisting of 40 hybrid magnetic hexapole lenses arranged in a circle. We show that for realistic parameters, hydrogen atoms with a velocity up to 600 m/s can be stored in a 1-meter diameter ring, which implies that the atoms can be injected in the ring directly from a pulsed supersonic beam source. This ring can be used to study collisions between stored hydrogen atoms and molecular beams of many different atoms and molecules. The advantage of using a synchrotron is two-fold: (i) the collision partners move in the same direction as the stored atoms, resulting in a small relative velocity and thus a low collision energy, and (ii) by storing atoms for many round-trips, the sensitivity to collisions is enhanced by a factor of 100-1000. In the proposed ring, the cross-sections for collisions between hydrogen, the most abundant atom in the universe, with any atom or molecule that can be put in a beam, including He, H$_2$, CO, ammonia and OH can be measured at energies...

  3. Penning ionization cross sections of excited rare gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electronic energy transfer processes involving excited rare gas atoms play one of the most important roles in ionized gas phenomena. Penning ionization is one of the well known electronic energy transfer processes and has been studied extensively both experimentally and theoretically. The present paper reports the deexcitation (Penning ionization) cross sections of metastable state helium He(23S) and radiative He(21P) atoms in collision with atoms and molecules, which have recently been obtained by the authors' group by using a pulse radiolysis method. Investigation is made of the selected deexcitation cross sections of He(23S) by atoms and molecules in the thermal collisional energy region. Results indicate that the cross sections are strongly dependent on the target molecule. The deexcitation probability of He(23S) per collision increases with the excess electronic energy of He(23S) above the ionization potential of the target atom or molecule. Another investigation, made on the deexcitation of He(21P), suggests that the deexcitation cross section for He(21P) by Ar is determined mainly by the Penning ionization cross section due to a dipole-dipole interaction. Penning ionization due to the dipole-dipole interaction is also important for deexcitation of He(21P) by the target molecules examined. (N.K.)

  4. Large amplitude spin oscillations in a collisionless trapped atomic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Piechon, F; Laloë, F

    2009-01-01

    We propose an explanation of the recently observed strong spin segregation in a trapped Fermi gas by Du et al. Numerical and analytical solutions of a spin 1/2 kinetic equation in a collisionless regime explain quantitatively the observation of an "anomalous" large time scale and amplitude of the segregation. The key difference with previous experiment on bosons rests more in the diluteness of the gas than in the quantum statistics of the atoms. When they undergo fast ballistic oscillations in the trap, they average the inhomogeneous external field in an energy dependent way, so that their transverse spin precession frequency becomes proportional to their energy. Interactions between atoms of different energies and different spin directions then involve the identical spin rotation effect (ISRE), which transfers atoms to the up or down spin state in an energy dependent way. Since low energy atoms are closer to the center of the trap than high energy atoms, which can visit its edges, the final outcome is a stro...

  5. Angular Momentum Regulates Atomic Gas Fractions of Galactic Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Obreschkow, Danail; Kilborn, Virginia; Lutz, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    We show that the mass fraction f_atm = 1.35*MHI/M of neutral atomic gas (HI and He) in isolated local disk galaxies of baryonic mass M is well described by a straightforward stability model for flat exponential disks. In the outer disk parts, where gas at the characteristic dispersion of the Warm Neutral Medium is stable in the sense of Toomre (1964), the disk consists of neutral atomic gas; conversely the inner part where this medium would be Toomre-unstable, is dominated by stars and molecules. Within this model, f_atm only depends on a global stability parameter q=j*sigma/(GM), where j is the baryonic specific angular momentum of the disk and sigma the velocity dispersion of the atomic gas. The analytically derived first-order solution f_atm = min{1,2.5q^1.12} provides a good fit to all plausible rotation curves. This model, with no free parameters, agrees remarkably well (+-0.2 dex) with measurements of f_atm in isolated local disk galaxies, even with galaxies that are extremely HI-rich or HI-poor for the...

  6. A simple thermodynamic model of diluted hydrogen gas/plasma for CFD applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartapelle, L.; Muzzio, A.

    2015-06-01

    This work describes a simple thermodynamic model of the hydrogen gas at low densities and for temperatures going from those involving quantum rotations of ortho- and para-hydrogen up to the fully ionized state. The closed-form energy levels of Morse rotating oscillator given [D.C. Harris, M.D. Bertolucci, Symmetry and Spectroscopy (Dover, New York, 1989)] (but not those in Morse's original paper) are shown to provide an internal partition function of H2 that is a sufficiently accurate representation of that exploiting the state-of-the-art spectrum of roto-vibrational levels calculated by Pachucki and Komasa [K. Pachucki, J. Komasa, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 164113 (2009)]. A system of two coupled quadratic equations for molecular dissociation and atomic ionization at thermodynamical and chemical equilibrium is derived according to the statistical mechanics by assuming that the system is an ideal mixture containing molecules, neutral atoms and noninteracting protons and electrons. The system of two equations reduces to a single quartic equation for the ionization unknown, with the coefficients dependent on the temperature and the specific volume. Explicit relations for specific energy and entropy of the hydrogen ideal gas/plasma model are derived. These fully compatible equations of state provide a complete thermodynamic description of the system, uniformly valid from low temperatures up to a fully ionized state, with electrons and ions relaxed to one and the same temperature. The comparison with results of other models developed in the framework of the physical and chemical pictures shows that the proposed elementary model is adequate for computational fluid dynamics purposes, in applications with the hydrogen gas under diluted conditions and when the dissociation and ionization can be assumed at thermodynamical and chemical equilibrium.

  7. Study of the gas phase hot atom chemistry using THOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactions of recoil tritium and chlorine atoms in the gas phase have been studied using the facility at Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR). The C2H3T yield, due to unimolecular reaction of the excited CH4THO* or C2H3T* molecules, is decreased with increasing pressure in the T + C2H5OH system. The yield of H38Cl is found in the range of 3 - 17 % based on CF3Cl/C2H4 ratio in the recoil 38Cl atom with ethylene system. (author)

  8. Measurements of relative photoemission time delays in noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We determine relative photoemission time delays between valence electrons in different noble gas atoms (Ar, Ne and He) in an energy range between 31 and 37 eV. The atoms are ionized by an attosecond pulse train synchronized with an infrared laser field and the delays are measured using an interferometric technique. We compare our results with calculations using the random phase approximation with exchange and multi-configurational Hartree–Fock. We also investigate the influence of the different ionization angular channels. (paper)

  9. Electroionization lasers using electron transitions in inert gas atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basov, N. G.; Danilychev, V. A.; Kholin, I. V.

    1986-04-01

    Recent developments in high-power quasi-continuous-wave lasers based on electron transitions in inert gas atoms and pumped by fast electrons or by the electroionization method are reviewed. In particular, attention is given to high-pressure lasers using atomic transitions in XeI, KrI, ArI, and NeI which generate in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. The advantages of these lasers over other high-power lasers and, particularly, over the CO2 laser are examined.

  10. Fermionic collective excitations in a lattice gas of Rydberg atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Olmos, B; González-Férez, R.; Lesanovsky, I.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the many-body quantum states of a laser-driven gas of Rydberg atoms confined to a large spacing ring lattice. If the laser driving is much stronger than the van-der-Waals interaction among the Rydberg sates, these many-body states are collective fermionic excitations. The first excited state is a spin-wave that extends over the entire lattice. We demonstrate that our system permits to study fermions in the presence of disorder although no external atomic motion takes place. We ...

  11. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral atoms: Theory, comparisons, and application to Ca

    CERN Document Server

    Barklem, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical method for the estimation of cross sections and rates for excitation and charge transfer processes in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral atoms, based on an asymptotic two-electron model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen atom system, is presented. The calculation of potentials and non-adiabatic radial couplings using the method is demonstrated. The potentials are used together with the multi-channel Landau-Zener model to calculate cross sections and rate coefficients. The main feature of the method is that it employs asymptotically exact atomic wavefunctions, which can be determined from known atomic parameters. The method is applied to Li+H, Na+H, and Mg+H collisions, and the results compare well with existing detailed full-quantum calculations. The method is applied to the astrophysically important problem of Ca+H collisions, and rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20000 K.

  12. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, PI; Jerry Meldon, Co-PI; Xiaomei Qi

    2002-12-01

    Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperatures to improve reaction kinetics and permeation. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H{sub 2} removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2}-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. The first-year screening studies of WGS catalysts identified Cu-ceria as the most promising high-temperature shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}, and were thus eliminated from further consideration. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. Several catalyst formulations were prepared, characterized and tested in the first year of study. Details from the catalyst development and testing work were given in our first annual technical report. Hydrogen permeation through Pd and Pd-alloy foils was investigated in a small membrane reactor constructed during the first year of the project. The effect of temperature on the hydrogen flux through pure Pd, Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} and Pd{sub 75}Ag{sub 25} alloy membranes, each 25 {micro}m thick, was evaluated in the temperature range from 250 C to 500 C at upstream pressure of 4.4 atm and permeate

  13. Gas exchange between hydrogen plasma with oxygen impurity and stainless steel surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the method of thermal desorption spectroscopy the hydrogen isotopes and oxygen trapping in stainless steel 12Kh18N10T during its exposure in the D2+O2 mixture in the presence of atom source or at irradiation by ions and electrons of deuterium plasma with oxygen impurity is studied. The dependences of oxygen trapping in steel on dose rate, irradiating ions energy, oxygen concentration in working gas are obtained. The regularities are determined and the technique for trapped oxygen removal by irradiation in helium or deuterium plasma is suggested

  14. Positron scattering from hydrogen atom with screened Coulomb potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elastic positron-hydrogen collisions with screened Coulomb potentials have been investigated using a second-order distorted wave Born approximation in the momentum space. Two types of potentials have been considered, namely, static screened Coulomb potential and exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potential. Using a simple variationally determined hydrogenic wave function it has been possible to obtain the scattering amplitude in a closed form. A detailed study has been made on the differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20–300 eV

  15. Possibility of significant heating of H atoms in high-density, helicon-wave excited hydrogen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, K.; Nakamoto, M.; Kadota, K.

    2001-10-01

    In the present work, we measured the distribution of H atom density in high-density hydrogen plasmas excited by helicon-wave discharges. The measurement was carried out in a linear machine with a uniform magnetic field of 1 kG along the cylindrical axis of the vacuum chamber. Plasmas were produced in a glass tube of 3 cm diameter by applying various rf powers to a helical antenna wound around the glass tube. The hydrogen gas pressure was 30--100 mTorr. Since the plasma was confined radially by the external magnetic field, we obtained a slender plasma column of 3 cm diameter at the center of the vacuum chamber. The distribution of the H atom density was measured by (2+1)-photon laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. As a result, it was found that the distribution of the H atom density had a deep dip in the high-density operation. The location of the dip corresponded to the high-density plasma column. A possible explanation for the deep dip in the plasma column is significant heating of H atoms. In general, it is known that temperatures of neutral species in low-pressure plasmas are not so far from room temperature. However, the present experimental result suggests the possibility of significant heating of neutral radicals in low-pressure, high-density plasmas. The high temperature may influence the transport and kinetics of reactive species in plasmas.

  16. Hydrogen Gas Production by an Ectothiorhodospira vacuolata Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, L J; Irgens, R L

    1991-02-01

    A hydrogen gas (H(2))-producing strain of Ectothiorhodospira vacuolata isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, possessed nitrogenase activity. Increasing evolution of H(2) with decreasing ammonium chloride concentrations provided evidence that nitrogenase was the catalyst in gas production. Cells were grown in a mineral medium plus 0.2% acetate with sodium sulfide as an electron donor. Factors increasing H(2) production included addition of reduced carbon compounds such as propionate and succinate, increased reducing power by increasing sodium sulfide concentrations, and increased energy charge (ATP) by increasing light intensity. PMID:16348423

  17. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Production in the UT TRIGA Reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In December 1999, The University of Texas at Austin (UT) reported an unusual condition associated with the annular graphite reflector surrounding the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) TRIGA reactor. The aluminum container encapsulating the graphite showed signs of bulging or swelling. Further, during an investigation of this occurrence, bubbles were detected coming from a weld in the aluminum. The gas composition was approximately 2:1 hydrogen to oxygen. After safety review and equipment fabrication, the reflector was successfully vented and flooded. The ratio of the gases produced is unusual, and the gas production mechanism has not yet been explained

  18. Origin of the smaller conductances of Rh, Pb, and Co atomic junctions in hydrogen environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study theoretically the structural and electronic origins of the smaller conductances (one conductance quantum, G0, and smaller) of Rh, Pb, and Co metal atomic junctions (MAJs) in a hydrogen environment, as were measured in recent experiments. For the Rh MAJs, the 1G0 conductance is attributed to a stable contact bridged by a single hydrogen molecule whose antibonding state provides a single transport channel. For the Pb and Co MAJs the 1G0 conductance is, however, ascribed to a linear atomic chain adsorbing two dissociated H atoms, which largely reduces the density of states at the Fermi energy with respect to the pure ones. On the other hand, the small conductances of 0.3G0 (Rh) and 0.2G0 (Co) are due to H-decorated atomic chains connected to electrodes by a H atom

  19. Dynamics of the molecular and atomic mechanisms for the hydrogen-iodine exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, L. M.; Thompson, D. L.; Sims, L. B.; Porter, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    The molecular and atomic mechanisms for the hydrogen-iodine exchange reaction are treated theoretically by means of extensive classical trajectories calculated on a reasonable potential energy surface on which the single adjustable parameter is the iodine-core effective charge. The analysis shows the molecular mechanism to be dynamically forbidden, but gives an over-all rate constant for the atomic mechanism that is in agreement with the experimental values. It is indicated that the formation of a weak H2I complex plays an important dynamical role if the atomic mechanism is limited to reactions with collision complexes involving no more than two hydrogen atoms and two iodine atoms. Excellent agreement with experiment is obtained for the rate constant for the recombination I+I+H2 yields I2+H2 and its negative temperature coefficient.

  20. Exotic atoms: Muonic atoms into vacuum from solid hydrogen. Technical progress report, February 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunselman, R.

    1993-12-31

    The experiments use various solid hydrogen layers to form various muonic hydrogen isotopes that escape into vacuum. The method relies on transfer of the muon from protium to either a deuteron or a triton. The resulting muonic deuterium or muonic tritium will not immediately thermalize because of the very low elastic cross sections, and may be emitted from the surface of the layer. Measurements which detect decay electrons, muonic x-rays, and fusion products have been used to study the processes. A target has been constructed which exploits muonic atom emission in order to learn more about the energy dependence of transfer and muon molecular formation.

  1. Exotic atoms: Muonic atoms into vacuum from solid hydrogen. Technical progress report, February 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiments use various solid hydrogen layers to form various muonic hydrogen isotopes that escape into vacuum. The method relies on transfer of the muon from protium to either a deuteron or a triton. The resulting muonic deuterium or muonic tritium will not immediately thermalize because of the very low elastic cross sections, and may be emitted from the surface of the layer. Measurements which detect decay electrons, muonic x-rays, and fusion products have been used to study the processes. A target has been constructed which exploits muonic atom emission in order to learn more about the energy dependence of transfer and muon molecular formation

  2. Detection of gas atoms via vibration of graphenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Behrouz; Wang, Quan; Duan, Wen Hui

    2011-06-01

    The application of single-layered graphene sheets as mass sensors in detection of noble gases via a vibration analysis of graphenes is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. An index based on frequency shifts of the graphenes attached by the distinct noble gas atoms is defined and examined to measure the sensitivity of the sensors. The dependence of number and location of gas atoms, size of graphene sheets, and type of restrained boundary of the sheets on the sensitivity is particularly studied. The simulation results indicate the resolution of a mass sensor made of a square graphene sheet with a size of 10 nm can achieve an order of 10 femtograms and the mass sensitivity can be enhanced with a decrease in sizes of graphenes.

