WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

  1. Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine at 170 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, G. C.; Dyer, Mark J.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine is reported. A doubled dye laser at 286-nm is Raman shifted in H2 to 170 nm (sixth anti-Stokes order) to excite ground-state 2P(0)J fluorine atoms to the 2D(0)J level. The fluorine atoms are detected by one of two methods: observing the fluorescence decay to the 2PJ level or observing F(+) production through the absorption of an additional photon by the excited atoms. Relative two-photon absorption cross sections to and the radiative lifetimes of the 2D(0)J states are measured.

  2. Laser-excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in a helium microwave-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Timothy S.

    The focus of this dissertation is to report the first documented coupling of helium microwave induced plasmas (MIPs) to laser excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability to effectively produce intense atomic emission from both metal and nonmetal analytes gives helium microwave induced plasmas a greater flexibility than the more commonly utilized argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Originally designed as an element selective detector for non-aqueous chromatography applications at low applied powers (500 W). The helium MIP has been shown to be a very powerful analytical atomic spectroscopy tool. The development of the pulsed dye laser offered an improved method of excitation in the field of atomic fluorescence. The use of laser excitation for atomic fluorescence was a logical successor to the conventional excitation methods involving hollow cathode lamps and continuum sources. The highly intense, directional, and monochromatic nature of laser radiation results in an increased population of atomic species in excited electronic states where atomic fluorescence can occur. The application of laser excitation atomic fluorescence to the analysis of metals in a helium microwave induced plasma with ultrasonic sample nebulization was the initial focus of this work. Experimental conditions and results are included for the aqueous characterization of manganese, lead, thallium, and iron in the helium MIP- LEAFS system. These results are compared to previous laser excitation atomic fluorescence experimentation. The effect of matrix interferences on the analytical fluorescence signal was also investigated for each element. The advantage of helium MIPs over argon ICPs in the determination of nonmetals in solution indicates that the helium MIP is an excellent candidate for laser excitation atomic fluorescence experiments involving nonmetals such as chlorine, bromine, iodine, and sulfur. Preliminary investigations into this area are reported, including documentation

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...... the foundations of the fluorescence phenomenon, introduces some general methodologies and provides selected examples on applications focused to disentangle structural and dynamical aspects of biological processes....

  4. Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy of extremely neutron-deficient barium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, S. A.; Evans, D. E.; Griffith, J. A. R.; Eastham, D. A.; Groves, J.; Smith, J. R. H.; Tolfree, D. W. L.; Warner, D. D.; Billowes, J.; Grant, I. S.; Walker, P. M.

    1988-09-01

    Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy (FACS) has been used to measure the nuclear mean square radii and moments of the extremely neutron-deficient isotopes 120-124Ba. At N=65 an abrupt change in nuclear mean square charge radii is observed which can be understood in terms of the occupation of the spin-orbit partner g7/25/2[413] neutron and g9/29/2[404] proton orbitals and the consequent enhancement of the n-p interaction.

  5. Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy of extremely neutron-deficient barium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, S.A.; Evans, D.E.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Eastham, D.A.; Groves, J.; Smith, J.R.H.; Tolfree, D.W.L.; Warner, D.D.; Billowes, J.; Grant, I.S.

    1988-09-01

    Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy (FACS) has been used to measure the nuclear mean square radii and moments of the extremely neutron-deficient isotopes /sup 120-124/Ba. At N=65 an abrupt change in nuclear mean square charge radii is observed which can be understood in terms of the occupation of the spin-orbit partner g/sub 7/2/ 5/2(413) neutron and g/sub 9/2/ 9/2(404) proton orbitals and the consequent enhancement of the n-p interaction.

  6. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  7. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  8. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  9. The generation of volatile organo-metallics compounds for on-line detection by atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, S.J.; Ebdon, L.; Goodall, P. [Univ. of Plymouth (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Previously we have described the use of sodium tetraethylborate (NaTEB) to derivatise cadmium, in aqueous solution, to yield an efficient vapour generation system which can be interfaced to both atomic absorption and fluorescence spectrometry (AAS, AFS). This approach has now been extended to the vapour generation of lead via the tetra-ethyl lead species. The efficient generation of lead requires the use of an auxiliary oxidising agent such as hydrogen peroxide and is therefore analogous to the lead (IV) hybride system. Conventional continuous flow methods were applied to lead alkyl generation with detection via AAS using a flame heated quartz furnace as an atom cell. A rigorous comparison of the lead alkyl and conventional hydride methods was undertaken after optimization of the two chemisties using simplex procedures.

  10. Fluorescence spectroscopy in polymer science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raja, T.N.; Brouwer, A.M.; Demchenko, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Polymer science is an interdisciplinary field, combining chemistry, physics, and in some cases biology. Structure, morphology, and dynamical phenomena in natural and synthetic polymers can be addressed using fluorescence spectroscopy. The most attractive aspect of fluorescent reporters is that their

  11. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  12. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented. (GHT)

  13. Solar Spectroscopy: Atomic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, H.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A Greek philosopher called DEMOCRITUS (c. 460-370 BC) first introduced the concept of atoms (which means indivisible). His atoms do not precisely correspond to our atoms of today, which are not indivisible, but made up of a nucleus (protons with positive charge and neutrons which have no charge) and orbiting electrons (with negative charge). Indeed, in the solar atmosphere, the temperature is suc...

  14. Atomic spectroscopy and radiative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the basic physical principles of atomic spectroscopy and the absorption and emission of radiation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. It summarizes the basics of electromagnetism and thermodynamics and then describes in detail the theory of atomic spectra for complex atoms, with emphasis on astrophysical applications. Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas are considered. The interaction between radiation and matter is described, together with various types of radiation (e.g., cyclotron, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung, Compton). The basic theory of polarization is explained, as is the theory of radiative transfer for astrophysical applications. Atomic Spectroscopy and Radiative Processes bridges the gap between basic books on atomic spectroscopy and the very specialized publications for the advanced researcher: it will provide under- and postgraduates with a clear in-depth description of theoretical aspects, supported by practical examples of applications.

  15. Spectroscopy, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the "Understanding the Atom" Series. The science of spectroscopy is presented by a number of topics dealing with (1) the uses of spectroscopy, (2) its origin and background, (3) the basic optical systems of spectroscopes, spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, (4) the characteristics of wave motion, (5) the…

  16. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  17. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hojoeng; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of a specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route towards portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  18. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-09-02

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample and compared performance against a conventional laboratory fluorimeter. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route toward portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  19. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  20. Solid Phase Extraction of Inorganic Mercury Using 5-Phenylazo-8-hydroxyquinoline and Determination by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy in Natural Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Daye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 8-Hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ was chosen as a powerful ligand for Hg solid phase extraction. Among several chelating resins based on 8-HQ, 5-phenylazo-8-hydroxyquinoline (5Ph8HQ is used for mercury extraction in which the adsorption dynamics were fully studied. It has been shown that Hg(II is totally absorbed by 5Ph8HQ within the first 30 minutes of contact time with t1/2 5 minutes, following Langmuir adsorption model. At pH 4, the affinity of mercury is unchallenged by other metals except, for Cu(II, which have shown higher Kd value. With these latter characteristics, 5Ph8HQ was examined for the preconcentration of trace levels of Hg(II. The developed method showed quantitative recoveries of Hg(II with LOD = 0.21 pg mL−1 and RSD = 3–6% using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CV-AFS with a preconcentration factor greater than 250.

  1. Automated dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to high performance liquid chromatography - cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of mercury species in natural water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Min; Zhang, Feng-Ping; Jiao, Bao-Yu; Rao, Jin-Yu; Leng, Geng

    2017-04-14

    An automated, home-constructed, and low cost dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) device that directly coupled to a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) - cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CVAFS) system was designed and developed for the determination of trace concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg(+)), ethylmercury (EtHg(+)) and inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) in natural waters. With a simple, miniaturized and efficient automated DLLME system, nanogram amounts of these mercury species were extracted from natural water samples and injected into a hyphenated HPLC-CVAFS for quantification. The complete analytical procedure, including chelation, extraction, phase separation, collection and injection of the extracts, as well as HPLC-CVAFS quantification, was automated. Key parameters, such as the type and volume of the chelation, extraction and dispersive solvent, aspiration speed, sample pH, salt effect and matrix effect, were thoroughly investigated. Under the optimum conditions, linear range was 10-1200ngL(-1) for EtHg(+) and 5-450ngL(-1) for MeHg(+) and Hg(2+). Limits of detection were 3.0ngL(-1) for EtHg(+) and 1.5ngL(-1) for MeHg(+) and Hg(2+). Reproducibility and recoveries were assessed by spiking three natural water samples with different Hg concentrations, giving recoveries from 88.4-96.1%, and relative standard deviations <5.1%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  3. Fluorescence Spectroscopy and its Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    ferent aspects of fluorescence spectroscopy and applications in chemistry, which I hope would be useful to both chemists and spectroscopists. I thank the Indian Academy of Sciences and, in particular, the Editorial. Board of the Journal of Chemical Sciences for inviting me to be the Guest. Editor of this Special Issue.

  4. CANAS '01 - Colloquium analytical atomic spectroscopy; CANAS '01 - Colloquium Analytische Atomspektroskopie. Programm. Kurzfassungen der Vortraege und Poster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The main topics of the meeting on analytical atom spectroscopy were: optical atom spectrometry, x-ray fluorescence analysis, absorption spectroscopy, icp mass spectroscopy, trace analysis, sampling, sample preparation and quality assurance.

  5. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  6. Fluorescence Spectroscopy in a Shoebox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq Wahab, M.

    2007-08-01

    This article describes construction of a simple, inexpensive fluorometer. It utilizes a flashlight or sunlight source, highlighter marker ink, bowl of water with mirror as dispersing element, and colored cellophane sheets as filters. The human eye is used as a detector. This apparatus is used to demonstrate important concepts related to fluorescence spectroscopy. Using ink from a highlighter marker, one can demonstrate the difference between light scattering and fluorescence emission, the need for an intense light source, phenomenon of the Stokes shift, the choice of filters, the preferred geometry of excitation source and emission detector, and the low detection limits that can be achieved by fluorescence measurements. By reflecting the fluorescence emission from a compact disk, it can be seen that the light emitted by molecules is not monochromatic. Furthermore, a spectrofluorometer is constructed using gratings made from a DVD or a CD. The shoebox fluorometer and spectrofluorometer can serve as useful teaching aids in places where commercial instruments are not available, and it avoids the black box problem of modern instruments.

  7. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  8. Microwave Spectroscopy of Cold Rubidium Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Entin, V. M.; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of microwave radiation on the resonance fluorescence of a cloud of cold $^{85}Rb$ atoms in a magnetooptical trap is studied. The radiation frequency was tuned near the hyperfine splitting frequency of rubidium atoms in the 5S ground state. The microwave field induced magnetic dipole transitions between the magnetic sublevels of the 5S(F=2) and 5S(F=3) states, resulting in a change in the fluorescence signal. The resonance fluorescence spectra were recorded by tuning the microwave r...

  9. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-12-31

    The negative ion of H is one of the simplest 3-body atomic systems. The techniques we have developed for experimental study of atoms moving near speed of light have been productive. This proposal request continuing support for experimental studies of the H{sup -} system, principally at the 800 MeV linear accelerator (LAMPF) at Los Alamos. Four experiments are currently planned: photodetachment of H{sup -} near threshold in electric field, interaction of relativistic H{sup -} ions with matter, high excitations and double charge escape in H{sup -}, and multiphoton detachment of electrons from H{sup -}.

  10. Small amplitude atomic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Ebeling, Daniel; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Bhushan, Bharat

    2011-01-01

    Over the years atomic force microscopy has developed from a pure imaging technique to a tool that can be employed for measuring quantitative tip–sample interaction forces. In this chapter we provide an overview of various techniques to extract quantitative tip–sample forces focusing on both

  11. Fluorescence spectroscopy for neoplasms control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratchenko, I. A.; Kristoforova, Yu. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of malignant skin tumors diagnosis was performed involving two setups for native tissues fluorescence control in visible and near infrared regions. Combined fluorescence analysis for skin malignant melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed. Autofluorescence spectra of normal skin and oncological pathologies stimulated by 457 nm and 785 nm lasers were registered for 74 skin tissue samples. Spectra of 10 melanomas and 27 basal cell carcinomas were registered ex vivo. Skin tumors analysis was made on the basis of autofluorescence spectra intensity and curvature for analysis of porphyrins, lipo-pigments, flavins and melanin. Separation of melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed on the basis of discriminant analysis. Overall accuracy of basal cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas separation in current study reached 86.5% with 70% sensitivity and 92.6% specificity.

  12. Precision spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthey, Christian Godehard

    2011-12-15

    This Thesis reports on three measurements involving the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and deuterium conducted on a 5.8 K atomic beam. The transition is excited Doppler-free via two counter-propagating photons near 243 nm. The H/D isotope shift has been determined as {delta}{integral}{sub exp}=670 994 334 606(15) Hz. Comparing with the theoretical value for the isotope shift, excluding the leading nuclear size effect, {delta}{integral}{sub th}=670 999 566.90(66)(60) kHz we confirm, twice more accurate, the rms charge radius difference of the deuteron and the proton as left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub d}- left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub p}=3.82007(65) fm{sup 2} and the deuteron structure radius r{sub str}=1.97507(78) fm. The frequency ratio of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen to the cesium ground state hyperfine transition provided by the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM is measured to be {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 035 (10) Hz which presents a fractional frequency uncertainty of 4.2 x 10{sup -15}. The second absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen presents the first application of a 900 km fiber link between MPQ and Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig which we have used to calibrate the MPQ hydrogen maser with the stationary cesium fountain clock CSF1 at PTB. With the result of {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 017 (11) Hz we can put a constraint on the electron Lorentz boost violating coefficients 0.95c{sub (TX)}-0.29c{sub (TY)}-0.08 c{sub (TZ)}=(2.2{+-}1.8) x 10{sup -11} within the framework of minimal standard model extensions. We limit a possible drift of the strong coupling constant through the ratio of magnetic moments at a competitive level ({partial_derivative})/({partial_derivative}t)ln ({mu}{sub Cs})/({mu}{sub B})=-(3.0{+-}1.2) x 10{sup -15} yr{sup -1}.

  13. Electronic structure of atoms: atomic spectroscopy information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, V. V.; Kazakov, V. G.; Kovalev, V. S.; Meshkov, O. I.; Yatsenko, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    The article presents a Russian atomic spectroscopy, information system electronic structure of atoms (IS ESA) (http://grotrian.nsu.ru), and describes its main features and options to support research and training. The database contains over 234 000 records, great attention paid to experimental data and uniform filling of the database for all atomic numbers Z, including classified levels and transitions of rare earth and transuranic elements and their ions. Original means of visualization of scientific data in the form of spectrograms and Grotrian diagrams have been proposed. Presentation of spectral data in the form of interactive color charts facilitates understanding and analysis of properties of atomic systems. The use of the spectral data of the IS ESA together with its functionality is effective for solving various scientific problems and training of specialists.

  14. Multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with total internal reflection fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsugi, Yu; Kinjo, Masataka

    2009-01-01

    We report simultaneous determination of diffusion coefficients at different points of a cell membrane using a multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system. A system carrying seven detection areas in the evanescent field is achieved by using seven optical fibers on the image plane in the detection port of an objective-type total internal reflection FCS (TIR-FCS) system. Fluctuation of fluorescence intensity is monitored and evaluated using seven photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and a newly constructed multichannel correlator. We demonstrate simultaneous-multipoint FCS, with a 3-mus time resolution, to investigate heterogeneous structures such as cell membranes and membrane-binding molecular dynamics near glass surfaces in live cells.

  15. Ultraviolet, Visible, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) range is one of the most commonly encountered laboratory techniques in food analysis. Diverse examples, such as the quantification of macrocomponents (total carbohydrate by the phenol-sulfuric acid method), quantification of microcomponents, (thiamin by the thiochrome fluorometric procedure), estimates of rancidity (lipid oxidation status by the thiobarbituric acid test), and surveillance testing (enzyme-linked immunoassays), are presented in this text. In each of these cases, the analytical signal for which the assay is based is either the emission or absorption of radiation in the UV-Vis range. This signal may be inherent in the analyte, such as the absorbance of radiation in the visible range by pigments, or a result of a chemical reaction involving the analyte, such as the colorimetric copper-based Lowry method for the analysis of soluble protein.

  16. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy Imaging-Guided Confocal Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Desheng; Kaldaras, Leonora; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an integrated spectroscopy system combining total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging with confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy for two-dimensional interfaces. This spectroscopy approach is capable of both multiple molecules simultaneously sampling and in situ confocal fluorescence dynamics analyses of individual molecules of interest. We have demonstrated the calibration with fluorescent microspheres, and carried out single-molecule spectroscop...

  17. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  18. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  19. Nondestructive fluorescent state detection of single neutral atom qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Michael J; Hamley, Christopher D; Shih, Chung-Yu; Chapman, Michael S

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate nondestructive (lossless) fluorescent state detection of individual neutral atom qubits trapped in an optical lattice. The hyperfine state of the atom is measured with a 95% accuracy and an atom loss rate of 1%. Individual atoms are initialized and detected over 100 times before being lost from the trap, representing a 100-fold improvement in data collection rates over previous experiments. Microwave Rabi oscillations are observed with repeated measurements of one and the same single atom. © 2011 American Physical Society

  20. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  1. Multiplexed fluorescence spectroscopy with holographic optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibula, M. A.; Kendrick, M. J.; Gruss, D. S.; Bychkova, V.; Pylypiuk, N.; Koesdjojo, M.; Remcho, V. T.; Ostroverkhova, O.; McIntyre, D. H.

    2011-10-01

    We present a multiplexed spectroscopy technique using holographic optical tweezers to trap and excite multiple sensor particles. Our goal is to develop a lab-on-a-chip measurement platform for monitoring pH and other ion concentrations with high spatial resolution in a microfluidic device or within biological cells. We have developed a variety of polymeric pH/ion sensitive nanoparticles with fluorescence spectra that change with the pH/ion concentration of the surrounding environment. We optically trap and manipulate multiple nanosensors using holographic optical tweezers. The trapped particles are irradiated with a separate excitation laser and the fluorescence from all the particles is detected simultaneously with an imaging spectrometer. Electronic separation of the parallel, discrete spectra allows for concurrent determination of multiple spectra.

  2. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, N.V.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra have been obtained from several variants of green fluorescent protein: blue fluorescent protein (BFP), enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), all from Aequorea victoria, and the red

  3. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-08-01

    We use a two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to measure the coupled absorption and emission properties of atomic species in plasmas produced via laser ablation of solid aluminum targets at atmospheric pressure. Emission spectra from the Al I 394.4 nm and Al I 396.15 nm transitions are measured while a frequency-doubled, continuous-wave, Ti:Sapphire laser is tuned across the Al I 396.15 nm transition. The resulting two-dimensional spectra show the energy coupling between the two transitions via increased emission intensity for both transitions during resonant absorption of the continuous-wave laser at one transition. Time-delayed and gated detection of the emission spectrum is used to isolate the resonantly-excited fluorescence emission from the thermally-excited emission from the plasma. In addition, the tunable continuous-wave laser measures the absorption spectrum of the Al transition with ultra-high resolution after the plasma has cooled, resulting in narrower spectral linewidths than observed in emission spectra. Our results highlight that fluorescence spectroscopy employing continuous-wave laser re-excitation after pulsed laser ablation combines benefits of both traditional emission and absorption spectroscopic methods.

  4. Collinear laser spectroscopy of atomic cadmium

    CERN Document Server

    Frömmgen, Nadja; Bissell, Mark L.; Bieroń, Jacek; Blaum, Klaus; Cheal, Bradley; Flanagan, Kieran; Fritzsche, Stephan; Geppert, Christopher; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Kreim, Kim; Krieger, Andreas; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Rajabali, Mustafa M.; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Papuga, Jasna; Yordanov, Deyan T.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine structure $A$ and $B$ factors of the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\rm{P}_2 \\rightarrow 5s\\,6s\\,\\; ^3\\rm{S}_1$ transition are determined from collinear laser spectroscopy data of $^{107-123}$Cd and $^{111m-123m}$Cd. Nuclear magnetic moments and electric quadrupole moments are extracted using reference dipole moments and calculated electric field gradients, respectively. The hyperfine structure anomaly for isotopes with $s_{1/2}$ and $d_{5/2}$ nuclear ground states and isomeric $h_{11/2}$ states is evaluated and a linear relationship is observed for all nuclear states except $s_{1/2}$. This corresponds to the Moskowitz-Lombardi rule that was established in the mercury region of the nuclear chart but in the case of cadmium the slope is distinctively smaller than for mercury. In total four atomic and ionic levels were analyzed and all of them exhibit a similar behaviour. The electric field gradient for the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\mathrm{P}_2$ level is derived from multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculatio...

  5. APD detectors for biological fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazeres, S. [Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, IPBS-CNRS, 205 route de Narbonne 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)]. E-mail: serge.mazeres@ipbs.fr; Borrel, V. [GIATHE/CESR, 9 avenue du Colonel Roche BP 4346, 31029 Toulouse Cedex (France); Magenc, C. [GIATHE/CESR, 9 avenue du Colonel Roche BP 4346, 31029 Toulouse Cedex (France); Courrech, J.L. [GIATHE/CESR, 9 avenue du Colonel Roche BP 4346, 31029 Toulouse Cedex (France); Bazer-Bachi, R. [GIATHE/CESR, 9 avenue du Colonel Roche BP 4346, 31029 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2006-11-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a very convenient and widely used method for studying the molecular background of biological processes [L. Salome, J.L. Cazeil, A. Lopez, J.F. Tocanne, Eur. Biophys. J. 27 (1998) 391-402]. Chromophores are included in the structure under study and a flash of laser light induces fluorescence (Fluorescence Recovery After Photo-bleaching), the decay of which yields information on the polarity, the speed of rotation, and the speed of diffusion as well as on the temporal and spatial evolution of interactions between molecular species. The method can even be used to study living cells [J.F. Tocanne, L. Cezanne, A. Lopez, Prog. Lipid Res. 33 (1994) 203-237, L. Cezanne, A. Lopez, F. Loste, G. Parnaud, O. Saurel, P. Demange, J.F. Tocanne, Biochemistry 38 (1999) 2779-2786]. This is classically performed with a PM-based system. For biological reasons a decrease of the excitation of the cells is highly desirable. Because the fluorescence response then becomes fainter a significant improvement in detector capability would be welcome. We present here results obtained with an Avalanche Photo Diode (APD)-based system. The small sensitive area of detection allows a very significant improvement in signal/noise ratio, improvement in gain, and the opening-up of a new parameter space. With these new detectors we can begin the study of information transmission between cells through morphine receptors. This work involves both electronics engineers and biophysicists, so results and techniques in both fields will be presented here.

  6. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Mark C; Brumfield, Brian E; LaHaye, Nicole; Harilal, Sivanandan S; Hartig, Kyle C; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-06-19

    We demonstrate measurement of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plumes using two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2DFS). The high-resolution, tunable CW-laser spectroscopy technique clearly distinguishes atomic absorption from 235U and 238U in natural and highly enriched uranium metal samples. We present analysis of spectral resolution and analytical performance of 2DFS as a function of ambient pressure. Simultaneous measurement using time-resolved absorption spectroscopy provides information on temporal dynamics of the laser ablation plume and saturation behavior of fluorescence signals. The rapid, non-contact measurement is promising for in-field, standoff measurements of uranium enrichment for nuclear safety and security.

  7. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-06-19

    We demonstrate measurement of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plumes using two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2DFS). The high-resolution, tunable CW-laser spectroscopy technique clearly distinguishes atomic absorption from 235U and 238U in natural and highly enriched uranium metal samples. We present analysis of spectral resolution and analytical performance of 2DFS as a function of ambient pressure. Simultaneous measurement using time-resolved absorption spectroscopy provides information on temporal dynamics of the laser ablation plume and saturation behavior of fluorescence signals. The rapid, non-contact measurement is promising for in-field, standoff measurements of uranium enrichment for nuclear safety and security applications.

  8. Theory of analytical curves in atomic fluorescence flame spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymayers, H.P.

    An explicit expression for the intensity of atomic resonance fluorescence as a function of atomic concentration in a flame is derived under certain idealized conditions. The expression is generally valid for a pure Doppler absorption line profile as well as for a combined Doppler and collisional

  9. High-speed atomic force microscopy: imaging and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghiaian, Frédéric; Rico, Felix; Colom, Adai; Casuso, Ignacio; Scheuring, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the type of scanning probe microscopy that is probably best adapted for imaging biological samples in physiological conditions with submolecular lateral and vertical resolution. In addition, AFM is a method of choice to study the mechanical unfolding of proteins or for cellular force spectroscopy. In spite of 28 years of successful use in biological sciences, AFM is far from enjoying the same popularity as electron and fluorescence microscopy. The advent of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), about 10 years ago, has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of membrane proteins and molecular machines from the single-molecule to the cellular level. HS-AFM imaging at nanometer-resolution and sub-second frame rate may open novel research fields depicting dynamic events at the single bio-molecule level. As such, HS-AFM is complementary to other structural and cellular biology techniques, and hopefully will gain acceptance from researchers from various fields. In this review we describe some of the most recent reports of dynamic bio-molecular imaging by HS-AFM, as well as the advent of high-speed force spectroscopy (HS-FS) for single protein unfolding. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  11. Single-molecule spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  12. Resonance Fluorescence from an Artificial Atom in Squeezed Vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Toyli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental realization of resonance fluorescence in squeezed vacuum. We strongly couple microwave-frequency squeezed light to a superconducting artificial atom and detect the resulting fluorescence with high resolution enabled by a broadband traveling-wave parametric amplifier. We investigate the fluorescence spectra in the weak and strong driving regimes, observing up to 3.1 dB of reduction of the fluorescence linewidth below the ordinary vacuum level and a dramatic dependence of the Mollow triplet spectrum on the relative phase of the driving and squeezed vacuum fields. Our results are in excellent agreement with predictions for spectra produced by a two-level atom in squeezed vacuum [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 2539 (1987], demonstrating that resonance fluorescence offers a resource-efficient means to characterize squeezing in cryogenic environments.

  13. Towards Atomic Column-by-Column Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Rafferty, B.

    1998-09-06

    The optical arrangement of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is ideally suited for performing analysis of individual atomic columns in materials. Using the incoherent Z-contrast image as a reference, and arranging incoherent conditions also for the spectroscopy, a precise correspondence is ensured between features in the inelastic image and elastic signals. In this way the exact probe position needed to maximise the inelastic signal from a selected column can be located and monitored during the analysis using the much higher intensity elastic signal. Although object functions for EELS are typically less than 1 {Angstrom} full width at half maximum, this is still an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding object functions for elastic (or diffuse) scattering used to form the Z-contrast image. Therefore the analysis is performed with an effective probe that is significantly broader than that used for the reference Z-contrast image. For a 2.2 {Angstrom} probe the effective probe is of the order of 2.5 {Angstrom}, while for a 1.3 {Angstrom} probe the effective probe is 1.6 {Angstrom}. Such increases in effective probe size can significantly reduce or even eliminate contrast between atomic columns that are visible in the image. However, this is only true if we consider circular collector apertures. Calculations based upon the theory of Maslen and Rossouw (Maslen and Rossouw 1984; Rossouw and Maslen 1984) show that employing an annular aperture can reduce the FWHM of the inelastic object function down to values close 0.1 {Angstrom}. With practical aperture sizes it should be possible to achieve this increased spatial resolution without loosing too much signal.

  14. Elasticity Maps of Living Neurons Measured by Combined Fluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Spedden, Elise; White, James D.; Naumova, Elena N.; Kaplan, David L.; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here, we combine atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy with fluorescence microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglio...

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy of synthetic melanin in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, G.; Frassanito, M.C. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Palazzo, G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Gallone, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Mallardi, A. [ICPS-CNR, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Biagi, P.F. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Universita di Bari, Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Capozzi, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy)], E-mail: v.capozzi@unifg.it

    2009-01-15

    We report a detailed investigation of fluorescence properties of synthetic eumelanin pigment in solution. A complete set of fluorescence spectra in the near-UV and visible range is analysed. Excitation spectra at a few selected emission energies are also investigated. Our measurements support the hypothesis that fluorescence in eumelanin is related to chemically distinct oligomeric units that can be selectively excited. Fluorescence due to large oligomer systems is spectrally differentiated from that due to monomers and small oligomer systems. Fluorescence excitation measurements show the contribution of 5,6-dihydroxyndole-2-carboxylic acid and 5,6-dihydroxyndole monomers to the emission of small-size oligomers.

  16. Simultaneous single molecule atomic force and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Olaf; Koberling, Felix; Walters, Deron; Koenig, Marcelle; Viani, Jacob; Ros, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with single-molecule-sensitive confocal fluorescence microscopy enables a fascinating investigation into the structure, dynamics and interactions of single biomolecules or their assemblies. AFM reveals the structure of macromolecular complexes with nanometer resolution, while fluorescence can facilitate the identification of their constituent parts. In addition, nanophotonic effects, such as fluorescence quenching or enhancement due to the AFM tip, can be used to increase the optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit, thus enabling the identification of different fluorescence labels within a macromolecular complex. We present a novel setup consisting of two commercial, state-of-the-art microscopes. A sample scanning atomic force microscope is mounted onto an objective scanning confocal fluorescence lifetime microscope. The ability to move the sample and objective independently allows for precise alignment of AFM probe and laser focus with an accuracy down to a few nanometers. Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) gives us the opportunity to measure single-molecule fluorescence lifetimes. We will be able to study molecular complexes in the vicinity of an AFM probe on a level that has yet to be achieved. With this setup we simultaneously obtained single molecule sensitivity in the AFM topography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of YOYO-1 stained lambda-DNA samples and we showed silicon tip induced single molecule quenching on organic fluorophores.

  17. Two-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dertinger, T.

    2007-05-15

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) has been invented more than 30 years ago and experienced a renaissance after stable and affordable laser sources and low-noise single-photon detectors have become available. Its ability to measure diffusion coefficients at nanomolar concentrations of analyte made it a widely used tool in biophysics. However, in recent years it has been shown by many authors that aberrational (e.g. astigmatism) and photophysical effects (e.g. optical saturation) may influence the result of an FCS experiment dramatically, so that a precise and reliable estimation of the diffusion coefficient is no longer possible. In this thesis, we report on the development, implementation, and application of a new and robust modification of FCS that we termed two-focus FCS (2fFCS) and which fulfils two requirements: (i) It introduces an external ruler into the measurement by generating two overlapping laser foci of precisely known and fixed distance. (ii) These two foci and corresponding detection regions are generated in such a way that the corresponding molecule detection functions (MDFs) are sufficiently well described by a simple two-parameter model yielding accurate diffusion coefficients when applied to 2fFCS data analysis. Both these properties enable us to measure absolute values of the diffusion coefficient with an accuracy of a few percent. Moreover, it will turn out that the new technique is robust against refractive index mismatch, coverslide thickness deviations, and optical saturation effects, which so often trouble conventional FCS measurements. This thesis deals mainly with the introduction of the new measurement scheme, 2fFCS, but also presents several applications with far-reaching importance. (orig.)

  18. Early Amyloidogenic Oligomerization Studied through Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Angel Orte; Lorena Varela; Fabio Castello; Elena Fernandez; Salvador Casares; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Jose M. Paredes

    2012-01-01

    Amyloidogenic protein aggregation is a persistent biomedical problem. Despite active research in disease-related aggregation, the need for multidisciplinary approaches to the problem is evident. Recent advances in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy are valuable for examining heterogenic biomolecular systems. In this work, we have explored the initial stages of amyloidogenic aggregation by employing fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS), an advanced modification of conve...

  19. Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Rare Earth Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Palm, Christopher; Joshi, Trinity; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We discuss progress in our experimental program to employ optical-frequency-comb-based spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms. We plan to carry out systematic measurements of atomic transitions in rare-earth atoms to elucidate the energy level structure and term assignment and determine presently unknown atomic state parameters. This spectroscopic information is important in view of the increasing interest in rare-earth atoms for atomic frequency standards, in astrophysical investigations of chemically peculiar stars, and in tests of fundamental physics (tests of parity and time-reversal invariance, searches for time variation of fundamental constants, etc.). We are presently studying the use of hollow cathode lamps as atomic sources for two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0958749.

  20. Detection of Counterfeit Tequila by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel de la Rosa Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultraviolet (UV light induced fluorescence study to discriminate fake tequila from genuine ones is presented. A portable homemade system based on four light emitting diodes (LEDs from 255 to 405 nm and a miniature spectrometer was used. It has been shown that unlike fake and silver tequila, which produce weak fluorescence signal, genuine mixed, rested, and aged tequilas show high fluorescence emission in the range from 400 to 750 nm. The fluorescence intensity grows with aging in 100% agave tequila. Such fluorescence differences can even be observed with naked eyes. The presented results demonstrate that the fluorescence measurement could be a good method to detect counterfeit tequila.

  1. Theoretical Calculations of Atomic Data for Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Manuel A.

    2000-01-01

    Several different approximations and techniques have been developed for the calculation of atomic structure, ionization, and excitation of atoms and ions. These techniques have been used to compute large amounts of spectroscopic data of various levels of accuracy. This paper presents a review of these theoretical methods to help non-experts in atomic physics to better understand the qualities and limitations of various data sources and assess how reliable are spectral models based on those data.

  2. Fluorescence spectroscopy and multi-way techniques. PARAFAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Kathleen R.; Stedmon, Colin A.; Graeber, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    PARAllel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC) is increasingly used to decompose fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMs) into their underlying chemical components. In the ideal case where fluorescence conforms to Beers Law, this process can lead to the mathematical identification and quantification ...... dataset. A new toolbox for MATLAB is presented to support improved visualisation and sensitivity analyses of PARAFAC models in fluorescence spectroscopy. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy and multi-way techniques. PARAFAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Kathleen R.; Stedmon, Colin A.; Graeber, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    PARAllel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC) is increasingly used to decompose fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMs) into their underlying chemical components. In the ideal case where fluorescence conforms to Beers Law, this process can lead to the mathematical identification and quantification...... dataset. A new toolbox for MATLAB is presented to support improved visualisation and sensitivity analyses of PARAFAC models in fluorescence spectroscopy. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  4. Liquid-Arc/Spark-Excitation Atomic-Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagen, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Constituents of solutions identified in situ. Liquid-arc/spark-excitation atomic-emission spectroscopy (LAES) is experimental variant of atomic-emission spectroscopy in which electric arc or spark established in liquid and spectrum of light from arc or spark analyzed to identify chemical elements in liquid. Observations encourage development of LAES equipment for online monitoring of process streams in such industries as metal plating, electronics, and steel, and for online monitoring of streams affecting environment.

  5. Magnetic field modulation spectroscopy of rubidium atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    phase-sensitive detection of the signal, thereby paving the way for very high sensitive measurement in the parts per billion (PPB) levels [4]. On the other hand, the saturation. FMS (SFMS) can be used as a very precise frequency reference in experiments involving laser-cooled atoms, frequency standards as in atomic clock, ...

  6. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  7. Early Amyloidogenic Oligomerization Studied through Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Orte

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidogenic protein aggregation is a persistent biomedical problem. Despite active research in disease-related aggregation, the need for multidisciplinary approaches to the problem is evident. Recent advances in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy are valuable for examining heterogenic biomolecular systems. In this work, we have explored the initial stages of amyloidogenic aggregation by employing fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS, an advanced modification of conventional fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS that utilizes time-resolved information. FLCS provides size distributions and kinetics for the oligomer growth of the SH3 domain of α-spectrin, whose N47A mutant forms amyloid fibrils at pH 3.2 and 37 °C in the presence of salt. The combination of FCS with additional fluorescence lifetime information provides an exciting approach to focus on the initial aggregation stages, allowing a better understanding of the fibrillization process, by providing multidimensional information, valuable in combination with other conventional methodologies.

  8. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  9. Fluorescence lifetime standards for time and frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boens, N.; Qin, Wenwu; Basaric, N.; Hofkens, J.; Ameloot, M.; Pouget, J.; Lefevre, J.P.; Valeur, B.; Gratton, E.; Ven, van de M.; Silva jr., D.; Engelborghs, Y.; Willaert, K.; Sillen, A.; Rumbles, G.; Philips, D.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Hoek, van A.; Lakowicz, J.R.; Malak, H.; Gryczynski, I.; Szabo, A.G.; Krajcarski, D.T.; Tamai, N.; Miura, A.

    2007-01-01

    A series of fluorophores with single-exponential fluorescence decays in liquid solution at 20 C were measured independently by nine laboratories using single-photon timing and multifrequency phase and modulation fluorometry instruments with lasers as excitation source. The dyes that can serve as

  10. In vivo quantification of chromophore concentration using fluorescence differential path length spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijt, Bastiaan; Kascakova, Slavka; de Bruijn, Henriette S.; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angelique; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Robinson, Dominic J.; Amelink, Arjen

    2009-01-01

    We present an optical method based on fluorescence spectroscopy for measuring chromophore concentrations in vivo. Fluorescence differential path length spectroscopy (FPDS) determines chromophore concentration based on the fluorescence intensity corrected for absorption. The concentration of the

  11. Principles and applications of force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Kyu; Kim, Woong; Park, Joon Won [Dept. of Chemistry, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful technique for addressing single molecules. Unseen structures and dynamics of molecules have been elucidated using force spectroscopy. Atomic force microscope (AFM)-based force spectroscopy studies have provided picoNewton force resolution, subnanometer spatial resolution, stiffness of substrates, elasticity of polymers, and thermodynamics and kinetics of single-molecular interactions. In addition, AFM has enabled mapping the distribution of individual molecules in situ, and the quantification of single molecules has been made possible without modification or labeling. In this review, we describe the basic principles, sample preparation, data analysis, and applications of AFM-based force spectroscopy and its future.

  12. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in tissue local necrosis detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cip, Ondrej; Buchta, Zdenek; Lesundak, Adam; Randula, Antonin; Mikel, Bretislav; Lazar, Josef; Veverkova, Lenka

    2014-03-01

    The recent effort leads to reliable imaging techniques which can help to a surgeon during operations. The fluorescence spectroscopy was selected as very useful online in vivo imaging method to organics and biological materials analysis. The presented work scopes to a laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to detect tissue local necrosis in small intestine surgery. In first experiments, we tested tissue auto-fluorescence technique but a signal-to-noise ratio didn't express significant results. Then we applied a contrast dye - IndoCyanine Green (ICG) which absorbs and emits wavelengths in the near IR. We arranged the pilot experimental setup based on highly coherent extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) used for stimulating of some critical areas of the small intestine tissue with injected ICG dye. We demonstrated the distribution of the ICG exciter with the first file of shots of small intestine tissue of a rabbit that was captured by high sensitivity fluorescent cam.

  13. Resonance fluorescence microscopy via three-dimensional atom localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchadhyayee, Pradipta; Dutta, Bibhas Kumar; Das, Nityananda; Mahapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A scheme is proposed to realize three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a driven two-level atomic system via resonance fluorescence. The field arrangement for the atom localization involves the application of three mutually orthogonal standing-wave fields and an additional traveling-wave coupling field. We have shown the efficacy of such field arrangement in tuning the spatially modulated resonance in all directions. Under different parametric conditions, the 3D localization patterns originate with various shapes such as sphere, sheets, disk, bowling pin, snake flute, flower vase. High-precision localization is achieved when the radiation field detuning equals twice the combined Rabi frequencies of the standing-wave fields. Application of a traveling-wave field of suitable amplitude at optimum radiation field detuning under symmetric standing-wave configuration leads to 100% detection probability even in sub-wavelength domain. Asymmetric field configuration is also taken into consideration to exhibit atom localization with appreciable precision compared to that of the symmetric case. The momentum distribution of the localized atoms is found to follow the Heisenberg uncertainty principle under the validity of Raman-Nath approximation. The proposed field configuration is suitable for application in the study of atom localization in an optical lattice arrangement.

  14. Metastable Magnesium fluorescence spectroscopy using a frequency-stabilized 517 nm laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Ming; Jensen, Brian B; Therkildsen, Kasper T

    2009-01-01

    We present a laser operating at 517 nm for our Magnesium laser-cooling and atomic clock project. A two-stage Yb-doped fiber amplifier (YDFA) system generates more than 1.5 W of 1034 nm light when seeded with a 15 mW diode laser. Using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide, we...... obtained more than 40 mW of 517 nm output power by single pass frequency doubling. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy of metastable magnesium atoms could be used to stabilize the 517 nm laser to an absolute frequency within 1 MHz....

  15. Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetard, L; Passian, A; Farahi, R H; Kalluri, U C; Davison, B H; Thundat, T

    2010-05-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass and Populus. These features may be attributable to the lignocellulosic cell wall composition, as the collected images exhibit the characteristic macromolecular globule structures attributable to the lignocellulosic systems. Using both AFM and a single case of mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) to characterize Populus, we obtained images that clearly show the cell wall structure. The results are of importance in providing a better understanding of the characteristic features of both mature cells as well as developing plant cells. In addition, we present spectroscopic investigation of the same samples.

  16. Diagnostic fluorescence spectroscopy of oral mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Krishnendu; Bottrill, Ian; Ingrams, Duncan R.; Pankratov, Michail M.; Rebeiz, Elie E.; Woo, Peak; Kabani, Sadru; Shapshay, Stanley M.; Manoharan, Ramasamy; Itzkan, Irving; Feld, Michael S.

    1995-05-01

    Autofluorescence characteristics of normal, dysplastic, and malignant squamous tissues from the oral cavity were measured with a spectrofluorometer in the excitation range of 250 - 500 nm and emission range of 350 - 750 nm. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEM) were obtained from samples collected from patients in the clinic and in the operating room. The same samples were submitted for histopathological examination following spectroscopic measurements. The contour plots obtained from the EEMs of the samples showed consistent differences between normal and abnormal tissues. All the abnormal samples showed enhanced red region (> 600 nm) fluorescence with a prominent peak at 635 nm, when excited by 410 nm light. A ratio contour plot (abnormal/normal) enhanced spectral differences in the red region. A fiber-optic based spectrofluorometer for EEM measurements is being developed for further investigations.

  17. Solving a Mock Arsenic-Poisoning Case Using Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarr, Matthew A.

    2001-01-01

    A new upper-level undergraduate atomic spectroscopy laboratory procedure has been developed that presents a realistic problem to students and asks them to assist in solving it. Students are given arsenic-laced soda samples from a mock crime scene. From these samples, they are to gather evidence to help prosecute a murder suspect. The samples are analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy or by atomic absorbance spectroscopy to determine the content of specific metal impurities. By statistical comparison of the samples' composition, the students determine if the soda samples can be linked to arsenic found in the suspect's home. As much as possible, the procedures and interpretations are developed by the students. Particular emphasis is placed on evaluating the limitations and capabilities of the analytical method with respect to the demands of the problem.

  18. U(IV) fluorescence spectroscopy. A new speciation tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, Susanne; Brendler, Vinzenz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes; Steudtner, Robin [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2017-06-01

    We combined absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy to study the speciation of U(IV) in solution in concentrations down to 10{sup -6} M uranium. With our time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence setup we could determine the fluorescence decay time of U(IV) in perchloric as well as in chloric acid with 2.6 ± 0.3 ns at room temperature and 148.4 ± 6.5 ns at liquid nitrogen temperature. For the U(IV) sulfate system, we observed a bathochromic shift and a peak shape modification in the fluorescence spectra with increasing sulfate concentration in solution. Thus, the potential of U(IV) fluorescence for speciation analysis could be proven.

  19. Nonlinear Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeev, Victor V.; Shirshin, Evgeny A.

    Principles of nonlinear laser fluorescence spectroscopy of complicated organic compounds and of the method capable of determining photophysical parameters are considered in this chapter. Special attention is paid to the peculiarities of the method connected with specific photophysical processes in natural organic compounds, especially in proteins, and to the major role of intramolecular energy transfer and presence of localized donor-acceptor pairs (LDAP) of fluorophores within single macromolecules. These facts stimulated the development of models based on the collective states formalism describing fluorescent response of LDAP to pulsed laser excitation. Unique features of the method are illustrated by the example of proteins (proteins with intrinsic fluorescence (HSA, BSA) and fluorescent protein mRFP1) that can be used as fluorescent tags of intracellular processes while their photophysical parameters can be used as the information channel.

  20. Measurement of frequency sweep nonlinearity using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningfang; Lu, Xiangxiang; Xu, Xiaobin; Pan, Xiong; Li, Wei; Hu, Di; Liu, Jixun

    2018-01-01

    A novel scheme to determine frequency sweep nonlinearity using atomic saturated absorption spectroscopy is proposed and demonstrated. The frequency modulation rate is determined by directly measuring the interference fringe number and the frequency gap between two atomic transition peaks of rubidium atom. An experimental setup is established, and test results show that the frequency sweep nonlinearity is ∼10%, with an average frequency modulation rate of ∼1.12 THz/s. Moreover, the absolute optical frequency and optical path difference between two laser beams are simultaneously determined with this method. This low-cost technique can be used for optical frequency sweep nonlinearity correction and real-time frequency monitor.

  1. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy applied to living plant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords: Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, photon counting histogram, intracellular, plant, AtSERK1

    In order to survive organisms have to be capable to adjust theirselves to changes in the environment. Cells, the

  2. EMCCD-based spectrally resolved fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestvater, Felix; Seghiri, Zahir; Kang, Moon Sik; Gröner, Nadine; Lee, Ji Young; Im, Kang-Bin; Wachsmuth, Malte

    2010-11-08

    We present an implementation of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with spectrally resolved detection based on a combined commercial confocal laser scanning/fluorescence correlation spectroscopy microscope. We have replaced the conventional detection scheme by a prism-based spectrometer and an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera used to record the photons. This allows us to read out more than 80,000 full spectra per second with a signal-to-noise ratio and a quantum efficiency high enough to allow single photon counting. We can identify up to four spectrally different quantum dots in vitro and demonstrate that spectrally resolved detection can be used to characterize photophysical properties of fluorophores by measuring the spectral dependence of quantum dot fluorescence emission intermittence. Moreover, we can confirm intracellular cross-correlation results as acquired with a conventional setup and show that spectral flexibility can help to optimize the choice of the detection windows.

  3. Application of dynamic impedance spectroscopy to atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Darowicki, Artur Zieliński and Krzysztof J Kurzydłowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM is a universal imaging technique, while impedance spectroscopy is a fundamental method of determining the electrical properties of materials. It is useful to combine those techniques to obtain the spatial distribution of an impedance vector. This paper proposes a new combining approach utilizing multifrequency scanning and simultaneous AFM scanning of an investigated surface.

  4. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  5. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The Present and the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Walter

    1982-01-01

    The status of current techniques and methods of atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy (flame, hybrid, and furnace AA) is discussed, including limitations. Technological opportunities and how they may be used in AA are also discussed, focusing on automation, microprocessors, continuum AA, hybrid analyses, and others. (Author/JN)

  6. Single atom identification by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovejoy, T. C.; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L. [Nion, 1102 8th St., Kirkland, Washington 98033 (United States); Ramasse, Q. M. [SuperSTEM Laboratory, STFC Daresbury, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Falke, M.; Kaeppel, A.; Terborg, R. [Bruker Nano GmbH, Schwarzschildstr. 12, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Zan, R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-09

    Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, single, isolated impurity atoms of silicon and platinum in monolayer and multilayer graphene are identified. Simultaneously acquired electron energy loss spectra confirm the elemental identification. Contamination difficulties are overcome by employing near-UHV sample conditions. Signal intensities agree within a factor of two with standardless estimates.

  7. SPECTRW: A software package for nuclear and atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalfas, C.A., E-mail: kalfas@inp.demokritos.gr [National Centre for Scientific Research Demokritos, Institute of Nuclear & Particle Physics, 15310 Agia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Axiotis, M. [National Centre for Scientific Research Demokritos, Institute of Nuclear & Particle Physics, 15310 Agia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Tsabaris, C. [Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Institute of Oceanography, 46.7 Km Athens-Sounio Ave, P.O. Box 712, Anavyssos 19013 (Greece)

    2016-09-11

    A software package to be used in nuclear and atomic spectroscopy is presented. Apart from analyzing γ and X-ray spectra, it offers many additional features such as de-convolution of multiple photopeaks, sample analysis and activity determination, detection system evaluation and an embedded code for spectra simulation.

  8. Current Status of Atomic Spectroscopy Databases at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramida, Alexander; Ralchenko, Yuri; Reader, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    NIST's Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center maintains several online databases on atomic spectroscopy. These databases can be accessed via the http://physics.nist.gov/PhysRefData web page. Our main database, Atomic Spectra Database (ASD), recently upgraded to v. 5.3, now contains critically evaluated data for about 250,000 spectral lines and 109,000 energy levels of almost all elements in the periodic table. This new version has added several thousand spectral lines and energy levels of Sn II, Mo V, W VIII, and Th I-III. Most of these additions contain critically evaluated transition probabilities important for astrophysics, technology, and fusion research. A new feature of ASD is providing line-ratio data for diagnostics of electron temperature and density in plasmas. Saha-Boltzmann plots have been modified by adding an experimental feature allowing the user to specify a multi-element mixture. We continue regularly updating our bibliography databases, ensuring comprehensive coverage of current literature on atomic spectra for energy levels, spectral lines, transition rates, hyperfine structure, isotope shifts, Zeeman and Stark effects. Our other popular databases, such as the Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopy Data, searchable atlases of spectra of Pt-Ne and Th-Ne lamps, and non-LTE plasma-kinetics code comparisons, continue to be maintained.

  9. Future projects of light kaonic atom X-ray spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuno H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray spectroscopy of light kaonic atoms is a unique tool to provide precise information on the fundamental K̄N interaction at the low-energy limit and the in-medium nuclear interaction of K−. The future experiments of kaonic deuterium strong-interaction shift and width (SIDDHARTA-2 and J-PARC E57 can extract the isospin dependent K−N interaction at threshold. The high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic helium with microcalorimeters (J-PARC E62 has the possibility to solve the long-standing potential-strength problem of the attractive K−-nucleus interaction. Here, the recent experimental results and the future projects of X-ray spectroscopy of light kaonic atoms are presented.

  10. Diagnosing breast cancer using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volynskaya, Zoya; Haka, Abigail S; Bechtel, Kate L; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Shenk, Robert; Wang, Nancy; Nazemi, Jon; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    Using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy, we have developed an algorithm that successfully classifies normal breast tissue, fibrocystic change, fibroadenoma, and infiltrating ductal carcinoma in terms of physically meaningful parameters. We acquire 202 spectra from 104 sites in freshly excised breast biopsies from 17 patients within 30 min of surgical excision. The broadband diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra are collected via a portable clinical spectrometer and specially designed optical fiber probe. The diffuse reflectance spectra are fit using modified diffusion theory to extract absorption and scattering tissue parameters. Intrinsic fluorescence spectra are extracted from the combined fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra and analyzed using multivariate curve resolution. Spectroscopy results are compared to pathology diagnoses, and diagnostic algorithms are developed based on parameters obtained via logistic regression with cross-validation. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and overall diagnostic accuracy (total efficiency) of the algorithm are 100, 96, 69, 100, and 91%, respectively. All invasive breast cancer specimens are correctly diagnosed. The combination of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy yields promising results for discrimination of breast cancer from benign breast lesions and warrants a prospective clinical study.

  11. Application of fluorescent and vibration spectroscopy for septic serum human albumin structure deformation during pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyubin, A.; Konstantinova, E.; Slezhkin, V.; Matveeva, K.; Samusev, I.; Bryukhanov, V.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we perform results of conformational analysis of septic human serum albumin (HSA) carried out by Raman spectroscopy (RS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and fluorescent spectroscopy. The main vibrational groups were identified and analyzed for septic HSA and its health control. Comparison between Raman and IR results were done. Fluorescent spectral changes of Trp-214 group were analyzed. Application of Raman, IR spectroscopy, fluorescent spectroscopy for conformational changes study of HSA during pathology were shown.

  12. Extreme ultraviolet fluorescence spectroscopy of pure and core-shell rare gas clusters at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroedter, Lasse

    2013-08-15

    The interaction of rare gas clusters with short-wavelength radiation of free-electron lasers (FELs) has been studied extensively over the last decade by means of electron and ion time-of-flight spectroscopy. This thesis describes the design and construction of a fluorescence spectrometer for the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range and discusses the cluster experiments performed at FLASH, the Free-electron LAser in Hamburg. Fluorescence of xenon and of argon clusters was studied, both in dependence on the FEL pulse intensity and on the cluster size. The FEL wavelength was set to the giant 4d-resonance of xenon at 13.5 nm and the FEL pulse intensity reached peak values of 2.7.10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. For xenon clusters, charge states of at least 11+ were identified. For argon, charge states up to 7+ were detected. The cluster-size dependent study revealed a decrease of the fluorescence yield per atom with increasing cluster size. This decrease is explained with the help of a geometric model. It assumes that virtually the entire fluorescence yield stems from shells of ions on the cluster surface, whereas ions in the cluster core predominantly recombine non-radiatively with electrons. However, the detailed analysis of fluorescence spectra from clusters consisting of a core of Xe atoms and a surrounding shell of argon atoms shows that, in fact, a small fraction of the fluorescence signal comes from Xe ions in the cluster core. Interestingly, these ions are as highly charged as the ions in the shells of a pure Xe cluster. This result goes beyond the current understanding of charge and energy transfer processes in these systems and points toward the observation of ultrafast charging dynamics in a time window where mass spectrometry is inherently blind. (orig.)

  13. Following protein association in vivo with fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Joachim D.

    2003-07-01

    The combination of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and two-photon excitation provides us with a powerful spectroscopic technique. Its submicron resolution and single molecule sensitivity make it an attractive technique for in vivo applications. Experiments have demonstrated that quantitative in vivo fluorescence fluctuation measurements are feasible, despite the presence of autofluorescence and the heterogeneity of the cellular environment. I will demonstrate that molecular brightness of proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a useful and robust parameter for in vivo studies. Knowledge of photon statistics is crucial for the interpretation of fluorescence fluctuation experiments. I will describe photon counting histogram (PCH) analysis, which determines the molecular brightness and complements autocorrelation analysis. Non-ideal detector effects and their influence on the photon statistics will be discussed. The goal of in vivo fluorescence fluctuation experiments is to address functional properties of biomolecules. We will focus on retinoid X receptor (RXR), a nuclear receptor, which is crucial for the regulation of gene expression. The fluorescence brightness of RXR tagged with EGFP will be used to probe the oligomerization state of RXR.

  14. Probing protein interactions in cells by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Joachim

    2003-03-01

    The combination of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and two-photon excitation provides us with a powerful spectroscopic technique. Its submicron resolution and single molecule sensitivity make it an attractive technique for in vivo applications. Experiments have demonstrated that quantitative in vivo fluorescence fluctuation measurements are feasible, despite the presence of autofluorescence and the heterogeneity of the cellular environment. I will demonstrate that molecular brightness of proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a useful and robust parameter for in vivo studies. Knowledge of photon statistics is crucial for the interpretation of fluorescence fluctuation experiments. I will describe photon counting histogram (PCH) analysis, which determines the molecular brightness and complements autocorrelation analysis. Non-ideal detector effects and their influence on the photon statistics will be discussed. The goal of in vivo fluorescence fluctuation experiments is to address functional properties of biomolecules. We will focus on retinoid X receptor (RXR), a nuclear receptor, which is crucial for the regulation of gene expression. The fluorescence brightness of RXR tagged with EGFP will be used to probe the oligomerization state of RXR.

  15. Polarization spectroscopy of atomic erbium in a hollow cathode lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang’ong’a, Jackson; Gadway, Bryce

    2018-02-01

    In this work we perform polarization spectroscopy of erbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp (HCL). We review the theory behind Doppler-free polarization spectroscopy, theoretically model the expected erbium polarization spectra, and compare the numerically calculated spectra to our experimental data. We further analyze the dependence of the measured spectra on the HCL current and the peak intensities of our pump and probe lasers to determine conditions. Applications include wavelength stabilization of diode laser radiation to the 400.91 nm erbium transition.

