WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

  1. Laser fluorescence spectroscopy of sputtered uranium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy was used to study the sputtering of 99.8% 238U metal foil when bombarded by normally incident 500 to 3000 eV Ne+, Ar+, Kr+, and O2+. A three-level atom model of the LIF processes is developed to interpret the observed fluorescent emission from the sputtered species. The model shows that close attention must be paid to the conditions under which the experiment is carried out as well as to the details of the collision cascade theory of sputtering. Rigorous analysis shows that when properly applied, LIF can be used to investigate the predictions of sputtering theory as regards energy distributions of sputtered particles and for the determination of sputtering yields. The possibility that thermal emission may occur during sputtering can also be tested using the proposed model. It is shown that the velocity distribution (either the number density or flux density distribution, depending upon the experimental conditions) of the sputtered particles can be determined using the LIF technique and that this information can be used to obtain a description of the basic sputtering mechanisms. These matters are discussed using the U-atom fluorescence measurements as a basis. The relative sputtering yields for various incident ions on uranium were also measured for the first time using the LIF technique. A surprisingly high fraction of the sputtered uranium atoms were found to occupy the low lying metastable energy levels of U(I). The population of the sputtered metastable atoms were found approximately to obey a Boltzman distribution with an effective temperature of 920 +- 1000K. 41 references

  2. Studies in atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy-V The fluorescence characteristics and determination of antimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnall, R M; Thompson, K C; West, T S

    1967-10-01

    Atomic-fluorescence of antimony may be generated in an air-propane flame by nebulizing aqueous solutions of antimony salts whilst irradiating the flame by means of a microwave-excited electrode-less discharge tube operating at 30 W. The strongest fluorescence is exhibited by the (4)S(11 2 ) --> (4)P(1 3 ) 2311 A resonance line and weaker signals are observed at the 2068 and 2176 A resonance lines and at four intercombination lines, at 2598, 2671, 2770 and 2878 A. A process of thermally assisted direct-line fluorescence is postulated to account for the otherwise inexplicable intensity of the 2598 A line emission. Atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy at 2176 A permits the determination of antimony in the range 0.1-120 ppm with a detection limit of 0.05 ppm. With the same equipment and source, the range of measurement for atomic-absorption was 6-120 ppm and the detection limit was 1 ppm. No interferences were observed from 100-fold molar amounts of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, NH(4), Pb and Zn or from arsenate, chloride, nitrate, phosphate and sulphate. PMID:18960212

  3. Quenching-independent fluorescence measurements of atomic hydrogen with photoionization controlled-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenching-independent fluorescence by atomic hydrogen has been measured with photoionization controlled-loss spectroscopy (PICLS) in stoichiometric and fuel-rich premixed H2/O2/N2 flames at a pressure of 20 Torr. These measurements are compared with conventional fluorescence measurements in the same flames. When matched in the postflame zone, the two sets of measurements diverge in the preheat zone between the burner surface and the peak of the fluorescence profiles. This divergence, caused by changes in the local quenching rate coefficient, shows the utility of PICLS for determining the kinetics of atomic hydrogen in the preheat zone

  4. Laser-excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in a helium microwave-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Timothy S.

    The focus of this dissertation is to report the first documented coupling of helium microwave induced plasmas (MIPs) to laser excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability to effectively produce intense atomic emission from both metal and nonmetal analytes gives helium microwave induced plasmas a greater flexibility than the more commonly utilized argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Originally designed as an element selective detector for non-aqueous chromatography applications at low applied powers (plasma has been applied to aqueous sample determinations at higher applied powers (>500 W). The helium MIP has been shown to be a very powerful analytical atomic spectroscopy tool. The development of the pulsed dye laser offered an improved method of excitation in the field of atomic fluorescence. The use of laser excitation for atomic fluorescence was a logical successor to the conventional excitation methods involving hollow cathode lamps and continuum sources. The highly intense, directional, and monochromatic nature of laser radiation results in an increased population of atomic species in excited electronic states where atomic fluorescence can occur. The application of laser excitation atomic fluorescence to the analysis of metals in a helium microwave induced plasma with ultrasonic sample nebulization was the initial focus of this work. Experimental conditions and results are included for the aqueous characterization of manganese, lead, thallium, and iron in the helium MIP- LEAFS system. These results are compared to previous laser excitation atomic fluorescence experimentation. The effect of matrix interferences on the analytical fluorescence signal was also investigated for each element. The advantage of helium MIPs over argon ICPs in the determination of nonmetals in solution indicates that the helium MIP is an excellent candidate for laser excitation atomic fluorescence experiments involving nonmetals such as chlorine, bromine, iodine, and

  5. New energy levels of atomic niobium by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the near infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy was applied in order to find new energy levels of the niobium atom. A continuous wave tuneable titanium–sapphire laser in the wavelength range from 750 to 865 nm and a hollow-cathode lamp were used. We discovered four energy levels of even parity, three lying levels below 19 000 cm−1 and one at much higher energy. Additionally hyperfine structure data of six levels of odd parity were determined. (paper)

  6. Elemental analysis of hair samples using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental analysis of hair samples was performed using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence. The ion exchange preconcentration technique was employed. The capacity of the exchanger used-cellulose hyphan at different pH was investigated to determine the optimum pH for the resin. The capacity of the resin to take up elements of interest from mixed solutions was also analysed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  7. Study of a Model Humic Acid-type Polymer by Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Antonio Piza; Nelson Consolin-Filho; Sérgio da Costa Saab; Daiana Kotra Deda; Fábio de Lima Leite; Marcilene Ferrari Barriquello; Ladislau Martin-Neto

    2012-01-01

    A model HA-type polymer of para-benzoquinone synthetic humic acid (SHA) and its complexes with copper, iron and manganese metal ions were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Natural humic acids (HA) and synthetic humic acids (SHA) were examined by fluorescence spectroscopy, which indicated similarity of SHA and HA spectra. The AFM images of SHA and its complexes revealed variable morphologies, such as small spheres, aggregates and a sponge-like structure. The SHA complexes displayed ...

  8. Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy of extremely neutron-deficient barium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy (FACS) has been used to measure the nuclear mean square radii and moments of the extremely neutron-deficient isotopes 120-124Ba. At N=65 an abrupt change in nuclear mean square charge radii is observed which can be understood in terms of the occupation of the spin-orbit partner g7/2 5/2[413] neutron and g9/2 9/2[404] proton orbitals and the consequent enhancement of the n-p interaction. (orig.)

  9. X-ray fluorescence/Auger-electron coincidence spectroscopy of vacancy cascades in atomic argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arp, U. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Electron and Optical Physics Div.; LeBrun, T.; Southworth, S.H.; Jung, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Physics Div.; MacDonald, M.A. [E.P.S.R.C. Daresbury Lab., Warrington (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01

    Argon L{sub 2.3}-M{sub 2.3}M{sub 2.3} Auger-electron spectra were measured in coincidence with K{alpha} fluorescent x-rays in studies of Ar K-shell vacancy decays at several photon energies above the K-threshold and on the 1s-4p resonance in atomic argon. The complex spectra recorded by conventional electron spectroscopy are greatly simplified when recorded in coincidence with fluorescent x-rays, allowing a more detailed analysis of the vacancy cascade process. The resulting coincidence spectra are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations which include shake-up transitions in the resonant case. Small energy shifts of the coincidence electron spectra are attributed to post-collision interaction with 1s photoelectrons.

  10. Use of laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectroscopy for characterization of an argon inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (LEAFS) is investigated and employed as a diagnostic technique for study of the argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Computer simulations are used to describe the behavior of nonsteady-state laser excited fluorescence (LEF) for multi-level atomic systems under conditions expected to be encountered in the ICP and an atmospheric pressure flame. These simulations are then compared to experimental data collected under similar conditions in the ICP and a flame. These studies show that LEAFS should be a useful tool for characterization of an ICP, with certain limitations. Relatively small changes in saturated LEF signals under changing quenching and mixing conditions are both predicted theoretically and observed experimentally for several atomic systems. This independence from quenching and mixing effects allows one to relate saturated LEF signals directly to relative number densities of species when spatially scanning over an inhomogeneous medium, such as an ICP discharge, where significant changes in quenching can be encountered in a single scan. SSI values are also found to be useful as indicators of relative collisional quenching rates and relative degree of LTE establishment in the ICP, as well as ease of saturation for a given transition

  11. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of matrix-isolated silver atoms after pulsed excitation of inner-shell transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, T.; Wiggenhauser, H.; Schriever, U.; Kolb, D. M.

    1990-02-01

    The energy dissipation in matrix-isolated silver atoms after pulsed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) excitation of 4d-5p transitions has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The decay behavior of the various fluorescence bands has been analyzed and a model for the relaxation process proposed within the framework of a two-dimensional configuration-coordinate diagram. If minute quantities of Ag2 are present in the matrix, the analysis requires consideration of energy transfer between silver atoms and dimers.

  12. Using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy method for investigating iron atom behaviour on the TO-2 tokamak plasma filament periphery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical prerequisites and methods for laser fluorescent spectroscopy (LFS) to measure heavy impurity concentration in a tokamak with TO-2 diverter are described with the purpose of organizing plasma diagnostics in the T-15 tokamak. Results of measuring iron atom absolute concentrations during discharge in the TO-2 tokamak near-the well area by LFS method are presented. Preliminary experiments on detecting channel absolute calibration by the fluorescent signal of a tube with a hollow cathode, pumped by probing laser radiation are conducted

  13. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Hink

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the molecul

  14. Velocity and electronic state distributions of sputtered Fe atoms by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velocity distributions and relative populations in the fine-structure levels of the a5D/sub J/ ground state of Fe atoms, produced by sputtering with 3 keV argon ions, have been investigated by Doppler shifted laser induced fluorescence. The laser system employs a single-mode, scanning ring dye laser, amplified by a sequence of three excimer-pumped flowing-dye cells. Frequency doubling in a KD*P crystal was used to produce high energy (> .5 mJ) pulses of narrowband tunable UV output near 300 nm. Laser power influence on effective velocity bandwidth was investigated. Favorable light-collection geometry minimized distortion of the velocity spectra from apparatus-averaging effects. In impurity flux diagnostic applications in fusion devices, substantial spatial averaging may occur. In the latter case, the narrow velocity bandwidth (70 m/s, transform limit) of the present laser system is particularly useful

  15. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  16. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  17. Local mobility in lipid domains of supported bilayers characterized by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankel, Daniel J.; Buranda, T. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Burns, Alan Richard

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is used to examine mobility of labeled probes at specific sites in supported bilayers consisting of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid domains in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). Those sites are mapped beforehand with simultaneous atomic force microscopy and submicron confocal fluorescence imaging, allowing characterization of probe partitioning between gel DPPC and disordered liquid DOPC domains with corresponding topography of domain structure. We thus examine the relative partitioning and mobility in gel and disordered liquid phases for headgroup- and tailgroup-labeled GM1 ganglioside probes and for headgroup- and tailgroup-labeled phospholipid probes. For the GM1 probes, large differences in mobility between fluid and gel domains are observed; whereas unexpected mobility is observed in submicron gel domains for the phospholipid probes. We attribute the latter to domain heterogeneities that could be induced by the probe. Furthermore, fits to the FCS data for the phospholipid probes in the DOPC fluid phase require two components (fast and slow). Although proximity to the glass substrate may be a factor, local distortion of the probe by the fluorophore could also be important. Overall, we observe nonideal aspects of phospholipid probe mobility and partitioning that may not be restricted to supported bilayers.

  18. Fluorescence spectroscopy in the nanosecond range for matrix-isolated Cu atoms and dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggenhauser, H.; Kolb, D. M.; Rotermund, H. H.; Schrittenlacher, W.; Schroeder, W.

    1985-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation in the single-bunch mode was employed to study time-resolved emission from Cu atoms and dimers isolated in a Ne matrix. The decay time of the matrix-related emission at 3.5 eV for Cu in Ne after excitation of the 4s → 4p resonance transition was determined as 6.9±0.3 ns, while excitation into higher-lying 3d → 4p transitions resulted in a much slower decay of the 3.5 eV emission. From analysis of rise and decay times, a detailed diagram for energy dissipation in matrix-isolated Cu atoms has been derived. The B → X (Σ u → Σ g) emission of Cu 2 in Ne has a first-order decay time of about 10 ns.

  19. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs

  20. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  1. Laser spectroscopy of sputtered atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of laser radiation to study the sputtering process is of relatively recent origin. Much has been learned from this work about the basic physics of the sputtering process itself through measurements of velocity and excited state distributions of sputtered atoms and the effects of adsorbates on substrate sputtering yields. Furthermore, the identification, characterization, and sensitive detection of sputtered atoms by laser spectroscopy has led to the development of in situ diagnostics for impurity fluxes in the plasma edge regions of tokamaks and of ultrasensitive methods (ppB Fe in Si) for surface analysis with ultralow (picocoulomb) ion fluences. The techniques involved in this work, laser fluorescence and multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy, will be described and illustrations given of results achieved up to now. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  2. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  3. Absolute nitrogen atom density measurements by two-photon laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges of pure nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy is used to follow the nitrogen atom density in flowing dielectric barrier discharges fed with pure nitrogen and operating at atmospheric pressure. Two different dielectric barrier discharge regimes are investigated: the Townsend regime, which is homogeneous although operating at atmospheric pressure, and the more common filamentary regime. In both regimes, densities as high as 3x1014/cm3 are detected. However, the N atoms kinetic formation depends on the discharge regime. The saturation level is reached more rapidly with a filamentary discharge. For a given discharge regime, the N atom density depends strongly on the energy dissipated in the plasma between the gas inlet and the measurement position, whether the energy is varied by varying the position of the measurements, the gas flow, or the dissipated power. Experiments performed in the postdischarge show that the N atom decay cannot be simply attributed to three-body recombination of atomic nitrogen with nitrogen molecules, meaning that other mechanisms such as surface recombination or gas impurities play a role.

  4. Improvements and application of a modified gas chromatography atomic fluorescence spectroscopy method for routine determination of methylmercury in biota samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorecki, Jerzy; Díez, Sergi; Macherzynski, Mariusz; Kalisinska, Elżbieta; Golas, Janusz

    2013-10-15

    Improvements to the application of a combined solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography coupled to pyrolysis and atomic fluorescence spectrometry method (SPME-GC-AFS) for methylmercury (MeHg) determination in biota samples are presented. Our new method includes improvements in the methodology of determination and the quantification technique. A shaker instead of a stirrer was used, in order to reduce the possibility of sample contamination and to simplify cleaning procedures. Then, optimal rotation frequency and shaking time were settled at 800 rpm and 10 min, respectively. Moreover, the GC-AFS system was equipped with a valve and an argon heater to eliminate the effect of the decrease in analytical signal caused by the moisture released from SPME fiber. For its determination, MeHg was first extracted from biota samples with a 25% KOH solution (3h) and then it was quantified by two methods, a conventional double standard addition method (AC) and a modified matrix-matched calibration (MQ) which is two times faster than the AC method. Both procedures were successfully tested with certified reference materials, and applied for the first time to the determination of MeHg in muscle samples of goosander (Mergus merganser) and liver samples of white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) with values ranging from 1.19 to 3.84 mg/kg dry weight (dw), and from 0.69 to 6.23 mg kg(-1) dw, respectively. PMID:24054647

  5. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric discharge type atomic vaporizer is developed for the spectroscopic study on actinide elements. Laser induced fluorescence study on actinide elements is performed by using this high temperature type atomizer. For the effective photoionization of elements, copper vapor laser pumped dye laser and electron beam heating type atomic vaporizer are built and their characteristics are measured. In addition, resonance ionization mass spectroscopic analysis for lead sample as well as laser induced fluorescence study on uranium sample in solution phase is made. (Author)

  6. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy for FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) is based on the absorption of a short pulse of tuned laser light by a group of atoms and the observation of the resulting fluorescence radiation from the excited state. Because the excitation is resonant it is very efficient, and the fluorescence can be many times brighter than the normal spontaneous emission, so low number densities of the selected atoms can be detected and measured. Good spatial resolution can be achieved by using a narrow laser beam. If the laser is sufficiently monochromatic, and it can be tuned over the absorption line profile of the selected atoms, information can also be obtained about the velocities of the atoms from the Doppler effect which can broaden and shift the line. In this report two topics are examined in detail. The first is the effect of high laser irradiance, which can cause 'power broadening' of the apparent absorption line profile. The second is the effect of the high magnetic field in FTU. Detailed calculations are given for LIFS of neutral iron and molybdenum atoms, including the Zeeman effect, and the implementation of LIFS for these atoms on FTU is discussed

  7. Statistical filtering in fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 406, č. 20 (2014), s. 4797-4813. ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Filtered fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  8. Photon-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (PIFS)

    CERN Document Server

    Schmoranzer, H; Vollweiler, F; Müller-Albrecht, R; Ehresmann, A; Schartner, K H; Zimmermann, B

    2001-01-01

    Photon-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (PIFS) using monochromatized synchrotron radiation for exciting the sample selectively and a fluorescence spectrometer with a position-sensitive photon detector for recording its fluorescence spectrum is a very powerful experimental technique especially for the investigation of atomic and molecular photoionization and photodissociation. To reduce the contributions of higher harmonics of the undulator radiation which are also transmitted through the primary monochromator a very compact He absorber was developed. With a He pressure of 30 mbar in the differentially pumped gas cell of the absorber the fraction of the third harmonic of the undulator transmitted through the monochromator was reduced by a factor of 175 for an exciting-photon energy of the first order of 24.18 eV.

  9. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  10. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented. (GHT)

  11. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented

  12. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  13. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He–O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm−3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60–70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260−300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production. (paper)

  14. Imaging an atomic beam using fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming He(何明); Jin Wang(王谨); Mingsheng Zhan(詹明生)

    2003-01-01

    A fluorescence detection scheme is applied to image an atomic beam. Using two laser diodes as the sources of detection light and pumping light respectively, the fluorescence image of the atomic beam is then observed by a commercial CCD-camera, which is corresponding to the atomic state and velocity distribution. The detection scheme has a great utilization in the experiments of cold atoms and atomic optics.

  15. Solar Spectroscopy: Atomic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, H.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A Greek philosopher called DEMOCRITUS (c. 460-370 BC) first introduced the concept of atoms (which means indivisible). His atoms do not precisely correspond to our atoms of today, which are not indivisible, but made up of a nucleus (protons with positive charge and neutrons which have no charge) and orbiting electrons (with negative charge). Indeed, in the solar atmosphere, the temperature is suc...

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy: basic foundations and methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  17. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), pt.A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  18. CANAS '01 - Colloquium analytical atomic spectroscopy; CANAS '01 - Colloquium Analytische Atomspektroskopie. Programm. Kurzfassungen der Vortraege und Poster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The main topics of the meeting on analytical atom spectroscopy were: optical atom spectrometry, x-ray fluorescence analysis, absorption spectroscopy, icp mass spectroscopy, trace analysis, sampling, sample preparation and quality assurance.

  19. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser atomic spectroscopic study on actinium element has been performed in many areas of spectroscopy. The study on characteristic of atomic vapor has been proceeded for copper atom and the spatial density distribution of copper vapor is measured. This experimental data has been compared with the theoretically calculated data. In spectroscopic experiment, the first and second excited states for actinium element are identified and the most efficient ionization scheme for actinium element is identified. In addition, the corrosion problem for filament material due to the heating of the actinium element has been studied. (Author)

  20. Studies on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser atomic spectroscopy is studied both theoretically and experimentally. For Na-like ions, possible electric dipole, quadrupole and magnetic dipole transitions between atomic levels below 4f doublet F (J=7/2) state are investigated, using the recently developed computer programs - MCDF, MJE and MULTPOL. Line strength, oscillator strength and transition probability are calculated. A preliminary results for Hg-RIS experiment are also presented. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, high power dye laser, vacuum system, ionization cell and ion measuring system are constructed, and their characteristics are examined. (Author)

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopy applied to orange trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcassa, L. G.; Gasparoto, M. C. G.; Belasque, J., Jr.; Lins, E. C.; Dias Nunes, F.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2006-05-01

    In this work, we have applied laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate biological processes in orange trees (Citrus aurantium L.). We have chosen to investigate water stress and Citrus Canker, which is a disease caused by the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri bacteria. The fluorescence spectroscopy was investigated by using as an excitation source a 442-nm 15-mW HeCd gas multimode discharge laser and a 532-nm 10-mW Nd3+:YAG laser. The stress manifestation was detected by the variation of fluorescence ratios of the leaves at different wavelengths. The fluorescence ratios present a significant variation, showing the possibility to observe water stress by fluorescence spectrum. The Citrus Canker’s contaminated leaves were discriminated from the healthy leaves using a more complex analysis of the fluorescence spectra. However, we were unable to discriminate it from another disease, and new fluorescence experiments are planned for the future.

  2. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  3. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A.; Parthey, Ch G.; Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Khabarova, K.; Pohl, R.; Peters, E.; Yost, D. C.; Matveev, A.; Predehl, K.; Droste, S.; Wilken, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.; Abgrall, M.; Rovera, D.; Salomon, Ch; Laurent, Ph; Udem, Th

    2013-12-01

    Precise determinations of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference [1]. A recent measurement of the 2S - 2P3/2 transition frequency in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct [2, 3]. We hope to contribute to this so-called "proton size puzzle" by providing additional experimental input from hydrogen spectroscopy.