  3. Plasma power source based on a catalytic reaction of atomic hydrogen measured by water bath calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy was recorded on microwave discharges of helium with 2% hydrogen. Novel emission lines were observed with energies of q x 13.6 eV, where q=1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11 or these discrete energies less 21.2 eV corresponding to inelastic scattering of these photons by helium atoms due to excitation of He (1s2) to He (1s12p1). The average hydrogen atom temperature was measured to be 180-210 eV versus ∼3 eV for pure hydrogen. The electron temperature Te for helium-hydrogen was 30,500±5% K compared to 7400±5% K for pure helium. Dominant He+ emission and an intensification of the plasma emission observed when He+ was present with atomic hydrogen demonstrated the role of He+ as a catalyst. Using water bath calorimetry, excess power was observed from the helium-hydrogen plasma compared to control krypton plasma. For example, for an input of 8.1 W, the total plasma power of the helium-hydrogen plasma measured by water bath calorimetry was 30.0 W corresponding to 21.9 W of excess power in 3 cm3. The excess power density and energy balance were high, 7.3 W/cm3 and -2.9x104 kJ/mole H2, respectively

  4. Centaurus A : Morphology and kinematics of the atomic hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struve, C.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Morganti, R.; Saripalli, L.

    2010-01-01

    We present new ATCA 21-cm line observations of the neutral hydrogen in the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A. We image in detail (with a resolution down to 7 '', similar to 100 pc) the distribution of HI along the dust lane. Our data have better velocity resolution and better sensitivity than previous

  5. First-principles calculation for the effect of hydrogen atoms on the mobility of a screw dislocation in BCC iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of hydrogen atoms on the mobility of a screw dislocation in BCC iron has been evaluated using the first-principles calculation. The stable position of a hydrogen atom is found to be near the screw dislocation core and inside the core respectively when the dislocation is at the easy-core or hard-core configuration in BCC iron. The intrinsically unstable hard-core configuration of the screw dislocation is stabilized when a hydrogen atom is trapped inside the core. On the basis of this first-principles result, an elastic string model of a dislocation is developed to predict the kink motion in the presence of a hydrogen atom. It is found that a double-kink formation is facilitated when a hydrogen atom is located near a dislocation line, however, a kink motion is retarded when a hydrogen atom is behind the kink. (author)

  6. Fermionic collective excitations in a lattice gas of Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Olmos, B; Lesanovsky, I

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the many-body quantum states of a laser-driven gas of Rydberg atoms confined to a large spacing ring lattice. If the laser driving is much stronger than the van-der-Waals interaction among the Rydberg sates, these many-body states are collective fermionic excitations. The first excited state is a spin-wave that extends over the entire lattice. We demonstrate that our system permits to study fermions in the presence of disorder although no external atomic motion takes place. We analyze how this disorder influences the excitation properties of the fermionic states. Our work shows a route towards the creation of complex many-particle states with atoms in lattices.

  7. Coaxial twin-fluid atomization with pattern air gas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei Ng, Chin; Aliseda, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    Coaxial twin-fluid atomization has numerous industrial applications, most notably fuel injection and spray coating. In the coating process of pharmaceutical tablets, the coaxial atomizing air stream is accompanied by two diametrically opposed side jets that impinge on the liquid/gas coaxial jets at an angle to produce an elliptical shape of the spray's cross section. Our study focuses on the influence of these side jets on the break up process and on the droplet velocity and diameter distribution along the cross section. The ultimate goal is to predict the size distribution and volume flux per unit area in the spray. With this predictive model, an optimal atomizing air/pattern air ratio can be found to achieve the desired coating result. This model is also crucial in scaling up the laboratory setup to production level. We have performed experiments with different atomized liquids, such as water and glycerine-water mixtures, that allow us to establish the effect of liquid viscosity, through the Ohnesorge number, in the spray characteristics. The gas Reynolds number of our experiments ranges from 9000 to 18000 and the Weber number ranges from 400 to 1600. We will present the effect of pattern air in terms of the resulting droplets size, droplet number density and velocity at various distances downstream of the nozzle where the effect of pattern air is significant.

  8. Hydrogen passivation effects on carbon dangling bond defects accompanying a nearby hydrogen atom in p-type Cd diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuochi, N. [Graduate School of Library, Information and Media Studies, University of Tsukuba, 1-2 Kasuga, Tsukuba-City, Ibaraki 305-8550 (Japan) and Diamond Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan) and CREST JST - Japan Science and Technology (Japan)]. E-mail: mizuochi@slis.tsukuba.ac.jp; Ogura, M. [Diamond Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); CREST JST (Japan Science and Technology) (Japan); Isoya, J. [Graduate School of Library, Information and Media Studies, University of Tsukuba, 1-2 Kasuga, Tsukuba-City, Ibaraki 305-8550 (Japan); Diamond Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Okushi, H. [Diamond Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); CREST JST (Japan Science and Technology) (Japan); Yamasaki, S. [Diamond Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); CREST JST (Japan Science and Technology) (Japan); Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, 305-8577 (Japan)

    2006-04-01

    Hydrogen (deuterium) passivation effects on carbon dangling bond defects accompanying a nearby hydrogen atom (H1') in boron-doped Cd homoepitaxial diamond films were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Deuterium was incorporated into the films using microwave deuterium plasma at 673 K for 22 h. Incorporation of deuterium was confirmed by the passivation of boron acceptors. From the comparison of the EPR signal intensity before and after the deuterium plasma exposure, it was revealed that H1' could not be passivated by the present condition. From these, the high stability of H1' was indicated.

  9. Experimental Study of Gas Explosions in Hydrogen Sulfide-Natural Gas-Air Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Vagner Gaathaug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of turbulent combustion of hydrogen sulfide (H2S and natural gas was performed to provide reference data for verification of CFD codes and direct comparison. Hydrogen sulfide is present in most crude oil sources, and the explosion behaviour of pure H2S and mixtures with natural gas is important to address. The explosion behaviour was studied in a four-meter-long square pipe. The first two meters of the pipe had obstacles while the rest was smooth. Pressure transducers were used to measure the combustion in the pipe. The pure H2S gave slightly lower explosion pressure than pure natural gas for lean-to-stoichiometric mixtures. The rich H2S gave higher pressure than natural gas. Mixtures of H2S and natural gas were also studied and pressure spikes were observed when 5% and 10% H2S were added to natural gas and also when 5% and 10% natural gas were added to H2S. The addition of 5% H2S to natural gas resulted in higher pressure than pure H2S and pure natural gas. The 5% mixture gave much faster combustion than pure natural gas under fuel rich conditions.

  10. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l−1 and 1.0 ng l−1, respectively. - Highlights: • We optimized and compared two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry. • Miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were optimized. • The limit of detection for arsenic was 1.0 ng l−1

  11. Experimental Study of Gas Explosions in Hydrogen Sulfide-Natural Gas-Air Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Gaathaug, André Vagner; Bjerketvedt, Dag; Vågsæther, Knut; Nilsen, Sandra Hennie

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study of turbulent combustion of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and natural gas was performed to provide reference data for verification of CFD codes and direct comparison. Hydrogen sulfide is present in most crude oil sources, and the explosion behaviour of pure H2S and mixtures with natural gas is important to address. The explosion behaviour was studied in a four-meter-long square pipe.The first two meters of the pipe had obstacles while the rest was smooth. Pressure transducers...

  12. Experimental Study of Gas Explosions in Hydrogen Sulfide-Natural Gas-Air Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    André Vagner Gaathaug; Dag Bjerketvedt; Knut Vaagsaether; Sandra Hennie Nilsen

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study of turbulent combustion of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and natural gas was performed to provide reference data for verification of CFD codes and direct comparison. Hydrogen sulfide is present in most crude oil sources, and the explosion behaviour of pure H2S and mixtures with natural gas is important to address. The explosion behaviour was studied in a four-meter-long square pipe. The first two meters of the pipe had obstacles while the rest was smooth. Pressure transducers w...

  13. Hydrogen atom wave function and eigen energy in the Rindler space

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, De-Chang

    2016-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom eigenstate energy and wave function in the Rindler space. The probability distribution is tilted because the electric field of the nucleus is no longer spherically symmetric. The hydrogen atom therefore cannot be treated exactly in the same way as what it is in an inertial frame. We also find that if the external force accelerates only the nucleus and then the nucleus accelerates its surrounding electrons through electromagnetic force, the electrons can tunnel through the local energy gap and split the hydrogen atom into an ion. This is similar to what one expects from the Stark effect. However, the critical acceleration is about $3\\times 10^{22} m/s^2$. It is well beyond the gravitational acceleration on a regular star surface.

  14. Density functional studies of surface potentials for hydrogen and oxygen atoms on diamond (111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Samar; Tokuda, Norio; Inokuma, Takao

    2014-02-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen and oxygen atoms on diamond (111)-(1 × 1) surfaces is investigated by a molecular orbital method based on the density functional theory. The potential energy for hydrogen and oxygen adatoms on a flat surface and a surface with monoatomic steps are studied. The oxygen adatom is found to have a much lower energy barrier for migration than the hydrogen adatom. On the basis of the variations of potential energy, surface diffusion coefficients of adatoms are calculated. The potential energy for the oxygen adatom is much lowered near the step edge in comparison with those on flat regions. It is suggested that the oxygen atoms adsorbed on the diamond (111) surface are preferentially trapped near atomic steps after migration.

  15. Hydrogenation-induced atomic stripes on the 2 H -MoS2 surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Wook; Yun, Won Seok; Lee, J. D.; Hwang, Y. H.; Baik, J.; Shin, H. J.; Lee, Wang G.; Park, Young S.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2015-12-01

    We report that the hydrogenation of a single crystal 2 H -MoS2 induces a novel-intermediate phase between 2H and 1T phases on its surface, i.e., the large-area, uniform, robust, and surface array of atomic stripes through the intralayer atomic-plane gliding. The total energy calculations confirm that the hydrogenation-induced atomic stripes are energetically most stable on the MoS2 surface between the semiconducting 2H and metallic 1T phase. Furthermore, the electronic states associated with the hydrogen ions, which is bonded to sulfur anions on both sides of the MoS2 surface layer, appear in the vicinity of the Fermi level (EF) and reduces the band gap. This is promising in developing the monolayer-based field-effect transistor or vanishing the Schottky barrier for practical applications.

  16. Fate of Accidental Symmetries of the Relativistic Hydrogen Atom in a Spherical Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Hashimi, M H; Wiese, U -J

    2015-01-01

    The non-relativistic hydrogen atom enjoys an accidental $SO(4)$ symmetry, that enlarges the rotational $SO(3)$ symmetry, by extending the angular momentum algebra with the Runge-Lenz vector. In the relativistic hydrogen atom the accidental symmetry is partially lifted. Due to the Johnson-Lippmann operator, which commutes with the Dirac Hamiltonian, some degeneracy remains. When the non-relativistic hydrogen atom is put in a spherical cavity of radius $R$ with perfectly reflecting Robin boundary conditions, characterized by a self-adjoint extension parameter $\\gamma$, in general the accidental $SO(4)$ symmetry is lifted. However, for $R = (l+1)(l+2) a$ (where $a$ is the Bohr radius and $l$ is the orbital angular momentum) some degeneracy remains when $\\gamma = \\infty$ or $\\gamma = \\frac{2}{R}$. In the relativistic case, we consider the most general spherically and parity invariant boundary condition, which is characterized by a self-adjoint extension parameter. In this case, the remnant accidental symmetry is ...

  17. Integrated Micro-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensor. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank DiMeo, Jr.

    2000-10-02

    This report details our recent progress in developing novel MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) based hydrogen gas sensors. These sensors couple novel thin films as the active layer on a device structure known as a Micro-HotPlate. This coupling has resulted in a gas sensor that has several unique advantages in terms of speed, sensitivity, stability and amenability to large scale manufacture. This Phase-I research effort was focused on achieving the following three objectives: (1) Investigation of sensor fabrication parameters and their effects on sensor performance. (2) Hydrogen response testing of these sensors in wet/dry and oxygen-containing/oxygen-deficient atmospheres. (3) Investigation of the long-term stability of these thin film materials and identification of limiting factors. We have made substantial progress toward achieving each of these objectives, and highlights of our phase I results include the demonstration of signal responses with and without oxygen present, as well as in air with a high level of humidity. We have measured response times of <0.5 s to 1% H{sub 2} in air, and shown the ability to detect concentrations of <200 ppm. These results are extremely encouraging and suggest that this technology has substantial potential for meeting the needs of a hydrogen based economy. These achievements demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-hotplates structures in conjunction with palladium+coated metal-hydride films for sensing hydrogen in many of the environments required by a hydrogen based energy economy. Based on these findings, they propose to continue and expand the development of this technology in Phase II.

  18. Nucleon Polarizabilities: from Compton Scattering to Hydrogen Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelstein, Franziska; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of the nucleon polarizabilities and of their role in nucleon Compton scattering and in hydrogen spectrum. We discuss the basic concepts, the recent lattice QCD calculations and advances in chiral effective-field theory. On the experimental side, we review the ongoing programs aimed to measure the nucleon (scalar and spin) polarizabilities via the Compton scattering processes, with real and virtual photons. A great part of the review is devoted to the general constraints based on unitarity, causality, discrete and continuous symmetries, which result in model-independent relations involving nucleon polarizabilities. We (re-)derive a variety of such relations and discuss their empirical value. The proton polarizability effects are presently the major sources of uncertainty in the assessment of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and hyperfine structure. Recent calculations of these effects are reviewed here in the context of the "proton-radius puzzle". We conclude with summary...