  16. Development of atomic spectroscopy technology -Development of ultrasensitive spectroscopic analysis technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Hyung Kee; Song Kyoo Suk; Kim, Duk Hyun; Hong, Suk Kyung; Lee, Yong Joo; Lee, Jong Hoon; Yang, Kee Hoh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    For the resonance ionization spectroscopy experiment, erbium and samarium were chosen as test elements and their optimum photoionization schemes for trace analysis have been investigated by using multiphoton spectroscopic techniques. With the optimum scheme, the detection limit of various atoms were measured. For the test of laser induced fluorescence system, calibration curves obtained from lead and cadmium standard solutions were made and Pb concentrations of various unknown solutions were determined. By using the developed differential absorption lidar system, backscattering signals from aerosol and ozone have been measured. Error source, error calibration and data interpretation techniques have been also studied. 60 figs, 8 pix, 28 tabs, 30 refs. (Author).

  17. Fluorescence spectroscopy using indocyanine green for lymph node mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Behm, Pascal; Shabo, Ivan; Wârdell, Karin

    2014-02-01

    The principles of cancer treatment has for years been radical resection of the primary tumor. In the oncologic surgeries where the affected cancer site is close to the lymphatic system, it is as important to detect the draining lymph nodes for metastasis (lymph node mapping). As a replacement for conventional radioactive labeling, indocyanine green (ICG) has shown successful results in lymph node mapping; however, most of the ICG fluorescence detection techniques developed are based on camera imaging. In this work, fluorescence spectroscopy using a fiber-optical probe was evaluated on a tissue-like ICG phantom with ICG concentrations of 6-64 μM and on breast tissue from five patients. Fiber-optical based spectroscopy was able to detect ICG fluorescence at low intensities; therefore, it is expected to increase the detection threshold of the conventional imaging systems when used intraoperatively. The probe allows spectral characterization of the fluorescence and navigation in the tissue as opposed to camera imaging which is limited to the view on the surface of the tissue.

  18. Laser induced fluorescence measurements on W- and Ba atoms eroded from fluorescent lamp electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlbeck, J.; Rackow, K.; Sigeneger, F.; Uhrlandt, D.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Hadrath, S.; Lieder, G.

    2010-05-01

    The method of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is applied to fluorescent lamps (FL) in order to investigate processes of electrode erosion in the vicinity of the electrodes. The life time of FLs which are ignited by instant start is mainly limited by sputtering of the coil electrodes and in final breaking. This sputtering of tungsten mainly occurs during the ignition in the glow discharge phase. Therefore, the density of W atoms is measured in the electrode region during ignition. Temporal and spatial resolved profiles were measured by LIF which has been combined with fast imaging. The life time of FLs which are started with preheated coils is also caused mainly by electrode failures. But the reason differs from the instant start case because here the loss is caused mainly by evaporation. End-of-lamp life is reached if the emitter material which is deposited at the coil to reduce the work function of the coil is lost completely. LIF is used to measure the density of the eroded emitter material, namely Barium atoms. First result of phase resolved absolute Ba atoms densities are presented.

  19. Atomic photoelectron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobrin, P.H.

    1983-02-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used to study the photoionization process in several atomic systems. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) photoelectron spectra of gaseous Cd, Hg, Ne, Ar, Ba, and Mn. The use of two TOF analyzers made possible the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions as well as branching ratios and partial cross sections.

  20. Two-Color Laser Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy of Zirconium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Shuichi; Nagamoto, Daisuke

    2017-10-01

    We have performed two-color laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of zirconium atoms to measure the energies of excited states below the third ionization limit. The number of intermediate states that we observed is 19, and energies deduced from the experiments agree with previous data. Complex ionization spectra of the excited states were observed through the intermediate states. The values of the first, second, and third ionization limits were derived from the Rydberg series of the spectra with quantum defect theory.

  1. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Laser Ablation Plumes Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2017-02-06

    We used a CW laser as a narrow-band (~50kHz) tunable LIF excitation source to probe absorption from selected atomic transitions (Al, U etc. ) in a ns laser ablation plume. A comparison of fluorescence signal with respect to emission spectroscopy show significant increase in the magnitude and persistence from selected Al and U transitions in a LIBS plume. The high spectral resolution provided by the LIF measurement allows peaks to be easily separated even if they overlap in the emission spectra.

  2. Single-atom spectroscopy of phosphorus dopants implanted into graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Toma; Hardcastle, Trevor P.; Hofsäss, Hans; Mittelberger, Andreas; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Mangler, Clemens; Drummond-Brydson, Rik; Scott, Andrew J.; Meyer, Jannik C.; Kotakoski, Jani

    2017-06-01

    One of the keys behind the success of modern semiconductor technology has been the ion implantation of silicon, which allows its electronic properties to be tailored. For similar purposes, heteroatoms have been introduced into carbon nanomaterials both during growth and using post-growth methods. However, due to the nature of the samples, it has been challenging to determine whether the heteroatoms have been incorporated into the lattice as intended. Direct observations have so far been limited to N and B dopants, and incidental Si impurities. Furthermore, ion implantation of these materials is challenging due to the requirement of very low ion energies and atomically clean surfaces. Here, we provide the first atomic-resolution imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) evidence of phosphorus atoms in the graphene lattice, implanted by low-energy ion irradiation. The measured P L 2,3-edge shows excellent agreement with an ab initio spectrum simulation, conclusively identifying the P in a buckled substitutional configuration. While advancing the use of EELS for single-atom spectroscopy, our results demonstrate the viability of phosphorus as a lattice dopant in sp 2-bonded carbon structures and provide its unmistakable fingerprint for further studies.

  3. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  4. Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL): Atomic Fluorescence in Cool, Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Ken G.; Nielsen, Krister E.; Kober, Gladys V.; Rau, Gioia

    2018-01-01

    The "Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) Project: Cool Stars" (PI = T. Ayres) collected a definitive set of representative, high-resolution (R~46,000 in the FUV up to ~1700 Å, R~30,000 for 1700-2150 Å, and R~114,000 >2150 Å) and high signal/noise (S/N>100) UV spectra of eight F-M evolved cool stars. These extremely high-quality STIS UV echelle spectra are available from the HST archive and from the Univ. of Colorado (http://casa.colorado.edu/~ayres/ASTRAL/) and will enable investigations of a broad range of problems -- stellar, interstellar, and beyond -- for many years. In this paper, we extend our study of the very rich emission-line spectra of the four evolved K-M stars in the sample, Beta Gem (K0 IIIb), Gamma Dra (K5 III), Gamma Cru (M3.4 III), and Alpha Ori (M2 Iab), to study the atomic fluorescence processes operating in their outer atmospheres. We summarize the pumping transitions and fluorescent line products known on the basis of previous work (e.g. Carpenter 1988, etc.) and newly identified in our current, on-going analysis of these extraordinary ASTRAL STIS spectra.

  5. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for analysis of wine and wine distillates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Ya.; Borisova, E.; Genova, Ts.; Zhelyazkova, Al.; Avramov, L.

    2015-01-01

    Wine and brandies are multicomponent systems and conventional fluorescence techniques, relying on recording of single emission or excitation spectra, are often insufficient. In such cases synchronous fluorescence spectra can be used for revealing the potential of the fluorescence techniques. The technique is based on simultaneously scanning of the excitation and emission wavelength with constant difference (Δλ) maintained between them. In this study the measurements were made using FluoroLog3 spectrofluorimeter (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) and collected for excitation and emission in the wavelength region 220 - 700 nm using wavelength interval Δλ from 10 to 100 nm in 10 nm steps. This research includes the results obtained for brandy and red wine samples. Fluorescence analysis takes advantage in the presence of natural fluorophores in wines and brandies, such as gallic, vanillic, p-coumaric, syringic, ferulic acid, umbelliferone, scopoletin and etc. Applying of synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for analysis of these types of alcohols allows us to estimate the quality of wines and also to detect adulteration of brandies like adding of a caramel to wine distillates for imitating the quality of the original product aged in oak casks.

  6. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10-5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 104 atoms cm-3. The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  7. Membrane mobility and microdomain association of the dopaminetransporter studied with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adkins, Erika; Samuvel, Devadoss; Fog, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    To investigate microdomain association of the dopamine transporter (DAT), we employed FCS (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy) and FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching). In non-neuronal cells (HEK293), FCS measurements revealed for the YFP-DAT (DAT tagged with yellow fluorescent...

  8. Membrane mobility and microdomain association of the dopamine transporter studied with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adkins, Erika M; Samuvel, Devadoss J; Fog, Jacob U

    2007-01-01

    To investigate microdomain association of the dopamine transporter (DAT), we employed FCS (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy) and FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching). In non-neuronal cells (HEK293), FCS measurements revealed for the YFP-DAT (DAT tagged with yellow fluorescent...

  9. Search for Ultralight Scalar Dark Matter with Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tilburg, Ken; Leefer, Nathan; Bougas, Lykourgos; Budker, Dmitry

    2015-07-03

    We report new limits on ultralight scalar dark matter (DM) with dilatonlike couplings to photons that can induce oscillations in the fine-structure constant α. Atomic dysprosium exhibits an electronic structure with two nearly degenerate levels whose energy splitting is sensitive to changes in α. Spectroscopy data for two isotopes of dysprosium over a two-year span are analyzed for coherent oscillations with angular frequencies below 1  rad s-1. No signal consistent with a DM coupling is identified, leading to new constraints on dilatonlike photon couplings over a wide mass range. Under the assumption that the scalar field comprises all of the DM, our limits on the coupling exceed those from equivalence-principle tests by up to 4 orders of magnitude for masses below 3×10(-18)  eV. Excess oscillatory power, inconsistent with fine-structure variation, is detected in a control channel, and is likely due to a systematic effect. Our atomic spectroscopy limits on DM are the first of their kind, and leave substantial room for improvement with state-of-the-art atomic clocks.

  10. In situ detection of atomic and molecular iodine using Resonance and Off-Resonance Fluorescence by Lamp Excitation: ROFLEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Martín, J. C.; Blahins, J.; Gross, U.; Ingham, T.; Goddard, A.; Mahajan, A. S.; Ubelis, A.; Saiz-Lopez, A.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a new instrument for in situ detection of atmospheric iodine atoms and molecules based on atomic and molecular resonance and off-resonance ultraviolet fluorescence excited by lamp emission. The instrument combines the robustness, light weight, low power consumption and efficient excitation of radio-frequency discharge light sources with the high sensitivity of the photon counting technique. Calibration of I2 fluorescence is achieved via quantitative detection of the molecule by Incoherent Broad Band Cavity-enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy. Atomic iodine fluorescence signal is calibrated by controlled broad band photolysis of known I2 concentrations in the visible spectral range at atmospheric pressure. The instrument has been optimised in laboratory experiments to reach detection limits of 1.2 pptv for I atoms and 13 pptv for I2, for S/N = 1 and 10 min of integration time. The ROFLEX system has been deployed in a field campaign in northern Spain, representing the first concurrent observation of ambient mixing ratios of iodine atoms and molecules in the 1-350 pptv range.

  11. Brain cancer probed by native fluorescence and stokes shift spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; He, Yong; Pu, Yang; Li, Qingbo; Wang, Wei; Alfano, Robert R.

    2012-12-01

    Optical biopsy spectroscopy was applied to diagnosis human brain cancer in vitro. The spectra of native fluorescence, Stokes shift and excitation spectra were obtained from malignant meningioma, benign, normal meningeal tissues and acoustic neuroma benign tissues. The wide excitation wavelength ranges were used to establish the criterion for distinguishing brain diseases. The alteration of fluorescence spectra between normal and abnormal brain tissues were identified by the characteristic fluorophores under the excitation with UV to visible wavelength range. It was found that the ratios of the peak intensities and peak position in both spectra of fluorescence and Stokes shift may be used to diagnose human brain meninges diseases. The preliminary analysis of fluorescence spectral data from cancer and normal meningeal tissues by basic biochemical component analysis model (BBCA) and Bayes classification model based on statistical methods revealed the changes of components, and classified the difference between cancer and normal human brain meningeal tissues in a predictions accuracy rate is 0.93 in comparison with histopathology and immunohistochemistry reports (gold standard).

  12. DNA length evaluation using cyanine dye and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Masafumi; Sasaki, Satoshi; Tsuruoka, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    To develop a high-performance method for measuring the length of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) fragments, the capability of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was examined. To omit troublesome and time-consuming labeling operations such as PCR with fluorescently labeled mononucleotides or primers, intercalation of dimeric cyanine dye YOYO-1 iodide (YOYO) to dsDNA was utilized as a simple labeling method. Various lengths of dsDNA fragments were prepared and mixed with YOYO prior to FCS, and the dependence of the diffusion time of a dsDNA-YOYO complex on the length of dsDNA fragment and the dsDNA/YOYO ratio was investigated. It was successfully demonstrated that the dsDNA length can be measured using YOYO and FCS, and the calibration curve was developed taking into account the rewinding and expansion of the dsDNA fragment caused by YOYO intercalation.

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence with an OPO system. Part II: direct determination of lead content in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, A; Lijour, Y; Giamarchi, P; Burel-Deschamps, L; Stephan, L

    2003-03-01

    Fluorescence was induced by coupling a laser with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to develop an analytical method for the direct determination of lead content, at ultra-trace level, in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF). The optimization of atomization conditions, laser pulse energy, and mainly temporal parameters allowed us to reach a 3 fg detection limit (0.3 ng L(-1)) despite the low repetition rate of the device. The expected error on predicted concentrations of lead, at trace levels, in seawater was below 15%.

  14. Optical fiber fluorescence spectroscopy for detecting AFM1 in milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, A. G.; Cucci, C.; Ciaccheri, L.; Dall'Asta, C.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.; Marchelli, R.

    2008-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy carried out by means of optical fibers was used for the rapid screening of M1 aflatoxin in milk, enabling the detection of concentrations up to the legal limit, which is 50 ppt. A compact fluorometric device equipped with a LED source, a miniaturized spectrometer, and optical fibers for illumination/detection of the measuring micro-cell was tested for measuring threshold values of AFM1 in pre-treated milk samples. Multivariate processing of the spectral data made it possible to obtain a preliminary screening at the earlier stages of the industrial process, as well as to discard contaminated milk stocks before their inclusion in the production chain.

  15. Identification of active fluorescence stained bacteria by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Mario; Beyer, Beatrice; Pietsch, Christian; Radt, Benno; Harz, Michaela; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2008-04-01

    Microorganisms can be found everywhere e.g. in food both as useful ingredients or harmful contaminations causing food spoilage. Therefore, a fast and easy to handle analysis method is needed to detect bacteria in different kinds of samples like meat, juice or air to decide if the sample is contaminated by harmful microorganisms. Conventional identification methods in microbiology require always cultivation and therefore are time consuming. In this contribution we present an analysis approach to identify fluorescence stained bacteria on strain level by means of Raman spectroscopy. The stained bacteria are highlighted and can be localized easier against a complex sample environment e.g. in food. The use of Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometrical methods allows the identification of single bacteria within minutes.

  16. Angular distribution and atomic effects in condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.F.

    1981-11-01

    A general concept of condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy is that angular distribution and atomic effects in the photoemission intensity are determined by different mechanisms, the former being determined largely by ordering phenomena such as crystal momentum conservation and photoelectron diffraction while the latter are manifested in the total (angle-integrated) cross section. In this work, the physics of the photoemission process is investigated in several very different experiments to elucidate the mechanisms of, and correlation between, atomic and angular distribution effects. Theoretical models are discussed and the connection betweeen the two effects is clearly established. The remainder of this thesis, which describes experiments utilizing both angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission in conjunction with synchrotron radiation in the energy range 6 eV less than or equal to h ..nu.. less than or equal to 360 eV and laboratory sources, is divided into three parts.

  17. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium.

  18. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Nagata, Y; Knudsen, H; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Hayano, R; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Leali, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

  19. Atomic Physics at Accelerators Laser Spectroscopy and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Letokhov, V

    2003-01-01

    From 19 to 24 September, 1999, the First European Conference Atomic physics at Accelerators: Laser Spectroscopy and Applications (APAC'99) was held at University of Mainz and Schloss Waldhausen (Budenheim, Germany) under the chairmanship of H. Backe and G. Huber. The idea of this up-to-date conference was associated with the 65th anniversary of Professor Ernst Otten (University of Mainz) who, together with H. Kluge, contributed much to the development of this work at CERN, University of Mainz, and Darmstadt. (17 refs).

  20. Atomic fluorescence emitted from a corona discharge in helium above and below saturated vapour pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiltagh, Nagham M.; Mendoza Luna, Luis G.; Watkins, Mark J.; Thornton, Stuart C.; von Haeften, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    A new apparatus was constructed to investigate the visible and near infrared fluorescence spectroscopy of electronically excited helium over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, covering both the gaseous and liquid phases. To achieve sufficient throughput, increased sensitivity was established by employing a micro-discharge cell and a high performance lens system that allows for a large collection solid angle. With this set-up, several thousand spectra were recorded. The atomic 3 s 1 S → 2 p 1 P and 3 s 3 S → 2 p 3 P atomic transitions showed line shifts, spectral broadening and intensity changes that were dependent in magnitude on pressure, temperature and thermodynamic phase. While in the gas phase the lines showed little dependency on the discharge cell temperature, the opposite was observed for the liquid phase, suggesting that a significant number of atoms were solvated. Triplet lines were up to a factor of 50 times stronger in intensity than the singlet lines, depending on pressure. When taking the particle density into account, this effect was stronger in the gas phase than in the liquid phase of helium. This was attributed to the recombination of He2 +, He3 + and He4 + with electrons, which is facilitated in the gas phase because of the significantly higher mobility.

  1. Impact of oxygen chemistry on the emission and fluorescence spectroscopy of laser ablation plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, K. C.; Brumfield, B. E.; Phillips, M. C.; Harilal, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    Oxygen present in the ambient gas medium may affect both laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) emission through a reduction of emission intensity and persistence. In this study, an evaluation is made on the role of oxygen in the ambient environment under atmospheric pressure conditions in LIBS and laser ablation (LA)-LIF emission. To generate plasmas, 1064 nm, 10 ns pulses were focused on an aluminum alloy sample. LIF was performed by frequency scanning a CW laser over the 396.15 nm (3s24s 2S1/2 → 3s23p 2P°3/2) Al I transition. Time-resolved emission and fluorescence signals were recorded to evaluate the variation in emission intensity caused by the presence of oxygen. The oxygen partial pressure (po) in the atmospheric pressure environment using N2 as the makeup gas was varied from 0 to 400 Torr O2. 2D-fluorescence spectroscopy images were obtained for various oxygen concentrations for simultaneous evaluation of the emission and excitation spectral features. Results showed that the presence of oxygen in the ambient environment reduces the persistence of the LIBS and LIF emission through an oxidation process that depletes the density of atomic species within the resulting laser-produced plasma (LPP) plume.

  2. Identification of Atherosclerotic Plaques in Carotid Artery by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Rick; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; Silveira, Landulfo; Costa, Maricília Silva; Alves, Leandro Procópio; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto; Brugnera, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the presence of atherosclerotic plaques in carotid artery using the Fluorescence Spectroscopy. The most important pathogeny in the cardiovascular disorders is the atherosclerosis, which may affect even younger individuals. With approximately 1.2 million heart attacks and 750,000 strokes afflicting an aging American population each year, cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of death. Carotid artery samples were obtained from the Autopsy Service at the University of São Paulo (São Paulo, SP, Brazil) taken from cadavers. After a histopathological analysis the 60 carotid artery samples were divided into two groups: normal (26) and atherosclerotic plaques (34). Samples were irradiated with the wavelength of 488 nm from an Argon laser. A 600 μm core optical fiber, coupled to the Argon laser, was used for excitation of the sample, whereas another 600 optical fiber, coupled to the spectrograph entrance slit, was used for collecting the fluorescence from the sample. Measurements were taken at different points on each sample and then averaged. Fluorescence spectra showed a single broad line centered at 549 nm. The fluorescence intensity for each sample was calculated by subtracting the intensity at the peak (550 nm) and at the bottom (510 nm) and then data were statistically analyzed, looking for differences between both groups of samples. ANOVA statistical test showed a significant difference (p<0,05) between both types of tissues, with regard to the fluorescence peak intensities. Our results indicate that this technique could be used to detect the presence of the atherosclerotic in carotid tissue.

  3. Laser Induced Fluorescence for Singly Ionized Atomic Iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Thomas; Scime, Earl

    2017-10-01

    While xenon is the standard propellant for a wide range of plasma thrusters, xenon is expensive and xenon propellant systems require heavy compressed gas tanks, pressure regulators, and other bulky hardware. Iodine has similar mass and is much easier to acquire than xenon. Iodines natural state of matter at room temperature is solid and is easily sublimated to gas with a simple heating element. This advantage for iodine is also a significant challenge when developing gas handling systems for iodine. Another challenge for iodine thrusters is a lack of well-defined spectroscopic diagnostics for single ionized iodine, specifically, a lack of a demonstrated laser induced fluorescence (LIF) scheme. We present emission spectroscopy measurements of iodine ion emission from the 6p5P3 - 5d5D4o transition at 695.878 nm and the 6p5P3 - 6s5S2o transition at 516.12 nm as a function of pressure and microwave power for a microwave excited iodine plasma in a sealed quartz cell at a pressure of 1 mTorr. The 5d5D4o state is metastable and was identified by Hargus et al. [48th AIAA Joint Propulsion, 2012] as a strong candidate for an iodine ion LIF scheme. We will also present preliminary LIF measurements using a tunable dye laser operating at 695.878 nm. Special thanks to Dr. William Hargus Jr. and Air Force Research Laboratory at Edwards AFB.

  4. Spectroscopy of lithium atoms and molecules on helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Florian; Poms, Johannes; Krois, Günter; Pototschnig, Johann V; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2013-11-21

    We report on the spectroscopic investigation of lithium atoms and lithium dimers in their triplet manifold on the surface of helium nanodroplets (He(N)). We present the excitation spectrum of the 3p ← 2s and 3d ← 2s two-photon transitions for single Li atoms on He(N). The atoms are excited from the 2S(Σ) ground state into Δ, Π, and Σ pseudodiatomic molecular substates. Excitation spectra are recorded by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight (REMPI-TOF) mass spectroscopy, which allows an investigation of the exciplex (Li*–He(m), m = 1–3) formation process in the Li–He(N) system. Electronic states are shifted and broadened with respect to free atom states, which is explained within the pseudodiatomic model. The assignment is assisted by theoretical calculations, which are based on the Orsay–Trento density functional where the interaction between the helium droplet and the lithium atom is introduced by a pairwise additive approach. When a droplet is doped with more than one alkali atom, the fragility of the alkali–He(N) systems leads preferably to the formation of high-spin molecules on the droplets. We use this property of helium nanodroplets for the preparation of Li dimers in their triplet ground state (13Σu(+)). The excitation spectrum of the 23Πg(ν′ = 0–11) ← 13Σu(+)(ν″ = 0) transition is presented. The interaction between the molecule and the droplet manifests in a broadening of the transitions with a characteristic asymmetric form. The broadening extends to the blue side of each vibronic level, which is caused by the simultaneous excitation of the molecule and vibrations of the droplet (phonons). The two isotopes of Li form 6Li2 and 7Li2 as well as isotope mixed 6Li7Li molecules on the droplet surface. By using REMPI-TOF mass spectroscopy, isotope-dependent effects could be studied.

  5. Atomic spectroscopy sympsoium, Gaithersburg, Maryland, September 23--26, 1975. [Program, abstracts, and author index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Abstracts of one hundred papers given at the conference are presented along with the conference program and an author index. Session topics include: highly ionized atoms; laser spectroscopy and hyperfine structure; complex spectra; laser spectroscopy, radiation theory; theory of highly ionized atoms and analysis of plasmas; plasma spectroscopy, line strengths; spectral analysis, instrumentation, reference wavelengths; beam foil spectroscopy, line strengths, energy levels; absorption spectroscopy, autoionization, and related theory; and spectral analysis, instrumentation, and VUV physics. (GHT)

  6. Rapid measurement of meat spoilage using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binlin; Dahlberg, Kevin; Gao, Xin; Smith, Jason; Bailin, Jacob

    2017-02-01

    Food spoilage is mainly caused by microorganisms, such as bacteria. In this study, we measure the autofluorescence in meat samples longitudinally over a week in an attempt to develop a method to rapidly detect meat spoilage using fluorescence spectroscopy. Meat food is a biological tissue, which contains intrinsic fluorophores, such as tryptophan, collagen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) etc. As meat spoils, it undergoes various morphological and chemical changes. The concentrations of the native fluorophores present in a sample may change. In particular, the changes in NADH and FAD are associated with microbial metabolism, which is the most important process of the bacteria in food spoilage. Such changes may be revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy and used to indicate the status of meat spoilage. Therefore, such native fluorophores may be unique, reliable and nonsubjective indicators for detection of spoiled meat. The results of the study show that the relative concentrations of all above fluorophores change as the meat samples kept in room temperature ( 19° C) spoil. The changes become more rapidly after about two days. For the meat samples kept in a freezer ( -12° C), the changes are much less or even unnoticeable over a-week-long storage.

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence and dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1-phenylpropargyl radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Neil J; Nakajima, Masakazu; Gibson, Bligh A; Schmidt, Timothy W; Kable, Scott H

    2009-04-14

    The D(1)((2)A("))-D(0)((2)A(")) electronic transition of the resonance-stabilized 1-phenylpropargyl radical, produced in a jet-cooled discharge of 3-phenyl-1-propyne, has been investigated in detail by laser-induced fluorescence excitation and dispersed single vibronic level fluorescence (SVLF) spectroscopy.The transition is dominated by the origin band at 21,007 cm(-1), with weaker Franck-Condon activity observed in a(') fundamentals and even overtones and combinations of a(") symmetry. Ab initio and density functional theory calculations of the D(0) and D(1) geometries and frequencies were performed to support and guide the experimental assignments throughout. Analysis of SVLF spectra from 16 D(1) vibronic levels has led to the assignment of 15 fundamental frequencies in the excited state and 19 fundamental frequencies in the ground state; assignments for many more normal modes not probed directly by fluorescence spectroscopy are also suggested. Duschinsky mixing, in which the excited state normal modes are rotated with respect to the ground state modes, is prevalent throughout, in vibrations of both a(') and a(") symmetry.

  8. Medical applications of atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Samjin; Jung, Gyeong Bok; Kim, Kyung Sook; Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy techniques, which are considered the multi-functional and powerful toolkits for probing the nanostructural, biomechanical and physicochemical properties of biomedical samples in medical science. We introduce briefly the basic principles of AFM and Raman spectroscopy, followed by diagnostic assessments of some selected diseases in biomedical applications using them, including mitochondria isolated from normal and ischemic hearts, hair fibers, individual cells, and human cortical bone. Finally, AFM and Raman spectroscopy applications to investigate the effects of pharmacotherapy, surgery, and medical device therapy in various medicines from cells to soft and hard tissues are discussed, including pharmacotherapy--paclitaxel on Ishikawa and HeLa cells, telmisartan on angiotensin II, mitomycin C on strabismus surgery and eye whitening surgery, and fluoride on primary teeth--and medical device therapy--collagen cross-linking treatment for the management of progressive keratoconus, radiofrequency treatment for skin rejuvenation, physical extracorporeal shockwave therapy for healing of Achilles tendinitis, orthodontic treatment, and toothbrushing time to minimize the loss of teeth after exposure to acidic drinks.

  9. Measurement of the diffusion coefficients of fluorescence beads and quantum dots by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yesul; Lee, Jaeran; Lee, Yumi; Kim, Sokwon [University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    FCS (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy) is a technique used to determine the dynamic characteristics of particles in solution and became common in the field of biophysics with the development of the confocal microscope, the high-speed photo-detector, and real-time data acquisition systems. In this study, the FCS system was composed of a commercial fluorescence microscope, a He-Ne laser (632.8 nm), a data acquisition board, and a software correlator written with LabVIEW. Autocorrelation functions were obtained using the measured fluorescence fluctuations of fluorescent beads and Q-dots (quantum dots) coated with carboxylate in distilled water. The diffusion coefficients of the beads and the Q-dots in distilled water and PBS (phosphate buffered saline) solution were obtained using the viscosity of water and the bead size. Also, using the bead size, we calculated the viscosity of the PBS solution, and we compared the Q-dots in water and in the PBS solution. The result showed that the viscosity of the PBS solution was 2.5 times greater than that of water, and that the sizes of Q-dots in water and PBS solution were one-third and one-sixth smaller than the known values, respectively, due to the pH variation in the solutions.

  10. Aqueous solutions of lower alcohols investigated by pyrene fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Jun; Xiao, Han-Shuang

    2012-03-01

    The aqueous solutions of lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol and 2-propanol, were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy of pyrene, defining the Py scale for polarity. Sigmoidal curves were used to fit the Py values of aqueous alcohol solutions as a function of the logarithm of water-alcohol mole ratio, i.e., log(WAR). The results from curve fittings were discussed in terms of the structural transitions of aqueous alcohol solutions, as well as the dissociation constants for alcohol- and water-pyrene complexes. The microscopic alcohol and water phases were considered to be saturated with each other, and the structures of dilute aqueous alcohol solutions were found to be more complicated than those of concentrated ones. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. On-line laser spectroscopy with thermal atomic beams

    CERN Document Server

    Thibault, C; De Saint-Simon, M; Duong, H T; Guimbal, P; Huber, G; Jacquinot, P; Juncar, P; Klapisch, Robert; Liberman, S; Pesnelle, A; Pillet, P; Pinard, J; Serre, J M; Touchard, F; Vialle, J L

    1981-01-01

    On-line high resolution laser spectroscopy experiments have been performed in which the light from a CW tunable dye laser interacts at right angles with a thermal atomic beam. /sup 76-98/Rb, /sup 118-145 /Cs and /sup 208-213/Fr have been studied using the ionic beam delivered by the ISOLDE on-line mass separator at CERN while /sup 30-31/Na and /sup 38-47/K have been studied by setting the apparatus directly on-line with the PS 20 GeV proton beam. The principle of the method is briefly explained and some results concerning nuclear structure are given. The hyperfine structure, spins and isotope shifts of the alkali isotopes and isomers are measured. (8 refs).

  12. The determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump-Wiesner, Hans J.; Feltz, H.R.; Purdy, W.C.

    1971-01-01

    A standard addition method is described for the determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. Sample pH is adjusted to 1.0 with concentrated hydrochloric acid and the vanadium is directly extracted with 5% cupferron in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The ketone layer is then aspirated into the flame and the recorded absorption values are plotted as a function of the concentration of the added metal. As little as 2.5 ??g l-1 of vanadium can be detected under the conditions of the procedure. Tungsten and tin interfere when present in excess of 5 and 10 ??g ml-1, respectively. The concentrations of the two interfering ions normally found in brines are well below interference levels. ?? 1971.

  13. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in biology, chemistry, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevoshchikova, I V; Kotova, E A; Antonenko, Y N

    2011-05-01

    This review describes the method of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and its applications. FCS is used for investigating processes associated with changes in the mobility of molecules and complexes and allows researchers to study aggregation of particles, binding of fluorescent molecules with supramolecular complexes, lipid vesicles, etc. The size of objects under study varies from a few angstroms for dye molecules to hundreds of nanometers for nanoparticles. The described applications of FCS comprise various fields from simple chemical systems of solution/micelle to sophisticated regulations on the level of living cells. Both the methodical bases and the theoretical principles of FCS are simple and available. The present review is concentrated preferentially on FCS applications for studies on artificial and natural membranes. At present, in contrast to the related approach of dynamic light scattering, FCS is poorly known in Russia, although it is widely employed in laboratories of other countries. The goal of this review is to promote the development of FCS in Russia so that this technique could occupy the position it deserves in modern Russian science.

  14. Ultrafast 2D Fluorescence Spectroscopy using Spectrally Entangled Photon Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymer, Michael

    2015-03-01

    We propose entangled photon-pair two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (EPP-2DFS) to probe the nonlinear electronic response of molecular systems. The method, inspired by results in, uses a technique from quantum optics--a separated two-photon (Franson) interferometer, which generates time-delayed packets of time-frequency-entangled photon pairs. This interferometer is incorporated into the framework of a fluorescence-detected 2D optical spectroscopic experiment. The continuous stream of entangled photons are phase-modulated in the interferometer, and used to excite a two-photon-absorbing sample, whose excited-state population is selectively detected by simultaneously monitoring the sample fluorescence and the transmitted exciting fields. In comparison to standard `classical' 2DFS techniques using coherent laser pulses and standard pulse-scanning sequences, advantages of this scheme include the suppression of uncorrelated background signals, the suppression of diagonal 2D spectral features, the enhancement and narrowing of off -diagonal spectral cross-peaks that contain information about electronic coupling, and the possibility for enhancement of simultaneous time-and-frequency resolution, including spectral selectivity within an inhomogeneously broadened distribution. These effects arise from the properties of parametric down-conversion light source, which effectively creates a different interaction-scanning protocol than in standard laser-pulse scanning. We numerically simulate the EPP-2DFS observable for the case of an electronically coupled molecular dimer. The EPP-2DFS spectrum is greatly simplified in comparison to its standard classical 2D counterpart. Our results indicate that EPP-2DFS can provide previously unattainable resolution to extract model Hamiltonian parameters from electronically coupled molecular dimers.

  15. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Photosynthetic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toru; Chen, Wei Jia; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S

    2017-01-25

    Photosynthesis begins when a network of pigment-protein complexes captures solar energy and transports it to the reaction center, where charge separation occurs. When necessary (under low light conditions), photosynthetic organisms perform this energy transport and charge separation with near unity quantum efficiency. Remarkably, this high efficiency is maintained under physiological conditions, which include thermal fluctuations of the pigment-protein complexes and changing local environments. These conditions introduce multiple types of heterogeneity in the pigment-protein complexes, including structural heterogeneity, energetic heterogeneity, and functional heterogeneity. Understanding how photosynthetic light-harvesting functions in the face of these fluctuations requires understanding this heterogeneity, which, in turn, requires characterization of individual pigment-protein complexes. Single-molecule spectroscopy has the power to probe individual complexes. In this review, we present an overview of the common techniques for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy applied to photosynthetic systems and describe selected experiments on these systems. We discuss how these experiments provide a new understanding of the impact of heterogeneity on light harvesting and thus how these systems are optimized to capture sunlight under physiological conditions.

  16. Rubidium atomic beam clock based on lamp-pumping and fluorescence-detection scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. H.; Huang, J. Q.; Gu, Y.; Liu, S. Q.; Dong, T. Q.; Lu, Z. H.

    2011-02-01

    A compact, portable rubidium atomic beam clock based on lamp-pumping and fluorescence-detection scheme is proposed. The expected short-term frequency stability can be at least two orders of magnitude better than previous experimental results. The usages of lamp pumping, fluorescence detection and microwave slow-wave resonance structures make this design robust and compact.

  17. Spatially resolved x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy of beryllium capsule implosions at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Bishel, D. T.; Saunders, A. M.; Scott, H. A.; Kyrala, G.; Kline, J.; MacLaren, S.; Thorn, D. B.; Yi, S. A.; Zylstra, A. B.; Falcone, R. W.; Doeppner, T.

    2017-10-01

    Beryllium ablators used in indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are doped with copper to prevent preheat of the cryogenic hydrogen fuel. Here, we present analysis of spatially resolved copper K- α fluorescence spectra from the beryllium ablator layer. It has been shown that K- α fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to measure plasma conditions of partially ionized dopants in high energy density systems. In these experiments, K-shell vacancies in the copper dopant are created by the hotspot emission at stagnation, resulting in K-shell fluorescence at bang time. Spatially resolved copper K- α emission spectra are compared to atomic kinetics and radiation code simulations to infer density and temperature profiles. This work was supported by the US DOE under Grant No. DE-NA0001859, under the auspices of the US DOE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and by Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-06NA52396.

  18. Study of the Interaction of Cefonicid Sodium with Bovine Serum Albumin by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Sh.-T.; Liu, B.-Sh.; Li, T.-T.; Cui, M.-M.

    2017-07-01

    The reaction mechanism of cefonicid sodium with bovine serum albumin was investigated by traditional fluorescence spectroscopy and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that cefonicid sodium caused a strong fluorescence quenching of bovine serum albumin through a static quenching mechanism, during which the electrostatic force played the dominant role in this system, and the number of binding sites in the system was close to 1. It also showed that the primary binding site for cefonicid sodium was closer to tryptophan residues located in sub-hydrophobic domain IIA. Moreover, circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the secondary structure of bovine serum albumin changed. The donor-to-acceptor distance r bovine serum albumin was a nonradiation energy transfer process. The data obtained from Δλ = 60 nm and λex = 295 nm indicated that synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy had higher sensitivity and accuracy compared to traditional fluorescence spectroscopy.

  19. Observation of Climacteric-Like Behavior of Citrus Leaves Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio B. Wetterich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Observation of climacteric-like behavior in citrus leaves depends on the detection of ethylene. However, such detection requires a gas chromatographer and complex sample preparation procedures. In this work, fluorescence spectroscopy was investigated as a diagnostic technique for climacteric-like behavior in citrus leaves. Our results indicate that the chlorophyll fluorescence presents a time evolution consistent with the ethylene evolution. Therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy may be used to observe the climacteric-like behavior in citrus leaves.

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy of soil pellets : The use of CP/PARAFAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounier, Stéphane; Nicolodeli, Gustavo; Redon, Roland; Hacherouf, Kalhed; Milori, Debora M. B. P.

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is one of the most sensitive techniques available for analytical purposes. It is relatively easy to implement, phenomenologically straightforward and well investigated. Largely non-invasive and fast, so that it can be useful for environmental applications. Fluorescence phenomenon is highly probable in molecular systems containing atoms with lone pairs of electrons such as C=O, aromatic, phenolic, quinone and more rigid unsaturated conjugated systems. These functional groups are present in humic substances (HS) from soils (Senesi, 1990; N. Senesi et al., 1991) and represent the main fluorophors of Soil Organic Matter (SOM). The extension of the conjugated electronic system, the level of heteroatom substitution and type and number of substituting groups under the aromatic rings strongly affect the intensity and wavelength of molecular fluorescence. However, to analyse the SOM it is generally done a chemical extraction that allows measuring the fluorescence response of the liquid extract. To avoid this fractionation of the SOM, Milori et al. (2006) proposed the application of laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) in whole soil. This work intends to assess the technical feasibility of 3D fluorescence spectroscopy using lamp for excitation to analyse solids opaque samples prepared with different substances. Seventy four (74) solid samples were prepared from different mixtures of boric acid (BA), humic substance acid and tryptophan (TRP) powder. The compounds were mixture and a pellet was done by using pressure (8 ton). The pellets were measured using a spectrofluorimeter HITACHI F4500, and a 3D fluorescence tensor was done from emission spectra (200-600 nm) with excitation range from 200 to 500 nm. The acquisition parameters were: step at 5 nm, scan speed at 2400 nm.min-1, response time at 0.1 s, excitation and emission slits at 5 nm and photomultiplier voltage at 700 V. Furthermore, measures of Laser-induced Fluorescence were

  1. Single Molecule Spectral Diffusion in a Solid Detected Via Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-15

    NO. NO ACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) Single Molecule Spectral Diffusion In A Solid Detected Via Fluorescence Spectroscopy...and identify by block number) FIELD jGROUP SUB-GROUP_ Single molecule spectroscopy Precision detection Spectral diffusion, Pentacene in p-terphenyl 19... Single Molecule Spectral Diffusion ’n A Solid Detected Via Fluorescence Spectroscopy hy W. P. Ambrose, T. Basche, and W. E. Moerner

  2. Relationship between Ba atom emission and electrode temperature in a low-pressure fluorescent lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagata, Yukihiko, E-mail: yamagata@ence.kyushu-u.ac.j [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kai, Makoto [Lighting Company, Panasonic Corporation, 1-1 Saiwaicho, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1193 (Japan); Naito, Sho; Tomita, Kentaro; Uchino, Kiichiro [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Manabe, Yoshio [Lighting Company, Panasonic Corporation, 1-1 Saiwaicho, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1193 (Japan)

    2010-04-30

    A relationship between emission characteristics of Ba atom as an emitter material and temperature distributions of an electrode in a fluorescent lamp is described, which is measured by using laser-induced fluorescence and black-body radiation method, respectively. In a virgin lamp, a hot spot observed at the electrode edge connected to the power supply is the main source of Ba atom emission. In a long-term-used lamp, it is shown that Ba atom emission, thermionic electron emission in cathode half-cycle and electron collection in anode half-cycle are most active on the hot spot appearing on the center of the electrode.

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy of fulvic acids from fen peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryganova, Victoria; Wojciech Szajdak, Lech

    2010-05-01

    Intensive cultivation and agricultural use of peatlands lead to the degradation and mineralization of peat. Fulvic acids (FA) as the most mobile part of peat organic matter can be considered as an early indicator of its changes. One of the most sensitive and simple methods for studying the structural chemistry of humic substances is fluorescence spectroscopy. The objective of this study was to analyze comparatively the fluorescence properties of FA from low-moor peats of different genesis and decomposition degree with respect to the peculiarities of their chemical structure. FA were isolated from 4 peat samples collected from different fen peatlands of Belarus. Fluorescence spectra were obtained on water solutions of FA at a concentration of 50 mg/L after adjustment to pH=2, 6 and 13 on a MSL-4800 spectrofluorimeter (Perkin Elmer, USA.) at 20 ± 2 oC. Emission spectra were obtained using an excitation wavelength of 365 nm. Excitation spectra were recorded by varying the excitation wavelength from 260 to 520 nm and measuring the fluorescence emission at a fixed wavelength of 520 nm. Elemental composition of FA and optical density at 465 nm (D465) of FA solutions in 0.1 N NaOH were determined. Emission spectra of FA are characterized by a broad featureless band of the maximum wavelengths at λ=460-475 nm. Excitation spectra of FA have three peaks localized in different wavelength regions. The maximum wavelengths and intensities of the excitation peaks depend on the pH values. The highest intensities are observed at pH=6. FA exhibit a main excitation peak at λ=355-370 nm, a minor peak at λ=395-400 nm, and a weak band at λ=430-440 nm. At pH=2, all the peaks decrease in intensity. With increasing the pH to 13, the excitation maximum at λ=355-370 nm shifts from 10 to 20 nm towards longer wavelengths compared to acidic solutions. A general decrease in fluorescence intensity is observed, the intensity decline of the peak at λ=355-370 nm being more marked than of the

  4. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal microscopy of the mycotoxin citrinin in condensed phase and hydrogel films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Milena H; Gehlen, Marcelo H; de Jesus, Karen; Berlinck, Roberto G S

    2014-05-01

    The emission spectra, quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes of citrinin in organic solvents and hydrogel films have been determined. Citrinin shows complex fluorescence decays due to the presence of two tautomers in solution and interconversion from excited-state double proton transfer (ESDPT) process. The fluorescence decay times associated with the two tautomers have values near 1 and 5 ns depending on the medium. In hydrogel films of agarose and alginate, fluorescence imaging showed that citrinin is not homogeneously dispersed and highly emissive micrometer spots may be formed. Fluorescence spectrum and decay analysis are used to recognize the presence of citrinin in hydrogel films using confocal fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy.

  6. Inference of protein diffusion probed via fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekouras, Konstantinos

    2015-03-01

    Fluctuations are an inherent part of single molecule or few particle biophysical data sets. Traditionally, ``noise'' fluctuations have been viewed as a nuisance, to be eliminated or minimized. Here we look on how statistical inference methods - that take explicit advantage of fluctuations - have allowed us to draw an unexpected picture of single molecule diffusional dynamics. Our focus is on the diffusion of proteins probed using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). First, we discuss how - in collaboration with the Bustamante and Marqusee labs at UC Berkeley - we determined using FCS data that individual enzymes are perturbed by self-generated catalytic heat (Riedel et al, Nature, 2014). Using the tools of inference, we found how distributions of enzyme diffusion coefficients shift in the presence of substrate revealing that enzymes performing highly exothermic reactions dissipate heat by transiently accelerating their center of mass following a catalytic reaction. Next, when molecules diffuse in the cell nucleus they often appear to diffuse anomalously. We analyze FCS data - in collaboration with Rich Day at the IU Med School - to propose a simple model for transcription factor binding-unbinding in the nucleus to show that it may give rise to apparent anomalous diffusion. Here inference methods extract entire binding affinity distributions for the diffusing transcription factors, allowing us to precisely characterize their interactions with different components of the nuclear environment. From this analysis, we draw key mechanistic insight that goes beyond what is possible by simply fitting data to ``anomalous diffusion'' models.

  7. Clinical measurement of von Willebrand factor by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Richard; Genzen, Jonathan R; Levene, Michael J

    2012-06-01

    Identification of von Willebrand factor (vWF) abnormalities in a variety of conditions is hampered by the limitations of currently available diagnostic tests. Although direct multimer visualization by immunoelectrophoresis is a commonly used method, it is impractical as a routine clinical test. In this study, we used a biophysical analysis tool, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to measure vWF distributions. The goals were to develop a method that is quicker and simpler than vWF gel electrophoresis and to evaluate the potential of FCS as a clinical diagnostic technique. We analyzed plasma from 12 patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease (vWD), 14 patients with type 2 vWD, and 10 healthy controls using a fluctuation-based immunoassay approach. FCS enabled identification and proper classification of type 1 and type 2 vWD, producing quantitative results that correspond to qualitative gel multimer patterns. FCS required minimal sample preparation and only a 5-min analysis time. This study represents the first implementation of FCS for clinical diagnostics directly on human plasma. The technique shows potential for further vWF studies and as a generally applicable laboratory test method.

  8. Cooperative fluorescence from a strongly driven dilute cloud of atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Wubs, Martijn; Lodahl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We investigate cooperative fluorescence in a dilute cloud of strongly driven two-level emitters. Starting from the Heisenberg equations of motion, we compute the first-order scattering corrections to the saturation of the excited-state population and to the resonance-fluorescence spectrum, which...... both require going beyond the state-of-the-art linear-optics approach to describe collective phenomena. A dipole blockade is observed due to long-range dipole-dipole coupling that vanishes at stronger driving fields. Furthermore, we compute the inelastic component of the light scattered by a cloud...

  9. Investigating single molecule adhesion by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Frank W S; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-02-27

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment.

  10. Single molecule atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocun, Marta; Grandbois, Michel; Cuccia, Louis A

    2011-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based force spectroscopy was used to study the desorption of individual chitosan polymer chains from substrates with varying chemical composition. AFM images of chitosan adsorbed onto a flat mica substrate show elongated single strands or aggregated bundles. The aggregated state of the polymer is consistent with the high level of flexibility and mobility expected for a highly positively charged polymer strand. Conversely, the visualization of elongated strands indicated the presence of stabilizing interactions with the substrate. Surfaces with varying chemical composition (glass, self-assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid/decanethiol and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) were probed with chitosan modified AFM tips and the corresponding desorption energies, calculated from plateau-like features, were attributed to the desorption of individual polymer strands. Desorption energies of 2.0±0.3×10(-20)J, 1.8±0.3×10(-20)J and 3.5±0.3×10(-20)J were obtained for glass, SAM of mercaptoundecanoic/dodecanethiol and PTFE, respectively. These single molecule level results can be used as a basis for investigating chitosan and chitosan-based materials for biomaterial applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

  12. Ultimate Statistical Physics: fluorescence of a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Pomeau, Yves; Ginibre, Jean

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the statistics of emission of photons by a single atom or ion illuminated by a laser beam at the frequency of quasi-resonance between two energy levels, a situation that corresponds to real experiments. We extend this to the case of two laser beams resonant with the energy differences between two excited levels and the ground state (three level atom in V-configuration). We use a novel approach of this type of problem by considering Kolmogorov equation for the probability distribution of the atomic state which takes into account first the deterministic evolution of this state under the effect of the incoming laser beam and the random emission of photons during the spontaneous decay of the excited state(s) to the ground state. This approach yields solvable equations in the two level atom case. For the three level atom case we set the problem and define clearly its frame. The results obtained are valid both in the opposite limits of rare and of frequent spontaneous decay, compared to the period of the...

  13. Development and testing of hyperbaric atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, D P; McNally, H A; Dean, J B

    2012-05-01

    A commercially available atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscope were installed and tested inside a custom-designed hyperbaric chamber to provide the capability to study the effects of hyperbaric gases on biological preparations, including cellular mechanism of oxidative stress. In this report, we list details of installing and testing atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy inside a hyperbaric chamber. The pressure vessel was designed to accommodate a variety of imaging equipment and ensures full functionality at ambient and hyperbaric conditions (≤85 psi). Electrical, gas and fluid lines were installed to enable remote operation of instrumentation under hyperbaric conditions, and to maintain viable biological samples with gas-equilibrated superfusate and/or drugs. Systems were installed for vibration isolation and temperature regulation to maintain atomic force microscopy performance during compression and decompression. Results of atomic force microscopy testing demonstrate sub-nanometre resolution at hyperbaric pressure in dry scans and fluid scans, in both contact mode and tapping mode. Noise levels were less when measurements were taken under hyperbaric pressure with air, helium (He) and nitrogen (N(2) ). Atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy measurements were made on a variety of living cell cultures exposed to hyperbaric gases (He, N(2) , O(2) , air). In summary, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were installed and tested for use at hyperbaric pressures and enables the study of cellular and molecular effects of hyperbaric gases and pressure per se in biological preparations. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  14. Atomic Oscillator Strengths by Emission Spectroscopy and Lifetime Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, W. L.; Griesmann, U.; Kling, R.; Musielok, J.

    2002-11-01

    Over the last seven years, we have carried out numerous oscillator strength measurements for some light and medium heavy elements (Musielok et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000; Veres & Wiese 1996; Griesmann et al. 1997; Bridges & Wiese 1998; Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Gries- mann 2000; Bridges & Wiese to be published). Most recently we have determined numerous transitions of Mu II (Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Griesmann 2000) and are now working on Cl I (Bridges & Wiese to be published). See the summary statement at the end of the text. For the emission measurements, we have applied either a high-current wall-stabilized arc (described for example, in Musielok et al. (1999)), or a high-current hollow cathode, or a Penning discharge. The latter two sources were used for branching ratio measurements from common upper 1ev- els, while the wall-stabilized arc was operated at atmospheric pressure under the condition of partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, which allows the measurement of relative transition probabilities. Absolute data were obtained by combining the emission results with lifetime data measured by other research groups, especially the University of Hannover, with which we have closely collaborated. This group uses the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Our emission spectra were recorded for the light elements with a 2 m grating spectrometer, or, for Mu II, with an FT 700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. The radiometric calibration was carried out with a tungsten strip lamp for the visible part of the spectrum and with a deuterium lamp for the ultraviolet. All measurements were made under optically thin conditions, which was checked by doubling the path length with a focusing mirror setup. Typical uncertainties of the measured oscillator strengths are estimated to be in the range 15%-20% (one-standard deviation). However, discrepancies with advanced atomic structure theories are sometimes much larger. In Tables 1-3 and Fig. 1, we

  15. Elasticity Maps of Living Neurons Measured by Combined Fluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spedden, Elise; Naumova, Elena N; Kaplan, David L; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here we combine Atomic Force Microscopy based force spectroscopy with Fluorescence Microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglion, and P-19 (mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells) neurons. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon disruption of microtubules of the cell. We find reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules. We also report that cortical and P-19 neurons have similar elasticity maps, with elastic moduli in the range 0.1-2 kPa, with typical average values of 0.4 kPa (P-19) and 0.2 k...

  16. Elasticity maps of living neurons measured by combined fluorescence and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spedden, Elise; White, James D; Naumova, Elena N; Kaplan, David L; Staii, Cristian

    2012-09-05

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here, we combine atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy with fluorescence microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglion, and P-19 (mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells) neurons. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon disruption of microtubules of the cell. We find reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules. We also report that cortical and P-19 neurons have similar elasticity maps, with elastic moduli in the range 0.1-2 kPa, with typical average values of 0.4 kPa (P-19) and 0.2 kPa (cortical). In contrast, dorsal root ganglion neurons are stiffer than P-19 and cortical cells, yielding elastic moduli in the range 0.1-8 kPa, with typical average values of 0.9 kPa. Finally, we report no measurable influence of substrate protein coating on cell body elasticity for the three types of neurons. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy. (GHT)

  18. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom–atom and atom–wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom–atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0−3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time. PMID:24934478

  19. Fluorescence spectroscopy of biological tissue: single- and two-photon excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Ge, Weikun; Yuen, Powing; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2004-06-01

    Endogenous fluorophores, such as NAD(P)H/FAD and collagen/elastin, have been regarded as in vivo quantitative fluorescence biomarkers for precancerous changes of epithelial tissue. However, the fluorescence signal measured by conventional spectroscopy is a mixture of autofluorescence from the epithelium and deep structures. The dominant fluorescence of collagen/elastin from connective tissue in deep layers creates serious challenge for extracting the epithelial fluorescence of NAD(P)H/FAD that is weak, but important for the characterization of tissue pathology. In this work, we instrumented a confocal fluorescence spectroscopy system and a two-photon excited fluorescence spectroscopy system to measure the depth-resolved single- and two-photon fluorescence spectra from the rabbit esophageal tissues. The excitation wavelengths were 349 nm and 735 nm, respectively. Both systems provided good optical sectioning. The information obtained from depth-resolved fluorescence was generally consistent with the histology of the examined tissue sample. The NAD(P)H signals from epithelial layers were clearly separated from the collagen signal from deep layers. In addition, strong second harmonic generations given by collagen fibers were observed. This work demonstrates that depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy may produce more accurate information on the diagnosis of tissue pathology.

  20. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for determination of tahini adulteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Havva Tumay; Tamer, Ugur; Berkkan, Aysel; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2017-05-15

    In this study, a quick and simple method was developed for detection of tahini adulteration with sunflower oil. The synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) data of oil samples were collected by scanning the excitation and emission monochromators simultaneously with 20, 40, 60 and 80nm wavelength intervals within the range of 250-600nm. Three different multivariate calibration methods, namely partial least squares (PLS) analysis, principal component regression (PCR), and multiple linear regression (MLR) were used for data analysis. Wavelength selection feature of the chemometric software was also used in order to determine the optimum range of each dataset collected at 20, 40, 60 and 80nm wavelength intervals. All regression methods with and without wavelength selection mode were applied to these each dataset individually. Application of wavelength selection mode adversely affected the root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) values and other quality parameters of all calibration and validation models which were built by using each dataset collected at 20, 40, 60 and 80nm wavelength intervals. Taking all parameters into consideration, the best results were obtained through the application of PLS analysis without wavelength selection mode on the SFS data collected at all wavelength intervals. The lowest detection limits of adulteration, 0.09% and 0.15% were obtained through the use of 40 and 80nm as wavelength intervals, respectively. RMSECV and RMSEP values were calculated as 0.74 and 1.26 for 40nm, and 0.65 and 0.81 for 80nm wavelength intervals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Noninvasive skin fluorescence spectroscopy for detection of abnormal glucose tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward L. Hull, PhD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The ENGINE study evaluated noninvasive skin fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS for detection of abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT. The AGT detection performance of SFS was compared to fasting plasma glucose (FPG and hemoglobin A1C (A1C. The study was a head-to-head comparison of SFS to FPG and A1C in an at-risk population of 507 subjects, with no prior diagnosis of diabetes, each of whom received a 75 g, two-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT. Subjects were measured by SFS on multiple days in fasting and non-fasting states. SFS data were acquired and analyzed with the SCOUT DS® device (VeraLight, Albuquerque, NM, USA. Disease truth was AGT, defined as OGTT ≥ 7.8 mmol/L. Sensitivity, false positive rate (FPR, ROC area, and equal error rate (EER for detection of AGT were computed. The reproducibility of SFS and FPG was assessed. The AGT sensitivity of SFS at the device's recommended screening threshold of 50 was 75.2%, higher than that of FPG (thresholds of 5.6 mmol/L or 6.1 mmol/L and A1C (thresholds of 5.7% or 6.0%. The SFS FPR was 42.1%, comparable to an A1C threshold of 5.7% (FPR = 43.5%. The EERs of SFS, FPG and A1C were similar, as were the partial ROC areas for FPRs of 20–50%. The reproducibility of SFS was 7.7% versus 8.1% for FPG. SFS had similar AGT detection performance to FPG and A1C and is a viable alternative to screening individuals for AGT.