  4. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  5. Determination of Mercury, Lead and Arsenic in Mainstream Smoke of Cigarette by Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy%原子荧光法测定卷烟主流烟气中的汞·砷·铅

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔维松; 汤丹俞; 曾晓鹰; 者为; 施红林; 张峻松

    2009-01-01

    A new method for the determination of mercury, lead and arsenic in cigarette smoke by using atomic fluorescence spectroscopy was studied.The mainstream cigarette smoke was collected by cambridge filter, and mercury, lead and arsenic were collected with 2% hydrochloric acid ultrasonic leaching filter.The mercury, lead and arsenic in digest were determined by atomic fluorescence spectroscopy.Under the optimum determination conditions, the standard relative standard deviations are 2.8%-3.2% and the recoveries are 91%-95%.%研究了用原子荧光法测定卷烟主流烟气中的汞、砷、铅.结果表明,卷烟主流烟气用剑桥滤片捕集,用2%盐酸超声波浸取滤片上捕集的汞、砷、铅,然后用原子荧光法测定,方法相对标准偏差为2.8%~3.2%,标准回收率为91%~95%.

  6. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in laser gradient field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is capable of probing dynamic processes in living biological systems. From photon fluctuation of fluorescing particles which diffuse through a small detection volume, FCS reveals information on the concentration and the structure of the particles, as well as information on microscopic environment.In this note, we study the radiation forces experienced by Rayleigh particles in a laser field in details, and analyze the effects of gradient field on FCS measurements.

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopy for neoplasms control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratchenko, I. A.; Kristoforova, Yu. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of malignant skin tumors diagnosis was performed involving two setups for native tissues fluorescence control in visible and near infrared regions. Combined fluorescence analysis for skin malignant melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed. Autofluorescence spectra of normal skin and oncological pathologies stimulated by 457 nm and 785 nm lasers were registered for 74 skin tissue samples. Spectra of 10 melanomas and 27 basal cell carcinomas were registered ex vivo. Skin tumors analysis was made on the basis of autofluorescence spectra intensity and curvature for analysis of porphyrins, lipo-pigments, flavins and melanin. Separation of melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed on the basis of discriminant analysis. Overall accuracy of basal cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas separation in current study reached 86.5% with 70% sensitivity and 92.6% specificity.

  8. Angle-Resolved Spectroscopy of Parametric Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Feng-kuo

    2013-01-01

    The parametric fluorescence from a nonlinear crystal forms a conical radiation pattern. We measure the angular and spectral distributions of parametric fluorescence in a beta-barium borate crystal pumped by a 405-nm diode laser employing angle-resolved imaging spectroscopy. The experimental angle-resolved spectra and the generation efficiency of parametric down conversion are compared with a plane-wave theoretical analysis. The parametric fluorescence is used as a broadband light source for the calibration of the instrument spectral response function in the wavelength range from 450 to 1000 nm.

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopy for medical and environmental diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence spectroscopy can be used for diagnostics in medical and environmental applications. The many aspects of fluorescence emission are utilized to enhance the accuracy of the diagnosis. A fluorescence detection system, based on nitrogen laser or dye laser excitation and optical multichannel detection, was constructed, and fluorescence spectra from human malignant tumours of various origins, were recorded. Tumour demarcation was observed using exogenous chromophores, as well as the endogenous tissue fluorescence. In particular, δ-amino levulinic acid was found to provide very good tumour demarcation. A multi-colour imaging system capable of simultaneous recording of four fluorescence images at selected wavelengths, was developed. Examples of processed images, based on the four sub-images, are shown for malignant tumours. In addition, data from photodynamic treatment of human malignant tumours are presented. Autofluorescence spectra from excised pieces of human atherosclerotic aorta and atherosclerotic coronary segment were found to be different from those of non-diseased vessels. Furthermore, fluorescence decay curves from atherosclerotic samples were found to differ from those of non-diseased samples. It is concluded that both spectral and temporal information should be utilized to enhance the demarcation. Methods for obtaining fluorescence data free from interference from blood, with applications to in vivo laser angioplasty of atherosclerosis, are discussed. The optical multichannel system and the multi-colour imaging system were integrated with a remote sensing system, originally used for environmental measurements, to obtain fluorescence spectra as well as fluorescence images of plants at a distance of up to 100 m. The fluorescence data from plants subject to environmental stress or senescent plants were found to differ from those obtained from healthy vegetation. 359 refs

  10. Determination of thiomersal by flow injection coupled with microwave-assisted photochemical online oxidative decomposition of organic mercury and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Thiomersal was determined on line using FI-MW/UV-CVGAFS. •MW/UV allows a “green” on line oxidation of organic mercury to HgII. •Each measure requires less than 5 min with a LOD of 3 ng mL−1 (as mercury). •Hg concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranges between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL−1. -- Abstract: We developed a flow injection (FI) method for the determination of thiomersal (sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate, C9H9HgNaO2S) based on the UV/microwave (MW) photochemical, online oxidation of organic mercury, followed by cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVG-AFS) detection. Thiomersal was quantitatively converted in the MW/UV process to Hg(II), with a yield of 97 ± 3%. This reaction was followed by the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) performed in a knotted reaction coil with NaBH4 solution, and AFS detection in an Ar/H2 miniaturized flame. The method was linear in the 0.01–2 μg mL−1 range, with a LOD of 0.003 μg mL−1. This method has been applied to the determination of thiomersal in ophthalmic solutions, with recoveries ranging between 97% and 101%. We found a mercury concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranging between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL−1

  11. Determination of thiomersal by flow injection coupled with microwave-assisted photochemical online oxidative decomposition of organic mercury and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Mascherpa, Marco Carlo; D’Ulivo, Alessandro [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ferrari, Carlo [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, INO–UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Bramanti, Emilia, E-mail: bramanti@pi.iccom.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Thiomersal was determined on line using FI-MW/UV-CVGAFS. •MW/UV allows a “green” on line oxidation of organic mercury to Hg{sup II}. •Each measure requires less than 5 min with a LOD of 3 ng mL{sup −1} (as mercury). •Hg concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranges between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL{sup −1}. -- Abstract: We developed a flow injection (FI) method for the determination of thiomersal (sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate, C{sub 9}H{sub 9}HgNaO{sub 2}S) based on the UV/microwave (MW) photochemical, online oxidation of organic mercury, followed by cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVG-AFS) detection. Thiomersal was quantitatively converted in the MW/UV process to Hg(II), with a yield of 97 ± 3%. This reaction was followed by the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) performed in a knotted reaction coil with NaBH{sub 4} solution, and AFS detection in an Ar/H{sub 2} miniaturized flame. The method was linear in the 0.01–2 μg mL{sup −1} range, with a LOD of 0.003 μg mL{sup −1}. This method has been applied to the determination of thiomersal in ophthalmic solutions, with recoveries ranging between 97% and 101%. We found a mercury concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranging between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL{sup −1}.

  12. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging-guided confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Desheng; Kaldaras, Leonora; Lu, H. Peter

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an integrated spectroscopy system combining total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging with confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy for two-dimensional interfaces. This spectroscopy approach is capable of both multiple molecules simultaneously sampling and in situ confocal fluorescence dynamics analyses of individual molecules of interest. We have demonstrated the calibration with fluorescent microspheres, and carried out single-molecule spectroscop...

  13. Differentiating tissue by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woessner, Stefan; Huen, Julien; Malthan, Dirk

    2004-03-01

    A common problem in several surgical applications is the lack of navigational information. Most often, the only source of information about the location of crucial structures, in relation to the surgical instrument, is the visible and tactile sensory input of the surgeon. In some cases, this leads to time-consuming procedures and a high risk for the patient. Therefore, we developed a spectroscopic sensor system for automatic differentiation between several tissue types. For example in milling processes, a sensor that is able to detect bone in contrast to nerve or vein tissue can be used to control the milling process. We showed exemplarily for the cochlea implant, a typical ENT-surgery, that with the help of our sensor system, the milling of bone can be accelerated without increasing the risk for the patient. It is also possible to use this type of sensor system in the area of medical robotics in soft-tissue applications. With real-time information, a continuous registration can take place, in contrast to a registration that is done using static preoperatively acquired images. We showed that our sensor system can be used to dynamically update the location of the patient in relation to CT or MR-images. In conclusion, we have been able to show that well-known spectroscopy sensors can be used to open new possibilities in medical treatment with and without the use of robotics.

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy for wastewater monitoring: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstea, Elfrida M; Bridgeman, John; Baker, Andy; Reynolds, Darren M

    2016-05-15

    Wastewater quality is usually assessed using physical, chemical and microbiological tests, which are not suitable for online monitoring, provide unreliable results, or use hazardous chemicals. Hence, there is an urgent need to find a rapid and effective method for the evaluation of water quality in natural and engineered systems and for providing an early warning of pollution events. Fluorescence spectroscopy has been shown to be a valuable technique to characterize and monitor wastewater in surface waters for tracking sources of pollution, and in treatment works for process control and optimization. This paper reviews the current progress in applying fluorescence to assess wastewater quality. Studies have shown that, in general, wastewater presents higher fluorescence intensity compared to natural waters for the components associated with peak T (living and dead cellular material and their exudates) and peak C (microbially reprocessed organic matter). Furthermore, peak T fluorescence is significantly reduced after the biological treatment process and peak C is almost completely removed after the chlorination and reverse osmosis stages. Thus, simple fluorometers with appropriate wavelength selectivity, particularly for peaks T and C could be used for online monitoring in wastewater treatment works. This review also shows that care should be taken in any attempt to identify wastewater pollution sources due to potential overlapping fluorophores. Correlations between fluorescence intensity and water quality parameters such as biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and total organic carbon (TOC) have been developed and dilution of samples, typically up to ×10, has been shown to be useful to limit inner filter effect. It has been concluded that the following research gaps need to be filled: lack of studies on the on-line application of fluorescence spectroscopy in wastewater treatment works and lack of data processing tools suitable for rapid correction and extraction of

  15. Atomic processes relevant to polarization plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When atoms (ions) are excited anisotropically, polarized excited atoms are produced and the radiation emitted by these atoms is polarized. From the standpoint of plasma spectroscopy research, we review the existing data for various atomic processes that are related to the polarization phenomena. These processes are: electron impact excitation, excitation by atomic and ionic collisions, photoexcitation, radiative recombination and bremsstrahlung. Collisional and radiative relaxation processes of atomic polarization follow. Other topics included are: electric-field measurement, self alignment, Lyman doublet intensity ratio, and magnetic-field measurement of the solar prominence. (author)

  16. Precision spectroscopy of the helium atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui-ming HU; Zheng-Tian LU; Zong-Chao YAN

    2009-01-01

    Persistent efforts in both theory and experiment have yielded increasingly precise understanding of the helium atom. Because of its simplicity, the helium atom has long been a testing ground for relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects in few-body atomic systems theoretically and experimentally.Comparison between theory and experiment of the helium spectroscopy in ls2p3pJ can potentially extract a very precise value of the fine structure constant a. The helium atom can also be used to explore exotic nuclear structures. In this paper, we provide a brief review of the recent advances in precision calculations and measurements of the helium atom.

  17. Single molecule detection and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy on surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Hassler, Kai; Lasser, Theo

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis a new approach for single molecule detection and analysis is explored. This approach is based on the combination of two well established methods, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). In contrast to most existing fluorescence spectroscopy techniques, the subject of primary interest in FCS is not the fluorescence intensity itself but the random intensity fluctuation around the mean value. Intensity fluctuations...

  18. Single molecule detection and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy on surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Hassler, Kai

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis a new approach for single molecule detection and analysis is explored. This approach is based on the combination of two well established methods, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). In contrast to most existing fluorescence spectroscopy techniques, the subject of primary interest in FCS is not the fluorescence intensity itself but the random intensity fluctuation around the mean value. Intensity fluctuations...

  19. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-08-01

    We use a two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to measure the coupled absorption and emission properties of atomic species in plasmas produced via laser ablation of solid aluminum targets at atmospheric pressure. Emission spectra from the Al I 394.4 nm and Al I 396.15 nm transitions are measured while a frequency-doubled, continuous-wave, Ti:Sapphire laser is tuned across the Al I 396.15 nm transition. The resulting two-dimensional spectra show the energy coupling between the two transitions via increased emission intensity for both transitions during resonant absorption of the continuous-wave laser at one transition. Time-delayed and gated detection of the emission spectrum is used to isolate the resonantly-excited fluorescence emission from the thermally-excited emission from the plasma. In addition, the tunable continuous-wave laser measures the absorption spectrum of the Al transition with ultra-high resolution after the plasma has cooled, resulting in narrower spectral linewidths than observed in emission spectra. Our results highlight that fluorescence spectroscopy employing continuous-wave laser re-excitation after pulsed laser ablation combines benefits of both traditional emission and absorption spectroscopic methods.

  20. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Ralf; Pernice, Wolfram; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  1. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Ralf; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert, E-mail: r.loew@physik.uni-stuttgart.de [5. Physikalisches Institut and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Gruhler, Nico; Pernice, Wolfram [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2015-07-27

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  2. Precision spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Thesis reports on three measurements involving the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and deuterium conducted on a 5.8 K atomic beam. The transition is excited Doppler-free via two counter-propagating photons near 243 nm. The H/D isotope shift has been determined as Δ∫exp=670 994 334 606(15) Hz. Comparing with the theoretical value for the isotope shift, excluding the leading nuclear size effect, Δ∫th=670 999 566.90(66)(60) kHz we confirm, twice more accurate, the rms charge radius difference of the deuteron and the proton as left angle r2 right angle d- left angle r2 right angle p=3.82007(65) fm2 and the deuteron structure radius rstr=1.97507(78) fm. The frequency ratio of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen to the cesium ground state hyperfine transition provided by the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM is measured to be ∫1S-2S=2 466 061 413 187 035 (10) Hz which presents a fractional frequency uncertainty of 4.2 x 10-15. The second absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen presents the first application of a 900 km fiber link between MPQ and Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig which we have used to calibrate the MPQ hydrogen maser with the stationary cesium fountain clock CSF1 at PTB. With the result of ∫1S-2S=2 466 061 413 187 017 (11) Hz we can put a constraint on the electron Lorentz boost violating coefficients 0.95c(TX)-0.29c(TY)-0.08 c(TZ)=(2.2±1.8) x 10-11 within the framework of minimal standard model extensions. We limit a possible drift of the strong coupling constant through the ratio of magnetic moments at a competitive level (∂)/(∂t)ln (μCs)/(μB)=-(3.0±1.2) x 10-15 yr-1.

  3. Precision spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthey, Christian Godehard

    2011-12-15

    This Thesis reports on three measurements involving the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and deuterium conducted on a 5.8 K atomic beam. The transition is excited Doppler-free via two counter-propagating photons near 243 nm. The H/D isotope shift has been determined as {delta}{integral}{sub exp}=670 994 334 606(15) Hz. Comparing with the theoretical value for the isotope shift, excluding the leading nuclear size effect, {delta}{integral}{sub th}=670 999 566.90(66)(60) kHz we confirm, twice more accurate, the rms charge radius difference of the deuteron and the proton as left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub d}- left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub p}=3.82007(65) fm{sup 2} and the deuteron structure radius r{sub str}=1.97507(78) fm. The frequency ratio of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen to the cesium ground state hyperfine transition provided by the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM is measured to be {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 035 (10) Hz which presents a fractional frequency uncertainty of 4.2 x 10{sup -15}. The second absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen presents the first application of a 900 km fiber link between MPQ and Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig which we have used to calibrate the MPQ hydrogen maser with the stationary cesium fountain clock CSF1 at PTB. With the result of {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 017 (11) Hz we can put a constraint on the electron Lorentz boost violating coefficients 0.95c{sub (TX)}-0.29c{sub (TY)}-0.08 c{sub (TZ)}=(2.2{+-}1.8) x 10{sup -11} within the framework of minimal standard model extensions. We limit a possible drift of the strong coupling constant through the ratio of magnetic moments at a competitive level ({partial_derivative})/({partial_derivative}t)ln ({mu}{sub Cs})/({mu}{sub B})=-(3.0{+-}1.2) x 10{sup -15} yr{sup -1}.

  4. Glucose Recognition in Vitro Using Fluorescent Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noronha, G; Heiss, A M; Reilly, J R; Vachon, Jr, D J; Cary, D R; Zaitseva, N P; Reibold, R A; Lane, S M; Peyser, T A; Satcher, J H

    2001-04-25

    Diabetes is a disease that affects over 16 million people in the USA at a cost of 100 billion dollars annually. The ability to regulate insulin delivery in people with Type 1 diabetes is imperative as is the need to manage glucose levels in all people with this disease. Our current method for monitoring glucose is a (FDA approved) minimally invasive enzymatic sensor that can measure glucose levels in vivo for three days. We are focused on developing a noninvasive implantable glucose sensor that will be interrogated by an external device. The material must be robust, easy to process, biocompatible and resistant to biofouling. In this Presentation we will discuss the development of a new polymeric matrix that can recognize physiological levels of glucose in vitro using fluorescent spectroscopy.

  5. Photoelectron spectroscopy of heavy atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of relativistic interactions in the photoionization of heavy atoms and molecules has been investigated by the technique of photoelectron spectroscopy. In particular, experiments are reported which illustrate the effects of the spin-orbit interaction in the neutral ground state, final ionic states and continuum states of the photoionization target

  6. Volatile species generation and atomization for atomic absorption and atomic fluorescence: new developments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan; Musil, Stanislav; Marschner, Karel; Matoušek, Tomáš; Svoboda, Milan; Mester, Z.; Sturgeon, R. E.; Talába, M.; Dvořák, P.

    2015. s. 41-41. [Colloquium Spectroscopicum Internationale /39./. 30.08.2015-03.09.2015, Figueira da Foz] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S; GA MŠk LO1411 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200311202 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : hydride generation * volatile species generation * atomic absorption * atomic fluorescence Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  7. Manipulation of the atomic localization via resonance fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of manipulating the position of atoms dressed in the standing field of the cavity, based on the resonance fluorescence emission, is discussed. Stark dynamics modification and the strong coupling between two undistinguishable radiators situated in non-symmetric positions of the anti-nodes are investigated. The fluorescent spectrum is shown versus the second atom localization and external field parameters. We describe the conditions in which the Rabi frequencies of atoms change their correlations and cooperative emission. (paper)

  8. Supersonic pulsed free-jet of atoms and molecules of refractory metals: laser induced fluorescence spectroscopic studies on zirconium atoms and zirconium oxide molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental setup for generating supersonic pulsed free-jet containing atoms and molecules of refractory nature has been built. The technique of laser vaporization in conjunction with supersonic cooling is used to generate these species. The cooled atoms and molecules in supersonic free-jet are probed by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. In particular, the technique has been used to perform low-resolution laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy, limited by laser linewidth, on cold Zr atoms and ZrO molecules. The translational temperatures of ∼ 26.5 K and the rotational temperatures of ∼ 81 K have been achieved. It is possible to achieve the Doppler width of few tens of MHz allowing it to perform high-resolution spectroscopy on these atomic and molecular species. Also because of low rotational temperature of molecules the spectral congestion is greatly reduced. In general, this technique can be applied to perform spectroscopy on atoms and molecules of refractory nature. (author)

  9. Scanning Josephson spectroscopy on the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randeria, Mallika T.; Feldman, Benjamin E.; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Yazdani, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The Josephson effect provides a direct method to probe the strength of the pairing interaction in superconductors. By measuring the phase fluctuating Josephson current between a superconducting tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a BCS superconductor with isolated magnetic adatoms on its surface, we demonstrate that the spatial variation of the pairing order parameter can be characterized on the atomic scale. This system provides an example where the local pairing potential suppression is not directly reflected in the spectra measured via quasiparticle tunneling. Spectroscopy with such superconducting tips also shows signatures of previously unexplored Andreev processes through individual impurity-bound Shiba states. The atomic resolution achieved here establishes scanning Josephson spectroscopy as a promising technique for the study of novel superconducting phases.

  10. Imaging spectroscopy with the atomic force microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Baselt, David R.; Baldeschwieler, John D.

    1994-01-01

    Force curve imaging spectroscopy involves acquiring a force-distance curve at each pixel of an atomic force microscope image. Processing of the resulting data yields images of sample hardness and tip-sample adhesion. These images resemble Z modulation images and the sum of forward and reverse friction images, respectively, and like them exhibit a number of potentially misleading contrast mechanisms. In particular, XY tip motion has a pronounced effect on hardness images and the meniscus force...

  11. Quantitative atomic spectroscopy for primary thermometry

    OpenAIRE

    Truong, Gar-Wing; May, Eric F.; Stace, Thomas M.; Luiten, Andre N.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative spectroscopy has been used to measure accurately the Doppler-broadening of atomic transitions in $^{85}$Rb vapor. By using a conventional platinum resistance thermometer and the Doppler thermometry technique, we were able to determine $k_B$ with a relative uncertainty of $4.1\\times 10^{-4}$, and with a deviation of $2.7\\times 10^{-4}$ from the expected value. Our experiment, using an effusive vapour, departs significantly from other Doppler-broadened thermometry (DBT) techniques,...

  12. Vacuum ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence on a Si atomic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brian, T. R.; Lawler, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    A broadly applicable vacuum ultraviolet experiment is described for measuring radiative lifetimes of neutral and singly-ionized atoms in a beam environment to 5-percent accuracy using laser induced fluorescence. First results for neutral Si are reported.

  13. Single-molecule spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the d

  14. Sensitive spectroscopy of an ytterbium atomic beam

    CERN Document Server

    Guttridge, A; Kemp, S L; Boddy, D; Freytag, R; Tarbutt, M R; Hinds, E A; Cornish, S L

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies of ultracold ytterbium atoms generally involve the frequency stabilisation (locking) of lasers to two transitions at 399 and 556 nm in order to implement laser cooling. Here we present a simple and robust apparatus for generation of suitable, narrow fluorescence signals with a high signal to noise ratio at both wavelengths. The design utilises easily acquired vacuum parts, optics and electronics and requires very little laser power. We demonstrate the stability and precision of the frequency stabilisation at 556 nm by presenting sensitive measurements of the gravitational sag of an ytterbium MOT as a function of laser power.