  19. Hydrogen gettering the overpressure gas from highly radioactive liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remediation of current inventories of high activity radioactive liquid waste (HALW) requires transportation of Type-B quantities of radioactive material, possibly up to several hundred liters. However, the only currently certified packaging is limited to quantities of 50 ml of Type-B radioactive liquid. Efforts are under way to recertify the existing packaging to allow the shipment of up to 4 liters of Type-B quantities of HALW, but significantly larger packaging could be needed in the future. Scoping studies and preliminary designs have identified the feasibility of retrofitting an insert into existing casks, allowing the transport of up to 380 liters of HALW. However, the insert design and ultimate certification strategy depend heavily on the gas-generating attributes of the HALW. A converted containment vessel filled with HALW, in the absence of any gas-mitigation technologies, poses a threat and, therefore, gas generation, specifically hydrogen generation, must be reliably controlled during all phases of transportation. Two techniques are available to mitigate hydrogen accumulation: recombiners and getters. Getters have an advantage over recombiners in that oxides are not required to react with the hydrogen. A test plan was developed to evaluate three forms of getter material in the presence of both simulated HALW and the gases that are produced by the HALW. These tests demonstrated that getters can react with hydrogen in the presence of simulated waste and in the presence of several other gases generated by the HALW, such as nitrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and carbon monoxide. Although the use of such a gettering system has been shown to be technically feasible, only a preliminary design for its use has been completed. No further development is planned until the requirement for bulk transport of Type-B quantities of HALW is more thoroughly defined

  20. Efficiency of hydrogen gas production in a stand-alone solar hydrogen system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many photovoltaic systems operate in a decentralised electricity producing system, or stand-alone mode and the total energy demand is met by the output of the photovoltaic array. The output of the photovoltaic system fluctuates and is unpredictable for many applications making some forms of energy storage system necessary. The role of storage medium is to store the excess energy produced by the photovoltaic arry, to absorb momentary power peaks and to supply energy during sunless periods. One of the storage modes is the use of electrochemical techniques, with batteries and water electrolysis as the most important examples. The present study includes three main parts: the first one is the hydrogen production form the electrolysis of water depending on the DC output current of the photovoltaic (PV) energy source and the charging of the battery. The second part presents the influence of various parameters on the efficiency of hydrogen gas production. The final part includes simulation studies with focus on solar hydrogen efficiency under the influence of various physical and chemical parameters. For a 50W panel-battery-electrolyser system, the dependence of volume of hydrogen gas on voltage, current and power yielded a maximum efficiency of 13.6% (author)

  1. Atoms in hydrogen plasma in strong electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-particle states of a hydrogen plasma under the influence of a homogeneous strong electric field and of the density are investigated. The complex rotated Stark-Coulomb-Schroedinger equation was solved analytically using complex power series expansions. In this technique one works with square integrable eigenfunctions. Density effects were taken into account as a second-order perturbation of those polynoms. Real and imaginary parts of the energies are determined which give information about location and width of the states

  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals: Atomic hydrogen from a variety of sources reduces the ductility of many metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, H C

    1968-03-01

    Hydrogen interacts with many metals to reduce their ductility (2) and frequently their strength also. It enters metals in the atomic form, diffusing very rapidly even at normal temperatures. During melting and fabrication, as well as during use, there are various ways in which metals come in contact with hydrogen and absorb it. The absorbed hydrogen may react irreversibly with oxides or carbides in some metals to produce a permanently degraded structure. It may also recombine at internal surfaces of defects of various types to form gaseous molecular hydrogen under pressures sufficiently high to form metal blisters when the recombination occurs near the outer surface. In other metals, brittle hydrides that lower the mechanical properties of the metal are formed. Another type of embrittlement is reversible, depending on the presence of hydrogen in the metal lattice during deformation for its occurrence. Under some conditions the failure may be delayed for long periods. A number of different mechanisms have been postulated to explain reversible embrittlement. According to some theories hydrogen interferes with the processes of plastic deformation in metals, while according to others it enhances the tendency for cracking. PMID:17775040

  3. Self-interaction in Green's-function theory of the hydrogen atom

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, W.; Bokes, P.; Rinke, P.; Godby, R.

    2007-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen provides a unique test case for computational electronic structure methods, since its electronic excitation energies are known analytically. With only one electron, hydrogen contains no electronic correlation and is therefore particularly susceptible to spurious self-interaction errors introduced by certain computational methods. In this paper we focus on many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) in Hedin’s GW approximation. While the Hartree-Fock and the exact MBPT self-energy are...

  4. High-voltage spark atomic emission detector for gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkin, C. L.; Koeplin, S. M.; Crouch, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A dc-powered, double-gap, miniature nanosecond spark source for emission spectrochemical analysis of gas chromatographic effluents is described. The spark is formed between two thoriated tungsten electrodes by the discharge of a coaxial capacitor. The spark detector is coupled to the gas chromatograph by a heated transfer line. The gas chromatographic effluent is introduced into the heated spark chamber where atomization and excitation of the effluent occurs upon breakdown of the analytical gap. A microcomputer-controlled data acquisition system allows the implementation of time-resolution techniques to distinguish between the analyte emission and the background continuum produced by the spark discharge. Multiple sparks are computer averaged to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The application of the spark detector for element-selective detection of metals and nonmetals is reported.

  5. Quenching-independent fluorescence measurements of atomic hydrogen with photoionization controlled-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenching-independent fluorescence by atomic hydrogen has been measured with photoionization controlled-loss spectroscopy (PICLS) in stoichiometric and fuel-rich premixed H2/O2/N2 flames at a pressure of 20 Torr. These measurements are compared with conventional fluorescence measurements in the same flames. When matched in the postflame zone, the two sets of measurements diverge in the preheat zone between the burner surface and the peak of the fluorescence profiles. This divergence, caused by changes in the local quenching rate coefficient, shows the utility of PICLS for determining the kinetics of atomic hydrogen in the preheat zone

  6. Two-colour three-photon transitions in a hydrogen atom embedded in Debye plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We sketch two-colour three-photon bound-bound transitions in hydrogen atoms embedded in weakly coupled plasmas. In the present context, analytical wavefunctions are used for initial and final states along with the pseudostate summation technique for intermediate states. The analytical wavefunctions are obtained from the modified wavefunctions for the screening Coulomb potential (Debye model) using the Ritz variation method. The resonance enhancement frequencies are varied with the Debye length. The results reveal plasma effects on the three-photon bound-bound transition amplitudes for the plasma-imbedded hydrogen atom.

  7. An integral transform solution for the one-dimensional hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The one-dimensional Schroedinger equation for the hydrogen atom is shown to be solvable in terms of an integral transform originally due to Bateman. Two sets of wave functions are obtained; the first set consists of polynomials that correspond to the integer principal quantum numbers and the second set consists of infinite series that corresponds to the non-integer principal quantum numbers. The results prove conclusively that all states of the one-dimensional hydrogen atom are non-degenerate and that the concept of degeneracy due to different parity about the origin does not apply here. (author)

  8. Exact semi-relativistic model for ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact

    OpenAIRE

    Attaourti, Y.; Taj, S.; Manaut, B.

    2004-01-01

    We present a semi-relativistic model for the description of the ionization process of atomic hydrogen by electron impact in the first Born approximation by using the Darwin wave function to describe the bound state of atomic hydrogen and the Sommerfeld-Maue wave function to describe the ejected electron. This model, accurate to first order in $Z/c$ in the relativistic correction, shows that, even at low kinetic energies of the incident electron, spin effects are small but not negligible. Thes...

  9. Enhanced stability of hydrogen atoms at the graphene/graphane interface of nanoribbons

    OpenAIRE

    Ao, Z. M.; Hernández-Nieves, A. D.; Peeters, F.M.; S. Li

    2010-01-01

    The thermal stability of graphene/graphane nanoribbons (GGNRs) is investigated using density functional theory. It is found that the energy barriers for the diffusion of hydrogen atoms on the zigzag and armchair interfaces of GGNRs are 2.86 and 3.17 eV, respectively, while the diffusion barrier of an isolated H atom on pristine graphene was only ~0.3 eV. These results unambiguously demonstrate that the thermal stability of GGNRs can be enhanced significantly by increasing the hydrogen diffusi...

  10. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION; A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperature to improve reaction kinetics. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H(sub 2) removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H(sub 2)-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. In the first year of the project, we prepared a series of nanostructured Cu- and Fe-containing ceria catalysts by a special gelation/precipitation technique followed by air calcination at 650 C. Each sample was characterized by ICP for elemental composition analysis, BET-N2 desorption for surface area measurement, and by temperature-programmed reduction in H(sub 2) to evaluate catalyst reducibility. Screening WGS tests with catalyst powders were conducted in a flow microreactor at temperatures in the range of 200-550 C. On the basis of both activity and stability of catalysts in simulated coal gas, and in CO(sub 2)-rich gases, a Cu-CeO(sub 2) catalyst formulation was selected for further study in this project. Details from the catalyst development and testing work are given in this report. Also in this report, we present H(sub 2) permeation data collected with unsupported flat membranes of pure Pd and Pd-alloys over a wide temperature window

  11. Adsorption and recombination of hydrogen atoms on a model graphite surface. [in interstellar space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronowitz, S.; Chang, S.

    1985-01-01

    The adsorption and recombination of atomic hydrogen on a model graphite grain have been examined in a series of calculations in which a modified, iterative, extended Hueckel program was used. The hydrogen atom is found to be chemisorbed at a site with a zero-point binding energy of 0.7 eV and at an equilibrium distance of 2.25 A above the site. Despite a barrier of about 0.4 eV between adjacent sites, calculations suggest that at temperatures as low as 10 K, an H atom will tunnel through to adjacent sites in less than one nanosecond. However, a potential barrier to the recombination of two hydrogen atoms has been found which displays high sensitivity to the mutual arrangement of the two hydrogen atoms with respect to the graphite surface. Results show that at very low temperatures, recombinations can occur only by tunneling. Consistent with experiment, the region in which H2 begins to form exhibits a repulsive potential with respect to possible chemisorption of the incipient H2 entity.

  12. Two puzzling problems in explanation of the linear Stark effect of hydrogen atom and space quantization of the dipole moment

    OpenAIRE

    You, Pei-Lin; Huang, Xiang-You

    2008-01-01

    The linear Stark effect for the first excited state of the hydrogen atom shows that, in the unperturbed states, the atom has a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of magnitude 3eao (ao is Bohr radius). The EDM is not induce by the external field but is inherent behavior of the atom. But the calculation of quantum mechanics tells us that unperturbed states of hydrogen atom have no EDM! In the effect, two of four states have no energy shift. What are the EDM of the hydrogen atoms in the two ...

  13. Influence of Punch Velocity on Gas Hydrogen Embrittlement Behaviors in SA372 Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When using hydrogen gas as an ecofriendly energy sources, it is necessary to conduct a safety assessment and ensure the reliability of the hydrogen pressure vessel against hydrogen embrittlement expected in the steel materials. In this study, by applying the in-situ SP test method, the gas hydrogen embrittlement behaviors in SA372 steel, which is commonly used as a pressurized hydrogen gas storage container, were evaluated. To investigate the hydrogen embrittlement behavior, SP tests at different punch velocities were conducted for specimens with differently fabricated surfaces at atmospheric pressure and under high-pressure hydrogen gas conditions. As a result, the SA372 steel showed significant hydrogen embrittlement under pressurized hydrogen gas conditions. The effect of punch velocity on the hydrogen embrittlement appeared clearly; the lower punch velocity case indicated significant hydrogen embrittlement resulting in lower SP energy. The fractographic morphologies observed after SP test also revealed the hydrogen embrittlement behavior corresponding to the punch velocity adopted. Under this pressurized gas hydrogen test condition, the influence of specimen surface condition on the extent of hydrogen embrittlement could not be determined clearly

  14. Angular Momentum Regulates Atomic Gas Fractions of Galactic Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obreschkow, D.; Glazebrook, K.; Kilborn, V.; Lutz, K.

    2016-06-01

    We show that the mass fraction {f}{{atm}}=1.35{M}{{H}{{I}}}/M of neutral atomic gas (H i and He) in isolated local disk galaxies of baryonic mass M is well described by a straightforward stability model for flat exponential disks. In the outer disk parts, where gas at the characteristic dispersion of the warm neutral medium is stable in the sense of Toomre, the disk consists of neutral atomic gas; conversely, the inner part where this medium would be Toomre-unstable, is dominated by stars and molecules. Within this model, {f}{{atm}} only depends on a global stability parameter q\\equiv jσ /({GM}), where j is the baryonic specific angular momentum of the disk and σ the velocity dispersion of the atomic gas. The analytically derived first-order solution {f}{{atm}}={min}\\{1,2.5{q}1.12\\} provides a good fit to all plausible rotation curves. This model, with no free parameters, agrees remarkably well (±0.2 dex) with measurements of {f}{{atm}} in isolated local disk galaxies, even with galaxies that are extremely H i-rich or H i-poor for their mass. The finding that {f}{{atm}} increasing monotonically with q for pure stability reasons offers a powerful intuitive explanation for the mean variation of {f}{{atm}} with M: in a cold dark matter universe, galaxies are expected to follow j\\propto {M}2/3, which implies the average scaling q\\propto {M}-1/3 and hence {f}{{atm}}\\propto {M}-0.37, in agreement with the observations.

  15. Stability of the hydrogen atom of classical electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, J

    2004-01-01

    We study the stability of the circular orbits of the electromagnetic two-body problem of classical electrodynamics. We introduce the concept of resonant dissipation, i.e. a motion that radiates the center-of-mass energy while the interparticle distance performs bounded oscillations about a metastable orbit. The stability mechanism is established by the existence of a quartic resonant constant generated by the stiff eigenvalues of the linear stability problem. This constant bounds the particles together during the radiative recoil. The condition of resonant dissipation predicts angular momenta for the metastable orbits in reasonable agreement with the Bohr atom. The principal result is that the emission lines agree with the predictions of quantum electrodynamics (QED) with 1 percent average error even up to the $40^{th}$ line. Our angular momenta depend logarithmically on the mass of the heavy body, such that the deuterium and the muonium atoms have essentially the same angular momenta, in agreement with QED. ...

  16. Gas atomization processing of tin and silicon modified LaNi{sub 5} for nickel-metal hydride battery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, J.

    1999-02-12

    Numerous researchers have studied the relevant material properties of so-called AB{sub 5} alloys for battery applications. These studies involved LaNi{sub 5} substituted alloys which were prepared using conventional cast and crush alloying techniques. While valuable to the understanding of metal hydride effects, the previous work nearly ignored the potential for alternative direct powder production methods, like high pressure gas atomization (HPGA). Thus, there is a need to understand the relationship between gas atomization processes, powder particle solidification phases, and hydrogen absorption properties of ultra fine (< 25 {micro}m) atomized powders with high surface area for enhanced battery performance. Concurrently, development of a gas atomization nozzle that is more efficient than all current designs is needed to increase the yield of ultrafine AB{sub 5} alloy powder for further processing advantage. Gas atomization processing of the AB{sub 5} alloys was demonstrated to be effective in producing ultrafine spherical powders that were resilient to hydrogen cycling for the benefit of improving corrosion resistance in battery application. These ultrafine powders benefited from the rapid solidification process by having refined solute segregation in the microstructure of the gas atomized powders which enabled a rapid anneal treatment of the powders. The author has demonstrated the ability to produce high yields of ultrafine powder efficiently and cost effectively, using the new HPGA-III technology. Thus, the potential benefits of processing AB{sub 5} alloys using the new HPGA technology could reduce manufacturing cost of nickel-metal hydride powder. In the near future, the manufacture of AB{sub 5} alloy powders could become a continuous and rapid production process. The economic benefit of an improved AB{sub 5} production process may thereby encourage the use of nickel-metal hydride rechargeable batteries in electrical vehicle applications in the foreseeable

  17. Gravitational Corrections to the Energy-Levels of a Hydrogen Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Zhen-Hua; Li, Xi-Guo

    2007-01-01

    The first order perturbations of the energy levels of a hydrogen atom in central internal gravitational field are investigated. The internal gravitational field is produced by the mass of the atomic nucleus. The energy shifts are calculated for the relativistic 1S, 2S, 2P, 3S, 3P, 3D, 4S and 4P levels with Schwarzschild metric. The calculated results show that the gravitational corrections are sensitive to the total angular momentum quantum number.

  18. Do Spin State and Spin Density Affect Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactivity?

    OpenAIRE

    Saouma, Caroline T.; Mayer, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions in chemical and biological systems has prompted much interest in establishing and understanding the underlying factors that enable this reactivity. Arguments have been advanced that the electronic spin state of the abstractor and/or the spin-density at the abstracting atom are critical for HAT reactivity. This is consistent with the intuition derived from introductory organic chemistry courses. Herein we present an alternative view on t...