  2. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Ultraviolet Resonance Raman (UVRR) Spectroscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for Study of the Kinetics of Formation and Structural Characterization of Tau Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Gayathri

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic studies of tau fibril formation in vitro most commonly employ spectroscopic probes such as thioflavinT fluorescence and laser light scattering or negative stain transmission electron microscopy. Here, I describe the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as complementary probes for studies of tau aggregation. The sensitivity of vibrational spectroscopic techniques (FTIR and UVRR) to secondary structure content allows for measurement of conformational changes that occur when the intrinsically disordered protein tau transforms into cross-β-core containing fibrils. AFM imaging serves as a gentle probe of structures populated over the time course of tau fibrillization. Together, these assays help further elucidate the structural and mechanistic complexity inherent in tau fibril formation.

  3. Applying fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate peptide-induced membrane disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding the interactions of antimicrobial peptides with phospholipid membranes. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful experimental technique that can be used to gain insight into these interactions. Specifically, FCS can be used to quant...

  4. Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Measuring Uranium Isotopes in Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-05-30

    We present the first two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plasmas. A new method of signal normalization is presented to reduce noise in absorption-based measurements of laser ablation.

  5. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gaoming [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin, E-mail: yjzheng@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Qiu, Yishen [Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2016-07-04

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  6. Fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy of ethyl nile blue A in animal models of (pre)malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Staveren, HJ; Speelman, OC; Witjes, MJH; Cincotta, L

    Discrimination between normal and premalignant tissues by fluorescence imaging and/or spectroscopy may be enhanced by a tumor-localizing fluorescent drug. Ethyl Nile Blue A (EtNBA), a dye with no phototoxic activity, was investigated for this purpose. The pharmacokinetics and tissue-localizing

  7. Tryptophan content for monitoring breast cancer cell aggressiveness by native fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Pu, Yang; Xue, Jianpeng; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Xu, Baogang; Achilefu, Samuel; Alfano, R. R.

    2014-03-01

    This study shows tryptophan as the key native marker in cells to determine the level of aggressive cancer in breast cell lines using native fluorescence spectroscopy. An algorithm based on the ratio of tryptophan fluorescence intensity at 340 nm to intensity at 460 nm is associated with aggressiveness of the cancer cells. The higher the ratio is, the more aggressive the tumor towards metastasis.

  8. Endogenous synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) of basal cell carcinoma-initial study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, E.; Zhelyazkova, Al.; Keremedchiev, M.; Penkov, N.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O.; Avramov, L.

    2016-01-01

    The human skin is a complex, multilayered and inhomogeneous organ with spatially varying optical properties. Analysis of cutaneous fluorescence spectra could be a very complicated task; therefore researchers apply complex mathematical tools for data evaluation, or try to find some specific approaches, that would simplify the spectral analysis. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) allows improving the spectral resolution, which could be useful for the biological tissue fluorescence characterization and could increase the tumour detection diagnostic accuracy.

  9. Precise atomic radiative lifetime via photoassociative spectroscopy of ultracold lithium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McAlexander, W.I.; Abraham, E.R.I.; Ritchie, N.W.M.; Williams, C.J.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Hulet, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    We have obtained spectra of the high-lying vibrational levels of the 13Σg+ state of 6Li2 via photoassociation of ultracold 6Li atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap. The 13Σg+ state of the diatomic molecule correlates to a 2S1/2 state atom plus a 2P1/2 state atom. The long-range part of the

  10. A fluorescence spectroscopy study of traditional Chinese medicine Angelica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyan; Song, Feng; Liu, Shujing; Chen, Guiyang; Wei, Chen; Liu, Yanling; Liu, Jiadong

    2013-10-01

    By measuring the fluorescence spectra of Chinese medicine (CM) Angelica water solutions with different concentrations from 0.025 to 2.5 mg/mL, results showed that the fluorescence intensity was proportional to the concentration. Through fluorescence spectra of Angelica solution under different pH values, results indicated coumarin compounds were the active ingredients of Angelica. We also observed fluorescence quenching of the Angelica solution in the presence of spherical silver nanoparticles with radius of 12 nm. Keeping a certain value for the volume of the silver nanoparticles, the fluorescence intensity at 402 nm was linearly proportional to the Angelica in the range of 1-3 mg/mL.

  11. Polymerized LB Films Imaged with a Combined Atomic Force Microscope-Fluorescence Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; Hansma, Helen G.; Gaub, Hermann E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-01-01

    The first results obtained with a new stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a standard Zeiss optical fluorescence microscope are presented. The optical microscope allows location and selection of objects to be imaged with the high-resolution AFM. Furthermore, the combined

  12. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements for Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzuchowski, Kristen; Singh, Jaideep; Wenzl, Jennifer; Frisbie, Dustin; Johnson, Maegan

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new highly selective detector to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. Our primary interest is the 22Ne(α , n) 25Mg reaction, which is a primary source of neutrons for the s-process. Our proposed detector, in conjunction with a recoil separator, captures the recoil products resulting from the reaction in a cryogenically frozen thin film of solid neon. The fluorescence spectra of the captured atoms is shifted from the absorption spectra by hundreds of nanometers. This allows for the optical detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light. We will describe our initial studies of laser-induced fluorescence of Yb and Mg in solid Ne. Neon is an attractive medium because it is optically transparent and provides efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Yb is used as a test atom because of its similar atomic structure to Mg and much brighter fluorescence signal. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  13. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  14. Application of normal fluorescence and stability-indicating derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of gliquidone in presence of its fluorescent alkaline degradation product

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-ghobashy, Mohamed R.; Yehia, Ali M.; Helmy, Aya H.; Youssef, Nadia F.

    2018-01-01

    Simple, smart and sensitive normal fluorescence and stability-indicating derivative synchronous spectrofluorimetric methods have been developed and validated for the determination of gliquidone in the drug substance and drug product. Normal spectrofluorimetric method of gliquidone was established in methanol at λ excitation 225 nm and λ emission 400 nm in concentration range 0.2-3 μg/ml with LOD equal 0.028. The fluorescence quantum yield of gliquidone was calculated using quinine sulfate as a reference and found to be 0.542. Stability-indicating first and third derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy were successfully utilized to overcome the overlapped spectra in normal fluorescence of gliquidone and its alkaline degradation product. Derivative synchronous methods are based on using the synchronous fluorescence of gliquidone and its degradation product in methanol at Δ λ50 nm. Peak amplitude in the first derivative of synchronous fluorescence spectra was measured at 309 nm where degradation product showed zero-crossing without interference. The peak amplitudes in the third derivative of synchronous fluorescence spectra, peak to trough were measured at 316,329 nm where degradation product showed zero-crossing. The different experimental parameters affecting the normal and synchronous fluorescence intensity of gliquidone were studied and optimized. Moreover, the cited methods have been validated as per ICH guidelines. The peak amplitude-concentration plots of the derivative synchronous fluorescence were linear over the concentration range 0.05-2 μg/ml for gliquidone. Limits of detection were 0.020 and 0.022 in first and third derivative synchronous spectra, respectively. The adopted methods were successfully applied to commercial tablets and the results demonstrated that the derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful stability-indicating method, suitable for routine use with a short analysis time. Statistical comparison between

  15. Direct solid surface fluorescence spectroscopy of standard chemicals and humic acid in ternary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounier, S; Nicolodelli, G; Redon, R; Milori, D M B P

    2017-04-15

    The front face fluorescence spectroscopy is often used to quantify chemicals in well-known matrices as it is a rapid and powerful technique, with no sample preparation. However it was not used to investigate extracted organic matter like humic substances. This work aims to fully investigate for the first time front face fluorescence spectroscopy response of a ternary system including boric acid, tryptophan and humic substances, and two binaries system containing quinine sulfate or humic substance in boric acid. Pure chemicals, boric acid, tryptophan, quinine sulfate and humic acid were mixed together in solid pellet at different contents from 0 to 100% in mass. The measurement of excitation emission matrix of fluorescence (3D fluorescence) and laser induced fluorescence were then done in the front face mode. Fluorescence matrices were decomposed using the CP/PARAFAC tools after scattering treatments. Results show that for 3D fluorescence there is no specific component for tryptophan and quinine sulfate, and that humic substances lead to a strong extinction effect for mixture containing quinine sulfate. Laser induced fluorescence gives a very good but non-specific related response for both quinine sulfate and tryptophan. No humic substances fluorescence response was found, but extinction effect is observed as for 3D fluorescence. This effect is stronger for quinine sulfate than for tryptophan. These responses were modeled using a simple absorbance versus emission model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Direct solid surface fluorescence spectroscopy of standard chemicals and humic acid in ternary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounier, S.; Nicolodelli, G.; Redon, R.; Milori, D. M. B. P.

    2017-04-01

    The front face fluorescence spectroscopy is often used to quantify chemicals in well-known matrices as it is a rapid and powerful technique, with no sample preparation. However it was not used to investigate extracted organic matter like humic substances. This work aims to fully investigate for the first time front face fluorescence spectroscopy response of a ternary system including boric acid, tryptophan and humic substances, and two binaries system containing quinine sulfate or humic substance in boric acid. Pure chemicals, boric acid, tryptophan, quinine sulfate and humic acid were mixed together in solid pellet at different contents from 0 to 100% in mass. The measurement of excitation emission matrix of fluorescence (3D fluorescence) and laser induced fluorescence were then done in the front face mode. Fluorescence matrices were decomposed using the CP/PARAFAC tools after scattering treatments. Results show that for 3D fluorescence there is no specific component for tryptophan and quinine sulfate, and that humic substances lead to a strong extinction effect for mixture containing quinine sulfate. Laser induced fluorescence gives a very good but non-specific related response for both quinine sulfate and tryptophan. No humic substances fluorescence response was found, but extinction effect is observed as for 3D fluorescence. This effect is stronger for quinine sulfate than for tryptophan. These responses were modeled using a simple absorbance versus emission model.

  17. Multiplexed fluorescence lifetime measurements by frequency-sweeping Fourier spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Peng, Leilei

    2010-09-01

    We report simultaneous measurements of fluorescence lifetimes at multiple excitation wavelengths with a Fourier transform frequency domain fluorescence lifetime spectrometer. The spectrometer uses a Michelson interferometer with its differential optical path length scanning at a 22,000 Hz scan rate. The scan speed of the optical delay varies linearly during each scan and creates interference modulations that sweep from -150 to 150 MHz in 45.5 micros. The frequency-sweeping modulation allows nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements within 45.5 micros. Because the interference modulation frequency is wavelength dependent, under the Fourier multiplexing principle, the spectrometer can perform lifetime measurements on multiple excitation wavelengths simultaneously.

  18. Modified diglycol-amides for actinide separation: solvent extraction and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy complexation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilden, A.; Modolo, G.; Lange, S.; Sadowski, F.; Bosbach, D. [Foschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, IEK-6, Juelich (Germany); Beele, B.B.; Panak, P.J. [Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisch Chemisces Institut - PCI, Heidelberg (Germany); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie - INE, Karlsruhe (Germany); Skerencak-Frech, A.; Geist, A. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie - INE, Karlsruhe (Germany); Iqbal, M. [University of Twente, Laboratory of Molecular Nanofabrication, Enschede (Netherlands); Department of Chemistry, University of Sargodha, Sargodha 40100 (Pakistan); Verboom, W. [University of Twente, Laboratory of Molecular Nanofabrication, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the back-bone of the diglycolamide-structure of the TODGA extractant was modified by adding one or two methyl groups to the central methylene carbon-atoms. The influence of these structural modifications on the extraction behavior of trivalent actinides and lanthanides and other fission products was studied in solvent extraction experiments. The addition of methyl groups to the central methylene carbon atoms leads to reduced distribution ratios, also for Sr(II). This reduced extraction efficiency for Sr(II) is beneficial for process applications, as the co-extraction of Sr(II) can be avoided, resulting in an easier process design. The use of these modified diglycol-amides in solvent extraction processes is discussed. Furthermore, the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) to the ligands was studied using Time-Resolved-Laser-Fluorescence-Spectroscopy (TRLFS). The complexes were characterized by slope analysis and conditional stability constants were determined.

  19. Molecular and atomic ultra trace analysis by laser induced fluorescence with OPO system and ICCD camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burel, L; Giamarchi, P; Stephan, L; Lijour, Y; Le Bihan, A

    2003-06-13

    This paper presents a synthesis of some analytical potentialities of an equipment designed for both laser induced molecular and atomic fluorescence in the field of ultra-trace analysis (ng l(-1)). Excitation of fluorescence was performed with a pulsed Nd:Yag laser coupled to an optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Fluorescence spectra were recorded with a spectrograph and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD). The high energy and the tunability of the excitation combined with the sensitivity of the ICCD and the time-resolution provide better limit of detection (LOD) and selectivity. By molecular fluorescence, some major organic contaminants in the environment were studied, i.e. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (benzo[a]pyrene and hydroxypyrene) and a pesticide (carbaryl). The LODs achieved by direct analysis were far below the restricted European values for tap water. Analysis was performed in water containing humic acids using time resolution to avoid the matrix fluorescence. By electro thermal atomisation-laser excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF), we detected traces of aluminium and lead in seawater. Some general considerations about the signal to noise ratio optimisation are reported. LODs reached the femtogram level.

  20. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  1. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C; Nagy, Attila

    2008-06-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. Here we describe these techniques and illustrate them with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations.

  2. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  3. Application of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging in the detection of a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Lixin; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2017-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently an advanced optical technology in medical applications. However, the application of PDT is limited by the detection of photosensitizers. This work focuses on the application of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging in the detection of an effective photosenzitizer, hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME). Optical properties of HMME were measured and analyzed based on its absorption and fluorescence spectra. The production mechanism of its fluorescence emission was analyzed. The detection device for HMME based on fluorescence spectroscopy was designed. Ratiometric method was applied to eliminate the influence of intensity change of excitation sources, fluctuates of excitation sources and photo detectors, and background emissions. The detection limit of this device is 6 μg/L, and it was successfully applied to the diagnosis of the metabolism of HMME in the esophageal cancer cells. To overcome the limitation of the point measurement using fluorescence spectroscopy, a two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence imaging system was established. The algorithm of the 2D fluorescence imaging system is deduced according to the fluorescence ratiometric method using bandpass filters. The method of multiple pixel point addition (MPPA) was used to eliminate fluctuates of signals. Using the method of MPPA, SNR was improved by about 30 times. The detection limit of this imaging system is 1.9 μg/L. Our systems can be used in the detection of porphyrins to improve the PDT effect.

  4. Use of fluorescence spectroscopy to control ozone dosage in recirculating aquaculture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Martin, Richard; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy to be used as an ozone dosage determination tool in recirculating aquaculture systems (RASs), by studying the relationship between fluorescence intensities and dissolved organic matter (DOM) degradation by ozone......, in order to optimise ozonation treatment. Water samples from six different Danish facilities (two rearing units from a commercial trout RAS, a commercial eel RAS, a pilot RAS and two marine water aquariums) were treated with different O3 dosages (1.0–20.0 mg/L ozone) in bench-scale experiments, following...... which fluorescence intensity degradation was eventually determined. Ozonation kinetic experiments showed that RAS water contains fluorescent organic matter, which is easily oxidised upon ozonation in relatively low concentrations (0–5 mg O3/L). Fluorescence spectroscopy has a high level of sensitivity...

  5. Determination of sulfur content in steel by laser-produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A.; Ortiz, M. [Unidad de Fisica Atomica y Laseres, Instituto de Investigacion Basica, CIEMAT, Avda Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Campos, J. [Catedra de Fisica Atomica Experimental, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    1995-11-01

    Sulfur content in steel samples has been determined by laser-produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy with the use of a Q-switch Nd:YAG laser. With the use of time-resolved spectroscopy employing an OMA III (EG&G) as detector, a detection limit of 70 ppm and a precision of 7{percent} have been obtained. Calibration curves are linear, and no noticeable matrix effects have been observed. {copyright} {ital 1995 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.}

  6. Ultrafast Fluorescence Spectroscopy via Upconversion: Applications to Biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhua; Knutson, Jay R.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews basic concepts of nonlinear fluorescence upconversion, a technique whose temporal resolution is essentially limited only by the pulse width of the ultrafast laser. Design aspects for upconversion spectrophotofluorometers are discussed, and a recently developed system is described. We discuss applications in biophysics, particularly the measurement of time-resolved fluorescence spectra of proteins (with subpicosecond time resolution). Application of this technique to biophysical problems such as dynamics of tryptophan, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids is reviewed. PMID:19152860

  7. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Síle Nic Chormaic

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications.

  8. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  9. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Morrissey, Michael J; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining ground in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension on this work to molecules will be introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for particular applications.

  10. A Pragmatic Smoothing Method for Improving the Quality of the Results in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennun, Leonardo

    2017-07-01

    A new smoothing method for improvement on the quantification of spectral signals, which requires the previous knowledge of the functions that should be quantified, is presented. These functions are used as weighted coefficients in the proposed smoothing algorithm. This method is extremely effective in reducing the scatter of signals obtained by the multichannel analyzer and it could be applied in atomic and nuclear spectroscopies, preferably to these techniques where net counts are a linear function of the acquisition time, like total reflection X-ray fluorescence, micro X-ray fluorescence, etc. If this algorithm is properly applied, it does not distort the form or the intensity of the signal, so it is well suited for use in all kinds of spectroscopic techniques. However, it should not be applied to data obtained from systems depending on time, e.g., control sciences, time series, sound analysis, etc. We applied this method over simulated data and real experimental measurements. As with all smoothing techniques, the proposed method improves the precision of the results, but when it was applied to computer-simulated spectra, we found a systematic enhancement on the accuracy of the results. We still do not have an answer for this apparent paradox. We also have to evaluate, in spectral analysis, the improvement produced by this smoothing procedure over detection and quantification limits. When this algorithm is applied over experimental results, it is mandatory that the sought characteristic functions, required for this weighted smoothing method, should be obtained from a system with strong stability. If the sought signals are not perfectly clean, this method should be applied with care.

  11. Conformation of microtubule-bound paclitaxel determined by fluorescence spectroscopy and REDOR NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Poliks, B; Cegelski, L; Poliks, M; Gryczynski, Z; Piszczek, G; Jagtap, P G; Studelska, D R; Kingston, D G; Schaefer, J; Bane, S

    2000-01-18

    The conformation of microtubule-bound paclitaxel has been examined by fluorescence and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. A fluorescent derivative of paclitaxel, 3'-N-debenzoyl-3'-N-(m-aminobenzoyl)paclitaxel (N-AB-PT), was prepared by semisynthesis. No differences in the microtubule-promoting activity between N-AB-PT and paclitaxel were observed, demonstrating that addition of the amino group did not adversely affect the ligand-receptor association. The distance between the fluorophore N-AB-PT and the colchicine binding site on tubulin polymers was determined through time-resolved measurements of fluorescence resonance energy transfer to be 29 +/- 2 A. The absorption and emission spectra of N-AB-PT bound to microtubules and in various solvents were measured. A plot of the Stokes shift as a function of solvent polarity was highly unusual. The Stokes shift increased linearly with solvent polarity in protic solvents, which is expected due to the nature of the fluorophore. In aprotic solvents, however, the Stokes shift was invariant with solvent polarity, indicating that the fluorophore was somehow shielded from the effects of the solvent. These data are best explained by considering the solution-state conformational properties of paclitaxel. It is known that paclitaxel adopts different conformations depending on the nature of the solvent, and these fluorescence data are consistent with the molecule adopting a "hydrophobic collapsed" conformation in protic solvents and an "extended" conformation in aprotic solvents. The Stokes shift of microtubule-bound N-AB-PT was within the protic solvent region, demonstrating that microtubule-bound paclitaxel is in a hydrophobic collapsed conformation. Microtubule-bound paclitaxel was also investigated by solid-state NMR. Paclitaxel was labeled with (19)F at the para position of the C-2 benzoyl substituent and with (13)C and (15)N in the side chain. Distances between the fluorine and carbon nuclei were determined by REDOR. The distance

  12. Speciation of methylmercury and ethylmercury by gas chromatography cold vapor atomic fluresence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boggess, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-28

    Existing models and simulants of tank disposition media at SRS have presumed the presence of high concentrations of inorganic mercury. However, recent quarterly tank analyses show that mercury is present as organomercurial species at concentrations that may present challenges to remediation and disposition and may exceed the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). To-date, methylmercury analysis for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has been performed off-site by Eurofins Scientific (Lancaster, PA). A series of optimization and validation experiments has been performed at SRNL, which has resulted in the development of on-site organomercury speciation capabilities using purge and trap gas chromatography coupled with thermal desorption cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (P&T GC/CVAFS). Speciation has been achieved for methylmercury, with a method reporting limit (MRL) values of 1.42 pg for methylmercury. Results obtained by SRNL from the analysis of past quarterly samples from tanks 21, 40, and 50 have demonstrated statistically indistinguishable concentration values compared with the concentration data obtained from Eurofins, while the data from SRNL has demonstrated significantly improved precision and processing time.

  13. Integrated liquid jet waveguide for fluorescence spectroscopy on chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persichetti, Gianluca; Testa, Genni; Bernini, Romeo

    2013-03-01

    An optofluidic jet waveguide for on chip fluorescence analysis is presented. The waveguide consists of an high speed water jet produced by means of a micro-channel coupled with a multimode optical fiber collecting the fluorescence opportunely excited. The liquid jet acts, at the same time, as the solution to analyse and as an optical waveguide. This configuration allows a strong reduction of the scattering and fluorescence of non analyte substances enabling a very low limit of detection (LOD). The integrated device is fabricated by PMMA micro-machining allowing a self-alignment between the liquid jet waveguide and the optical fiber used to deliver the fluorescence to the detector. The performance of the system has been tested on Cy5 water solutions and LOD of 2.56 nM has been obtained. A proof-of-concept of filter-free measurements has been performed demonstrating that fluorescence measurements can be performed also by using a photodiode with an LOD of 6.11 nM.

  14. Measurements of amplitude and frequencies of subwavelength oscillations of atoms using resonance fluorescence of three levels atom in two standing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enaki, Nicolae; Bazgan, Sergiu; Mihailescu, Ion

    2015-02-01

    The resonance fluorescence of an atomic (or ion) system implanted in the materials driving two standing waves of the optical cavity is studied taking into consideration the delocalization of the atom. It is demonstrated that the resonance fluorescence depends on the position of atoms (or ions) relative the nodes or antinodes of standing waves. This situation gives us the possibility to measure the amplitude of mechanical oscillations of these radiators implanted in organic or inorganic materials. It is proposed to measure the amplitude of the mechanical oscillations relative to the equilibrium position using the time changes in the positions of the five peaks of the resonance fluorescence spectrum. In this case, the small oscillation amplitude relative to the standing wave length can drastically change the spectrum of resonance fluorescence of such atoms. The proposed method can be used in the measurements of the nanostructure temperature (or bio-molecule temperature deformation).

  15. Atom-at-a-time laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of nobelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Lauth, Werner; Backe, Hartmut; Block, Michael; Ackermann, Dieter; Cheal, Bradley; Chhetri, Premaditya; Düllmann, Christoph Emanuel; van Duppen, Piet; Even, Julia; Ferrer, Rafael; Giacoppo, Francesca; Götz, Stefan; Heßberger, Fritz Peter; Huyse, Mark; Kaleja, Oliver; Khuyagbaatar, Jadambaa; Kunz, Peter; Lautenschläger, Felix; Mistry, Andrew Kishor; Raeder, Sebastian; Ramirez, Enrique Minaya; Walther, Thomas; Wraith, Calvin; Yakushev, Alexander

    2016-10-27

    Optical spectroscopy of a primordial isotope has traditionally formed the basis for understanding the atomic structure of an element. Such studies have been conducted for most elements and theoretical modelling can be performed to high precision, taking into account relativistic effects that scale approximately as the square of the atomic number. However, for the transfermium elements (those with atomic numbers greater than 100), the atomic structure is experimentally unknown. These radioactive elements are produced in nuclear fusion reactions at rates of only a few atoms per second at most and must be studied immediately following their production, which has so far precluded their optical spectroscopy. Here we report laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of nobelium (No; atomic number 102) in single-atom-at-a-time quantities, in which we identify the ground-state transition 1S01P1. By combining this result with data from an observed Rydberg series, we obtain an upper limit for the ionization potential of nobelium. These accurate results from direct laser excitations of outer-shell electrons cannot be achieved using state-of-the-art relativistic many-body calculations that include quantum electrodynamic effects, owing to large uncertainties in the modelled transition energies of the complex systems under consideration. Our work opens the door to high-precision measurements of various atomic and nuclear properties of elements heavier than nobelium, and motivates future theoretical work.

  16. Atom-at-a-time laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of nobelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Lauth, Werner; Backe, Hartmut; Block, Michael; Ackermann, Dieter; Cheal, Bradley; Chhetri, Premaditya; Düllmann, Christoph Emanuel; van Duppen, Piet; Even, Julia; Ferrer, Rafael; Giacoppo, Francesca; Götz, Stefan; Heßberger, Fritz Peter; Huyse, Mark; Kaleja, Oliver; Khuyagbaatar, Jadambaa; Kunz, Peter; Lautenschläger, Felix; Mistry, Andrew Kishor; Raeder, Sebastian; Ramirez, Enrique Minaya; Walther, Thomas; Wraith, Calvin; Yakushev, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Optical spectroscopy of a primordial isotope has traditionally formed the basis for understanding the atomic structure of an element. Such studies have been conducted for most elements and theoretical modelling can be performed to high precision, taking into account relativistic effects that scale approximately as the square of the atomic number. However, for the transfermium elements (those with atomic numbers greater than 100), the atomic structure is experimentally unknown. These radioactive elements are produced in nuclear fusion reactions at rates of only a few atoms per second at most and must be studied immediately following their production, which has so far precluded their optical spectroscopy. Here we report laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of nobelium (No; atomic number 102) in single-atom-at-a-time quantities, in which we identify the ground-state transition 1S0 1P1. By combining this result with data from an observed Rydberg series, we obtain an upper limit for the ionization potential of nobelium. These accurate results from direct laser excitations of outer-shell electrons cannot be achieved using state-of-the-art relativistic many-body calculations that include quantum electrodynamic effects, owing to large uncertainties in the modelled transition energies of the complex systems under consideration. Our work opens the door to high-precision measurements of various atomic and nuclear properties of elements heavier than nobelium, and motivates future theoretical work.

  17. Time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy for the assessment of skin photoaging process

    Science.gov (United States)

    D´Almeida, Camila de Paula; Campos, Carolina; Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    pathology. The optical properties of these intrinsic fluorophores respond to the microenvironment and the metabolic status, thus making fluorescence spectroscopy a valuable tool to study the conditions of biological tissues. The purpose of this study is to investigate the hairless mice skin metabolic changes during the photoaging process through lifetime and fluorescence measurements targeting NADH and FAD. Two lasers centered at 378 nm and 445 nm, respectively, perform excitation of NADH and FAD. The fluorescence acquisition is carried out at mice dorsal and ventral regions throughout the photoaging protocol and aging process. Differences in fluorescence and lifetime data between young and photoaged mice measurements were observed. The endogenous fluorescence spectrum of photoaged dorsal skin showed an increase compared to young and aged skin. Lifetime of bound NADH and free FAD presented an increase in the first week that continued until the end of the protocol. Aging process is being investigated to complement the information obtained from fluorescence data and lifetime of photoaging process.

  18. MEMBRANE MOBILITY AND MICRODOMAIN LOCALIZATION OF THE DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER STUDIED BY CONFOCAL FLUORESCENCE CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY (FCS) AND FRAP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adkins, Erica; (Vægter), Christian Bjerggaard; van Deurs, Bo

    targets for many psychotropic drugs, including cocaine, antidepressants, and amphetamine. We have used a confocal single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy technique, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to asses directly the mobility of YFP-tagged DAT in living cells. In both stably...... FCS measurements in transiently transfected N2A neuroblastoma cells were impaired by photobleachning suggesting immobilization of the transporter in the membrane. This was confirmed by the use of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which showed clear recovery of YFP-DAT fluorescence...

  19. Variation of fluorescence spectroscopy during the menstrual cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaulay, Calum; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Utzinger, Urs; Fedyk, Amanda; Neely Atkinson, E.; Cox, Dennis; Follen, Michele

    2002-06-01

    Cervical autofluorescence has been demonstrated to have potential for real-time diagnosis. Inter-patient and intra-patient variations in fluorescence intensity have been measured. Inter-patient measurements may vary by a factor of ten, while intra-patient measurements may vary by a factor of two. Age and menopausal status have been demonstrated to account for some of the variations, while race and smoking have not. In order to explore in detail the role of the menstrual cycle in intra-patient variation, a study was designed to measure fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMs) in patients daily throughout one cycle. Ten patients with a history of normal menstrual cycles and normal Papanicolaou smears underwent daily measurements of fluorescence EEMs from three colposcopically normal sites throughout one menstrual cycle. Changes in signals from porphyrin, NADH, and FAD fluorescence and blood absorption were noted when the data was viewed in a graphical format. Visually interpreted features of the EEMs in this graphical format did not appear to correlate with the day of the menstrual cycle with the exception that blood absorption features were more prominent during the menstrual phase (during which bleeding occurs), suggesting that measurements during the menstrual phase should be avoided. Variations in cycle date likely do not account for inter- or intra-patient variations.

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the retina from scrapie-infected mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, we have proposed that the fluorescence spectra of sheep retina can be well correlated to the presence or absence of scrapie. Scrapie is the most widespread TSE (transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) affecting sheep and goats worldwide. Mice eyes have been previously reported as a model ...

  1. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of a Langmuir Monolayer of C-16 Fluorescent Dipyrrinone Liquid Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struebing, Christian; Deluca, Giovanni; Prayaga, Chandra; Wade, Aaron; Huggins, Michael; Renaud, Amy; Chandler, Rebecca

    2013-03-01

    A C-16 Fluorescent Dipyrrinone Liquid Crystal synthesized by the Chemistry department, University of West Florida, has been prepared in a Langmuir monolayer using a Nima Langmuir-Blodgett Trough. DeLuca et al. studied how the length of the hydrocarbon tail influences the behavior of the pressure-area isotherm of the Langmuir film. The C-16 Fluorescent Dipyrrinone Liquid Crystal film produced a stable film at 20 mN/m and a stable, optical quality film at 40 mN/m. We present a study of the fluorescence properties of the C-16 fluorescent dipyrrinone liquid crystal film. Once the monolayer is compressed the sample is excited using a 410 nm wavelength laser and the fluorescence is measured using an Oriel MS260i 1/4 m Spectrograph. Undergraduate Student

  2. Atomic fluorescence method for determination of concentration of alkali metal vapor using a laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budkin, L.A.; Okhotnikov, O.G.; Pak, G.T.; Pikhtelev, A.I.; Puzanov, S.L.

    1984-04-01

    An experimental investigation into the temperature dependence of the cesium vapor concentration has been carried out within the 20-80 deg C temperature range on the base of the atomic fluorescence method with the use of a semiconductor laser. The relation allowing one to study the alkali metal atomic concentration as a function of the vapor temperature and also the method sensitivity as a function of the laser intensity has been derived using the balance equations. A good agreement of the experimental results with estimated ones has been obtained. The method sensitivity has been found to grow with the laser intensity.

  3. Clinical feasibility of monitoring m-THPC mediated photodynamic therapy by means of fluorescence differential path-length spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karakullukcu, Baris; Kanick, Stephen Chad; Aans, Jan Bonne; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Tan, I. Bing; Amelink, Arjen; Robinson, Dominic J.

    2011-01-01

    The objective quantitative monitoring of light, oxygen, and photosensitizer is challenging in clinical photodynamic therapy settings. We have previously developed fluorescence differential path-length spectroscopy (FDPS), a technique that utilizes reflectance spectroscopy to monitor microvascular

  4. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreham, Alexander; Brodwolf, Robert; Walker, Karolina; Haag, Rainer; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2016-12-24

    The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  5. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Boreham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  6. Two-dimensional fluorescence correlation spectroscopy IV: resolution of fluorescence of tryptophan residues in alcohol dehydrogenase and lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Hiroaki; Nakashima, Kenichi; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Noda, Isao

    2006-11-01

    Generalized two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence correlation spectroscopy has been used to resolve the fluorescence spectra of two tryptophan (Trp) residues in alcohol dehydrogenase and lysozyme. In each protein, one Trp residue is buried in a hydrophobic domain of the protein matrix and the other Trp residue is located at a hydrophilic domain close to the protein-water interface. Fluorescence quenching by iodide ion, a hydrophilic quencher, was employed as a perturbation to induce the intensity change in the spectra. The Trp residue which is located at the hydrophilic domain is effectively quenched by the quencher, while the Trp residue located at the hydrophobic domain is protected from the quenching. Therefore, the fluorescence of these two Trp residues have a different sensitivity to the quenching, showing a different response to the concentration of the quencher. Fluorescence spectra of the two Trp residues in alcohol dehydrogenase, which are heavily overlapped in conventional one-dimensional spectra, have been successfully resolved by the 2D correlation technique. From the asynchronous correlation map, it was revealed that the quenching of Trp located at the hydrophobic part was brought about after that of Trp located at the hydrophilic part. In contrast, the fluorescence spectra of the two Trp residues could not be resolved after the alcohol dehydrogenase was denatured with guanidine hydrochloride. These results are consistent with the well-known structure of alcohol dehydrogenase. Furthermore, it was elucidated that the present 2D analysis is not interfered by Raman bands of the solvent, which sometimes bring difficulty into the conventional fluorescence analysis. Fluorescence spectra of the Trp residues in lysozyme could not be resolved by the 2D correlation technique. The differences between the two proteins are attributed to the fact that the Trp residue in the hydrophobic site of lysozyme is not sufficiently protected from the quenching.

  7. Two-dimensional fluorescence correlation spectroscopy IV: Resolution of fluorescence of tryptophan residues in alcohol dehydrogenase and lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Hiroaki; Nakashima, Kenichi; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Noda, Isao

    2006-11-01

    Generalized two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence correlation spectroscopy has been used to resolve the fluorescence spectra of two tryptophan (Trp) residues in alcohol dehydrogenase and lysozyme. In each protein, one Trp residue is buried in a hydrophobic domain of the protein matrix and the other Trp residue is located at a hydrophilic domain close to the protein-water interface. Fluorescence quenching by iodide ion, a hydrophilic quencher, was employed as a perturbation to induce the intensity change in the spectra. The Trp residue which is located at the hydrophilic domain is effectively quenched by the quencher, while the Trp residue located at the hydrophobic domain is protected from the quenching. Therefore, the fluorescence of these two Trp residues have a different sensitivity to the quenching, showing a different response to the concentration of the quencher. Fluorescence spectra of the two Trp residues in alcohol dehydrogenase, which are heavily overlapped in conventional one-dimensional spectra, have been successfully resolved by the 2D correlation technique. From the asynchronous correlation map, it was revealed that the quenching of Trp located at the hydrophobic part was brought about after that of Trp located at the hydrophilic part. In contrast, the fluorescence spectra of the two Trp residues could not be resolved after the alcohol dehydrogenase was denatured with guanidine hydrochloride. These results are consistent with the well-known structure of alcohol dehydrogenase. Furthermore, it was elucidated that the present 2D analysis is not interfered by Raman bands of the solvent, which sometimes bring difficulty into the conventional fluorescence analysis. Fluorescence spectra of the Trp residues in lysozyme could not be resolved by the 2D correlation technique. The differences between the two proteins are attributed to the fact that the Trp residue in the hydrophobic site of lysozyme is not sufficiently protected from the quenching.

  8. Quantitative frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy in tissues and tissue-like media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert Edward

    1999-09-01

    In the never-ending quest for improved medical technology at lower cost, modern near-infrared optical spectroscopy offers the possibility of inexpensive technology for quantitative and non-invasive diagnoses. Hemoglobin is the dominant chromophore in the 700-900 nm spectral region and as such it allows for the optical assessment of hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygenation by absorption spectroscopy. However, there are many other important physiologically relevant compounds or physiological states that cannot be effectively sensed via optical methods because of poor optical contrast. In such cases, contrast enhancements are required. Fluorescence spectroscopy is an attractive component of optical tissue spectroscopy. Exogenous fluorophores, as well as some endogenous ones, may furnish the desperately needed sensitivity and specificity that is lacking in near-infrared optical tissue spectroscopy. The main focus of this thesis was to investigate the generation and propagation of fluorescence photons inside tissues and tissue-like media (i.e., scattering dominated media). The standard concepts of fluorescence spectroscopy have been incorporated into a diffusion-based picture that is sometimes referred to as photon migration. The novelty of this work lies in the successful quantitative recovery of fluorescence lifetimes, absolute fluorescence quantum yields, fluorophore concentrations, emission spectra, and both scattering and absorption coefficients at the emission wavelength from a tissue-like medium. All of these parameters are sensitive to the fluorophore local environment and hence are indicators of the tissue's physiological state. One application demonstrating the capabilities of frequency-domain lifetime spectroscopy in tissue-like media is a study of the binding of ethidium bromide to bovine leukocytes in fresh milk. Ethidium bromide is a fluorescent dye that is commonly used to label DNA, and hence visualize chromosomes in cells. The lifetime of

  9. Changes and characteristics of dissolved organic matter in a constructed wetland system using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Yun-Zhen; Guo, Xu-Jing; Huang, Tao; Gao, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Ying-Pei; Yuan, Feng

    2016-06-01

    Domestic wastewater was treated by five constructed wetland beds in series. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) collected from influent and effluent samples from the constructed wetland was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy combined with fluorescence regional integration (FRI), parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis, and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS). This study evaluates the capability of these methods in detecting the spectral characteristics of fluorescent DOM fractions and their changes in constructed wetlands. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with FRI analysis showed that protein-like materials displayed a higher removal ratio compared to humic-like substances. The PARAFAC analysis of wastewater DOM indicated that six fluorescent components, i.e., two protein-like substances (C1 and C6), three humic-like substances (C2, C3 and C5), and one non-humic component (C4), could be identified. Tryptophan-like C1 was the dominant component in the influent DOM. The removal ratios of six fluorescent components (C1-C6) were 56.21, 32.05, 49.19, 39.90, 29.60, and 45.87 %, respectively, after the constructed wetland treatment. Furthermore, 2D-COS demonstrated that the sequencing of spectral changes for fluorescent DOM followed the order 298 nm → 403 nm → 283 nm (310-360 nm) in the constructed wetland, suggesting that the peak at 298 nm is associated with preferential tryptophan fluorescence removal. Variation of the fluorescence index (FI) and the ratio of fluorescence components indicated that the constructed wetland treatment resulted in the decrease of fluorescent organic pollutant with increasing the humification and chemical stability of the DOM.

  10. Time correlated single-photon counting and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Rainer; Enderlein, Jorg; Wahl, Michael

    2005-12-01

    A comprehensive reference on modern technological aspects of time-correlated single photon counting as used in academic and industrial applications. It thus covers areas that have either been neglected in the current literature, or for which an updated reference is not available. The book focuses on general fundamentals of photon statistics, light sources, and electronics for photon counting, time-correlated photon counting, data analysis, and fluorescence correlation techniques. One whole chapter is also devoted to applications of this universal technique in life sciences, with most of the attention given to fluorescence phenomena. The whole is backed by an appendix offering measurement examples and practical hints for data analysis. For physicists, spectroscopists, chemists, and biochemists.

  11. Fluorescent probes for shock compression spectroscopy of microstructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, James M.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    We are developing fluorescent probes to obtain dynamic two-dimensional pressure maps of shocked microstructured materials. We have fabricated silica nano-or micro-spheres doped with rhodamine 6G dye (R6G) which fluoresce strongly, and which may be dispersed throughout a microstructured sample. Alternatively we can grow thin skin layers of dye-doped silica on the surface of particles. The emissive microspheres were embedded in poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and were excited by a quasi-continuous laser. When the samples were shocked to 3-8.4 GPa using laser-driven flyer plates, the emission redshifted and lost intensity. When encapsulating the dye in silica, the emission became brighter and the intensity-loss response became fast enough to monitor nanosecond shock effects. Preliminary data are reported showing the intensity loss in a shocked microstructured medium, an artificial sand, consisting of dye-coated silica microspheres.

  12. Precision Spectroscopy of Kaonic Atoms at DAΦNE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scordo A.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The SIDDHARTA experiment aims at a precise measurement of K -series kaonic hydrogen x-rays and the first-ever measurement of the kaonic deuterium x-rays to determine the strong-interaction energy-level shift and width of the lowest lying atomic states. These measurements offer a unique possibility to precisely determine the isospin-dependent $ar{K}$-nucleon scattering lengths.

  13. Prediction of Ba, Co and Ni for tropical soils using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes Camargo, Livia; Marques Júnior, José; Reynaldo Ferracciú Alleoni, Luís; Tadeu Pereira, Gener; De Bortoli Teixeira, Daniel; Santos Rabelo de Souza Bahia, Angélica

    2017-04-01

    Environmental impact assessments may be assisted by spatial characterization of potentially toxic elements (PTEs). Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) are rapid, non-destructive, low-cost, prediction tools for a simultaneous characterization of different soil attributes. Although low concentrations of PTEs might preclude the observation of spectral features, their contents can be predicted using spectroscopy by exploring the existing relationship between the PTEs and soil attributes with spectral features. This study aimed to evaluate, in three geomorphic surfaces of Oxisols, the capacity for predicting PTEs (Ba, Co, and Ni) and their spatial variability by means of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). For that, soil samples were collected from three geomorphic surfaces and analyzed for chemical, physical, and mineralogical properties, and then analyzed in DRS (visible + near infrared - VIS+NIR and medium infrared - MIR) and XRF equipment. PTE prediction models were calibrated using partial least squares regression (PLSR). PTE spatial distribution maps were built using the values calculated by the calibrated models that reached the best accuracy using geostatistics. PTE prediction models were satisfactorily calibrated using MIR DRS for Ba, and Co (residual prediction deviation - RPD > 3.0), Vis DRS for Ni (RPD > 2.0) and FRX for all the studied PTEs (RPD > 1.8). DRS- and XRF-predicted values allowed the characterization and the understanding of spatial variability of the studied PTEs.

  14. Integrated optical measurement system for fluorescence spectroscopy in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2001-01-01

    A transportable miniaturized fiber-pigtailed measurement system is presented which allows quantitative fluorescence detection in microliquid handling systems. The microliquid handling chips are made in silica on silicon technology and the optical functionality is monolithically integrated with th...... with two dyes, fluorescein, and Bodipy 650/665 X, showed good linear behavior over a wide range of concentrations. Minimally detected concentrations were 250 pM for fluorescein and 100 nM for Bodipy....

  15. Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy for analysis of vegetable oils

    OpenAIRE

    Nigri S.; Oumeddour R.

    2013-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and fluorescence spectroscopy, combined with chemometric approaches have been developed to analysis of extra virgin olive oil adulterated with pomace olive oil. The measurements were made on pure vegetable oils: extra virgin oil, pomace olive oil and that adulterated with varying concentration of pomace olive oil. Today, the application of FTIR spectroscopy has increased in food studied, and particularly has become a powerful analytical tool in the study of e...

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool for determination of organic matter removal efficiency at water treatment works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Z. Bieroza

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic matter (OM in drinking water treatment is a common impediment responsible for increased coagulant and disinfectant dosages, formation of carcinogenic disinfection-by products, and microbial re-growth in distribution system. The inherent heterogeneity of OM implies the utilization of advanced analytical techniques for its characterization and assessment of removal efficiency. Here, the application of simple fluorescence excitation-emission technique to OM characterization in drinking water treatment is presented. The fluorescence data of raw and clarified water was obtained from 16 drinking water treatment works. The reduction in fulvic-like fluorescence was found to significantly correlate with OM removal measured with total organic carbon (TOC. Fluorescence properties, fulvic- and tryptophan-like regions, were found to discriminate OM fractions of different removal efficiencies. The results obtained in the study show that fluorescence spectroscopy provides a rapid and accurate characterization and quantification of OM fractions and indication of their treatability in conventional water treatment.

  17. Application of normal fluorescence and stability-indicating derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of gliquidone in presence of its fluorescent alkaline degradation product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghobashy, Mohamed R; Yehia, Ali M; Helmy, Aya H; Youssef, Nadia F

    2018-01-05

    Simple, smart and sensitive normal fluorescence and stability-indicating derivative synchronous spectrofluorimetric methods have been developed and validated for the determination of gliquidone in the drug substance and drug product. Normal spectrofluorimetric method of gliquidone was established in methanol at λ excitation 225nm and λ emission 400nm in concentration range 0.2-3μg/ml with LOD equal 0.028. The fluorescence quantum yield of gliquidone was calculated using quinine sulfate as a reference and found to be 0.542. Stability-indicating first and third derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy were successfully utilized to overcome the overlapped spectra in normal fluorescence of gliquidone and its alkaline degradation product. Derivative synchronous methods are based on using the synchronous fluorescence of gliquidone and its degradation product in methanol at Δ λ50nm. Peak amplitude in the first derivative of synchronous fluorescence spectra was measured at 309nm where degradation product showed zero-crossing without interference. The peak amplitudes in the third derivative of synchronous fluorescence spectra, peak to trough were measured at 316,329nm where degradation product showed zero-crossing. The different experimental parameters affecting the normal and synchronous fluorescence intensity of gliquidone were studied and optimized. Moreover, the cited methods have been validated as per ICH guidelines. The peak amplitude-concentration plots of the derivative synchronous fluorescence were linear over the concentration range 0.05-2μg/ml for gliquidone. Limits of detection were 0.020 and 0.022 in first and third derivative synchronous spectra, respectively. The adopted methods were successfully applied to commercial tablets and the results demonstrated that the derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful stability-indicating method, suitable for routine use with a short analysis time. Statistical comparison between the

  18. The interaction of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole with human serum albumin as determined by spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuqin; Jia, Baoxiu; Wang, Hao; Li, Nana; Chen, Gaopan; Lin, Yuejuan; Gao, Wenhua

    2013-04-01

    The interaction of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied in vitro by equilibrium dialysis under normal physiological conditions. This study used fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling techniques. Association constants, the number of binding sites and basic thermodynamic parameters were used to investigate the quenching mechanism. Based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the distance between the HSA and MBI was 2.495 nm. The ΔG(0), ΔH(0), and ΔS(0) values across temperature indicated that the hydrophobic interaction was the predominant binding Force. The UV, FT-IR, CD and Raman spectra confirmed that the HSA secondary structure was altered in the presence of MBI. In addition, the molecular modeling showed that the MBI-HSA complex was stabilized by hydrophobic forces, which resulted from amino acid residues. The AFM results revealed that the individual HSA molecule dimensions were larger after interaction with MBI. Overall, this study suggested a method for characterizing the weak intermolecular interaction. In addition, this method is potentially useful for elucidating the toxigenicity of MBI when it is combined with the biomolecular function effect, transmembrane transport, toxicological testing and other experiments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Echo spectroscopy and quantum stability of trapped atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, M. F.; Kaplan, A.; Davidson, N.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the dephasing of ultra cold ^{85}Rb atoms trapped in an optical dipole trap and prepared in a coherent superposition of their two hyperfine ground states by interaction with a microwave pulse. We demonstrate that the dephasing, measured as the Ramsey fringe contrast, can be reversed by stimulating a coherence echo with a pi-pulse between the two pi/2 pulses, in analogy to the photon echo. We also demonstrate that the failure of the echo for certain trap parameters is due to dyn...

  20. Excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) investigations of gastrointestinal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Ts.; Borisova, E.; Zhelyazkova, Al.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O.; Penkov, N.; Keremedchiev, M.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this report we will present our recent investigations of the fluorescence properties of lower part gastrointestinal tissues using excitation-emission matrix and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy measurement modalities. The spectral peculiarities observed will be discussed and the endogenous sources of the fluorescence signal will be addressed. For these fluorescence spectroscopy measurements the FluoroLog 3 system (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) was used. It consists of a Xe lamp (300 W, 200-650 nm), a double mono-chromators, and a PMT detector with a work region at 220- 850 nm. Autofluorescence signals were detected in the form of excitation-emission matrices for the samples of normal mucosa, dysphasia and colon carcinoma and specific spectral features for each tissue were found. Autofluorescence signals from the same samples are observed through synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, which is a novel promising modality for fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of bio-samples. It is one of the most powerful techniques for multicomponent analysis, because of its sensitivity. In the SFS regime, the fluorescence signal is recorded while both excitation λexc and emission wavelengths λem are simultaneously scanned. A constant wavelength interval is maintained between the λexc and λem wavelengths throughout the spectrum. The resulted fluorescence spectrum shows narrower peak widths, in comparison with EEMs, which are easier for identification and minimizes the chance for false determinations or pretermission of specific spectral feature. This modality is also faster, than EEMs, a much smaller number of data points are required.1 In our measurements we use constant wavelength interval Δλ in the region of 10-200 nm. Measurements are carried out in the terms of finding Δλ, which results in a spectrum with most specific spectral features for comparison with spectral characteristics observed in EEMs. Implementing synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy in optical

  1. New insights into heat induced structural changes of pectin methylesterase on fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistor, Oana Viorela; Stănciuc, Nicoleta; Aprodu, Iuliana; Botez, Elisabeta

    2014-07-01

    Heat-induced structural changes of Aspergillus oryzae pectin methylesterase (PME) were studied by means of fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling, whereas the functional enzyme stability was monitored by inactivation studies. The fluorescence spectroscopy experiments were performed at two pH value (4.5 and 7.0). At both pH values, the phase diagrams were linear, indicating the presence of two molecular species induced by thermal treatment. A red shift of 7 nm was observed at neutral pH by increasing temperature up to 60 °C, followed by a blue shift of 4 nm at 70 °C, suggesting significant conformational rearrangements. The quenching experiments using acrylamide and iodide demonstrate a more flexible conformation of enzyme with increasing temperature, especially at neutral pH. The experimental results were complemented with atomic level observations on PME model behavior after performing molecular dynamics simulations at different temperatures. The inactivation kinetics of PME in buffer solutions was fitted using a first-order kinetics model, resulting in activation energy of 241.4 ± 7.51 kJ mol-1.

  2. Optical biopsy using fluorescence spectroscopy for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binlin; Gao, Xin; Smith, Jason; Bailin, Jacob

    2017-02-01

    Native fluorescence spectra are acquired from fresh normal and cancerous human prostate tissues. The fluorescence data are analyzed using a multivariate analysis algorithm such as non-negative matrix factorization. The nonnegative spectral components are retrieved and attributed to the native fluorophores such as collagen, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in tissue. The retrieved weights of the components, e.g. NADH and FAD are used to estimate the relative concentrations of the native fluorophores and the redox ratio. A machine learning algorithm such as support vector machine (SVM) is used for classification to distinguish normal and cancerous tissue samples based on either the relative concentrations of NADH and FAD or the redox ratio alone. The classification performance is shown based on statistical measures such as sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, along with the area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. A cross validation method such as leave-one-out is used to evaluate the predictive performance of the SVM classifier to avoid bias due to overfitting.

  3. Quantitative fluorescence correlation spectroscopy on DNA in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Cameron; Kafle, Rudra P.; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2017-02-01

    FCS is a fluorescence technique conventionally used to study the kinetics of fluorescent molecules in a dilute solution. Being a non-invasive technique, it is now drawing increasing interest for the study of more complex systems like the dynamics of DNA or proteins in living cells. Unlike an ordinary dye solution, the dynamics of macromolecules like proteins or entangled DNA in crowded environments is often slow and subdiffusive in nature. This in turn leads to longer residence times of the attached fluorophores in the excitation volume of the microscope and artifacts from photobleaching abound that can easily obscure the signature of the molecular dynamics of interest and make quantitative analysis challenging.We discuss methods and procedures to make FCS applicable to quantitative studies of the dynamics of DNA in live prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The intensity autocorrelation is computed function from weighted arrival times of the photons on the detector that maximizes the information content while simultaneously correcting for the effect of photobleaching to yield an autocorrelation function that reflects only the underlying dynamics of the sample. This autocorrelation function in turn is used to calculate the mean square displacement of the fluorophores attached to DNA. The displacement data is more amenable to further quantitative analysis than the raw correlation functions. By using a suitable integral transform of the mean square displacement, we can then determine the viscoelastic moduli of the DNA in its cellular environment. The entire analysis procedure is extensively calibrated and validated using model systems and computational simulations.

  4. Studies of multifrequency phase-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for spectral fingerprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGown, L.B.

    1990-01-01

    During the past two project periods (7/1/88--12/31/90), we have made significant advances towards our goal of characterizing samples in terms of their dynamic spectral characteristics through the use of phase-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Specific achievements are discussed, each of which describes a particular area of focus in our studies.

  5. Review of X-ray Tomography and X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shear, Trevor A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-16

    This literature review will focus on both laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray tomography of materials and highlight the inner workings of these instruments. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy will also be reviewed and applications of the tandem use of these techniques will be explored. The real world application of these techniques during the internship will also be discussed.

  6. Biological Interaction of Molybdenocene Dichloride with Bovine Serum Albumin Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Moralba; Cortes-Figueroa, Jose´ E.; Meléndez, Enrique

    2018-01-01

    Bioinorganic topics are ubiquitous in the inorganic chemistry curriculum; however, experiments to enhance understanding of related topics are scarce. In this proposed laboratory, upper undergraduate students assess the biological interaction of molybdenocene dichloride (Cp2MoCl2) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) by fluorescence spectroscopy.…

  7. A statistical strategy to assess cleaning level of surfaces using fluorescence spectroscopy and Wilks’ ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoica, Iuliana-Madalina; Babamoradi, Hamid; van den Berg, Frans

    2017-01-01

    •A statistical strategy combining fluorescence spectroscopy, multivariate analysis and Wilks’ ratio is proposed.•The method was tested both off-line and on-line having riboflavin as a (controlled) contaminant.•Wilks’ ratio signals unusual recordings based on shifts in variance and covariance stru...

  8. Pigment-Protein Interactions in Phytochromes Probed by Fluorescence Line Narrowing Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieder, J.B.; Stojkovic, E.A; Moffat, K.; Forest, K.T.; Lamparter, T.; Bittl, R.; Kennis, J.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence line narrowing (FLN) spectroscopy was used to study bacteriophytochromes and variants from various species in their red-absorbing Pr ground state, including phytochromes Agp1 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, DrBphP from Deinococcus radiodurans, and RpBphP2 and RpBphP3 from

  9. Spectral Behavior of White Pigment Mixtures Using Reflectance, Ultraviolet-Fluorescence Spectroscopy, and Multispectral Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronti, Lucilla; Felici, Anna Candida; Ménager, Matthieu; Vieillescazes, Cathy; Piacentini, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy, ultraviolet (UV)-fluorescence spectroscopy, and multispectral imaging have been widely employed for pigment identification on paintings. From ancient times to the present, lead white, zinc white, and titanium white have been the most important white pigments used for paintings and they are used as pigment markers for dating a work of art. The spectral behavior of these pigments is reported in several scientific papers and websites, but those of their mixtures are quite unknown. We present a combined nondestructive approach for identifying mixtures of lead white, zinc white, and titanium white as powder and dispersed in two different binder media (egg yolk and linseed oil) by using reflectance spectroscopy, spectrofluorimetry, multispectral reflectance and UV-fluorescence imaging. We propose a novel approach for mapping the presence of white pigments in paintings by false color images obtained from multispectral reflectance and UV-fluorescence images. We found that the presence of lead white mixed with either zinc white or titanium white is highly detectable. Zinc white mixed with lead white or titanium white can be identified due to its UV-fluorescence emission, whereas titanium white in association with lead white or zinc white is distinguishable by its reflectance spectral features. In most cases, the UV-fluorescence analyses also permit the recognition of the binder media in which the pigments are dispersed.

  10. An atomic hydrogen beam to test ASACUSA's apparatus for antihydrogen spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Diermaier, Martin; Kolbinger, Bernadette; Malbrunot, Chloé; Massiczek, Oswald; Sauerzopf, Clemens; Simon, Martin C.; Wolf, Michael; Zmeskal, Johann; Widmann, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration aims to measure the ground state hyperfine splitting (GS-HFS) of antihydrogen, the antimatter pendant to atomic hydrogen. Comparisons of the corresponding transitions in those two systems will provide sensitive tests of the CPT symmetry, the combination of the three discrete symmetries charge conjugation, parity, and time reversal. For offline tests of the GS-HFS spectroscopy apparatus we constructed a source of cold polarised atomic hydrogen. In these proceedings we report the successful observation of the hyperfine structure transitions of atomic hydrogen with our apparatus in the earth's magnetic field.