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy of synthetic melanin in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, G.; Frassanito, M.C. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Palazzo, G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Gallone, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Mallardi, A. [ICPS-CNR, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Biagi, P.F. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Universita di Bari, Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Capozzi, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy)], E-mail: v.capozzi@unifg.it

    2009-01-15

    We report a detailed investigation of fluorescence properties of synthetic eumelanin pigment in solution. A complete set of fluorescence spectra in the near-UV and visible range is analysed. Excitation spectra at a few selected emission energies are also investigated. Our measurements support the hypothesis that fluorescence in eumelanin is related to chemically distinct oligomeric units that can be selectively excited. Fluorescence due to large oligomer systems is spectrally differentiated from that due to monomers and small oligomer systems. Fluorescence excitation measurements show the contribution of 5,6-dihydroxyndole-2-carboxylic acid and 5,6-dihydroxyndole monomers to the emission of small-size oligomers.

  16. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  17. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  18. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  19. Fluorescence spectroscopy and multi-way techniques. PARAFAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Kathleen R.; Stedmon, Colin A.; Graeber, Daniel;

    2013-01-01

    PARAllel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC) is increasingly used to decompose fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMs) into their underlying chemical components. In the ideal case where fluorescence conforms to Beers Law, this process can lead to the mathematical identification and quantification of...... independently varying fluorophores. However, many practical and analytical hurdles stand between EEM datasets and their chemical interpretation. This article provides a tutorial in the practical application of PARAFAC to fluorescence datasets, demonstrated using a dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluorescence...... dataset. A new toolbox for MATLAB is presented to support improved visualisation and sensitivity analyses of PARAFAC models in fluorescence spectroscopy. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  20. Two-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dertinger, T.

    2007-05-15

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) has been invented more than 30 years ago and experienced a renaissance after stable and affordable laser sources and low-noise single-photon detectors have become available. Its ability to measure diffusion coefficients at nanomolar concentrations of analyte made it a widely used tool in biophysics. However, in recent years it has been shown by many authors that aberrational (e.g. astigmatism) and photophysical effects (e.g. optical saturation) may influence the result of an FCS experiment dramatically, so that a precise and reliable estimation of the diffusion coefficient is no longer possible. In this thesis, we report on the development, implementation, and application of a new and robust modification of FCS that we termed two-focus FCS (2fFCS) and which fulfils two requirements: (i) It introduces an external ruler into the measurement by generating two overlapping laser foci of precisely known and fixed distance. (ii) These two foci and corresponding detection regions are generated in such a way that the corresponding molecule detection functions (MDFs) are sufficiently well described by a simple two-parameter model yielding accurate diffusion coefficients when applied to 2fFCS data analysis. Both these properties enable us to measure absolute values of the diffusion coefficient with an accuracy of a few percent. Moreover, it will turn out that the new technique is robust against refractive index mismatch, coverslide thickness deviations, and optical saturation effects, which so often trouble conventional FCS measurements. This thesis deals mainly with the introduction of the new measurement scheme, 2fFCS, but also presents several applications with far-reaching importance. (orig.)

  1. Two-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) has been invented more than 30 years ago and experienced a renaissance after stable and affordable laser sources and low-noise single-photon detectors have become available. Its ability to measure diffusion coefficients at nanomolar concentrations of analyte made it a widely used tool in biophysics. However, in recent years it has been shown by many authors that aberrational (e.g. astigmatism) and photophysical effects (e.g. optical saturation) may influence the result of an FCS experiment dramatically, so that a precise and reliable estimation of the diffusion coefficient is no longer possible. In this thesis, we report on the development, implementation, and application of a new and robust modification of FCS that we termed two-focus FCS (2fFCS) and which fulfils two requirements: (i) It introduces an external ruler into the measurement by generating two overlapping laser foci of precisely known and fixed distance. (ii) These two foci and corresponding detection regions are generated in such a way that the corresponding molecule detection functions (MDFs) are sufficiently well described by a simple two-parameter model yielding accurate diffusion coefficients when applied to 2fFCS data analysis. Both these properties enable us to measure absolute values of the diffusion coefficient with an accuracy of a few percent. Moreover, it will turn out that the new technique is robust against refractive index mismatch, coverslide thickness deviations, and optical saturation effects, which so often trouble conventional FCS measurements. This thesis deals mainly with the introduction of the new measurement scheme, 2fFCS, but also presents several applications with far-reaching importance. (orig.)

  2. Quantification estimate methods for synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bewer, Brian, E-mail: brian.bewer@lightsource.ca

    2015-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is a method which allows low elemental concentrations to be measured within a sample. To maintain biological or medical relevance increased importance is being placed on quantifying these in situ localized elemental concentrations. For third generation synchrotron light sources, which have the potential for high sample throughput, a rapid method of obtaining a quantification estimate is needed. Non-destructive transmission and surface analysis techniques for first transition metals, or elements of higher atomic number, using reference standards are examined for different sample property regimes to elucidate methods of quantitative synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

  3. Quantitative Determination of DNA-Ligand Binding Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Eamonn F.

    2007-01-01

    The effective use of fluorescence spectroscopy for determining the binding of the intercalcating agent crhidium bromide to DNA is being described. The analysis used simple measurement techniques and hence can be easily adopted by the students for a better understanding.

  4. Detection of Counterfeit Tequila by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel de la Rosa Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultraviolet (UV light induced fluorescence study to discriminate fake tequila from genuine ones is presented. A portable homemade system based on four light emitting diodes (LEDs from 255 to 405 nm and a miniature spectrometer was used. It has been shown that unlike fake and silver tequila, which produce weak fluorescence signal, genuine mixed, rested, and aged tequilas show high fluorescence emission in the range from 400 to 750 nm. The fluorescence intensity grows with aging in 100% agave tequila. Such fluorescence differences can even be observed with naked eyes. The presented results demonstrate that the fluorescence measurement could be a good method to detect counterfeit tequila.

  5. Theory of analytical curves in atomic fluorescence flame spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymayers, H.P.

    1968-01-01

    An explicit expression for the intensity of atomic resonance fluorescence as a function of atomic concentration in a flame is derived under certain idealized conditions. The expression is generally valid for a pure Doppler absorption line profile as well as for a combined Doppler and collisional bro

  6. Laser Spectroscopy of Muonic Atoms and Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Fernandes, Luis M P; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Amaro, Fernando D; Amaro, Pedro; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Franke, Beatrice; Galtier, Sandrine; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L; Götzfried, Johannes; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hildebrandt, Malte; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kirch, Klaus; Knecht, Andreas; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Bigot, Eric-Olivier Le; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Machado, Jorge; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; Santos, Joaquim M F dos; Santos, José Paulo; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Szabo, Csilla I; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Voss, Andreas; Weichelt, Birgit; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy of the Lamb shift (2S-2P energy difference) in light muonic atoms or ions, in which one negative muon $\\mu^-$ is bound to a nucleus, has been performed. The measurements yield significantly improved values of the root-mean-square charge radii of the nuclei, owing to the large muon mass, which results in a vastly increased muon wave function overlap with the nucleus. The values of the proton and deuteron radii are 10 and 3 times more accurate than the respective CODATA values, but 7 standard deviations smaller. Data on muonic helium-3 and -4 ions is being analyzed and will give new insights. In future, the (magnetic) Zemach radii of the proton and the helium-3 nuclei will be determined from laser spectroscopy of the 1S hyperfine splittings, and the Lamb shifts of muonic Li, Be and B can be used to improve the respective charge radii.

  7. Atomic emission spectroscopy in high electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.E.; Filuk, A.B.; Carlson, A.L. [and others

    1995-12-31

    Pulsed-power driven ion diodes generating quasi-static, {approximately}10 MV/cm, 1-cm scale-length electric fields are used to accelerate lithium ion beams for inertial confinement fusion applications. Atomic emission spectroscopy measurements contribute to understanding the acceleration gap physics, in particular by combining time- and space-resolved measurements of the electric field with the Poisson equation to determine the charged particle distributions. This unique high-field configuration also offers the possibility to advance basic atomic physics, for example by testing calculations of the Stark-shifted emission pattern, by measuring field ionization rates for tightly-bound low-principal-quantum-number levels, and by measuring transition-probability quenching.

  8. Atomic emission spectroscopy in high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed-power driven ion diodes generating quasi-static, ∼10 MV/cm, 1-cm scale-length electric fields are used to accelerate lithium ion beams for inertial confinement fusion applications. Atomic emission spectroscopy measurements contribute to understanding the acceleration gap physics, in particular by combining time- and space-resolved measurements of the electric field with the Poisson equation to determine the charged particle distributions. This unique high-field configuration also offers the possibility to advance basic atomic physics, for example by testing calculations of the Stark-shifted emission pattern, by measuring field ionization rates for tightly-bound low-principal-quantum-number levels, and by measuring transition-probability quenching

  9. Atomic spectroscopy sympsoium, Gaithersburg, Maryland, September 23--26, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of one hundred papers given at the conference are presented along with the conference program and an author index. Session topics include: highly ionized atoms; laser spectroscopy and hyperfine structure; complex spectra; laser spectroscopy, radiation theory; theory of highly ionized atoms and analysis of plasmas; plasma spectroscopy, line strengths; spectral analysis, instrumentation, reference wavelengths; beam foil spectroscopy, line strengths, energy levels; absorption spectroscopy, autoionization, and related theory; and spectral analysis, instrumentation, and VUV physics

  10. Quantum dots fluorescence quantum yield measured by Thermal Lens Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estupiñán-López, Carlos; Dominguez, Christian Tolentino; Cabral Filho, Paulo E; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E

    2014-01-01

    An essential parameter to evaluate the light emission properties of fluorophores is the fluorescence quantum yield, which quantify the conversion efficiency of absorbed photons to emitted photons. We detail here an alternative nonfluorescent method to determine the absolute fluorescence quantum yield of quantum dots (QDs). The method is based in the so-called Thermal Lens Spectroscopy (TLS) technique, which consists on the evaluation of refractive index gradient thermally induced in the fluorescent material by the absorption of light. Aqueous dispersion carboxyl-coated cadmium telluride (CdTe) QDs samples were used to demonstrate the Thermal Lens Spectroscopy technical procedure. PMID:25103802

  11. Early Amyloidogenic Oligomerization Studied through Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Orte

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidogenic protein aggregation is a persistent biomedical problem. Despite active research in disease-related aggregation, the need for multidisciplinary approaches to the problem is evident. Recent advances in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy are valuable for examining heterogenic biomolecular systems. In this work, we have explored the initial stages of amyloidogenic aggregation by employing fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS, an advanced modification of conventional fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS that utilizes time-resolved information. FLCS provides size distributions and kinetics for the oligomer growth of the SH3 domain of α-spectrin, whose N47A mutant forms amyloid fibrils at pH 3.2 and 37 °C in the presence of salt. The combination of FCS with additional fluorescence lifetime information provides an exciting approach to focus on the initial aggregation stages, allowing a better understanding of the fibrillization process, by providing multidimensional information, valuable in combination with other conventional methodologies.

  12. Measurement of surface concentration of fluorophores using fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Delon, Antoine; Delapierre, Guillaume; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy is applied to study molecules, passing through a small observation volume, usually subjected to diffusive or convective motion in liquid phase. We suggest that such a technique could be used to measure the areal absolute concentration of fluorophores deposited on a substrate or imbedded in a thin film, with a resolution of a few micrometers. The principle is to translate the solid substrate in front of a confocal fluorescence microscope objective and to record the subsequent fluctuations of the fluorescence intensity. The validity of this concept is investigated on model substrates (fluorescent microspheres) and DNA biochips.

  13. Collinear laser spectroscopy of atomic cadmium

    CERN Document Server

    Frömmgen, Nadja; Bissell, Mark L; Bieroń, Jacek; Blaum, Klaus; Cheal, Bradley; Flanagan, Kieran; Fritzsche, Stephan; Geppert, Christopher; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Kreim, Kim; Krieger, Andreas; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Rajabali, Mustafa M; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Papuga, Jasna; Yordanov, Deyan T

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine structure $A$ and $B$ factors of the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\rm{P}_2 \\rightarrow 5s\\,6s\\,\\; ^3\\rm{S}_1$ transition are determined from collinear laser spectroscopy data of $^{107-123}$Cd and $^{111m-123m}$Cd. Nuclear magnetic moments and electric quadrupole moments are extracted using reference dipole moments and calculated electric field gradients, respectively. The hyperfine structure anomaly for isotopes with $s_{1/2}$ and $d_{5/2}$ nuclear ground states and isomeric $h_{11/2}$ states is evaluated and a linear relationship is observed for all nuclear states except $s_{1/2}$. This corresponds to the Moskowitz-Lombardi rule that was established in the mercury region of the nuclear chart but in the case of cadmium the slope is distinctively smaller than for mercury. In total four atomic and ionic levels were analyzed and all of them exhibit a similar behaviour. The electric field gradient for the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\mathrm{P}_2$ level is derived from multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculatio...

  14. Study on Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry Excited by Synchrotron Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-jia Guo; Wu-er Gan; Guo-bin Zhang; Qing-de Su

    2008-01-01

    A novel analysis approach using atomic fluorescence excited by synchrotron radiation is presented. A system for synchrotron radiation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry is developed, and experimental conditions such as flow rate, analyte acidity, concentration of pre-reducing and hydrogenation system are optimized. The proposed method is successfully applied to get an excitation spectrum of arsenic. Seven of ten primary spectral lines, four of which have never been reported by means of atomic fluorescence spectrometry, agree well with the existing reports. The other three are proposed for the first time. Excitation potentials and possible transitions are investigated. Especially for the prominent line at 234.99 nm, the mechanism of generation is discussed and a model of energy transition processes is proposed.

  15. Elasticity Maps of Living Neurons Measured by Combined Fluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Spedden, Elise; White, James D.; Naumova, Elena N.; Kaplan, David L.; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here, we combine atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy with fluorescence microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglio...

  16. Quantum beats in fluorescence for multi-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For Λ-type three-level atomic systems we have clarified using diagram that (1) it is impossible to observe quantum beats due to the ground state sublevels by measuring the time dependence of the fluorescence intensity, and (2) why it is physically possible to observe and how we can observe quantum beats in the ground state sublevels by using fluorescence. Generalization of the results shows that we can determine from which state (the ground state or the excited state) the quantum beats are originated. Analytical result is shown for four-level atomic systems.

  17. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy on a smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md. Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Ast, Sandra; Rutledge, Peter J.; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    A self-powered smartphone-based field-portable "dual" spectrometer has been developed for both absorption and fluorescence measurements. The smartphone's existing flash LED has sufficient optical irradiance to undertake absorption measurements within a 3D-printed case containing a low cost nano-imprinted polymer diffraction grating. A UV (λex ~ 370 nm) and VIS (λex ~ 450 nm) LED are wired into the circuit of the flash LED to provide an excitation source for fluorescence measurements. Using a customized app on the smartphone, measurements of absorption and fluorescence spectra are demonstrated using pH-sensitive and Zn2+-responsive probes. Detection over a 300 nm span with 0.42 nm/pixel spectral resolution is demonstrated. Despite the low cost and small size of the portable spectrometer, the results compare well with bench top instruments.

  18. Fluorescence spectra of atomic ensembles in a magneto-optical trap as an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Seokchan; Kang, Sungsam; Kim, Wook-Rae; Kim, Jung-Ryul; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) as an optical lattice. Fluorescence spectra of atoms trapped in a MOT with a passively phase-stabilized beam configuration have been measured by means of the photon-counting heterodyne spectroscopy. We observe a narrow Rayleigh peak and well-resolved Raman sidebands in the fluorescence spectra which clearly show that the MOT itself behaves as a three-dimensional optical lattice. Optical-lattice-like properties of the phase-stabilized MOT such as vibrational frequencies and lineshapes of Rayleigh peak and Raman sidebands are investigated systematically for various trap conditions.

  19. An atomic beam fluorescence locked magneto-optical trap for krypton atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here an atomic beam loaded magneto-optical trap (MOT) for metastable krypton atoms in which the fluorescence signal from the atomic beam is used to lock the cooling laser frequency. The fluorescence signal is generated by exciting the metastable krypton atomic beam using a probe laser beam (i.e. part of the cooling laser beam) intersecting the atomic beam at an angle. A spectral shift in the fluorescence signal can be achieved by varying the angle between the probe laser beam and the atomic beam to obtain the desired frequency detuning to lock the cooling laser frequency. This has been used to optimize the number of cold atoms in the MOT. The dependence of the peak height and slope of the atomic beam fluorescence (ABF) locking signal on the RF power in the discharge tube and pressure in the observation chamber of the setup has been studied to correlate its effect on the number of atoms in the MOT. (paper)

  20. Quantitative atomic spectroscopy for primary thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative spectroscopy has been used to measure accurately the Doppler broadening of atomic transitions in 85Rb vapor. By using a conventional platinum resistance thermometer and the Doppler thermometry technique, we were able to determine kB with a relative uncertainty of 4.1x10-4 and with a deviation of 2.7x10-4 from the expected value. Our experiment, using an effusive vapor, departs significantly from other Doppler-broadened thermometry (DBT) techniques, which rely on weakly absorbing molecules in a diffusive regime. In these circumstances, very different systematic effects such as magnetic sensitivity and optical pumping are dominant. Using the model developed recently by Stace and Luiten, we estimate the perturbation due to optical pumping of the measured kB value was less than 4x10-6. The effects of optical pumping on atomic and molecular DBT experiments is mapped over a wide range of beam size and saturation intensity, indicating possible avenues for improvement. We also compare the line-broadening mechanisms, windows of operation and detection limits of some recent DBT experiments.

  1. Quantitative atomic spectroscopy for primary thermometry

    CERN Document Server

    Truong, Gar-Wing; Stace, Thomas M; Luiten, Andre N

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative spectroscopy has been used to measure accurately the Doppler-broadening of atomic transitions in $^{85}$Rb vapor. By using a conventional platinum resistance thermometer and the Doppler thermometry technique, we were able to determine $k_B$ with a relative uncertainty of $4.1\\times 10^{-4}$, and with a deviation of $2.7\\times 10^{-4}$ from the expected value. Our experiment, using an effusive vapour, departs significantly from other Doppler-broadened thermometry (DBT) techniques, which rely on weakly absorbing molecules in a diffusive regime. In these circumstances, very different systematic effects such as magnetic sensitivity and optical pumping are dominant. Using the model developed recently by Stace and Luiten, we estimate the perturbation due to optical pumping of the measured $k_B$ value was less than $4\\times 10^{-6}$. The effects of optical pumping on atomic and molecular DBT experiments is mapped over a wide range of beam size and saturation intensity, indicating possible avenues for im...

  2. [Study on interaction of caffeine with myoglobin by fluorescence spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He-Yong; Gu, Xiao-Tian; Ding, Yan; Zhou, Jia-Hong; Feng, Yu-Ying

    2009-10-01

    The interaction of caffein and myoglobin was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. The intrinsic fluorescence of myoglobin was significantly quenched by caffein under the physiological condition (pH 7.4). The results indicated that caffeine was capable of binding with myoglobin to form a 1:1 complex and the quenching mechanism of myoglobin affected by caffeine was shown to be a static quenching procedure by calculating quenching constant, binding sites and binding constant. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the main binding force of the interaction is electrostatic force and hydrophobic force. The change in the micro-circumstance of aminos of myoglobin was analyzed by synchronous fluorescence spectrometry. The result indicated that caffeine can change the conformation of the protein, leading to the change in the micro-environment of tryptophane and tyrosine residues from hydrophobic environment to hydrophilic environment to different extent. PMID:20038063

  3. Measurement of DNA size by fluorescence-fluctuation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers research on measuring the size of very large DNA molecules by fluorescence-fluctuation spectroscopy. The primary reason was to measure the formation of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells by agents such as ionizing radiation, and to measure the repair of these breaks. Fluorescence-fluctuation spectroscopy was employed because it is known to be able to measure the size of DNA of molecular weight greater than 109 (Weissman, et al., 1976). Most of this report is devoted to the techniques of fluorescent fluctuation spectroscopy. Using the procedures described here, it is likely that measurements could be made of DNA of molecular weight 1010, which would be formed in mammalian cells given 1000 rads of x-rays

  4. Mapping of ice cream formulation using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Granger, Christine; Da Costa, Jean-Pierre; Toutain, Jean; Barey, Philippe; Cansel, Maud

    2006-01-01

    Front-face fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize 16 ice cream formulations (four fats, two mono-/diglyceride mixtures, and two protein mixtures). Tryptophan fluorescence spectra were recorded directly from the ice cream samples. The discriminant ability of the data was investigated by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square (PLS) discriminant analysis. The similarity maps defined by principal components 1 and 2 allowed clear discrimination between the protein ...

  5. Chromophore detection by fluorescence spectroscopy in tissue-like phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Fantini, Sergio; Maier, John S.; Mantulin, William W.; Gratton, Enrico

    1997-08-01

    In the near-infrared spectral region (700 - 900 nm) light penetrates a few centimeters into tissues and hemoglobin dominates the absorption. Consequently, in vivo near-infrared tissue absorption spectroscopy becomes difficult for endogenous compounds of biological interest other than hemoglobin. Exogenous chromophore detection by fluorescence spectroscopy has the potential to provide enhanced sensitivity and specificity for in vivo optical tissue spectroscopy, facilitating the study of many important metabolites in tissues other than hemoglobin. We have performed measurements of the dc fluorescence intensity generated by a fluorophore (rhodamine B) homogeneously dissolved inside a highly scattering tissue-simulating phantom (aqueous suspension of titanium-dioxide particles). The phantom was prepared with optical coefficients (absorption and reduced scattering) similar to those of tissue in the near-infrared; these coefficients were measured with a frequency-domain spectrometer. Measurable dc fluorescence intensity signals from 1 nM rhodamine concentrations inside the phantom are reported. Furthermore, we were able to resolve changes in rhodamine concentration on the order of 1% using the dc fluorescence intensity. This dc fluorescence sensitivity is characterized experimentally at two concentrations (55 and 360 nM) and over a range of source-detector separations. Other aspects of the sensitivity are discussed over a large range of concentrations using a fluorescence photon migration model.