  19. Hydrogen-Atom Attack on Methyl Viologen in Aqueous Solution Studied by Pulse Radiolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solar, S.; Solar, W.; Getoff, N.;

    1984-01-01

    Using hydrogen at high pressures of up to 150 bar (0.12 mol dm–3 H2) as an OH scavenger in aqueous MV2+ solutions (pH 1) it is possible to differentiate between two kinds of transient formed simultaneously by H-atom attack on methyl viologen. One of them is assigned to an H adduct on the N atom, ......–7); its absorption spectrum does not change in this pH range....

  20. Ionization of hydrogen atom by X-ray absorption in the presence of optical laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorption of X-rays in hydrogen atom considering the irradiation of the target by an intense optical laser of frequency ω is studied. It is found that the terms of the modified scattering amplitude has different dependence on polarization vectors of X-ray fields and laser fields. There is resonance in the differential cross section for absorption at different frequencies when ω (the laser frequency) becomes nearly equal to atomic transition frequency. (author). 21 refs., 2 figs

  1. Vacuum polarization in hydrogen like relativistic atom: g-factor of bound electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacuum polarization contribution to the bound electron g-factor of the hydrogen-like atom basic state is considered. The finite expression for the correction is obtained in terms of the summarized hypergeometric functions and it represents the Zα parameters function and orbital particle (electron or muon) relation to the particle mass in the vacuum loop. Various asymptotes of the obtained expression both for ordinary and muon atoms are presented

  2. The application of atomic hydrogen effects in silicon and silicon electronic devices technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of atomic hydrogen effects on the properties of monocrystalline Czochralski-grown (Cz) as well as polycrystalline silicon is presented. The hydrogen passivation of defects and impurities as well as enhancement of radiation hardness was observed. It is shown that the atomic hydrogen acts as a catalyst and can significantly enhance the rate of thermal donors formation in p-type Cz Si. This effect is used for the production of the n-p, p-n-p and n-p-n silicon based device structures. The depths of the p-n junctions are dependent on the injected hydrogen ion dose and on the thermal pre-treatments as well as interstitial oxygen concentration in Cz Si. It was shown that the buried defect layers created by high-energy hydrogen or helium implantation act as a good getter centers for hydrogen at appropriate heat treatment with the following hydrogenation. The use of this method for the realisation of an kind of SMART-CUT technology is discussed

  3. Methane formation from the reactions of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen atoms with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acidic, aqueous, deaerated solutions of pure DMSO, of DMSO-KBr and of DMSO-EtOH in completely filled glass ampoules were irradiated with a 60Co γ source. The gases formed were extracted under vacuum and analysed by gas chromatography. Argon and helium were used as carrier gases and the principal gaseous products were CH4, H2, C2H6: traces of CO2 and C2H4 were also detected. It was shown that both hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl radicals react with dimethylsulfoxide in aqueous acid solution to produce methane. In both cases however only a fraction of the radicals captured gives rise to this product. Thus methane formed in the reaction of DMSO with biological systems is not unequivocal proof of the presence of OH radicals; nor is the yield of methane a direct measure of an OH yield. The rate constants k(H+DMSO)=2.6x107M-1s-1 and k(OH+DMSO)=2.1x1010M-1s-1 were determined in the presence of 5x10-1M sulfuric acid

  4. Determination of the 1s-2s two-photon excitation cross-section in atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen atoms are ablated from zirconium alloys into the gas phase by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser and photo-ionized with three photons at 243 nm via the two-photon 1s 2S1/2-2s 2S1/2 resonant transition. A determination of the effective 1s-2s two-photon excitation cross-section is necessary to quantify the hydrogen atom density in the ablation plume. A measurement of the ion signal vs photo-ionization beam energy is fitted to an expression derived from the rate equations. The temporal and spatial properties of the photo-ionization laser beam, transit of the H atoms through the beam, and detector geometry are taken into account. The effective two-photon cross-section for this experimental configuration, derived with the rate equation formalism, is 3.3 ± 0.8 X 10-28 cm4 W-1. This compares well with the ab initio prediction of 5 ± 1 X 10-28 cm4 W-1 under these experimental conditions. (author)

  5. Determination of the 1s-2s two-photon excitation cross-section in atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickel, G.A.; McRae, G.A

    2000-07-01

    Hydrogen atoms are ablated from zirconium alloys into the gas phase by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser and photo-ionized with three photons at 243 nm via the two-photon 1s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} resonant transition. A determination of the effective 1s-2s two-photon excitation cross-section is necessary to quantify the hydrogen atom density in the ablation plume. A measurement of the ion signal vs photo-ionization beam energy is fitted to an expression derived from the rate equations. The temporal and spatial properties of the photo-ionization laser beam, transit of the H atoms through the beam, and detector geometry are taken into account. The effective two-photon cross-section for this experimental configuration, derived with the rate equation formalism, is 3.3 {+-} 0.8 X 10{sup -28} cm{sup 4} W{sup -1}. This compares well with the ab initio prediction of 5 {+-} 1 X 10{sup -28} cm{sup 4} W{sup -1} under these experimental conditions. (author)

  6. Nucleon polarizabilities: From Compton scattering to hydrogen atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelstein, Franziska; Miskimen, Rory; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of the nucleon polarizabilities and of their role in nucleon Compton scattering and in hydrogen spectrum. We discuss the basic concepts, the recent lattice QCD calculations and advances in chiral effective-field theory. On the experimental side, we review the ongoing programs aimed to measure the nucleon (scalar and spin) polarizabilities via the Compton scattering processes, with real and virtual photons. A great part of the review is devoted to the general constraints based on unitarity, causality, discrete and continuous symmetries, which result in model-independent relations involving nucleon polarizabilities. We (re-)derive a variety of such relations and discuss their empirical value. The proton polarizability effects are presently the major sources of uncertainty in the assessment of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and hyperfine structure. Recent calculations of these effects are reviewed here in the context of the "proton-radius puzzle". We conclude with summary plots of the recent results and prospects for the near-future work.

  7. Star-forming dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster: the link between molecular gas, atomic gas, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, M.; Corbelli, E.; Bizzocchi, L.; Giovanardi, C.; Bomans, D.; Coelho, B.; De Looze, I.; Gonçalves, T. S.; Hunt, L. K.; Leonardo, E.; Madden, S.; Menéndez-Delmestre, K.; Pappalardo, C.; Riguccini, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present 12CO(1-0) and 12CO(2-1) observations of a sample of 20 star-forming dwarfs selected from the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, with oxygen abundances ranging from 12 + log (O / H) ~ 8.1 to 8.8. CO emission is observed in ten galaxies and marginally detected in another one. CO fluxes correlate with the FIR 250 μm emission, and the dwarfs follow the same linear relation that holds for more massive spiral galaxies extended to a wider dynamical range. We compare different methods to estimate H2 molecular masses, namely a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor and one dependent on H-band luminosity. The molecular-to-stellar mass ratio remains nearly constant at stellar masses ≲ 109 M⊙, contrary to the atomic hydrogen fraction, MHI/M∗, which increases inversely with M∗. The flattening of the MH2/M∗ ratio at low stellar masses does not seem to be related to the effects of the cluster environment because it occurs for both Hi-deficient and Hi-normal dwarfs. The molecular-to-atomic ratio is more tightly correlated with stellar surface density than metallicity, confirming that the interstellar gas pressure plays a key role in determining the balance between the two gaseous components of the interstellar medium. Virgo dwarfs follow the same linear trend between molecular gas mass and star formation rate as more massive spirals, but gas depletion timescales, τdep, are not constant and range between 100 Myr and 6 Gyr. The interaction with the Virgo cluster environment is removing the atomic gas and dust components of the dwarfs, but the molecular gas appears to be less affected at the current stage of evolution within the cluster. However, the correlation between Hi deficiency and the molecular gas depletion time suggests that the lack of gas replenishment from the outer regions of the disc is lowering the star formation activity. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30-m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany

  8. Indirect hydrogen analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet, V; Smith, F; Augsburger, M

    2013-08-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is an analytical tool very useful to investigate the composition of gaseous mixtures. The different gases are separated by specific columns but, if hydrogen (H2 ) is present in the sample, its detection can be performed by a thermal conductivity detector or a helium ionization detector. Indeed, coupled to GC, no other detector can perform this detection except the expensive atomic emission detector. Based on the detection and analysis of H2 isotopes by low-pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (MS), a new method for H2 detection by GC coupled to MS with an electron ionization ion source and a quadrupole analyser is presented. The presence of H2 in a gaseous mixture could easily be put in evidence by the monitoring of the molecular ion of the protonated carrier gas. PMID:23893637

  9. Ground state of a hydrogen ion molecule immersed in an inhomogeneous electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we have calculated the ground state energy of the hydrogen molecule, H2+, immersed in the highly inhomogeneous electron gas around a metallic surface within the local density approximation. The molecule is perturbed by the electron density of a crystalline surface of Au with the internuclear axis parallel to the surface. The surface spatial electron density is calculated through a linearized band structure method (LMTO-DFT). The ground state of the molecule-ion was calculated using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for a fixed-ion while the screening effects of the inhomogeneous electron gas are depicted by a Thomas-Fermi like electrostatic potential. We found that within our model the molecular ion dissociates at the critical distance of 2.35a.u. from the first atomic layer of the solid

  10. The Synergic Effect of Atomic Hydrogen Adsorption and Catalyst Spreading on Ge Nanowire Growth Orientation and Kinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolíbal, Miroslav; Pejchal, Tomáš; Vystavěl, Tomáš; Šikola, Tomáš

    2016-08-10

    Hydride precursors are commonly used for semiconductor nanowire growth from the vapor phase and hydrogen is quite often used as a carrier gas. Here, we used in situ scanning electron microscopy and spatially resolved Auger spectroscopy to reveal the essential role of atomic hydrogen in determining the growth direction of Ge nanowires with an Au catalyst. With hydrogen passivating nanowire sidewalls the formation of inclined facets is suppressed, which stabilizes the growth in the ⟨111⟩ direction. By contrast, without hydrogen gold diffuses out of the catalyst and decorates the nanowire sidewalls, which strongly affects the surface free energy of the system and results in the ⟨110⟩ oriented growth. The experiments with intentional nanowire kinking reveal the existence of an energetic barrier, which originates from the kinetic force needed to drive the droplet out of its optimum configuration on top of a nanowire. Our results stress the role of the catalyst material and surface chemistry in determining the nanowire growth direction and provide additional insights into a kinking mechanism, thus allowing to inhibit or to intentionally initiate spontaneous kinking. PMID:27458789

  11. Selective permeation of hydrogen gas using cellulose nanofibril film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Hayaka; Fujisawa, Shuji; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2013-05-13

    Biobased membranes that can selectively permeate hydrogen gas have been developed from aqueous dispersions of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCN) prepared from wood cellulose: TOCN-coated plastic films and self-standing TOCN films. Compared with TOCNs with sodium, lithium, potassium, and cesium carboxylate groups, TOCN with free carboxyl groups (TOCN-COOH) had much high and selective H2 gas permeation performance. Because permeabilities of H2, N2, O2, and CO2 gases through the membranes primarily depended on their kinetic diameters, the gas permeation behavior of the various TOCNs can be explained in terms of a diffusion mechanism. Thus, the selective H2 gas permeability for TOCN-COOH was probably due to a larger average size in free volume holes present between nanofibrils in the layer and film than those of other TOCNs with metal carboxylate groups. The obtained results indicate that TOCN-COOH membranes are applicable as biobased H2 gas separation membranes in fuel cell electric power generation systems. PMID:23594396

  12. Mechanism of Hydrogenated Microcrystalline Si Film Deposition by Magnetron Sputtering Employing a Si Target and H2/Ar Gas Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, Kota; Tabata, Akimori; Sasaki, Koichi

    2009-03-01

    The mechanism of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (µc-Si:H) film deposition by magnetron sputtering employing a Si target and H2/Ar gas mixture has been investigated by measuring Si and H atom densities in the gas phase by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The crystalline volume fraction of the film correlated positively with H atom density. The variation in Si atom density indicated the increase in sputtering yield from the Si target in the H2/Ar discharge. The surface of the Si target immersed in the H2/Ar discharge was hydrogenated. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect the production of SiHx molecules (typically SiH4) from the hydrogenated Si target via reactive ion etching. Since SiHx molecules produced from the target may function as a deposition precursor, the mechanism of µc-Si:H film deposition is considered to be similar to that of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) employing a SiH4/H2 gas mixture. The advantage of magnetron sputtering deposition over PECVD is the production of SiHx molecules without using toxic, explosive SiH4.

  13. Time-resolved ionization of the hydrogen atom in strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use the strong field approximation to study the single-photon ionization of the hydrogen atom in the time domain. During the interaction of the laser pulse and the atom, the electron is pumped to the Volkov state and has a widely energy distribution at the beginning of the laser pulse. With the time evolution, only the photon-electron with the energy hra - Ip is survived, where to is the laser angular frequency, and Ip is the ionization potential of the atom. Therefore we observed how the energy spectrum of the ionized electron builds in the time domain.

  14. Interference Dynamics of Hydrogen Atoms in High-Frequency Dichromatic Laser Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程太旺; 李晓峰; 傅盘铭; 陈式刚

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the ionization and high-order harmonic generation of a hydrogen atom in high-frequency (several atomic units) super strong (up to several tens of atomic units) dichromatic laser fields. An effective iterative method in the framework of high-frequency Floquet theory is used in the calculations. We have considered two kinds of dichromatic laser field, i.e. 1ω - 2ω and lω - 3ω. We find that, in both the cases, the ionization and high-order harmonic generation show evident dependence on the relative phase and strength of the additional harmonic field. The dynamical origin of these interference effects is also discussed.

  15. Entanglement harvesting from the electromagnetic vacuum with hydrogen-like atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Pozas-Kerstjens, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    We study how two fully-featured hydrogen-like atoms harvest entanglement from the electromagnetic field vacuum, even when the atoms are spacelike separated. We compare the electromagnetic case ---qualitatively and quantitatively--- with previous results that used scalar fields and featureless, idealized atomic models. Our study reveals the new traits that emerge when we relax these idealizations, such as anisotropies in entanglement harvesting and the effect of exchange of angular momentum. We show that, under certain circumstances, relaxing previous idealizations makes vacuum entanglement harvesting more efficient.

  16. Energy and diffusion of hydrogen atoms in titanium substituted vanadium hydrides from ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equilibrium lattice parameters, formation energy, and diffusion behavior of hydrogen atoms in vanadium hydrides with and without Ti substitution were calculated by ab initio calculations and quantum correction by zero point energy was achieved using phonon vibration calculations. The calculated formation energies indicated that Ti substitution induces instability in the vanadium hydrides and electron density calculations showed that hydrogen has strong electrochemical affinity with Ti. The diffusion behavior was examined by the nudged elastic band (NEB) method to investigate the transition states of the hydrides. It revealed that Ti substitution is shown to reduce the diffusion coefficient and this effect was decreased with increasing temperature. The results of this study are expected to provide useful guidelines for understanding hydrogen absorption and desorption properties of hydrogen storage materials. - Highlights: • Ti substitution expands any crystal structure of vanadium metal or hydride. • H atoms are repulsed by Ti atoms despite their high electrochemical affinity. • Strong electrochemical bonding between Ti and H lowers the formation energy. • Ti substitution reduces hydrogen diffusion by over 90% at room temperature

  17. Energy and diffusion of hydrogen atoms in titanium substituted vanadium hydrides from ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jiwoong, E-mail: jwk@kigam.re.kr; Yoo, Jeong-Hyun, E-mail: yjh0010@naver.com; Cho, Sung-Wook, E-mail: cho@kigam.re.kr

    2014-12-15

    The equilibrium lattice parameters, formation energy, and diffusion behavior of hydrogen atoms in vanadium hydrides with and without Ti substitution were calculated by ab initio calculations and quantum correction by zero point energy was achieved using phonon vibration calculations. The calculated formation energies indicated that Ti substitution induces instability in the vanadium hydrides and electron density calculations showed that hydrogen has strong electrochemical affinity with Ti. The diffusion behavior was examined by the nudged elastic band (NEB) method to investigate the transition states of the hydrides. It revealed that Ti substitution is shown to reduce the diffusion coefficient and this effect was decreased with increasing temperature. The results of this study are expected to provide useful guidelines for understanding hydrogen absorption and desorption properties of hydrogen storage materials. - Highlights: • Ti substitution expands any crystal structure of vanadium metal or hydride. • H atoms are repulsed by Ti atoms despite their high electrochemical affinity. • Strong electrochemical bonding between Ti and H lowers the formation energy. • Ti substitution reduces hydrogen diffusion by over 90% at room temperature.