  11. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Havener, C. C.; Mattolat, C.; Vane, C. R.; Wendt, K.

    2013-12-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  12. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy of native membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel J; Engel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Membrane proteins comprise 30% of the proteome of higher organisms. They mediate energy conversion, signal transduction, solute transport and secretion. Their native environment is a bilayer in a physiological buffer solution, hence their structure and function are preferably assessed in this environment. The surface structure of single membrane proteins can be determined in buffer solutions by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at a lateral resolution of less than 1 nm and a vertical resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm. Moreover, single proteins can be directly addressed, stuck to the AFM stylus and subsequently unfolded, revealing the molecular interactions of the protein studied. The examples discussed here illustrate the power of AFM in the structural analysis of membrane proteins in a native environment.

  13. Photon emission spectroscopy of ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystroem, B.

    1995-10-01

    Emission cross sections for the 1snp{sup 1}P{sub 1}-levels have been measured by photon emission spectroscopy for the collision systems He{sup +} + He at 10 keV and He{sup 2+} + He at 10-35 keV. Photon spectra of Krypton (Kr VIII) and Xenon (Xe V - IX) have also been obtained using 10q keV beams of Kr{sup q+} (q=7-9) and Xe{sup q+} (q=5-9) colliding with Helium and Argon. The Lifetimes of 3p{sup 2}P-levels in Na-like Nb are reported together with lifetime for the 3s3p{sup 3}P{sub 1}-level in Mg-like Ni, Kr, Y, Zr and Nb where this level has an intercombination transition to the ground state. 45 refs, 20 figs.

  14. A Pragmatic Smoothing Method for Improving the Quality of the Results in Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennun, Leonardo

    2017-07-01

    A new smoothing method for the improvement on the identification and quantification of spectral functions based on the previous knowledge of the signals that are expected to be quantified, is presented. These signals are used as weighted coefficients in the smoothing algorithm. This smoothing method was conceived to be applied in atomic and nuclear spectroscopies preferably to these techniques where net counts are proportional to acquisition time, such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and other X-ray fluorescence spectroscopic methods, etc. This algorithm, when properly applied, does not distort the form nor the intensity of the signal, so it is well suited for all kind of spectroscopic techniques. This method is extremely effective at reducing high-frequency noise in the signal much more efficient than a single rectangular smooth of the same width. As all of smoothing techniques, the proposed method improves the precision of the results, but in this case we found also a systematic improvement on the accuracy of the results. We still have to evaluate the improvement on the quality of the results when this method is applied over real experimental results. We expect better characterization of the net area quantification of the peaks, and smaller Detection and Quantification Limits. We have applied this method to signals that obey Poisson statistics, but with the same ideas and criteria, it could be applied to time series. In a general case, when this algorithm is applied over experimental results, also it would be required that the sought characteristic functions, required for this weighted smoothing method, should be obtained from a system with strong stability. If the sought signals are not perfectly clean, this method should be carefully applied

  15. Laboratory micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy instrumentation and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Haschke, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Micro-X-ray fluorescence offers the possibility for a position- sensitive and non-destructive analysis that can be used for the analysis of non-homogeneous materials and layer systems. This analytical technique has shown a dynamic development in the last 15 years and is used for the analysis of small particles, inclusions, of elemental distributions for a wide range of different applications both in research and quality control. The first experiments were performed on synchrotrons but there is a requirement for laboratory instruments which offers a fast and immediate access for analytical results. The book discuss the main components of a µ-XRF instrument and the different measurement modes, it gives an overview about the various instruments types, considers the special requirements for quantification of non-homogeneous materials and presents a wide range of application for single point and multi-point analysis as well as for distribution analysis in one, two and three dimensions.

  16. Atomic collision and spectroscopy experiments with ultra-low-energy antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Torii, Hiroyuki A; Toyoda, Hiroshi; Imao, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Naofumi; Varentsov, Victor L; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2009-01-01

    Antiproton, the antiparticle of proton, is a unique projectile in the study of atomic collision physics, which can be treated theoretically either as a 'negative proton' or a 'heavy electron'. Atomic capture of an antiproton will result in formation of a highly excited exotic atom. Antiprotonic helium atom has been studied intensively by means of precision laser spectroscopy, which has led to a stringent determination of antiproton mass and charge to a level of ppb. Comparison of these values with those of proton gives one of the best tests of CPT invariance, the most fundamental symmetry in physics. However, the dynamic processes of antiproton capture remain unclarified. With an aim to produce an antiproton beam at atomic-physics energies for 'pure' collision experiments, we have so far developed techniques to decelerate, cool and confine antiprotons in vacuo, using a sequential combination of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN, a Radio-Frequency Quadrupole Decelerator (RFQD), and an electromagnetic tra...

  17. Combined fiber probe for fluorescence lifetime and Raman spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dochow, Sebastian; Ma, Dinglong; Latka, Ines; Bocklitz, Thomas; Hartl, Brad; Bec, Julien; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Marple, Eric; Urmey, Kirk; Schmitt, Michael; Marcu, Laura; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been proven to have tremendous potential as biomedical analytical tool for spectroscopic disease diagnostics. The use of fiberoptic coupled Raman spectroscopy systems can enable in-vivo characterization of suspicious lesions. However, Raman spectroscopy has the drawback of rather long acquisition times of several hundreds of milliseconds which makes scanning of larger regions quite challenging. By combining Raman spectroscopy with a fast imaging technique this problem can be alleviate in part. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) offers a great potential for such a combination. FLIm can allow for fast tissue area pre-segmentation and location of the points for Raman spectra acquisition. Here, we introduce an optical fiber probe combining FLIm and Raman spectroscopy with an outer diameter of 2 mm. Fluorescence is generated via excitation with a fiber laser at 355 nm. The fluorescence emission is spectrally resolved using a custom-made wavelength-selection module (WSM). The Raman excitation power at 785 nm was set to 50 mW for the in-vivo measurements to prevent sample drying. The lateral probe resolution was determined to be brain and subsequently to acquire FLIm guided Raman spectra of several tissues in and around the craniotomy.

  18. A total internal reflection-fluorescence correlation spectroscopy setup with pulsed diode laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, Lukas; Hoffmann-Jacobsen, Kerstin

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measures fluctuations in a (sub-)femtoliter volume to analyze the diffusive behavior of fluorescent particles. This highly sensitive method has proven to be useful for the analysis of dynamic biological systems as well as in chemistry, physics, and material sciences. It is routinely performed with commercial fluorescence microscopes, which provide a confined observation volume by the confocal technique. The evanescent wave of total internal reflectance (TIR) is used in home-built systems to permit a surface sensitive FCS analysis. We present a combined confocal and TIR-FCS setup which uses economic low-power pulsed diode lasers for excitation. Excitation and detection are coupled to time-correlated photon counting hardware. This allows simultaneous fluorescence lifetime and FCS measurements in a surface-sensitive mode. Moreover, the setup supports fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy at surfaces. The excitation can be easily switched between TIR and epi-illumination to compare the surface properties with those in liquid bulk. The capabilities of the presented setup are demonstrated by measuring the diffusion coefficients of a free dye molecule, a labeled polyethylene glycol, and a fluorescent nanoparticle in confocal as well as in TIR-FCS.

  19. Characterising organic matter in recirculating aquaculture systems with fluorescence EEM spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, A C; Arvin, E; Pedersen, L-F; Pedersen, P B; Seredyńska-Sobecka, B; Stedmon, C A

    2015-10-15

    The potential of recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) in the aquaculture industry is increasingly being acknowledged. Along with intensified application, the need to better characterise and understand the accumulated dissolved organic matter (DOM) within these systems increases. Mature RASs, stocked with rainbow trout and operated at steady state at four feed loadings, were analysed by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) analysis and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. The fluorescence dataset was then decomposed by PARAFAC analysis using the drEEM toolbox. This revealed that the fluorescence character of the RAS water could be represented by five components, of which four have previously been identified in fresh water, coastal marine water, wetlands and drinking water. The fluorescence components as well as the DOC showed positive correlations with feed loading, however there was considerable variation between the five fluorescence components with respect to the degree of accumulation with feed loading. The five components were found to originate from three sources: the feed; the influent tap water (groundwater); and processes related to the fish and the water treatment system. This paper details the first application of fluorescence EEM spectroscopy to assess DOM in RAS, and highlights the potential applications of this technique within future RAS management strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of fluorescence spectroscopy to control ozone dosage in recirculating aquaculture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Martin, Richard; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Andersen, Henrik R

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy to be used as an ozone dosage determination tool in recirculating aquaculture systems (RASs), by studying the relationship between fluorescence intensities and dissolved organic matter (DOM) degradation by ozone, in order to optimise ozonation treatment. Water samples from six different Danish facilities (two rearing units from a commercial trout RAS, a commercial eel RAS, a pilot RAS and two marine water aquariums) were treated with different O3 dosages (1.0-20.0 mg/L ozone) in bench-scale experiments, following which fluorescence intensity degradation was eventually determined. Ozonation kinetic experiments showed that RAS water contains fluorescent organic matter, which is easily oxidised upon ozonation in relatively low concentrations (0-5 mg O3/L). Fluorescence spectroscopy has a high level of sensitivity and selectivity in relation to associated fluorophores, and it is able to determine accurately the ozone demand of each system. The findings can potentially be used to design offline or online sensors based on the reduction by ozone of natural fluorescent-dissolved organic matter in RAS. The suggested indirect determination of ozone delivered into water can potentially contribute to a safer and more adequate ozone-based treatment to improve water quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy of barium atoms and functional groups on graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothroyd, C.B., E-mail: ChrisBoothroyd@cantab.net [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Moreno, M.S. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, 8400 – San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Duchamp, M.; Kovács, A. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Monge, N.; Morales, G.M.; Barbero, C.A. [Department of Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, X5804BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    We present an atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) study of the local structure and composition of graphene oxide modified with Ba{sup 2+}. In our experiments, which are carried out at 80 kV, the acquisition of contamination-free high-resolution STEM images is only possible while heating the sample above 400 °C using a highly stable heating holder. Ba atoms are identified spectroscopically in electron energy-loss spectrum images taken at 800 °C and are associated with bright contrast in high-angle annular dark-field STEM images. The spectrum images also show that Ca and O occur together and that Ba is not associated with a significant concentration of O. The electron dose used for spectrum imaging results in beam damage to the specimen, even at elevated temperature. It is also possible to identify Ba atoms in high-resolution TEM images acquired using shorter exposure times at room temperature, thereby allowing the structure of graphene oxide to be studied using complementary TEM and STEM techniques over a wide range of temperatures. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide modified with Ba{sup 2+} was imaged using TEM and STEM at 80 kV. • High-resolution images and spectra were obtained only by heating above 400 °C. • Elemental maps show the distribution of C, Ba, O and Ca on the graphene oxide. • Single Ba atoms were identified in STEM HAADF and HRTEM images.

  2. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy used for the investigation of Landé gJ- factors of praseodymium energy levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewski, Ł. M.; Windholz, L.; Kwela, J.

    2017-06-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy was used for the investigation of structures of 52 spectral lines of Pr I in the wavelength range 561.3 - 613.9 nm. As a source of free Pr atoms a hollow cathode discharge lamp was used. We monitored selected LIF signals appearing when the laser beam excites the hollow cathode plasma. LIF spectra were recorded in the presence of a magnetic field of about 800 G produced by a permanent magnet for two linear polarizations of the exciting laser beam. We have determined for the first time Landé gJ- factors for 71 levels of neutral Pr and reinvestigated data for several other levels.

  3. A dark-field scanning spectroscopy platform for localized scatter and fluorescence imaging of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Laughney, Ashley M.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-03-01

    Tissue ultra-structure and molecular composition provide native contrast mechanisms for discriminating across pathologically distinct tissue-types. Multi-modality optical probe designs combined with spatially confined sampling techniques have been shown to be sensitive to this type of contrast but their extension to imaging has only been realized recently. A modular scanning spectroscopy platform has been developed to allow imaging localized morphology and molecular contrast measures in breast cancer surgical specimens. A custom designed dark-field telecentric scanning spectroscopy system forms the core of this imaging platform. The system allows imaging localized elastic scatter and fluorescence measures over fields of up to 15 mm x 15 mm at 100 microns resolution in tissue. Results from intralipid and blood phantom measurements demonstrate the ability of the system to quantify localized scatter parameters despite significant changes in local absorption. A co-registered fluorescence spectroscopy mode is also demonstrated in a protophorphyrin-IX phantom.

  4. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  5. Atom-at-a-time laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of nobelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Lauth, Werner; Backe, Hartmut; Block, Michael; Ackermann, Dieter; Cheal, Bradley; Chhetri, Premaditya; Düllmann, Christoph Emanuel; van Duppen, Piet; Even, Julia; Ferrer, Rafael; Giacoppo, Francesca; Götz, Stefan; Heßberger, Fritz Peter; Huyse, Mark; Kaleja, Oliver; Khuyagbaatar, Jadambaa; Kunz, Peter; Lautenschläger, Felix; Mistry, Andrew Kishor; Raeder, Sebastian; Ramirez, Enrique Minaya; Walther, Thomas; Wraith, Calvin; Yakushev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy of a primordial isotope has traditionally formed the basis for understanding the atomic structure of an element. Such studies have been conducted for most elements and theoretical modelling can be performed to high precision, taking into account relativistic effects that scale

  6. Circuit Board Analysis for Lead by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in a Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhammer, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    A circuit board analysis of the atomic absorption spectroscopy, which is used to measure lead content in a course for nonscience majors, is being presented. The experiment can also be used to explain the potential environmental hazards of unsafe disposal of various used electronic equipments.

  7. Continuation of Atomic Spectroscopy on Alkali Isotopes at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Laser optical measurements on Rb, Cs and Fr have already been performed at ISOLDE in 1978-79. The hyperfine structure and isotope shift of |7|6|-|9|8Rb, |1|1|8|-|1|4|5Cs, |2|0|8|-|2|1|3Fr and 14 of their isomers have been studied. Among the wealth of information which has been obtained, the most important are the first observation of an optical transition of the element Fr, the evidence of the onset of nuclear deformation at N~=~60 for Rb isotopes and the shape isomerism isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ From both the atomic and nuclear physics point of view, new studies seem very promising: \\item - the search for new optical transitions in Fr; the shell effect in the rms charge radius at N~=~126 for Fr isotopes \\item - the study of a possible onset of deformation for Cs isotopes beyond |1|4|5Cs \\item - the study of a region of static deformation in neutron-deficient Rb isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ \\end{enumerate} A new apparatus has been built. The principle remains the same as used in our earlier experiments. The improvements concern ess...

  8. Some historic and current aspects of plasma diagnostics using atomic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming; Andersson, Martin; Brage, Tomas; Martinson, Indrek

    2010-07-01

    In this paper we give a short introduction to the use of atomic spectroscopy in plasma diagnostics. Both older works and exciting new branches of atomic physics, which have relevance to diagnostics, are discussed. In particular we focus on forbidden lines in Be-like ions, lines sensitive to magnetic fields and levels which have a lifetime dependence on the nuclear spin of the ion, i.e. f-dependent lifetimes. Finally we mention a few examples of where tokamaks, instead of needing atomic data, actually provide new data and lead to developments in atomic structure studies. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Nicol J Peacock (1931-2008), a distinguished plasma scientist who contributed much to the field of spectroscopy applied to plasma, and in particular, fusion plasma diagnostics. During the final stages of the preparation of this paper Professor Indrek Martinson passed away peacefully in his sleep on 14 November 2009. Indrek will be greatly missed by many people, both for his contributions to atomic spectroscopy and for his great kindness and friendliness, which many of us experienced.

  9. Effect of Glow-to-Arc Transition on Loss Mechanism of Ba Atoms from Electrode of Fluorescent Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Takashi; Samir, Ahmed; Egashira, Yuichi; Yamashita, Go; Shimada, Shozaburo; Yamagata, Yukihiko; Uchino, Kiichiro; Manabe, Yoshio

    2007-10-01

    The loss of Ba atoms from the electrode of a fluorescent lamp was measured while the lamp was operated in the glow and arc discharge modes at 60 Hz. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique was applied to the measurements of the temporal and spatial distributions of Ba atoms in the vicinity of the electrode. Ground-state (61S0) Ba atoms were excited to a 51P1 level by a frequency-doubled dye laser beam (350.1 nm), and the subsequent fluorescence (51P1-51D2, 582.6 nm) was detected. The temporal and spatial distributions of Ba atoms were found to be completely different in the two discharge modes. Temporally; in the arc discharge mode, the density of the Ba atoms was found to have two peaks, and the number of Ba atoms emitted in the anode half-cycle was about twofold larger than that emitted in the cathode half-cycle. In the glow discharge mode, the number of Ba atoms emitted in the anode half-cycle was found to be negligible compared with that emitted in the cathode half-cycle. Spatially; in the arc discharge mode, Ba atoms were found to be emitted mainly from the hot spot of the filament electrode. In the glow discharge mode, Ba atoms were found to be emitted from all parts of the filament electrodes homogeneously. The mechanism of Ba atom loss in both modes was discussed.

  10. Transmission and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy cell/flow reactor for powder samples under vacuum or in reactive atmospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Hoffman, A. S.

    2016-07-26

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is an element-specific technique for probing the local atomic-scale environment around an absorber atom. It is widely used to investigate the structures of liquids and solids, being especially valuable for characterization of solid-supported catalysts. Reported cell designs are limited in capabilities—to fluorescence or transmission and to static or flowing atmospheres, or to vacuum. Our goal was to design a robust and widely applicable cell for catalyst characterizations under all these conditions—to allow tracking of changes during genesis and during operation, both under vacuum and in reactive atmospheres. Herein, we report the design of such a cell and a demonstration of its operation both with a sample under dynamic vacuum and in the presence of gases flowing at temperatures up to 300 °C, showing data obtained with both fluorescence and transmission detection. The cell allows more flexibility in catalyst characterization than any reported.

  11. Prediction of cell culture media performance using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Paul W; Li, Boyan; Shanahan, Michael; Leister, Kirk J; Ryder, Alan G

    2010-02-15

    Cell culture media used in industrial mammalian cell culture are complex aqueous solutions that are inherently difficult to analyze comprehensively. The analysis of media quality and variance is of utmost importance in efficient manufacturing. We are exploring the use of rapid "holistic" analytical methods that can be used for routine screening of cell culture media used in industrial biotechnology. The application of rapid fluorescence spectroscopic techniques to the routine analysis of cell culture media (Chinese hamster ovary cell-based manufacture) was investigated. We have developed robust methods which can be used to identify compositional changes and ultimately predict the efficacy of individual fed batch media in terms of downstream protein product yield with an accuracy of +/-0.13 g/L. This is achieved through the implementation of chemometric methods such as multiway robust principal component analysis (MROBPCA), and n-way partial least-squares-discriminant analysis and regression (NPLS-DA and NPLS). This ability to observe compositional changes and predict product yield before media use has enormous potential and should permit the effective elimination of one of the major process variables leading to more consistent product quality and improved yield. These robust and reliable methods have the potential to become an important part of upstream biopharmaceutical quality control and analysis.

  12. Rapid screening test for porphyria diagnosis using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, A.; Stepp, H.; Homann, C.; Hennig, G.; Brittenham, G. M.; Vogeser, M.

    2015-07-01

    Porphyrias are rare genetic metabolic disorders, which result from deficiencies of enzymes in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Depending on the enzyme defect, different types of porphyrins and heme precursors accumulate for the different porphyria diseases in erythrocytes, liver, blood plasma, urine and stool. Patients with acute hepatic porphyrias can suffer from acute neuropathic attacks, which can lead to death when undiagnosed, but show only unspecific clinical symptoms such as abdominal pain. Therefore, in addition to chromatographic methods, a rapid screening test is required to allow for immediate identification and treatment of these patients. In this study, fluorescence spectroscopic measurements were conducted on blood plasma and phantom material, mimicking the composition of blood plasma of porphyria patients. Hydrochloric acid was used to differentiate the occurring porphyrins (uroporphyrin-III and coproporphyrin-III) spectroscopically despite their initially overlapping excitation spectra. Plasma phantom mixtures were measured using dual wavelength excitation and the corresponding concentrations of uroporphyrin-III and coproporphyrin-III were determined. Additionally, three plasma samples of porphyria patients were examined and traces of coproporphyrin-III and uroporphyrin-III were identified. This study may therefore help to establish a rapid screening test method with spectroscopic differentiation of the occurring porphyrins, which consequently allows for the distinction of different porphyrias. This may be a valuable tool for clinical porphyria diagnosis and rapid or immediate treatment.

  13. Development of atomic spectroscopy technologies - Hyperfine structure of 2 period atoms using optogalvanic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Nam Ic [Hankuk University of foreign studies, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The source of anomalous broad linewidth of 3{sup 3}P{sub 1},{sub 2},{sub 3}-3{sup 3}D{sub 2},{sub 3},4(3s') transition was explained. The broad optogalvanic spectrum was consisted of two gaussian peaks of different linewidths, and they are separated by 250 MHz. The Narrow peak, which has linewidth of room temperature, is from oxygen atoms already separated, and the shifted broad peak, which has linewidth corresponding to a temperature of 9000 K, is from weakly bound molecular ions. Obtained hyperfine spectrum of fluorine atom at the expected frequency, was too weak to analyze hyperfine structure constants. Microwave discharge might be necessary for higher density of excited state. 16 refs., 11 figs. (Author)

  14. European Group for Atomic Spectroscopy. Summaries of contributions, eleventh annual conference, Paris-Orsay, July 10-13, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    Summaries are presented of talks given at the eleventh conference of the European group for atomic spectroscopy. Topics covered include: lifetimes; collisions; line shape; hyperfine structure; isotope shifts; saturation spectroscopy; Hanle effect; Rydberg levels; quantum beats; helium and helium-like atoms; metrology; and molecules. (GHT)

  15. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  16. Ultra-trace determination of methylmercuy in seafood by atomic fluorescence spectrometry coupled with electrochemical cold vapor generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zu, Wenchuan, E-mail: zuhongshuai@126.com [Beijing Institute of Technology, College of Chemistry, Beijing 100081 (China); Beijing Center for Physical & Chemical Analysis, Beijing 100089 (China); Wang, Zhenghao [Beijing Normal University, College of Chemistry, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • Methylmercury detection by ECVG-AFS without pre-separation by HPLC is proposed. • Methylmercury is atomized by direct electrochemical reduction with no reductant. • Remarkably better sensitivity is obtained than the traditional HPLC-UV-AFS method. • Glassy carbon is the best cathode material to generate Hg vapor from methylmercury. - Abstract: A homemade electrochemical flow cell was adopted for the determination of methylmercury. The cold vapor of mercury atoms was generated from the surface of glassycarbon cathode through the method of electrolytic reduction and detected by atomic fluorescence spectroscopy subsequently. The operating conditions were optimized with 2 ng mL{sup −1} methylmercury standard solution. The caliberation curve was favorably linear when the concentrations of standard HgCH{sub 3}{sup +} solutions were in the range of 0.2–5 ng mL{sup −1}(as Hg). Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for methylmercury was 1.88 × 10{sup −3} ng mL{sup −1} and the precision evaluated by relative standard deviation was 2.0% for six times 2 ng mL{sup −1} standard solution replicates. The terminal analytical results of seafood samples, available from local market, showed that the methylmercury content ranged within 3.7–45.8 ng g{sup −1}. The recoveries for methylmercury spiked samples were found to be in the range of 87.6–103.6% and the relative standard deviations below 5% (n = 6)were acquired, which showed this method was feasible for real sample analysis.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy in multiple-scattering environments: an application to biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio

    1999-07-01

    Over the past few years, there has been significant research activity devoted to the application of fluorescence spectroscopy to strongly scattering media, where photons propagate diffusely. Much of this activity focused on fluorescence as a source of contrast enhancement in optical tomography. Our efforts have emphasized the quantitative recovery of fluorescence parameters for spectroscopy. Using a frequency-domain diffusion-based model, we have successfully recovered the lifetime, the absolute quantum yield, the fluorophore concentration, and the emission spectrum of the fluorophore, as well as the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients at the emission wavelength of the medium in different measurements. In this contribution, we present a sensitive monitor of the binding between ethidium bromide and bovine cells in fresh milk. The spectroscopic contrast was the approximately tenfold increase in the ethidium bromide lifetime upon binding to DNA. The measurement clearly demonstrated that we could quantitatively measure the density of cells in the milk, which is an application vital to the tremendous economic burden of bovine subclinical mastitis detection. Furthermore, we may in principle use the spirit of this technique as a quantitative monitor of the binding of fluorescent drugs inside tissues. This is a first step towards lifetime spectroscopy in tissues.

  18. Classification of Aroma Styles and Geographic Origins of Chinese Liquors Using Chemometrics Based on Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y.; Huo, D.-Q.; Qin, H.; Shen, C.-H.; Yang, P.; Hou, C.-J.

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the feasibility of fluorescence spectroscopy as a reliable method for discrimination of Chinese liquor according to different aroma styles and geographic origins. The 84 Chinese liquors were analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy and chemometrics. The results showed that Chinese liquors exhibit characteristic fluorescence spectra recorded at special excitation wavelengths that may be considered as fingerprints. Both principal component analysis (PCA) and stepwise linear discriminant analysis (SLDA) were carried out on the emission spectra (330-435 nm) recorded at excitation wavelength 300 nm to classify different aroma styles of Chinese liquors. The first two principal components explained 98.87% of the total variance, and the SLDA classified correctly 100%. Both hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were carried out on the emission spectra (325-420 nm) recorded at excitation wavelength 300 nm to identify different geographic origins of Chinese liquors. HCA accurately identified all the samples and the first three PCA explained 98.25% of the total variance. This study indicates that fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with chemometrics offers a promising approach for identifying Chinese liquors according to different flavor types and geographic origins.

  19. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, David; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Okusanya, Olugbenga; Keating, Jane; Venegas, Ollin; Deshpande, Charuhas; Karakousis, Giorgos; Madajewski, Brian; Durham, Amy; Nie, Shuming; Yodh, Arjun G.; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-07-01

    Surgery is the most effective method to cure patients with solid tumors, and 50% of all cancer patients undergo resection. Local recurrences are due to tumor cells remaining in the wound, thus we explore near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging to identify residual cancer cells after surgery. Fifteen canines and two human patients with spontaneously occurring sarcomas underwent intraoperative imaging. During the operation, the wounds were interrogated with NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. NIR monitoring identified the presence or absence of residual tumor cells after surgery in 14/15 canines with a mean fluorescence signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of ˜16. Ten animals showed no residual tumor cells in the wound bed (mean SBR1-year follow-up. In five animals, the mean SBR of the wound was >15, and histopathology confirmed tumor cells in the postsurgical wound in four/five canines. In the human pilot study, neither patient had residual tumor cells in the wound bed, and both remain disease free at >1.5-year follow up. Intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in surgical wounds. These observations suggest that NIR imaging techniques may improve tumor resection during cancer operations.

  20. Ultrastable combined atomic force and total internal reflection fluorescence microscope [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumpp, H; Stahl, S W; Strackharn, M; Puchner, E M; Gaub, H E

    2009-06-01

    Combining atomic force microscope (AFM) with other microscopy techniques has expanded the range of potential applications for single molecule investigations dramatically. Particularly hybrid instruments with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) excitation have opened new routes in life sciences. Here we present a novel design for such a hybrid microscope, which overcomes the limitations of conventional combinations caused by their limited mechanical stability. A thorough analysis of the noise spectra and a comparison of the different designs and the different operation modes are given. With this instrument we demonstrate single molecule manipulation by AFM and simultaneous TIRF imaging.

  1. In-vivo optical detection of cancer using chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Photosensitizer based fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy is fast becoming a promising approach for cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) formulated in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a potential exogenous fluorophore for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopic detection of human cancer tissue xenografted in preclinical models as well as in a patient. Methods Fluorescence imaging was performed on MGH human bladder tumor xenografted on both the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and the murine model using a fluorescence endoscopy imaging system. In addition, fiber optic based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed on tumors and various normal organs in the same mice to validate the macroscopic images. In one patient, fluorescence imaging was performed on angiosarcoma lesions and normal skin in conjunction with fluorescence spectroscopy to validate Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence visual assessment of the lesions. Results Margins of tumor xenografts in the CAM model were clearly outlined under fluorescence imaging. Ce6-PVP-induced fluorescence imaging yielded a specificity of 83% on the CAM model. In mice, fluorescence intensity of Ce6-PVP was higher in bladder tumor compared to adjacent muscle and normal bladder. Clinical results confirmed that fluorescence imaging clearly captured the fluorescence of Ce6-PVP in angiosarcoma lesions and good correlation was found between fluorescence imaging and spectral measurement in the patient. Conclusion Combination of Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy could allow for optical detection and discrimination between cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. Ce6-PVP seems to be a promising fluorophore for fluorescence diagnosis of cancer. PMID:19133127

  2. Assessing the photoaging process at sun exposed and non-exposed skin using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Kurachi, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Photoaging is the skin premature aging due to exposure to ultraviolet light, which damage the collagen, elastin and can induce alterations on the skin cells DNA, and, then, it may evolve to precancerous lesions, which are widely investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime. The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime analysis has been presented as a technique of great potential for biological tissue characterization at optical diagnostics. The main targeted fluorophores are NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide), which have free and bound states, each one with different average lifetimes. The average lifetimes for free and bound NADH and FAD change according to tissue metabolic alterations and may contribute to a non-invasive clinical investigation of injuries such as skin lesions. These lesions and the possible areas where they may develop can be interrogated using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy taking into account the variability of skin phototypes and the changes related to melanin, collagen and elastin, endogenous fluorophores which have emissions that spectrally overlap to the NADH and FAD emission. The objective of this study is to assess the variation on fluorescence lifetimes of normal skin at sun exposed and non-exposed areas and associate this variation to the photoaging process.

  3. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy to detect hepatic necrosis after normothermic ischemia: animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Renan A.; Vollet-Filho, Jose D.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Fernandez, Jorge L.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Castro-e-Silva, Orlando; Sankarankutty, Ajith K.

    2015-06-01

    Liver transplantation is a well-established treatment for liver failure. However, the success of the transplantation procedure depends on liver graft conditions. The tissue function evaluation during the several transplantation stages is relevant, in particular during the organ harvesting, when a decision is made concerning the viability of the graft. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy is a good option because it is a noninvasive and fast technique. A partial normothermic hepatic ischemia was performed in rat livers, with a vascular occlusion of both median and left lateral lobes, allowing circulation only for the right lateral lobe and the caudate lobe. Fluorescence spectra under excitation at 532 nm (doubled frequency Nd:YAG laser) were collected using a portable spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean Optics, USA). The fluorescence emission was collected before vascular occlusion, after ischemia, and 24 hours after reperfusion. A morphometric histology analysis was performed as the gold standard evaluation - liver samples were analyzed, and the percentage of necrotic tissue was obtained. The results showed that changes in the fluorescence emission after ischemia can be correlated with the amount of necrosis evaluated by a morphometric analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficient of the generated model was 0.90 and the root mean square error was around 20%. In this context, the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique after normothermic ischemia showed to be a fast and efficient method to differentiate ischemic injury from viable tissues.

  4. Applicability of Fluorescence and Absorbance Spectroscopy to Estimate Organic Pollution in Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Heloise Garcia; Fernandes, Cristovão Vicente Scapulatempo; de Azevedo, Júlio Cesar Rodrigues; do Amaral Porto, Monica Ferreira

    2014-12-01

    This article explores the applicability of fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy for estimating organic pollution in polluted rivers. The relationship between absorbance, fluorescence intensity, dissolved organic carbon, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and other water quality parameters were used to characterize and identify the origin and the spatial variability of the organic pollution in a highly polluted watershed. Analyses were performed for the Iguassu River, located in southern Brazil, with area about 2,700 km 2 and ∼3 million inhabitants. Samples were collect at six monitoring sites covering 107 km of the main river. BOD, COD, nitrogen, and phosphorus concentration indicates a high input of sewage to the river. Specific absorbance at 254 and 285 nm (SUVA 254 and A 285 /COD) did not show significant variation between sites monitored, indicating the presence of both dissolved compounds found in domestic effluents and humic and fulvic compounds derived from allochthonous organic matter. Correlations between BOD and tryptophan-like fluorescence peak (peak T 2 , r =0.7560, and peak T 1 , r =0.6949) and tyrosine-like fluorescence peak (peak B, r =0.7321) indicated the presence of labile organic matter and thus confirmed the presence of sewage in the river. Results showed that fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy provide useful information on pollution in rivers from critical watersheds and together are a robust method that is simpler and more rapid than traditional methods employed by regulatory agencies.

  5. Diode-Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of an Optically Thick Plasma in Combination with Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nomura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortion of laser-induced fluorescence profiles attributable to optical absorption and saturation broadening was corrected in combination with laser absorption spectroscopy in argon plasma flow. At high probe-laser intensity, saturated absorption profiles were measured to correct probe-laser absorption. At low laser intensity, nonsaturated absorption profiles were measured to correct fluorescence reabsorption. Saturation broadening at the measurement point was corrected using a ratio of saturated to non-saturated broadening. Observed LIF broadening and corresponding translational temperature without correction were, respectively, 2.20±0.05 GHz and 2510±100 K and corrected broadening and temperature were, respectively, 1.96±0.07 GHz and 1990±150 K. Although this correction is applicable only at the center of symmetry, the deduced temperature agreed well with that obtained by LAS with Abel inversion.

  6. Laser spectroscopy of the antiprotonic helium atom – its energy levels and state lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hidetoshi, Yamaguchi

    2003-01-01

    The antiprotonic atom is a three-body exotic system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus. Its surprising longevity was found and has been studied for more than 10 years. In this work, transition energies and lifetimes of this exotic atom were systematically studied by using the antiproton beam of AD(Antiproton Decelerator) facility at CERN, with an RFQ antiproton decelerator, a narrow-bandwidth laser, Cerenkov counters with fast-response photomultiplier tubes, and cryogenic helium target systems. Thirteen transition energies were determined with precisions of better than 200 ppb by a laser spectroscopy method, together with the elimination of the shift effect caused by collisions with surrounding atoms. Fifteen lifetimes (decay rates) of short-lived states were determined from the time distributions of the antiproton-annihilation signals and the resonance widths of the atomic spectral lines. The relation between the magnitude of the decay rates and the transition multipolarity was inv...

  7. Infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy for monitoring protein structure and interaction changes during cheese ripening

    OpenAIRE

    Mazerolles, Gérard; Devaux, Marie-Françoise; Duboz, Gabriel; Duployer, Marie-Hélène; Riou, Nadine; Dufour, Éric

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Sixteen experimental semi-hard cheeses, varying in moisture (42.1 to 49.8% ), protein (20.2 to 25.9% ) and fat (23.7 to 31.1% ) content, were manufactured and ripened under controlled conditions. Fluorescence (tryptophan) and mid-infrared (Amide I and II regions) spectra were collected at 1, 21, 51 and 81 days of ripening in order to test the ability of spectroscopy to highlight the molecular changes that occur during this process. The mid-infrared and fluorescence spe...

  8. Portable fluorescence spectroscopy platform for Huanglongbing (HLB) citrus disease in situ detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Alessandro D.; Rossi, Giuliano; de Castro, Guilherme Cunha; Ortega, Tiago A.; de Castro N., Jarbas C.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the development of a portable fluorescence spectroscopy platform for Huanglongbing (HLB) citrus disease in situ detection is presented. The equipment consists of an excitation blue LED light source, a commercial miniature spectrometer and embedded software. Measurements of healthy, HLB-symptomatic and HLB-asymptomatic citrus leafs were performed. Leafs were excited with the blue LED and their fluorescence spectra collected. Embedded electronics and software were responsible for the spectrum processing and classification via partial least squares regression. Global success rates above 80% and 100% distinction of healthy and HLB-symptomatic leafs were obtained.

  9. Quantitative Studies of Antimicrobial Peptide Pore Formation in Large Unilamellar Vesicles by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2013-01-01

    In spite of intensive research efforts over the past decades, the mechanisms by which membrane-active antimicrobial peptides interact with phospholipid membranes are not yet fully elucidated. New tools that can be used to characterize antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions are therefore...... leakage of fluorescent probes of different sizes through transmembrane pores formed by each of the three representative antimicrobial peptides: melittin, magainin 2, and mastoparan X. The experimental results demonstrate that leakage assays based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy offer new...... and detailed insight into the size and cooperative nature of transmembrane pores formed by antimicrobial peptides that is not available from the conventional quenching-based leakage assays....

  10. Measurement of the Local Tension of Red Blood Cell Membranes by Atomic Force Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sergunova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the average local tension of a membrane upon exposure to its modifiers. Materials and methods. Blood from 3 healthy donors was sampled into ethylene diamine tetraacetate-containing microvettes (Sarstedt AG and Co., Germany during prophylactic examinations. In this series of experiments, the red blood cells were exposed to the membrane nanosurface modifier hemin (muriatic hematin. Hemin disrupts the conformation of spectrin, a band 4.1 protein, and weakens their bond [19]. Hemin was added to blood in vitro. Its blood concentration was 1.8 mM. The images of cells and their membranes were obtained on a NTEGRA Prima atomic force microscope (NT-MDT, Russia [16]. The membrane tension was estimated by atomic force spectroscopy. Results. After exposure to hemin, 68% of cases showed a 2.1-fold increase in the average tension as compared to the mean control value (p<0.05, which could reduce ID by «30 %. Subsequent exposure to perftoran returned the membrane tension to the baseline values in 85% of cases. The membrane tension of other 15% of the areas on the cells remained high — 2.3 times higher than the control values (p<0.05 even despite the action of perftoran. Conclusion. Thus, atomic force spectroscopy was used to measure the average local tension of the membrane, which depended on exposure to its modifiers, such as hemin. Key words: red blood cell, membrane tension, atomic force spectroscopy, hemin.

  11. Spectroscopy of lithium atoms sublimated from isolation matrix of solid Ne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacramento, R L; Scudeller, L A; Lambo, R; Crivelli, P; Cesar, C L

    2011-10-07

    We have studied, via laser absorption spectroscopy, the velocity distribution of (7)Li atoms released from a solid neon matrix at cryogenic temperatures. The Li atoms are implanted into the Ne matrix by laser ablation of a solid Li precursor. A heat pulse is then applied to the sapphire substrate sublimating the matrix together with the isolated atoms at around 12 K. We find interesting differences in the velocity distribution of the released Li atoms from the model developed for our previous experiment with Cr [R. Lambo, C. C. Rodegheri, D. M. Silveira, and C. L. Cesar, Phys. Rev. A 76, 061401(R) (2007)]. This may be due to the sublimation regime, which is at much lower flux for the Li experiment than for the Cr experiment, as well as to the different collisional cross sections between those species to the Ne gas. We find a drift velocity compatible with Li being thermally sublimated at 11-13 K, while the velocity dispersion around this drift velocity is low, around 5-7 K. With a slow sublimation of the matrix we can determine the penetration depth of the laser ablated Li atoms into the Ne matrix, an important information that is not usually available in most matrix isolation spectroscopy setups. The present results with Li, together with the previous results with Cr suggest this to be a general technique for obtaining cryogenic atoms, for spectroscopic studies, as well as for trap loading. The release of the isolated atoms is also a useful tool to study and confirm details of the matrix isolated atoms which are masked or poorly understood in the solid. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  12. Synergy Effect of Combining Fluorescence and Mid Infrared Fiber Spectroscopy for Kidney Tumor Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Bogomolov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Matching pairs of tumor and non-tumor kidney tissue samples of four patients were investigated ex vivo using a combination of two methods, attenuated total reflection mid infrared spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, through respectively prepared and adjusted fiber probes. In order to increase the data information content, the measurements on tissue samples in both methods were performed in the same 31 preselected positions. Multivariate data analysis revealed a synergic effect of combining the two methods for the diagnostics of kidney tumor compared to individual techniques.

  13. Antimony determination and speciation by multisyringe flow injection analysis with hydride generation-atomic fluorescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenova, N.V. [Department of Geography, Lomonosov State University, Moscow 119899 (Russian Federation); Leal, L.O. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, Carretera de Valldemossa, km.7.5, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Forteza, R. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, Carretera de Valldemossa, km.7.5, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Cerda, V. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, Carretera de Valldemossa, km.7.5, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)]. E-mail: vcerda@p01.uib.es

    2005-02-07

    A new analytical procedure for determination of inorganic antimony and speciation of antimony(III) and antimony(V) is presented. For this purpose, a software-controlled time-based multisyringe flow injection system, which contains a multisyringe burette provided with a multi-port selection valve, was developed. Hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry was used as a detection technique. A 0.3% (w/v) reducing sodium tetrahydroborate solution, hydrochloric acid (2 M), an antimony solution and a pre-reducing solution of 10% (w/v) KI and 0.3% (w/v) ascorbic acid are dispensed simultaneously into a gas-liquid separation cell with further propulsion of the reaction product into the flame of an atomic fluorescence spectrometer using argon flow. A hydrogen flow was employed to support the flame. The linear range and the detection limit (3s{sub b}/S) of the proposed technique were 0.2-5.6 {mu}g l{sup -1} and 0.08 {mu}g l{sup -1}, respectively. A sample throughput of 18 samples per hour (corresponding to 80 injections per hour) was achieved. The relative standard deviation for 18 independent measurements was 4.6%. This technique was validated by means of reference solid and water materials with good agreement with the certified values. Satisfactory results for speciation of Sb(III) and Sb(V) by means of the developed technique were obtained.

  14. Backward-emitted sub-Doppler fluorescence from an optically thick atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, João Carlos de Aquino; Laliotis, Athanasios; Chevrollier, Martine; Oriá, Marcos; Bloch, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Literature mentions only incidentally a sub-Doppler contribution in the excitation spectrum of the backward fluorescence of a dense vapor. This contribution is here investigated on Cs vapor, both on the first resonance line (894 nm) and on the weaker second resonance line (459 nm). We show that in a strongly absorbing medium, the quenching of excited atoms moving towards a window irradiated under near normal incidence reduces the fluorescence on the red side of the excitation spectrum. Atoms moving slowly towards the window produce a sub-Doppler velocity-selective contribution, whose visibility is here improved by applying a frequency-modulation technique. This sub-Doppler feature, induced by a surface quenching combined with a short absorption length for the incident irradiation, exhibits close analogies with the narrow spectra appearing with thin vapor cells. We also show that a normal incidence irradiation is essential for the sub-Doppler feature to be observed, while it should be independent of the detection geometry.

  15. On-Line Monitoring of Fermentation Processes by Near Infrared and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Carina

    of on-line monitoring systems. The primary aim of this thesis is to elucidate and explore the dynamics in fermentation processes by spectroscopy. Though a number of successful on-line lab-scale monitoring systems have been reported, it seems that several challenges are still met, which limits the number......Monitoring and control of fermentation processes is important to ensure high product yield, product quality and product consistency. More knowledge on on-line analytical techniques such as near infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy is desired in the fermentation industry to increase the efficiency...... or decrease was observed in the fluorescence landscapes. This thesis presents a correction strategy based on a chemometric modelling approach, where weighted non-linear regression and weighted PARAFAC analysis are combined. Based on the research conducted in this PhD project, it is concluded that near...

  16. [Synchronous fluorescence and raman spectroscopy study on the interaction of pulsed electric field (PEF) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le-jun; Chen, Shu-de; Qiao, Deng-jiang

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of pulsed electric field (PEF) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by synchronous fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. The results of synchronous fluorescence showed that pulsed electric field exerted its effects on the emission fluorescence spectrum and reduced the fluorescence intensities of the tyrosine and tryptophan side chains. The results of Raman spectroscopy verified this. These two experiments indicated that PEF exposure changed the microenvironments of the two aromatic amino adds, which were located in the active parts of BSA, and further indicated the conformational changes of the proteins, and the change in its biological functions.

  17. Development of a 2D temperature measurement technique for combustion diagnostics using 2-line atomic fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstroem, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the development and application of a novel planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique for temperature measurements in a variety of combusting flows. Accurate measurement of temperature is an essential task in combustion diagnostics, since temperature is one of the most fundamental quantities for the characterization of combustion processes. The technique is based on two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) from small quantities of atomic indium (In) seeded into the fuel. It has been developed from small-scale experiments in laboratory flames to the point where practical combustion systems can be studied. The technique is conceptually simple and reveals temperature information in the post-flame regions. The viability of the technique has been tested in three extreme measurement situations: in spark ignition engine combustion, in ultra-lean combustion situations such as lean burning aero-engine concepts and, finally, in fuel-rich combustion. TLAF was successfully applied in an optical Sl engine using isooctane as fuel. The wide temperature sensitivity, 700 - 3000 K, of the technique using indium atoms allowed measurements over the entire combustion cycle in the engine to be performed. In applications in lean combustion a potential problem caused by the strong oxidation processes of indium atoms was encountered. This limits measurement times due to deposits of absorbing indium oxide on measurement windows. The seeding requirement is a disadvantage of the technique and can be a limitation in some applications. The results from experiments performed in sooting flames are very promising for thermometry measurements in such environments. Absorption by hydrocarbons and other native species was found to be negligible. Since low laser energies and low seeding concentrations could be used, the technique did not, unlike most other incoherent optical thermometry techniques, suffer interferences from LII of soot particles or LIF from PAH

  18. High-power Ti:sapphire lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms and radioactive ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M., E-mail: Masaki.Hori@mpq.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik (Germany); Dax, A. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Soter, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed injection-seeded Ti:sapphire lasers of linewidth {Gamma}{sub pl} {approx} 6 MHz, pulse energy 50-100 mJ, and output wavelength {lambda} = 726-941 nm. They are being used in two-photon spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium atoms at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. Ti:sapphire lasers of larger linewidth {Gamma}{sub pl} {approx} 100 MHz but more robust design will also be used in collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiments of neutron-deficient francium ions at the ISOLDE facility.

  19. High-power Ti:sapphire lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms and radioactive ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Soter, A.

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed injection-seeded Ti:sapphire lasers of linewidth Γpl ˜ 6 MHz, pulse energy 50-100 mJ, and output wavelength λ = 726-941 nm. They are being used in two-photon spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium atoms at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. Ti:sapphire lasers of larger linewidth Γpl ˜ 100 MHz but more robust design will also be used in collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiments of neutron-deficient francium ions at the ISOLDE facility.

  20. Determination of mercury distribution inside spent compact fluorescent lamps by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Raap, Natalia; Gallardo, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    In this study, spent compact fluorescent lamps were characterized to determine the distribution of mercury. The procedure used in this research allowed mercury to be extracted in the vapor phase, from the phosphor powder, and the glass matrix. Mercury concentration in the three phases was determined by the method known as cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Median values obtained in the study showed that a compact fluorescent lamp contained 24.52±0.4ppb of mercury in the vapor phase, 204.16±8.9ppb of mercury in the phosphor powder, and 18.74±0.5ppb of mercury in the glass matrix. There are differences in mercury concentration between the lamps since the year of manufacture or the hours of operation affect both mercury content and its distribution. The 85.76% of the mercury introduced into a compact fluorescent lamp becomes a component of the phosphor powder, while more than 13.66% is diffused through the glass matrix. By washing and eliminating all phosphor powder attached to the glass surface it is possible to classified the glass as a non-hazardous waste. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Correlated Fluorescence-Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of the Clathrin Mediated Endocytosis in SKMEL Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steve; Hor, Amy; Luu, Anh; Kang, Lin; Scott, Brandon; Bailey, Elizabeth; Hoppe, Adam

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is one of the central pathways for cargo transport into cells, and plays a major role in the maintenance of cellular functions, such as intercellular signaling, nutrient intake, and turnover of plasma membrane in cells. The clathrin-mediated endocytosis process involves invagination and formation of clathrin-coated vesicles. However, the biophysical mechanisms of vesicle formation are still debated. We investigate clathrin vesicle formation mechanisms through the utilization of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy for high resolution topographical imaging in neutral buffer solution of unroofed cells exposing the inner membrane, combined with fluorescence imaging to definitively label intracellular constituents with specific fluorescent fusion proteins (actin filaments labeled with green phalloidin-antibody and clathrin coated vesicles with the fusion protein Tq2) in SKMEL (Human Melanoma) cells. Results from our work are compared against dynamical polarized total internal fluorescence (TIRF), super-resolution photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to draw conclusions regarding the prominent model of vesicle formation in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Funding provided by NSF MPS/DMR/BMAT award # 1206908.

  2. Probe pressure effects on human skin diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Liang; Nichols, Brandon; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Tunnell, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy are popular research techniques for noninvasive disease diagnostics. Most systems include an optical fiber probe that transmits and collects optical spectra in contact with the suspected lesion. The purpose of this study is to investigate probe pressure effects on human skin spectroscopic measurements. We conduct an in-vivo experiment on human skin tissue to study the short-term (30 s) effects of probe pressure on diffuse reflectance and fluor...

  3. Coagulation protein FVIII binding to phospholipid membranes investigated by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Engelke, Hanna C.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) allows one to measure protein-membrane binding, self-assembly and other molecular reactions and parameters quantitatively in buffer as well as in complex media. Subject of this thesis was to investigate protein-membrane interactions within blood coagulation in buffer as well as in their biological environment with FCS. Binding of Factor VIII (FVIII) to phosphatidylserine (PS)-expressing platelets is a key process in the intravascular pathwa...

  4. Differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging for biological and materials sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Dallas Jonathan

    The field of laser-based diagnostics has been a topic of research in various fields, more specifically for applications in environmental studies, military defense technologies, and medicine, among many others. In this dissertation, a novel laser-based optical diagnostic method, differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS), has been implemented in a spectroscopy mode and expanded into an imaging mode in combination with fluorescence techniques. The DLIPS method takes advantage of deep ultraviolet (UV) laser perturbation at sub-ablative energy fluences to photochemically cleave bonds and alter fluorescence signal response before and after perturbation. The resulting difference spectrum or differential image adds more information about the target specimen, and can be used in combination with traditional fluorescence techniques for detection of certain materials, characterization of many materials and biological specimen, and diagnosis of various human skin conditions. The differential aspect allows for mitigation of patient or sample variation, and has the potential to develop into a powerful, noninvasive optical sensing tool. The studies in this dissertation encompass efforts to continue the fundamental research on DLIPS including expansion of the method to an imaging mode. Five primary studies have been carried out and presented. These include the use of DLIPS in a spectroscopy mode for analysis of nitrogen-based explosives on various substrates, classification of Caribbean fruit flies versus Caribbean fruit flies that have been irradiated with gamma rays, and diagnosis of human skin cancer lesions. The nitrogen-based explosives and Caribbean fruit flies have been analyzed with the DLIPS scheme using the imaging modality, providing complementary information to the spectroscopic scheme. In each study, a comparison between absolute fluorescence signals and DLIPS responses showed that DLIPS statistically outperformed traditional fluorescence techniques

  5. Characterising organic matter in recirculating aquaculture systems with fluorescence EEM spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hambly, Adam; Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2015-01-01

    The potential of recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) in the aquaculture industry is increasingly being acknowledged. Along with intensified application, the need to better characterise and understand the accumulated dissolved organic matter (DOM) within these systems increases. Mature RASs......, stocked with rainbow trout and operated at steady state at four feed loadings, were analysed by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) analysis and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. The fluorescence dataset was then decomposed by PARAFAC analysis using the drEEM toolbox. This revealed...... there was considerable variation between the five fluorescence components with respect to the degree of accumulation with feed loading. The five components were found to originate from three sources: the feed; the influent tap water (groundwater); and processes related to the fish and the water treatment system...

  6. Triplet fraction buildup effect of the DNA-YOYO complex studied with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Masafumi; Sasaki, Satoshi; Kinjo, Masataka

    2007-07-01

    DNA fragments of various lengths and YOYO-1 iodide (YOYO) were mixed at various ratios, and fluorescence was measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The number of substantially emitting YOYO molecules binding to the DNA and the binding intervals between the YOYO molecules were estimated for DNA-YOYO complexes of various lengths. In the present study, we found an interesting phenomenon: triplet buildup. Because fluorophores that fall into the triplet state do not emit fluorescence, a part of the dark period can be recovered by emitting photons from other excited YOYO molecules in the same DNA strings in the confocal elements. The remaining dark period can be considered to be the total miss-emission rate. Estimates of the total miss-emission rate are important for calculation of the length and amount of DNA.

  7. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for the characterization of membranes : A short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS is a highly sensitive fluorescence microscopy technique that can be used to probe a wide range of biophysical processes including diffusion, Ligand-receptor binding and molecular aggregation on artificial and cell membranes. FCS is able to measure very small volumes at nanomolar concentrations. In this work, we review the different types of diffusion on cell membranes,describe the theory of FCS and illustrate several of its applications for the characterization of membranes and membrane associated proteins. For comparison with other techniques we discuss the differences of FCS and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP,a widely used technique for diffusion measurements on membranes, in detail

  8. Fluorescence spectroscopy for assessment of liver transplantation grafts concerning graft viability and patient survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollet Filho, José D.; da Silveira, Marina R.; Castro-e-Silva, Orlando; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Evaluating transplantation grafts at harvest is essential for its success. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) can help monitoring changes in metabolic/structural conditions of tissue during transplantation. The aim of the present study is to correlate LIFSobtained spectra of human hepatic grafts during liver transplantation with post-operative patients' mortality rate and biochemical parameters, establishing a method to exclude nonviable grafts before implantation. Orthotopic liver transplantation, piggyback technique was performed in 15 patients. LIFS was performed under 408nm excitation. Collection was performed immediately after opening donor's abdominal cavity, after cold perfusion, end of back-table period, and 5 min and 1 h after warm perfusion at recipient. Fluorescence information was compared to lactate, creatinine, bilirubin and INR levels and to survival status. LIFS was sensitive to liver changes during transplantation stages. Study-in-progress; initial results indicate correlation between fluorescence and life/death status of patients.

  9. Native fluorescence spectroscopy of cervical tissues: classification by different statistical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Singaravelu; Vengadesan, Nammalver; Anbupalam, Thalaimuthu; Hemamalini, Srinivasan; Aruna, Prakasa R.; Karkuzhali, P.

    2002-05-01

    Optical Spectroscopy in the diagnosis of diseases has attracted the medical community due to their minimally invasive nature. Among various optical spectroscopic techniques, native fluorescence spectroscopy has emerged as a potential tool in diagnostic oncology. However, still the reasons for the altered spectral signatures between normal and cancer tissues not yet completely understood. Recently, data reported that emission due to the alteration of some proteins is responsible for the transformation of normal in to malignant one. In this regard, the present study is aimed to characterize the native fluorescence spectroscopy of abnormal and normal cervical tissues, at 280nm excitation. From the study, it is observed that the normal and pathologically diseased cervical tissues have their peak emission around 339 and 336nm respectively with a secondary peak around 440nm. The FWHM value of emission spectra of abnormal tissues is lower than that of normal tissues. The fluorescence spectra of normal and various pathological conditions of cancerous tissues were analyzed by various empirical and statistical methods. Among various type of discriminant analysis, combination of ratio values and linear discrimination method provides better discrimination of normal from pre-malignant and malignant tissues.

  10. Quantitative structural modeling on the wavelength interval (Δλ) in synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samari, Fayezeh; Yousefinejad, Saeed

    2017-11-01

    Emission fluorescence spectroscopy has an extremely restricted scope of application to analyze of complex mixtures since its selectivity is reduced by the extensive spectral overlap. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) is a technique enables us to analyze complex mixtures with overlapped emission and/or excitation spectra. The difference of excitation and emission wavelength of compounds (interval wavelength or Δλ) is an important characteristic in SFS. Thus a multi-parameter model was constructed to predict Δλ in 63 fluorescent compounds and the regression coefficient in training set, cross validation and test set were 0.88, 0.85 and 0.91 respectively. Furthermore, the applicability and validity of model were evaluated using different statistical methods such as y-scrambling and applicability domain. It was concluded that increasing average valence connectivity, number of Al2-NH functional group and Geary autocorrelation (lag 4) with electronegative weights can lead to increasing Δλ in the fluorescent compounds. The current study obtained an insight into the structural properties of compounds effective on their Δλ as an important parameter in SFS.