  6. Combined fiber probe for fluorescence lifetime and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dochow, Sebastian; Ma, Dinglong; Latka, Ines; Bocklitz, Thomas; Hartl, Brad; Bec, Julien; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Marple, Eric; Urmey, Kirk; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Schmitt, Michael; Marcu, Laura; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution we present a dual modality fiber optic probe combining fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and Raman spectroscopy for in vivo endoscopic applications. The presented multi-spectroscopy probe enables efficient excitation and collection of fluorescence lifetime signals for FLIm in the UV/visible wavelength region, as well as of Raman spectra in the near-IR for simultaneous Raman/FLIm imaging. The probe was characterized in terms of its lateral resolution and distance dependency of the Raman and FLIm signals. In addition, the feasibility of the probe for in vivo FLIm and Raman spectral characterization of tissue was demonstrated. PMID:26093843

  7. Single-atom-resolved fluorescence imaging of an atomic Mott insulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherson, Jacob; Weitenberg, Christof; Andres, Manuel;

    2010-01-01

    situ images of a quantum fluid in which each underlying quantum particle is detected. Here we report fluorescence imaging of strongly interacting bosonic Mott insulators in an optical lattice with single-atom and single-site resolution. From our images, we fully reconstruct the atom distribution on the...

  8. Characterizing optical dipole trap via fluorescence of trapped cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Tao; GENG; Tao; YAN; Shubin; LI; Gang; ZHANG; Jing; WANG; Junmin; PENG; Kunchi; ZHANG; Tiancai

    2006-01-01

    Optical dipole trap (ODT) is becoming an important tool of manipulating neutral atoms. In this paper ODT is realized with a far-off resonant laser beam strongly focused in the magneto-optical trap (MOT) of cesium atoms. The light shift is measured by simply monitoring the fluorescence of the atoms in the magneto-optical trap and the optical dipole trap simultaneously. The advantages of our experimental scheme are discussed, and the effect of the beam waist and power on the potential of dipole trap as well as heating rate is analyzed.

  9. Intramolecular Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy in a Feedback Tracking Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Kevin; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2010-07-01

    We derive the statistics of the signals generated by shape fluctuations of large molecules studied by feedback tracking microscopy. We account for the influence of intramolecular dynamics on the response of the tracking system, and derive a general expression for the fluorescence autocorrelation function that applies when those dynamics are linear. We show that tracking provides enhanced sensitivity to translational diffusion, molecular size, heterogeneity and long time-scale decays in comparison to traditional fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We demonstrate our approach by using a three-dimensional tracking microscope to study genomic $\\lambda$-phage DNA molecules with various fluorescence label configurations.

  10. The development of attenuation compensation models of fluorescence spectroscopy signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremin, Victor V.; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A.; Rafailov, Ilya E.; Vinokurov, Andrey Y.; Novikova, Irina N.; Zherebtsova, Angelina I.; Litvinova, Karina S.; Dunaev, Andrey V.

    2016-04-01

    This study examines the effect of blood absorption on the endogenous fluorescence signal intensity of biological tissues. Experimental studies were conducted to identify these effects. To register the fluorescence intensity, the fluorescence spectroscopy method was employed. The intensity of the blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. We proposed one possible implementation of the Monte Carlo method for the theoretical analysis of the effect of blood on the fluorescence signals. The simulation is constructed as a four-layer skin optical model based on the known optical parameters of the skin with different levels of blood supply. With the help of the simulation, we demonstrate how the level of blood supply can affect the appearance of the fluorescence spectra. In addition, to describe the properties of biological tissue, which may affect the fluorescence spectra, we turned to the method of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Using the spectral data provided by the DRS, the tissue attenuation effect can be extracted and used to correct the fluorescence spectra.

  11. "FluSpec": A Simulated Experiment in Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, Stephen W.; Bigger, Andrew S.; Ghiggino, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    The "FluSpec" educational software package is a fully contained tutorial on the technique of fluorescence spectroscopy as well as a simulator on which experiments can be performed. The procedure for each of the experiments is also contained within the package along with example analyses of results that are obtained using the software.

  12. The fast polarization modulation based dualfocus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štefl, Martin; Benda, Aleš; Gregor, I.; Hof, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2014), s. 885-899. ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400400904; GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : spectroscopy * fluorescence and luminiscence * confocal microscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014

  13. Metastable Magnesium fluorescence spectroscopy using a frequency-stabilized 517 nm laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Ming; Jensen, Brian B; Therkildsen, Kasper T;

    2009-01-01

    We present a laser operating at 517 nm for our Magnesium laser-cooling and atomic clock project. A two-stage Yb-doped fiber amplifier (YDFA) system generates more than 1.5 W of 1034 nm light when seeded with a 15 mW diode laser. Using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide, we...... obtained more than 40 mW of 517 nm output power by single pass frequency doubling. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy of metastable magnesium atoms could be used to stabilize the 517 nm laser to an absolute frequency within 1 MHz....

  14. Photonic Methods to Enhance Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Single Molecule Fluorescence Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Hervé Rigneault; Jérome Wenger

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in nanophotonics open the way for promising applications towards efficient single molecule fluorescence analysis. In this review, we discuss how photonic methods bring innovative solutions for two essential questions: how to detect a single molecule in a highly concentrated solution, and how to enhance the faint optical signal emitted per molecule? The focus is set primarily on the widely used technique of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), yet the discussion can be ...

  15. Chromophore maturation and fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins in a cell-free expression system

    OpenAIRE

    Macdonald, Patrick J.; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D.

    2011-01-01

    Cell-free synthesis, a method for the rapid expression of proteins, is increasingly used to study interactions of complex biological systems. GFP and its variants have become indispensable for fluorescence studies in live cells and are equally attractive as reporters for cell-free systems. This work investigates the use of fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) as a tool for quantitative analysis of protein interactions in cell-free expression systems. We also explore chromophore maturat...

  16. Solid-phase fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize organic wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Mathieu; Milori, Débora Marcondes Bastos Pereira; Déléris, Stéphane; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Dudal, Yves

    2011-01-01

    The production of solid organic waste (SOW) such as sewage sludge (SS) or municipal solid waste (MSW) has been continuously increasing in Europe since the beginning of the 1990'. Today, the European Union encourages the stabilization of these wastes using biologic processes such as anaerobic digestion and/or composting to produce bio-energy and organic fertilizers. However, the design and management of such biologic processes require knowledge about the quantity and quality of the organic matter (OM) contained in the SOW. The current methods to characterize SOW are tedious, time-consuming and often insufficiently informative. In this paper, we assess the potential of solid-phase fluorescence (SPF) spectroscopy to quickly provide a relevant characterization of SOW. First, we tested well known model compounds (tryptophan, bovine serum albumin, lignin and humic acid) and biologic matrix (Escherichia coli) in three dimensional solid-phase fluorescence (3D-SPF) spectroscopy. We recorded fluorescence spectra from proteinaceous samples but we could not record the fluorescence emitted by lignin and humic acid powders. For SOW samples, fluorescence spectra were successfully recorded for MSW and most of its sub-components (foods, cardboard) but impossible for SS, sludge compost (SC) and ligno-cellulosic wastes. Based on visual observations and additional assays, we concluded that the presence of highly light-absorptive chemical structures in such dark-colored samples was responsible for this limitation. For such samples, i.e. lignin, humic acid, SS, SC and ligno-cellulosic wastes, we show that laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy enables the acquisition of 2D fluorescence spectra. PMID:21696938

  17. Energy dissipation in matrix-isolated silver atoms: A time-resolved fluorescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggenhauser, H.; Schroeder, W.; Kolb, D. M.

    1988-03-01

    The fluorescence from optically excited Ag atoms in Ar, Kr, and Xe matrices has been investigated in a time-resolved synchrotron-radiation study. A detailed energy dissipation model could be established from a systematic analysis of rise and decay times of all the observed fluorescence bands after pulsed excitation into the Ag (4d105p)2P1/2,3/2 levels, and by setting time windows between the excitation pulses in emission and emission-yield spectroscopy. Although the overall wavelength dependence of the decay time follows the λ3 law, the decay time is independent of λ within a given emission band. Finally, the role of energy transfer between Ag atoms and dimers for the evaluation of decay times is briefly addressed.

  18. Atomization of volatile compounds for atomic absorption and atomic fluorescence spectrometry: On the way towards the ideal atomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review summarizes and discusses the individual atomizers of volatile compounds. A set of criteria important for analytical praxis is used to rank all the currently existing approaches to the atomization based on on-line atomization for atomic absorption (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) as well as on in-atomizer trapping for AAS. Regarding on-line atomization for AAS, conventional quartz tubes are currently the most commonly used devices. They provide high sensitivity and low baseline noise. Running and investment costs are low. The most serious disadvantage is the poor resistance against atomization interferences and often unsatisfactory linearity of calibration graphs. Miniature diffusion flame (MDF) is extremely resistant to interferences, simple, cheap and user-friendly. Its essential disadvantage is low sensitivity. A novel device, known as a multiatomizer, was designed to overcome disadvantages of previous atomizers. It matches performance of conventional quartz tubes in terms of sensitivity and baseline noise as well as in running and investment costs. The multiatomizer, however, provides much better (i) resistance against atomization interferences and (ii) linearity of calibration graphs. In-atomizer trapping enhances the sensitivity of the determination and eliminates the effect of the generation kinetics and of surges in gas flow on the signal shape. This is beneficial for the accuracy of the determination. It could also be an effective tool for reducing some interferences in the liquid phase. In-situ trapping in graphite furnaces (GF) is presently by far the most popular approach to the in-atomizer trapping. Its resistance against interferences is reasonably good and it can be easily automated. In-situ trapping in GF is a mature method well established in various application fields. These are the reasons to rank in-situ trapping in GF as currently the most convenient approach to hydride atomization for AAS. The recently suggested

  19. Development of temperature imaging using two-line atomic fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medwell, Paul R; Chan, Qing N; Kalt, Peter A M; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dally, Bassam B; Nathan, Graham J

    2009-02-20

    This work aims to advance understanding of the coupling between temperature and soot. The ability to image temperature using the two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) technique is demonstrated. Previous TLAF theory is extended from linear excitation into the nonlinear fluence regime. Nonlinear regime two-line atomic fluorescence (NTLAF) provides superior signal and reduces single-shot uncertainty from 250 K for conventional TLAF down to 100 K. NTLAF is shown to resolve the temperature profile across the stoichiometric envelope for hydrogen, ethylene, and natural gas flames, with deviation from thermocouple measurements not exceeding 100 K, and typically ≲30 K. Measurements in flames containing soot demonstrate good capacity of NTLAF to exclude interferences that hamper most two-dimensional thermometry techniques. PMID:23567586

  20. Solvent effects on two-line atomic fluorescence of indium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Qing N; Medwell, Paul R; Kalt, Peter A M; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dally, Bassam B; Nathan, Graham J

    2010-03-10

    We aim to investigate the potential of four different organic solvents, namely, acetone, ethanol, methanol, and isopropanol, and the organic-solvent-water mixtures as a seeding medium for the two-line atomic fluorescence technique. Water is used as the reference case. Indium, which has been previously shown to have suitable spectroscopic attributes, is chosen as the thermometry species in the present study. Acetone and methanol are shown to enhance the fluorescence signal intensity the most (approximately threefold to fivefold at stoichiometric conditions) when used. Acetone and methanol are shown to improve the fluorescence emission over the entire stoichiometric envelope of flame, most significantly in the rich combustion region, as well as a twofold enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:20220881

  1. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS): Concepts, Applications and Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapusta, Peter; Macháň, Radek; Benda, Aleš; Hof, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS) is a variant of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which uses differences in fluorescence intensity decays to separate contributions of different fluorophore populations to FCS signal. Besides which, FLCS is a powerful tool to improve quality of FCS data by removing noise and distortion caused by scattered excitation light, detector thermal noise and detector after pulsing. We are providing an overview of, to our knowledge, all published applications of FLCS. Although these are not numerous so far, they illustrate possibilities for the technique and the research topics in which FLCS has the potential to become widespread. Furthermore, we are addressing some questions which may be asked by a beginner user of FLCS. The last part of the text reviews other techniques closely related to FLCS. The generalization of the idea of FLCS paves the way for further promising application of the principle of statistical filtering of signals. Specifically, the idea of fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy is here outlined. PMID:23202928

  2. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: the technique and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is an experimental technique using statistical analysis of the fluctuations of fluorescence in a system in order to decipher dynamic molecular events, such as diffusion or conformational fluctuations of biomolecules. First introduced by Magde et al to measure the diffusion and binding of ethidium bromide onto double-stranded DNA, the technique has been undergoing a renaissance since 1993 with the implementation of confocal microscopy FCS. Since then, a flurry of experiments has implemented FCS to characterize the photochemistry of dyes, the translational and rotational mobilities of fluorescent molecules, as well as to monitor conformational fluctuations of green fluorescent proteins and DNA molecules. In this review, we present the analytical formalism of an FCS measurement, as well as practical considerations for the design of an FCS setup and experiment. We then review the recent applications of FCS in analytical chemistry, biophysics and cell biology, specifically emphasizing the advantages and pitfalls of the technique compared to alternative spectroscopic tools. We also discuss recent extensions of FCS in single-molecule spectroscopy, offering alternative data processing of fluorescence signals to glean more information on the kinetic processes. (author)

  3. Intramolecular fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in a feedback tracking microscope

    CERN Document Server

    McHale, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    We derive the statistics of the signals generated by shape fluctuations of large molecules studied by feedback tracking microscopy. We account for the influence of intramolecular dynamics on the response of the tracking system, and derive a general expression for the fluorescence autocorrelation function that applies when those dynamics are linear. We show that tracking provides enhanced sensitivity to translational diffusion, molecular size, heterogeneity and long time-scale decays in comparison to traditional fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We demonstrate our approach by using a three-dimensional tracking microscope to study genomic $\\lambda$-phage DNA molecules with various fluorescence label configurations. We conclude with a discussion of related techniques, including computation of the relevant statistics for camera-based intramolecular correlation measurements.

  4. Investigating Lyophilization of Lipid Nanocapsules with Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Polina B.; Dendramis, Kimberly A.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes characterization of lyophilized lipid nanocapsules loaded with Alexa 488 by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Fluorimetry analysis of nanocapsules containing self-quenching concentrations of 5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein was performed to establish a point of reference for FCS. FCS results complemented the results obtained by fluorimetry for a bulk nanocapsule solution and provided additional information about the size and dye retention by individual nanocapsules...

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopy using indocyanine green for lymph node mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Behm, Pascal; Shabo, Ivan; Wârdell, Karin

    2014-02-01

    The principles of cancer treatment has for years been radical resection of the primary tumor. In the oncologic surgeries where the affected cancer site is close to the lymphatic system, it is as important to detect the draining lymph nodes for metastasis (lymph node mapping). As a replacement for conventional radioactive labeling, indocyanine green (ICG) has shown successful results in lymph node mapping; however, most of the ICG fluorescence detection techniques developed are based on camera imaging. In this work, fluorescence spectroscopy using a fiber-optical probe was evaluated on a tissue-like ICG phantom with ICG concentrations of 6-64 μM and on breast tissue from five patients. Fiber-optical based spectroscopy was able to detect ICG fluorescence at low intensities; therefore, it is expected to increase the detection threshold of the conventional imaging systems when used intraoperatively. The probe allows spectral characterization of the fluorescence and navigation in the tissue as opposed to camera imaging which is limited to the view on the surface of the tissue.

  6. In Vivo Fluorescence Correlation and Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mütze, Jörg; Ohrt, Thomas; Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra

    In this manuscript, we describe the application of Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS), and scanning FCS (sFCS) to two in vivo systems. In the first part, we describe the application of two-photon standard and scanning FCS in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The differentiation of a single fertilized egg into a complex organism in C. elegans is regulated by a number of protein-dependent processes. The oocyte divides asymmetrically into two daughter cells of different developmental fate. Two of the involved proteins, PAR-2 and NMY-2, are studied. The second investigated system is the mechanism of RNA interference in human cells. An EGFP based cell line that allows to study the dynamics and localization of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) with FCS in vivo is created, which has so far been inaccessible with other experimental methods. Furthermore, Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy is employed to highlight the asymmetric incorporation of labeled siRNAs into RISC.

  7. Stark Spectroscopy of Rubrene. II. Stark Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Quenching Induced by an External Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimori, Toshifumi; Ito, Ryuichi; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2016-07-21

    We report Stark fluorescence spectroscopy investigation of rubrene dispersed in a poly(methyl methacrylate) film. The features of the fluorescence spectrum are analogous to those in solutions. In the Stark fluorescence spectrum, the decrease of the fluorescence quantum yield in the presence of an external electric field is observed. This result shows that the yield of nonradiative decay processes is increased by the application of an external electric field. It is known that the fluorescence quantum yield for rubrene, which is nearly unity at room temperature, depends on temperature, and a major nonradiative decay process in photoexcited rubrene is ascribed to a thermally activated intersystem crossing (ISC). Equations that express the field-induced fluorescence quenching in terms of the molecular parameters are derived from the ensemble average of electric field effects on the activation energy of the reaction rate constant in random orientation systems. The molecular parameters are then extracted from the observed data. It is inferred that the field-induced increase in the yield of other intramolecular and intermolecular photophysical processes in addition to the ISC should be taken into account. PMID:27341859

  8. Extreme ultraviolet fluorescence spectroscopy of pure and core-shell rare gas clusters at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroedter, Lasse

    2013-08-15

    The interaction of rare gas clusters with short-wavelength radiation of free-electron lasers (FELs) has been studied extensively over the last decade by means of electron and ion time-of-flight spectroscopy. This thesis describes the design and construction of a fluorescence spectrometer for the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range and discusses the cluster experiments performed at FLASH, the Free-electron LAser in Hamburg. Fluorescence of xenon and of argon clusters was studied, both in dependence on the FEL pulse intensity and on the cluster size. The FEL wavelength was set to the giant 4d-resonance of xenon at 13.5 nm and the FEL pulse intensity reached peak values of 2.7.10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. For xenon clusters, charge states of at least 11+ were identified. For argon, charge states up to 7+ were detected. The cluster-size dependent study revealed a decrease of the fluorescence yield per atom with increasing cluster size. This decrease is explained with the help of a geometric model. It assumes that virtually the entire fluorescence yield stems from shells of ions on the cluster surface, whereas ions in the cluster core predominantly recombine non-radiatively with electrons. However, the detailed analysis of fluorescence spectra from clusters consisting of a core of Xe atoms and a surrounding shell of argon atoms shows that, in fact, a small fraction of the fluorescence signal comes from Xe ions in the cluster core. Interestingly, these ions are as highly charged as the ions in the shells of a pure Xe cluster. This result goes beyond the current understanding of charge and energy transfer processes in these systems and points toward the observation of ultrafast charging dynamics in a time window where mass spectrometry is inherently blind. (orig.)

  9. THE SPECTROSCOPY OF URANIUM ATOM WITHIN THE "SILVA" PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    Avril, R.; Ebrardt, J.; Petit, A.; Viala, F.; Vors, E.

    1987-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (SILVA) has been recognized as beeing an attractive powerful technique for the enrichment of uranium for light water reactor fuel. Since the heart of the AVLIS process is based on selective multistep photoionization of an uranium atomic vapor stream, the development of this process in France, has stimulated intensive studies in the field of uranium spectroscopy.

  10. Design of a WWW database server for Atomic Spectroscopy Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The department of Atomic Spectroscopy at Lund Univ produces large amounts of experimental data on energy levels and emissions for atomic systems. In order to make this data easily available to users outside the institution, a database has been produced and made available on the Internet. This report describes the organization of the data and the Internet interface of the data base. 4 refs

  11. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: Counting noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe new work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions). When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. We show that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective. (orig./FKS)

  12. Constraints on extra dimensions from atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dahia, F

    2015-01-01

    We consider a hydrogen atom confined in a thick brane embedded in a higher-dimensional space. Due to effects of the extra dimensions, the gravitational potential is amplified in distances smaller than the size of the supplementary space, in comparison with the Newtonian potential. Studying the influence of the gravitational interaction modified by the extra dimensions on the energy levels of the hydrogen atom, we find independent constraints for the higher-dimensional Planck mass in terms of the thickness of the brane by using accurate measurements of atomic transition frequencies. The constraints are very stringent for narrow branes.

  13. 微波消解氢化物原子荧光法测定食品中的砷和汞%Simultaneous determination of arsenic and mercury in food by microwave digestion and atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭同兵; 黄谦; 刘剑波

    2011-01-01

    A process of closed and high pressure microwave digestion with atomic fluorescence spectrometer for simultaneously determine As and Hg in food was established. Compared with traditional wet digestion method, the microwave digestion features simple operation, fast, little interference and excellent process controllability. After detect rice, meat, mineral water.aquatic product and so on, we find the detection limits for arsenic and mercury were 0. 030 6 μg/L and 0. 005 2 μg/L respectively. The relative standard deviation for As was 2. 40%,while 1. 39% for Hg. The recovery for As was in the rang of 99. 4% - 101. 2% and 94. 5%~ 106. 5% for Hg. And the As correlation coefficient was 0. 999 7, while the Hg was 0. 999 6. The result is fine, and is fit for simultaneously determine As and Hg in food.%采用高压密闭微波消解氢化物原子荧光法对食品中砷、汞进行同时测定,并与传统的湿法消解进行比较.结果表明:该法具有操作简单、快速、干扰少、良好的过程可控性等优点.通过对大米、肉类罐头、矿采水和水产品等样品的检测,发现砷、汞的检出限分别为0.0306,0.0052 μg/L;相对标准偏差(RSD):砷为2.40%,Hg为1.39%;回收率:As为99.4%~101.2%,Hg为94.5%~106.5%;相关系数(r):As为0.999 7,Hg为0.999 6.结果良好,适用于多种食品中砷和采的同时检测.