  18. Small angle elastic scattering of electrons by noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, measurements are carried out to obtain small angle elastic differential cross sections in order to check the validity of Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations for electrons scattered by noble gas atoms. First, total cross sections are obtained for argon, krypton and xenon. Next, a parallel plate electrostatic energy analyser for the simultaneous measurement of doubly differential cross section for small angle electron scattering is described. Also absolute differential cross sections are reported. Finally the forward dispersion relation for electron-helium collisions is dealt with. (Auth.)

  19. Atomic lifetime measurements by beam-gas-dye laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoranzer, H.; Volz, U.

    1993-01-01

    Beam-gas-dye laser spectroscopy as a precise, cascade-free and collision-free method for measuring atomic lifetimes and individual oscillator strengths is described. Its recent application to fine-structure levels of the KrI 5p configuration is reported. The experimental uncertainty is reduced by one order of magnitude, with respect to previous work, down to 0.3% (1σ). The discussion of these results in comparison with experimental and theoretical ones from the literature underlines the precision of the method and its potential to guide future theoretical developments.

  20. Photoionization yield of atomic hydrogen using intense few-cycle pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present experimentally measured photoionization yields of atomic hydrogen as a function of laser intensity for few-cycle laser pulses. Comparison of data with exact ab-initio simulations produce better agreement than analytical theories and enable accurate intensity calibration.

  1. Angular correlation measurements for the 32Dsub(j) states of atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angular correlation measurements have been made of the Lyman-α radiation arising from the cascade of the 32Dsub(j) states of atomic hydrogen detected in coincidence with electron scattered with n=3 energy loss. Data are presented at incident energies of 54.4 and 100 eV and electron scattering angles thetasub(e)=20 and 250. (author)

  2. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics

  3. Effect of vacuum polarization on the excitation of hydrogen atom by electron impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Bhattacharyya

    1981-01-01

    for 1S−2S excitation of the hydrogen atom by electron impact. The excitation amplitude calculated field theoretically is found to be lowered by 0.47t2/(t2+93 where t2=4|P−Q|2, P and Q being the momenta of the incident and scattered electrons respectively.

  4. Resonant ionization of oxygen and hydrogen atoms following laser-induced photodissociation of nitrobenzene vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resonant ionization of oxygen and hydrogen atoms has been observed in a linear time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer during studies of the resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of nitrobenzene vapour in the wavelength region 225-245 nm. (author)

  5. Resonant ionization of oxygen and hydrogen atoms following laser-induced photodissociation of nitrobenzene vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, A.; Kosmidis, C.; Ledingham, K.W.D.; Marshall, A.; Singhal, R.P. (Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Campbell, M. (Glasgow Caledonian Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physical Sciences)

    1993-10-14

    The resonant ionization of oxygen and hydrogen atoms has been observed in a linear time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer during studies of the resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of nitrobenzene vapour in the wavelength region 225-245 nm. (author).

  6. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  7. Effects of laser radiation field on energies of hydrogen atom in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence of laser radiation field within the Ehlotzky approximation using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms in consideration of different sets of the parameters in the potential. By applying laser field, the total interaction potential of hydrogen atom embedded in plasmas converts to double well-type potential. The plasma screening effects under the influence of laser field as well as confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the Schrödinger equation with the laser-dressed MGECSC potential. It is resulted that since applying a monochromatic laser field on hydrogen atom embedded in a Debye and quantum plasma causes to shift in the profile of the total interaction potential, the confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in plasmas modeled by the MGECSC potential change localizations of energy states

  8. The vacuum-polarization contribution to the hyperfine structure splitting of hydrogen-like atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calculation of the vacuum-polarization contribution to the hyperfine splitting for hydrogen-like atoms is presented. The extended nuclear charge distribution is taken into account. For the experimentally interesting case 209Bi82+ we predict a Δλ = -1.6 nm shift for the transition wave length of the ground state hyperfine splitting. (orig.)

  9. Hydrogen atom in space with a compactified extra dimension and potential defined by Gauss' law

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bureš, M.; Siegl, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 354, MAR (2015), s. 316-327. ISSN 0003-4916 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GD202/08/H072 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : extra dimensions * hydrogen atom * quantum stability Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 2.103, year: 2014

  10. Multigrid solution of a path integral formulation for the hydrogen atom

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, D

    2004-01-01

    An efficient multigrid Monte-Carlo algorithm for calculating the ground state of the hydrogen atom using path integral is presented. The algorithm uses a unigrid approach. The action integral near r=0 is modified so that the correct values of observables are obtained. It is demonstrated that the critical slow down (CSD) is eliminated. Finally, the algorithm is compared to the staging algorithm.

  11. Existence of a ground state for the confined hydrogen atom in non-relativistic QED

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amour, Laurent; Faupin, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    We consider a system of a hydrogen atom interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field. Instead of fixing the nucleus, we assume that the system is confined by its center of mass. This model is used in theoretical physics to explain the Lamb-Dicke effect. After a brief review of the...

  12. Learning about Regiochemistry from a Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears-Dundes, Christopher; Huon, Yoeup; Hotz, Richard P.; Pinhas, Allan R.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment has been developed in which the hydrogen-atom abstraction and the coupling of propionitrile, using Fenton's reagent, are investigated. Students learn about the regiochemistry of radical formation, the stereochemistry of product formation, and the interpretation of GC-MS data, in a safe reaction that can be easily completed in one…

  13. CALCULATED PROPERTIES OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL SPIN-POLARIZED ATOMIC HYDROGEN

    OpenAIRE

    Lantto, L.; Nieminen, R.

    1980-01-01

    Optimal HNC-Jastrow calculations have been carried out for gaseous spin-polarized hydrogen in two space dimensions. Accurate values for the ground state energy, radial distribution function, average exchange energy and momentum distribution are obtained at low atomic densities.

  14. Solving problems on hydrogen atom in electric field by means of REDUCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique of solving perturbation theory problems of quantum mechanics in the language of the dynamic symmetry group by means of REDUCE computer algebra system is discussed. The program for analytical calculation of energy and wave functions of hydrogen atom in an electric field in arbitrary order of the perturbation theory is presented

  15. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. II. Hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rates of reactions of hydrogen atoms (from radiolysis of water and other sources) with organic and inorganic molecules, ions, and transients in aqueous solution were tabulated. Directly measured rates obtained by kinetic spectroscopy or conductimetric methods, and relative rates determined by competition kinetics are included. (U.S.)

  16. A theoretical perspective of the nature of hydrogen-bond types - the atoms in molecules approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pandiyan, B. V.; Kolandaivel, P.; Deepa, Palanisamy

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 12 (2014), s. 1609-1623. ISSN 0026-8976 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrogen bond * proton affinity * deprotanation enthalpy * atoms in molecules * chemical shift Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.720, year: 2014

  17. Atomic and molecular hydrogen in the circumstellar envelopes of late-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of atomic and molecular hydrogen in the expanding circumstellar envelopes of cool evolved stars is discussed. The main concern is to evaluate the effects of photodestruction of H2 by galactic UV radiation, including shielding of the radiation by H2 itself and by dust in the envelope. One of the most important parameters is the H/H2 ratio which is frozen out in the upper atmosphere of the star. For stars with photospheric temperatures greater than about 2500 K, atmospheric models suggest that the outflowing hydrogen is mainly atomic, whereas cooler stars should be substantially molecular. In the latter case, photodissociation of H2 and heavy molecules contribute to the atomic hydrogen content of the outer envelope. The presented estimates indicate that atomic hydrogen is almost at the limit of detection in the C-rich star IRC + 10216, and may be detectable in warmer stars. Failure to detect it would have important implications for the general understanding of circumstellar envelopes.

  18. On the proton exchange contribution to electron-hydrogen atom elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the exchange contribution to the electron-proton potential Born term in elastic electron-hydrogen atom scattering arises as the non relativistic limit from the exchange of a proton between the two participant electrons - calculated from quantum electrodynamics including properly bound states (as solution of Bethe - Salpeter equation). (Author)

  19. Hydrogen atom ionization by fast electrons in an external electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen atom ionization by fast electrons in an external electric field is considered. The oscillative character of ionization is referred to interference effects, occuring under electron transition to states of continuous energy spectrum. These states are described by wave functions in the form of standing waves

  20. Exponential photonic localization and chaos in the hydrogen atom in a monochromatic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that in highly excited hydrogen atoms irradiated by a monochromatic microwave field the energy distribution over unperturbed levels is exponentially localized in the number of absorbed photons. This result, which is a quantum manifestation of classical chaos, explains the presence of a large ionization peak with frequencies much below those required for the conventional one-photon photoelectric effect. (author)

  1. On the hidden symmetry of a one-dimensional hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fock method is applied to the problem of a one-dimensional hydrogen atom. Integral Fock equations are obtained in discrete and continuous spectra; the case of zero energy is studied and wavefunctions and normalisation constants are calculated in the momentum representation. (author)

  2. Hidden symmetry, separation of variables and interbasis expansions in the two-dimensional hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expansions for each fundamental basis of the hydrogen atom over two others are found and an additional integral of motion corresponding to an elliptic basis is determined. Representations of the elliptic basis as a superposition of polar and parabolic states are obtained. Certain interesting limiting cases are investigated. (author)

  3. Study on the recovery of hydrogen from refinery (hydrogen+methane) gas mixtures using hydrate technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique for separating hydrogen from (H2 + CH4) gas mixtures through hydrate formation/dissociation was proposed. In this work, a systematic experimental study was performed on the separation of hydrogen from (H2 + CH4) feed mixtures with various hydrogen contents (mole fraction x = 40%-90%). The experimental results showed that the hydrogen content could be enriched to as high as ~94% for various feed mixtures using the proposed hydrate technology under a temperature slightly above 0℃ and a pressure below 5.0 MPa. With the addition of a small amount of suitable additives, the rate of hydrate formation could be increased significantly. Anti-agglomeration was used to disperse hydrate particles into the condensate phase. Instead of preventing hydrate growth (as in the kinetic inhibitor tests), hydrates were allowed to form, but only as small dispersed particles. Anti-agglomeration could keep hydrate particles suspended in a range of condensate types at 1℃ and 5 MPa in the water-in-oil emulsion.

  4. Study on the recovery of hydrogen from refinery (hydrogen + methane) gas mixtures using hydrate technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XiuLin; CHEN GuangJin; YANG LanYing; ZHANG LinWei

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique for separating hydrogen from (H2 + CH4) gas mixtures through hydrate forma-tion/dissociation was proposed.In this work, a systematic experimental study was performed on the separation of hydrogen from (H2+CH4) feed mixtures with various hydrogen contents (mole fraction x =40%-90%).The experimental results showed that the hydrogen content could be enriched to as high as~94% for various feed mixtures using the proposed hydrate technology under a temperature slightly above 0℃ and a pressure below 5.0 MPa.With the addition of a small amount of suitable additives, the rate of hydrate formation could be increased significantly.Anti-agglomeration was used to disperse hydrate particles into the condensate phase.Instead of preventing hydrate growth (as in the kinetic inhibitor tests), hydrates were allowed to form, but only as small dispersed particles.Anti-agglomera-tion could keep hydrate particles suspended in a range of condensate types at 1℃ and 5 MPa in the water-in-oil emulsion.

  5. Catalysts for selective oxidation of ammonia in a gas containing hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention contributes to a cost effective way to solve the problem of trace ammonia removal from hydrogen containing gas. The set of catalysts of the invention selectively oxidised ammonia in ppm concentration even in gas mixture containing hydrogen gas in concentration of three orders of...

  6. Catalysts for selective oxidation of ammonia in a gas containing hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The invention contributes to a cost effective way to solve the problem of trace ammonia removal from a hydrogen and nitrogen containing gas. The set of catalysts of the invention selectively oxidised ammonia in ppm concentration even in gas mixtures containing hydrogen gas in concentrations of...

  7. Synergistic Formation of Radicals by Irradiation with Both Vacuum Ultraviolet and Atomic Hydrogen: A Real-Time In Situ Electron Spin Resonance Study

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Kono, Akihiko; Horibe, Hideo; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; 10.1021/jz2002937

    2012-01-01

    We report on the surface modification of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as an example of soft- and bio-materials that occur under plasma discharge by kinetics analysis of radical formation using in situ real-time electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. During irradiation with hydrogen plasma, simultaneous measurements of the gas-phase ESR signals of atomic hydrogen and the carbon dangling bond (C-DB) on PTFE were performed. Dynamic changes of the C-DB density were observed in real time, where the rate of density change was accelerated during initial irradiation and then became constant over time. It is noteworthy that C-DBs were formed synergistically by irradiation with both vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and atomic hydrogen. The in situ real-time ESR technique is useful to elucidate synergistic roles during plasma surface modification.

  8. Inelastic scattering of electrons by metastable hydrogen atoms in a laser field

    CERN Document Server

    Buica, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    The inelastic scattering of fast electrons by metastable hydrogen atoms in the presence of a linearly polarized laser field is theoretically studied in the domain of moderate field intensities. The interaction of the hydrogen atom with the laser field is described by first-order time-dependent perturbation theory, while the projectile electrons interacting with the laser field are described by the Gordon-Volkov wave functions. An analytic expression is obtained for the differential scattering cross section in the first-order Born approximation for laser-assisted inelastic e-H(2s) scattering for the 2s-nl excitation. Detailed analytical and numerical results are presented for inelastic scattering accompanied by one-photon absorption, and the angular dependence and resonance structure of the differential cross sections is discussed for the 2s -4l excitation of metastable hydrogen.