  11. Spoilage of foods monitored by native fluorescence spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    The modern food processing and storage environments require the real-time monitoring and rapid microbiological testing. Optical spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelengths can be the basis of a novel, rapid, reagent less, noncontact and non-destructive technique for monitoring the food spoilage. The native fluorescence spectra of muscle foods stored at 2-4°C (in refrigerator) and 20-24°C (in room temperature) were measured as a function of time with a selective excitation wavelength of 340nm. The contributions of the principal molecular components to the native fluorescence spectra of meat were measured spectra of each fluorophore: collagen, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and flavin. The responsible components were extracted using a method namely Multivariate Curve Resolution with Alternating Least-Squares (MCR-ALS). The native fluorescence combined with MCR-ALS can be used directly on the surface of meat to produce biochemically interpretable "fingerprints", which reflects the microbial spoilage of foods involved with the metabolic processes. The results show that with time elapse, the emission from NADH in meat stored at 24°C increases much faster than that at 4°C. This is because multiplying of microorganisms and catabolism are accompanied by the generation of NADH. This study presents changes of relative content of NADH may be used as criterion for detection of spoilage degree of meat using native fluorescence spectroscopy.

  12. Optical frequency synthesizer for precision spectroscopy of Rydberg states of Rb atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Naoto; Tamura, Hikaru; Musha, Mitsuru; Nakagawa, Ken'ichi

    2017-11-01

    We have developed an optical frequency synthesizer for the precision spectroscopy of highly excited Rydberg states of Rb atoms. This synthesizer can generate a widely tunable 480 nm laser light with an optical power of 150 mW and an absolute frequency uncertainty of less than 100 kHz using a high-repetition-rate (325 MHz) Er fiber-based optical frequency comb and a tunable frequency-doubled diode laser at 960 nm. We demonstrate the precision two-photon spectroscopy of the Rydberg states of 87Rb atoms by observing the electromagnetically induced transparency in a vapor cell, and measure the absolute transition frequencies of 87Rb to nD (n = 53-92) and nS (n = 60-90) Rydberg states with an uncertainty of less than 250 kHz. It is the first direct frequency measurements of these transitions using an optical frequency comb.

  13. Deuteron charge radius and Rydberg constant from spectroscopy data in atomic deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Randolf; Nez, François; Udem, Thomas; Antognini, Aldo; Beyer, Axel; Fleurbaey, Hélène; Grinin, Alexey; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Julien, Lucile; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J.; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Matveev, Arthur; Biraben, François

    2017-04-01

    We give a pedagogical description of the method to extract the charge radii and Rydberg constant from laser spectroscopy in regular hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms, that is part of the CODATA least-squares adjustment (LSA) of the fundamental physical constants. We give a deuteron charge radius {{r}\\text{d}} from D spectroscopy alone of 2.1415(45) fm. This value is independent of the measurements that lead to the proton charge radius, and five times more accurate than the value found in the CODATA Adjustment 10. The improvement is due to the use of a value for the 1S\\to 2S transition in atomic deuterium which can be inferred from published data or found in a PhD thesis.

  14. Development of atomic spectroscopy technologies - Study on the ac stark from intense light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Dong Hyun; Lim, Dong Kun; Park, Chang Yong; Lee, Chung Mok [Korea University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    We studied the ac Stark shift on heavy atoms from an intense laser light using the spherical tensor formalism. In the experimental part, we used a low-velocity intense source constructed from a magneto-optical trap and the stimulated Raman spectroscopy as well as a vapor cell with the saturated absorption spectroscopy. We found that when the laser light is circularly polarized and properly detuned the resulting ac Stark shift could take the form of a pure Zeeman shift. We also found a condition where an atomic clock driven by a stimulated Raman process did not have a systematic shift from the ac Stark shift. We also studied the energy shift of an excited state in relation to that of the ground state. 10 refs., 18 figs. (Author)

  15. New Atomic Data for Doubly Ionized Iron Group Atoms by High Resolution UV Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter L.; Pickering, Juliet C.; Thorne, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    Currently available laboratory spectroscopic data of doubly ionized iron-group element were obtained about 50 years ago using spectrographs of modest dispersion, photographic plates, and eye estimates of intensities. The accuracy of the older wavelength data is about 10 mAngstroms at best, whereas wavelengths are now needed to an accuracy of 1 part in 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7) (0.2 to 2 mAngstroms at 2000 Angstroms). The Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy group at Imperial College, London, and collaborators at the Harvard College Observatory have used a unique VUV FT spectrometer in a program focussed on improving knowledge of spectra of many neutral and singly and doubly ionized, astrophysically important, iron group elements. Spectra of Fe II and Fe III have been recorded at UV and VUV wavelengths with signal-to-noise ratios of several hundred for the stronger lines. Wavelengths and energy levels for Fe III are an order of magnitude more accurate than previous work; analysis is close to completion. f-values for Fe II have been published.

  16. Determination of traces of silicone defoamer in fruit juices by solvent extraction/atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, E G

    1993-01-01

    Silicone defoamers are used to control foam during the processing of fruit juices. Residual silicones in fruit juices can be separated from the naturally occurring siliceous materials in fruit products and selectively recovered by solvent extraction, after suitable pretreatment. The recovered silicone is measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Silicone concentrations as low as about 1 ppm can be measured. The juices are accurately spiked for recovery studies by the addition of silicone dispersed in D-sorbitol.

  17. A Pragmatic Smoothing Method for Improving the Quality of the Results in Atomic Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Bennun, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    A new smoothing method for the improvement on the identification and quantification of spectral functions based on the previous knowledge of the signals that are expected to be quantified, is presented. These signals are used as weighted coefficients in the smoothing algorithm. This smoothing method was conceived to be applied in atomic and nuclear spectroscopies preferably to these techniques where net counts are proportional to acquisition time, such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE...

  18. Some problems connected with boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy and the sensitivity improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA J. SAVOVIC

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Two atomizers were compared: an N2O–C2H2 flame and a stabilized U-shaped DC arc with aerosol supply. Both the high plasma temperature and the reducing atmosphere obtained by acetylene addition to the argon stream substantially increase the sensitivity of boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS when the arc atomizer is used. The results were compared with those for silicon as a control element. The experimental characteristic concentrations for both elements were compared with the computed values. The experimentally obtained characteristic concentration for boron when using the arc atomizer was in better agreement with the calculated value. It was estimated that the influence of stable monoxide formation on the sensitivity for both elements was about the same, but reduction of analyte and formation of non-volatile carbide particles was more important for boron, which is the main reason for the low sensitivity of boron determination using a flame atomizer. The use of an arc atomizer suppresses this interference and significantly improves the sensitivity of the determination.

  19. Study on Temporal and Spatial Distributions of Ba Atoms in Fluorescent Lamp Discharge Using Laser-Induced Florescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlyHendy, Ahmed Samir; Yamashita, Go; Yamagata, Yukihiko; Uchino, Kiichiro; Ueda, Takashi; Manabe, Yoshio

    2006-10-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique was applied to the measurements of the temporal and spatial distributions of Ba atoms in the vicinity of the electrode of a fluorescent lamp operated at 60 Hz. Ground-state (61S0) Ba atoms were excited to a 51P1 level (350.1 nm) by a frequency-doubled dye laser beam, and the subsequent fluorescence (51P1-51D2, 582.6 nm) was detected. Over a whole periodic time (16.67 ms), the density of the Ba atoms was found to have two peaks, and the number of Ba atoms emitted in the anode half-cycle was about twofold larger than that emitted in the cathode half-cycle. This difference between the Ba atoms emitted during the anode half-cycle and those emitted during the cathode half-cycle was studied for lamps with different gas pressures. Ba atoms were found to be emitted mainly from the hot spot of the filament electrode. It is suggested that the main factor for Ba atom emission from the electrode is not sputtering by ion bombardment but thermal evaporation.

  20. Fluorescent core-shell star polymers based bioassays for ultrasensitive DNA detection by surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chuan Liang; Yin, Meizhen; Zhang, Di; Zhu, Shenmin; Caminade, Anne Marie; Majoral, Jean Pierre; Müllen, Klaus

    2011-04-19

    Multilayers containing a perylene diimide labelled star polymers (FSP) donor adjacent to phosphorus dendrimer layer on a silver substrate were constructed by layer by layer (LBL) approach. Using Surface Plasmon Enhanced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (SPFS) technique, a time-resolved ultrasensitive and selective detection of DNA targets relying on enhanced optical fields associated with energy transfer (ET) were achieved under the excitation at 543 nm. The detection limit is about 8 orders of magnitude better than the achieved one under the excitation at 632 nm, which is ascribed to no energy transfer from the donor to the acceptor under the excitation at 632 nm, resulting in much weak detection signal in turn. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Precision spectroscopy of Mg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, A. N.; Bonert, A. E.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Shilov, A. M.; Bagayev, S. N.

    2014-06-01

    We report the results of experimental investigations aimed at creation of the optical frequency standard based on magnesium atoms cooled and localised in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). An experimentally realised MOT for magnesium made it possible to obtain a cloud comprising ~106 - 107 atoms at a temperature of 3 - 5 mK. The results of ultra-high resolution spectroscopy of intercombination 1S0 - 3P1 transition for Mg atom are presented, the resonances in time-domain separated optical fields with the half-width of Γ = 500 Hz are recorded, which corresponds to the Q-factor of the reference line Q = ν/Δν ~ 1.3 × 1012.

  2. Exploring the binding of 4-thiothymidine with human serum albumin by spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and molecular modeling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juling; Gu, Huaimin; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2014-01-30

    The interaction of 4-thiothymidine (S(4)TdR) with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by equilibrium dialysis under normal physiological conditions. In this work, the mechanism of the interaction between S(4)TdR and human serum albumin (HSA) was exploited by fluorescence, UV, CD circular, and SERS spectroscopic. Fluorescence and UV spectroscopy suggest that HSA intensities are significantly decreased when adding S(4)TdR to HAS, and the quenching mechanism of the fluorescence is static. Also, the ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS values across temperature indicated that hydrophobic interaction was the predominant binding force. The CD circular results show that there is little change in the secondary structure of HSA except the environment of amino acid changes when adding S(4)TdR to HSA. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) shows that the interaction between S(4)TdR and HSA can be achieved through different binding sites which are probably located in the II A and III A hydrophobic pockets of HSA which correspond to Sudlow's I and II binding sites. In addition, the molecular modeling displays that S(4)TdR-HSA complex is stabilized by hydrophobic forces, which result from amino acid residues. The atomic force microscopy results revealed that the single HSA molecular dimensions were larger after interaction of 4-thiothymidine. This work would be useful to understand the state of the transportation, distribution, and metabolism of the anticancer drugs in the human body, and it could provide a useful biochemistry parameter for the development of new anti-cancer drugs and research of pharmacology mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Applications of beam-foil spectroscopy to atomic collisions in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellin, I. A.

    1976-01-01

    Some selected papers presented at the Fourth International Conference on Beam-Foil Spectroscopy, whose results are of particular pertinence to ionic collision phenomena in solids, are reviewed. The topics discussed include solid target effects and means of surmounting them in the measurement of excited projectile ion lifetimes for low-energy heavy element ions; the electron emission accompanying the passage of heavy particles through solid targets; the collision broadening of X rays emitted from 100 keV ions moving in solids; residual K-shell excitation in chlorine ions penetrating carbon; comparison between 40 MeV Si on gaseous SiH4 targets at 300 mtorr and 40 MeV Si on Al; and the emergent surface interaction in beam-foil spectroscopy. A distinct overlap of interests between the sciences of beam-foil spectroscopy and atomic collisions in solids is pointed out.

  4. Assessment of drinking water quality at the tap using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heibati, Masoumeh; Stedmon, Colin A; Stenroth, Karolina; Rauch, Sebastien; Toljander, Jonas; Säve-Söderbergh, Melle; Murphy, Kathleen R

    2017-11-15

    Treated drinking water may become contaminated while travelling in the distribution system on the way to consumers. Elevated dissolved organic matter (DOM) at the tap relative to the water leaving the treatment plant is a potential indicator of contamination, and can be measured sensitively, inexpensively and potentially on-line via fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy. Detecting elevated DOM requires potential contamination events to be distinguished from natural fluctuations in the system, but how much natural variation to expect in a stable distribution system is unknown. In this study, relationships between DOM optical properties, microbial indicator organisms and trace elements were investigated for households connected to a biologically-stable drinking water distribution system. Across the network, humic-like fluorescence intensities showed limited variation (RSD = 3.5-4.4%), with half of measured variation explained by interactions with copper. After accounting for quenching by copper, fluorescence provided a very stable background signal (RSD water would be detectable. Smaller infiltrations would be detectable in the case of contamination by sewage with a strong tryptophan-like fluorescence signal. These findings indicate that DOM fluorescence is a sensitive indicator of water quality changes in drinking water networks, as long as potential interferents are taken into account. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) rev by (time-resolved) fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kungl, A J; Seidel, C; Schilk, A; Daly, T J; Kauffmann, H F; Auer, M

    1994-12-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has been applied to the single tryptophan-containing regulatory protein Rev of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The fluorescence emission was found to have a maximum at 336 nm which refers to a surrounding of the chromophore of intermediate polarity. Fluorescence transients recorded at the maximum of fluorescence were found to decay nonexponentially. A bimodal lifetime distribution is obtained from exponential series analysis (ESM) with centers at 1.7 and 4.5 ns. Two microenvironments for tryptophan are suggested to be responsible for the two lifetime distributions. No innerfilter effect occurred in a Rev solution up to a concentration of 40 μM. A data quality study of ESM analysis as function of collected counts in the peak channel maximum (CIM) showed that, for reliable reconvolution, at least 15,000 CIM are necessary. The widths of the two distributions are shown to be temperature dependent. The broadening of the lifetime distributions when the temperature is raised to 50°C is interpreted as extension of the number of conformational substates which do not interconvert on the fluorescence time scale. The thermal deactivation (temperature quenching) is reflected in a constant decrease in the center of the short-lived lifetime distribution.

  6. On the performance of bioanalytical fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements in a multiparameter photon-counting microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazouchi, Amir; Liu Baoxu; Bahram, Abdullah [Department of Physics, Institute for Optical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Rd. N., Mississauga, ON, L5L 1C6 (Canada); Gradinaru, Claudiu C., E-mail: claudiu.gradinaru@utoronto.ca [Department of Physics, Institute for Optical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Rd. N., Mississauga, ON, L5L 1C6 (Canada)

    2011-02-28

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) data acquisition and analysis routines were developed and implemented in a home-built, multiparameter photon-counting microscope. Laser excitation conditions were investigated for two representative fluorescent probes, Rhodamine110 and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Reliable local concentrations and diffusion constants were obtained by fitting measured FCS curves, provided that the excitation intensity did not exceed 20% of the saturation level for each fluorophore. Accurate results were obtained from FCS measurements for sample concentrations varying from pM to {mu}M range, as well as for conditions of high background signals. These experimental constraints were found to be determined by characteristics of the detection system and by the saturation behavior of the fluorescent probes. These factors actually limit the average number of photons that can be collected from a single fluorophore passing through the detection volume. The versatility of our setup and the data analysis capabilities were tested by measuring the mobility of EGFP in the nucleus of Drosophila cells under conditions of high concentration and molecular crowding. As a bioanalytical application, we studied by FCS the binding affinity of a novel peptide-based drug to the cancer-regulating STAT3 protein and corroborated the results with fluorescence polarization analysis derived from the same photon data.

  7. Monitoring of petroleum hydrocarbon pollution in surface waters by a direct comparison of fluorescence spectroscopy and remote sensing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Domenico, L.; Crisafi, E. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Messina (Italy). Thalassografic Inst.); Magazzu, G. (Lecce Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Biology); Puglisi, A. (Mediterranean Oceanological Centre (CEOM), Palermo (Italy)); La Rosa, A. (Air-Survey, Italy s.r.l., Catania (Italy))

    1994-10-01

    Oil pollution levels were estimated using simultaneous acquisition of data from remote sensing by helicopter and fluorescence spectroscopy on surface samples. Laboratory quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons was used to calibrate remotely sensed data. The data were treated using a computer to generate a colour-coded map not attainable with conventional methods representing seawater pollution. Results were in good agreement and indicated that remotely sensed data together with those achieved by fluorescence spectroscopy are applicable for monitoring hydrocarbon pollution. (author)

  8. A comparative evaluation of Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy for optical diagnosis of oral neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, S. K.; Krishna, H.; Sidramesh, M.; Chaturvedi, P.; Gupta, P. K.

    2011-08-01

    We report the results of a comparative evaluation of in vivo fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy for diagnosis of oral neoplasia. The study carried out at Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, involved 26 healthy volunteers and 138 patients being screened for neoplasm of oral cavity. Spectral measurements were taken from multiple sites of abnormal as well as apparently uninvolved contra-lateral regions of the oral cavity in each patient. The different tissue sites investigated belonged to one of the four histopathology categories: 1) squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 2) oral sub-mucous fibrosis (OSMF), 3) leukoplakia (LP) and 4) normal squamous tissue. A probability based multivariate statistical algorithm utilizing nonlinear Maximum Representation and Discrimination Feature for feature extraction and Sparse Multinomial Logistic Regression for classification was developed for direct multi-class classification in a leave-one-patient-out cross validation mode. The results reveal that the performance of Raman spectroscopy is considerably superior to that of fluorescence in stratifying the oral tissues into respective histopathologic categories. The best classification accuracy was observed to be 90%, 93%, 94%, and 89% for SCC, SMF, leukoplakia, and normal oral tissues, respectively, on the basis of leave-one-patient-out cross-validation, with an overall accuracy of 91%. However, when a binary classification was employed to distinguish spectra from all the SCC, SMF and leukoplakik tissue sites together from normal, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy were seen to have almost comparable performances with Raman yielding marginally better classification accuracy of 98.5% as compared to 94% of fluorescence.

  9. Dual time-resolved temperature-jump fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy for the study of fast protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Caitlin M; Reddish, Michael J; Dyer, R Brian

    2017-05-05

    Time-resolved temperature-jump (T-jump) coupled with fluorescence and infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for monitoring protein dynamics. Although IR spectroscopy of the polypeptide amide I mode is more technically challenging, it offers complementary information because it directly probes changes in the protein backbone, whereas, fluorescence spectroscopy is sensitive to the environment of specific side chains. With the advent of widely tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) it is possible to efficiently probe multiple IR frequencies with high sensitivity and reproducibility. Here we describe a dual time-resolved T-jump fluorescence and IR spectrometer and its application to study protein folding dynamics. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser provides the T-jump source for both time-resolved IR and fluorescence spectroscopy, which are probed by a QCL and Ti:Sapphire laser, respectively. The Ho:YAG laser simultaneously pumps the time-resolved IR and fluorescence spectrometers. The instrument has high sensitivity, with an IR absorbance detection limit of jump induced difference spectrum from 50ns to 0.5ms. This study demonstrates the power of the dual time-resolved T-jump fluorescence and IR spectroscopy to resolve complex folding mechanisms by complementary IR absorbance and fluorescence measurements of protein dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Applications of Fluorescence Spectroscopy for dissolved organic matter characterization in wastewater treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, Angélique; Guérin, Sabrina; Rocher, Vincent; Varrault, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) influences wastewater treatment plants efficiency (WTTP): variations in its quality and quantity can induce a foaming phenomenon and a fouling event inside biofiltration processes. Moreover, in order to manage denitrification step (control and optimization of the nitrate recirculation), it is important to be able to estimate biodegradable organic matter quantity before biological treatment. But the current methods used to characterize organic matter quality, like biological oxygen demand are laborious, time consuming and sometimes not applicable to directly monitor organic matter in situ. In the context of MOCOPEE research program (www.mocopee.com), this study aims to assess the use of optical techniques, such as UV-Visible absorbance and more specifically fluorescence spectroscopy in order to monitor and to optimize process efficiency in WWTP. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy was employed to prospect the possibility of using this technology online and in real time to characterize dissolved organic matter in different effluents of the WWTP Seine Centre (240,000 m3/day) in Paris, France. 35 sewage water influent samples were collected on 10 days at different hours. Data treatment were performed by two methods: peak picking and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). An evolution of DOM quality (position of excitation - emission peaks) and quantity (intensity of fluorescence) was observed between the different treatment steps (influent, primary treatment, biological treatment, effluent). Correlations were found between fluorescence indicators and different water quality key parameters in the sewage influents. We developed different multivariate linear regression models in order to predict a variety of water quality parameters by fluorescence intensity at specific excitation-emission wavelengths. For example dissolved biological oxygen demand (r2=0,900; pprocess efficiency in WWTP.

  11. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yankelevich, Diego R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, 3101 Kemper Hall, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura, E-mail: lmarcu@ucdavis.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Elson, Daniel S. [Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and <1 ms per point measurement, respectively, for the detection of tissue autofluorescent components. Organic and biological chromophores with lifetimes that spanned a 0.8–7 ns range were used for system validation, and the measured lifetimes from the organic fluorophores deviated by less than 10% from values reported in the literature. Multi-spectral lifetime images of organic dye solutions contained in glass capillary tubes were recorded by raster scanning the single fiber probe in a 2D plane to validate the system as an imaging tool. The lifetime measurement variability was measured indicating that the system provides reproducible results with a standard deviation smaller than 50 ps. The ms-TRFS is a compact apparatus that makes possible the fast, accurate, and precise multispectral time-resolved fluorescence

  12. Fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity: analysis of 30 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, A. L. N.; Correr, W. R.; Azevedo, L. H.; Galletta, V. K.; Pinto, C. A. L.; Kowalski, L. P.; Kurachi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer is a major health problem worldwide and although early diagnosis of potentially malignant and malignant diseases is associated with better treatment results, a large number of cancers are initially misdiagnosed, with unfortunate consequences for long-term survival. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a noninvasive modality of diagnostic approach using induced fluorescence emission in tumors that can improve diagnostic accuracy. The objective of this study was to determine the ability to discriminate between normal oral mucosa and potentially malignant disorders by fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence investigation under 408 and 532 nm excitation wavelengths was performed on 60 subjects, 30 with potentially malignant disorders and 30 volunteers with normal mucosa. Data was analyzed to correlate fluorescence patterns with clinical and histopathological diagnostics. Fluorescence spectroscopy used as a point measurement technique resulted in a great variety of spectral information. In a qualitative analysis of the fluorescence spectral characteristics of each type of injury evaluated, it was possible to discriminate between normal and abnormal oral mucosa. The results show the potential use of fluorescence spectroscopy for an improved discrimination of oral disorders.

  13. High-speed atomic force microscope combined with single-molecule fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Shingo; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Iino, Ryota; Okazaki, Yasutaka; Yoshida, Masato; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Ando, Toshio

    2013-07-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) have mutually complementary capabilities. Here, we report techniques to combine these microscopy systems so that both microscopy capabilities can be simultaneously used in the full extent. To combine the two systems, we have developed a tip-scan type HS-AFM instrument equipped with a device by which the laser beam from the optical lever detector can track the cantilever motion in the X- and Y-directions. This stand-alone HS-AFM system is mounted on an inverted optical microscope stage with a wide-area scanner. The capability of this combined system is demonstrated by simultaneous HS-AFM∕TIRFM imaging of chitinase A moving on a chitin crystalline fiber and myosin V walking on an actin filament.

  14. PREFACE: Heavy-Ion Spectroscopy and QED Effects in Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Martinson, Indrek; Schuch, Reinhold

    1993-01-01

    now essentially solved. The experimental accuracy is already so high that also higher-order QED effects become observable, and several groups are now active in trying to evaluate such effects from first principles. Another related field where substantial progress has recently been made involves precision measurements of X-ray transitions. This has created an interest in the study of deep inner holes in heavy atoms, where large relativistic and QED effects appear. These effects are as large as in corresponding highly charged ions, but the interpretation requires that the many-body effects from the surrounding electrons are accurately extracted. This is a big challenge at present. Atomic collision physics with highly charged ions has been dominated in recent years by the search for a possibility to describe electron-electron interaction within the dynamics of collisions. The experiments on multielectron transfer reactions with highly charged ions posed in this respect quite a challenge to the theory. The models developed to meet this were often based on methods and terminologies developed for describing the inter-electronic interactions in atomic structure. This caused many controversial discussions, also during this symposium. A new and fast rising field is the interaction of highly charged ions with solid surfaces. This may become an important link between atomic physics and condensed-matter physics, stimulated by the opportunity to study effects in coupled many-body systems present in the case when a large amount of electrons is transferred from the solid to each single ion. Furtheron, collision experiments with cooled ion beams in ion storage rings open new dimensions also for atomic spectroscopy. It appears possible that transition and binding energies can be measured in recombination of very heavy ions with a better quality than by conventional Auger electron or X-ray spectroscopy. Obviously, it is not possible to cover all the fields mentioned here in a single

  15. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma O'Brien, Ella; Foing, Bernard; Pascale, Ehrenfreund

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates a plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examined.

  16. Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy for analysis of vegetable oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigri S.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and fluorescence spectroscopy, combined with chemometric approaches have been developed to analysis of extra virgin olive oil adulterated with pomace olive oil. The measurements were made on pure vegetable oils: extra virgin oil, pomace olive oil and that adulterated with varying concentration of pomace olive oil. Today, the application of FTIR spectroscopy has increased in food studied, and particularly has become a powerful analytical tool in the study of edible oils and fats. The spectral regions where the variations were observed chosen for developing models and cross validation was used. The synchronous fluorescence spectrometry takes advantage of the hardware capability to vary both the excitation and emission wavelengths during the analysis with constant wavelength difference is maintained between the two. The region between 300 and 400 nm is attributed to the tocopherols and phenols, the derivatives of vitamin E are associated with the region 400–600 nm and the bands in the region of 600–700 nm are attributed to the chlorophyll and peophytin pigments. The results presented in this study suggest that FTIR and fluorescence may be a useful tool for analysis and detecting adulteration of extra virgin olive oil with pomace oil.

  17. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy as a tool for determining quality of sparkling wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elcoroaristizabal, Saioa; Callejón, Raquel M; Amigo, Jose M; Ocaña-González, Juan A; Morales, M Lourdes; Ubeda, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Browning in sparkling wines was assessed by the use of excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy combined with PARAllel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC). Four different cava sparkling wines were monitored during an accelerated browning process and subsequently storage. Fluorescence changes observed during the accelerated browning process were monitored and compared with other conventional parameters: absorbance at 420nm (A420) and the content of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF). A high similarity of the spectral profiles for all sparkling wines analyzed was observed, being explained by a four component PARAFAC model. A high correlation between the third PARAFAC factor (465/530nm) and the commonly used non-enzymatic browning indicators was observed. The fourth PARAFAC factor (280/380nm) gives us also information about the browning process following a first order kinetic reaction. Hence, excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy, together with PARAFAC, provides a faster alternative for browning monitoring to conventional methods, as well as useful key indicators for quality control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Combining surface sensitive vibrational spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy to study biological interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Jasensky, Joshua; Wu, Jing; Chen, Zhan

    2014-03-01

    A multimodal system combining surface sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and total-internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for surface and interface study was developed. Interfacial molecular structural information can be detected using SFG spectroscopy while interfacial fluorescence signal can be visualized using TIRF microscopy from the same sample. As a proof of concept experiment, SFG spectra of fluorescent polystyrene (PS) beads with different surface coverage were correlated with TIRF signal observed. Results showed that SFG signals from the ordered surfactant methyl groups were detected from the substrate surface, while signals from PS phenyl groups on the beads were not seen. Additionally, a lipid monolayer labeled using lipid-associated dye was deposited on a silica substrate and studied in different environments. The contact with water of this lipid monolayer caused SFG signal to disappear, indicating a possible lipid molecular disorder and the formation of lipid bilayers or liposomes in water. TIRF was able to visualize the presence of lipid molecules on the substrate, showing that the lipids were not removed from the substrate surface by water. The integration of the two surface sensitive techniques can simultaneously visualize interfacial molecular dynamics and characterize interfacial molecular structures in situ, which is important and is expected to find extensive applications in biological interface related research.

  19. Characterization of early-stage amyloid aggregates by incorporating extrinsic fluorescence and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Moonjee; Lee, Hwiin; Lee, Youmin; Lee, Minyung

    2014-11-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers are nanosized bio-assemblies that cause Alzheimer's disease. Characterizing early-stage Aβ aggregates becomes an important issue because it is a prerequisite in exploring small molecule inhibitors that bind to Aβ oligomers. Of special interest are efficient screening systems that characterize the Aβ oligomer size with respect to the aging time. In this work, highly sensitive fluorescence techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to investigate the size determination of Aβ and screening of small molecule inhibitors. A solvatochromic dye, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS), was used as an extrinsic fluorophore to monitor the growth mechanism of the Aβ aggregates. Then, the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy method was employed to estimate the hydrodynamic size of Aβ oligomers. Finally, AFM was used to characterize the Aβ oligomer size in the absence and presence of potential inhibitors. We present that the combination of such three experimental techniques is an excellent way to detect the early stage of Aβ aggregation and to screen small molecule inhibitors.

  20. High pressure sample cell for total internal reflection fluorescence spectroscopy at pressures up to 2500 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Juny; Czeslik, Claus

    2012-08-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) spectroscopy is a surface sensitive technique that is widely used to characterize the structure and dynamics of molecules at planar liquid-solid interfaces. In particular, biomolecular systems, such as protein adsorbates and lipid membranes can easily be studied by TIRF spectroscopy. Applying pressure to molecular systems offers access to all kinds of volume changes occurring during assembly of molecules, phase transitions, and chemical reactions. So far, most of these volume changes have been characterized in bulk solution, only. Here, we describe the design and performance of a high pressure sample cell that allows for TIRF spectroscopy under high pressures up to 2500 bar (2.5 × 108 Pa), in order to expand the understanding of volume effects from the bulk phase to liquid-solid interfaces. The new sample cell is based on a cylindrical body made of Nimonic 90 alloy and incorporates a pressure transmitting sample cuvette. This cuvette is composed of a fused silica prism and a flexible rubber gasket. It contains the sample solution and ensures a complete separation of the sample from the liquid pressure medium. The sample solution is in contact with the inner wall of the prism forming the interface under study, where fluorescent molecules are immobilized. In this way, the new high pressure TIRF sample cell is very useful for studying any biomolecular layer that can be deposited at a planar water-silica interface. As examples, high pressure TIRF data of adsorbed lysozyme and two phospholipid membranes are presented.

  1. Tunable diode-laser induced fluorescence on Al and Ti atoms in low pressure magnetron discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitelaru, C; Minea, T M; Boisse-Laporte, C; Bretagne, J [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas, UMR 8578 CNRS, Universite Paris Sud-XI, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Aniculaesei, C; Popa, G [Physics Department, Faculty of Physics Al I Cuza University, Bd. Carol No 11, Iasi, 700506 (Romania); De Poucques, L, E-mail: catalin.vitelaru@u-psud.f [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS - UHP Nancy, UPV-Metz, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, boulevard des aiguillettes, BP 70239 - 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy Cedex (France)

    2010-03-31

    Two different blue light laser diodes were used to investigate two types of atoms, namely Ti with resonance transition centred at {lambda}{sub 0}(Ti) = 398.289 nm and Al with {lambda}{sub 0}(Al) = 394.512 nm. Tunable diode-laser induced fluorescence offers local information on two groups of sputtered particles-non-thermalized and thermalized. The anisotropic velocity distribution functions (vdfs) are characterized probing the plasma along two directions: parallel to the target, v{sub r}, and perpendicular to it, v{sub z}. Measurements were performed in two plasma reactors both having planar magnetron cathodes with circular symmetry but with Ti and Al targets of different magnet strengths and diameters. The similar results of the vdf space dependence for these magnetron systems confirm the general behaviour of sputtered species transport. These similarities are related to the circular geometry and fundamentals of sputtering whereas differences are due to each specific sputtered element. The experimental results also show the effect of current density on the shape of vdf for Ti and Al. An increase in the current intensity implies a linear increase in the relative density of energetic sputtered atoms while the group of thermalized ones appears unaffected in the high current density regime.

  2. Probing an Excited-State Atomic Transition Using Hyperfine Quantum Beat Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, Christopher G; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to observe the dynamics of an excited-state transition in a room temperature atomic vapor using hyperfine quantum beats. Our experiment using cesium atoms consists of a pulsed excitation of the D2 transition, and continuous-wave driving of an excited-state transition from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state to the 7S$_{1/2}$ state. We observe quantum beats in the fluorescence from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state which are modified by the driving of the excited-state transition. The Fourier spectrum of the beat signal yields evidence of Autler-Townes splitting of the 6P$_{3/2}$, F = 5 hyperfine level and Rabi oscillations on the excited-state transition. A detailed model provides qualitative agreement with the data, giving insight to the physical processes involved.

  3. Investigation of the inclusion behavior between p-sulfoniccalix[8]arene and norfloxacin by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xueying [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Room 204, Building 9, No. 106, Jiwei Road, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China); Luo Chuannan, E-mail: chm_luocn@ujn.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Room 204, Building 9, No. 106, Jiwei Road, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China); Lv Zhen; Lu Fuguang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Room 204, Building 9, No. 106, Jiwei Road, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China)

    2011-09-15

    The host-guest complexation between p-sulfoniccalix[8]arene (SC{sub 8}A) and norfloxacin (NFLX) in aqueous solution was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. Strong fluorescence intensity of the NFLX aqueous solution alone and obvious fluorescence quenching of NFLX solution in the presence of SC{sub 8}A were observed. The fluorescence lifetimes of NFLX and SC{sub 8}A-NFLX inclusion complex were determined and the effect of temperature on SC{sub 8}A-NFLX inclusion complex was studied. The static quenching of the inclusion was obtained, that is the SC{sub 8}A can form a nonfluorescent ground-state inclusion complex with NFLX. As the results show, the combined ratio (n) was 1:1 and association constant K was 1.17x10{sup 5} L/mol. Based on the experimental results, the mechanism of the inclusion complex was explored. The space matching, electrostatic force and hydrogen bond play important effects in the inclusion process. Subsequently, the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution led to the recovery of fluorescence intensity. It is indicated that BSA can liberate the NFLX into the solution by destructing the SC{sub 8}A-NFLX inclusion complex. Hence SC{sub 8}A may be used for controlled-release drug delivery in the pharmaceutical industry. - Highlights: > Fluorescence lifetimes of NFLX and SC8A-NFLX inclusion complex were determined. > Mechanism of the SC8A-NFLX inclusion complex was explored. > It is proved that SC8A can form a nonfluorescent ground-state inclusion complex with NFLX.

  4. Photon-number statistics from resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom near a plasmonic nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, Vladimir M.; Vladimirova, Yulia V.; Zadkov, Victor N.

    2014-12-01

    The photon-number statistics from resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom near a metal nanosphere driven by a laser field with finite bandwidth is studied theoretically. Our analysis shows that all interesting physics here takes place in a small area around the nanosphere where the near field and the atom-nanosphere coupling essentially affect the radiative properties of the atom. Computer modeling estimates this area roughly as r ≤2 a (r is the distance from the center of the nanosphere to the atom), with a being the radius of the nanosphere. At the larger distances, the influence of the nanoparticle vanishes and the atom tends to behave similarly to that in free space. It is shown that the distribution function p (n ,T ) of the emission probability of n photons in a given time interval T in steady-state resonance fluorescence drastically depends on the atom location around the nanosphere for r ≤2 a , featuring a characteristic twist in the ridgelike dependence and a convergence time of up to 9 μ s, two orders of magnitude slower than for the atom in free space. At large distances, the distribution converges to a Gaussian one, as for the atom in free space. The typical convergence time scale at large distances r >2 a tends to the convergence time of the atom in free space. There are also two areas symmetrical around the nanosphere in which Ω ˜γ and the convergence time goes to zero. This behavior is determined by the interplay of the radiative and nonradiative decay rates of the atom due to the coupling with the metal nanosphere and by the near-field intensity. Additional parameters are the normalized laser frequency detuning from the atomic resonance and the bandwidth of the incoming laser field.

  5. Non-linear Spectroscopy of Sr Atoms in an Optical Cavity for Laser Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Bjarke T R; Schäffer, Stefan A; Westergaard, Philip G; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-01-01

    We study the non-linear interaction of a cold sample of strontium-88 atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit and investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak inter-combination line $\\lvert 5s^{2} \\, ^1 \\textrm{S}_0 \\rangle \\,-\\, \\lvert 5s5p \\, ^3 \\textrm{P}_1 \\rangle$ at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the light field transmitted through the cavity represented by the complex cavity transmission coefficient. We demonstrate high signal-to-noise-ratio measurements of both quadratures - the cavity transmitted phase and absorption - by employing FM spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). We also show that when FM spectroscopy is employed in connection with a cavity locked to the probe light, observables are substantially modified compared to the free space situation where no cavity is present. Furthermore, the non-linear dynami...

  6. Dielectrophoretic positioning of single nanoparticles on atomic force microscope tips for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiterer, Christian; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Singh, Prabha; Wirth, Janina; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, a combination of Raman spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy, is a powerful technique to detect the vibrational fingerprint of molecules at the nanometer scale. A metal nanoparticle at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip leads to a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field when illuminated with an appropriate wavelength, resulting in an increased Raman signal. A controlled positioning of individual nanoparticles at the tip would improve the reproducibility of the probes and is quite demanding due to usually serial and labor-intensive approaches. In contrast to commonly used submicron manipulation techniques, dielectrophoresis allows a parallel and scalable production, and provides a novel approach toward reproducible and at the same time affordable tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tips. We demonstrate the successful positioning of an individual plasmonic nanoparticle on a commercial atomic force microscope tip by dielectrophoresis followed by experimental proof of the Raman signal enhancing capabilities of such tips. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Determination of the botanical origin of honey by front-face synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, Lea; Zeković, Ivana; Dramićanin, Tatjana; Dramićanin, Miroslav D; Bro, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Front-face synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy combined with chemometrics is used to classify honey samples according to their botanical origin. Synchronous fluorescence spectra of three monofloral (linden, sunflower, and acacia), polyfloral (meadow mix), and fake (fake acacia and linden) honey types (109 samples) were collected in an excitation range of 240-500 nm for synchronous wavelength intervals of 30-300 nm. Chemometric analysis of the gathered data included principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis. Mean cross-validated classification errors of 0.2 and 4.8% were found for a model that accounts only for monofloral samples and for a model that includes both the monofloral and polyfloral groups, respectively. The results demonstrate that single synchronous fluorescence spectra of different honeys differ significantly because of their distinct physical and chemical characteristics and provide sufficient data for the clear differentiation among honey groups. The spectra of fake honey samples showed pronounced differences from those of genuine honey, and these samples are easily recognized on the basis of their synchronous fluorescence spectra. The study demonstrated that this method is a valuable and promising technique for honey authentication.

  8. Ex-vivo UV autofluorescence imaging and fluorescence spectroscopy of atherosclerotic pathology in human aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, William; Williams, Maura; Franco, Walfre

    2017-02-01

    The aim of our study was to identify fluorescence excitation-emission pairs correlated with atherosclerotic pathology in ex-vivo human aorta. Wide-field images of atherosclerotic human aorta were captured using UV and visible excitation and emission wavelength pairs of several known fluorophores to investigate correspondence with gross pathologic features. Fluorescence spectroscopy and histology were performed on 21 aortic samples. A matrix of Pearson correlation coefficients were determined for the relationship between relevant histologic features and the intensity of emission for 427 wavelength pairs. A multiple linear regression analysis indicated that elastin (370/460 nm) and tryptophan (290/340 nm) fluorescence predicted 58% of the variance in intima thickness (R-squared = 0.588, F(2,18) = 12.8, p=.0003), and 48% of the variance in media thickness (R-squared = 0.483, F(2,18) = 8.42, p=.002), suggesting that endogenous fluorescence intensity at these wavelengths can be utilized for improved pathologic characterization of atherosclerotic plaques.

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopy of collagen crosslinking: non-invasive and in situ evaluation of corneal stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Walfre; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Ruisheng; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2015-03-01

    Collagen is a long fibrous structural protein that imparts mechanical support, strength and elasticity to many tissues. The state of the tissue mechanical environment is related to tissue physiology, disease and function. In the cornea, the collagen network is responsible for its shape and clarity; disruption of this network results in degradation of visual acuity, for example in the keratoconus eye disease. The objective of the present study is to investigate the feasibility of using the endogenous fluorescence of collagen crosslinks to evaluate variations in the mechanical state of tissue, in particular, the stiffness of cornea in response to different degrees of photo-crosslinking or RGX treatment—a novel keratoconus treatment. After removing the epithelium, rabbit corneas were stained with Rose Bengal and then irradiated with a 532 nm solid-state laser. Analysis of the excitation spectra obtained by fluorescence spectroscopy shows a correlation between the fluorescence intensity at 370/460 nm excitation/emission wavelengths and the mechanical properties. In principle, it may be feasible to use the endogenous fluorescence of collagen crosslinks to evaluate the mechanical stiffness of cornea non-invasively and in situ.

  10. Probe pressure effects on human skin diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Liang; Nichols, Brandon; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Tunnell, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy are popular research techniques for noninvasive disease diagnostics. Most systems include an optical fiber probe that transmits and collects optical spectra in contact with the suspected lesion. The purpose of this study is to investigate probe pressure effects on human skin spectroscopic measurements. We conduct an in-vivo experiment on human skin tissue to study the short-term (30 s) effects of probe pressure on diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements. Short-term light probe pressure (P0 physiological properties extracted from diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements, and less than 0 +/- 5% for diagnostically significant physiological properties. Absorption decreases with site-specific variations due to blood being compressed out of the sampled volume. Reduced scattering coefficient variation is site specific. Intrinsic fluorescence shows a large standard error, although no specific pressure-related trend is observed. Differences in tissue structure and morphology contribute to site-specific probe pressure effects. Therefore, the effects of pressure can be minimized when the pressure is small and applied for a short amount of time; however, long-term and large pressures induce significant distortions in measured spectra.

  11. Remote temperature measurements in femto-liter volumes using dual-focus-Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Claus B; Weiss, Kerstin; Loman, Anastasia; Enderlein, Jörg; Richtering, Walter

    2009-05-07

    Remote temperature measurements in microfluidic devices with micrometer spatial resolution are important for many applications in biology, biochemistry and chemistry. The most popular methods use the temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetime of Rhodamine B, or the temperature-dependent size of thermosensitive materials such as microgel particles. Here, we use the recently developed method of dual-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (2fFCS) for measuring the absolute diffusion coefficient of small fluorescent molecules at nanomolar concentrations and show how these data can be used for remote temperature measurements on a micrometer scale. We perform comparative temperature measurements using all three methods and show that the accuracy of 2fFCS is comparable or even better than that achievable with Rhodamine B fluorescence lifetime measurements. The temperature dependent microgel swelling leads to an enhanced accuracy within a narrow temperature range around the volume phase transition temperature, but requires the availability of specific microgels, whereas 2fFCS is applicable under very general conditions.

  12. Evaluation of a fiber-optic fluorescence spectroscopy system to assist neurosurgical tumor resections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilias, Michail A.; Richter, Johan; Westermark, Frida; Brantmark, Martin; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Wårdell, Karin

    2007-07-01

    The highly malignant brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme, is difficult to totally resect without aid due to its infiltrative way of growing and its morphological similarities to surrounding functioning brain under direct vision in the operating field. The need for an inexpensive and robust real-time visualizing system for resection guiding in neurosurgery has been formulated by research groups all over the world. The main goal is to develop a system that helps the neurosurgeon to make decisions during the surgical procedure. A compact fiber optic system using fluorescence spectroscopy has been developed for guiding neurosurgical resections. The system is based on a high power light emitting diode at 395 nm and a spectrometer. A fiber bundle arrangement is used to guide the excitation light and fluorescence light between the instrument and the tissue target. The system is controlled through a computer interface and software package especially developed for the application. This robust and simple instrument has been evaluated in vivo both on healthy skin but also during a neurosurgical resection procedure. Before surgery the patient received orally a low dose of 5-aminolevulinic acid, converted to the fluorescence tumor marker protoporphyrin IX in the malignant cells. Preliminary results indicate that PpIX fluorescence and brain tissue autofluorescence can be recorded with the help of the developed system intraoperatively during resection of glioblastoma multiforme.

  13. Artificial neural networks for processing fluorescence spectroscopy data in skin cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, L.; Zeković, I.; Dramićanin, T.; Dramićanin, M. D.

    2013-11-01

    Over the years various optical spectroscopic techniques have been widely used as diagnostic tools in the discrimination of many types of malignant diseases. Recently, synchronous fluorescent spectroscopy (SFS) coupled with chemometrics has been applied in cancer diagnostics. The SFS method involves simultaneous scanning of both emission and excitation wavelengths while keeping the interval of wavelengths (constant-wavelength mode) or frequencies (constant-energy mode) between them constant. This method is fast, relatively inexpensive, sensitive and non-invasive. Total synchronous fluorescence spectra of normal skin, nevus and melanoma samples were used as input for training of artificial neural networks. Two different types of artificial neural networks were trained, the self-organizing map and the feed-forward neural network. Histopathology results of investigated skin samples were used as the gold standard for network output. Based on the obtained classification success rate of neural networks, we concluded that both networks provided high sensitivity with classification errors between 2 and 4%.

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy to study dissolved organic matter interactions with agrochemicals applied in Swiss vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daouk, Silwan; Frege, Carla; Blanc, Nicolas; Mounier, Stéphane; Redon, Roland; Merdy, Patricia; Lucas, Yves; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf

    2015-06-01

    UV/Vis fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the possible interactions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) with the herbicide glyphosate and copper-based fungicide used in vineyards. The study focused on the role of DOM in the transport of these micropollutants from parcels to surface waters (river, lake). Soil solution and river water samples were collected in the Lavaux vineyard area, western Switzerland. Their fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEM) were decomposed using parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis, and compared to their content in glyphosate and copper. PARAFAC analysis of EEM of both types of samples showed the contribution of protein-like and humic-like fluorophores. In soil water samples, complexes between fulvic-like and humic-like fluorophores of DOM, copper, and glyphosate were likely formed. In surface water, DOM-copper and glyphosate-copper interactions were observed, but not between glyphosate and DOM.

  15. What it means to measure a single molecule in a solution by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Földes-Papp, Zeno

    2006-06-01

    Traditional methodologies in micro- and nanofluidics measure biological mechanisms as an average of a population of molecules as only their combined effect can be detected. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy methods such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and two-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) are used as alternative experimental approaches in ultrasensitive analytics at the single-molecule level. However, what is the measurement time in which one is able to study just one single molecule in solution without immobilizing it? Existing theories are inadequate since they do not predict the meaningful time as a function of the concentration of other molecules of the same kind in bulk solution. This situation produces considerable concern, and experimental hypotheses differ according to which single-molecule detection methods are thought to have greater validity. This subject is clearly at the forefront of research and should be of great interest to experimental medical scientists. As will be seen in this article, it is worthwhile to obtain a correct form of the meaningful-time relationship through theoretical means. The new ideas are comprehensively presented, and this relationship is a new concept at this time. The meaningful time for studying just one molecule without immobilization specifies the time parameter in the selfsame molecule likelihood estimator. Possible users for this concept are those working in biotechnological applications dealing with gene technology. Furthermore, the concept is of interest for a great number of medical, pharmaceutical and chemical laboratories. It may serve as a foundation for further work in single-cell biology. It is suspected that heterogeneities play a much larger role inside the cell than in free solution--a perfect opportunity for single-molecule studies and, thus, a novel hypothesis regarding structure and dynamics of cellular networks is first presented for the minimal neurotrophin

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool for quality assessment of humic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguta, Patrycja

    2016-04-01

    *The studies were partly carried out within the framework of a research project. The project was financed from funds of National Science Center on the base of decision number DEC-2013/11/D/NZ9/02545. Fluorescence spectroscopy belongs to modern, non-destructive, rapid and relatively cheap methods, as well as for many years it was successfully used in studies of organic compounds in the fields of medicine, biology and chemistry. On the other hand, soil organic matter is a group of compounds with a complex spatial structure showing a large number of groups with different kinds of fluorophores. This could suggest the possibility of application of fluorescence spectroscopy in assessing the quality of humic substances as well as in monitoring of their chemical transformations. The aim of study was chemical description of humic and fulvic acids based on fluorescence spectra, as well as an attempt of evaluation of changes occurring under the influence of different pH and during interactions with various concentrations of metal. The humic and fulvic acids were isolated from chemically different soils. The measurements were carried out on Hitachi fluorescence spectrometer in solutions with a concentration of humic acids 40mg dm-3, at pH from 3 to 7, and for the evaluation of the metal impact: with increasing Zn concentrations (0-50mg dm-3). The fluorescence spectra were recorded in the form of synchronous and emission-excitation matrices (EEM). Studies have shown the presence of different groups of fluorophores. Synchronous spectra were characterized by a well-separated bands showing fluorescence in the area of low, medium and high wavelengths, suggesting the presence of structures, both weakly and strongly humified. EEM spectra revealed map of fluorophores within wide ranges of emission and excitation. Fluorophores differed in both position and intensity. The highest intensity was observed for compounds with the lowest humification degree which might be due to high amount

  17. Atomic force microscopy study of the antigen-antibody binding force on patient cancer cells based on ROR1 fluorescence recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili; Zhang, Weijing

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge of drug-target interaction is critical to our understanding of drug action and can help design better drugs. Due to the lack of adequate single-molecule techniques, the information of individual interactions between ligand-receptors is scarce until the advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) that can be used to directly measure the individual ligand-receptor forces under near-physiological conditions by linking ligands onto the surface of the AFM tip and then obtaining force curves on cells. Most of the current AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments were performed on cells grown in vitro (cell lines) that are quite different from the human cells in vivo. From the view of clinical practice, investigating the drug-target interactions directly on the patient cancer cells will bring more valuable knowledge that may potentially serve as an important parameter in personalized treatment. Here, we demonstrate the capability of AFM to measure the binding force between target (CD20) and drug (rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody targeted drug) directly on lymphoma patient cancer cells under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition. ROR1 is a receptor expressed on some B-cell lymphomas but not on normal cells. First, B-cell lymphoma Raji cells (a cell line) were used for ROR1 fluorescence labeling and subsequent measurement of CD20-rituximab binding force. The results showed that Raji cells expressed ROR1, and the labeling of ROR1 did not influence the measurement of CD20-rituximab binding force. Then the established experimental procedures were performed on the pathological samples prepared from the bone marrow of a follicular lymphoma patient. Cancer cells were recognized by ROR1 fluorescence. Under the guidance of fluorescence, with the use of a rituximab-conjugated tip, the cellular topography was visualized by using AFM imaging and the CD20-Rituximab binding force was measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy. Copyright © 2013

  18. Analysis of the Peiting Woman Using Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauerochse, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Portable X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy was applied to the skeletal remains of 13 bog bodies and their bog burial environments. The objective was to create a better understanding of Northern European bog environmental chemistry and its diagenetic effects on interred bog bodies, determine bog body geographic disparity and/or origin, and identify if post-discovery preservation procedures were applied to the bog body remains. This paper summarizes the findings for one of those 13 bog bodies: the Peiting Woman from Bavaria, Germany. The elements analyzed include Antimony, Cobalt, Copper, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Lead, Strontium, Titanium, Zinc, and Zirconium.

  19. Detection of citrus canker and Huanglongbing using fluorescence imaging spectroscopy and support vector machine technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, Caio Bruno; Felipe de Oliveira Neves, Ruan; Belasque, José; Marcassa, Luis Gustavo

    2016-01-10

    Citrus canker and Huanglongbing (HLB) are citrus diseases that represent a serious threat to the citrus production worldwide and may cause large economic losses. In this work, we combined fluorescence imaging spectroscopy (FIS) and a machine learning technique to discriminate between these diseases and other ordinary citrus conditions that may be present at citrus orchards, such as citrus scab and zinc deficiency. Our classification results are highly accurate when discriminating citrus canker from citrus scab (97.8%), and HLB from zinc deficiency (95%). These results show that it is possible to accurately identify citrus diseases that present similar symptoms.

  20. Unfolding Studies of Escherichia coli Maltodextrin Glucosidase Monitored by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Subhankar; Kundu, Madhuchhanda; Das, Kali P.; Mishra, Saroj; Chaudhuri, Tapan K.

    2008-01-01

    Equilibrium unfolding of a 69-kDa monomeric Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase (MalZ) was studied using intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy. The unfolding transition of MalZ followed a three-state process, involving the formation of a stable intermediate state having more exposed hydrophobic surface. It was found that the protein structure can be easily perturbed by low concentration of guanidium hydrochloride (GdnHCl) and, at a GdnHCl concentration of 2 M, MalZ was denat...

  1. Determination of Concentration of Living Immobilized Yeast Cells by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podrazký, Ondřej; Kuncová, Gabriela

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2005), s. 126-134 ISSN 0925-4005. [European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors EUROPT(R)ODE /7./. Madrid, 04.04.2004-07.04.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0461; GA MŠk(CZ) OC 840.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : immobilization of cells * 2-D fluorescence spectroscopy * sol–gel Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.646, year: 2005

  2. PyCorrFit-generic data evaluation for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Paul; Schwille, Petra; Weidemann, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    We present a graphical user interface (PyCorrFit) for the fitting of theoretical model functions to experimental data obtained by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The program supports many data file formats and features a set of tools specialized in FCS data evaluation. The Python source code is freely available for download from the PyCorrFit web page at http://pycorrfit.craban.de. We offer binaries for Ubuntu Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Steady-state tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy study to probe tertiary structure of proteins in solid powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas K; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to obtain information about protein tertiary structure in solid state by using steady state tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence emission spectroscopy on protein powders. Beta-lactoglobulin (betaLg) and interferon alpha-2a (IFN) powder samples were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy using a front surface sample holder. Two different sets of dried betaLg samples were prepared by vacuum drying of solutions: one containing betaLg, and the other containing a mixture of betaLg and guanidine hydrochloride. Dried IFN samples were prepared by vacuum drying of IFN solutions and by vacuum drying of polyethylene glycol precipitated IFN. The results obtained from solid samples were compared with the emission scans of these proteins in solutions. The emission scans obtained from protein powders were slightly blue-shifted compared to the solution spectra due to the absence of water. The emission scans were red-shifted for betaLg samples dried from solutions containing GuHCl. The magnitude of the shifts in lambda(max) depended on the extent of drying of the samples, which was attributed to the crystallization of GuHCl during the drying process. The shifts in the lambda(max) of the Trp emission spectrum are associated with the changes in the tertiary structure of betaLg. In the case of IFN, the emission scans obtained from PEG-precipitated and dried sample were different compared to the emission scans obtained from IFN in solution and from vacuum dried IFN. The double peaks observed in this sample were attributed to the unfolding of the protein. In the presence of trehalose, the two peaks converged to form a single peak, which was similar to solution emission spectra, whereas no change was observed in the presence of mannitol. We conclude that Trp fluorescence spectroscopy provides a simple and reliable means to characterize Trp microenvironment in protein powders that is related to the tertiary conformation of proteins in the solid state. This study shows

  4. Direct Vpr-Vpr Interaction in Cells monitored by two Photon Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mély Yves

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 encodes several regulatory proteins, notably Vpr which influences the survival of the infected cells by causing a G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Such an important role of Vpr in HIV-1 disease progression has fuelled a large number of studies, from its 3D structure to the characterization of specific cellular partners. However, no direct imaging and quantification of Vpr-Vpr interaction in living cells has yet been reported. To address this issue, eGFP- and mCherry proteins were tagged by Vpr, expressed in HeLa cells and their interaction was studied by two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Results Results show that Vpr forms homo-oligomers at or close to the nuclear envelope. Moreover, Vpr dimers and trimers were found in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Point mutations in the three α helices of Vpr drastically impaired Vpr oligomerization and localization at the nuclear envelope while point mutations outside the helical regions had no effect. Theoretical structures of Vpr mutants reveal that mutations within the α-helices could perturb the leucine zipper like motifs. The ΔQ44 mutation has the most drastic effect since it likely disrupts the second helix. Finally, all Vpr point mutants caused cell apoptosis suggesting that Vpr-mediated apoptosis functions independently from Vpr oligomerization. Conclusion We report that Vpr oligomerization in HeLa cells relies on the hydrophobic core formed by the three α helices. This oligomerization is required for Vpr localization at the nuclear envelope but not for Vpr-mediated apoptosis.