  14. Exploring the Single Atom Spin State by Electron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Chang; Teng, Po-Yuan; Chiu, Po-Wen; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-11-13

    To control the spin state of an individual atom is an ultimate goal for spintronics. A single atom magnet, which may lead to a supercapacity memory device if realized, requires the high-spin state of an isolated individual atom. Here, we demonstrate the realization of well isolated transition metal (TM) atoms fixed at atomic defects sparsely dispersed in graphene. Core-level electron spectroscopy clearly reveals the high-spin state of the individual TM atoms at the divacancy or edge of the graphene layer. We also show for the first time that the spin state of single TM atoms systematically varies with the coordination of neighboring nitrogen or oxygen atoms. These structures can be thus regarded as the smallest components of spintronic devices with controlled magnetic behavior. PMID:26613462

  15. Ablation plume structure and dynamics in ambient gas observed by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Khumaeni, A.; Kato, M.; Wakaida, I.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamic behavior of an ablation plume in ambient gas has been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. The second harmonic beam from an Nd:YAG laser (0.5-6 J/cm2) was focused on a sintered oxide pellet or a metal chip of gadolinium. The produced plume was subsequently intersected with a sheet-shaped UV beam from a dye laser so that time-resolved fluorescence images were acquired with an intensified CCD camera at various delay times. The obtained cross-sectional images of the plume indicate that the ablated ground state atoms and ions of gadolinium accumulate in a hemispherical contact layer between the plume and the ambient gas, and a cavity containing a smaller density of ablated species is formed near the center of the plume. At earlier expansion stage, another luminous component also expands in the cavity so that it coalesces into the hemispherical layer. The splitting and coalescence for atomic plume occur later than those for ionic plume. Furthermore, the hemispherical layer of neutral atoms appears later than that of ions; however, the locations of the layers are nearly identical. This coincidence of the appearance locations of the layers strongly suggests that the neutral atoms in the hemispherical layer are produced as a consequence of three-body recombination of ions through collisions with gas atoms. The obtained knowledge regarding plume expansion dynamics and detailed plume structure is useful for optimizing the experimental conditions for ablation-based spectroscopic analysis.

  16. Quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy of dynamic processes by multifocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krmpot, Aleksandar J.; Nikolić, Stanko N.; Vitali, Marco; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K.; Oasa, Sho; Thyberg, Per; Tisa, Simone; Kinjo, Masataka; Nilsson, Lennart; Gehring, Walter J.; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf; Vukojevic, Vladana

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging without scanning is developed for the study of fast dynamical processes. The method relies on the use of massively parallel Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (mpFCS). Simultaneous excitation of fluorescent molecules across the specimen is achieved by passing a single laser beam through a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) to generate a quadratic illumination matrix of 32×32 light sources. Fluorescence from 1024 illuminated spots is detected in a confocal arrangement by a matching matrix detector consisting of the same number of single-photon avalanche photodiodes (SPADs). Software was developed for data acquisition and fast autoand cross-correlation analysis by parallel signal processing using a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU). Instrumental performance was assessed using a conventional single-beam FCS instrument as a reference. Versatility of the approach for application in biomedical research was evaluated using ex vivo salivary glands from Drosophila third instar larvae expressing a fluorescently-tagged transcription factor Sex Combs Reduced (Scr) and live PC12 cells stably expressing the fluorescently tagged mu-opioid receptor (MOPeGFP). We show that quantitative mapping of local concentration and mobility of transcription factor molecules across the specimen can be achieved using this approach, which paves the way for future quantitative characterization of dynamical reaction-diffusion landscapes across live cells/tissue with a submillisecond temporal resolution (presently 21 μs/frame) and single-molecule sensitivity.

  17. Observables in neutrino mass spectroscopy using atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of collective de-excitation of atoms in a metastable level into emission mode of a single photon plus a neutrino pair, called radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP), is sensitive to the absolute neutrino mass scale, to the neutrino mass hierarchy and to the nature (Dirac or Majorana) of massive neutrinos. We investigate how the indicated neutrino mass and mixing observables can be determined from the measurement of the corresponding continuous photon spectrum taking the example of a transition between specific levels of the Yb atom. The possibility of determining the nature of massive neutrinos and, if neutrinos are Majorana fermions, of obtaining information about the Majorana phases in the neutrino mixing matrix, is analyzed in the cases of normal hierarchical, inverted hierarchical and quasi-degenerate types of neutrino mass spectrum. We find, in particular, that the sensitivity to the nature of massive neutrinos depends critically on the atomic level energy difference relevant in the RENP

  18. Fluorescence detection at the atom shot noise limit for atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rocco, Emanuele; Valenzuela, Tristan; Boyer, Vincent; Freise, Andreas; Bongs, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Atom interferometers are promising tools for precision measurement with applications ranging from geophysical exploration to tests of the equivalence principle of general relativity, or the detection of gravitational waves. Their optimal sensitivity is ultimately limited by their detection noise. We review resonant and near-resonant methods to detect the atom number of the interferometer outputs and we theoretically analyze the relative influence of various scheme dependent noise sources and the technical challenges affecting the detection. We show that for the typical conditions under which an atom interferometer operates, simultaneous fluorescence detection with a CCD sensor is the optimal imaging scheme. We extract the laser beam parameters such as detuning, intensity, and duration, required for reaching the atom shot noise limit.

  19. Cytoskeleton dynamics studied by dispersion-relation fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ru; Lei, Lei; Wang, Yingxiao; Levine, Alex; Popescu, Gabriel

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence is the most widely used microscopy technique for studying the dynamics and function in both medical and biological sciences due to its sensitivity and specificity. Inspired by the spirit of spatial fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we propose a new method to study the transport dynamics over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. The molecules of interest are labeled with a fluorophore whose motion gives rise to spontaneous fluorescence intensity fluctuations that can be further analyzed to quantify the governing molecular mass transport dynamics. We analyze these data by the dispersion relation in the form of a power law, Γ(q) ~qα , which describe the relaxation rate of fluorescence intensity fluctuations, Γ, vs. the wavenumber, q. We used this approach to study the interplay of various cytoskeletal components in intracellular transport under the influence of protein-motor inhibitors. We found that after actin is depolymerized, the transport becomes completely random for a few minutes and then it starts to organize deterministically again. We conclude that the disrupted cytoskeletal components first diffuse in the cytoplasm, but then become attached to microtubules and get transported deterministically.

  20. Brain cancer probed by native fluorescence and stokes shift spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; He, Yong; Pu, Yang; Li, Qingbo; Wang, Wei; Alfano, Robert R.

    2012-12-01

    Optical biopsy spectroscopy was applied to diagnosis human brain cancer in vitro. The spectra of native fluorescence, Stokes shift and excitation spectra were obtained from malignant meningioma, benign, normal meningeal tissues and acoustic neuroma benign tissues. The wide excitation wavelength ranges were used to establish the criterion for distinguishing brain diseases. The alteration of fluorescence spectra between normal and abnormal brain tissues were identified by the characteristic fluorophores under the excitation with UV to visible wavelength range. It was found that the ratios of the peak intensities and peak position in both spectra of fluorescence and Stokes shift may be used to diagnose human brain meninges diseases. The preliminary analysis of fluorescence spectral data from cancer and normal meningeal tissues by basic biochemical component analysis model (BBCA) and Bayes classification model based on statistical methods revealed the changes of components, and classified the difference between cancer and normal human brain meningeal tissues in a predictions accuracy rate is 0.93 in comparison with histopathology and immunohistochemistry reports (gold standard).

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopy for endogenous porphyrins in human facial skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, I.; Tseng, S. H.; Cula, G. O.; Bargo, P. R.; Kollias, N.

    2009-02-01

    The activity of certain bacteria in skin is known to correlate to the presence of porphyrins. In particular the presence of coproporphyrin produced by P.acnes inside plugged pores has been correlated to acne vulgaris. Another porphyrin encountered in skin is protoporphyrin IX, which is produced by the body in the pathway for production of heme. In the present work, a fluorescence spectroscopy system was developed to measure the characteristic spectrum and quantify the two types of porphyrins commonly present in human facial skin. The system is comprised of a Xe lamp both for fluorescence excitation and broadband light source for diffuse reflectance measurements. A computer-controlled filter wheel enables acquisition of sequential spectra, first excited by blue light at 405 nm then followed by the broadband light source, at the same location. The diffuse reflectance spectrum was used to correct the fluorescence spectrum due to the presence of skin chromophores, such as blood and melanin. The resulting fluorescence spectra were employed for the quantification of porphyrin concentration in a population of healthy subjects. The results show great variability on the concentration of these porphyrins and further studies are being conducted to correlate them with skin conditions such as inflammation and acne vulgaris.

  2. An Analog Filter Approach to Frequency Domain Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainham, R; O'Neill, M; McKenna, I J

    2015-11-01

    The rate equations found in frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy are the same as those found in electronics under analog filter theory. Laplace transform methods are a natural way to solve the equations, and the methods can provide solutions for arbitrary excitation functions. The fluorescence terms can be modelled as circuit components and cascaded with drive and detection electronics to produce a global transfer function. Electronics design tools such as SPICE can be used to model fluorescence problems. In applications, such as remote sensing, where detection electronics are operated at high gain and limited bandwidth, a global modelling of the entire system is important, since the filter terms of the drive and detection electronics affect the measured response of the fluorescence signals. The techniques described here can be used to separate signals from fast and slow fluorophores emitting into the same spectral band, and data collection can be greatly accelerated by means of a frequency comb driver waveform and appropriate signal processing of the response. The simplification of the analysis mathematics, and the ability to model the entire detection chain, make it possible to develop more compact instruments for remote sensing applications. PMID:26429345

  3. Optical Multidimensional Spectroscopy of Atomic Vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siemens Mark E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical single- and double-quantum three-dimensional Fourier-transform spectra are obtained for atomic vapors. We show that three-dimensional spectra can be used to identify the Hamiltonian of complex systems and to reveal the nature of many-body interactions.

  4. Laser-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of oxide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing was applied to investigate the local fields and interactions of paramagnetic ions in oxide glasses. Studies included the site dependence of energy levels, radiative and nonradiative transition probabilities, homogeneous line broadening, and ion--ion energy transfer of rare earth ions. These results and the experimental techniques are reviewed briefly; the use of paramagnetic ions other than the rare earths is also considered. Recently, laser-excited fluorescence spectroscopy was used to investigate modifications in the local structure of lithium borate glass caused by compositional changes and phase separation and the site dependence of nonradiative relaxation of paramagnetic ions by multiphonon processes. These results and their implications are discussed. 6 figures

  5. Transient Fluorescence Spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence lifetimes of terbium doped dipicolinic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makoui, Anali

    We have investigated the use of deep UV laser induced fluorescence for the sensitive detection and spectroscopic lifetime studies of terbium doped dipicolinic acid (DPA-Tb) and used this to study the optical characteristics of DPA which is a chemical surrounding most bacterial spores. Background absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, and Excitation Emission Matrix (EEM) spectra were made of the DPA-Tb complex, using both fixed 266 nm wavelength and tunable (220 nm--280 nm) UV laser excitations. Of importance, the fluorescence lifetimes of the four main fluorescence peaks (488 nm, 543 nm, 581 nm, and 618 nm) of the DPA-Tb complex have been measured for the first time to our knowledge. The lifetimes of all the fluorescing lines have been measured as a function of DPA-Tb concentration, solvent pH, and solvent composition, including that for the weakest fluorescing line of DPA-Tb at 618 nm. In addition, a new spectroscopic lifetime measurement technique, which we call "Transient Fluorescence Spectroscopy", was developed. In this technique, a weak, quasi-CW, amplitude modulated UV laser (8.5 kHz) was used to measure the lifetimes of the fluorescence lines, and yields insight into energy transfer and excitation lifetimes within the system. This technique is especially useful when a high power laser is not either available or not suitable. In the latter case, this would be when a high power pulsed deep-UV laser could produce bleaching or destruction of the biological specimen. In addition, this technique simulated the excitation and fluorescence emission of the DPA-Tb using a 4-level energy model, and solved the dynamic transient rate equations to predict the temporal behavior of the DPA-Tb emitted fluorescence. Excellent agreement between the experiments and the simulation were found. This technique has the potential to provide a more accurate value for the fluorescence lifetime values. In addition, with the use of asymmetric excitation waveforms, the dynamic

  6. Determination of antioxidant content in biodiesel by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Keurison F.; Caires, Anderson R.L. [Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados, MS (Brazil). Grupo de Optica Aplicada; Oliveira, Samuel L. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), MS (Brazil). Grupo de Optica e Fotonica

    2011-07-01

    Full text. Biodiesel is an alternative fuel composed by mono-alkyl esters obtained from vegetable oils or animal fats. Due to its chemical structure, biodiesel is highly susceptible to oxidation which leads to formation of insoluble gums and sediments that can block the filter system of fuel injection. Biodiesel made from vegetable oils typically has a small amount of natural antioxidants so that it is necessary to add synthetic antioxidants to enhance its stability and retain their properties for a longer period. The main antioxidants are synthetic phenolic compounds such as butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ) as well as natural antioxidants as tocopherols. The fluorescence spectroscopy has been applied for determination of phenolic compounds in oils. Here, a method based on fluorescence is proposed to quantify the BHA and TBHQ antioxidant concentration in biodiesel produced from sunflower and soybean oils. Soybean and sunflower biodiesel were obtained by transesterification of fatty alcohol in the presence of NaOH as catalyst. The reactions were carried out in the molar ratio of 6:1 methanol/oil. After the production and purification, biodiesel samples were stored. Biodiesel samples with BHA and TBHQ concentrations from 1000 to 8000 ppm (m/m) were pre- pared. These samples were diluted in ethanol (95%) in order to measure the fluorescence spectra. Fluorescence and excitation spectra of the solutions were recorded at room temperature using a spectrofluorimeter. The emission spectra were obtained under excitation at about 310nm and fluorescence in the 320-800nm range was evaluated. Biodiesel samples without BHA and TBHQ showed fluorescence band at about 420nm, which can be attributed to tocopherols inherent to the vegetable oils used in the biodiesel production. The addition of BHA and/or TBHQ is responsible for the appearance of a fluorescence band around 330nm. It was verified that the fluorescence

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in tissue local necrosis detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Číp, Ondřej; Buchta, Zdeněk; Lešundák, Adam; Randula, A.; Mikel, Břetislav; Lazar, Josef; Veverková, L.

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2014, 89411D:1-6. ISSN 1605-7422. [Optical Interactions with Tissue and Cells /25./; and Terahertz for Biomedical Applications. San Francisco (US), 02.02.2014-04.02.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/1813; GA MŠk EE2.4.31.0016; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : IndoCyanine Green * fluorescence spectroscopy * small intestine * surgery Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s

  8. Quantum process tomography by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pachón, Leonardo A. [Grupo de Física Atómica y Molecular, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Marcus, Andrew H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Oregon Center for Optics, Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States); Aspuru-Guzik, Alán [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter Γ of the doubly excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed.

  9. Quantum process tomography by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter Γ of the doubly excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed

  10. Synthesis of Ag clusters in microemulsions: A time-resolved UV vis and fluorescence spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledo, Ana; Martínez, F.; López-Quintela, M. A.; Rivas, J.

    2007-09-01

    The combined use of the microemulsion technique and the kinetic control allows the preparation of small silver clusters. By using UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy the main stages by which the clusters grow, before the formation of nanoparticles, were elucidated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) were used to further characterize the samples. Two main stages were clearly identified, which are associated with: (1) the formation of Ag n clusters with n<10, which self-aggregate into one atom high 2D nanodiscs of 3.2 nm size and (2) Ag n clusters, which self-aggregate into 3D nanostructures of 1.5 nm in size. The fluorescence properties observed with both stages show that the formed clusters are small enough to display a molecule-like behaviour.

  11. Sub-Doppler fluorescence spectroscopy of Cs-vapour layers with nano-metric thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The extensive study of alkali-vapor layers with nano-metric thickness L has been made possible through the development of cells of L ≤ 1 μm, where the thickness of the vapor-layer can be varied in an interval around the wavelength λ of the irradiating light. It was shown that the width of the fluorescence profiles increases with the cell thickness. We present experimental and theoretical studies of the fluorescence spectra on the D2 line of Cs-atomic-layers with L = mλ (m = 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25), when irradiated by narrowband laser light tuned around λ = 852 nm. We use the theoretical model based on the optical Bloch equations and obtain qualitative agreement between the theory and the experiment. The atomic systems are separated in two groups: closed and open. Well pronounced narrow dip in the fluorescence (superimposed on the top of the sub-Doppler width fluorescence profile) is observed experimentally only for the open transitions suffering hyperfine/Zeeman optical pumping, and for L ≥ λ. In the case of closed transition, non-suffering population loss extremely small peculiarity in the fluorescence profile is observed for L 1.25 λ. Systematic comparison is made between the fluorescence profiles amplitude and width, estimated theoretically and experimentally. With laser power the amplitude and the width of the fluorescence profiles increase, for all cell thicknesses and all transitions. In agreement with the previous results, the width of the transition profiles is growing with L. However, we report here about the following new peculiarity: the enhancement rate of the transition width is not constant, namely it is larger for L varying in the interval 0.75 λ ≤ L ≤ λ than that varying in the interval λ ≤ L ≤ 1.25 λ. We show that the width of the fluorescence profiles strongly depends on the layer thickness (with variations as small as 213 nm). These results can be used for spectral investigations of atoms confined in nano volumes, as

  12. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the technique of resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS), a laser is tuned to a wavelength that will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or non-resonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms: and because detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples of one-atom detection are given, including that of the noble gases, to show complementarity with accelerator mass spectrometry AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81Kr by using RIS has interesting applications for solar-neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. (author)

  13. Electron spectroscopy of collisional excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis measurements are described in which coincidences are detected between scattered projectiles and emitted electrons. This yields information on two-electron excitation processes. In order to show what can be learnt from coincidence experiments a detailed theoretical analysis is given. The transition amplitudes, which contain all the information, are introduced (ch.2). In ch.3 the experimental set-up is shown. The results for the Li+-He system are shown in ch. 7 and are compared with predictions based on the Molecular-Orbitalmodel which however does not account for two-excitation mechanisms. With the transition amplitudes also the wave function of the excited atom has been completely determined. In ch.8 the shape of the electron cloud, induced by the collision, is derived from the amplitudes. The relation between the oscillatory motion of this cloud after the collision and the correlation between the two electrons of the excited atom is discussed. In ch. 6 it is shown that the broad structures in the non-coincident energy spectra of the Li+-He system are erroneously interpretated as a result of electron emission from the (Li-He)+-quasimolecule. A model is presented which explains, based on the results obtained from the coincidence measurements, these broad structures. In ch. 4 the Post-Collision Interaction process is treated. It is shown that for high-energy collisions, in contrast with general assumptions, PCI is important. In ch. 5 the importance of PCI-processes in photoionization of atoms, followed by Auger decay, are studied. From the formulas derived in ch. 4 simple analytical results are obtained. These are applied to recent experiments and good agreement is achieved. 140 refs.; 55 figs.; 9 tabs

  14. Atomic absorption spectroscopy with high temperature flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, J B

    1968-07-01

    An account is given of the history of the development of high temperature flames for the atomic absorption measurement of metals forming refractory oxides. The principles governing the design of premix burners for such flames, and the relative merits of different types of nebulizer burner systems are described. After a brief account of the structure and emission characteristics of the premixed oxygen-acetylene and nitrous oxide-acetylene flames, the scope and limitations of the latter flame in chemical analysis are discussed. PMID:20068790

  15. Modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in hollow cathode lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the experimental study of modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp. The dependences of its linewidth, slope and magnitude on the various experimental parameters are measured and fitted by the well-known theoretical expressions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We have observed the Dicke narrowing effect by increasing the current of the hollow cathode lamp. It is also found that there are the optimal current and laser power to generate the better modulation transfer spectroscopy signal, which can be employed for locking the laser frequency to the atomic transition. (authors)

  16. Deuteron charge radius from spectroscopy data in atomic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Antognini, Aldo; Beyer, Axel; Fleurbaey, Hélène; Grinin, Alexey; Hänsch, Theodor W; Julien, Lucile; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Matveev, Arthur; Biraben, François

    2016-01-01

    We give a pedagogical description of the method to extract the charge radii and Rydberg constant from laser spectroscopy in regular hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms, that is part of the CODATA least-squares adjustment of the fundamental physical constants. We give a deuteron charge radius from D spectroscopy alone of 2.1415(45) fm. This value is independent of the proton charge radius, and five times more accurate than the value found in the CODATA Adjustment 10.

  17. Quantitative Studies of Antimicrobial Peptide Pore Formation in Large Unilamellar Vesicles by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2013-01-01

    leakage of fluorescent probes of different sizes through transmembrane pores formed by each of the three representative antimicrobial peptides: melittin, magainin 2, and mastoparan X. The experimental results demonstrate that leakage assays based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy offer new and...