  9. Construction of the isocopalane skeleton: application of a desulfinylative 1,7-hydrogen atom transfer strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiong; Xu, ZhongYu; Zeng, Qian-Ding; Chen, Xi-Bo; Ji, Wen-Hao; Han, Ying; Wu, PeiYing; Ren, Jiangmeng; Zeng, Bu-Bing

    2015-06-01

    Two attractive chirons, aldehyde 6 and chloride 7, exhibiting functionalized ent-spongiane-type tricyclic skeletons (ABC ring system), have been constructed and their absolute configurations have been studied by NMR spectroscopy and confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Both of these chirons are derived from commercially available andrographolide in good yield. Aldehyde 6 is obtained through a novel K2 S2 O8 -catalyzed aquatic ring-closing reaction of allylic sodium sulfonate and intramolecular 1,7-hydrogen atom transfer process. Further mechanistic investigations demonstrate that the 1,7-hydrogen atom transfer is a free-radical process, whereby hydrogen migrates from C18 to C17, as evidenced by double-18- deuterium-labeled isotope experiments. Prospective applications of these two chiral sources are also discussed. PMID:25907201

  10. Electrochemical removal of hydrogen atoms in Mg-doped GaN epitaxial layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen atoms inside of an Mg-doped GaN epitaxial layer were effectively removed by the electrochemical potentiostatic activation (EPA) method. The role of hydrogen was investigated in terms of the device performance of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The effect of the main process parameters for EPA such as solution type, voltage, and time was studied and optimized for application to LED fabrication. In optimized conditions, the light output of 385-nm LEDs was improved by about 26% at 30 mA, which was caused by the reduction of the hydrogen concentration by ∼35%. Further removal of hydrogen seems to be involved in the breaking of Ga-H bonds that passivate the nitrogen vacancies. An EPA process with high voltage breaks not only Mg-H bonds that generate hole carriers but also Ga-H bonds that generate electron carriers, thus causing compensation that impedes the practical increase of hole concentration, regardless of the drastic removal of hydrogen atoms. A decrease in hydrogen concentration affects the current-voltage characteristics, reducing the reverse current by about one order and altering the forward current behavior in the low voltage region

  11. Electrochemical removal of hydrogen atoms in Mg-doped GaN epitaxial layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, June Key, E-mail: junekey@jnu.ac.kr, E-mail: hskim7@jbnu.ac.kr; Hyeon, Gil Yong; Tawfik, Wael Z.; Choi, Hee Seok [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Optoelectronics Convergence Research Center, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Sang-Wan [Department of Physics and Optoelectronics Convergence Research Center, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Tak [Korea Photonics Technology Institute, Gwangju 500-460 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Eunjin; Kim, Hyunsoo, E-mail: junekey@jnu.ac.kr, E-mail: hskim7@jbnu.ac.kr [School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Semiconductor Physics Research Center, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-14

    Hydrogen atoms inside of an Mg-doped GaN epitaxial layer were effectively removed by the electrochemical potentiostatic activation (EPA) method. The role of hydrogen was investigated in terms of the device performance of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The effect of the main process parameters for EPA such as solution type, voltage, and time was studied and optimized for application to LED fabrication. In optimized conditions, the light output of 385-nm LEDs was improved by about 26% at 30 mA, which was caused by the reduction of the hydrogen concentration by ∼35%. Further removal of hydrogen seems to be involved in the breaking of Ga-H bonds that passivate the nitrogen vacancies. An EPA process with high voltage breaks not only Mg-H bonds that generate hole carriers but also Ga-H bonds that generate electron carriers, thus causing compensation that impedes the practical increase of hole concentration, regardless of the drastic removal of hydrogen atoms. A decrease in hydrogen concentration affects the current-voltage characteristics, reducing the reverse current by about one order and altering the forward current behavior in the low voltage region.

  12. Critical radius and critical number of gas atoms for cavities containing a Van der Waals gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of gas on void nucleation and growth is particularly important for structural materials in fusion reactors because of the high production of helium by neutron-induced transmutation reactions. Gas reduces the critical radius for bias driven growth and there is a critical number of gas atoms, n/sub g/*, at which the critical radius is reduced essentially to zero. The significance of this is that the time interval to the accumulation of n/sub g/* gas atoms may determine the time to the onset of bias driven swelling where n/sub g/* is large. In previous papers these critical quantities were given for an ideal gas. Recently, we presented the results for a Van der Waals gas. Here the derivation of these relations is presented and further results of calculations are given. At low temperatures (high pressures) the results depart from those of the ideal gas, with the critical number affected more strongly than the critical radius. Comparisons are made with earlier calculations

  13. Observing gas-catalyst dynamics at atomic resolution and single-atom sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helveg, S; Kisielowski, C F; Jinschek, J R; Specht, P; Yuan, G; Frei, H

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an indispensable technique for studying heterogeneous catalysts. In particular, advancements of aberration-corrected electron optics and data acquisition schemes have made TEM capable of delivering images of catalysts with sub-Ångström resolution and single-atom sensitivity. Parallel developments of differentially pumped electron microscopes and of gas cells enable in situ observations of catalysts during the exposure to reactive gas environments at pressures of up to atmospheric levels and temperatures of up to several hundred centigrade. Here, we outline how to take advantage of the emerging state-of-the-art instrumentation and methodologies to study surface structures and dynamics to improve the understanding of structure-sensitive catalytic functionality. The concept of using low electron dose-rates in TEM in conjunction with in-line holography and aberration-correction at low voltage (80 kV) is introduced to allow maintaining atomic resolution and sensitivity during in situ observations of catalysts. Benefits are illustrated by exit wave reconstructions of TEM images of a nanocrystalline Co3O4 catalyst material acquired in situ during their exposure to either a reducing or oxidizing gas environment. PMID:25245867

  14. Synthesis of hydrogen gas by thermal decomposition of methane gas with carbon sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen gas synthesis by the thermal decomposition of methane gas in a non-transferred arc thermal plasma reactor is studied. A thermodynamic study was carried out obtaining free energy minimization plots for the C-H-N and C-H-N-Si systems by using the CSIRO thermo package. Nitrogen gas was used as an ionizing gas and metallic silicon fine powder was injected to promote the in fly silicon carbide nucleation. The effect of current intensity on the thermal decomposition of methane was studied. The degree of methane gas decomposition was in the range 84-97%. The fine solid product collected was characterized using the XRD and MEB-EDAX methods. Elemental carbon particles as well as silicon carbide particles in the nanometric range were identified by the last technique.

  15. Evidence for the Heating of Atomic Interstellar Gas by PAHs

    CERN Document Server

    Helou, G; Hollenbach, D J; Dale, D A; Contursi, A; Helou, George; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Hollenbach, David J.; Dale, Daniel A.; Contursi, Alessandra

    2001-01-01

    We report a strong correlation between the [CII] 158 micron cooling line and the mid-infrared flux in the 5-10 micron range in a wide variety of star-forming galaxies. The mid-infrared flux is dominated by Aromatic Feature Emission (AFE), which is thought to arise from large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules or `PAHs' and generally associated with the smallest interstellar grains. The [CII] line is the dominant gas coolant in most regions of atomic interstellar gas, and therefore reflects the heating input to the gas. The ratio of these two quantities, [CII]/AFE, remains nearly constant with the ratio of the IRAS 60 micron band flux to the 100 micron band flux, R(60/100). This is in contrast to the drop in the [CII]/FIR ratio with increasing R(60/100), which signal higher dust temperatures and more intense radiation fields. We interpret the stable [CII]/AFE ratio as evidence that gas heating is dominated by the PAHs or small grains which are also AFE carriers over a wide range of conditions. The trend...

  16. The hydrogen atom in an electric field: closed-orbit theory with bifurcating orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closed-orbit theory provides a general approach to the semiclassical description of photo-absorption spectra of arbitrary atoms in external fields, the simplest of which is the hydrogen atom in an electric field. Yet, despite its apparent simplicity, a semiclassical quantization of this system by means of closed-orbit theory has not been achieved so far. It is the aim of this paper to close that gap. We first present a detailed analytic study of the closed classical orbits and their bifurcations. We then derive a simple form of the uniform semiclassical approximation for the bifurcations that is suitable for an inclusion into a closed-orbit summation. By means of a generalized version of the semiclassical quantization by harmonic inversion, we succeed in calculating high-quality semiclassical spectra for the hydrogen atom in an electric field

  17. Stabilizing a Platinum1 Single-Atom Catalyst on Supported Phosphomolybdic Acid without Compromising Hydrogenation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Asakura, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Jiaguang; De, Sudipta; Yan, Ning

    2016-07-11

    In coordination chemistry, catalytically active metal complexes in a zero- or low-valent state often adopt four-coordinate square-planar or tetrahedral geometry. By applying this principle, we have developed a stable Pt1 single-atom catalyst with a high Pt loading (close to 1 wt %) on phosphomolybdic acid(PMA)-modified active carbon. This was achieved by anchoring Pt on the four-fold hollow sites on PMA. Each Pt atom is stabilized by four oxygen atoms in a distorted square-planar geometry, with Pt slightly protruding from the oxygen planar surface. Pt is positively charged, absorbs hydrogen easily, and exhibits excellent performance in the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene and cyclohexanone. It is likely that the system described here can be extended to a number of stable SACs with superior catalytic activities. PMID:27240266

  18. Interaction of Atomic and Molecular Hydrogen with Tholin Surfaces at Low Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ling; Vidali, Gianfranco; Frank, Yechiel; Lohmar, Ingo; Perets, Hagai B; Biham, Ofer; 10.1021/jp104944y

    2010-01-01

    We study the interaction of atomic and molecular hydrogen with a surface of tholin, a man-made polymer considered to be an analogue of aerosol particles present in Titan's atmosphere, using thermal programmed desorption at low temperatures below 30 K. The results are fitted and analyzed using a fine-grained rate equation model that describes the diffusion, reaction and desorption processes. We obtain the energy barriers for diffusion and desorption of atomic and molecular hydrogen. These barriers are found to be in the range of 30 to 60 meV, indicating that atom/molecule-surface interactions in this temperature range are dominated by weak adsorption forces. The implications of these results for the understanding of the atmospheric chemistry of Titan are discussed.

  19. PROBING THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF ATOMIC GAS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeleman, Marcel; Wolfe, Arthur M. [Department of Physics and Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, UCSD, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Prochaska, J. Xavier, E-mail: mneeleman@physics.ucsd.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, 1156 High Street, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    A new method is used to measure the physical conditions of the gas in damped Lyα systems (DLAs). Using high-resolution absorption spectra of a sample of 80 DLAs, we are able to measure the ratio of the upper and lower fine-structure levels of the ground state of C{sup +} and Si{sup +}. These ratios are determined solely by the physical conditions of the gas. We explore the allowed physical parameter space using a Monte Carlo Markov chain method to constrain simultaneously the temperature, neutral hydrogen density, and electron density of each DLA. The results indicate that at least 5% of all DLAs have the bulk of their gas in a dense, cold phase with typical densities of ∼100 cm{sup –3} and temperatures below 500 K. We further find that the typical pressure of DLAs in our sample is log (P/k{sub B} ) = 3.4 (K cm{sup –3}), which is comparable to the pressure of the local interstellar medium (ISM), and that the components containing the bulk of the neutral gas can be quite small with absorption sizes as small as a few parsecs. We show that the majority of the systems are consistent with having densities significantly higher than expected for a purely canonical warm neutral medium, indicating that significant quantities of dense gas (i.e., n {sub H} > 0.1 cm{sup –3}) are required to match observations. Finally, we identify eight systems with positive detections of Si II*. These systems have pressures (P/k{sub B} ) in excess of 20,000 K cm{sup –3}, which suggest that these systems tag a highly turbulent ISM in young, star-forming galaxies.

  20. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  1. Improvement of anaerobic bio-hydrogen gas production from organic sludge waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbial hydrogen gas production from organic matters stands out as one of the most promising alternatives for sustainable green energy production. Based on the literature review, investigation of anaerobic bio-hydrogen gas production from organic sludge waste using a mixed culture has been very limited. The objective of this study was to assess the anaerobic bio-hydrogen gas production from organic sludge waste under various conditions. (Author)

  2. Gas phase hydrogen permeation in alpha titanium and carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Shah, K. K.; Reeves, B. H.; Gadgeel, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium and heats of Armco ingot iron and steels containing from 0.008-1.23 w/oC were annealed or normalized and machined into hollow cylinders. Coefficients of diffusion for alpha-Ti and alpha-Fe were determined by the lag-time technique. Steady state permeation experiments yield first power pressure dependence for alpha-Ti and Sievert's law square root dependence for Armco iron and carbon steels. As in the case of diffusion, permeation data confirm that alpha-titanium is subject to at least partial phase boundary reaction control while the steels are purely diffusion controlled. The permeation rate in steels also decreases as the carbon content increases. As a consequence of Sievert's law, the computed hydrogen solubility decreases as the carbon content increases. This decreases in explained in terms of hydrogen trapping at carbide interfaces. Oxidizing and nitriding the surfaces of alpha-titanium membranes result in a decrease in the permeation rate for such treatment on the gas inlet surfaces but resulted in a slight increase in the rate for such treatment on the gas outlet surfaces. This is explained in terms of a discontinuous TiH2 layer.

  3. Emission in the deep vacuum ultraviolet from a plasma formed by incandescently heating hydrogen gas with trace amounts of potassium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hydrogen plasma with intense extreme ultraviolet and visible emission was generated from low pressure hydrogen gas (0.1-1 mbar) in contact with a hot tungsten filament only when the filament heated a titanium dissociator coated with K2CO3 above 750 deg. C. The electric field strength from the filament was about 1 V cm-1, two orders of magnitude lower than the starting voltages measured for gas glow discharges. The emission of the Hα and Hβ transitions as well as the Lα and Lβ transitions were recorded and analysed. The plasma seemed to be far from thermal equilibrium, and no conventional mechanism was found to explain the formation of a hydrogen plasma by incandescently heating hydrogen gas in the presence of trace amounts of K2CO3. The temporal behaviour of the plasma was recorded via hydrogen Balmer alpha line emission when all power into the cell was terminated and an excessive afterglow duration (2 s) was observed. The plasma was found to be dependent on the chemistry of atomic hydrogen with potassium since no plasma formed with Na2CO3 replacing K2CO3 and the time constant of the emission following the removal of all of the power to the cell matched that of the cooling of the filament and the resulting shift from atomic to molecular hydrogen. Our results indicate that a novel chemical power source is present and that it forms the energetic hydrogen plasma that is a potential new light source

  4. Pressure of a partially ionized hydrogen gas: numerical results from exact low temperature expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alastuey, A. [Laboratoire de Physique, ENS Lyon, CNRS, Lyon (France); Ballenegger, V. [Institut UTINAM, Universite de Franche-Comte, CNRS, Besancon (France)

    2010-01-15

    We consider a partially ionized hydrogen gas at low densities, where it reduces almost to an ideal mixture made with hydrogen atoms in their ground-state, ionized protons and ionized electrons. By performing systematic low-temperature expansions within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential, exact formulae for the first.ve leading corrections to the ideal Saha equation of state have been derived[A. Alastuey, V. Ballenegger et al., J. Stat. Phys. 130, 1119 (2008)]. Those corrections account for all effects of interactions and thermal excitations up to order exp(E{sub H} /kT) included, where E{sub H} {approx_equal} -13.6 eV is the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom. Among the.ve leading corrections, three are easy to evaluate, while the remaining ones involve suitably truncated internal partition functions of H{sub 2} molecules and H{sup -} and H{sub 2}{sup +} ions, for which no analytical formulae are available in closed form. We estimate those partitions functions at.nite temperature via a simple phenomenology based on known values of rotational and vibrational energies. This allows us to compute numerically the leading deviations to the Saha pressure along several isotherms and isochores. Our values are compared with those of the OPAL tables (for pure hydrogen) calculated within the ACTEX method (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Study on atmospheric hydrogen enrichment by cryopump method and isotope separation by gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain the information of source of atmospheric hydrogen tritium an analysis of tritium isotopes is thought to be effective. So an atmospheric hydrogen enrichment apparatus and a cryogenic gas chromatographic column were made. Experiments were carried out to study the performance of cryopump to enrich atmospheric hydrogen and the column to separate hydrogen isotopes that obtained by cryopump method. The cryopump was able to process about 1000 1 atmosphere and the column was able to separate hydrogen isotopes with good resolution. (author)