  5. Tissue diagnosis using power-sharing multifocal Raman micro-spectroscopy and auto-fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinjab, Faris; Kong, Kenny; Gibson, Graham; Varma, Sandeep; Williams, Hywel; Padgett, Miles; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-08-01

    We describe a multifocal Raman micro-spectroscopy detection method based on a digital micromirror device, which allows for simultaneous "power-sharing" acquisition of Raman spectra from ad hoc sampling points. As the locations of the points can be rapidly updated in real-time via software control of a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM), this technique is compatible with automated adaptive- and selective-sampling Raman spectroscopy techniques, the latter of which has previously been demonstrated for fast diagnosis of skin cancer tissue resections. We describe the performance of this instrument and show examples of multiplexed measurements on a range of test samples. Following this, we show the feasibility of reducing measurement time for power-shared multifocal Raman measurements combined with confocal auto-fluorescence imaging to provide guided diagnosis of tumours in human skin samples.

  6. X-Ray Fluorescence and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy analysis of Roman silver denarii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, L.; El Hassan, A.; Ferretti, M.; Foresta, A.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Nebbia, E.; Catalli, F.; Harith, M. A.; Diaz Pace, D.; Anabitarte Garcia, F.; Scuotto, M.; Palleschi, V.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we present the results of a study performed on a large collection of silver Roman republican denarii, encompassing about two centuries of history. The joint use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy allowed for an accurate determination of the coins' elemental composition; the measurements, performed mostly in situ at the 'Monetiere' in Florence, revealed a striking connection between the 'quality' of the silver alloy and some crucial contemporary events. This finding was used to classify a group of denarii whose dating was otherwise impossible. The comparison with other contemporary denarii disproves a recent theory on the origin of the so called 'serrated' denarii (denarii showing notched chisel marks on the edge of the coin).

  7. Atomic substitutions in synthetic apatite; Insights from solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, John S.

    Apatite, Ca5(PO4)3X (where X = F, Cl, or OH), is a unique mineral group capable of atomic substitutions for cations and anions of varied size and charge. Accommodation of differing substituents requires some kind of structural adaptation, e.g. new atomic positions, vacancies, or coupled substitutions. These structural adaptations often give rise to important physicochemical properties relevant to a range of scientific disciplines. Examples include volatile trapping during apatite crystallization, substitution for large radionuclides for long-term storage of nuclear fission waste, substitution for fluoride to improve acid resistivity in dental enamel composed dominantly of hydroxylapatite, and the development of novel biomaterials with enhanced biocompatibility. Despite the importance and ubiquity of atomic substitutions in apatite materials, many of the mechanisms by which these reactions occur are poorly understood. Presence of substituents at dilute concentration and occupancy of disordered atomic positions hinder detection by bulk characterization methods such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an isotope-specific structural characterization technique that does not require ordered atomic arrangements, and is therefore well suited to investigate atomic substitutions and structural adaptations in apatite. In the present work, solid-state NMR is utilized to investigate structural adaptations in three different types of apatite materials; a series of near-binary F, Cl apatite, carbonate-hydroxylapatite compositions prepared under various synthesis conditions, and a heat-treated hydroxylapatite enriched in 17O. The results indicate that hydroxyl groups in low-H, near binary F,Cl apatite facilitate solid-solution between F and Cl via column reversals, which result in average hexagonal symmetry despite very dilute OH concentration ( 2 mol percent). In addition, 19F NMR spectra indicate

  8. Stark spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen balmer-alpha line for electric field measurement in plasmas by saturation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, S.; Katayama, K.; Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Sasaki, K.

    2016-09-01

    Detailed structures of electric fields in sheath and pre-sheath regions of various plasmas are interested from the viewpoint of basic plasma physics. Several researchers observed Stark spectra of Doppler-broadened Rydberg states to evaluate electric fields in plasmas; however, these measurements needed high-power, expensive tunable lasers. In this study, we carried out another Stark spectroscopy with a low-cost diode laser system. We applied saturation spectroscopy, which achieves a Doppler-free wavelength resolution, to observe the Stark spectrum of the Balmer-alpha line of atomic hydrogen in the sheath region of a low-pressure hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma was generated in an ICP source which was driven by on-off modulated rf power at 20 kHz. A planar electrode was inserted into the plasma. Weak probe and intense pump laser beams were injected into the plasma from the counter directions in parallel to the electrode surface. The laser beams crossed with a small angle above the electrode. The observed fine-structure spectra showed shifts, deformations, and/or splits when varying the distance between the observation position and the electrode surface. The detection limit for the electric field was estimated to be several tens of V/cm.

  9. Atomic Force Microscopy-Infrared Spectroscopy of Individual Atmospheric Aerosol Particles: Subdiffraction Limit Vibrational Spectroscopy and Morphological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Amy L; Kirpes, Rachel M; Merzel, Rachel L; Pratt, Kerri A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Ault, Andrew P

    2017-09-05

    Chemical analysis of atmospheric aerosols is an analytical challenge, as aerosol particles are complex chemical mixtures that can contain hundreds to thousands of species in attoliter volumes at the most abundant sizes in the atmosphere (∼100 nm). These particles have global impacts on climate and health, but there are few methods available that combine imaging and the detailed molecular information from vibrational spectroscopy for individual particles <500 nm. Herein, we show the first application of atomic force microscopy with infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) to detect trace organic and inorganic species and probe intraparticle chemical variation in individual particles down to 150 nm. By detecting photothermal expansion at frequencies where particle species absorb IR photons from a tunable laser, AFM-IR can study particles smaller than the optical diffraction limit. Combining strengths of AFM (ambient pressure, height, morphology, and phase measurements) with photothermal IR spectroscopy, the potential of AFM-IR is shown for a diverse set of single-component particles, liquid-liquid phase separated particles (core-shell morphology), and ambient atmospheric particles. The spectra from atmospheric model systems (ammonium sulfate, sodium nitrate, succinic acid, and sucrose) had clearly identifiable features that correlate with absorption frequencies for infrared-active modes. Additionally, molecular information was obtained with <100 nm spatial resolution for phase separated particles with a ∼150 nm shell and 300 nm core. The subdiffraction limit capability of AFM-IR has the potential to advance understanding of particle impacts on climate and health by improving analytical capabilities to study water uptake, heterogeneous reactivity, and viscosity.

  10. Spectroscopy and atomic physics of highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni for tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Cheng, C.-C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers the spectroscopy and atomic physics for some highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni ions produced in tokamak plasmas. Forbidden and intersystem wavelengths for Cr and Ni ions are extrapolated and interpolated using the known wavelengths for Fe lines identified in solar-flare plasmas. Tables of transition probabilities for the B I, C I, N I, O I, and F I isoelectronic sequences are presented, and collision strengths and transition probabilities for Cr, Fe, and Ni ions of the Be I sequence are given. Similarities of tokamak and solar spectra are discussed, and it is shown how the atomic data presented may be used to determine ion abundances and electron densities in low-density plasmas.

  11. Atomic physics studies of highly charged ions on tokamaks using x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.

    1989-07-01

    An overview is given of atomic physics issues which have been studied on tokamaks with the help resolution x-ray spectroscopy. The issues include the testing of model calculations predicting the excitation of line radiation, the determination of rate coefficients, and accurate atomic structure measurements. Recent research has focussed primarily on highly charged heliumlike (22 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 28) and neonlike (34 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 63) ions, and results are presented from measurements on the PLT and TFTR tokamaks. Many of the measurements have been aided by improved instrumental design and new measuring techniques. Remarkable agreement has been found between measurements and theory in most cases. However, in this review those areas are stressed where agreement is worst and where further investigations are needed. 19 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Spectroscopy with Laser-cooled Francium and Progress on Atomic Parity Non-conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiehang

    Francium, the heaviest alkali, possesses a unique combination of structural simplicity and great sensitivity to effects such as atomic parity non-conservation (APNC). We report in this thesis our progress towards measuring weak-interaction physics in a low energy system: the francium atom. We have built a new generation of high-efficiency laser cooling and trapping facility at TRIUMF national laboratory in Canada. We constructed a precision science chamber and demonstrate francium atom transfer into the precision trap, where the electromagnetic field environments can be exquisitely controlled such that weak-interaction studies via optical and microwave excitations can take place. We perform laser spectroscopy measurements of the hyperfine structure and isotope shifts in a chain of francium isotopes near the neutron closed shell (N = 126), including both ground and isomeric nuclear states. These measurements provide a basis for benchmarking state of the art atomic theory, as well as future nuclear structure calculations in Fr, necessary for interpreting the weak-interaction studies. These developments lay important foundations for precision parity non-conservation measurements with francium.

  13. Wideband laser locking to an atomic reference with modulation transfer spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negnevitsky, V; Turner, L D

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate that conventional modulated spectroscopy apparatus, used for laser frequency stabilization in many atomic physics laboratories, can be enhanced to provide a wideband lock delivering deep suppression of frequency noise across the acoustic range. Using an acousto-optic modulator driven with an agile oscillator, we show that wideband frequency modulation of the pump laser in modulation transfer spectroscopy produces the unique single lock-point spectrum previously demonstrated with electro-optic phase modulation. We achieve a laser lock with 100 kHz feedback bandwidth, limited by our laser control electronics. This bandwidth is sufficient to reduce frequency noise by 30 dB across the acoustic range and narrows the imputed linewidth by a factor of five.

  14. Optical spectroscopy study of c(4 x 2) Ge (001)-surfaces, covered with atomic Au wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Utz; Meyer, Sebastian; Schaefer, Joerg; Geurts, Jean [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Physikalisches Institut, Am Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Speiser, Eugen; Esser, Norbert [ISAS, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Novel quasi-1D systems like e.g. atomic gold chains on a c(4x2) reconstructed Ge(001)-surfaces enable the investigation of 1D-effects like the possible occurrence of the Luttinger- to Fermi liquid transition. As there is a crucial interplay of the lattice vibrations and the electrical and structural properties on such sensitive systems, phonon dynamics are in the focus of this work. The phonons were addressed by Raman spectroscopy and reveal a clear change from the Ge-oxide layer to the final surface with Au-nano wires. Thermally deoxidizing the Ge-surface under UHV leads to a distinct low-frequency vibration around 65cm-1. Its frequency range and its persistence after Gold deposition in the submonolayer range indicate that this signal is surface related. Additionally, the surface-induced anisotropy of the optical reflectance was complementary investigated by Reflectance-Anisotropy-Spectroscopy (RAS) and IR-ellipsometry.

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopy and photochemistry of novel branched fluorescent nitro-stilbene derivatives with benzopheonone groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fang; Liu, Jian; Peng, Huayong; Hu, Nvdan; Li, Hongru; Zhang, Shengtao

    2010-05-01

    In this article, we presented novel nitro-stilbene derivatives with one or two benzophenone groups as photoinitiators via multi-steps synthesis. The ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy and the emission spectroscopy of the compounds were determined in various solvents. The results showed that the ultraviolet/visible absorption spectroscopy of the derivatives with benzophenone moiety displayed overlap effects of nitro-stilbene and benzophenone parts. In non-polar solvents, the derivatives exhibited strong emission, while they displayed weak emission in modest and strong polar solvents. Dyes-linked benzopheonone groups displayed stronger fluorescence emission than simple chromophore parent molecules. Visible-light photoinitiating effects of the derivatives were investigated extensively. Methyl methacrylate could be photoinitiated efficiently by the derivatives with benzophenone moieties at very low concentration, even at 1 x 10(-5) mol/L. While the photopolymerization efficiency of styrene initiated by the derivatives was lower than that of methyl methacrylate. Our results showed that the dye-linked photoinitators had more efficient photoinitiating than the simple mixture of dye and photoinitator. Furthermore, the derivative with two benzophenone groups displayed more excellent photoiniatiating effects than the derivative with one benzophenone group. Thermodynamics driving for the occurrence of visible-light photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer from chromophore part to benzophenone part was evaluated. Benzopinacol moiety produced in photoreaction was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonant spectroscopy. Thermal stability of the derivatives was analyzed.

  16. Two photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN’s AD

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M

    2014-01-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration of CERN has carried out two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms using counter-propagating ultraviolet laser beams. This excited some non-linear transitions of the antiproton at the wavelengths λ = 139.8–197.0 nm, in a way that reduced the thermal Doppler broadening of the observed resonances. The resulting narrow spectral lines allowed the measurement of three transition frequencies with fractional precisions of 2.3–5 parts in 109. By comparing these values with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was derived as 1836.1526736(23). We briefly review these results.

  17. Effects of nonlinear forces on dynamic mode atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Soma; Sreeram, P A; Raychaudhuri, A K

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the effects of nonlinear tip-sample forces on dynamic mode atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy. The jumps and hysteresis observed in the vibration amplitude (A) versus tip-sample distance (h) curves have been traced to bistability in the resonance curve. A numerical analysis of the basic dynamic equation was used to explain the hysteresis in the experimental curve. It has been found that the location of the hysteresis in the A-h curve depends on the frequency of the forced oscillation relative to the natural frequency of the cantilever.

  18. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  19. Athermalization in atomic force microscope based force spectroscopy using matched microstructure coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torun, H; Finkler, O; Degertekin, F L

    2009-07-01

    The authors describe a method for athermalization in atomic force microscope (AFM) based force spectroscopy applications using microstructures that thermomechanically match the AFM probes. The method uses a setup where the AFM probe is coupled with the matched structure and the displacements of both structures are read out simultaneously. The matched structure displaces with the AFM probe as temperature changes, thus the force applied to the sample can be kept constant without the need for a separate feedback loop for thermal drift compensation, and the differential signal can be used to cancel the shift in zero-force level of the AFM.

  20. The determination of aluminum, copper, iron, and lead in glycol formulations by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Initial screening tests and the results obtained in developing procedures to determine Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb in glycol formulations are described. Atomic absorption completion was selected for Cu, Fe and Pb, and after comparison with emission spectroscopy, was selected for Al also. Before completion, carbon, iron, and lead are extracted with diethyl dithio carbamate (DDC) into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Aluminum was also extracted into MIBK using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. As little as 0.02 mg/l carbon and 0.06 mg/l lead or iron may be determined in glycol formulations. As little as 0.3 mg/l aluminum may be determined.

  1. Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayano, Ryugo S.

    2010-01-01

    Antiprotonic helium atom, a metastable neutral system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus, was serendipitously discovered, and has been studied at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility. Its transition frequencies have recently been measured to nine digits of precision by laser spectroscopy. By comparing these experimental results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron massratio was determined as 1836.152674(5). This result contributed to the CODATA recommended values of the fundamental physical constants. PMID:20075605

  2. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fara, M.; Novak, F. [EGU Prague, PLC, Bichovice, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  3. Quantification of aortic valve calcification using multislice spiral computed tomography: comparison with atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Ralf; Mahnken, Andreas Horst; Kühl, Harald Peter; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Mevissen, Vera; Stork, Ludwig; Dronskowski, Richard; Langebartels, Georg; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Ortlepp, Jan R

    2006-05-01

    Multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) allows the in vivo detection of valvular calcification. The aim of this study was to validate the quantification of aortic valve calcification (AVC) by MSCT with in vitro measurements by atomic absorption spectroscopy. In 18 patients with severe aortic stenosis, 16 detector row MSCT (SOMATOM Sensation 16, Siemens, Forchheim, Germany with scan parameters as follows: 420 milliseconds tube rotation time, 12 x 0.75 mm collimation, tube voltage 120 KV) was performed before aortic valve replacement. Images were reconstructed at 60% of the RR interval with an effective slice thickness of 3 mm and a reconstruction increment of 2 mm. AVC was assessed using Agatston AVC score, mass AVC score, and volumetric AVC score. After valve replacement, the calcium content of the excised human stenotic aortic valves was determined in vitro using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The mean Agatston AVC score was 3,842 +/- 1,790, the mean volumetric AVC score was 3,061 +/- 1,406, and mass AVC score was 888 +/- 492 as quantified by MSCT. Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed a mean true calcification mass (Ca5(PO4)3OH) of 19 +/- 8 mass%. There was a significant correlation between in vivo AVC scores determined by MSCT and in vitro mean true calcification mass (r = 0.74, P = 0.0004 for mass AVC score, r = 0.79, P = 0.0001 for volumetric AVC score and r = 0.80, P = 0.0001 for Agatston AVC score) determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Linear regression analysis showed a significant association between the degree of hydroxyapatite (given in mass%) in the aortic valve and the degree of AVC (R = 0.74, F = 19.6, P = 0.0004 for mass AVC score, R = 0.80, F = 29.3, P = 0.0001 for Agatston AVC score and R = 0.79, F = 27.3, P = 0.0001 for volumetric AVC score) assessed by MSCT. MSCT allows accurate in vivo quantification of aortic valve calcifications.

  4. Highly sensitive determination of hydrogen peroxide and glucose by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuki; Morikawa, Mika; Okada, Ryuichi; Miura, Toshiaki; Ito, Etsuro

    2011-01-01

    Because H(2)O(2) is generated by various oxidase-catalyzed reactions, a highly sensitive determination method of H(2)O(2) is applicable to measurements of low levels of various oxidases and their substrates such as glucose, lactate, glutamate, urate, xanthine, choline, cholesterol and NADPH. We propose herein a new, highly sensitive method for the measurement of H(2)O(2) and glucose using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). FCS has the advantage of allowing us to determine the number of fluorescent molecules. FCS measures the fluctuations in fluorescence intensity caused by fluorescent probe movement in a small light cavity with a defined volume generated by confocal illumination. We thus developed a highly sensitive determination system of H(2)O(2) by FCS, where horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzes the formation of a covalent bond between fluorescent molecules and proteins in the presence of H(2)O(2). Our developed system gave a linear calibration curve for H(2)O(2) in the range of 28 to 300 nM with the detection limit of 8 nM. In addition, by coupling with glucose oxidase (GOD)-catalyzed reaction, the method allows to measure glucose in the range of 80 nM to 1.5 µM with detection limit of 24 nM. The method was applicable to the assay of glucose in blood plasma. The mean concentration of glucose in normal human blood plasma was determined to be 4.9 mM. In comparison with commercial available methods, the detection limit and the minimum value of determination for glucose are at least 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive in our system. Such a highly sensitive method leads the fact that only a very small amount of plasma (20 nL) is needed for the determination of glucose concentration in blood plasma.

  5. Highly sensitive determination of hydrogen peroxide and glucose by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Watabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because H(2O(2 is generated by various oxidase-catalyzed reactions, a highly sensitive determination method of H(2O(2 is applicable to measurements of low levels of various oxidases and their substrates such as glucose, lactate, glutamate, urate, xanthine, choline, cholesterol and NADPH. We propose herein a new, highly sensitive method for the measurement of H(2O(2 and glucose using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: FCS has the advantage of allowing us to determine the number of fluorescent molecules. FCS measures the fluctuations in fluorescence intensity caused by fluorescent probe movement in a small light cavity with a defined volume generated by confocal illumination. We thus developed a highly sensitive determination system of H(2O(2 by FCS, where horseradish peroxidase (HRP catalyzes the formation of a covalent bond between fluorescent molecules and proteins in the presence of H(2O(2. Our developed system gave a linear calibration curve for H(2O(2 in the range of 28 to 300 nM with the detection limit of 8 nM. In addition, by coupling with glucose oxidase (GOD-catalyzed reaction, the method allows to measure glucose in the range of 80 nM to 1.5 µM with detection limit of 24 nM. The method was applicable to the assay of glucose in blood plasma. The mean concentration of glucose in normal human blood plasma was determined to be 4.9 mM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In comparison with commercial available methods, the detection limit and the minimum value of determination for glucose are at least 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive in our system. Such a highly sensitive method leads the fact that only a very small amount of plasma (20 nL is needed for the determination of glucose concentration in blood plasma.

  6. The use of atomic spectroscopy in the pharmaceutical industry for the determination of trace elements in pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewen, Nancy

    2011-06-25

    The subject of the analysis of various elements, including metals and metalloids, in the pharmaceutical industry has seen increasing importance in the last 10-15 years, as modern analytical instrumentation has afforded analysts with the opportunity to provide element-specific, accurate and meaningful information related to pharmaceutical products. Armed with toxicological data, compendial and regulatory agencies have revisited traditional approaches to the testing of pharmaceuticals for metals and metalloids, and analysts have begun to employ the techniques of atomic spectroscopy, such as flame- and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS, Flame AA or FAA and GFAAS), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), to meet their analytical needs. Newer techniques, such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation ICP-MS (LAICP-MS) are also beginning to see wider applications in the analysis of elements in the pharmaceutical industry.This article will provide a perspective regarding the various applications of atomic spectroscopy in the analysis of metals and metalloids in drug products, active pharmaceutical ingredients (API's), raw materials and intermediates. The application of atomic spectroscopy in the analysis of metals and metalloids in clinical samples, nutraceutical, metabolism and pharmacokinetic samples will not be addressed in this work. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Redox speciation analysis of antimony in soil extracts by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, Edwar; Pinochet, Hugo; Gregori, Ida de E-mail: idegrego@ucv.cl; Potin-Gautier, Martine

    2003-07-18

    A sensitive atomic spectrometric method for the redox speciation analysis of antimony in soils is described. The method is based on the selective generation of stibine from Sb(III) in a continuous flow system using atomic fluorescence spectrometry for detection. Sb(V) is masked by citric or oxalic acid in HCl medium. The procedure was optimized with synthetic solutions of Sb(III) and Sb(V). The effect of carboxylic acid and HCl concentration on the recovery of Sb(III) and Sb(V) species from standard solutions, and on the fluorescence signal were studied. Both species were extracted from soil with H{sub 2}O, 0.05 mol l{sup -1} EDTA and 0.25 mol l{sup -1} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Since the soil samples were collected from sites impacted by copper mining activities, the effect of Cu{sup 2+} on the determination of antimony in synthetic solutions and soil extracts was studied. Cu{sup 2+} decreased the Sb(III) signal, but had no effect on the total antimony determination. Therefore, the selective determination of Sb(III) was carried out in citric acid-HCl medium, using the analyte addition technique. Total antimony in soil extracts was determined using the standard calibration technique after reducing Sb(V) to Sb(III) at room temperature with KI-ascorbic acid. The Sb(V) concentration was calculated from the difference between total antimony and Sb(III). The limits of detection (PS Analytical, Excalibur Millennium model) were 17 and 10 ng l{sup -1} for Sb(III) and total antimony, respectively, and the R.S.D. at the 0.5-{mu}g l{sup -1} level were 2.5 and 2.4%, respectively. The total antimony concentration of soils is in the mg kg{sup -1} range; the Sb recovery from the different soils by the extracting solutions was between less than 0.02% and approximately 10%. Similar recoveries were obtained using EDTA and sulfuric acid solutions. Sb(V) was found to be the main antimony species extracted from soils.

  8. Applicability of multisyringe chromatography coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry for mercury speciation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Mar, J.L.; Hinojosa-Reyes, L. [Department of Chemistry Sciences, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Cd. Universitaria, Pedro de Alba s/n, C.P. 66451 San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Serra, A.M. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Hernandez-Ramirez, A. [Department of Chemistry Sciences, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Cd. Universitaria, Pedro de Alba s/n, C.P. 66451 San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Cerda, V., E-mail: victor.cerda@uib.es [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2011-12-05

    Graphical abstract: An automatic system, based on the applicability of multisyringe chromatography (MSC) coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV/AFS) detection is developed for mercury speciation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The on-line coupling of MSC to CV/AFS was developed for mercury speciation analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The speciation of MeHg{sup +}, Hg{sup 2+} and EtHg{sup +} was achieved on a RP C18 monolithic column. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hyphenated system provided higher sample throughput compared to HPLC-CV/AFS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The limits of detection for mercury species were comparable or better than those reported by HPLC-CV/AFS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The developed method also provided low instrumental and operational costs. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel automatic approach for the speciation of inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}), methylmercury (MeHg{sup +}) and ethylmercury (EtHg{sup +}) using multisyringe chromatography (MSC) coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV/AFS) was developed. For the first time, the separation of mercury species was accomplished on a RP C18 monolithic column using a multi-isocratic elution program. The elution protocol involved the use of 0.005% 2-mercapthoethanol in 240 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6)-acetonitrile (99:1, v/v), followed by 0.005% 2-mercapthoethanol in 240 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6)-acetonitrile (90:10, v/v). The eluted mercury species were then oxidized under post-column UV radiation and reduced using tin(II) chloride in an acidic medium. Subsequently, the generated mercury metal were separated from the reaction mixture and further atomized in the flame atomizer and detected by AFS. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the limits of detection (3{sigma}) were found to be 0.03, 0.11 and 0.09 {mu}g L{sup -1} for MeHg{sup +}, Hg{sup 2+} and EtHg{sup +}, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 6) of the

  9. Silicon photon-counting avalanche diodes for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalet, Xavier; Ingargiola, Antonino; Colyer, Ryan A; Scalia, Giuseppe; Weiss, Shimon; Maccagnani, Piera; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool with applications in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. The basic feature of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume and work in a low concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single molecule. Detecting photon bursts is a challenging task: the small number of emitted photons in each burst calls for high detector sensitivity. Bursts are very brief, requiring detectors with fast response time and capable of sustaining high count rates. Finally, many bursts need to be accumulated to achieve proper statistical accuracy, resulting in long measurement time unless parallelization strategies are implemented to speed up data acquisition. In this paper we will show that silicon single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) best meet the needs of single-molecule detection. We will review the key SPAD parameters and highlight the issues to be addressed in their design, fabrication and operation. After surveying the state-of-the-art SPAD technologies, we will describe our recent progress towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. The potential of this approach is illustrated with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements.

  10. Silicon photon-counting avalanche diodes for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalet, Xavier; Ingargiola, Antonino; Colyer, Ryan A.; Scalia, Giuseppe; Weiss, Shimon; Maccagnani, Piera; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool with applications in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. The basic feature of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume and work in a low concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single molecule. Detecting photon bursts is a challenging task: the small number of emitted photons in each burst calls for high detector sensitivity. Bursts are very brief, requiring detectors with fast response time and capable of sustaining high count rates. Finally, many bursts need to be accumulated to achieve proper statistical accuracy, resulting in long measurement time unless parallelization strategies are implemented to speed up data acquisition. In this paper we will show that silicon single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) best meet the needs of single-molecule detection. We will review the key SPAD parameters and highlight the issues to be addressed in their design, fabrication and operation. After surveying the state-of-the-art SPAD technologies, we will describe our recent progress towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. The potential of this approach is illustrated with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. PMID:25309114

  11. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry in the diagnostics of alopecia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomorokha, Diana P.; Pigoreva, Yulia N.; Salmin, Vladimir V.

    2016-04-01

    Development of optical biopsy methods has a great interest for medical diagnostics. In clinical and experimental studies it is very important to analyze blood circulation quickly and accurately, thereby laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is widely used. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (UV LIFS) is express highly sensitive and widely-spread method with no destructive impact, high excitation selectivity and the possibility to use in highly scattering media. The goal of this work was to assess a correlation of UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry parameters, and a possibility to identify or to differentiate various types of pathological changes in tissues according to their autofluorescence spectra. Three groups of patients with diffuse (symptomatic) alopecia, androgenic alopecia, and focal alopecia have been tested. Each groups consisted of not less than 20 persons. The measurements have been done in the parietal and occipital regions of the sculls. We used the original automated spectrofluorimeter to record autofluorescence spectra, and standard laser Doppler flowmeter BLF-21 (Transonic Systems, Inc., USA) to analyze the basal levels of blood circulation. Our results show that UV LIFS accurately distinguishes the zones with different types of alopecia. We found high correlation of the basal levels of blood circulation and the integrated intensity of autofluorescence in the affected tissue.

  12. Potential application of synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy to determine benzo[a]pyrene in soil extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Guoxiong [School of Biology, Institute for Research on the Environment and Sustainability, Devonshire Building, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Killham, Ken [Department of Plant and Soil Science, Cruickshank Building, University of Aberdeen, AB24 3UU (United Kingdom); Singleton, Ian [School of Biology, Institute for Research on the Environment and Sustainability, Devonshire Building, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ian.singleton@ncl.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a significant environmental pollutant and rapid, accurate methods to quantify this compound in soil for both research and environmental investigation purposes are required. In this work, solvent extracts from five contrasting soils spiked with four different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were rapidly analysed by using a synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) method. The SFS method was validated using HPLC with ultraviolet detection. A good correlation for the quantification of BaP in soil extracts by the two methods was observed. The detection limit of the SFS method was 1.6 x 10{sup -9} g/ml in CTAB micellar medium (7.8 mmol/l). The work demonstrates that SFS has potential as a sensitive, accurate, rapid, simple and economic methodology and an efficient alternative to HPLC for fast confirmation and quantification of BaP in complex soil extracts. - Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy has potential as a method for confirmation of benzo[a]pyrene in soil extracts.

  13. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy shows that monomeric polyglutamine molecules form collapsed structures in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Scott L.; Jayaraman, Murali; Frieden, Carl; Wetzel, Ronald; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2006-01-01

    We have used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements to quantify the hydrodynamic sizes of monomeric polyglutamine as a function of chain length (N) by measuring the scaling of translational diffusion times (τD) for the peptide series (Gly)-(Gln)N-Cys-Lys2 in aqueous solution. We find that τD scales with N as τoNν and therefore ln(τD) = ln(τo) + νln(N). The values for ν and ln(τo) are 0.32 ± 0.02 and 3.04 ± 0.08, respectively. Based on these observations, we conclude that water is a polymeric poor solvent for polyglutamine. Previous studies have shown that monomeric polyglutamine is intrinsically disordered. These observations combined with our fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data suggest that the ensemble for monomeric polyglutamine is made up of a heterogeneous collection of collapsed structures. This result is striking because the preference for collapsed structures arises despite the absence of residues deemed to be hydrophobic in the sequence constructs studied. Working under the assumption that the driving forces for collapse are similar to those for aggregation, we discuss the implications of our results for the thermodynamics and kinetics of polyglutamine aggregation, a process that has been implicated in the molecular mechanism of Huntington's disease. PMID:17075061

  14. Detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in raw menhaden fish oil using fluorescence spectroscopy: Method development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Edwin A; Ridley, Lauren M; Murphy, Wyatt R; Sowa, John R; Bentivegna, Carolyn S

    2015-09-01

    Raw menhaden fish oil was developed for biomonitoring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using fluorescence spectroscopy. Menhaden (Genus Brevoortia) were collected in 2010 and/or 2011 from Delaware Bay, New Jersey, USA; James River, Virginia, USA; Vermillion Bay, Louisiana, USA (VBLA); and Barataria Bay, Louisiana, USA (BBLA). Barataria Bay, Louisiana received heavy oiling from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Method development included determining optimal wavelengths for PAH detection, fish oil matrix interferences, and influence of solvent concentration on extraction. Results showed that some fish oils contained high molecular weight PAH-like compounds in addition to other fluorescent compounds such as albumin and vitamin A and vitamin E. None of these naturally occurring compounds interfered with detection of high molecular weight PAHs. However, data suggested that the lipid component of fish oil was altering fluorescence spectra by supporting the formation of PAH excimers. For example, the most intense excitation wavelength for hydroxypyrene shifted from Ex285/Em430 to Ex340/Em430. Comparison of Deepwater Horizon crude oil and fish oil spectra indicated that some fish oils contained crude oil-like PAHs. Using wavelengths of Ex360/Em430, fish oil concentrations were calculated as 3.92 μg/g, 0.61 μg/g, and 0.14 μg/g for a Delaware Bay sample, BBLA 2011, and VBLA 2011, respectively. Overall, these results supported using menhaden fish oil to track PAH exposures spatially and temporally. © 2015 SETAC.

  15. Analytical form of the autocorrelation function for the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hołyst, Robert; Poniewierski, Andrzej; Zhang, Xuzhu

    2017-02-08

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) can provide information about diffusion coefficients and rate constants of chemical reactions in small systems of interacting molecules. However, the interpretation of FCS experiments depends crucially on the model of the autocorrelation function for the fluorescence intensity fluctuations. In this theoretical work, we consider a system of fluorescent molecules that diffuse and interact with massive particles, e.g. surfactant micelles. Using the general formalism of FCS, we derive a new analytical approximation of the autocorrelation function for systems in which both diffusion and a binary reaction occur. This approximation provides a smooth interpolation between the limit of fast reaction (much faster than diffusion), and the opposite limit of slow reaction. Our studies of noncovalent interactions of micelles with dyes by FCS provided an experimental case to which the approximate autocorrelation function was successfully applied [X. Zhang, A. Poniewierski, A. Jelińska, A. Zagożdżon, A. Wisniewska, S. Hou and R. Hołyst, Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 8186-8194].

  16. Studies on the formation and stability of triplex DNA using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongyan; Huang, Xiangyi; Ren, Jicun

    2016-05-01

    Triplex DNA has become one of the most useful recognition motifs in the design of new molecular biology tools, therapeutic agents and sophisticated DNA-based nanomaterials because of its direct recognition of natural double-stranded DNA. In this paper, we developed a sensitive and microscale method to study the formation and stability characterization of triplex DNA using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The principle of this method is mainly based on the excellent capacity of FCS for sensitively distinguishing between free single-strand DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes and fluorescent probe-double-strand DNA (dsDNA) hybridized complexes. First, we systematically investigated the experimental conditions of triplex DNA formation. Then, we evaluated the equilibrium association constants (K(a)) under different ssDNA probe lengths, composition and pH. Finally, we used FCS to measure the hybridization fraction of a 20-mer perfectly matched ssDNA probe and three single-base mismatched ssDNA probes with 146-mer dsDNA. Our data illustrated that FCS is a useful tool for the direct determination of the thermodynamic parameters of triplex DNA formation and discrimination of a single-base mismatch of triplex DNA without denaturation. Compared with current methods, our method is characterized by high sensitivity, good universality and small sample and reagent requirements. More importantly, our method has the potential to become a platform for triplex DNA research in vitro. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Binding mechanism of PicoGreen to DNA characterized by magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Schellenberg, Helene; Walhorn, Volker; Toensing, Katja; Anselmetti, Dario

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescent dyes are broadly used in many biotechnological applications to detect and visualize DNA molecules. However, their binding to DNA alters the structural and nanomechanical properties of DNA and, thus, interferes with associated biological processes. In this work we employed magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the binding of PicoGreen to DNA at room temperature in a concentration-dependent manner. PicoGreen is an ultrasensitive quinolinium nucleic acid stain exhibiting hardly any background signal from unbound dye molecules. By means of stretching and overwinding single, torsionally constrained, nick-free double-stranded DNA molecules, we acquired force-extension and supercoiling curves which allow quantifying DNA contour length, persistence length and other thermodynamical binding parameters, respectively. The results of our magnetic tweezers single-molecule binding study were well supported through analyzing the fluorescent spectra of stained DNA. On the basis of our work, we could identify a concentration-dependent bimodal binding behavior, where, apparently, PicoGreen associates to DNA as an intercalator and minor-groove binder simultaneously.

  18. Spectroscopy, microscopy and fluorescence imaging of Origanum vulgare L. basis for nondestructive quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Johanna M; Iriel, Analia; Claudia Marchi, María; Gabriela Lagorio, María

    2013-01-01

    The organs of Origanum vulgare L. plant were examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and autofluorescence imaging. The different organs were also studied spectroscopically. Fluorescence emission spectra were recorded for intact inflorescences, leaves and stems. Several fluorescence ratios (Blue/Red, Blue/Far-red, Green/Red and Green/Far-red), which varied depending on the considered organ of the plant, were derived. For leaves, a dependence of fluorescence spectra with water content was obtained as well. The intact samples were also analyzed by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. These spectra were transformed to the Remission function depending on the wavenumber and two absorption bands (811 and 1740 cm(-1)), which displayed differences according to the plant organ sampled, were detected. These results were consistent with higher carvacrol content in inflorescences. The spectroscopic results were connected with the microscopic observation and with the presence of relevant nutraceutics contained in the plant. The optical indexes derived in this work may serve as potential indicators to be explored in the development of nondestructive methods for oregano quality assessment. © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  19. Interactions of chlorine with tropical aquatic fulvic acids and formation of intermediates observed by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Eduarda R.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of tropical aquatic fulvic acids (AFA with chlorine and formation of trihalomethanes were characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy. The aquatic humic substances (AHS were isolated from a dark-brown stream (located in a environmental protection area near Cubatão city in São Paulo State, Brazil by means of the collector XAD 8 according the procedure recommended by the International Humic Substances Society. The photoluminescence measurements were made by using a Perkin Elmer spectrometer; AHS, aquatic humic acids (AHA and AFA samples were assayed. The interactions of AFA and chlorine were characterized by using different reaction times (1, 24, 48, 72 and 168 h and chlorine concentrations (2.5, 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 mg L-1. The relative fluorescence intensity for AFA was significantly decreased with the increasing of chlorine concentration and reaction time. The reduction of fluorescence intensity in the region of longer wavelength was interpreted as an indicative of interaction between condensed aromatic groups of AFA and chlorine.

  20. Pancreatic tumor detection using hypericin-based fluorescence spectroscopy and cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavu, Harish; Geary, Kevin; Fetterman, Harold R.; Saxton, Romaine E.

    2005-04-01

    Hypericin is a novel, highly fluorescent photosensitizer that exhibits selective tumor cell uptake properties and is particularly resistant to photobleaching. In this study, we have characterized hypericin uptake in human pancreatic tumor cells with relation to incubation time, cell number, and drug concentration. Ex vivo hypericin based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed to detect the presence of MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity of BALB/c nude mice, as well as to quantify gross tumor burden. Hypericin based cytology of peritoneal lavage samples, using both one and two photon laser confocal microscopy, demonstrated more than a two-fold increase in fluorescence emission of pancreatic tumor cells as compared to control samples. In vitro treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with hypericin based photodynamic therapy showed tumor cell cytotoxicity in a drug dose, incident laser power, and time dependent manner. For these experiments, a continuous wavelength solid-state laser source (532 nm) was operated at power levels in the range of 100-400 mW. Potential applications of hypericin in tumor diagnosis, staging, and therapy will be presented.

  1. Tracking variations of fluorescent dissolved organic matter during wastewater treatment by accumulative fluorescence emission spectroscopy combined with principal component, second derivative and canonical correlation analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xujing; Yu, Huibin; Yan, Zongcheng; Gao, Hongjie; Zhang, Yizhang

    2018-03-01

    Accumulative fluorescence emission (AFE) spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis (PCA), second derivative and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was firstly developed into an available tool to track variations in dissolved organic matter (DOM) fractions and contents during wastewater treatment. Samples were collected from a wastewater treatment plant with a traditional anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A2O) process. The AFE spectroscopy deduced from the sum of intensities along the excitation wavelengths of fluorescence excitation emission matrix (EEM), could distinctly track tyrosine-like, tryptophan-like, fulvic-like substances. The AFE spectroscopy with the PCA not only disaggregated DOM fractions into the tyrosine-like, tryptophan-like, microbial humic-like, fulvic-like and humic-like substances, but discriminated DOM fractions from the physical sedimentation, anaerobic/anoxic and oxic processes. Absolute areas of fluorescence components obtained by the second derivative AFF spectra had positive liner correlations with Fmax of the relevant components modeling from EEM-PARAFAC, especially the tryptophan-like (R 2  = 0.95, p < 0.01) and tyrosine-like (R 2  = 0.83, p < 0.01) substances. The CCA of the sites presented that the potential factors contained the tryptophan-like and tyrosine-like substances. This indirectly proved that the tryptophan-like and tyrosine-like substances were the dominant components of fluorescent DOM, which were further removed in A2O than the other fluorescent components. The CCA of the fluorescent components exhibited that the potential factors included the sites #1 to #6, which were located in the original wastewater, sand setting, primary sedimentation, anaerobic, anoxic, facultative units. This elaborated that the fluorescent components were mainly degraded in the physical sedimentation, anaerobic and anoxic processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Precision X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms as a probe of low-energy kaon-nucleus interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the exotic atoms where one atomic 1s electron is replaced by a K−, the strong interaction between the K− and the nucleus introduces an energy shift and broadening of the low-lying kaonic atomic levels which are determined by only the electromagnetic interaction. By performing X-ray spectroscopy for Z = 1,2 kaonic atoms, the SIDDHARTA experiment determined with high precision the shift and width for the 1s state of K− p and the 2p state of kaonic helium-3 and kaonic helium-4. These results provided unique information of the kaon-nucleus interaction in the low energy limit.

  3. Atomic layer deposition to prevent metal transfer from implants: An X-ray fluorescence study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilo, Fabjola [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Borgese, Laura, E-mail: laura.borgese@unibs.itl [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Prost, Josef; Rauwolf, Mirjam; Turyanskaya, Anna; Wobrauschek, Peter; Kregsamer, Peter; Streli, Christina [Atominstitut, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Pazzaglia, Ugo [Dipartimento Specialità Medico Chirurgiche Sc. Radiol. e Sanità Pubblica, University of Brescia, v.le Europa, 11, 25121 Brescia (Italy); Depero, Laura E. [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Co and Cr migrate from bare alloy implant to the surrounding tissue showing a cluster distribution. • Co and Cr migrate from the TiO{sub 2} coated implant to the surrounding tissue showing a decreasing gradient distribution from the alloy surface. • TiO{sub 2} coating layers obtained by ALD on Co–Cr alloy show a barrier effect for the migration of metals. • The thicker the TiO{sub 2} layer deposited by ALD, the lower the metal migration. • The migration of metals from bare alloy toward the surrounding tissue increases with time. This effect is not detected in the coated samples. - Abstract: We show that Atomic Layer Deposition is a suitable coating technique to prevent metal diffusion from medical implants. The metal distribution in animal bone tissue with inserted bare and coated Co–Cr alloys was evaluated by means of micro X-ray fluorescence mapping. In the uncoated implant, the migration of Co and Cr particles from the bare alloy in the biological tissues is observed just after one month and the number of particles significantly increases after two months. In contrast, no metal diffusion was detected in the implant coated with TiO{sub 2}. Instead, a gradient distribution of the metals was found, from the alloy surface going into the tissue. No significant change was detected after two months of aging. As expected, the thicker is the TiO{sub 2} layer, the lower is the metal migration.

  4. Correlated fluorescence-atomic force microscopy studies of the clathrin mediated endocytosis in SKMEL cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hor, Amy; Luu, Anh; Kang, Lin; Scott, Brandon; Bailey, Elizabeth; Hoppe, Adam; Smith, Steve

    2017-02-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is one of the central pathways for cargo transport into cells, and plays a major role in the maintenance of cellular functions, such as intercellular signaling, nutrient intake, and turnover of plasma membrane in cells. The clathrin-mediated endocytosis process involves invagination and formation of clathrin-coated vesicles. However, the biophysical mechanisms of vesicle formation are still debated. Currently, there are two models describing membrane bending during the formation of clathrin cages: the first involves the deposition of all clathrin molecules to the plasma membrane, forming a flat lattice prior to membrane bending, whereas in the second model, membrane bending happens simultaneously as the clathrin arrives to the site to form a clathrin-coated cage. We investigate clathrin vesicle formation mechanisms through the utilization of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy for high resolution topographical imaging in neutral buffer solution of unroofed cells exposing the inner membrane, combined with fluorescence imaging to definitively label intracellular constituents with specific fluorophores (actin filaments labeled with green phalloidin and clathrin coated vesicles with the fusion protein Tq2) in SKMEL (Human Melanoma) cells. An extensive statistical survey of many hundreds of CME events, at various stages of progression, are observed via this method, allowing inferences about the dominant mechanisms active in CME in SKMEL cells. Results indicate a mixed model incorporating aspects of both the aforementioned mechanisms for CME.

  5. An Effective-Hamiltonian Approach to CH5+, Using Ideas from Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougen, Jon T.

    2016-06-01

    In this talk we present the first steps in the design of an effective Hamiltonian for the vibration-rotation energy levels of CH5+. Such a Hamiltonian would allow calculation of energy level patterns anywhere along the path travelled by a hypothetical CH5+ (or CD5+) molecule as it passes through various coupling cases, and might thus provide some hints for assigning the observed high-resolution spectra. The steps discussed here, which have not yet addressed computational problems, focus on mapping the vibration-rotation problem in CH5+ onto the five-electron problem in the boron atom, using ideas and mathematical machinery from Condon and Shortley's book on atomic spectroscopy. The mapping ideas are divided into: (i) a mapping of particles, (ii) a mapping of coordinates (i.e., mathematical degrees of freedom), and (iii) a mapping of quantum mechanical interaction terms. The various coupling cases along the path correspond conceptually to: (i) the analog of a free-rotor limit, where the H atoms see the central C atom but do not see each other, (ii) the low-barrier and high-barrier tunneling regimes, and (iii) the rigid-molecule limit, where the H atoms remain locked in some fixed molecular geometry. Since the mappings considered here often involve significant changes in mathematics, a number of interesting qualitative changes occur in the basic ideas when passing from B to CH5+, particularly in discussions of: (i) antisymmetrization and symmetrization ideas, (ii) n,l,ml,ms or n,l,j,mj quantum numbers, and (iii) Russell-Saunders computations and energy level patterns. Some of the mappings from B to CH5+ to be discussed are as follows. Particles: the atomic nucleus is replaced by the C atom, the electrons are replaced by protons, and the empty space between particles is replaced by an "electron soup." Coordinates: the radial coordinates of the electrons map onto the five local C-H stretching modes, the angular coordinates of the electrons map onto three rotational

  6. Single Ra{sup +} ion spectroscopy - towards a measurement of atomic parity violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez Portela, Mayerlin; Mohanti, A.; Dijck, E.A.; Bekker, H.; Boell, O.; Berg, J. van den; Giri, G.S.; Jungmann, K.; Onderwater, C.J.G.; Santra, B.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Versolato, O.O.; Wansbeek, L.W.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H.W. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    The sensitivity of the Atomic Parity Violation (APV) signal grows faster than the third power of the atomic number Z. Ra{sup +} (Z=88) is heaviest alkaline earth ion available. A single trapped Ra{sup +} ion opens a very promising path for a measurement atomic parity violation. One of the experimental challenges is the localization of the ion within a fraction of an optical wavelength. For this the current experiments are focused on trapping and laser cooling of Ba{sup +} ions as a precursor for Ra{sup +}. Ba{sup +} ions are trapped and laser cooled in a precision hyperbolic Paul trap. Work towards single Ba{sup +} ion localization and detection is in progress. Recently the hyperfine structure of the 6d{sub 2}D{sub 3/2} states and the isotope shift of the 6d{sub 2}D{sub 3/2}-7p{sub 2}P{sub 1/2} transition in the isotopes {sup 209-214}Ra{sup +} has been measured in online laser spectroscopy experiments at the KVI AGOR/TRIμP facility. These results are essential for the interpretation of an APV measurement in Ra{sup +}.

  7. Beyond-Born-Oppenheimer effects in sub-kHz-precision photoassociation spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Mateusz; Buchachenko, Alexei A.; Ciuryło, Roman; Julienne, Paul S.; Yamada, Hirotaka; Kikuchi, Yuu; Takahashi, Kakeru; Takasu, Yosuke; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2017-12-01

    We present high-resolution two-color photoassociation spectroscopy of Bose-Einstein condensates of ytterbium atoms. The use of narrow Raman resonances and careful examination of systematic shifts enabled us to measure 13 bound-state energies for three isotopologues of the ground-state ytterbium molecule with standard uncertainties of the order of 500 Hz. The atomic interactions are modeled using an ab initio based mass-scaled Born-Oppenheimer potential whose long-range van der Waals parameters and total WKB phase are fitted to experimental data. We find that the quality of the fit of this model, of about 112.9 kHz (rms) can be significantly improved by adding the recently calculated beyond-Born-Oppenheimer (BBO) adiabatic corrections [J. J. Lutz and J. M. Hutson, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 330, 43 (2016), 10.1016/j.jms.2016.08.007] and by partially treating the nonadiabatic effects using distance-dependent reduced masses. Our BBO interaction model represents the experimental data to within about 30.2 kHz on average, which is 3.7 times better than the "reference" Born-Oppenheimer model. We calculate the s -wave scattering lengths for bosonic isotopic pairs of ytterbium atoms with error bars over two orders of magnitude smaller than previous determinations. For example, the s -wave scattering length for 174Yb is +5.55812 (50 ) nm.

  8. New Strategies for Atomic Scale Measurements at Interfaces using Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, David A.

    1997-03-01

    The local electronic structure of a material can be measured directly from the energy loss spectrum of a swift electron scattered through it. When the electron beam is focussed down to the width of an atomic column, the electronic density of states at an interface, grain boundary or impurity site can be decomposed by site, chemical species and angular momentum. Here, we discuss the use of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) fine structure to provide insight into the origin of grain boundary and interfacial properties. EELS can reveal the physics underlying why a particular local bonding arrangement develops. Even a qualitative understanding of local bonding can help indentify possible sites for chemical reactions and potentially weak points at a grain boundary. More can be done however: an EELS sum rule allows quantitative estimates of grain boundary energies. This is particularly useful at general, large angle grain boundaries where no other atomic scale information can be obtained. As an example, we show how atomic-scale EELS measurements of grain boundaries in Ni_3Al (D.A. Muller, S. Subramanian, P.E. Batson, S.L. Sass, J. Silcox, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 75 4744 (1995). lead not only to rules-of-thumb for segregation and bond strength, but also to quantitative estimates of the boundary cohesion. Application to magnetic multilayers and Al:Cu interconnects will also be touched on. (Work at Cornell supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER45322 and NSF grant DMR-9121654.)

  9. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-05

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor.

  10. Atomic spectroscopy studies of short-lived isotopes and nuclear isomer separation with the ISOLDE RILIS

    CERN Document Server

    Fedosseev, V; Weissman, L; Mishin, V I; Federov, D V; Seliverstov, D M; Horn, R; Huber, G; Lassen, J; Wendt, K

    2003-01-01

    The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) at the ISOLDE on-line isotope separator is based on the selective excitation of atomic transitions by tunable laser radiation. Ion beams of isotopes of 20 elements have been produced using the RILIS setup. Together with the mass separator and a particle detection system it represents a tool for high-sensitive laser spectroscopy of short-lived isotopes. By applying narrow-bandwidth lasers for the RILIS one can study isotope shifts (IS) and hyperfine structure (HFS) of atomic optical transitions. Such measurements are capable of providing data on nuclear charge radii, spins and magnetic moments of exotic nuclides far from stability. Although the Doppler broadening of the optical absorption lines limits the resolution of the technique, the accuracy of the HFS measurements examined in experiments with stable Tl isotopes approaches a value of 100 MHz. Due to the hyperfine splitting of atomic lines the RILIS gives an opportunity to separate nuclear isomers. Isomer s...

  11. AN IN VIVO STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION ON TISSUES BY LASER FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Guseva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laser fluorescence spectroscopy (LFS is widely used in various medical areas, oncology being the most known of them. In general, the LFS is used for in vivo diagnostics of tumors. Recent studies have shown that this method could be used for diagnostics of local inflammation, induced by thermal or mechanical injury. It is of interest if LFS could be used for assessment of soft biological tissue injury caused by radiation exposure. Aim: To study fluorescence of an exogenous photosensitizer and its changes over time in the radiation injury area by LFS method in vivo. Materials and methods: The experiment was done in 12 outbred SHK mice whose right hind limbs were irradiated using a gamma-therapy device ROKUS-AM (source, 60Co, at dose of 15 Gy. Before irradiation, the photosensitizer Photosens was administered to all animals intraperitoneally at dose of 2.5 mg/kg. For 21 days fluorescence was assessed in vivo with a laser diagnostic system LAKK-M in the “fluorescence” operation mode, with an excitation wavelength of 635 nm. At days 7 and 21, tissue samples from the irradiated areas of the model animals were studied histologically and differential blood cell counts were assessed simultaneously. Results: The LFS method showed an increase in the accumulation of the photosensitizer in the affected area, compared to an intact contralateral area, with higher signal intensity from the irradiated limb. The changes in the fluorescence signal from the affected over time had two characteristic peaks at days 3 and 14, probably reflecting the stage of local radiation injury. Conclusion: The use of LFS with an exogenous photosensitizer has a potential for a personalized assessment of radiation reactions in radiology.

  12. Quantitative generalized ratiometric fluorescence spectroscopy for turbid media based on probe encapsulated by biologically localized embedding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Xiu-Fang; Chen, Zeng-Ping, E-mail: zpchen2002@hotmail.com; Cui, Yin-Yin; Hu, Yuan-Liang; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-05-19

    PEBBLE (probe encapsulated by biologically localized embedding) nanosensor encapsulating an intensity-based fluorescence indicator and an inert reference fluorescence dye inside the pores of stable matrix can be used as a generalized wavelength-ratiometric probe. However, the lack of an efficient quantitative model render the choices of inert reference dyes and intensity-based fluorescence indicators used in PEBBLEs based generalized wavelength-ratiometric probes rather limited. In this contribution, an extended quantitative fluorescence model was derived specifically for generalized wavelength-ratiometric probes based on PEBBLE technique (QFM{sub GRP}) with a view to simplify the design of PEBBLEs and hence further extend their application potentials. The effectiveness of QFM{sub GRP} has been tested on the quantitative determination of free Ca{sup 2+} in both simulated and real turbid media using a Ca{sup 2+} sensitive PEBBLE nanosensor encapsulating Rhod-2 and eosin B inside the micropores of stable polyacrylamide matrix. Experimental results demonstrated that QFM{sub GRP} could realize precise and accurate quantification of free Ca{sup 2+} in turbid samples, even though there is serious overlapping between the fluorescence excitation peaks of eosin B and Ca{sup 2+} bound Rhod-2. The average relative predictive error value of QFM{sub GRP} for the test simulated turbid samples was 5.9%, about 2–4 times lower than the corresponding values of partial least squares calibration model and the empirical ratiometric model based on the ratio of fluorescence intensities at the excitation peaks of Ca{sup 2+} bound Rhod-2 and eosin B. The recovery rates of QFM{sub GRP} for the real and spiked turbid samples varied from 93.1% to 101%, comparable to the corresponding results of atomic absorption spectrometry. - Highlights: • An advanced model was derived for generalized wavelength-ratiometric PEBBLEs. • The model can simplify the design of generalized wavelength

  13. Study of the Neutron Deficient Pb and Bi Isotopes by Simultaneous Atomic- and Nuclear-Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Kessler, T

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study systematically nuclear properties of the neutron deficient lead $^{183-189}$Pb, $^{191g}$Pb, $^{193g}$Pb and bismuth isotopes $^{188-200}$Bi by atomic spectroscopy with the ISOLDE resonance ionisation laser ion source (RILIS) combined with simultaneous nuclear spectroscopy at the detection set-up. The main focus is the determination of the mean square charge radii of $^{183-190}$Pb and $^{188-193}$Bi from which the influence of low-lying intruder states should become obvious. Also the nuclear spin and magnetic moments of ground-states and long-lived isomers will be determined unambiguously through evaluation of the hyperfine structure, and new isomers could be discovered. The decay properties of these nuclei can be measured by $\\alpha$-$\\gamma$ and $\\beta$-$\\gamma$ spectroscopy. With this data at hand, possible shape transitions around mid-shell at N$\\sim$104 will be studied. This data is crucial for the direct test of nuclear theory in the context of intruder state influence (e.g. energy ...

  14. Atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy on the assessment of protein folding and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A; Martins, Ivo C; Santos, Nuno C

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) applied to biological systems can, besides generating high-quality and well-resolved images, be employed to study protein folding via AFM-based force spectroscopy. This approach allowed remarkable advances in the measurement of inter- and intramolecular interaction forces with piconewton resolution. The detection of specific interaction forces between molecules based on the AFM sensitivity and the manipulation of individual molecules greatly advanced the understanding of intra-protein and protein-ligand interactions. Apart from the academic interest in the resolution of basic scientific questions, this technique has also key importance on the clarification of several biological questions of immediate biomedical relevance. Force spectroscopy is an especially appropriate technique for "mechanical proteins" that can provide crucial information on single protein molecules and/or domains. Importantly, it also has the potential of combining in a single experiment spatial and kinetic measurements. Here, the main principles of this methodology are described, after which the ability to measure interactions at the single-molecule level is discussed, in the context of relevant protein-folding examples. We intend to demonstrate the potential of AFM-based force spectroscopy in the study of protein folding, especially since this technique is able to circumvent some of the difficulties typically encountered in classical thermal/chemical denaturation studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterizing chlorine oxidation of dissolved organic matter and disinfection by-product formation with fluorescence spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, Katherine M. H.; Summers, R. Scott; McKnight, Diane M.