  18. Speciesion arsenic and selenium using hydride method atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrides production - atomic absorption spectroscopy system was studied. Hydrides production tool and gas-liquid separator were tested and successfully used in this work. Hydride was produced through natrium borohydride reaction with sample solution. Emitted gas was separated by gas-liquid separator before it is carried by nitrogen gas through T tube which is put in atomic absorption flame spectrophotometer. Efficiency of the system was tested through standard reference sample and seawater / sediment samples which is collected from Negeri Johor water bays

  19. Determination of trace amounts of scandium by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Y K

    1968-05-01

    Optimum instrumental conditions were investigated for the determination of trace quantities of scandium by atomic-absorption spectroscopy. Enhancement effects by organic solvents and by complex extractions were also studied. (46)Sc was used to establish the optimum extraction conditions. A sensitivity of 0.06 ppm of Sc was observed when using extraction into oxine-butanol and atomic absorption was measured with an acetylene-nitrous oxide flame. PMID:18960315

  20. Remote excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy using silver nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liang; Yuan, Haifeng; Lu, Gang; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten; Uji-i, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a powerful tool to resolve local properties, dynamical process of molecules, rotational and translational diffusion motions, relies on the fluctuations of florescence observables in the observation volume. In the case of rare transition events or small dynamical fluctuations, FCS requires few molecules or even single molecules in the observation volume at a time to minimize the background signals. Metal nanoparticle which possess unique localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) have been used to reduce the observation volume down to sub-diffraction limited scale while maintain at high analyst concentration up to tens of micromolar. Nevertheless, the applications of functionalized nanoparticles in living cell are limited due to the continuous diffusion after cell uptake, which makes it difficult to target the region of interests in the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the use of silver nanowires for remote excitation FCS on fluorescent molecules in solution. By using propagation surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) which supported by the silver nanowire to excite the fluorescence, both illumination and observation volume can be reduced simultaneously. In such a way, less perturbation is induced to the target region, and this will broaden the application scope of silver nanowire as tip in single cell endoscopy.

  1. Spectroscopy of PTCDA attached to rare gas samples: clusters vs. bulk matrices. II. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Dvorak, M.; Müller, M; Knoblauch, T.; Bünermann, O.; Rydlo, A.; Minniberger, S.; Harbich, W.; Stienkemeier, F.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride) molecules and solid rare gas samples is studied by means of fluorescence emission spectroscopy. On the one hand, laser-excited PTCDA-doped large argon, neon and para-hydrogen clusters in comparison with PTCDA embedded in helium nanodroplets are spectroscopically characterized with respect to line broadening and shifting. A fast non-radiative relaxation is observed before a radiative decay in the electronic ground st...

  2. Live-cell multiphoton fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with an improved large Stokes shift fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yinghua; Meurer, Matthias; Raghavan, Sarada; Rebane, Aleksander; Lindquist, Jake R.; Santos, Sofia; Kats, Ilia; Davidson, Michael W.; Mazitschek, Ralph; Hughes, Thomas E.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Knop, Michael; Shah, Jagesh V.

    2015-01-01

    We report an improved variant of mKeima, a monomeric long Stokes shift red fluorescent protein, hmKeima8.5. The increased intracellular brightness and large Stokes shift (∼180 nm) make it an excellent partner with teal fluorescent protein (mTFP1) for multiphoton, multicolor applications. Excitation of this pair by a single multiphoton excitation wavelength (MPE, 850 nm) yields well-separable emission peaks (∼120-nm separation). Using this pair, we measure homo- and hetero-oligomerization interactions in living cells via multiphoton excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (MPE-FCS). Using tandem dimer proteins and small-molecule inducible dimerization domains, we demonstrate robust and quantitative detection of intracellular protein–protein interactions. We also use MPE-FCCS to detect drug–protein interactions in the intracellular environment using a Coumarin 343 (C343)-conjugated drug and hmKeima8.5 as a fluorescence pair. The mTFP1/hmKeima8.5 and C343/hmKeima8.5 combinations, together with our calibration constructs, provide a practical and broadly applicable toolbox for the investigation of molecular interactions in the cytoplasm of living cells. PMID:25877871

  3. Measurement of the diffusion coefficients of fluorescence beads and quantum dots by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FCS (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy) is a technique used to determine the dynamic characteristics of particles in solution and became common in the field of biophysics with the development of the confocal microscope, the high-speed photo-detector, and real-time data acquisition systems. In this study, the FCS system was composed of a commercial fluorescence microscope, a He-Ne laser (632.8 nm), a data acquisition board, and a software correlator written with LabVIEW. Autocorrelation functions were obtained using the measured fluorescence fluctuations of fluorescent beads and Q-dots (quantum dots) coated with carboxylate in distilled water. The diffusion coefficients of the beads and the Q-dots in distilled water and PBS (phosphate buffered saline) solution were obtained using the viscosity of water and the bead size. Also, using the bead size, we calculated the viscosity of the PBS solution, and we compared the Q-dots in water and in the PBS solution. The result showed that the viscosity of the PBS solution was 2.5 times greater than that of water, and that the sizes of Q-dots in water and PBS solution were one-third and one-sixth smaller than the known values, respectively, due to the pH variation in the solutions.

  4. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π− beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π− occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN

  5. Transient x-ray absorption spectroscopy of hydrated halogen atom

    CERN Document Server

    Elles, Christopher G; Crowell, Robert A; Arms, Dohn A; Landahl, Eric C

    2007-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy monitors the transient species generated by one-photon detachment of an electron from aqueous bromide. Hydrated bromine atoms with a lifetime of ca. 17 ns were observed, nearly half of which react with excess Br- to form Br2-. The K-edge spectra of the Br atom and Br2- anion exhibit distinctive resonant transitions that are absent for the Br- precursor. The absorption spectra indicate that the solvent shell around a Br0 atom is defined primarily by hydrophobic interactions, in agreement with a Monte Carlo simulation of the solvent structure.

  6. Ablation plume structure and dynamics in ambient gas observed by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic behavior of an ablation plume in ambient gas has been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. The second harmonic beam from an Nd:YAG laser (0.5–6 J/cm2) was focused on a sintered oxide pellet or a metal chip of gadolinium. The produced plume was subsequently intersected with a sheet-shaped UV beam from a dye laser so that time-resolved fluorescence images were acquired with an intensified CCD camera at various delay times. The obtained cross-sectional images of the plume indicate that the ablated ground state atoms and ions of gadolinium accumulate in a hemispherical contact layer between the plume and the ambient gas, and a cavity containing a smaller density of ablated species is formed near the center of the plume. At earlier expansion stage, another luminous component also expands in the cavity so that it coalesces into the hemispherical layer. The splitting and coalescence for atomic plume occur later than those for ionic plume. Furthermore, the hemispherical layer of neutral atoms appears later than that of ions; however, the locations of the layers are nearly identical. This coincidence of the appearance locations of the layers strongly suggests that the neutral atoms in the hemispherical layer are produced as a consequence of three-body recombination of ions through collisions with gas atoms. The obtained knowledge regarding plume expansion dynamics and detailed plume structure is useful for optimizing the experimental conditions for ablation-based spectroscopic analysis. - Highlights: • Ablated ground-state species accumulated in a thin hemispherical boundary layer • Inside the layer, a cavity containing a small density of ablated species was formed. • The hemispherical layers of atoms and ions appeared at a nearly identical location. • The measured intensity peak variation was in good agreement with a model prediction. • We ascribed the dominant process for forming the layer to a three-body recombination

  7. SPECTRW: A software package for nuclear and atomic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfas, C. A.; Axiotis, M.; Tsabaris, C.

    2016-09-01

    A software package to be used in nuclear and atomic spectroscopy is presented. Apart from analyzing γ and X-ray spectra, it offers many additional features such as de-convolution of multiple photopeaks, sample analysis and activity determination, detection system evaluation and an embedded code for spectra simulation.

  8. Doppler-free spectroscopy on tantalum atomic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the usefulness of an atomic beam source for refractory metals in Doppler-free spectroscopy. The splittings between seven hyperfine components of the weak 578.01 nm transition in TaI are measured to +- 1 MHz. The hyperfine A and B coefficients for the upper and lower level are determined from the observed splittings. (orig.)

  9. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  10. Atomic and molecular spectroscopy of transition metals in condensed helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We investigated laser induced fluorescence spectra of copper and gold atoms and dimers thereof isolated in solid and liquid 4He. Among the atomic spectral lines the most interesting ones are forbidden transitions that involve electrons from inner d-shells which are screened from the surrounding He atoms by the outer s-shell and are therefore much less affected by the interaction with the He matrix. Indeed, the observed spectral lineshapes are much narrower than those of transitions involving outer shell electrons. Another important result is the observation of well resolved vibrational structures in five molecular bands of the Au2 and Cu2 dimers. We expect that the analysis of those spectra will significantly advance our understanding of impurity atoms and molecules in condensed He. (author)

  11. Current Status of Atomic Spectroscopy Databases at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramida, Alexander; Ralchenko, Yuri; Reader, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    NIST's Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center maintains several online databases on atomic spectroscopy. These databases can be accessed via the http://physics.nist.gov/PhysRefData web page. Our main database, Atomic Spectra Database (ASD), recently upgraded to v. 5.3, now contains critically evaluated data for about 250,000 spectral lines and 109,000 energy levels of almost all elements in the periodic table. This new version has added several thousand spectral lines and energy levels of Sn II, Mo V, W VIII, and Th I-III. Most of these additions contain critically evaluated transition probabilities important for astrophysics, technology, and fusion research. A new feature of ASD is providing line-ratio data for diagnostics of electron temperature and density in plasmas. Saha-Boltzmann plots have been modified by adding an experimental feature allowing the user to specify a multi-element mixture. We continue regularly updating our bibliography databases, ensuring comprehensive coverage of current literature on atomic spectra for energy levels, spectral lines, transition rates, hyperfine structure, isotope shifts, Zeeman and Stark effects. Our other popular databases, such as the Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopy Data, searchable atlases of spectra of Pt-Ne and Th-Ne lamps, and non-LTE plasma-kinetics code comparisons, continue to be maintained.

  12. Spectroscopy and Dynamics of K Atoms on Argon Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douady, J; Awali, S; Poisson, L; Soep, B; Mestdagh, J M; Gervais, B

    2015-06-11

    We present a combined experimental and simulation study of the 4s → 4p photoexcitation of the K atom trapped at the surface of ArN clusters made of a few hundred Ar atoms. Our experimental method based on photoelectron spectroscopy allows us to firmly establish that one single K atom is trapped at the surface of the cluster. The absorption spectrum is characterized by the splitting of the atomic absorption line into two broad bands, a Π band associated with p orbitals parallel to the cluster surface and a Σ band associated with the perpendicular orientation. The spectrum is consistent with observations reported for K atoms trapped on lighter inert gas clusters, but the splitting between the Π and Σ bands is significantly larger. We show that a large amount of K atoms are transiently stuck and eventually lost by the Ar cluster, in contrast with previous observations reported for alkaline earth metal systems. The excitation in the Σ band leads systematically to the ejection of the K atom from the Ar cluster. On the contrary, excitation in the Π band leads to the formation of a bound state. In this case, the analysis of the experimental photoelectron spectrum by means of nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation shows that the relaxation drives the system toward a basin where the coordination of the K atom is 2.2 Ar atoms on the average, in a poorly structured surface. PMID:25854161

  13. Atomic spectroscopy introduction to the theory of hyperfine structure

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Anatoli V

    2006-01-01

    Atomic Spectroscopy provides a comprehensive discussion on the general approach to the theory of atomic spectra, based on the use of the Lagrangian canonical formalism. This approach is developed and applied to explain the hydrogenic hyperfine structure associated with the nucleus motion, its finite mass, and spin. The non-relativistic or relativistic, spin or spin-free particle approximations can be used as a starting point of general approach. The special attention is paid to the theory of Lamb shift formation. The formulae for hydrogenic spectrum including the account of Lamb shift are written in simple analytical form. The book is of interest to specialists, graduate and postgraduate students, who are involved into the experimental and theoretical research in the field of modern atomic spectroscopy.

  14. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  15. Laser cooling of dense atomic gases by collisional redistribution of radiation and spectroscopy of molecular dimers in a dense buffer gas environment

    OpenAIRE

    Saß, Anne; Forge, Ralf; Christopoulos, Stavros; Knicker, Katharina; Moroshkin, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We study laser cooling of atomic gases by collisional redistribution of fluorescence. In a high pressure buffer gas regime, frequent collisions perturb the energy levels of alkali atoms, which allows for the absorption of a far red detuned irradiated laser beam. Subsequent spontaneous decay occurs close to the unperturbed resonance frequency, leading to a cooling of the dense gas mixture by redistribution of fluorescence. Thermal deflection spectroscopy indicates large relative temperature ch...

  16. Uranium concentrate analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of As, Ca, Fe, Mo, P, S, Si. Th, V and U in uranium concentrates by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy has been studied. As and U are determined in nitric solutions and for the rest of elements analysis is performed by a bead fusion technique using Li2B4O7 and Li2CO3 as fluxes. Although the uranium matrix minimizes the absorption and enhancement effects, because of the content variations of this element it is advisable to operate at a constant level of U3O8. Despite the high matrix absorption and the large dilution of the samples, sensitivity and speed are found to be satisfactory as the result of the use of a high sensitivity automatic spectrometer. The spectral interferences of Mo on S and P, and of Pb on As have been particularly considered. (author)

  17. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Nonlinear Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Del Razo, Mauricio J; Qian, Hong; Lin, Guang

    2014-01-01

    The currently existing theory of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy(FCS) is based on the linear fluctuation theory originally developed by Einstein, Onsager, Lax, and others as a phenomenological approach to equilibrium fluctuations in bulk solutions. For mesoscopic reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear chemical reactions among a small number of molecules, a situation often encountered in single-cell biochemistry, it is expected that FCS time correlation functions of a reaction-diffusion system can deviate from the classic results of Elson and Magde. We first discuss this nonlinear effect for reaction systems without diffusion. For nonlinear stochastic reaction-diffusion systems here are no closed solutions; therefore, stochastic Monte-Carlo simulations are carried out. We show that the deviation is small for a simple bimolecular reaction; the most significant deviations occur when the number of molecules is small and of the same order. Our results show that current linear FCS theory could be adequate ...

  18. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l−1 and 1.0 ng l−1, respectively. - Highlights: • We optimized and compared two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry. • Miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were optimized. • The limit of detection for arsenic was 1.0 ng l−1

  19. Development of atomic spectroscopy technology -Development of ultrasensitive spectroscopic analysis technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Hyung Kee; Song Kyoo Suk; Kim, Duk Hyun; Hong, Suk Kyung; Lee, Yong Joo; Lee, Jong Hoon; Yang, Kee Hoh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    For the resonance ionization spectroscopy experiment, erbium and samarium were chosen as test elements and their optimum photoionization schemes for trace analysis have been investigated by using multiphoton spectroscopic techniques. With the optimum scheme, the detection limit of various atoms were measured. For the test of laser induced fluorescence system, calibration curves obtained from lead and cadmium standard solutions were made and Pb concentrations of various unknown solutions were determined. By using the developed differential absorption lidar system, backscattering signals from aerosol and ozone have been measured. Error source, error calibration and data interpretation techniques have been also studied. 60 figs, 8 pix, 28 tabs, 30 refs. (Author).

  20. Evaluation of actinic cheilitis using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Cosci, Alessandro; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Takahama, Ademar; Souza Azevedo, Rebeca; Kurachi, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially malignant disorder that mostly affects the vermilion border of the lower lip and can lead to squamous cell carcinoma. Because of its heterogeneous clinical aspect, it is difficult to indicate representative biopsy area. Late diagnosis is a limiting factor of therapeutic possibilities available to treat oral cancer. The diagnosis of actinic cheilitis is mainly based on clinical and histopathological analysis and it is a time consuming procedure to get the results. Information about the organization and chemical composition of the tissues can be obtained using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy techniques without the need for biopsy. The main targeted fluorophores are NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide), which have free and bound states, each one with different average lifetimes. The average lifetimes for free and bound NADH and FAD change according to tissue metabolic alterations and allow a quick and non-invasive clinical investigation of injuries and to help clinicians with the early diagnosis of actinic cheilitis. This study aims to evaluate the fluorescence lifetime parameters at the discrimination of three degrees of epithelial dysplasia, the most important predictor of malignant development, described in up to 100% of actinic cheilitis cases.

  1. Diagnosis of meningioma by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butte, Pramod V; Pikul, Brian K; Hever, Aviv; Yong, William H; Black, Keith L; Marcu, Laura

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the use of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) as an adjunctive tool for the intraoperative rapid evaluation of tumor specimens and delineation of tumor from surrounding normal tissue. Tissue autofluorescence is induced with a pulsed nitrogen laser (337 nm, 1.2 ns) and the intensity decay profiles are recorded in the 370 to 500 nm spectral range with a fast digitizer (0.2 ns resolution). Experiments are conducted on excised specimens (meningioma, dura mater, cerebral cortex) from 26 patients (97 sites). Spectral intensities and time-dependent parameters derived from the time-resolved spectra of each site are used for tissue characterization. A linear discriminant analysis algorithm is used for tissue classification. Our results reveal that meningioma is characterized by unique fluorescence characteristics that enable discrimination of tumor from normal tissue with high sensitivity (>89%) and specificity (100%). The accuracy of classification is found to increase (92.8% cases in the training set and 91.8% in the cross-validated set correctly classified) when parameters from both the spectral and the time domain are used for discrimination. Our findings establish the feasibility of using TR-LIFS as a tool for the identification of meningiomas and enables further development of real-time diagnostic tools for analyzing surgical tissue specimens of meningioma or other brain tumors. PMID:16409091

  2. Optical biopsy fiber-based fluorescence spectroscopy instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Alvin; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Yang, Yuanlong; Tang, Gui C.; Budansky, Yury; Celmer, Edward J.; Savage, Howard E.; Schantz, Stimson P.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1996-04-01

    Native fluorescence spectroscopy of biomolecules has emerged as a new modality to the medical community in characterizing the various physiological conditions of tissues. In the past several years, many groups have been working to introduce the spectroscopic methods to diagnose cancer. Researchers have successfully used native fluorescence to distinguish cancerous from normal tissue samples in rat and human tissue. We have developed three generations of instruments, called the CD-scan, CD-ratiometer and CD-map, to allow the medical community to use optics for diagnosing tissue. Using ultraviolet excitation and emission spectral measurements on both normal and cancerous tissue of the breast, gynecology, colon, and aerodigestive tract can be separated. For example, from emission intensities at 340 nm to 440 nm (300 nm excitation), a statistically consistent difference between malignant tissue and normal or benign tissue is observed. In order to utilize optical biopsy techniques in a clinical setting, the CD-scan instrument was developed, which allows for rapid and reliable in-vitro and in-vivo florescence measurements of the aerodigestive tract with high accuracy. The instrumentation employs high sensitivity detection techniques which allows for lamp excitation, small diameter optical fiber probes; the higher spatial resolution afforded by the small diameter probes can increase the ability to detect smaller tumors. The fiber optic probes allow for usage in the aerodigestive tract, cervix and colon. Needle based fiber probes have been developed for in-vivo detection of breast cancer.

  3. Titanium atom detection by resonance fluorescence excited with a nitrogen laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coincidence of wave lengths of nitrogen laser basing lines and resonance transitions in titanium atom is investigated. It is shown that resonance fluorescence excited by nitrogen laser can be used for absolute titanium atom density measurements. Experiments on titanium atom detection in a vapour cloud formed under irradiation of a titanium target in vacuum by dye laser pulse, are conducted. Fluorescence extinguishing is observed under high evaporation power

  4. Spectroscopy of PTCDA attached to rare gas samples: clusters vs. bulk matrices. II. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorak, M; Knoblauch, T; Bünermann, O; Rydlo, A; Minniberger, S; Harbich, W; Stienkemeier, F

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride) molecules and solid rare gas samples is studied by means of fluorescence emission spectroscopy. On the one hand, laser-excited PTCDA-doped large argon, neon and para-hydrogen clusters in comparison with PTCDA embedded in helium nanodroplets are spectroscopically characterized with respect to line broadening and shifting. A fast non-radiative relaxation is observed before a radiative decay in the electronic ground state takes place. On the other hand, fluorescence emission studies of PTCDA embedded in bulk neon and argon matrices results in much more complex spectral signatures characterized by a splitting of the different emission lines. These can be assigned to the appearance of site isomers of the surrounding matrix lattice structure.

  5. In Vitro and In Vivo Applications of Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Staroske, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analyzes the fluctuations in the fluorescence intensity, which is emitted from a tiny excition volume, to obtain information about the concentration, the mobility, and the molecular interactions of labeled molecules. The more advanced fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) increases the precision in the determination of fl ow velocities and binding constants compared to standard FCS. The miniaturization in biomedical and chemical e...

  6. Observation of Climacteric-Like Behavior of Citrus Leaves Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio B. Wetterich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Observation of climacteric-like behavior in citrus leaves depends on the detection of ethylene. However, such detection requires a gas chromatographer and complex sample preparation procedures. In this work, fluorescence spectroscopy was investigated as a diagnostic technique for climacteric-like behavior in citrus leaves. Our results indicate that the chlorophyll fluorescence presents a time evolution consistent with the ethylene evolution. Therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy may be used to observe the climacteric-like behavior in citrus leaves.

  7. Atomic photoelectron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoelectron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used to study the photoionization process in several atomic systems. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) photoelectron spectra of gaseous Cd, Hg, Ne, Ar, Ba, and Mn. The use of two TOF analyzers made possible the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions as well as branching ratios and partial cross sections

  8. Atomic photoelectron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobrin, P.H.

    1983-02-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used to study the photoionization process in several atomic systems. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) photoelectron spectra of gaseous Cd, Hg, Ne, Ar, Ba, and Mn. The use of two TOF analyzers made possible the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions as well as branching ratios and partial cross sections.