  6. Hydrogen rich gas production by thermocatalytic decomposition of kenaf biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irmak, Sibel; Oeztuerk, ilker [Department of Chemistry, Cukurova University, Arts and Sciences Faculty, Adana 01330 (Turkey)

    2010-06-15

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), a well known energy crop and an annual herbaceous plant grows very fast with low lodging susceptibility was used as representative lignocellulosic biomass in the present work. Thermocatalytic conversions were performed by aqueous phase reforming (APR) of kenaf hydrolysates and direct gasification of solid biomass of kenaf using 5% Pt on activated carbon as catalyst. Hydrolysates used in APR experiments were prepared by solubilization of kenaf biomass in subcritical water under CO{sub 2} gas pressure. APR of kenaf hydrolysate with low molecular weight polysaccharides in the presence of the reforming catalyst produced more gas compared to the hydrolysate that had high molecular weight polysaccharides. APR experiments of kenaf biomass hydrolysates and glucose, which was used as a simplest biomass model compound, in the presence of catalyst produced various amounts of gas mixtures that consisted of H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The ratios of H{sub 2} to other gases produced were 0.98, 1.50 and 1.35 for 150 C and 250 C subcritical water-treated kenaf hydrolysates and glucose, respectively. These ratios indicated that more the degraded organic content of kenaf hydrolysate the better selectivity for hydrogen production. Although APR of 250 C-kenaf hydrolysate resulted in similar gas content and composition as glucose, the gas volume produced was three times higher in glucose feed. The use of solid kenaf biomass as starting feedstock in APR experiments resulted in less gas production since the activity of catalyst was lowered by solid biomass particles. (author)

  7. Atomic and molecular physics in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial and temporal distributions of energy deposition by high-linear-energy-transfer radiation play an important role in the subsequent chemical and biological processes leading to radiation damage. Because the spatial structures of energy deposition events are of the same dimensions as molecular structures in the mammalian cell, direct measurements of energy deposition distributions appropriate to radiation biology are infeasible. This has led to the development of models of energy transport based on a knowledge of atomic and molecular interactions process that enable one to simulate energy transfer on an atomic scale. Such models require a detailed understanding of the interactions of ions and electrons with biologically relevant material. During the past 20 years there has been a great deal of progress in our understanding of these interactions; much of it coming from studies in the gas phase. These studies provide information on the systematics of interaction cross sections leading to a knowledge of the regions of energy deposition where molecular and phase effects are important and that guide developments in appropriate theory. In this report studies of the doubly differential cross sections, crucial to the development of stochastic energy deposition calculations and track structure simulation, will be reviewed. Areas of understanding are discussed and directions for future work addressed. Particular attention is given to experimental and theoretical findings that have changed the traditional view of secondary electron production for charged particle interactions with atomic and molecular targets

  8. Gas phase selective hydrogenation over oxide supported Ni-Au.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Lizana, Fernando; Keane, Mark A

    2015-11-14

    The chemoselective continuous gas phase (T = 573 K; P = 1 atm) hydrogenation of nitroarenes (p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) and m-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB)) has been investigated over a series of oxide (Al2O3 and TiO2) supported Au and Ni-Au (1 : 10 mol ratio; 0.1-1 mol% Au) catalysts. Monometallic supported Au with mean particle size 3-9 nm promoted exclusive formation of p-chloroaniline (p-CAN) and m-nitroaniline (m-NAN). Selective hydrogenation rate was higher over smaller Au particles and can be attributed to increased surface hydrogen (from TPD measurements) at higher metal dispersion. (S)TEM analysis has confirmed an equivalent metal particle size for the supported bimetallics at the same Au loading where TPR indicates Ni-Au interaction and EDX surface mapping established Ni in close proximity to Au on isolated nanoparticles with a composition (Au/Ni) close to the bulk value (= 10). Increased spillover hydrogen due to the incorporation of Ni in the bimetallics resulted in elevated -NO2 group reduction rate. Full selectivity to p-CAN was maintained over all the bimetallic catalysts. Conversion of m-DNB over the lower loaded Ni-Au/Al2O3 generated m-NAN as sole product. An increase in Ni content (0.01 → 0.1 mol%) or a switch from Al2O3 to TiO2 as support resulted in full -NO2 reduction (to m-phenylenediamine). Our results demonstrate the viability of Ni-promotion of Au in the continuous production of functionalised anilines. PMID:25752655

  9. Biogenic hydrogen sulfide in the oil gas of Western Siberian fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yershov, V.A.; Chetverkina, V.N.; Nosova, V.S.; Shakirova, A.Kh.

    1984-01-01

    In connection with the discovery of biogenic hydrogen sulfide in the oil gas of Western Siberian fields, the quantity of hydrogen sulfide has been monitored and the dynamics of the development of the sulfate reduction processes and their features are examined. It is noted that in the absence of influences on the bacterial flora, it is necessary to eliminate hydrogen sulfide from natural gas or to use hydrogen sulfide corrosion inhibiters in order to suppress biocenosis in building gas processing plants and gas lift systems, in order to reduce equipment corrosion.

  10. Optical beam profile monitor and residual gas fluorescence at the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized hydrogen jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, T; Bellavia, S; Connolly, R; Gassner, D; Makdisi, Y; Russo, T; Thieberger, P; Trbojevic, D; Zelenski, A

    2008-10-01

    A gas fluorescence beam profile monitor has been implemented at the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) using the polarized atomic hydrogen gas jet, which is part of the polarized proton polarimeter. RHIC proton beam profiles in the vertical plane of the accelerator are obtained as well as measurements of the width of the gas jet in the beam direction. For gold ion beams, the fluorescence cross section is sufficiently large so that profiles can be obtained from the residual gas alone, albeit with long light integration times. We estimate the fluorescence cross sections that were not known in this ultrarelativistic regime and calculate the beam emittance to provide an independent measurement of the RHIC beam. This optical beam diagnostic technique, utilizing the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas, offers a noninvasive particle beam characterization and provides visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. PMID:19044742

  11. Gas-chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes mixtures on capillary molecular sieve 5 A column at 173 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of a gas mixture of hydrogen species, is not too easy because the differences in their physical-chemical properties are very small; the most different are their masses, and consequently most common analytical method appear to be the mass-spectrometry. However, the impossibility to distinguish between two ions (atomic or molecular) with the same mass renders this method as unapplicable. Another problem is the decay of tritium with production of 3 He. These disadvantages of mass-spectrometry have made that other analytical methods, like gas chromatography, to be considered and developed. Thus, there are many papers about various chromatographic columns especially prepared for hydrogen species separation but the preparation and treatment of these columns are very difficult to reproduce. Besides these, there are two other main disadvantages: column operating temperature is very low and long retention times for hydrogen species (more than half an hour) are required. However, the gas-chromatography method still remains an appropriate one. The method described in this paper was based on using a capillary molecular sieve 5A column which has been operated for this kind of separation. The retention times were relatively short, about 8-9 minutes. The carrier gas was Ne and the detector - TCD. In the paper chromatograms for various carrier flow rates and various hydrogen isotope mixtures are presented. The results demonstrated a quite good efficiency for H2, HD, D2 and a not very good one for orthoH2-paraH2. (authors)

  12. Selective hydrogen gas sensor using CuFe2O4 nanoparticle based thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haija, Mohammad Abu; Ayesh, Ahmad I.; Ahmed, Sadiqa; Katsiotis, Marios S.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen gas sensors based on CuFe2O4 nanoparticle thin films are presented in this work. Each gas sensor was prepared by depositing CuFe2O4 thin film on a glass substrate by dc sputtering inside a high vacuum chamber. Argon inert gas was used to sputter the material from a composite sputtering target. Interdigitated metal electrodes were deposited on top of the thin films by thermal evaporation and shadow masking. The produced sensors were tested against hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, and ethylene gases where they were found to be selective for hydrogen. The sensitivity of the produced sensors was maximum for hydrogen gas at 50 °C. In addition, the produced sensors exhibit linear response signal for hydrogen gas with concentrations up to 5%. Those sensors have potential to be used for industrial applications because of their low power requirement, functionality at low temperatures, and low production cost.

  13. Theoretical investigation of the hydrogen atom transfer in the hydrated A–T base pair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We study the hydrated A–T base pair with 2 and 4 water molecules. ► We consider the dynamics of hydrogen transfer in the hydrogen bridges. ► We compare this study with experimental data and simple schemes. - Abstract: The hydrated A–T base pair has been studied in order to understand the structural modifications and their electronic rearrangements induced by the movement of the hydrogen atoms in the H-bonds. The comparison of these results with that of the nonhydrated system can explain the role of the H-bonds of the water molecules in this system. Two naïve schemes have been considered, one where the hydrogen bonds of the water molecules are only indirectly involved in the hydrogen atoms transfer between the bases and another where the water molecules are directly involved in this transfer. The results support the idea that the real mechanisms are more complexes than these schemes. Some new stable structures of the A–T(H2O)2 and the A–T(H2O)4 systems have been found and the mechanisms of their generations have been analysed.

  14. Single-Atom Pd₁/Graphene Catalyst Achieved by Atomic Layer Deposition: Remarkable Performance in Selective Hydrogenation of 1,3-Butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huan; Cheng, Hao; Yi, Hong; Lin, Yue; Yao, Tao; Wang, Chunlei; Li, Junjie; Wei, Shiqiang; Lu, Junling

    2015-08-26

    We reported that atomically dispersed Pd on graphene can be fabricated using the atomic layer deposition technique. Aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy both confirmed that isolated Pd single atoms dominantly existed on the graphene support. In selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene, the single-atom Pd1/graphene catalyst showed about 100% butenes selectivity at 95% conversion at a mild reaction condition of about 50 °C, which is likely due to the changes of 1,3-butadiene adsorption mode and enhanced steric effect on the isolated Pd atoms. More importantly, excellent durability against deactivation via either aggregation of metal atoms or carbonaceous deposits during a total 100 h of reaction time on stream was achieved. Therefore, the single-atom catalysts may open up more opportunities to optimize the activity, selectivity, and durability in selective hydrogenation reactions. PMID:26268551

  15. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Gas on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao-xin; Han, Bing; Hou, Li-Min; An, Ting-Ting; Jia, Guang; Cheng, Zhuo-Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Yi-Nan; Kong, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Jia; Wang, Yong-Wei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Pan, Shang-Ha; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease mediated by damage to acinar cells and pancreatic inflammation. In patients with AP, subsequent systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organs dysfunction commonly occur. Interactions between cytokines and oxidative stress greatly contribute to the amplification of uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is a potent free radical scavenger that not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also lowers cytokine levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of H2 gas on AP both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assessment, AR42J cells were treated with cerulein and then incubated in H2-rich or normal medium for 24 h, and for the in vivo experiment, AP was induced through a retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct (0.1 mL/100 g body weight). Wistar rats were treated with inhaled air or 2% H2 gas and sacrificed 12 h following the induction of pancreatitis. Specimens were collected and processed to measure the amylase and lipase activity levels; the myeloperoxidase activity and production levels; the cytokine mRNA expression levels; the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and glutathione levels; and the cell survival rate. Histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses were then conducted. The results revealed significant reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of H2 gas were associated with reductions in AR42J cell and pancreatic tissue damage. In conclusion, our results suggest that H2 gas is capable of ameliorating damage to the pancreas and AR42J cells and that H2 exerts protective effects both in vitro and in vivo on subjects with AP. Thus, the results obtained indicate that this gas may represent a novel therapy agent in the management of AP. PMID:27115738

  16. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

    2004-02-01

    This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space

  17. CHOOSING OF PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS OF LIGHT-DUTY ENGINE RUNNING ON NATURAL GAS AND HYDROGEN MIXTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Dube; R. Maamri; O. Kabanov; F. Abramchuk; L. Toubal; Kodjo, A

    2011-01-01

    The results of investigation of light-duty gas engine running on natural gas and hydrogen mixture has been given. The mathematical model of combustion process with variable Vibe combus-tion factor for this engine type has been specified.

  18. The contribution of dissociative processes to the production of atomic lines in hydrogen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The contribution of molecular dissociative processes to the production of atomic lines is considered for a steady-state hydrogen plasma. If the contribution of dissociative processes is dominant, a substantial simplification in plasma diagnostics can be achieved. Numerical calculations have been performed for the production of Balmer alpha, beta, and gamma lines in hydrogen plasmas with medium and large degrees of ionization (x greater than about 0.0001) and for electron temperatures of 5000-45,000 K and electron densities of 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 16th/cu cm.

  19. Detail Design of the hydrogen system and the gas blanketing system for the HANARO-CNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Hark Rho; Kim, Young Ki; Wu, Sang Ik; Kim, Bong Su; Lee, Yong Seop

    2007-04-15

    The cold neutron source (CNS), which will be installed in the vertical CN hole of the reflector tank at HANARO, makes thermal neutrons to moderate into the cold neutrons with the ranges of 0.1 {approx} 10 meV passing through a moderator at about 22K. A moderator to produce cold neutrons is liquid hydrogen, which liquefies by the heat transfer with cryogenic helium flowing from the helium refrigeration system (HRS). Because of its installed location, the hydrogen system is designed to be surrounded by the gas blanketing system to notify the leakage on the system and to prevent hydrogen leakage out of the CNS. The hydrogen system, consisted of hydrogen charging unit, hydrogen storage unit, hydrogen buffer tank, and hydrogen piping, is designed to smoothly and safely supply hydrogen to and to draw back hydrogen from the IPA of the CNS under the HRS operation mode. Described is that calculation for total required hydrogen amount in the CNS as well as operation schemes of the hydrogen system. The gas blanketing system (GBS) is designed for the supply of the compressed nitrogen gas into the air pressurized valves for the CNS, to isolate the hydrogen system from the air and the water, and to prevent air or water intrusion into the vacuum system as well as the hydrogen system. All detail descriptions are shown inhere as well as the operation scheme for the GBS.

  20. Multiphoton ionization of the hydrogen atom exposed to circularly or linearly polarized laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studies the multiphoton ionization of the hydrogen atom exposed to the linearly or circularly polarized laser pulses by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. It finds that the ratio of the ionization probabilities by linearly and circularly polarized laser pulses varies with the numbers of absorbing photons. With the same laser intensity, the circularly polarized laser pulse favors to ionize the atom with more ease than the linearly polarized laser pulse if only two or three photons are necessary to be absorbed. For the higher order multiphoton ionization, the linearly polarized laser pulse has the advantage over circularly polarized laser pulse to ionize the atom. (atomic and molecular physics)

  1. Quantized magnetic flux through the orbits of hydrogen-like atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Wolf-Dieter R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    I report on the investigation of the quantization of the magnetic flux through the orbits of the hydrogen atom on the basis of the Rutherford-Bohr model of the atom. In contrast to earlier studies based on magnetic fields originating from the magnetic moment of the proton, here the origin of the magnetic flux is taken to be the orbiting electron itself. The magnetic moment of the proton causes an additional magnetic flux through the atomic orbits resulting in small energy shifts of the atomic levels, which are studied in more detail. The energy difference due to opposite directions of the magnetic moment of the proton results in a fractional amount of 3/8 of the hyperfine level splitting of the lowest Bohr orbit. Such a ratio was also observed for the fine structure energy level splitting when the spin of the electron is neglected. Generalizations are discussed.