    2009-12-01

    Relationships between chlorine demand and disinfection by-product (DBP) formation during chlorination and fluorescence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were developed. Fluorescence excitation and emission (EEM) spectroscopy was employed, and parameters including fluorescence index, redox index, and overall fluorescence intensity (OFI) were correlated to chlorine demand and DBP formation. The EEMs were also analyzed using a well established global parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model which resolves the fluorescence signal into 13 components, including quinone-like and protein-like components. Over an 8-day chlorination period the OFI and sum of the 13 PARAFAC loadings decreased by more than 70%. The remaining identified quinone-like compounds within the DOM were shifted to a more oxidized state. Quinone fluorescence was strongly correlated to both reduced fluorescence intensity and to chlorine demand which indicates that fluorescence may be used to track the chlorine oxidation of DOM. Quinone fluorescence was also correlated strongly with both classes of regulated DBPs: total trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. Quinone-like components were found to be strongly correlated to overall, short-term, and long-term specific DBP formation. The results of this study show that fluorescence is a useful tool in tracking both DOM oxidation and DBP formation during chlorination.

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity: analysis of 30 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco, ALN; Correr, WR; Azevedo, LH; Galletta, VK; Pinto, CAL; Kowalski, LP; Kurachi,C.

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer is a major health problem worldwide and although early diagnosis of potentially malignant and malignant diseases is associated with better treatment results, a large number of cancers are initially misdiagnosed, with unfortunate consequences for long-term survival. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a noninvasive modality of diagnostic approach using induced fluorescence emission in tumors that can improve diagnostic accuracy. The objective of this study was to determine the ability to ...

  17. Nondestructive application of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy for quantitative analyses of phenolic compounds in strawberry fruits (Fragaria x ananassa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, J S; Rühmann, S; Rego, I; Puhl, I; Treutter, D; Zude, M

    2008-05-14

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) was nondestructively applied on strawberries (EX = 337 nm, EM = 400-820 nm) to test the feasibility of quantitatively determining native phenolic compounds in strawberries. Eighteen phenolic compounds were identified in fruit skin by UV and MS spectroscopy and quantitatively determined by use of rp-HPLC for separation and diode-array or chemical reaction detection. Partial least-squares calibration models were built for single phenolic compounds by means of nondestructively recorded fluorescence spectra in the blue-green wavelength range using different data preprocessing methods. The direct orthogonal signal correction resulted in r (2) = 0.99 and rmsep fruits.

  18. Diffusion behavior of the fluorescent proteins eGFP and Dreiklang in solvents of different viscosity monitored by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Cornelia; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Vukojević, Vladana; Friedrich, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy relies on temporal autocorrelation analysis of fluorescence intensity fluctuations that spontaneously arise in systems at equilibrium due to molecular motion and changes of state that cause changes in fluorescence, such as triplet state transition, photoisomerization and other photophysical transformations, to determine the rates of these processes. The stability of a fluorescent molecule against dark state conversion is of particular concern for chromophores intended to be used as reference tags for comparing diffusion processes on multiple time scales. In this work, we analyzed properties of two fluorescent proteins, the photoswitchable Dreiklang and its parental eGFP, in solvents of different viscosity to vary the diffusion time through the observation volume element by several orders of magnitude. In contrast to eGFP, Dreiklang undergoes a dark-state conversion on the time scale of tens to hundreds of microseconds under conditions of intense fluorescence excitation, which results in artificially shortened diffusion times if the diffusional motion through the observation volume is sufficiently slowed down. Such photophysical quenching processes have also been observed in FCS studies on other photoswitchable fluorescent proteins including Citrine, from which Dreiklang was derived by genetic engineering. This property readily explains the discrepancies observed previously between the diffusion times of eGFP- and Dreiklang-labeled plasma membrane protein complexes.

  19. Ionization potentials of the lanthanides and actinides - towards atomic spectroscopy of super-heavy elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, K.; Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Raeder, S.

    2014-06-01

    A study on the systematic of the atomic ionization potentials for both, the lanthanide and actinide elements have been performed. The existing experimental basis, predominantly relying on results from resonance ionization spectroscopy, has been extended by novel laser spectroscopic investigations on the elements Au, Dy, Pr and Pa. Conclusive results of suitable precision for the ionization potentials could be obtained except for Pa, due to the complexity of its atomic spectrum. Nevertheless, a consistent interpretation of the observed trends for the ionization potentials of lanthanides and actinides was attempted. The series of lanthanides depicts the two well-known, completely smooth, linear trends above and below half-shell closure, from which an expectation value for the missing ionization potential of the all radioactive element promethium of IP Pm= 44985(140) cm -1 was derived. In contrast, the lighter members of the actinide series below the half-filled shell exhibit a significant deviation from predictions, which are ascribed dominantly to relativistic influences affecting the energetic position of the multitude of low-lying configurations. With the assumption of removal of a 6d electron during the ionization process agreement between theory and experiment and a smooth, even though not linear behavior, is obtained also in this region of the Periodic Table. This new interpretation could help to better predict similar trends and systematics for elements heavier than the actinides. Particularly relevant in this respect are the super-heavy elements, which are produced only in minuscule atom numbers and thus were not accessible for any atomic physics study yet.

  20. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples. PMID:21997909

  1. An integrated instrumental setup for the combination of atomic force microscopy with optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, R J; Heyes, C D; Knebel, D; Röcker, C; Nienhaus, G U

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, the study of single biomolecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques has resulted in a plethora of new information regarding the physics underlying these complex biological systems. It is especially advantageous to be able to measure the optical, topographical, and mechanical properties of single molecules simultaneously. Here an AFM is used that is especially designed for integration with an inverted optical microscope and that has a near-infrared light source (850 nm) to eliminate interference between the optical experiment and the AFM operation. The Tip Assisted Optics (TAO) system consists of an additional 100 x 100-microm(2) X-Y scanner for the sample, which can be independently and simultaneously used with the AFM scanner. This allows the offset to be removed between the confocal optical image obtained with the sample scanner and the simultaneously acquired AFM topography image. The tip can be positioned exactly into the optical focus while the user can still navigate within the AFM image for imaging or manipulation of the sample. Thus the tip-enhancement effect can be maximized and it becomes possible to perform single molecule manipulation experiments within the focus of a confocal optical image. Here this is applied to simultaneous measurement of single quantum dot fluorescence and topography with high spatial resolution. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Super-resolution fluorescence imaging and correlation spectroscopy: Principles and examples of application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović-Talisman Tijana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-organization of cell-surface receptors in structurally distinct domains in the plasma membrane is of vital interest for correct cellular signaling. However, this dynamic process is difficult to study in cells with sufficiently high temporal and spatial resolution. We present here two quantitative high-resolution methods with single-molecule sensitivity, Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS and pair-correlation Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (pcPALM, which enable nondestructive study of receptor diffusion and lateral organization at the nanoscale level. We introduce here the methods and review their application in studies of lateral organization of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs. Examples from our own work on opioid receptor lateral organization are presented in order to illustrate the most recent advances in the field. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172015 i br. 45001

  3. Surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy in PCR product analysis by peptide nucleic acid probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Danfeng; Yu, Fang; Kim, Junyoung; Scholz, Judith; Nielsen, Peter E; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2004-12-14

    Surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) was recently developed for PCR product analysis, which allowed for real-time monitoring of hybridization processes and for the detection of trace amounts of PCR products, with a detection limit of 100 fmol on the peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe surface, and 500 fmol on the DNA probe surface. By selectively labeling the strands of PCR-amplified DNA, it was shown that the heat denaturation process in combination with the application of low-salt condition substantially reduced the interference from the antisense strands and thus simplified the surface hybridization. Furthermore, SPFS was demonstrated to be capable of quantitatively discriminating the difference induced by single nucleotide substitution, even within one minute of contact time.

  4. Comparison of nanoparticle diffusion using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and differential dynamic microscopy within concentrated polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokeen, Namita; Issa, Christopher; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis

    2017-12-01

    We studied the diffusion of nanoparticles (NPs) within aqueous entangled solutions of polyethylene oxide (PEO) by using two different optical techniques. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, a method widely used to investigate nanoparticle dynamics in polymer solution, was used to measure the long-time diffusion coefficient (D) of 25 nm radius particles within high molecular weight, Mw = 600 kg/mol PEO in water solutions. Differential dynamic microscopy (DDM) was used to determine the wave-vector dependent dynamics of NPs within the same polymer solutions. Our results showed good agreement between the two methods, including demonstration of normal diffusion and almost identical diffusion coefficients obtained by both techniques. The research extends the scope of DDM to study the dynamics and rheological properties of soft matter at a nanoscale. The measured diffusion coefficients followed a scaling theory, which can be explained by the coupling between polymer dynamics and NP motion.

  5. Reconstruction of confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy depth scans obtained with a laboratory setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Wolff, Timo; Seim, Christian; Stoytschew, Valentin; Malzer, Wolfgang; Kanngiesser, Birgit

    2014-10-07

    Depth profiling with confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (confocal micro-XRF) is a nondestructive analytical method for obtaining elemental depth profiles in the micrometer region. Up until now, the quantitative reconstruction of thicknesses and elemental concentration of stratified samples has been only possible with monochromatic, thus, synchrotron radiation. In this work, we present a new calibration and reconstruction procedure, which renders quantification in the laboratory feasible. The proposed model uses the approximation of an effective spot size of the optic in the excitation channel and relies on the calibration of the transmission of this lens beforehand. Calibration issues are discussed and validation measurements on thick multielement reference material and a stratified system are presented.

  6. Organic matter source discrimination by humic acid characterization: synchronous scan fluorescence spectroscopy and Ferrate(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Carolyn; Sharma, Virender K; Baum, J Clayton; Sohn, Mary

    2013-02-01

    In this study, seven soil and sedimentary humic acid samples were analyzed by synchronous scan fluorescence (SSF) spectroscopy. The spectra of these humic acids were compared to each other and characterized, based on three major SSF peaks centered at approximately 281, 367 and 470 nm. Intensity ratios were calculated based on these peaks that were used to numerically assist in source discrimination. All humic acid samples were then reacted with Ferrate(VI) and were again analyzed with SSF. Upon the addition of Ferrate(VI) SSF spectra were obtained which more readily differentiated humic acid source. This method will assist geochemists and water management districts in tracing sources of organic matter to receiving water bodies and may aid in the elucidation of the chemical nature of humic acids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Atomic scattering spectroscopy for determination of the polarity of semipolar AlN grown on ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ueno, Kohei; Ohta, Jitsuo; Oshima, Masaharu; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    Determination of the polarity of insulating semipolar AlN layers was achieved via atomic scattering spectroscopy. The back scattering of neutralized He atoms on AlN surfaces revealed the atomic alignment of the topmost layers of semipolar AlN and the ZnO substrate. Pole figures of the scattering intensity were used to readily determine the polarity of these wurtzite-type semipolar materials. In addition, we found that +R-plane AlN epitaxially grows on -R-plane ZnO, indicating that the polarity flips at the semipolar AlN/ZnO interface. This polarity flipping is possibly explained by the appearance of -c and m-faces on the -R ZnO surfaces, which was also revealed by atomic scattering spectroscopy.

  8. The Effect of a Fluorophore Photo-Physics on the Lipid Vesicle Diffusion Coefficient Studied by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabik, Dominik; Przybyło, Magda; Sikorski, Aleksander; Langner, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) is a technique, which allows determination of the diffusion coefficient and concentration of fluorescent objects suspended in the solution. The measured parameter is the fluctuation of the fluorescence signal emitted by diffusing molecules. When 100 nm DOPC vesicles labeled with various fluorescent dyes (Fluorescein-PE, NBD-PE, Atto488 DOPE or βBodipy FL) were measured, different values of diffusion coefficients have been obtained. These diffusion coefficients were different from the expected values measured using the dynamic light scattering method (DLS). The FCS was initially developed for solutions containing small fluorescent molecules therefore the observed inconsistency may result from the nature of vesicle suspension itself. The duration of the fluorescence signal may depend on the following factors: the exposure time of the labeled object to the excitation beam, the photo-physical properties (e.g., stability) of a fluorophore, the theoretical model used for the calculations of the diffusion coefficient and optical properties of the vesicle suspension. The diffusion coefficients determined for differently labeled liposomes show that its dependence on vesicle size and quantity of fluorescent probed used for labeling was significant demonstrating that the fluorescence properties of the fluorophore itself (bleaching and/or blinking) were critical factors for a correct outcome of FCS experiment. The new, based on combined FCS and DLS measurements, method for the determination of the focal volume prove itself to be useful for the evaluation of a fluorescence dye with respect to its applicability for FCS experiment.

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopy of single molecules at room temperature and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Taekjip [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    We performed fluorescence spectroscopy of single and pairs of dye molecules on a surface at room temperature. Near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and far field scanning optical microscope with multi-color excitation/detection capability were built. The instrument is capable of optical imaging with 100nm resolution and has the sensitivity necessary for single molecule detection. A variety of dynamic events which cannot be observed from an ensemble of molecules is revealed when the molecules are probed one at a time. They include (1) spectral jumps correlated with dark states, (2) individually resolved quantum jumps to and from the meta-stable triplet state, (3) rotational jumps due to desorption/readsorption events of single molecules on the surface. For these studies, a computer controlled optical system which automatically and rapidly locates and performs spectroscopic measurements on single molecules was developed. We also studied the interaction between closely spaced pairs of molecules. In particular, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a single resonant pair of donor and acceptor molecules was measured. Photodestruction dynamics of the donor or acceptor were used to determine the presence and efficiency of energy transfer Dual molecule spectroscopy was extended to a non-resonant pair of molecules to obtain high resolution differential distance information. By combining NSOM and dual color scheme, we studied the co-localization of parasite proteins and host proteins on a human red blood cell membrane infected with malaria. These dual-molecule techniques can be used to measure distances, relative orientations, and changes in distances/orientations of biological macromolecules with very good spatial, angular and temporal resolutions, hence opening new capabilities in the study of such systems.

  10. Ultrasensitive detection of genetically modified plants by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junfeng; Xing, Da; Chen, Tongsheng; Liu, Jinfeng

    2006-09-01

    In this study, a novel method for the direct detection of GMP without amplified by the general method of PCR is firstly presented and proved by experiments. In our method, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, cleaving nucleic acid by restriction endonuclease and two nucleic acid probe hybridization techniques are combined to distinguish the caulifiower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and determine whether samples contain genetically modified components. The detection principle is as follows: firstly two restriction endonucleases FOKI and BsrDlare used to cleave the genomic DNA and the 169bp fragments of CaMV 35S promoter are retrieved; secondly, two nucleic acid probes labeled by Rhodamine Green and y5 dyes respectively hybridize with cleaved 169bp fragments of CaMV 35S promoter; thirdly, the hybridization products simultaneously with two dye-labeled probes are detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and GMP is distinguished. As the detection and analysis by FCS can be performed at the level of single molecule, there is no need for any type of amplification. Genetically modified tobaccos are measured by this method. The results indicate this method can detect CaMV 35S promoter of GMP exactly and the sensitivity can be down to 3.47X10 -10M. Because no any type of amplification is involved, this method can avoid the non-specffic amplification and false-positive problems of PCR, Due to its high-sensitivity, simplicity, reliability and little need for sample amounts, this method promises to be a highly effective detection method for GMP.

  11. The interaction between atoms of Au and Cu with clean Si(111) surface: a study combining synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis and theoretical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Hudson W P; Batista, Ana P L; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Pérez, Carlos A; Gobbi, Angelo Luiz

    2009-09-15

    In order to evaluate the interactions between Au/Cu atoms and clean Si(111) surface, we used synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis and theoretical calculations. Optimized geometries and energies on different adsorption sites indicate that the binding energies at different adsorption sites are high, suggesting a strong interaction between metal atom and silicon surface. The Au atom showed higher interaction than Cu atom. The theoretical and experimental data showed good agreement.

  12. Potential of two-line atomic fluorescence for temperature imaging in turbulent indium-oxide-producing flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Münsterjohann, Bettina; Huber, Franz J. T.; Klima, Tobias C.; Holfelder, Sandra; Engel, Sascha R. [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Lehrstuhl für Technische Thermodynamik (LTT) (Germany); Miller, Joseph D. [Aerospace Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory (United States); Meyer, Terrence R. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT) (Germany); Will, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.will@fau.de [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Lehrstuhl für Technische Thermodynamik (LTT) (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The applicability of two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) for temperature imaging in an indium-based flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) process is demonstrated using a single tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to generate the required excitation wavelengths consecutively. Single-shot images of the detected fluorescence signals demonstrate that the signal levels in the flame are suitable for evaluation of temperature and verify the capability and potential of the measurement technique directly during particle formation without additional indium seeding. Qualitative averaged two-dimensional temperature distributions in the FSP flame are presented, showing the influence of varying sheath gas flow rates on the resulting temperature distribution. With the addition of a second OPO and detection system, the two fluorescence signals acquired consecutively in this work could be obtained simultaneously and enable spatio-temporally resolved single-shot temperature measurements in flame synthesis processes of indium-containing nanoparticles.

  13. Microneedles rollers as a potential device to increase ALA diffusion and PpIX production: evaluations by wide-field fluorescence imaging and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracielli Sousa, R. Phamilla; de Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Fujita, Alessandra K. L.; Requena, Michelle B.; Govone, Angelo Biassi; Escobar, André; de Nardi, Andrigo B.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2014-03-01

    One of the limitations of topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is the poor ability to penetrate biological barriers of skin and the recurrence rates in treatments. This study aimed to identify possible signs of increased diffusion of ALA-induced PpIX by fluorescence images and fluorescence spectroscopy. The research was done using in vivo porcine skin model. Before the cream application, microholes was performed with microneedles rollers in only one direction, afterward the ALA cream was applied at a 2.5cm2 area in triplicate and an occlusive dressing was placed. PpIX production was monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy collected at skin surface after 70, 100, 140, and 180 minutes of ALA incubation. About 100 fluorescence spectra of each treatment were collected, distributed by about five points for each site. Wide-field fluorescence imaging was made after 70, 90, and 170 minutes after treatment. The results obtained by imaging analysis indicated increase of the PpIX diffusion in the skin surface using the microneedles rollers (MNs) before ALA application. Circular regions of red fluorescence around the microholes were observed. In addition, the fluorescence spectra showed a greater intensity (2 times as many) in groups microneedles rollers associated. In conclusion, our data shown greater homogeneity and PpIX production in the groups pre-treated with microneedles indicating that the technique can be used to greater uniformity of PpIX production throughout the area to be treated reducing the chances of recurrent tumor as well as has potential for decreasing the time of therapy. (FUNDING SUPPORT:CAPES, CNPq and FAPESP)

  14. Detection of rhodopsin dimerization in situ by PIE-FCCS, a time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam W

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin self-associates in the plasma membrane. At low concentrations, the interactions are consistent with a monomer-dimer equilibrium (Comar et al., J Am Chem Soc 136(23):8342-8349, 2014). At high concentrations in native tissue, higher-order clusters have been observed (Fotiadis et al., Nature 421:127-128, 2003). The physiological role of rhodopsin dimerization is still being investigated, but it is clear that a quantitative assessment is essential to determining the function of rhodopsin clusters in vision. To quantify rhodopsin interactions, I will outline the theory and methodology of a specialized time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for measuring membrane protein-protein interactions called pulsed-interleaved excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (PIE-FCCS). The strength of this technique is its ability to quantify rhodopsin interactions in situ (i.e., a live cell plasma membrane). There are two reasons for restricting the scope to live cell membranes. First, the compositional heterogeneity of the plasma membrane creates a complex milieu with thousands of lipid, protein, and carbohydrate species. This makes it difficult to infer quaternary interactions from detergent solubilized samples or construct a model phospholipid bilayer that recapitulates all of the interactions present in native membranes. Second, organizational structure and dynamics is a key feature of the plasma membrane, and fixation techniques like formaldehyde cross-linking and vitrification will modulate the interactions. PIE-FCCS is based on two-color fluorescence imaging with time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) (Becker et al., Rev Sci Instrum 70:1835-1841, 1999). By time-tagging every detected photon, the data can be analyzed as a fluorescence intensity distribution, fluorescence lifetime histogram, or fluorescence (cross-)correlation spectra (FCS/FCCS) (Becker, Advanced time-correlated single-photon counting techniques, Springer, Berlin, 2005). These

  15. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons - Spectroscopy and collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    This is the second volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 2 introduces lasers and quantum optics, while the main focus is on the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy, as well as on collision physics as the continuum counterpart to bound molecular states. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  16. Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging and Force Spectroscopy of Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsay, Joseph D.; Cosentino, Katia; García-Sáez, Ana J.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile, high-resolution imaging technique that allows visualization of biological membranes. It has sufficient magnification to examine membrane substructures and even individual molecules. AFM can act as a force probe to measure interactions and mechanical properties of membranes. Supported lipid bilayers are conventionally used as membrane models in AFM studies. In this protocol, we demonstrate how to prepare supported bilayers and characterize their structure and mechanical properties using AFM. These include bilayer thickness and breakthrough force. The information provided by AFM imaging and force spectroscopy help define mechanical and chemical properties of membranes. These properties play an important role in cellular processes such as maintaining cell hemostasis from environmental stress, bringing membrane proteins together, and stabilizing protein complexes. PMID:26273958

  17. Towards 4-dimensional atomic force spectroscopy using the spectral inversion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeffrey C; Solares, Santiago D

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel and potentially powerful, yet relatively simple extension of the spectral inversion method, which offers the possibility of carrying out 4-dimensional (4D) atomic force spectroscopy. With the extended spectral inversion method it is theoretically possible to measure the tip-sample forces as a function of the three Cartesian coordinates in the scanning volume (x, y and z) and the vertical velocity of the tip, through a single 2-dimensional (2D) surface scan. Although signal-to-noise ratio limitations can currently prevent the accurate experimental implementation of the 4D method, and the extraction of rate-dependent material properties from the force maps is a formidable challenge, the spectral inversion method is a promising approach due to its dynamic nature, robustness, relative simplicity and previous successes.

  18. Towards 4-dimensional atomic force spectroscopy using the spectral inversion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C. Williams

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a novel and potentially powerful, yet relatively simple extension of the spectral inversion method, which offers the possibility of carrying out 4-dimensional (4D atomic force spectroscopy. With the extended spectral inversion method it is theoretically possible to measure the tip–sample forces as a function of the three Cartesian coordinates in the scanning volume (x, y and z and the vertical velocity of the tip, through a single 2-dimensional (2D surface scan. Although signal-to-noise ratio limitations can currently prevent the accurate experimental implementation of the 4D method, and the extraction of rate-dependent material properties from the force maps is a formidable challenge, the spectral inversion method is a promising approach due to its dynamic nature, robustness, relative simplicity and previous successes.

  19. Minimizing pulling geometry errors in atomic force microscope single molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Monica; Lee, Whasil; Ke, Changhong; Marszalek, Piotr E; Cole, Daniel G; Clark, Robert L

    2008-10-01

    In atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy (AFM-SMFS), it is assumed that the pulling angle is negligible and that the force applied to the molecule is equivalent to the force measured by the instrument. Recent studies, however, have indicated that the pulling geometry errors can drastically alter the measured force-extension relationship of molecules. Here we describe a software-based alignment method that repositions the cantilever such that it is located directly above the molecule's substrate attachment site. By aligning the applied force with the measurement axis, the molecule is no longer undergoing combined loading, and the full force can be measured by the cantilever. Simulations and experimental results verify the ability of the alignment program to minimize pulling geometry errors in AFM-SMFS studies.

  20. An open source/real-time atomic force microscope architecture to perform customizable force spectroscopy experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materassi, Donatello; Baschieri, Paolo; Tiribilli, Bruno; Zuccheri, Giampaolo; Samorì, Bruno

    2009-08-01

    We describe the realization of an atomic force microscope architecture designed to perform customizable experiments in a flexible and automatic way. Novel technological contributions are given by the software implementation platform (RTAI-LINUX), which is free and open source, and from a functional point of view, by the implementation of hard real-time control algorithms. Some other technical solutions such as a new way to estimate the optical lever constant are described as well. The adoption of this architecture provides many degrees of freedom in the device behavior and, furthermore, allows one to obtain a flexible experimental instrument at a relatively low cost. In particular, we show how such a system has been employed to obtain measures in sophisticated single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments [Fernandez and Li, Science 303, 1674 (2004)]. Experimental results on proteins already studied using the same methodologies are provided in order to show the reliability of the measure system.

  1. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy to probe single membrane proteins in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, K Tanuj

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has opened vast avenues hitherto inaccessible to the biological scientist. The high temporal (millisecond) and spatial (nanometer) resolutions of the AFM are suited for studying many biological processes in their native conditions. The AFM cantilever stylus is aptly termed as a "lab on a tip" owing to its versatility as an imaging tool as well as a handle to manipulate single bonds and proteins. Recent examples assert that the AFM can be used to study the mechanical properties and monitor processes of single proteins and single cells, thus affording insight into important mechanistic details. This chapter specifically focuses on practical and analytical protocols of single-molecule AFM methodologies related to high-resolution imaging and single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins. Both these techniques are operator oriented, and require specialized working knowledge of the instrument, theoretical, and practical skills.

  2. Extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy and atomic models of highly charged heavy ions in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, C.; Murakami, I.; Koike, F.; Tamura, N.; Sakaue, H. A.; Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Kato, D.; Ohashi, H.; Higashiguchi, T.; Sudo, S.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2017-01-01

    We report recent results of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy of highly charged heavy ions in plasmas produced in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The LHD is an ideal source of experimental databases of EUV spectra because of high brightness and low opacity, combined with the availability of pellet injection systems and reliable diagnostic tools. The measured heavy elements include tungsten, tin, lanthanides and bismuth, which are motivated by ITER as well as a variety of plasma applications such as EUV lithography and biological microscopy. The observed spectral features drastically change between quasicontinuum and discrete depending on the plasma temperature, which leads to some new experimental identifications of spectral lines. We have developed collisional-radiative models for some of these ions based on the measurements. The atomic number dependence of the spectral feature is also discussed.

  3. Probing nucleic acid-ion interactions with buffer exchange-atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfeld, Max; Herschlag, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The ion atmosphere of nucleic acids directly affects measured biochemical and biophysical properties. However, study of the ion atmosphere is difficult due to its diffuse and dynamic nature. Standard techniques available have significant limitations in sensitivity, specificity, and directness of the assays. Buffer exchange-atomic emission spectroscopy (BE-AES) was developed to overcome many of the limitations of previously available techniques. This technique can provide a complete accounting of all ions constituting the ionic atmosphere of a nucleic acid at thermodynamic equilibrium. Although initially developed for the study of the ion atmosphere of nucleic acids, BE-AES has also been applied to study site-bound ions in RNA and protein. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lattice-Assisted Spectroscopy: A Generalized Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Ultracold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantian, A; Schollwöck, U; Giamarchi, T

    2015-10-16

    We propose a scheme to measure the frequency-resolved local particle and hole spectra of any optical lattice-confined system of correlated ultracold atoms that offers single-site addressing and imaging, which is now an experimental reality. Combining perturbation theory and time-dependent density matrix renormalization group simulations, we quantitatively test and validate this approach of lattice-assisted spectroscopy on several one-dimensional example systems, such as the superfluid and Mott insulator, with and without a parabolic trap, and finally on edge states of the bosonic Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model. We highlight extensions of our basic scheme to obtain an even wider variety of interesting and important frequency resolved spectra.

  5. High precision X-ray spectroscopy in hydrogen-like fermionic and bosonic atomic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borchert, G.L.; Anagnostopoulos, D.; Augsburger, M.; Belmiloud, D.; Castelli, C.; Chatellard, D.; Daum, M.; Egger, J.P.; El-Khoury, P.; Elble, M.; Frosch, R.; Gorke, H.; Gotta, D.; Hauser, P.; Indelicato, P.; Kirch, K.; Lenz, S.; Nelms, N.; Rashid, K.; Schult, O.W.B. (and others)

    1998-11-15

    Some time after its formation an exotic atom may be considered a hydrogen-like system consisting of a nucleus and an exotic particle in a bound state. In this situation it is an ideal tool to study cascade properties, while for the innermost orbits it can be used to probe the interaction with the nucleus. From an extended series of experiments using high resolution X-ray spectroscopy for both aspects typical examples are reported and preliminary results are given: 1. To determine the complex scattering length in p-barH the 3D{yields}2P hyperfine transitions have been measured. 2. To determine the pion mass the 5 {yields} 4 transitions in {pi}{sup 14}N have been studied. In all cases a major contribution to the uncertainty originates from the calibration. Therefore a new method is proposed that will establish a universal set of high precision calibration lines for pionic, muonic and electronic systems.

  6. Atomic force microscope-based single-molecule force spectroscopy of RNA unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heus, Hans A; Puchner, Elias M; van Vugt-Jonker, Aafke J; Zimmermann, Julia L; Gaub, Hermann E

    2011-07-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) using the atomic force microscope (AFM) has emerged as an important tool for probing biomolecular interaction and exploring the forces, dynamics, and energy landscapes that underlie function and specificity of molecular interaction. These studies require attaching biomolecules on solid supports and AFM tips to measure unbinding forces between individual binding partners. Herein we describe efficient and robust protocols for probing RNA interaction by AFM and show their value on two well-known RNA regulators, the Rev-responsive element (RRE) from the HIV-1 genome and an adenine-sensing riboswitch. The results show the great potential of AFM-SMFS in the investigation of RNA molecular interactions, which will contribute to the development of bionanodevices sensing single RNA molecules. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The use of one- and two- photon induced fluorescence spectroscopy for the optical characterization of carcinogenic aflatoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeesters, L.; Meulebroeck, W.; Raeymaekers, S.; Thienpont, H.

    2014-09-01

    Carcinogenic and toxic contaminants in food and feed products are nowadays mostly detected by destructive, time-consuming chemical analyses, like HPLC and LC-MS/MS methods. However, as a consequence of the severe and growing regulations on food products by the European Union, there arose an increased demand for the ultra-fast, high-sensitive and non-destructive detection of contaminants in food and feed products. Therefore, we have investigated fluorescence spectroscopy for the characterization of carcinogenic aflatoxins. With the use of a tunable titanium-sapphire laser in combination with second and third harmonic wavelength generation, both one- and two-photon induced fluorescence excitation wavelengths could be generated using the same setup. We characterized and compared the one- and two-photon induced fluorescence spectra of pure aflatoxin powder, after excitation with 365nm and 730nm respectively. Moreover, we investigated the absolute fluorescence intensity as function of the excitation power density. Afterwards, we applied our characterization setup to the detection of aflatoxins in maize grains. The fluorescence spectra of both healthy and contaminated maize samples were experimentally characterized. In addition to the fluorescence spectrum of the pure aflatoxin, we observed an unwanted influence of the intrinsic fluorescence of the maize. Depending on the excitation wavelength, a varying contrast between the fluorescence spectra of the healthy and contaminated samples was obtained. After a comparison of the measured fluorescence signals, a detection criterion for the optical identification of the contaminated maize samples could be defined. As a result, this illustrates the use of fluorescence spectroscopy as a valuable tool for the non-destructive, real-time and high-sensitive detection of aflatoxins in maize.

  8. Use of COD, TOC, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy to Estimate BOD in Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Evelyn; Batista, Jacimaria R; Gerrity, Daniel

    2017-02-01

      Common to all National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits in the United States is a limit on biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), and fluorescence spectroscopy are also capable of quantifying organic content, although the mechanisms of quantification and the organic fractions targeted differ for each test. This study explores correlations between BOD5 and these alternate test procedures using facility influent, primary effluent, and facility effluent samples from a full-scale water resource recovery facility. Relative reductions of the water quality parameters proved to be strong indicators of their suitability as surrogates for BOD5. Suitable correlations were generally limited to the combined datasets for the three sampling locations or the facility effluent alone. COD exhibited relatively strong linear correlations with BOD5 when considering the three sample points (r = 0.985) and the facility effluent alone (r = 0.914), while TOC exhibited a suitable linear correlation with BOD5 in the facility effluent (r = 0.902). Exponential regressions proved to be useful for estimating BOD5 based on TOC or fluorescence (r > 0.95).

  9. Characterization of protein adsorption onto FePt nanoparticles using dual-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Maffre

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Using dual-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we have analyzed the adsorption of three human blood serum proteins, namely serum albumin, apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein E4, onto polymer-coated, fluorescently labeled FePt nanoparticles (~12 nm diameter carrying negatively charged carboxyl groups on their surface. For all three proteins, a step-wise increase in hydrodynamic radius with protein concentration was observed, strongly suggesting the formation of protein monolayers that enclose the nanoparticles. Consistent with this interpretation, the absolute increase in hydrodynamic radius can be correlated with the molecular shapes of the proteins known from X-ray crystallography and solution experiments, indicating that the proteins bind on the nanoparticles in specific orientations. The equilibrium dissociation coefficients, measuring the affinity of the proteins to the nanoparticles, were observed to differ by almost four orders of magnitude. These variations can be understood in terms of the electrostatic properties of the proteins. From structure-based calculations of the surface potentials, positively charged patches of different extents can be revealed, through which the proteins interact electrostatically with the negatively charged nanoparticle surfaces.

  10. Fluorescence background removal method for biological Raman spectroscopy based on empirical mode decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Bejarano, Maritza; Dorantes-Mendez, Guadalupe; Ramirez-Elias, Miguel; Mendez, Martin O; Alba, Alfonso; Rodriguez-Leyva, Ildefonso; Jimenez, M

    2016-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy of biological tissue presents fluorescence background, an undesirable effect that generates false Raman intensities. This paper proposes the application of the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method to baseline correction. EMD is a suitable approach since it is an adaptive signal processing method for nonlinear and non-stationary signal analysis that does not require parameters selection such as polynomial methods. EMD performance was assessed through synthetic Raman spectra with different signal to noise ratio (SNR). The correlation coefficient between synthetic Raman spectra and the recovered one after EMD denoising was higher than 0.92. Additionally, twenty Raman spectra from skin were used to evaluate EMD performance and the results were compared with Vancouver Raman algorithm (VRA). The comparison resulted in a mean square error (MSE) of 0.001554. High correlation coefficient using synthetic spectra and low MSE in the comparison between EMD and VRA suggest that EMD could be an effective method to remove fluorescence background in biological Raman spectra.

  11. A sensitive assay of mercury using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhancheng; Lan, Tao; Huang, Xiangyi; Dong, Chaoqing; Ren, Jicun

    2015-08-01

    We described a new and sensitive method for the determination of mercury ions (Hg(2+) ) on the basis of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and recognition of oligonucleotides. In this assay, 30-nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were modified with oligonucleotides containing thymine bases (T) as fluorescent probes, and the principle of this assay was based on the specific binding of Hg(2+) by two DNA thymine bases. When two GNPs labelled with different oligonucleotides were mixed with a sample containing Hg(2+), the T-Hg(2+)-T binding reaction should cause GNPs to form dimers (or oligomers), which would lead to a significant increase in the characteristic diffusion time of GNPs in the detection volume. The FCS method is a single molecule detection method and can sensitively detect the change in the characteristic diffusion time of GNPs before and after binding reactions. The quantitative analysis was performed according to the relation between the change in the characteristic diffusion time of GNPs and the concentration of Hg(2+). Under optimal conditions, the linear range of this method was from 0.3 nM to 100 nM, and the detection limit was 0.14 nM for Hg(2+). This new method was successfully applied for direct determination of Hg(2+) levels in water and cosmetics samples. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Detection and characterization of stomach cancer and atrophic gastritis with fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Lin, Junxiu; Jia, Chunde; Wang, Rong

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we attempt to find a valid method to distinguish gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis. Auto-fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy of laser induced (514.5 nm and 488.0 nm) was measured. The serum spectrum is different between normal and cancer. Average value of diagnosis parameter for normal serum, red shift is less than 12 nm and Raman relative intensity of peak C by 514.5 nm excited is stronger than that of 488.0 nm. To gastric cancer, its red shift of average is bigger than 12 nm and relative intensity of Raman peak C by 514.5 nm excited is weaker than that by 488.0 nm. To atrophic gastritis, the distribution state of Raman peaks is similar with normal serum and auto-fluorescence spectrum's shape is similar to that of gastric cancer. Its average Raman peak red shift is bigger than 12 nm and the relative intensity of peak C by 514.5 excited is stronger than that of by 488.0. We considered it as a criterion and got an accuracy of 85.6% for diagnosis of gastric cancer compared with the result of clinical diagnosis.

  13. Characterization of powellite-based solid solutions by site-selective time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Moritz; Heck, Stephanie; Bosbach, Dirk; Ganschow, Steffen; Walther, Clemens; Stumpf, Thorsten

    2013-06-21

    We present a comprehensive study of the solid solution system Ca2(MoO4)2-NaGd(MoO4)2 on the molecular scale, by means of site-selective time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Eu(3+) is used as a trace fluorescent probe, homogeneously substituting for Gd(3+) in the solid solution crystal structure. Site-selective TRLFS of a series of polycrystalline samples covering the whole composition range of the solid solution series from 10% substitution of Ca(2+) to the NaGd end-member reveals it to be homogeneous throughout the whole range. The trivalent ions are incorporated into the powellite structure in only one coordination environment, which exhibits a very strong ligand-metal interaction. Polarization-dependent measurements of a single crystal of NaGd(Eu)(MoO4)2 identify the coordination geometry to be of C2v point symmetry. The S4 symmetry of the Ca site within the powellite lattice can be transformed into C2v assuming minor motion in the first coordination sphere.

  14. THE USE OF FLUORESCENCE CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY TO PROBE CHROMATIN IN THE CELL NUCLEUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorscher, Stanley M.; Bartholemew, James C.; Klein, Melvin P.

    1980-03-01

    All systems in thermodynamic equilibrium are subject to spontaneous fluctuations from equilibrium. For very small systems, the fluctuations can be made apparent, and can be used to study the behavior of the system without introducing any external perturbations. The mean squared amplitude of these fluctuations contains information about the absolute size of the system. The characteristic time of the fluctuation autocorrelation function contains kinetic information. In the experiments reported here, these concepts are applied to the binding equilibrium between ethidium bromide and DNA, a system where the fluorescence properties of the dye greatly enhance the effect of spontaneous fluctuations in the binding equilibrium. Preliminary experiments employ well characterized DNA preparations, including calf thymus DNA, SV40 DNA, and calf thymus nucleohistone particles. Additional measurements are described which have been made in small regions of individual nuclei, isolated from green monkey kidney cells, observing as few as 5000 dye molecules. The data indicate that the strength of dye binding increases in nuclei isolated from cells which have been stimulated to enter the cell growth cycle. The viscosity of nuclear material is inferred to be between one and two orders of magnitude greater than that of water, and decreases as the cells leave the resting state, and enter the cell growth cycle. Washing the nuclei also lowers the viscosity. These experiments demonstrate that fluorescence correlation spectroscopy can provide information at the subnuclear level that is otherwise unavailable.

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy for monitoring reduction of natural organic matter and halogenated furanone precursors by biofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleato, Nicolás M; McKie, Michael; Taylor-Edmonds, Lizbeth; Andrews, Susan A; Legge, Raymond L; Andrews, Robert C

    2016-06-01

    The application of fluorescence spectroscopy to monitor natural organic matter (NOM) reduction as a function of biofiltration performance was investigated. This study was conducted at pilot-scale where a conventional media filter was compared to six biofilters employing varying enhancement strategies. Overall reductions of NOM were identified by measuring dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and UV absorbance at 254 nm, as well as characterization of organic sub-fractions by liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) and parallel factors analysis (PARAFAC) of fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (FEEM). The biofilter using granular activated carbon media, with exhausted absorptive capacity, was found to provide the highest removal of all identified PARAFAC components. A microbial or processed humic-like component was found to be most amenable to biodegradation by biofilters and removal by conventional treatment. One refractory humic-like component, detectable only by FEEM-PARAFAC, was not well removed by biofiltration or conventional treatment. All biofilters removed protein-like material to a high degree relative to conventional treatment. The formation potential of two halogenated furanones, 3-chloro-4(dichloromethyl)-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and mucochloric acid (MCA), as well as overall treated water genotoxicity are also reported. Using the organic characterization results possible halogenated furanone and genotoxicity precursors are identified. Comparison of FEEM-PARAFAC and LC-OCD results revealed polysaccharides as potential MX/MCA precursors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Noninvasive evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsuna, Toshiharu; Sato, Masato; Ishihara, Miya; Furukawa, Katsuko S; Nagai, Toshihiro; Kikuchi, Makoto; Ushida, Takashi; Mochida, Joji

    2010-06-01

    Regenerative medicine requires noninvasive evaluation. Our objective is to investigate the application of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) using a nano-second-pulsed laser for evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage (TEC). To prepare scaffold-free TEC, articular chondrocytes from 4-week-old Japanese white rabbits were harvested, and were inoculated at a high density in a mold. Cells were cultured for 5 weeks by rotating culture (RC) or static culture (SC). The RC group and SC group at each week (n = 5), as well as normal articular cartilage and purified collagen type II (as controls), were analyzed by TR-LIFS. The peak wavelength was compared with those of type II collagen immunostaining and type II collagen quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and tensile testing. The fluorescence peak wavelength of the TEC analyzed by this method shifted significantly in the RC group at 3 weeks, and in the SC group at 5 weeks (p TEC.

  17. Characterization of self-assembling copolymers in aqueous solutions using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghein, N; Rouxhet, L; Dinguizli, M; Brewster, M E; Ariën, A; Préat, V; Habib, J L; Gallez, B

    2007-02-12

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy have been used to determine the micropolarity and microviscosity of self-assembling systems based on mmePEG-p(CL-co-TMC) having different PEG chain lengths and different CL/TMC ratios and PEG/MOG/SA (45/5/50) polymers with different PEG chain lengths. Four reporter probes have been used: two spin probes, 16-doxyl stearic acid and 5-doxylstearic acid, and two fluorescent probes, pyrene and 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl) propane (P3P). We found that the micelles based on mmePEG-p(CL-co-TMC) polymers are of a biphasic nature. The micelles are made of a hydrophilic corona with low viscosity while the core of the micelle is more hydrophobic and more viscous. The outer shell is made up of PEG chains, the hydrophobic part of the chains making the core. The partial hydration of the shell seems to lead to a looser chain network than that associated with deeper domains in the micelles. By contrast, in micelles composed of PEG/MOG/SA, there is no clear domain separation. This is consistent with a spatial configuration of random polymeric chains forming a loose network. In these micelles, the microviscosity is low and the hydrophobicity is high.

  18. Investigating temperature effects on extra virgin olive oil using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M.; Ahmad, Naveed; Ali, H.; Bilal, M.; Khan, Saranjam; Ullah, Rahat; Ahmed, M.; Mahmood, S.

    2017-12-01

    The potential of fluorescence spectroscopy has been utilized to study the heating effects on extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). Through a series of experiments, a temperature range from 140 °C  ‑  150 °C has been found where cooking with EVOO is possible without destroying its natural ingredients. Fluorescence emission spectra from all heated and non-heated EVOO samples were recorded using an excitation source at 350 nm, where emission bands in non-heated EVOO at 380, 440, 455, and 525 nm are labelled for vitamin E and a band at 673 nm is assigned for chlorophyll a. The emission band at 525 nm is also responsible for beta carotenoids (vitamin A). As a result of heating, prominent intensity variations have been observed in all spectral bands, but it is particularly affected at 525 nm, indicating the deterioration of vitamin E and beta carotenoids. However, if the temperature of oil can be maintained in the above defined range, then frying food with EVOO is possible by preserving its natural ingredients. The spectral variations resulting from the heating effects have been further highlighted by using principal component analysis for classification purposes.

  19. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  20. Distance Mapping in Proteins Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy: The Tryptophan-Induced Quenching (TrIQ) Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Steven E.; DeWitt, Mark A.; Farrens, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Studying the interplay between protein structure and function remains a daunting task. Especially lacking are methods for measuring structural changes in real time. Here we report our most recent improvements to a method that can be used to address such questions. This method, which we now call Tryptophan induced quenching (TrIQ), provides a straightforward, sensitive and inexpensive way to address questions of conformational dynamics and short-range protein interactions. Importantly, TrIQ only occurs over relatively short distances (~5 to 15 Å), making it complementary to traditional fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) methods that occur over distances too large for precise studies of protein structure. As implied in the name, TrIQ measures the efficient quenching induced in some fluorophores by tryptophan (Trp). We present here our analysis of the TrIQ effect for five different fluorophores that span a range of sizes and spectral properties. Each probe was attached to four different cysteine residues on T4 lysozyme and the extent of TrIQ caused by a nearby Trp was measured. Our results show that for smaller probes, TrIQ is distance dependent. Moreover, we also demonstrate how TrIQ data can be analyzed to determine the fraction of fluorophores involved in a static, non-fluorescent complex with Trp. Based on this analysis, our study shows that each fluorophore has a different TrIQ profile, or "sphere of quenching", which correlates with its size, rotational flexibility, and the length of attachment linker. This TrIQ-based "sphere of quenching" is unique to every Trp-probe pair and reflects the distance within which one can expect to see the TrIQ effect. It provides a straightforward, readily accessible approach for mapping distances within proteins and monitoring conformational changes using fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:20886836

  1. Planetary Surface Analysis Using Fast Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Combined Microscopic Raman, LIBS, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman, G. R.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ exploration of planetary surfaces has to date required multiple techniques that, when used together, yield important information about their formation histories and evolution. We present a time-resolved laser spectroscopic technique that could potentially collect complementary sets of data providing information on mineral structure, composition, and hydration state. Using a picosecond-scale pulsed laser and a fast time-resolved detector we can simultaneously collect spectra from Raman, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and fluorescence emissions that are separated in time due to the unique decay times of each process. The use of a laser with high rep rate (40 KHz) and low pulse energy (1 μJ/pulse) allows us to rapidly collect high signal to noise Raman spectra while minimizing sample damage. Increasing the pulse energy by about an order of magnitude creates a microscopic plasma near the surface and enables the collection of LIBS spectra at an unusually high rep rate and low pulse energy. Simultaneously, broader fluorescence peaks can be detected with lifetimes varying from nanosecond to microsecond. We will present Raman, LIBS, and fluorescence spectra obtained on natural mineral samples such as sulfates, clays, pyroxenes and carbonates that are of interest for Mars mineralogy. We demonstrate this technique using a photocathode-based streak camera detector as well as a newly-developed solid state Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) sensor array based on Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. We will discuss the impact of system design and detector choice on science return of a potential planetary surface mission, with a specific focus on size, weight, power, and complexity. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  2. High sensitivity detection of protein molecules picked up on a probe of atomic force microscope based on the fluorescence detection by a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takafumi; Afrin, Rehana; Arakawa, Hideo; Ikai, Atsushi

    2004-07-02

    We developed a method to detect and identify proteins on a probe of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with a high sensitivity. Due to a low background noise of the total internal reflection fluorescence microscope employed as a detecting system, we were able to achieve a high enough sensitivity to detect zeptomole orders of protein molecules immobilized on the tip. Several different methods to immobilize protein molecules to AFM-probes were tested, meant for a wide range of applications of this method. Furthermore, we demonstrated that different proteins were clearly distinguished by immunofluorescence microscopy on the probe using their specific antibodies.

  3. Removal of Chromophore-Proximal Polar Atoms Decreases Water Content and Increases Fluorescence in a Near Infrared Phytofluor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtivuori, Heli; Bhattacharya, Shyamosree; Angenent-Mari, Nicolaas M; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Forest, Katrina T

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded fluorescent markers have revolutionized cell and molecular biology due to their biological compatibility, controllable spatiotemporal expression, and photostability. To achieve in vivo imaging in whole animals, longer excitation wavelength probes are needed due to the superior ability of near infrared light to penetrate tissues unimpeded by absorbance from biomolecules or autofluorescence of water. Derived from near infrared-absorbing bacteriophytochromes, phytofluors are engineered to fluoresce in this region of the electromagnetic spectrum, although high quantum yield remains an elusive goal. An invariant aspartate residue is of utmost importance for photoconversion in native phytochromes, presumably due to the proximity of its backbone carbonyl to the pyrrole ring nitrogens of the biliverdin (BV) chromophore as well as the size and charge of the side chain. We hypothesized that the polar interaction network formed by the charged side chain may contribute to the decay of the excited state via proton transfer. Thus, we chose to further probe the role of this amino acid by removing all possibility for polar interactions with its carboxylate side chain by incorporating leucine instead. The resultant fluorescent protein, WiPhy2, maintains BV binding, monomeric status, and long maximum excitation wavelength while minimizing undesirable protoporphyrin IXα binding in cells. A crystal structure and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy reveal that water near the BV chromophore is excluded and thus validate our hypothesis that removal of polar interactions leads to enhanced fluorescence by increasing the lifetime of the excited state. This new phytofluor maintains its fluorescent properties over a broad pH range and does not suffer from photobleaching. WiPhy2 achieves the best compromise to date between high fluorescence quantum yield and long illumination wavelength in this class of fluorescent proteins.

  4. Removal of Chromophore-proximal Polar Atoms Decreases Water Content and Increases Fluorescence in a Near Infrared Phytofluor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli eLehtivuori

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded fluorescent markers have revolutionized cell and molecular biology due to their biological compatibility, controllable spatiotemporal expression, and photostability. To achieve in vivo imaging in whole animals, longer excitation wavelength probes are needed due to the superior ability of near infrared light to penetrate tissues unimpeded by absorbance from biomolecules or autofluorescence of water. Derived from near infrared-absorbing bacteriophytochromes, phytofluors are engineered to fluoresce in this region of the electromagnetic spectrum, although high quantum yield remains an elusive goal. An invariant aspartate residue is of utmost importance for photoconversion in native phytochromes, presumably due to the proximity of its backbone carbonyl to the pyrrole ring nitrogens of the biliverdin (BV chromophore as well as the size and charge of the side chain. We hypothesized that the polar interaction network formed by the charged side chain may contribute to the decay of the excited state via proton transfer. Thus, we chose to further probe the role of this amino acid by removing all possibility for polar interactions with its carboxylate side chain by incorporating leucine instead. The resultant fluorescent protein, WiPhy2, maintains BV binding, monomeric status, and long maximum excitation wavelength while minimizing undesirable protoporphyrin IXα binding in cells. A crystal structure and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy reveal that water near the BV chromophore is excluded and thus validate our hypothesis that removal of polar interactions leads to enhanced fluorescence by increasing the lifetime of the excited state. This new phytofluor maintains its fluorescent properties over a broad pH range and does not suffer from photobleaching. WiPhy2 achieves the best compromise to date between high fluorescence quantum yield and long illumination wavelength in this class of fluorescent proteins.

  5. X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Pre-Federal American Currency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddell, Mark; Manukyan, Khachatur; Aprahamian, Ani; Wiescher, Michael; Jordan, Louis

    2017-09-01

    X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XRF) was used to study 17th and 18th century Mexican, Potosí, and Massachusetts silver colonial coins from the University of Notre Dame's Rare Books and Special Collections. Using different configurations and devices, we have learned more about the limitations and optimizations of the method. We have developed a moveable stand that may be used for XRF mapping of coin surfaces. We created standard silver alloy materials for quantification of the elemental composition of the coins. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopy was applied to determine the precise composition of the standards for accurate and non-destructive analyses of the colonial coins. XRF measurements were performed using two different XRF spectrometers, in both air and vacuum conditions, as well as an x-ray beam tube of varying diameters from 2 mm, 1 mm, and 0.03 mm. We quantified both the major elements and the bulk and surface impurities for 90 coins. We are using PCA to look at possible correlations between compositions of coinage from different geographical regions. Preliminary data analyses suggest that Massachusetts coins were minted using silver from Latin American sources. These results are of great interest to historians in tracing the origins of the currency. This work was made possible by the Notre Dame College of Science Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (COS-SURF).

  6. Intrinsic fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy identify superficial foam cells in coronary plaques prone to erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angheloiu, George O; Arendt, Joseph T; Müller, Markus G; Haka, Abigail S; Georgakoudi, Irene; Motz, Jason T; Scepanovic, Obrad R; Kuban, Barry D; Myles, Jonathan; Miller, Frank; Podrez, Eugene A; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Kramer, John R; Feld, Michael S

    2006-07-01

    Foam cells perform critical functions in atherosclerosis. We hypothesize that coronary segments with superficial foam cells (SFCs) situated in a region of interest with a depth of 200 mum can be identified using intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy (IFS) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). This is a key step in our ongoing program to develop a spectroscopic technique for real-time in vivo diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque. We subjected 132 human coronary segments to in vitro IFS and DRS. We detected SFCs in 13 thick fibrous cap atheromas and 8 pathologic intimal thickening (PIT) lesions. SFCs colocalized with accumulations of smooth muscle cells and proteoglycans, including hyaluronan (P40%, 20%, 10%, 5%, 2.5%, and 0% of the region of interest with 98%, 98%, 93%, 94%, 93%, and 90% accuracy, respectively. Our combined IFS and DRS technique accurately detects SFCs in thick fibrous cap atheromas and PIT lesions. Because SFCs are associated with histological markers of plaque erosion, our spectroscopic technique could prove useful in identifying vulnerable plaques.

  7. X-Ray Fluorescence and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy analysis of Roman silver denarii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardini, L. [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici del CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); El Hassan, A. [National Institute for Laser- Enhanced Sciences (NILES), Cairo University Giza (Egypt); Ferretti, M. [Istituto per le Tecnologie Applicate ai Beni Culturali, Area della Ricerca del CNR di Montelibretti Roma (Italy); Foresta, A.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G. [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici del CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Nebbia, E. [Universita degli Studi di Torino (Italy); Catalli, F. [Monetiere di Firenze, Museo Archeologico Nazionale Firenze (Italy); Harith, M.A. [National Institute for Laser- Enhanced Sciences (NILES), Cairo University Giza (Egypt); Diaz Pace, D. [Institute of Physics ' Arroyo Seco' , Faculty of Science, Tandil (Argentina); Anabitarte Garcia, F. [Photonics Engineering Group, University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Scuotto, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Archeologiche, Via Galvani 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Palleschi, V., E-mail: vincenzo.palleschi@cnr.it [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici del CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Archeologiche, Via Galvani 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    In this paper we present the results of a study performed on a large collection of silver Roman republican denarii, encompassing about two centuries of history. The joint use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy allowed for an accurate determination of the coins' elemental composition; the measurements, performed mostly in situ at the 'Monetiere' in Florence, revealed a striking connection between the 'quality' of the silver alloy and some crucial contemporary events. This finding was used to classify a group of denarii whose dating was otherwise impossible. The comparison with other contemporary denarii disproves a recent theory on the origin of the so called 'serrated' denarii (denarii showing notched chisel marks on the edge of the coin). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied a large collection of Roman republican silver denarii. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XRF and LIBS allowed to determine the precious metal content of the coins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A correlation of the 'quality' of the alloy with some contemporary events was found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study allowed to controvert a recent theory on the so called 'serrated' denarii.

  8. Shock-tube measurements of excited oxygen atoms using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nations, Marcel; Wang, Shengkai; Goldenstein, Christopher S; Sun, Kai; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2015-10-10

    We report the use of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using two distributed feedback diode lasers near 777.2 and 844.6 nm for sensitive, time-resolved, in situ measurements of excited-state populations of atomic oxygen in a shock tube. Here, a 1% O2/Ar mixture was shock-heated to 5400-8000 K behind reflected shock waves. The combined use of a low-finesse cavity, fast wavelength scanning of the lasers, and an off-axis alignment enabled measurements with 10 μs time response and low cavity noise. The CEAS absorption gain factors of 104 and 142 for the P35←S520 (777.2 nm) and P0,1,23←S310 (844.6 nm) atomic oxygen transitions, respectively, significantly improved the detection sensitivity over conventional single-pass measurements. This work demonstrates the potential of using CEAS to improve shock-tube studies of nonequilibrium electronic-excitation processes at high temperatures.