  9. Laser spectroscopy of atomic beams of short-lived nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possibility of performing laser-nuclear-spectroscopic experiments at qualitatively new level aimed to solve the second-glass current problem and to search T-non invariant effects in the beta-decay of atomic nuclei is discussed. The question of the increase in efficiency of the experiments, aimed to study the main characteristics of nuclei, far from the beta-stability, by means of the laser spectroscopy methods is considered. 147 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  11. High sensitivity detection of selenium by laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry using electrothermal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high sensitivity detection of the trace element selenium is reported. The analytical method applied is Laser Excited Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry using Electrothermal Atomization within a graphite furnace atomizer. For the production of tunable laser radiation in the VUV spectral region a laser system was developed which consists of two dye lasers pumped by a Nd:YAG laser. The laser radiations are subsequently frequency doubled and sum frequency mixed by nonlinear optical KDP or BBO crystals, respectively. The system works with a repetition rate of 20 Hz and provides output energies of up to 100 μJ in the VUV at a pulse duration of 5 ns. The analytical investigations were focused on the detection of selenium in aqueous solutions and samples of human whole blood. From measurements on aqueous standards detection limits of 1.5 ng/l for selenium were obtained, with corresponding absolute detected masses of only 15 fg. The linear dynamic range spanned six orders of magnitude and good precision was achieved. In case of human whole blood samples the recovery was found to be within the range of 96% to 104%. The determination of the selenium content yielded medians of [119.5 ± 17.3] μg/l for 200 frozen blood samples taken in 1988 and [109.1 ± 15.6] μg/l for 103 fresh blood samples. (author)

  12. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun [Department of Physics, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible} 6s7s {sup 1}S{sub 0}) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm{sup 3} and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s{sup 1}S{sub 0} state via the intercombination 6s6p{sup 3}P{sub 1} state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 Degree-Sign C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle.

  13. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2013-02-01

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s(2)(1)S0↔ 6s7s (1)S0) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm(3) and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s(1)S0 state via the intercombination 6s6p(3)P1 state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 °C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle. PMID:23464193

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy of soil pellets : The use of CP/PARAFAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounier, Stéphane; Nicolodeli, Gustavo; Redon, Roland; Hacherouf, Kalhed; Milori, Debora M. B. P.

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is one of the most sensitive techniques available for analytical purposes. It is relatively easy to implement, phenomenologically straightforward and well investigated. Largely non-invasive and fast, so that it can be useful for environmental applications. Fluorescence phenomenon is highly probable in molecular systems containing atoms with lone pairs of electrons such as C=O, aromatic, phenolic, quinone and more rigid unsaturated conjugated systems. These functional groups are present in humic substances (HS) from soils (Senesi, 1990; N. Senesi et al., 1991) and represent the main fluorophors of Soil Organic Matter (SOM). The extension of the conjugated electronic system, the level of heteroatom substitution and type and number of substituting groups under the aromatic rings strongly affect the intensity and wavelength of molecular fluorescence. However, to analyse the SOM it is generally done a chemical extraction that allows measuring the fluorescence response of the liquid extract. To avoid this fractionation of the SOM, Milori et al. (2006) proposed the application of laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) in whole soil. This work intends to assess the technical feasibility of 3D fluorescence spectroscopy using lamp for excitation to analyse solids opaque samples prepared with different substances. Seventy four (74) solid samples were prepared from different mixtures of boric acid (BA), humic substance acid and tryptophan (TRP) powder. The compounds were mixture and a pellet was done by using pressure (8 ton). The pellets were measured using a spectrofluorimeter HITACHI F4500, and a 3D fluorescence tensor was done from emission spectra (200-600 nm) with excitation range from 200 to 500 nm. The acquisition parameters were: step at 5 nm, scan speed at 2400 nm.min-1, response time at 0.1 s, excitation and emission slits at 5 nm and photomultiplier voltage at 700 V. Furthermore, measures of Laser-induced Fluorescence were

  15. Influence of angle's ranges for recording an X-ray fluorescence hologram on reconstructed atomic images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Hong-Lan; CHEN Jian-Wen; GAO Hong-Yi; ZHU Hua-Feng; LI Ru-Xin; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2004-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a novel method for three-dimensional (3D) imaging of atomic structure. Theoretically, in an XFH experiment, one has to measure the fluorescence energy on a spherical surface to get well-resolved 3D images of atoms. But in practice, the experimental system arrangement does not allow the measurement of the fluorescent intensity oscillations in the full sphere. The holographic information losses because of the limited sampling range (less than 4π) will directly result in defective reconstructed atomic images. In this work, the atomic image of a Fe single crystal (001) was reconstructed by numerically simulating X-ray fluorescence holograms of the crystal at different recording angle's ranges and step lengths. Influences of the ranges of azimuth angles and polar angles and the step length of polar angles on the reconstructed atomic images were discussed.

  16. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  17. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Poli, N.; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M.; Sorrentino, F.; Drullinger, R. E.; Tino, G. M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable View the MathML source state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trap...

  18. Investigation on the Photodissociation of Oxygen from Oxymyoglobin by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hua-wei; CAO Hong-yu; TANG Qian; MA Jun-yan; ZHANG Ying-ying; ZHENG Xue-fang

    2011-01-01

    Photodissociation of oxygen from oxymyoglobin(oxyMb)was investigated by means of fluorescence spectroscopy.One of the most important findings of the photodissociation of oxyMb was the discovery of two processes which were affected by excitation intensity,temperature,solvent viscosity,and excitation wavelength.Process Ⅰ(PⅠ)corresponded to oxygen escaping from the binding site at ferrous heme iron atom within the porphyrin ring into the heme pocket,whereas process Ⅱ(PⅡ)was ascribed to oxygen escaping from the heme pocket into the solvent.To elucidate this interesting phenomenon,we proposed a model that oxygen encountered two barriers on its way from the binding site at the ferrous heme iron to the solvent.Reversibility and wavelength sensitivity of the photodissociation were also observed.

  19. Atomic jet with ionization detection for laser spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms under collisions and fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, G.

    2008-03-01

    An efficient atomic jet setup offering many unprecedented advantages over a conventional heat pipe setup used in multi-photon spectroscopy, mainly of alkaline-earth metals, has been constructed by a scheme in which the sample material is encapsulated in a disposable cartridge oven located inside a thermally stabilised heat-pipe and is made to effuse in to a row of atomic beams merging to form a jet target. This novel scheme combines the advantages of both high density atomic beam with convenient geometry for orthogonal excitation and high sensitive ionisation detection capabilities of thermionic diodes, besides eliminating several problems inherent in the usual heat-pipe operation. Out of various designs, typical results are presented for a linear heat-pipe with vertical atomic jet used in two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of Sr I. Controlled excitations of both Rydberg and non-Rydberg states, which cannot otherwise be accessed from the ground state due to parity and spectroscopic selection rules, have been achieved by employing a weak electric field complimented by collisions. The atomic jet setup is also found very useful for the study of collisional broadening and shift of excited states and time evolution of Rydberg atoms.

  20. Inference of protein diffusion probed via fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekouras, Konstantinos

    2015-03-01

    Fluctuations are an inherent part of single molecule or few particle biophysical data sets. Traditionally, ``noise'' fluctuations have been viewed as a nuisance, to be eliminated or minimized. Here we look on how statistical inference methods - that take explicit advantage of fluctuations - have allowed us to draw an unexpected picture of single molecule diffusional dynamics. Our focus is on the diffusion of proteins probed using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). First, we discuss how - in collaboration with the Bustamante and Marqusee labs at UC Berkeley - we determined using FCS data that individual enzymes are perturbed by self-generated catalytic heat (Riedel et al, Nature, 2014). Using the tools of inference, we found how distributions of enzyme diffusion coefficients shift in the presence of substrate revealing that enzymes performing highly exothermic reactions dissipate heat by transiently accelerating their center of mass following a catalytic reaction. Next, when molecules diffuse in the cell nucleus they often appear to diffuse anomalously. We analyze FCS data - in collaboration with Rich Day at the IU Med School - to propose a simple model for transcription factor binding-unbinding in the nucleus to show that it may give rise to apparent anomalous diffusion. Here inference methods extract entire binding affinity distributions for the diffusing transcription factors, allowing us to precisely characterize their interactions with different components of the nuclear environment. From this analysis, we draw key mechanistic insight that goes beyond what is possible by simply fitting data to ``anomalous diffusion'' models.

  1. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of Kα and Kβ emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS

  2. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  3. Plasmonic antennas and zero mode waveguides to enhance single molecule fluorescence detection and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy towards physiological concentrations

    CERN Document Server

    Punj, Deep; Moparthi, Satish Babu; de Torres, Juan; Grigoriev, Victor; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule approaches to biology offer a powerful new vision to elucidate the mechanisms that underpin the functioning of living cells. However, conventional optical single molecule spectroscopy techniques such as F\\"orster fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) are limited by diffraction to the nanomolar concentration range, far below the physiological micromolar concentration range where most biological reaction occur. To breach the diffraction limit, zero mode waveguides and plasmonic antennas exploit the surface plasmon resonances to confine and enhance light down to the nanometre scale. The ability of plasmonics to achieve extreme light concentration unlocks an enormous potential to enhance fluorescence detection, FRET and FCS. Single molecule spectroscopy techniques greatly benefit from zero mode waveguides and plasmonic antennas to enter a new dimension of molecular concentration reaching physiological conditions. The application of nano-optics...

  4. Laser cooling, trapping, and Rydberg spectroscopy of neutral holmium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetter, James Allen

    This thesis focuses on progress towards using ensembles of neutral holmium for use in quantum computing operations. We are particularly interested in using a switchable interaction between neutral atoms, the Rydberg blockade, to implement a universal set of quantum gates in a collective encoding scheme that presents many benefits over quantum computing schemes which rely on physically distinct qubits. We show that holmium is uniquely suited for operations in a collective encoding basis because it has 128 ground hyperfine states, the largest number of any stable, neutral atom. Holmium is a rare earth atom that is very poorly described for our purposes as it has never been cooled and trapped, its spectrum is largely unknown, and it presents several unique experimental challenges related to its complicated atomic structure and short wavelength transitions. We demonstrate important progress towards overcoming these challenges. We produce the first laser cooling and trapping of holmium into a MOT. Because we use a broad cooling transition, our cooling technique does not require the use of a Zeeman slower. Using MOT depletion spectroscopy, we provide precise measurements of holmium's Rydberg states and its ionization potential. Our work continues towards cooling holmium into a dipole trap by calculating holmium's AC polarizability and demonstrating the results of early attempts at an optical dipole trap. We provide details of future upgrades to the experimental apparatus and discuss interesting potential for using holmium in quantum computing using single atoms in a magnetically trapped lattice. This thesis shows several promising indicators for continued work in this field.

  5. Analyses of the Dynamic Properties of Nuclear Lamins by Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshi, Shimi; Pack, Chan-Gi; Goldman, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    The major structural components of the nuclear lamina are the A- and B-type nuclear lamin proteins which are also present in the nucleoplasm. Studies of molecular movements of the lamins in both the lamina and nucleoplasm of living cell nuclei have provided insights into their roles in maintaining nuclear architecture. In this chapter, we present protocols for quantitatively measuring the mobilities of lamin proteins by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in mammalian cell nuclei. PMID:27147036

  6. Polymer dynamics, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and the limits of optical resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Enderlein, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy has been increasingly applied for the study of polymer dynamics on the nanometer scale. The core idea is to extract, from a measured autocorrelation curve, an effective mean-square displacement function that contains information about the underlying conformational dynamics. The paper presents a fundamental study of the applicability of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for the investigation of nanoscale conformational and diffusional dynamics. We find that fluorescence correlation spectroscopy cannot reliably elucidate processes on length scales much smaller than the resolution limit of the optics used and that its improper use can yield spurious results for the observed dynamics.

  7. Search for Ultralight Scalar Dark Matter with Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tilburg, Ken; Leefer, Nathan; Bougas, Lykourgos; Budker, Dmitry

    2015-07-01

    We report new limits on ultralight scalar dark matter (DM) with dilatonlike couplings to photons that can induce oscillations in the fine-structure constant α. Atomic dysprosium exhibits an electronic structure with two nearly degenerate levels whose energy splitting is sensitive to changes in α. Spectroscopy data for two isotopes of dysprosium over a two-year span are analyzed for coherent oscillations with angular frequencies below 1  rad s-1. No signal consistent with a DM coupling is identified, leading to new constraints on dilatonlike photon couplings over a wide mass range. Under the assumption that the scalar field comprises all of the DM, our limits on the coupling exceed those from equivalence-principle tests by up to 4 orders of magnitude for masses below 3×10(-18)  eV. Excess oscillatory power, inconsistent with fine-structure variation, is detected in a control channel, and is likely due to a systematic effect. Our atomic spectroscopy limits on DM are the first of their kind, and leave substantial room for improvement with state-of-the-art atomic clocks. PMID:26182090

  8. Membrane mobility and microdomain association of the dopaminetransporter studied with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adkins, Erika; Samuvel, Devadoss; Fog, Jacob;

    2007-01-01

    To investigate microdomain association of the dopamine transporter (DAT), we employed FCS (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy) and FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching). In non-neuronal cells (HEK293), FCS measurements revealed for the YFP-DAT (DAT tagged with yellow fluorescent...... protein) a diffusion coefficient (D) of ~3.6 × 10-9 cm2/s, consistent with a relatively freely diffusible protein. In neuronally derived cells (N2a), we were unable to perform FCS measurements on plasma membrane-associated protein due to photobleaching, suggesting partial immobilization. This was...

  9. Membrane mobility and microdomain association of the dopamine transporter studied with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adkins, Erika M; Samuvel, Devadoss J; Fog, Jacob U;

    2007-01-01

    To investigate microdomain association of the dopamine transporter (DAT), we employed FCS (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy) and FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching). In non-neuronal cells (HEK293), FCS measurements revealed for the YFP-DAT (DAT tagged with yellow fluorescent...... protein) a diffusion coefficient (D) of approximately 3.6 x 10(-9) cm2/s, consistent with a relatively freely diffusible protein. In neuronally derived cells (N2a), we were unable to perform FCS measurements on plasma membrane-associated protein due to photobleaching, suggesting partial immobilization...

  10. Mercury pollution surveys in Riga by Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Practical sessions of mercury pollution measurements in Riga (Latvia) have been performed in several districts using an RA-915+ Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer coupled with a global positioning system (GPS). The measurements were taken from a driving car and in different days at one particular location (the Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy) for monitoring the changes in atmospheric mercury concentration. GPS was used to relate the measurement results to particular places, which made it possible to create a digitalized database of pollution for different geographic coordinates in different time spans. The measurements have shown that the background level of mercury concentration in Riga does not exceed 5 ng/m3, although there are several areas of elevated mercury pollution that need particular attention. (Authors)

  11. Atomic and Molecular Data for Optical Stellar Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Heiter, U; Asplund, M; Barklem, P S; Bergemann, M; Magrini, L; Masseron, T; Mikolaitis, Š; Pickering, J C; Ruffoni, M P

    2015-01-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2- to 10-m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available ...

  12. Angular distribution and atomic effects in condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general concept of condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy is that angular distribution and atomic effects in the photoemission intensity are determined by different mechanisms, the former being determined largely by ordering phenomena such as crystal momentum conservation and photoelectron diffraction while the latter are manifested in the total (angle-integrated) cross section. In this work, the physics of the photoemission process is investigated in several very different experiments to elucidate the mechanisms of, and correlation between, atomic and angular distribution effects. Theoretical models are discussed and the connection betweeen the two effects is clearly established. The remainder of this thesis, which describes experiments utilizing both angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission in conjunction with synchrotron radiation in the energy range 6 eV less than or equal to h ν less than or equal to 360 eV and laboratory sources, is divided into three parts

  13. Atomic lifetime measurements by beam-gas-dye laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoranzer, H.; Volz, U.

    1993-01-01

    Beam-gas-dye laser spectroscopy as a precise, cascade-free and collision-free method for measuring atomic lifetimes and individual oscillator strengths is described. Its recent application to fine-structure levels of the KrI 5p configuration is reported. The experimental uncertainty is reduced by one order of magnitude, with respect to previous work, down to 0.3% (1σ). The discussion of these results in comparison with experimental and theoretical ones from the literature underlines the precision of the method and its potential to guide future theoretical developments.

  14. Resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering spectroscopy of an atomic transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xudong; Qiao, Cuifang; Li, Chuanliang; Chen, Fenghua

    2016-07-01

    A novel resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering (REBS) spectroscopy from a population difference grating (PDG) is reported. The PDG is formed by a standing-wave (SW) pump field, which periodically modulates the space population distributions of two levels in the 87Rb D1 line. Then, a probe beam, having identical frequency and orthogonal polarization with the SW pump field, is Bragg-scattered by the PDG. The research achievement shows that the Bragg-scattered light is strongest at an atomic transition, and forms an REBS spectrum with a high signal-to-noise ratio and sub-natural linewidth. The observed REBS can be applied in precise frequency measurements.

  15. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, G; T.M. Brzozowski; R. DRULLINGER; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Toninelli, C.; Tino, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    Laser Optics 2003: Solid State Lasers and Nonlinear Frequency Conversion, edited by Vladimir I. Ustugov abstract: We present a new laser setup suited for high precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium. The source is used for an absolute frequency measurement of the visible 5s21S0-5s5p3P1 intercombination line of strontium which is considered a possible candidate for a future optical frequency standard. The optical frequency is measured with an optical comb generator referenced to the SI t...

  16. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Soter, A; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Breuker, H; Nagata, Y; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Hayano, R; Knudsen, H; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Leali, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

  17. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium. PMID:16527534

  18. Characterization of coal oil using three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Xiao; Yujun Zhang; Zhigang Wang; Dan Jin; Gaofang Yin; Wenqing Liu

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensioned (3D) excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy is applied to charac terize the coal oil. The results show that the 3D fluorescence spectra of coal oil in aqueous solution mainly have one broad peak. This peak is identified at the excitation/emission wavelengths of 270/290 nm. The relation between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of coal oil is also studied. When the concentration lies between 2 鈥? 2000 ppm, the relation between the fluorescence intensity and the concen tration of coal oil is well linear. The nature of solvents significantly affects the EEM fluorescence of coal oil.

  19. Combined atomic force and fluorescence microscopy to study lipid transfer from lipoproteins to biomembranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological cells notice there environment via highly sensitive receptor-ligand interactions. The involved receptors reside at the cellular plasma membrane and react along complex molecular processes to the external stimulus. The spatial arrangement of the receptors affect their function strongly. By stimulating specific receptors -molecule by molecule- we can characterize their function. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) enables controlled stimulation of single receptor molecules. For this purpose the corresponding ligand is attached via a flexible linker to the cantilever tip. In contrast, fluorescence microscopy allows for measuring the time response of the signal processing, even at the single molecule level. It is the combination of both approaches, however, which paves the way for reaching new levels of understanding of cellular processes, as molecular trigger set by the functionalized AFM tip can be directly correlated to the cellular response measured by fluorescence microscopy. In this thesis, I firstly developed the instrumentation for combined and fully synchronized force and fluorescence microscopy, down to the level of single molecules. Secondly, I applied the new instrumentation to study the transfer of individual lipid molecules out of an HDL-particle into supported lipid bilayers, which serve as well defined model membranes. In particular, the transfer of fluorescently labeled lipids as a function of the receptor for selective cholesterol uptake was of major interest. It is generally assumed that this process is a receptor-mediated transfer of lipid from the particle directly into the cellular plasma membrane. By analyzing the interaction of HDL-particles and a supported lipid bilayer, I could demonstrate that cholesterol can indeed be transferred from an HDL particle to the bilayer without the need for a receptor; for cholesteryl ester, no transfer was observable. The ability to monitor released lipids and to adjust contact times or contact forces let

  20. Production of ultra slow antiprotons, its application to atomic collisions and atomic spectroscopy - ASACUSA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) project aims at studying collision dynamics with slow antiprotons and high precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms. To realize these purposes, the production of high quality ultra slow antiproton beams is essential, which is achieved by the combination of antiproton decelerator (AD) from 3 GeV to 5 MeV, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) decelerator from 5 MeV to 50 keV, and finally an electromagnetic trap from 50 keV to 10 eV. From the atomic physics point of view, an antiproton is an extremely heavy electron and/or a negatively charged proton, i.e., the antiproton is a unique tool to shed light on collision dynamics from the other side of the world. In addition to this fundamentally important feature, the antiproton has also a big practical advantage, i.e., it annihilates with the target nuclei emitting several energetic pions, which provides high detection efficiency with very good time resolution. Many-body effects which are of great importance to several branches of science will be studied through ionization and antiprotonic atom formation processes under single collision conditions. Various antiprotonic atoms including protonium (p anti-p) are expected to be meta-stable in vacuum, which is never true for those in dense media except for antiprotonic helium. High precision spectroscopy of protonium will for the first time become feasible benefited by this meta-stability. The present review reports briefly the production scheme of ultra slow antiproton beams and several topics proposed in the ASACUSA project

  1. Atomic spectroscopy sympsoium, Gaithersburg, Maryland, September 23--26, 1975. [Program, abstracts, and author index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Abstracts of one hundred papers given at the conference are presented along with the conference program and an author index. Session topics include: highly ionized atoms; laser spectroscopy and hyperfine structure; complex spectra; laser spectroscopy, radiation theory; theory of highly ionized atoms and analysis of plasmas; plasma spectroscopy, line strengths; spectral analysis, instrumentation, reference wavelengths; beam foil spectroscopy, line strengths, energy levels; absorption spectroscopy, autoionization, and related theory; and spectral analysis, instrumentation, and VUV physics. (GHT)

  2. Cooperative Fluorescence from a Strongly Driven Dilute Cloud of Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Wubs, Martijn; Lodahl, Peter; Mortensen, N. Asger; Kaiser, R.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate cooperative fluorescence in a dilute cloud of strongly driven two-level emitters. Starting from the Heisenberg equations of motion, we compute the first-order scattering corrections to the saturation of the excited-state population and to the resonance-fluorescence spectrum, which both require going beyond the state-of-the-art linear-optics approach to describe collective phenomena. A dipole blockade is observed due to long-range dipole-dipole coupling that vanishes at stronger...