  2. Study on Fine Structure of Gas Atomized LaNi5-based Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai JING; Hong GUO; Shuguang ZHANG; Zili MA; Shaoming ZHANG

    2003-01-01

    The fine structure of hydrogen storage alloy powders MINi4.3-xCoxMn0.4Al0.3(x=0.75, 0.45, 0.10; MI: La-rich mischmetal) prepared by rapidly solidifying gas atomization was investigated using a Rietveld analysis method. Two setsof CaCu5-type crystal constants were observed in the studied alloys and one set was larger than the other. Withdecreasing powder radius the solidification rate of powder increased, and so did the percentage of a particle partwith larger crystal constants. The reason why there were two sets of crystal constants might be the difference ofsolidification rate between the outside and inside of a particle.

  3. Device for removing hydrogen gas from the safety containment vessel of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safe processing of all concentrations of gas mixtures should be possible with such a device using a thermal recombiner of compact construction. A recombiner consisting of a metal case and diverter sheets situated in it is heated by induction. The incoming pipe for the gas mixture enriched with hydrogen and the outgoing pipe for the gas mixture with low hydrogen content are connected together by a three way valve. The third connection to the safety valve takes the larger port of the gas mixture with low hydrogen content back to the safety containment vessel. Sufficient of the gas mixture with low hydrogen content is taken via the three way valve to the safety containment vessel to ensure that the hydrogen content of the gas mixture taken to the recombiner remains below the 4% by volume limit. (orig.)

  4. A mathematical framework for modelling and evaluating natural gas pipeline networks under hydrogen injection

    OpenAIRE

    Tabkhi, Firooz; Azzaro-Pantel, Catherine; Pibouleau, Luc; Domenech, Serge

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the framework of a mathematical formulation for modelling and evaluating natural gas pipeline networks under hydrogen injection. The model development is based on gas transport through pipelines and compressors which compensate for the pressure drops by implying mainly the mass and energy balances on the basic elements of the network. The model was initially implemented for natural gas transport and the principle of extension for hydrogen-natural gas mixtures is presente...

  5. Trends in Ground-State Entropies for Transition Metal Based Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mader, Elizabeth A.; Manner, Virginia W.; Markle, Todd F.; Wu, Adam; Franz, James A.; Mayer, James M.

    2009-03-10

    Reported herein are thermochemical studies of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions involving transition metal H-atom donors MIILH and oxyl radicals. [FeII(H2bip)3]2+, [FeII(H2bim)3]2+, [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ and RuII(acac)2(py-imH) [H2bip = 2,2’-bi-1,4,5,6-tetrahydro¬pyrimidine, H2bim = 2,2’-bi-imidazoline, acac = 2,4-pentandionato, py-imH = 2-(2’-pyridyl)¬imidazole)] each react with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl) or tBu3PhO• (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) to give the deprotonated, oxidized metal complex MIIIL, and TEMPOH or tBu3PhOH. Solution equilibrium measurements for the reactions of Co and Fe complexes with TEMPO show a large, negative ground-state entropy for hydrogen atom transfer: ΔSºHAT = -30 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for the two iron complexes and -41 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for [CoII(H2bim)3]2+. The ΔSºHAT for TEMPO + RuII(acac)2(py-imH) is much closer to zero, 4.9 ± 1.1 cal mol-1 K-1. Calorimetric measurements quantitatively confirm the enthalpy of reaction for [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ + TEMPO, thus also confirming ΔSºHAT. Calorimetry on TEMPOH + tBu3PhO• gives ΔHºHAT = 11.2 ± 0.5 kcal mol-1 which matches the enthalpy predicted from the difference in literature solution BDEs. An evaluation of the literature BDEs of both TEMPOH and tBu3PhOH is briefly presented and new estimates are included on the relative enthalpy of solvation for tBu3PhO• vs. tBu3PhOH. The primary contributor to the large magnitude of the ground-state entropy |ΔSºHAT| for the metal complexes is vibrational entropy, ΔSºvib. The common assumption that ΔSºHAT ≈ 0 for HAT reactions, developed for organic and small gas phase molecules, does not hold for transition metal based HAT reactions. The trend in magnitude of |ΔSºHAT| for reactions with TEMPO, RuII(acac)2(py-imH) << [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ = [FeII(H2bim)3]2+ < [CoII(H2bim)3]2+, is surprisingly well predicted by the trends for electron transfer half-reaction entropies, ΔSºET, in aprotic solvents. ΔSºET and

  6. The RESOLVE Survey Atomic Gas Census and Environmental Influences on Galaxy Gas Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, David; Kannappan, Sheila; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Jonathan, Florez; Hall, Kirsten; Watson, Linda C.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Burchett, Joseph; Guynn, David; Baker, Ashley; Moffett, Amanda J.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Norris, Mark A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Leroy, Adam K.; Pisano, Daniel J.; Wei, Lisa H.; Gonzalez, Roberto; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    We present the >93% complete 21cm inventory for the RESOLVE survey, a volume-limited census of ~1500 galaxies spanning diverse environments and probing baryonic masses down to ~109 M⊙. A key strength of the 21cm observational program is its fractional mass limited design, which yields an unbiased inventory of atomic gas mass, with either clean detections or strong upper limits dark matter halo mass) up to large-scale structure (mass density of the cosmic web and classification into filaments, walls, and voids) to investigate the influence of small and large-scale environment on galaxy gas content. We show that satellites in groups down to 1012 M⊙ have lower gas fractions compared to centrals at similar stellar mass, suggesting that group processes that deplete gas content are active well below the large group/cluster scale. In addition, at fixed halo mass both centrals and satellites in large-scale walls have systematically lower gas fractions than galaxies in filaments or voids, and this trend cannot be fully explained by differing stellar mass distributions within these large-scale environments. Lastly, we show that the abundance of gas-poor (gas-to-stellar mass ratio 1012 M⊙ groups than do more gas-rich but otherwise analogous low halo-mass centrals, suggesting that the gas-poor centrals have lost their gas in flyby interactions with the nearby groups. We discuss how the observed trends may be shaped by a number of physical processes such as gas stripping, starvation, and halo assembly bias. This project has been supported by NSF funding for the RESOLVE survey (AST-0955368), the GBT Student Observing Support program, and a UNC Royster Society of Fellows Dissertation Completion Fellowship.

  7. The dynamical properties of Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE; Meihua; ZHANG; Yanhui; WANG; Dehua; DU; Mengli; LIN; Sh

    2005-01-01

    The dynamical properties of Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface are presented by using the methods of phase space analysis and closed orbit theory. Transforming the coordinates of the Hamiltonian, we find that the phase space of the system is divided into vibrational and rotational region. Both the Poincaré surface of section and the closed orbit theory verify the same conclusion clearly. In this paper we choose the atomic principal quantum number as n = 20. The dynamical character of the exited hydrogen atom depends sensitively on the atom-surface distance d. When d is sufficiently large, the atom-surface potential can be expressed by the traditional van der Waals force and the system is integrable. When d becomes smaller, there exists a critical value dc. For d > dc, the system is near-integrable and the motion is regular. While chaotic motion appears for d < dc, and the system tends to be non-integrable. The trajectories become unstable and the electron might be captured onto the metal surface.

  8. The thermal phase of fast proton equilibration in metals: hydrogen atom diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fast proton passing through a metal slows down and captures an electron to form a hydrogen atom. Subsequent equilibration of the spatial location of the hydrogen atom proceeds by diffusion amongst interstitial sites in the crystal lattice of the metal. The diffusion coefficient is a strong function of both temperature and the isotopic mass of the H-atom. Using a quantum barrier crossing model, we have computed the Arrhenius activation energy, Ej, for diffusion where j=1, 2, 3 runs over the mass numbers of the three isotopes, 1H, 2H, 3H, respectively. At sufficiently low temperatures, we find a ''normal'' isotope effect, where E123 (as in the case of H-atoms diffusing through Fe, V, Nb, and Ta), while at sufficiently high temperatures, we find an ''inverse'' isotope effect, where E321 (as in the case of H-atoms diffusing through Cu, Ni, and Pd). Between these two extremes, we find temperature ''cross-over'' regions where E132 and E312. (orig.)

  9. Computer simulation of rare-gas atoms injection into single-wall carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of rare-gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar) injected into single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) was modeled with molecular-dynamics simulations. The site dependence of the threshold energy of rare-gas atoms forming endohedral complexes was investigated, and the formation mechanism of some defects was revealed. The hole on the sidewall of the SWNT induced by incident rare-gas atoms can be healed by annealing at a certain temperature

  10. The intelligent control of an inert-gas atomization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osella, S. A.; Ridder, S. D.; Biancaniello, F. S.; Espina, P. I.

    1991-01-01

    Intelligent control is an attempt to specify the function of a controller in ways which mimic the decision-making capabilities of humans. Traditionally, issues relating to the emulation of human-like capabilities have fallen in the domain of artificial intelligence. Intelligent processing is a specific form of intelligent control in which the system to be controlled is a process rather than the more conventional mechanical or electrical system. The National Institute of Standards and Technology's program on intelligent processing of metal powders is a multi-disciplinary research initiative investigating the application of intelligent control technologies to improve the state of the art of metal powder manufacturing. This paper reviews the design of the institute's supersonic inert-gas metal-atomizer control system.

  11. Chemisorption of hydrogen and oxygen atoms on a cobalt surface: A quantum chemical cluster model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemisorption of atomic hydrogen and oxygen on a cobalt surface has been studied on a five-atom cluster model using one-electron effective core potential (le- ECP) and all-electron calculations at the ab initio SCF and MCPF levels. Also, density functional calculations have been carried out. The different approaches are evaluated. The le- ECP has been compared to similar ECPS for nickel and copper. Our results indicate that this approach is valid also for cobalt. Different contributions to the cluster-adsorbate bonding energy are discussed. 31 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  12. Multiphoton resonant ionization of hydrogen atom exposed to two-colour laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studies the multiphoton resonant ionization by two-colour laser pulses in the hydrogen atom by solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation. By fixing the parameters of fundamental laser field and scanning the frequency of second laser field, it finds that the ionization probability shows several resonance peaks and is also much larger than the linear superposition of probabilities by applying two lasers separately. The enhancement of the ionization happens when the system is resonantly pumped to the excited states by absorbing two or more colour photons non-sequentially. (atomic and molecular physics)

  13. An Introduction to Multiphoton Ionization and Study of Ionization Rate of Hydrogen Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a semiclassical point of view, we discuss the problem of nonlinear interaction between electromagnetic radiation and atoms. The time-dependent Schroedinger equation for single electron systems is solved using perturbative technique to obtain transition probability. We also discuss higher order perturbation used in multiple processes where two or more quanta are emitted instead of a single photon. The approach is based on the assumption that the perturbation is small. From the transition probability ionization rate and absorption, the cross-section of hydrogen atoms is calculated. Variation in photon energy and field strength is analyzed. Variation of cross-section with photon energy is discussed.

  14. Resonance and interference phenomena in the photoionisation of a hydrogen atom in a uniform electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photoionisation cross section for a hydrogen atom placed in a uniform electric field is investigated as a function of the light frequency. Analytical formulae are obtained describing the cross section structure in various regions of photon energy and field strength. The Fano parametrisation of resonance peak is generalised for the overlapping resonance case. When the photon energy is close to the ionisation potential the resonance peaks are strongly asymmetrical. A comparison is made with experiments where the structure is observed in the photoionisation of sodium and rubidium atoms. (author)

  15. Computation for High Excited Stark Levels of hydrogen Atoms in Uniform Electric Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田人和

    2003-01-01

    We present a new method for the numerical calculation of exact complex eigenvalues of Schrodinger equations for a hydrogen atom in a uniform electric field. This method allows a direct calculation for complex eigenvalues without using any auxiliary treatment, such as the Breit-Wigner parametrization and the complex scale transformation,etc. The characteristics of high excited atoms in electric field have attracted extensive interest in experimental aspect, however, the existing theoretical calculation is only up to n = 40. Here we present the computation results ranging from n = 1 to 100. The data for n(<,_ ) 40 are in agreement with the results of other researchers.

  16. Positronium formation and ionization in slow positron-hydrogen atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron capture and ionization processes in slow collisions of positrons with hydrogen atoms are considered within the advanced adiabatic approach to atomic collisions. The mass asymmetry of the (p,e-,e+) collision system is properly taken into account. The calculated positronium formation and ionization cross sections compare favourably with the available experimental data in the adiabatic energy region. It is shown that the potential energy curve of the 2p σ molecular state supports a quasi-bound level of the three-particle (p,e+,e-) system with an energy of -0.3 eV and decay width of 0.15 eV, approximately. (author)

  17. (2+1) laser-induced fluorescence of spin-polarized hydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Everest, Michael A; Alexander, Andrew J; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2010-11-01

    We report the measurement of the spin polarization of hydrogen (SPH) atoms by (2+1) laser-induced fluorescence, produced via the photodissociation of thermal HBr molecules with circularly polarized 193 nm light. This scheme, which involves two-photon laser excitation at 205 nm and fluorescence at 656 nm, offers an experimentally simpler polarization-detection method than the previously reported vacuum ultraviolet detection scheme, allowing the detection of SPH atoms to be performed more straightforwardly, from the photodissociation of a wide range of molecules and from a variety of collision experiments. PMID:21054033

  18. Evidence for alkali metal induced intermolecular acetylenic hydrogen atom transfer between hydrogen-bonded alkyne complexes in solid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condensation of acetylene, propyne, and 2-butyne/acetylene mixtures with heavy alkali metal atoms (Na, K, Cs) in an argon matrix at 15 K has led to the appearance of infrared absorptions due to ethylene, propylene, and trans-2-butene, respectively. These results stand in sharp contrast with the products obtained with lithium. Isotopic studies have shown that ethylene formation involved three different acetylene molecules and evidenced a difference in the product yield with hydrogen vs. deuterium as well as a preference for trans- vs. cis-C2H2D2 formation, which is discussed and rationalized by differences in the zero point energies for the different mixed deuterium isotopes of the intermediate vinyl radical. This trend is amplified by methyl substitution. Spectroscopic evidence was found in these experiments for cesium acetylide (Cs+C2H-) and a cesium-acetylene π complex, which are involved in the intermolecular acetylenic hydrogen atom transfer process. 26 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  19. Simulation Studies of the Damaging Effect of Molecular Hydrogen gas on Double Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ershadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogen damage in the double walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs was studied through molecular simulation.The simulation performed in the measuring domain has the dimensions of about 20×20×13 A. Our calculations revealed that the partial pressure of the hydrogen gas between the two walls is 180 atm and this pressure is equal to hydrogen density of 7.6 mol/L.This simulation procedure showed that the partial amount of the hydrogen molecules gas at first dissociated and then penetrate to the external wall of DWCNT.This approach is similar to hydrogen embrittlement on metals surface.

  20. Photoelectrochemical production of atomic hydrogen at tungsten bronze/aqueous solution interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, G.; Schiller, R.

    1988-12-01

    The cathodic photoeffect on hydrogenated sodium tungsten bronzes was studied in acid solutions under potentiostatic conditions. Solute effect proved the accompanying chemical reactions in the liquid phase to be brought about by hydrogen atoms. Kinetic analysis of the photocurrent showed that photoproduction and second-order recombination of the charge carriers in the solid are followed by reversible reduction of H/sup +/ at the interface. Finally H-atoms react with solutes like O/sub 2/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, Fe/sup 3+/, Fe(CN)/sub 6//sup 3-/, or tetranitromethane. The kinetics of charge carrier formation and of chemical reactions seem to be only weakly coupled, and the entire process can be described in terms of homogeneous kinetics showing diffusion and migration to be kinetically unimportant.