  9. Unraveling protein-protein interactions in clathrin assemblies via atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Albert J; Lafer, Eileen M; Peng, Jennifer Q; Smith, Paul D; Nossal, Ralph

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and single particle force spectroscopy (SPFS) are used to characterize intermolecular interactions and domain structures of clathrin triskelia and clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). The latter are involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) and other trafficking pathways. Here, we subject individual triskelia, bovine-brain CCVs, and reconstituted clathrin-AP180 coats to AFM-SMFS and AFM-SPFS pulling experiments and apply novel analytics to extract force-extension relations from very large data sets. The spectroscopic fingerprints of these samples differ markedly, providing important new information about the mechanism of CCV uncoating. For individual triskelia, SMFS reveals a series of events associated with heavy chain alpha-helix hairpin unfolding, as well as cooperative unraveling of several hairpin domains. SPFS of clathrin assemblies exposes weaker clathrin-clathrin interactions that are indicative of inter-leg association essential for RME and intracellular trafficking. Clathrin-AP180 coats are energetically easier to unravel than the coats of CCVs, with a non-trivial dependence on force-loading rate. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. In vivo quantification of photosensitizer concentration using fluorescence differential path-length spectroscopy : influence of photosensitizer formulation and tissue location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visscher, Sebastiaan A. H. J.; Witjes, Max J. H.; Kascakova, Slavka; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Robinson, Dominic J.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; Amelink, Arjen

    In vivo measurement of photosensitizer concentrations may optimize clinical photodynamic therapy (PDT). Fluorescence differential path-length spectroscopy (FDPS) is a non-invasive optical technique that has been shown to accurately quantify the concentration of Foscan (R) in rat liver. As a next

  11. Low affinity binding of plasma proteins to lipid-coated quantum dots as observed by in situ fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapper, Yvonne; Maffre, Pauline; Shang, Li; Ekdahl, Kristina N; Nilsson, Bo; Hettler, Simon; Dries, Manuel; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2015-06-14

    Protein binding to lipid-coated nanoparticles has been pursued quantitatively by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The binding of three important plasma proteins to lipid-enwrapped quantum dots (QDs) shows very low affinity, with an apparent dissociation coefficient in the range of several hundred micromolar. Thus, the tendency to adsorb is orders of magnitude weaker than for QDs coated with dihydrolipoic acid.

  12. Investigation of ultrafast dynamics of CdTe quantum dots by femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, G.-X.; Lü, L.-H.; Gui, M.-F.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Zheng, X.-F.; Ji, X.-H.; Zhang, H.; Cui, Z.-F.

    2012-01-01

    The ultrafast carrier relaxation processes in CdTe quantum dots are investigated by femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion spectroscopy. Photo-excited hole relaxing to the edge of the forbidden gap takes a maximal time of ~ 1.6 ps with exciting at 400 nm, depending on the state of the photo-excited

  13. Fluorescence and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy for the analysis of iconic Italian design lamps made of polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toja, Francesca; Nevin, Austin; Comelli, Daniela; Levi, Marinella; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Toniolo, Lucia

    2011-03-01

    The preservation of design object collections requires an understanding of their constituent materials which are often polymeric blends. Challenges associated with aging of complex polymers from objects with an unknown physical history may compromise the interpretation of data from analytical techniques, and therefore complicate the assessment of the condition of polymers in indoor museum environments. This study focuses on the analysis of polymeric materials from three well-known Italian design lamps from the 1960s. To assess the degree of chemical modifications in the polymers, non-destructive molecular spectroscopic techniques, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and fluorescence spectroscopy, have been applied directly on the object surfaces using an optical fiber probe and through examination of micro samples. FTIR spectra of the different polymers, polyvinylacetate (PVAc) for the lamps Taraxacum and Fantasma, and both acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene polymer (ABS) and cellulose acetate (CA) for the lamp Nesso, allowed the detection of ongoing deterioration processes. Fluorescence spectroscopy proved particularly sensitive for the detection of molecular changes in the polymeric objects, as the spectra obtained from the examined lamps differ significantly from those of the unaged reference materials. Differences in fluorescence spectra are also detected between different points on the same object further indicating the presence of different chemical species on the surfaces. With the aid of complementary data from FTIR spectroscopy, an interpretation of the emission spectra of the studied polymeric objects is here proposed, further suggesting that fluorescence spectroscopy may be useful for following the degradation of historical polymeric objects.

  14. Study of NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} nanostructures in the Suzuki phase by optical spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejía-Uriarte, E.V., E-mail: elsi.mejia@ccadet.unam.mx [Laboratorio de Fotónica de Microondas, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-186, C.P. 04510, D.F. México (Mexico); Kolokoltsev, O. [Laboratorio de Fotónica de Microondas, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-186, C.P. 04510, D.F. México (Mexico); Navarrete Montesinos, M. [Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, D.F. México (Mexico); Camarillo, E.; Hernández A, J.; Murrieta S, H. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 20-364, C.P. 01000, D.F. México (Mexico)

    2015-04-15

    NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} nanostructures in the Suzuki phase have been studied by fluorescence (emission and excitation) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a function of temperature. The “as-grown” samples give rise to two broad emission bands that peak at 508 (green emission) and 610 nm (red emission). The excitation spectrum shows peaks at 227 nm and 232 nm for emission wavelengths at 508 nm and 610 nm, respectively. When the samples are heated continuously from room temperature up to 220 °C, the green emission (associated to the excitation peak at 227 nm) disappears at a temperature close to 120 °C, whilst only the red emission remains, which is characteristic of manganese ions. AFM images on the (0 0 1) surface (freshly cleaved) show several conformations of nanostructures, such as disks of 20–50 nm in diameter. Particularly, the images also reveal nanostructures with rectangular shape of ~280×160 nm{sup 2} and ~6 nm height; these are present only in samples with green emission associated to the Suzuki phase. Then, the evidence suggests that this topographic configuration might be related to the interaction with the first neighbors and the next neighbors, according to the configuration that has been suggested for the Suzuki phase. - Highlights: • NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} single crystals in the Suzuki phase contain rectangular nanostructures. • Double emission of manganese ions: green (508 nm) and red (610 nm) bands. • The excitation peak at 227 nm is attributed to rectangular nanostructures. • The green emission band associated to Suzuki phase is extinguished at 120 °C.

  15. Quantification of zinc-porphyrin in dry-cured ham products by spectroscopic methods Comparison of absorption, fluorescence and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Kristoffer; Adamsen, Christina E; Laursen, Jens; Olsen, Karsten; Møller, Jens K S

    2008-03-01

    Zinc-protoporphyrin (Zn-pp), which has been identified as the major pigment in certain dry-cured meat products, was extracted with acetone/water (75%) and isolated from the following meat products: Parma ham, Iberian ham and dry-cured ham with added nitrite. The quantification of Zn-pp by electron absorption, fluorescence and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy was compared (concentration range used [Zn-pp]=0.8-9.7μM). All three hams were found to contain Zn-pp, and the results show no significant difference among the content of Zn-pp quantified by fluorescence, absorbance and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for Parma ham and Iberian ham. All three methods can be used for quantification of Zn-pp in acetone/water extracts of different ham types if the content is higher than 1.0ppm. For dry-cured ham with added nitrite, XRF was not applicable due to the low content of Zn-pp (ham extracts investigated (limit of detection; Fe⩽1.8ppm), it allows the conclusion that iron containing pigments, e.g., heme, do not contribute to the noticeable red colour observed in some of the extracts.

  16. Optical response of magnetic fluorescent microspheres used for force spectroscopy in the evanescent field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijamov, Alex; Shubitidze, Fridon; Oliver, Piercen M; Vezenov, Dmitri V

    2010-07-20

    Force spectroscopy based on magnetic tweezers is a powerful technique for manipulating single biomolecules and studying their interactions. The resolution in magnetic probe displacement, however, needs to be commensurate with molecular sizes. To achieve the desirable sensitivity in tracking displacements of the magnetic probe, some recent approaches have combined magnetic tweezers with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. In this situation, a typical force probe is a polymer microsphere containing two types of optically active components: a pure absorber (magnetic nanoparticles for providing the pulling force) and a luminophore (semiconducting nanoparticles or organic dyes for fluorescent imaging). To assess the system's capability fully with regard to tracking the position of the force probe with subnanometer accuracy, we developed a body-of-revolution formulation of the method of auxiliary sources (BOR-MAS) to simulate the absorption, scattering, and fluorescence of microscopic spheres in an evanescent electromagnetic field. The theoretical formulation uses the axial symmetry of the system to reduce the dimensionality of the modeling problem and produces excellent agreement with the reported experimental data on forward scattering intensity. Using the BOR-MAS numerical model, we investigated the probe detection sensitivity for a high numerical aperture objective. The analysis of both backscattering and fluorescence observation modes shows that the total intensity of the bead image decays exponentially with the distance from the surface (or the length of a biomolecule). Our investigations demonstrate that the decay lengths of observable optical power are smaller than the penetration depth of the unperturbed excitation evanescent wave. In addition, our numerical modeling results illustrate that the expected sensitivity for the decay length changes with the angle of incidence, tracking the theoretical penetration depth for a two-media model, and is

  17. Identification of cow and buffalo milk based on Beta carotene and vitamin-A concentration using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahat Ullah

    Full Text Available The current study presents the application of fluorescence spectroscopy for the identification of cow and buffalo milk based on β-carotene and vitamin-A which is of prime importance from the nutritional point of view. All samples were collected from healthy animals of different breeds at the time of lactation in the vicinity of Islamabad, Pakistan. Cow and buffalo milk shows differences at fluorescence emission appeared at band position 382 nm, 440 nm, 505 nm and 525 nm both in classical geometry (right angle setup as well as front face fluorescence setup. In front face fluorescence geometry, synchronous fluorescence emission shows clear differences at 410 nm and 440 nm between the milk samples of both these species. These fluorescence emissions correspond to fats, vitamin-A and β-carotene. Principal Component Analysis (PCA further highlighted these differences by showing clear separation between the two data sets on the basis of features obtained from their fluorescence emission spectra. These results indicate that classical geometry (fixed excitation wavelength as well as front face (synchronous fluorescence emission of cow and buffalo milk nutrients could be used as fingerprint from identification point of view. This same approach can effectively be used for the determination of adulterants in the milk and other dairy products.

  18. Design and research of analysis instrument based on Q-switch micro-crystal UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Suping; Han, Hanguang; Yu, Jinming; Fu, Yinping; Sha, Pingsheng

    2010-10-01

    The physical principle of micro- crystal UV Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (MUV-LIF) is expatiated in the paper, and the application of MUV-LIF to organic matter is studied. Then a portable intelligent analysis instrument based on MUV-LIF is designed. The instrument is composed of following units-----excitation source module based on micro-crystal UV laser, laser driving and controlling module, sample cell, spectroscopy-detecting module, processing and displaying module. Especially, because of high peak power and high repetition frequency rate, Qswitch micro-crystal UV laser is selected as excitation source. MUV-laser module of the instrument is singlepolarization solid-state coherent sources. The module is quasi monolithic integrated. The MUV-laser emits at wavelengths of 355nm, 266nm and 213nm, and it has many advantages, such as high peak power (greater than 30kw), high repeat frequency rate (greater than 10kHz), subnanosecond pulse (less than 500ps pulse width). So the excitation source module is an efficient compact high-order harmonic laser system. Laser driving and controlling module supplies power regulator and temperature controller for MUV-laser. Fluorescence spectroscopy image is produced by spectroscopy-detecting module and pre-processed in processing module. Qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of sample can be conducted by referring to fluorescence spectroscopy feature library. The experimental results express that lots of organic matter, e.g. melamine, can be detected. The portal instrument has high SNR and sensitivity.

  19. Fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of potentially malignant disorders and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Ana Lucia Noronha; Correr, Wagner Rafael; Azevedo, Luciane Hiramatsu; Kern, Vivian Galletta; Pinto, Clóvis Antônio Lopes; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Kurachi, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    Oral cancer is a public health problem with relevant incidence in the world population. The affected patient usually presents advanced stage disease and the consequence of this delay is a reduction in survival rates. Given this, it is essential to detect oral cancer at early stages. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a non-invasive diagnostic tool that can improve cancer detection in real time. It is a fast and accurate technique, relatively simple, which evaluates the biochemical composition and structure using the tissue fluorescence spectrum as interrogation data. Several studies have positive data regarding the tools for differentiating between normal mucosa and cancer, but the difference between cancer and potentially malignant disorders is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of fluorescence spectroscopy in the discrimination of normal oral mucosa, oral cancer, and potentially malignant disorders. The fluorescence spectroscopy was evaluated in 115 individuals, of whom 55 patients presented oral squamous cell carcinoma, 30 volunteers showing normal oral mucosa, and 30 patients having potentially malignant disorders. The spectra were classified and compared to histopathology to evaluate the efficiency in diagnostic discrimination employing fluorescence. In order to classify the spectra, a decision tree algorithm (C4.5) was applied. Despite of the high variance observed in spectral data, the specificity and sensitivity obtained were 93.8% and 88.5%, respectively at 406 nm excitation. These results point to the potential use of fluorescence spectroscopy as an important tool for oral cancer diagnosis and potentially malignant disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of anti-cancer effects of chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chithra, K.; Vijayaraghavan, S.; Prakasarao, Aruna; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    The analysis of the variations in the spectroscopic patterns of the key bio molecules using Native fluorescence spectroscopy, without exogenous labels, has emerged as a new trend in the characterization of the Physiological State and the Discrimination of Pathological from normal conditions of cells and tissues as the relative concentration of these bio-molecules serve as markers in evaluating the presence of cancer in the body. The aim of this unique study is to use these features of Optical spectroscopy in monitoring the behavior of cells to treatment and thus to evaluate the response to Chemotherapeutic agents and Radiation in Breast Cancer Patients. The results of the study conducted using NFS of Human blood plasma of biopsy proved Breast Cancer patients undergoing treatment are promising, enhancing the scope of Native fluorescence Spectroscopy emerging as a promising technology in the evaluation of Therapeutic Response in Breast Cancer Patients.

  1. Symmetry-resolved spectroscopy by detection of a metastable hydrogen atom for investigating the doubly excited states of molecular hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odagiri, Takeshi; Kumagai, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Takehiko; Nakano, Motoyoshi; Kouchi, Noriyuki [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Suzuki, Isao H, E-mail: joe@chem.titech.ac.j [Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2009-11-01

    Symmetry-resolved spectroscopy for investigating the doubly excited states of molecular hydrogen has been newly developed, where a metastable hydrogen atom dissociating in a direction parallel and perpendicular to the electric vector of the linearly polarized incident light is detected.

  2. Antiproton–to–electron mass ratio determined by two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sótér A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA collaboration of CERN has recently carried out two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms. Three transition frequencies were determined with fractional precisions of 2.3–5 parts in 109. By comparing the results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as 1836.1526736(23.

  3. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  4. Precision spectroscopy of the 2S-4P{sub 1/2} transition in atomic hydrogen on a cold thermal beam of optically excited 2S atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Axel; Kolachevsky, Nikolai; Alnis, Janis; Yost, Dylan C.; Matveev, Arthur; Parthey, Christian G.; Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Khabarova, Ksenia [FSUE ' VNIIFTRI' , 141570 Moscow (Russian Federation); Haensch, Theodor W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, 80799 Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The 'proton size puzzle', i.e. the discrepancy between the values for the proton r.m.s. charge radius deduced from precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen and electron-proton-scattering on one side and the value deduced from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy on the other side, has been persisting for more than two years now. Although huge efforts have been put into trying to resolve this discrepancy from experimental and theoretical side, no convincing argument could be found so far. In this talk, we report on a unique precision spectroscopy experiment on atomic hydrogen, which is aiming to bring some light to the hydrogen part of the puzzle: In contrast to any previous high resolution experiment probing a transition frequency between the meta-stable 2S state and a higher lying nL state (n=3,4,6,8,12, L=S,P,D), our measurement of the 2S-4P{sub 1/2} transition frequency is the first experiment being performed on a cold thermal beam of hydrogen atoms optically excited to the 2S state. We will discuss how this helps to efficiently suppresses leading systematic effects of previous measurements and present the preliminary results we obtained so far.

  5. A highly selective and ratiometric fluorescent probe for cyanide by rationally altering the susceptible H-atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yuanqiang; Nguyen, Khac Hong; Zhang, Yintang; Zhang, Guan; Fan, Shengnan; Li, Fen; Guo, Chao; Lu, Yuanyuan; Song, Xiaoqing; Qu, Peng; Liu, You-Nian; Xu, Maotian

    2018-01-01

    A highly selective and ratiometric fluorescent probe for cyanide was rationally designed and synthesized. The probe comprises a fluorophore unit of naphthalimide and a CN- acceptor of methylated trifluoroacetamide group. For these previous reported trifluoroacetamide derivative-based cyanide chemosensors, the H-atom of amide adjacent to trifluoroacetyl group is susceptible to be attacked by various anions (CN- itself, F-, AcO-, et al.) and even the solvent molecule, which resulted in the bewildered reaction mechanism and poor selectivity of the assay. In this work, the susceptible H-atom of trifluoroacetamide was artfully substituted by alkyl group. Thus a highly specific fluorescent probe was developed for cyanide sensing. Upon the nucleophilic addition of cyanide anion to the carbonyl of trifluoroacetamide moiety of the probe, the ICT process of the probe was significantly enhanced and leading to a remarkable red shift in both absorption and emission spectra of the probe. This fluorescent assay showed a linear range of 1.0-80.0µM and a LOD (limit of detection) of 0.23µM. All the investigated interference have no influence on the sensing behavior of the probe toward cyanide. Moreover, by coating on TLC plate, the probe can be utilized for practical detection of trace cyanide in water samples. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Direct determination of mercury in white vinegar by matrix assisted photochemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Qingyang, E-mail: liuqingyang0807@yahoo.com.c [Beijing Center for Physical and Chemical Analysis, Beijing 100089 (China)

    2010-07-15

    This paper proposes the use of photochemical vapor generation with acetic acid as sample introduction for the direct determination of ultra-trace mercury in white vinegars by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under ultraviolet irradiation, the sample matrix (acetic acid) can reduce mercury ion to atomic mercury Hg{sup 0}, which is swept by argon gas into an atomic fluorescence spectrometer for subsequent analytical measurements. The effects of several factors such as the concentration of acetic acid, irradiation time, the flow rate of the carrier gas and matrix effects were discussed and optimized to give detection limits of 0.08 ng mL{sup -1} for mercury. Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (3% v/v acetic acid, 30 s irradiation time and 20 W mercury lamp), the precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation, were 4.6% (one day) and 7.8% (inter-day) for mercury (n = 9). Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the range of 92-98% for mercury. The method was also validated by analysis of vinegar samples without detectable amount of Hg spiked with aqueous standard reference materials (GBW(E) 080392 and GBW(E) 080393). The results were also compared with those obtained by acid digestion procedure and determination of mercury by ICP-MS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  7. Tumor margin assessment in Mohs surgery using reflectance, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hieu T. M.; Moy, Austin J.; Zhang, Yao; Feng, Xu; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Fox, Matthew; Tunnell, James W.

    2017-02-01

    Mohs surgery is the current gold standard to treat large, aggressive or high-risk non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) cases. While Mohs surgery is an effective treatment, the procedure is time-consuming and expensive for physicians as well as burdensome for patients as they wait for frozen section histology. Our group has recently demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy using a noninvasive "spectral biopsy" (combination of diffuse reflectance (DRS), fluorescence (FS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS)) to classify NMSC vs. normal lesion in a screening setting of intact tissue. Here, we examine the sensitivity of spectral biopsy to pathology in excised Mohs sections. The system is designed with three modalities integrated into one fiber probe, which is utilized to measure DRS, FS, and RS of freshly excised skin from patients with various NMSC pathologies including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), where each measurement location is correlated to histopathology. The spectral biopsy provides complimentary physiological information including the reduced scattering coefficient, hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation from DRS, NADH and collagen contribution from FS and information regarding multiple proteins and lipids from RS. We then apply logistic regression model to the extracted physiological parameters to classify NMSC vs. normal tissue. The results on the excised tissue are generally consistent with in vivo measurements showing decreased scattering within the tumor and reduced fluorescence. Due to the high sensitivity of RS to lipids, subcutaneous fat often dominates the RS signal. This pilot study demonstrates the potential for a spectral biopsy to classify NMSC vs. normal tissue, indicating the opportunity to guide Mohs excisions.

  8. Noninvasive fluorescence excitation spectroscopy for the diagnosis of oral neoplasia in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenezar, Jeyasingh; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Aruna, Prakasarao; Muralinaidu, Radhakrishnan; Renganathan, Kannan; Saraswathy, Thillai Rajasekaran

    2012-09-01

    Fluorescence excitation spectroscopy (FES) is an emerging approach to cancer detection. The goal of this pilot study is to evaluate the diagnostic potential of FES technique for the detection and characterization of normal and cancerous oral lesions in vivo. Fluorescence excitation (FE) spectra from oral mucosa were recorded in the spectral range of 340 to 600 nm at 635 nm emission using a fiberoptic probe spectrofluorometer to obtain spectra from the buccal mucosa of 30 sites of 15 healthy volunteers and 15 sites of 10 cancerous patients. Significant FE spectral differences were observed between normal and well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (WDSCC) oral lesions. The FE spectra of healthy volunteers consists of a broad emission band around 440 to 470 nm, whereas in WDSCC lesions, a new primary peak was seen at 410 nm with secondary peaks observed at 505, 540, and 580 nm due to the accumulation of porphyrins in oral lesions. The FE spectral bands of the WDSCC lesions resemble the typical absorption spectra of a porphyrin. Three potential ratios (I410/I505, I410/I540, and I410/I580) were calculated from the FE spectra and used as input variables for a stepwise linear discriminant analysis (SLDA) for normal and WDSCC groups. Leave-one-out (LOO) method of cross-validation was performed to check the reliability on spectral data for tissue characterization. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were determined for normal and WDSCC lesions from the scatter plot of the discriminant function scores. It was observed that diagnostic algorithm based on discriminant function scores obtained by SLDA-LOO method was able to distinguish WDSCC from normal lesions with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 100%. Results of the pilot study demonstrate that the FE spectral changes due to porphyrin have a good diagnostic potential; therefore, porphyrin can be used as a native tumor marker.

  9. Complexation of HSA with different forms of antimony (Sb): An application of fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Wenjuan [State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Zhang, Daoyong [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Pan, Xiangliang, E-mail: xlpan@ms.xjb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Lee, Duu-Jong [State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2013-04-15

    Antimony (Sb) pollution has been of a great environmental concern in some areas in China. Sb enters human body via drinking water, inhalation and food chain, unavoidably interacts with human serum albumin (HSA) in blood plasma, and consequently does harm to human health. The harmful effects of Sb on human health depend on the Sb species and their binding ability to HSA. In the present study, binding of three forms of Sb with HSA was investigated by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. All of antimony potassium tartrate, antimony trichloride and potassium pyroantimonate quenched fluorescence of HSA. Values of conditional stability constant K{sub a} (×10{sup 5}/M) for Sb and HSA systems were 8.13–9.12 for antimony potassium tartrate, 2.51–4.27 for antimony trichloride and 3.63–9.77 for potassium pyroantimonate. The binding constant K{sub b} (×10{sup 4}/M) values of HSA with antimony potassium tartrate, antimony trichloride and potassium pyroantimonate were 0.02–0.07, 3.55–5.01, and 0.07–1.08, respectively. There was one independent class of binding site for antimony trichloride towards HSA. There was more than one Sb binding site and negative cooperativity between multiple binding sites for potassium pyroantimonate and antimony potassium tartrate towards HSA. The binding ability of HSA to complex Sb followed the order: antimony trichloride>potassium pyroantimonate>antimony potassium tartrate. -- Highlights: ► The first study reporting interaction of Sb with HSA. ► Sb can effectively quench the fluorescence of HSA. ► The binding ability of HSA to Sb was dependent on the form of Sb. ► Binding differences indicate differences in toxicity of various forms Sb to human. ► HAS-Sb binding parameters are important for understanding toxicity of Sb.

  10. Human feasibility study of fluorescence spectroscopy guided optical biopsy needle for prostate cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werahera, Priya N; Jasion, Edward A; Liu, Yongjun; Daily, John W; Arangua, Paul; Jones, Clifford; Nash, S Russell; Morrell, Michael; Crawford, E David

    2015-01-01

    Current prostate biopsy cores have a very low diagnostic yield. These biopsies often fail to diagnose prostate cancer since 90% of cores are histopathologically classified as benign. The concentrations of endogenous fluorophores in prostate tissue vary with disease states. Thus, fluorescence spectroscopy could be utilized to quantify these variations for identification of malignant lesions. We investigated clinical feasibility of a 14 gauge (1.98 mm) optical biopsy needle guided by fluorescence spectroscopy for real-time in vivo prostate cancer diagnosis. Built-in optical sensor has 8×100μm fibers for tissue excitation and a single 200μm fiber to collect spectral data. Custom-made fluorometer has 2 light-emitting diodes at 290 and 340 nm and a spectrometer. User interface for fluorometer operation and data collection was developed using LabView software. Each spectral data acquisition required ~2 seconds. The in vivo biopsies were performed during radical retropubic prostatectomy surgery on the exposed prostate with blood flow to the gland intact. A tissue biopsy core was obtained from each biopsy site after acquisition of spectral data. Above procedure was repeated ex vivo after surgical excision of the prostate. Biopsy cores were histopathologically classified as either benign or malignant and correlated with corresponding spectral data. Partial Least Square analysis was performed to determine diagnostically significant principal components as potential classifiers. A linear support vector machine and leave-one-out cross validation method was employed for tissue classification. Thirteen patients were consented to the study. Histopathological analysis found cancer in 29/208 in vivo and 51/224 ex vivo viable biopsy cores. Study results show 72% sensitivity, 66% specificity, and 93% negative predictive value for in vivo and 75%, 80%, and 93%, respectively, for ex vivo malignant versus benign prostatic tissue classification. Optical biopsy needle has a very high

  11. Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence and Ionization in a Graphite Furnace for the Determination of Metals and Nonmetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, David James

    1990-01-01

    Here is reported novel instrumentation for atomic spectrometry that combined the use of a pulsed laser system as the light source and an electrothermal atomizer as the atom cell. The main goal of the research was to develop instrumentation that was more sensitive for elemental analysis than commercially available instruments and could be used to determine elements in real sample matrices. Laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (LEAFS) in an electrothermal atomizer (ETA) was compared to ETA atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) for the determination of thallium, manganese, and lead in food and agricultural standard reference materials (SRMs). Compared to ETA AAS, ETA LEAFS has a longer linear dynamic range (LDR) (5-7 orders of magnitude compared to 2-3 orders of magnitude) and higher sensitivity (10 ^{-16} to 10^{ -14} g as compared to 10^{ -13} to 10^{-11} g). Consequently, ETA LEAFS allows elemental analysis to be done over a wider range of concentrations with less dilution steps. Thallium was accurately determined in biological samples by ETA LEAFS at amounts five to one hundred times below the ETA AAS detection limit. ETA AAS and ETA LEAFS were compared for the determination of lead and manganese, and in general, the accuracies and precisions of ETA AAS were the same, with typical precisions between 3% and 6%. Fluorine was determined using laser excited molecular fluorescence spectrometry (LEMOFS) in an ETA. Molecular fluorescence from magnesium fluoride was collected, and the detection limit of 0.3 pg fluorine was two to six orders of magnitude more sensitive than other methods commonly used for the determination of fluorine. Significant interferences from ions were observed, but the sensitivity was high enough that fluorine could be determined in freeze dried urine SRMs by diluting the samples by a factor of one hundred to remove the interferences. Laser enhanced ionization (LEI) in an ETA was used for the determination of metals. For thallium, indium

  12. Feasibility of the simultaneous determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons based on two-dimensional fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Renjie; Dong, Guimei; Sun, Xueshan; Yang, Yanrong; Yu, Yaping; Liu, Haixue; Zhang, Weiyu

    2018-02-01

    A new approach for quantitative determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in environment was proposed based on two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in conjunction with multivariate method. 40 mixture solutions of anthracene and pyrene were prepared in the laboratory. Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra of all samples were collected. And 2D fluorescence correlation spectra were calculated under the excitation perturbation. The N-way partial least squares (N-PLS) models were developed based on 2D fluorescence correlation spectra, showing a root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC) of 3.50 μg L- 1 and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 4.42 μg L- 1 for anthracene and of 3.61 μg L- 1 and 4.29 μg L- 1 for pyrene, respectively. Also, the N-PLS models were developed for quantitative analysis of anthracene and pyrene using EEM fluorescence spectra. The RMSEC and RMSEP were 3.97 μg L- 1 and 4.63 μg L- 1 for anthracene, 4.46 μg L- 1 and 4.52 μg L- 1 for pyrene, respectively. It was found that the N-PLS model using 2D fluorescence correlation spectra could provide better results comparing with EEM fluorescence spectra because of its low RMSEC and RMSEP. The methodology proposed has the potential to be an alternative method for detection of PAHs in environment.

  13. Determination of total tin in canned food using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perring, Loic; Basic-Dvorzak, Marija [Department of Quality and Safety Assurance, Nestle Research Centre, P.O. Box 44, Vers chez-les-Blanc, 1000, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Tin is considered to be a priority contaminant by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Tin can enter foods either from natural sources, environmental pollution, packaging material or pesticides. Higher concentrations are found in processed food and canned foods. Dissolution of the tinplate depends on the of food matrix, acidity, presence of oxidising reagents (anthocyanin, nitrate, iron and copper) presence of air (oxygen) in the headspace, time and storage temperature. To reduce corrosion and dissolution of tin, nowadays cans are usually lacquered, which gives a marked reduction of tin migration into the food product. Due to the lack of modern validated published methods for food products, an ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) method has been developed and evaluated. This technique is available in many laboratories in the food industry and is more sensitive than atomic absorption. Conditions of sample preparation and spectroscopic parameters for tin measurement by axial ICP-AES were investigated for their ruggedness. Two methods of preparation involving high-pressure ashing or microwave digestion in volumetric flasks were evaluated. They gave complete recovery of tin with similar accuracy and precision. Recoveries of tin from spiked products with two levels of tin were in the range 99{+-}5%. Robust relative repeatabilities and intermediate reproducibilities were <5% for different food matrices containing >30 mg/kg of tin. Internal standard correction (indium or strontium) did not improve the method performance. Three emission lines for tin were tested (189.927, 283.998 and 235.485 nm) but only 189.927 nm was found to be robust enough with respect to interferences, especially at low tin concentrations. The LOQ (limit of quantification) was around 0.8 mg/kg at 189.927 nm. A survey of tin content in a range of canned foods is given. (orig.)

  14. Mercury in Environmental and Biological Samples Using Online Combustion with Sequential Atomic Absorption and Fluorescence Measurements: A Direct Comparison of Two Fundamental Techniques in Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizdziel, James V.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students quantitatively determine the concentration of an element (mercury) in an environmental or biological sample while comparing and contrasting the fundamental techniques of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A mercury analyzer based on sample combustion,…

  15. Single-lane single-fluor sequencing using dideoxy-labeled, heavy-atom-modified near-IR fluorescent dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Daryl C.; Flanagan, James H., Jr.; Legendre, Benjamin L., Jr.; Hammer, Robert P.; Soper, Steven A.

    1995-04-01

    Using a near-IR (NIR) fluorescence detection system and labels synthesized in our laboratories, electropherograms of oligonucleotides separated by capillary gel electrophoresis and detected using NIR fluorescence will be presented. The sequence of nucleotide bases was determined using a single-lane, single-dye technique. The molar concentrations of the ddNTP's used during extension reactions were varied in order to achieve a ratio of 4:2:1:0 (A:C:G:T) which allowed the identification of each terminal base via fluorescence intensity measurements. Sequencing ladders were prepared from the template, M13mp18, using standard Sanger dideoxy chain termination techniques, the modified T7 DNA polymerase, and a NIR-labeled M13 primer. The data indicated reliable sequence determination up to 300 bases with a base-calling accuracy of 90%. In order to eliminate the need for dye-labeled primers and the T7 DNA polymerase enzyme, we have developed a sequencing strategy which utilizes dye-labeled dideoxy nucleotides in a single-lane, single-fluor approach. Base-calling is accomplished by measuring the fluorescence lifetime of intramolecular heavy-atom modified dyes.

  16. Laser excited analytical atomic and ionic fluorescence in flames, furnaces and inductively coupled plasmas—I. General considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omenetto, N.; Human, H. G. C.

    Several important parameters for the analytical use of laser excited fluorescence spectrometry in flames, graphite furnaces and inductively coupled plasmas are discussed in some detail. These parameters include the laser characteristics such as peak power, pulse duration, spectral bandwidth and repetition rate, the choice of the excitation line, the optical arrangement and the detection system, this last one centred on the widespread use of the boxcar averager. It is shown that, if the ultimate sensitivity is the goal to be achieved, then the choice must be the electrothermal atomization. However, even for flames and inductively coupled plasmas, excellent results are possible provided that: (i) the laser system allows complete spectral coverage in the ultraviolet: (ii) saturation of the fluorescence signal can be approached over a large sample volume; and (iii) the gated detection parameters and the laser repetition frequency are optimized with respect to each other so as to reach the maximum signal-to-noise ratio.

  17. Synchronizing atomic force microscopy force mode and fluorescence microscopy in real time for immune cell stimulation and activation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazaux, Séverine; Sadoun, Anaïs; Biarnes-Pelicot, Martine; Martinez, Manuel; Obeid, Sameh; Bongrand, Pierre; Limozin, Laurent; Puech, Pierre-Henri

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented for combining atomic force microscopy (AFM) force mode and fluorescence microscopy in order to (a) mechanically stimulate immune cells while recording the subsequent activation under the form of calcium pulses, and (b) observe the mechanical response of a cell upon photoactivation of a small G protein, namely Rac. Using commercial set-ups and a robust signal coupling the fluorescence excitation light and the cantilever bending, the applied force and activation signals were very easily synchronized. This approach allows to control the entire mechanical history of a single cell up to its activation and response down to a few hundreds of milliseconds, and can be extended with very minimal adaptations to other cellular systems where mechanotransduction is studied, using either purely mechanical stimuli or via a surface bound specific ligand. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Farnsworth, Paul B., E-mail: paul_farnsworth@byu.edu [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s {sup 3}S{sub 1} metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} and 0.011 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} and 0.97 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges. - Highlights: • We determine He metastable number densities for four plasma types • The highest number densities were observed in a dielectric barrier discharge • No helium metastable atoms were observed downstream from the exits of glow discharges.

  19. A new technique for ultrafast velocity distribution measurements of atomic species by post-ionization laser induced fluorescent (PILIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F.L.

    1992-07-01

    A new method for single shot velocity distribution measurement of metallic impurities of relevance for studies involving continuous sources, such as limiter experiments in fusion devices or sputtering experiments, based in the combination of Resonant Enhanced Multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is proposed. High ionization yield and good time resolution are expected according to the numerical simulation of the experiment that has been run for several atomic species. Other possible applications of REMPI to plasma edge physics and to conventional techniques for velocity distribution measurements are briefly addressed. (Author) 8 refs.

  20. Verification of cell viability at progressively higher scanning forces using a hybrid atomic force and fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C A; O'Hagan, B M G; Howard, C V; McKerr, G

    2007-11-01

    The prudent use of the atomic force microscope as a supra-vital live cell imaging tool requires that cell viability must be determined before and after scanning. Complementary optical techniques in conjunction with the fluorescent dyes rhodamine-123 and ethidium homodimer have been used within this study to determine cell viability after increasing loads are applied in contact mode. Guideline force ranges for five commonly cultured cell lines, human squamous carcinoma (A431), fibroblast, HeLa, Potorous tridactylis (PtK2) and rat intestinal epithelial (RIE) cells are given.

  1. Photoluminescence Enhancement in Nanotextured Fluorescent SiC Passivated by Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    The influence of thickness of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films on nano-textured fluorescent 6H-SiC passivation is investigated. The passivation effect on the light emission has been characterized by photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence at room temperature. The results show...... that 20nm thickness of Al2O3 layer is favorable to observe a large photoluminescence enhancement (25.9%) and long carrier lifetime (0.86ms). This is a strong indication for an interface hydrogenation that takes place during post-thermal annealing. These results show that an Al2O3 layer could serve...

  2. Reduction of artifacts in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy due to sample adsorption on optical glass surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Daniel K; Wayman, Ashley E; Rolando, Chelsey N; Dande, Prasad; Carter, Phillip W; Remsen, Edward E

    2013-06-01

    The preparation of glass cell surfaces that are chemically functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains to reduce sample adsorption and their use in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is described. Optical glass coverslips were acid etched and reacted with either 750 Mr PEG (PEG-750) or 5000 Mr PEG (PEG-5000) to produce adsorption-resistant optical surfaces. FCS data for Nile red-loaded Triton X-100 micelles (NR-TX-100) and Alexa Fluor 555-labeled proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA-A555), lipidized BSA (lipid-BSA-A555), and three low molecular weight dyes deposited on PEGylated coverslips were evaluated. Measurement artifacts due to sample adsorption on the PEG-5000 functionalized coverslips were reduced significantly for the majority of test materials. Calculations of translational diffusion coefficients and Stokes radii confirmed the effectiveness of this approach. PEG-5000 functionalized coverslips were demonstrated as more effective in inhibiting adsorption than PEG-750 functionalized coverslips. Neither of the functionalized coverslips inhibited the adsorption of one test compound, rhodamine B, a dye that adsorbs strongly on glass surfaces. The use of longer PEG chains in conjunction with chemical cross-linking is proposed for producing a denser, less porous PEG layer for the prevention of strongly glass-adsorbing fluorophores that do not interact with the PEG layer.

  3. Protein oligomerization equilibria and kinetics investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: a mathematical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, David M; Levitus, Marcia

    2014-10-30

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a technique that is increasingly being used to investigate protein oligomerization equilibria and dynamics. Each individual FCS decay is characterized by its amplitude and a characteristic diffusion time, both of which are sensitive to the degree of dissociation of the protein. Here, we provide a mathematical treatment that relates these observables with the parameters of interest: the equilibrium constants of the different protein dissociation steps and their corresponding dissociation and association kinetic rate constants. We focused on the two most common types of protein homooligomers (dimers and tetramers) and on the experimental variables relevant for the design of the experiment (protein concentration, fractional concentration of labeled protein). The analysis of the theoretical expectations for proteins with different dissociation constants is a key aspect of experiment design and data analysis and cannot be performed without a physically accurate treatment of the system. In particular, we show that the analysis of FCS data using some commonly used empirical models may result in a serious misinterpretation of the experimental results.

  4. Laser-induced fluorescence and FT-Raman spectroscopy for characterizing patinas on stone substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oujja, M; Vázquez-Calvo, C; Sanz, M; Álvarez de Buergo, M; Fort, R; Castillejo, M

    2012-02-01

    This article reports on a compositional investigation of stone patinas: thin colored layers applied for protective and/or aesthetic purposes on architectural or sculptural substrates of cultural heritage. The analysis and classification of patinas provide important information of historic and artistic interest, as their composition reflects local practices, the availabilities of different materials, and the development of technological knowledge during specific historical periods. Model patinas fabricated according to traditional procedures and applied onto limestone, and a historic patina sample from the main façade of the San Blas Monastery in Lerma (a village in the province of Burgos, Spain), were analyzed by laser-induced fluorescence and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained demonstrate the ability of these two analytical techniques to identify the key components of each formulation and those of the reaction products which result from the chemical and mineralogical transformations that occur during aging, as well as to provide information that can aid the classification of different types of patinas.

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with PARAFAC and PLS DA for characterization and classification of honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, Lea; Bro, Rasmus; Zeković, Ivana; Dramićanin, Tatjana; Dramićanin, Miroslav D

    2015-05-15

    Fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and Partial least squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS DA) were used for characterization and classification of honey. Excitation emission spectra were obtained for 95 honey samples of different botanical origin (acacia, sunflower, linden, meadow, and fake honey) by recording emission from 270 to 640 nm with excitation in the range of 240-500 nm. The number of fluorophores present in honey, excitation and emission spectra of each fluorophore, and their relative concentration are determined using a six-component PARAFAC model. Emissions from phenolic compounds and Maillard reaction products exhibited the largest difference among classes of honey of different botanical origin. The PLS DA classification model, constructed from PARAFAC model scores, detected fake honey samples with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Honey samples were also classified using PLS DA with errors of 0.5% for linden, 10% for acacia, and about 20% for both sunflower and meadow mix. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cell cycle-dependent mobility of Cdc45 determined in vivo by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Broderick

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic DNA replication is a dynamic process requiring the co-operation of specific replication proteins. We measured the mobility of eGFP-Cdc45 by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS in vivo in asynchronous cells and in cells synchronized at the G1/S transition and during S phase. Our data show that eGFP-Cdc45 mobility is faster in G1/S transition compared to S phase suggesting that Cdc45 is part of larger protein complex formed in S phase. Furthermore, the size of complexes containing Cdc45 was estimated in asynchronous, G1/S and S phase-synchronized cells using gel filtration chromatography; these findings complemented the in vivo FCS data. Analysis of the mobility of eGFP-Cdc45 and the size of complexes containing Cdc45 and eGFP-Cdc45 after UVC-mediated DNA damage revealed no significant changes in diffusion rates and complex sizes using FCS and gel filtration chromatography analyses. This suggests that after UV-damage, Cdc45 is still present in a large multi-protein complex and that its mobility within living cells is consistently similar following UVC-mediated DNA damage.

  7. Tar analysis from biomass gasification by means of online fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumhakl, Christoph; Karellas, Sotirios

    2011-07-01

    Optical methods in gas analysis are very valuable mainly due to their non-intrusive character. That gives the possibility to use them for in-situ or online measurements with only optical intervention in the measurement volume. In processes like the gasification of biomass, it is of high importance to monitor the gas quality in order to use the product gas in proper machines for energy production following the restrictions in the gas composition but also improving its quality, which leads to high efficient systems. One of the main problems in the biomass gasification process is the formation of tars. These higher hydrocarbons can lead to problems in the operation of the energy system. Up to date, the state of the art method used widely for the determination of tars is a standardized offline measurement system, the so-called "Tar Protocol". The aim of this work is to describe an innovative, online, optical method for determining the tar content of the product gas by means of fluorescence spectroscopy. This method uses optical sources and detectors that can be found in the market at low cost and therefore it is very attractive, especially for industrial applications where cost efficiency followed by medium to high precision are of high importance.

  8. Measurement of biomolecular diffusion in extracellular matrix condensed by fibroblasts using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanori Kihara

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM comprises the heterogeneous environment outside of cells in a biological system. The ECM is dynamically organized and regulated, and many biomolecules secreted from cells diffuse throughout the ECM, regulating a variety of cellular processes. Therefore, investigation of the diffusive behaviors of biomolecules in the extracellular environment is critical. In this study, we investigated the diffusion coefficients of biomolecules of various sizes, measuring from 1 to 10 nm in radius, by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in contracted collagen gel caused by fibroblasts, a traditional culture model of dynamic rearrangement of collagen fibers. The diffusion coefficients of the biomolecules in control collagen gel without cells decreased slightly as compared to those in solution, while the diffusion coefficients of biomolecules in the contracted gel at the cell vicinity decreased dramatically. Additionally, the diffusion coefficients of biomolecules were inversely correlated with molecular radius. In collagen gels populated with fibroblasts, the diffusion coefficient at the cell vicinity clearly decreased in the first 24 h of culture. Furthermore, molecular diffusion was greatly restricted, with a central focus on the populated cells. By using the obtained diffusion coefficients of biomolecules, we calculated the collagen fiber condensation ratio by fibroblasts in the cell vicinity at 3 days of culture to represent a 52-fold concentration. Thus, biomolecular diffusion is restricted in the vicinity of the cells where collagen fibers are highly condensed.

  9. Performance of fluorescence spectroscopy for beef meat authentication: Effect of excitation mode and discriminant algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aït-Kaddour, A; Loudiyi, M; Ferlay, A; Gruffat, D

    2018-03-01

    This study evaluated the performance of classical front face (FFFS) and synchronous (SFS) fluorescence spectroscopy combined with Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (PLSDA), Support Vector Machine associated with PLS (PLS-SVM) and Principal Components Analysis (PCA-SVM) to discriminate three beef muscles (Longissimus thoracis, Rectus abdominis and Semitendinosus). For the FFFS, 5 excitation wavelengths were investigated, while 6 offsets were studied for SFS. Globally, the results showed a good discrimination between muscles with Recall and Precision between 47.82 and 94.34% and Error ranging from 6.03 to 32.39%. For the FFFS, the PLS-SVM with the 382nm excitation wavelength gave the best discrimination results (Recall, Precision and Error of 94.34%, 89.53% and 6.03% respectively). For SFS, when performing discrimination of the three muscles, the 120nm offset gave the highest Recall and Precision (from 57.66% to 94.99%) and the lowest Error values (from 6.78 to 8.66%) whatever the algorithm (PLSDA, PLS-SVM and PCA-SVM). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Photolithography and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy used to examine the rates of exchange in reverse micelle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Zach; Mawson, Cara; Johnson, Kyron; Kessler, Sarah; Rebecca, Anne; Wolf, Nathan; Lim, Michael; Nucci, Nathaniel

    Reverse micelles are molecular complexes that encapsulate a nanoscale pool of water in a surfactant shell dissolved in non-polar solvent. These complexes have a wide range of applications, and in all cases, the degree to which reverse micelles (RM) exchange their contents is relevant for their use. Despite its importance, this aspect of RM behavior is poorly understood. Photolithography is employed here to create micro and nano scale fluidic systems in which mixing rates can be precisely measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Micro-channel patterns are etched using reactive ion etching process into a layer of silicon dioxide on crystalline silicon substrates. Solutions containing mixtures of reverse micelles, proteins, and fluorophores are placed into reservoirs in the patterns, while diffusion and exchange between RMs is monitored using a FCS system built from a modified confocal Raman spectrometer. Using this approach, the diffusion and exchange rates for RM systems are measured as a function of the components of the RM mixture. Funding provided by Rowan University.

  11. Multi-confocal Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy : experimental demonstration and potential applications for living cell measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Galland, Rémi; Kloster, Meike; Herbomel, Gaetan; Destaing, Olivier; Balland, Martial; Souchier, Catherine; Usson, Yves; Derouard, Jacques; Wang, Irène; Delon, Antoine; 10.2741/e263

    2011-01-01

    We report, for the first time, a multi-confocal Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (mFCS) technique which allows parallel measurements at different locations, by combining a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), with an Electron Multiplying-CCD camera (EM-CCD). The SLM is used to produce a series of laser spots, while the pixels of the EM-CCD play the roles of virtual pinholes. The phase map addressed to the SLM is calculated by using the spherical wave approximation and makes it possible to produce several diffraction limited laser spots, either aligned or spread over the field of view. To attain fast enough imaging rates, the camera has been used in different acquisition modes, the fastest of which leads to a time resolution of 100 $\\mu$s. We qualified the experimental set-up by using solutions of sulforhodamine G in glycerol and demonstrated that the observation volumes are similar to that of a standard confocal set-up. To demonstrate that our mFCS method is suitable for intracellular studies, experiments have...

  12. Low frequency Raman spectroscopy of few-atomic-layer thick hBN crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, I.; Schué, L.; Boukhicha, M.; Berini, B.; Plaçais, B.; Loiseau, A.; Barjon, J.

    2017-09-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has recently gained a strong interest as a strategic component in engineering van der Waals heterostructures built with 2D crystals such as graphene. This work reports micro-Raman measurements on hBN flakes made of a few atomic layers, prepared by mechanical exfoliation. The temperature dependence of the Raman scattering in hBN is investigated first such as to define appropriate measurements conditions suitable for thin layers avoiding undesirable heating induced effects. We further focus on the low frequency Raman mode corresponding to the rigid shearing oscillation between adjacent layers, found to be equal to 52.5 cm-1 in bulk hBN. For hBN sheets with thicknesses below typically 4 nm, the frequency of this mode presents discrete values, which are found to decrease down to 46.0(5) cm-1 for a three-layer hBN, in good agreement with the linear-chain model. This makes Raman spectroscopy a relevant tool to quantitatively determine in a non destructive way the number of layers in ultra thin hBN sheets, below 8 L, prior to their integration in van der Waals heterostructures.

  13. Sub-microanalysis of solid samples with near-field enhanced atomic emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Liang, Zhisen; Meng, Yifan; Wang, Tongtong; Hang, Wei; Huang, Benli

    2018-03-01

    A novel approach, which we have chosen to name it as near-field enhanced atomic emission spectroscopy (NFE-AES), was proposed by introducing a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) system into a laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS). The near-field enhancement of a laser-illuminated tip was utilized to improve the lateral resolution tremendously. Using the hybrid arrangement, pure metal tablets were analyzed to verify the performance of NFE-AES both in atmosphere and in vacuum. Due to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the incident electromagnetic field is enhanced and confined at the apex of tip, resulting in sub-micron scale ablation and elemental emission signal. We discovered that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the spectral resolution obtained in vacuum condition are better than those acquired in atmospheric condition. The quantitative capability of NFE-AES was demonstrated by analyzing Al and Pb in Cu matrix, respectively. Submicron-sized ablation craters were achieved by performing NFE-AES on a Si wafer with an Al film, and the spectroscopic information from a crater of 650 nm diameter was successfully obtained. Due to its advantage of high lateral resolution, NFE-AES imaging of micro-patterned Al lines on an integrated circuit of a SIM card was demonstrated with a sub-micron lateral resolution. These results reveal the potential of the NFE-AES technique in sub-microanalysis of solids, opening an opportunity to map chemical composition at sub-micron scale.

  14. Compact metal probes: a solution for atomic force microscopy based tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, R D; Sheremet, E; Müller, S; Gordan, O D; Villabona, A; Schulze, S; Hietschold, M; Zahn, D R T

    2012-12-01

    There are many challenges in accomplishing tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and obtaining a proper tip is probably the greatest one. Since tip size, composition, and geometry are the ultimate parameters that determine enhancement of intensity and lateral resolution, the tip becomes the most critical component in a TERS experiment. However, since the discovery of TERS the cantilevers used in atomic force microscopy (AFM) have remained basically the same: commercial silicon (or silicon nitride) tips covered by a metallic coating. The main issues of using metal-coated silicon cantilevers, such as wearing off of the metal layer or increased tip radius, can be completely overcome by using all-metal cantilevers. Until now in TERS experiments such probes have only been used in a scanning tunneling microscope or in a tuning fork-based shear force microscope but not in AFM. In this work for the first time, we show the use of compact silver cantilevers that are fully compatible with contact and tapping modes in AFM demonstrating their superb performance in TERS experiments.

  15. Electron-beam-induced carbon contamination on silicon: characterization using Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Deborah; Hughes, Anthony E; Muster, Tim H; Davis, Timothy J; Glenn, A Matthew

    2010-02-01

    Electron-beam-induced carbon film deposition has long been recognized as a side effect of scanning electron microscopy. To characterize the nature of this type of contamination, silicon wafers were subjected to prolonged exposure to 15 kV electron beam energy with a probe current of 300 pA. Using Raman spectroscopy, the deposited coating was identified as an amorphous carbon film with an estimated crystallite size of 125 A. Using atomic force microscopy, the cross-sectional profile of the coating was found to be raised and textured, indicative of the beam raster pattern. A map of the Raman intensity across the coating showed increased intensity along the edges and at the corner of the film. The intensity profile was in excess of that which could be explained by thickness alone. The enhancement was found to correspond with a modeled local field enhancement induced by the coating boundary and showed that the deposited carbon coating generated a localized disturbance in the opto-electrical properties of the substrate, which is compared and contrasted with Raman edge enhancement that is produced by surface structure in silicon.

  16. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy and the fascinating angular momentum realm of the atomic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Paul, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    In 1974 Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson predicted the different ‘phases’ that may be expected in deformed nuclei as a function of increasing angular momentum and excitation energy all the way up to the fission limit. While admitting their picture was highly conjectural they confidently stated ‘...with the ingenious experimental approaches that are being developed, we may look forward with excitement to the detailed spectroscopic studies that will illuminate the behaviour of the spinning quantised nucleus’. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy has indeed been a major tool in studying the structure of atomic nuclei and has witnessed numerous significant advances over the last four decades. This article will select highlights from investigations at the Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark, and Daresbury Laboratory, UK, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, some of which have continued at other national laboratories in Europe and the USA to the present day. These studies illustrate the remarkable diversity of phenomena and symmetries exhibited by nuclei in the angular momentum-excitation energy plane that continue to surprise and fascinate scientists.

  17. MDM2-MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2-MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ) in the micromolar range for the MDM2-MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2-MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation.

  18. Atomic layer sensitive in-situ plasma etch depth control with reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Christoph; Kleinschmidt, Ann-Kathrin; Barzen, Lars; Strassner, Johannes; Fouckhardt, Henning

    2017-06-01

    Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) allows for in-situ monitoring of reactive ion etching (RIE) of monocrystalline III-V semiconductor surfaces. Upon use of RAS the sample to be etched is illuminated with broad-band linearly polarized light under nearly normal incidence. Commonly the spectral range is between 1.5 and 5.5 eV. Typically the spectrally resolved difference in reflectivity for light of two orthogonal linear polarizations of light is measured with respect to time - for example for cubic lattices (like the zinc blende structures of most III-V semiconductors) polarizations along the [110] and the [-110] direction. Local anisotropies on the etch front cause elliptical polarization of the reflected light resulting in the RAS signal. The time and photon energy resolved spectra of RAS include reflectometric as well as interferometric information. Light with wavelengths well above 100 nm (even inside the material) can be successfully used to monitor surface abrasion with a resolution of some tens of nanometers. The layers being thinned out act as optical interferometers resulting in Fabry-Perot oscillations of the RAS-signal. Here we report on RAS measurements assessing the surface deconstruction during dry etching. For low etch rates our experimental data show even better resolution than that of the (slow) Fabry-Perot oscillations. For certain photon energies we detect monolayer-etch-related oscillations in the mean reflectivity, which give the best possible resolution in etch depth monitoring and control, i.e. the atomic scale.

  19. Highly sensitive fiber grating chemical sensors: An effective alternative to atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxmeshwar, Lata. S.; Jadhav, Mangesh S.; Akki, Jyoti. F.; Raikar, Prasad; Kumar, Jitendra; prakash, Om; Raikar, U. S.

    2017-06-01

    Accuracy in quantitative determination of trace elements like Zinc, present in drinking water in ppm level, is a big challenge and optical fiber gratings as chemical sensors may provide a promising solution to overcome the same. This paper presents design of two simple chemical sensors based on the principle of shift in characteristic wavelength of gratings with change in their effective refractive index, to measure the concentration of Zinc in drinking water using etched short period grating (FBG) and Long period grating (LPG) respectively. Three samples of drinking water from different places have been examined for presence of Zinc. Further, the results obtained by our sensors have also been verified with the results obtained by a standard method, Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The whole experiment has been performed by fixing the fibers in a horizontal position with the sensor regions at the center of the fibers, making it less prone to disturbance and breaking. The sensitivity of LPG sensor is about 205 times that of the FBG sensor. A few advantages of Fiber grating sensors, besides their regular features, over AAS have also been discussed, that make our sensors potential alternatives for existing techniques in determination of trace elements in drinking water.

  20. Detection of Glucose with Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy by Using Oligonucleotide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Yan, Honglian; Ling, Liansheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for the detection of glucose was established with atomic absorption spectroscopy by using the label of gold nanoparticle (AuNP). Silver-coated glass assembled with oligonucleotide 5'-SH-T12-AGA CAA GAG AGG-3' (Oligo 1) was acted as separation probe, oligonucleotide 5'-CAA CAG AGA ACG-T12-SH-3' modified gold nanoparticle (AuNP-Oligo 2) was acted as signal-reporting probe. Oligonucleotide 5'-CGT TCT CTG TTG CCT CTC TTG TCT-3' (Oligo 3) could hybridize with Oligo 1 on the surface of silver-coated glass and AuNP-Oligo 2, and free AuNP-Oligo 2 could be removed by rinsing with buffer. Hence the concentration of Oligo 3 was transformed into the concentration of gold element. In addition, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by glucose, glucose oxidase and Fe(2+)-EDTA through Fenton reaction. Thereby the concentration of glucose could be transformed to the absorbance of gold element. Under the optimum conditions, the integrated absorbance decreased proportionally to the concentration of glucose over the range from 50.0 μM to 1.0 mM with a detection limit of 40.0 μM. Moreover, satisfactory result was obtained when the assay was used to determinate glucose in human serum.