  3. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaoming; Gao, Fei; Qiu, Yishen; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  4. Laser-induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy for applications in chemical sensing and optical refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumi Barimah, Eric

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an innovative technique that has been used as a method for fast elemental analysis in real time. Conventional ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) LIBS has been applied to detect the elemental composition of different materials, including explosives, pharmaceutical drugs, and biological samples. The extension of conventional LIBS to the infrared region (˜1-12 mum) promises to provide additional information on molecular emission signatures due to rotational-vibrational transitions. In this research, a pulsed Nd: YAG laser operating at 1064 nm was focused onto several sodium compounds (NaCl, NaClO3, Na2CO3 and NaClO4) and potassium compounds (KCl, KClO3, K2CO3 and KClO4) to produce an intense plasma at the target surface. Several distinct infrared (IR) atomic emission signatures were observed from all sodium and potassium containing compounds. The atomic emission lines observed from the investigated samples matched assigned transitions of neutral sodium and potassium atoms published in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) atomic database. In addition to the intense atomic lines, the rst evidence of molecular LIBS emission structures were observed at ˜10.0 m in KClO3 and NaClO3 for the chlorate anion (ClO3 --1), at ˜6.7 to 8.0 mum in KNO3 and NaNO 3 for the nitrate anion (NO3--1 ), ˜8.0 to 10.0 mum in KClO4 and NaClO4 for perchlorate anion (ClO4--1 ), and ˜6.88 mum and 11.53 mum in Na2CO3 for the carbonate anion (CO3--1 ). The observed molecular emission showed strong correlation with the conventional Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) absorption spectra of the investigated samples. IR LIBS was also applied to determine the limit of detection (LOD) for the perchlorate anion in KClO4 using the 8.0 -11.0 mum IR-LIBS emission band. The calibration curve of ClO4 in KClO4 was constructed using peak and integrated emission intensities for known concentrations of mixed KClO4/NH4NO3 samples. The

  5. Scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. I. Theory and simulation of aggregation measurements.

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, N O

    1986-01-01

    Scanning Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (S-FCS) is introduced as an adaptation of Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) to measure aggregation in systems, such as biological cell membranes, where diffusion or flow is slow. The theoretical framework for interpretation of S-FCS measurements are discussed in this paper with emphasis on the limitations arising from the sample size and shape. Computer simulations of the experiment demonstrate the potential of the technique and illustr...

  6. Fluorescence Spectroscopy as a Tool for Investigating the Self-Organized Polyelectrolyte Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházka, K.; Limpouchová, Z.; Uhlík, F.; Košovan, P.; Matějíček, P.; Štěpánek, M.; Uchman, M.; Kuldová, J.; Šachl, Radek; Humpolíčková, Jana; Hof, Martin

    Heidelberg: Springer, 2011 - (Müller, H.; Borisov, O.), s. 187-249. (Advances in Polymer Science . Vol. 241). ISBN 978-3-642-22485-0 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Block copolymer micelles * Fluorescence anisotropy * Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  7. Endogenous synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) of basal cell carcinoma-initial study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, E.; Zhelyazkova, Al.; Keremedchiev, M.; Penkov, N.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O.; Avramov, L.

    2016-01-01

    The human skin is a complex, multilayered and inhomogeneous organ with spatially varying optical properties. Analysis of cutaneous fluorescence spectra could be a very complicated task; therefore researchers apply complex mathematical tools for data evaluation, or try to find some specific approaches, that would simplify the spectral analysis. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) allows improving the spectral resolution, which could be useful for the biological tissue fluorescence characterization and could increase the tumour detection diagnostic accuracy.

  8. Arsenic speciation analysis by post-separation hydride generation and atomic fluorescence detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Rychlovský, P.; Dědina, Jiří

    2014. s. 133-133. [Rio Symposium on Atomic Spectrometry /13./. 19.10.2014-24.10.2014, Merida, Yucatan] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : arsenic speciation analysis * hydride generation * atomic fluorescence spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  9. Optical resonance shifts in the fluorescence imaging of thermal and cold Rubidium atomic gases

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, S D; Javanainen, J; Bourgain, R; Jennewein, S; Sortais, Y R P; Browaeys, A

    2016-01-01

    We show that the resonance shifts in fluorescence of a cold gas of rubidium atoms substantially differ from those of thermal atomic ensembles that obey the standard continuous medium electrodynamics. The analysis is based on large-scale microscopic numerical simulations and experimental measurements of the resonance shifts in a steady-state response in light propagation.

  10. Novel laser atomic fluorescence spectrometer for environmental and biomedical analyses of heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergachev, Alex Y.; Mirov, Sergey B.; Pitt, Robert E.; Parmer, Keith D.

    1997-05-01

    We report on the development of a novel experimental set-up using laser atomic fluorescence for detection and concentration measurements of heavy metal atoms for environmental and biomedical analyses. This spectrometer is based on the application of tunable LiF:F2+** and LiF:F2- color center and alexandrite lasers with nonlinear converters for narrowband excitation of atomic fluorescence and the use of gated multichannel CCD detectors for fluorescence measurements. A standard graphite furnace module was used for sample atomization. The laser sources used provide narrowband selective laser excitation continuously tunable in the 200 - 400 nm range and are therefore suitable for resonant excitation of atomic transitions in practically all known heavy metal atoms. In the first experiments, water samples containing Cu, Pb and Fe impurities were studied and detection levels of less than 1 ppb were observed. Comparison of the results of atomic laser fluorescence analysis and traditional atomic absorption spectrometry showed good qualitative agreement between these two methods. It is projected that full optimization of our experimental set up will allow for improved detection levels of several orders of magnitude. Possible optimization and simplification of the spectrometer are discussed in the context of developing a portable instrument for field use.

  11. Optical Resonance Shifts in the Fluorescence of Thermal and Cold Atomic Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, S. D.; Ruostekoski, J.; Javanainen, J.; Bourgain, R.; Jennewein, S.; Sortais, Y. R. P.; Browaeys, A.

    2016-05-01

    We show that the resonance shifts in the fluorescence of a cold gas of rubidium atoms substantially differ from those of thermal atomic ensembles that obey the standard continuous medium electrodynamics. The analysis is based on large-scale microscopic numerical simulations and experimental measurements of the resonance shifts in a steady-state response in light propagation.

  12. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 109, JUL (2015), s. 16-23. ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200311202 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : hydride generation * arsenic * atomic fluorescence spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.176, year: 2014

  13. Atomic spectroscopy and highly accurate measurement: determination of fundamental constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author concerning highly accurate atomic spectroscopy applied for the determination of fundamental constants. A pure optical frequency measurement of the 2S-12D 2-photon transitions in atomic hydrogen and deuterium has been performed. The experimental setting-up is described as well as the data analysis. Optimized values for the Rydberg constant and Lamb shifts have been deduced (R = 109737.31568516 (84) cm-1). An experiment devoted to the determination of the fine structure constant with an aimed relative uncertainty of 10-9 began in 1999. This experiment is based on the fact that Bloch oscillations in a frequency chirped optical lattice are a powerful tool to transfer coherently many photon momenta to the atoms. We have used this method to measure accurately the ratio h/m(Rb). The measured value of the fine structure constant is α-1 = 137.03599884 (91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.7*10-9. The future and perspectives of this experiment are presented. This document presented before an academic board will allow his author to manage research work and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  14. A double-well atom trap for fluorescence detection at the Heisenberg limit

    CERN Document Server

    Stroescu, Ion; Oberthaler, Markus K

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an atom number detector capable of simultaneous detection of two mesoscopic ensembles with single atom resolution. Such a sensitivity is a prerequisite for going beyond quantum metrology with spin-squeezed states. Our system is based on fluorescence detection of atoms in a novel hybrid trap in which a dipole barrier divides a magneto-optical trap into two separated wells. We introduce a noise model describing the various sources contributing to the measurement error and report a limit of up to 500 atoms for the exact determination of the atom number difference.

  15. Cooperative fluorescence from a strongly driven dilute cloud of atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Wubs, Martijn; Lodahl, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    We investigate cooperative fluorescence in a dilute cloud of strongly driven two-level emitters. Starting from the Heisenberg equations of motion, we compute the first-order scattering corrections to the saturation of the excited-state population and to the resonance-fluorescence spectrum, which...... both require going beyond the state-of-the-art linear-optics approach to describe collective phenomena. A dipole blockade is observed due to long-range dipole-dipole coupling that vanishes at stronger driving fields. Furthermore, we compute the inelastic component of the light scattered by a cloud of...

  16. Synchrotron radiation induced fluorescence spectroscopy of gas phase molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez Ruiz, Jesús

    2004-01-01

    A new experimental set-up for gas phase fluorescence studies using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed to perform simultaneously total and dispersed fluorescence measurements. Neutral photodissociation of CO has been investigated after excitation with 19-26 eV photons. Fluorescence from 3p 3P, 3p 3S and 3p 1D excited states in carbon was recorded and interpreted by ab initio calculations. The population and dissociation of states belonging to the C and D Rydberg series in ...

  17. Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy for precise concentration detection in vivo by background subtraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Maria; Mütze, Jörg; Ohrt, Thomas; Schwille, Petra

    2009-07-01

    In vivo studies of single molecule dynamics by means of Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy can suffer from high background. Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy provides a tool to distinguish between signal and unwanted contributions via lifetime separation. By studying the motion of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) within two compartments of a human cell, the nucleus and the cytoplasm, we observed clear differences in concentration as well as mobility of the protein complex between those two locations. Especially in the nucleus, where the fluorescence signal is very weak, a correction for background is crucial to provide reliable results of the particle number. Utilizing the fluorescent lifetime of the different contributions, we show that it is possible to distinguish between the fluorescent signal and the autofluorescent background in vivo in a single measurement.

  18. Comparative studies on the interaction of cefixime with bovine serum albumin by fluorescence quenching spectroscopy and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihui; Liu, Baosheng; Li, Zhiyun; Guo, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Under simulated physiological conditions, the reaction mechanism between cefixime and bovine serum albumin at different temperatures (293, 303 and 310 K) was investigated using a fluorescence quenching method and synchronous fluorescence method, respectively. The results indicated that the fluorescence intensity and synchronous fluorescence intensity of bovine serum albumin decreased regularly on the addition of cefixime. In addition, the quenching mechanism, binding constants, number of binding sites, type of interaction force and energy-transfer parameters of cefixime with bovine serum albumin obtained from two methods using the same equation were consistent. The results indicated that the synchronous fluorescence spectrometry could be used to study the binding mechanism between drug and protein, and was a useful supplement to the conventional method. PMID:25351241

  19. Characterising organic matter in recirculating aquaculture systems with fluorescence EEM spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hambly, Adam; Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming;

    2015-01-01

    , stocked with rainbow trout and operated at steady state at four feed loadings, were analysed by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) analysis and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. The fluorescence dataset was then decomposed by PARAFAC analysis using the drEEM toolbox. This revealed...... that the fluorescence character of the RAS water could be represented by five components, of which four have previously been identified in fresh water, coastal marine water, wetlands and drinking water. The fluorescence components as well as the DOC showed positive correlations with feed loading...

  20. Integrated optical measurement system for fluorescence spectroscopy in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Jørgensen, Anders Michael; Friis, Peter; Telleman, Pieter; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2001-01-01

    A transportable miniaturized fiber-pigtailed measurement system is presented which allows quantitative fluorescence detection in microliquid handling systems. The microliquid handling chips are made in silica on silicon technology and the optical functionality is monolithically integrated with the...... microfluidic channel system. This results in inherent stability and photolithographic alignment precision. Permanently attached optical fibers provide a rugged connection to the light source, detection, and data processing unit, which potentially allows field use of such systems. Fluorescence measurements with...

  1. Multiplexed fluorescence lifetime measurements by frequency-sweeping Fourier spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ming; Peng, Leilei

    2010-01-01

    We report simultaneous measurements of fluorescence lifetimes at multiple excitation wavelengths with a Fourier transform frequency domain fluorescence lifetime spectrometer. The spectrometer uses a Michelson interferometer with its differential optical path length scanning at 22,000 Hz scan rate. The scan speed of the optical delay varies linearly during each scan and creates interference modulations that sweep from −150 to 150 MHz in 45.5 μs. The frequency-sweeping modulation allows nanosec...

  2. [Laser-time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in immunoassays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, L; Du, J; Xie, W; Du, Q; Yun, Q

    2000-06-01

    This paper described a laser-excited time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay set. It made lanthanide ion to couple the anhydrde of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPAA) for labeling antibodies. The experiment used polystyrene tap coated with HCV antigen as the solid phase and a chelate of the rare earth metal europium as fluorescent label. A nitrogen laser beam was used to excite the Eu3- chelates and after 60 microseconds delay time, the emission fluorescence was measured. Background fluorescence of short lifetimes caused by serum components and Raman scattering can be eliminated by set the delay time. In the system condition, fluorescent spectra and fluorescent lifetimes of Eu3+ beta-naphthoyltrifluroacetone (NTA) chelates were measured. The fluorescent lifetime value is 650 microseconds. The maximum emission wavelength is 613 nm. The linear range of europium ion concentration is 1 x 10(-7)-1 x 10(-11) g.mL-1 and the detection limit is 1 x 10(-13) g.mL-1. The relative standard deviation of determination (n = 12) for samples at 0.01 ng.mL-1 magnitude is 6.4%. Laser-TRFIA was also found to be suitable for diagnosis of HCV. The sensitivity and specificity were comparable to enzyme immunoassay. The result was obtained with laser-TRFIA for 29 human correlated well with enzyme immunoassay. PMID:12958930

  3. [Determination of potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, C; Wen, X; Jia, Y; Sun, S

    2001-06-01

    Sodium is used as a coolant in China experiment fast reactor (CEFR). Potassium in sodium has an influence on heat property of reactor. A analytical method has been developed to determinate potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy. Sodium sample is dissolved by ultrasonic humidifier. The working conditions of the instrument and inTerferences from matrix sodium, acid effect and concomitant elements have been studied. Standard addition experiments are carried out with potassium chloride. The percentage recoveries are 94.7%-109.8%. The relative standard deviation is 4.2%. The analytical range accords with sodium quality control standard of CFFR. The precision corresponds to the international analytical method in sodium coolant reactor. PMID:12947670

  4. On-line laser spectroscopy with thermal atomic beams

    CERN Document Server

    Thibault, C; De Saint-Simon, M; Duong, H T; Guimbal, P; Huber, G; Jacquinot, P; Juncar, P; Klapisch, Robert; Liberman, S; Pesnelle, A; Pillet, P; Pinard, J; Serre, J M; Touchard, F; Vialle, J L

    1981-01-01

    On-line high resolution laser spectroscopy experiments have been performed in which the light from a CW tunable dye laser interacts at right angles with a thermal atomic beam. /sup 76-98/Rb, /sup 118-145 /Cs and /sup 208-213/Fr have been studied using the ionic beam delivered by the ISOLDE on-line mass separator at CERN while /sup 30-31/Na and /sup 38-47/K have been studied by setting the apparatus directly on-line with the PS 20 GeV proton beam. The principle of the method is briefly explained and some results concerning nuclear structure are given. The hyperfine structure, spins and isotope shifts of the alkali isotopes and isomers are measured. (8 refs).

  5. Ultimate Statistical Physics: fluorescence of a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Pomeau, Yves; Ginibre, Jean

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the statistics of emission of photons by a single atom or ion illuminated by a laser beam at the frequency of quasi-resonance between two energy levels, a situation that corresponds to real experiments. We extend this to the case of two laser beams resonant with the energy differences between two excited levels and the ground state (three level atom in V-configuration). We use a novel approach of this type of problem by considering Kolmogorov equation for the probability distribution of the atomic state which takes into account first the deterministic evolution of this state under the effect of the incoming laser beam and the random emission of photons during the spontaneous decay of the excited state(s) to the ground state. This approach yields solvable equations in the two level atom case. For the three level atom case we set the problem and define clearly its frame. The results obtained are valid both in the opposite limits of rare and of frequent spontaneous decay, compared to the period of the...

  6. Elasticity Maps of Living Neurons Measured by Combined Fluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spedden, Elise; Naumova, Elena N; Kaplan, David L; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here we combine Atomic Force Microscopy based force spectroscopy with Fluorescence Microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglion, and P-19 (mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells) neurons. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon disruption of microtubules of the cell. We find reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules. We also report that cortical and P-19 neurons have similar elasticity maps, with elastic moduli in the range 0.1-2 kPa, with typical average values of 0.4 kPa (P-19) and 0.2 k...

  7. Laser spectroscopy of multi-level doppler broadened atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doppler broadened atomic vapor system can be easily prepared for spectroscopy study than an atomic beam system can be. Vapor cell and hollow cathode discharge lamps are widely used in the experiment. The possibility for observing the trapped state in a Doppler broadened Λ system was examined and confirmed by our early experiment where counter-propagating laser beams are used. For the measurement of the hyperfine structure constants of high-lying levels of heavy elements, we compared the co-propagating and counter-propagating beams in a Doppler broadened ladder systems. It was shown that the counter-propagating beams give a stronger and narrower signal than that from the co-propagating beams. Our treatment also considers the power broadening of the transition. For some photo-ionization experiments, it is necessary to pump two thermally populated levels simultaneously to the higher level and then to the auto-ionizing levels. A technique is proposed to avoid the trapped state and to increase the ionization efficiency.

  8. Atomic Physics with Accelerators: Projectile Electron Spectroscopy (APAPES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new research initiative APAPES (http://apapes.physics.uoc.gr/) has already established a new experimental station with a beam line dedicated for atomic collisions physics research, at the 5 MV TANDEM accelerator of the National Research Centre ''Demokritos'' in Athens, Greece. A complete zero-degree Auger projectile spectroscopy (ZAPS) apparatus has been put together to perform high resolution studies of electrons emitted in ion-atom collisions. A single stage hemispherical spectrometer with a 2-dimensional Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) combined with a doubly-differentially pumped gas target will be used to perform a systematic isoelectronic investigation of K-Auger spectra emitted from collisions of preexcited and ground state He-like ions with gas targets using novel techniques. Our intention is to provide a more thorough understanding of cascade feeding of the 1s2s2p 4P metastable states produced by electron capture in collisions of He-like ions with gas targets and further elucidate their role in the non-statistical production of excited three-electron 1s2s2p states by electron capture, recently a field of conflicting interpretations awaiting further resolution. At the moment, the apparatus is being completed and the spectrometer will soon be fully operational. Here we present the project progress and the recent high resolution spectrum obtained in collisions of 12 MeV C4+ on a Neon gas target

  9. Experimental and theoretical comparison of the precision of flame atomic absorption, fluorescence, and emission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical equations and experimental evaluation procedures for the determination of the precision of flame atomic absorption, emission, and fluorescence measurements are presented. These procedures and noise power spectra are used to evaluate the precision and noise characteristics of atomic copper measurements with all three techniques under the same experimental conditions in a H2-air flame. At the detection limit, emission and fluorescence measurements are limited by background emission shot and flicker noise whereas absorption measurements are limited by flame transmission lamp flicker noise. Analyte flicker noise limits precision at higher analyte concentrations for all three techniques. Fluctutations in self-absorption and the inner filter effect are shown to contribute to the noise in atomic emission and fluorescence measurements

  10. Research of the interaction between kangai injection and human serum albumin by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Changbin; Lin, Xiaogang; Zhu, Hao; Li, Wenchao; Wu, Jie

    2015-10-01

    The interaction between drugs and serum albumin is the theoretical basis of pharmacology research. Kangai injection with invigorating Qi, enhancing the immune function, is widely used for a variety of malignant tumor treatment. Fluorescence spectroscopy was adopted due to its high sensitivity and other advantages. The interaction between kangai injection and human serum albumin (HSA) in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The results of fluorescence spectrum at three temperature (296K, 303K and 310K) showed the degree of binding at 310K is the highest. Also, the maximum emission peak has a slight blue shift, which indicates that the interaction between kangai injection and HSA has an effect on the conformation of HSA. That is, the microenvironment of tryptophan increase hydrophobic due to the increase of the concentration of kangai injection. Results obtained from analysis of fluorescence spectrum and fluorescence intensity indicated that kangai injection has a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA. And according to the Stern-Volume equation, the quenching mechanism is static quenching, which is further proved by the UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy.

  11. In-trap fluorescence detection of atoms in a microscopic dipole trap

    CERN Document Server

    Hilliard, A J; Sompet, P; Carpentier, A V; Andersen, M F

    2015-01-01

    We investigate fluorescence detection using a standing wave of blue-detuned light of one or more atoms held in a deep, microscopic dipole trap. The blue-detuned standing wave realizes a Sisyphus laser cooling mechanism so that an atom can scatter many photons while remaining trapped. When imaging more than one atom, the blue detuning limits loss due to inelastic light-assisted collisions. Using this standing wave probe beam, we demonstrate that we can count from one to the order of 100 atoms in the microtrap with sub-poissonian precision.

  12. Polymerized LB films imaged with a combined atomic force microscope-fluorescence microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Hansma, Helen G.; Gaub, Hermann E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-01-01

    The first results obtained with a new stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a standard Zeiss optical fluorescence microscope are presented. The optical microscope allows location and selection of objects to be imaged with the high-resolution AFM. Furthermore, the combined microscope enables a direct comparison between features observed in the fluorescence microscope and those observed in the images obtained with the AFM, in air or under liquid. The cracks in polymerized La...

  13. Diagnosis of corneal pathology by laser fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmin, V. V.; Lazarenko, V. I.; Salmina, A. B.; Hovalyg, M. Sh.; Vladimirova, E. S.

    2012-09-01

    We have studied the difference between the fluorescence spectra of the human cornea in vivo under normal conditions and after contact lenses have been worn for different lengths of time, with excitation by emission from a nitrogen laser (337 nm). The most significant sections of the difference spectrum were identified, corresponding to peaks for endogenous fluorophores (NADH and collagen). A high correlation was found between how long the contact lenses have been worn and the fluorescence intensity ratio for wavelengths 460 nm and 410 nm.

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy in the analysis of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important first step in the initiation of carcinogenesis by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), is the formation of a covalently bound adduct between the metabolized PAH and one or more deoxyribonucleic acid bases. In vivo concentrations of these adducts are typically ∼1 adducted base per 108 normal DNA base pairs. In this paper methods of generating high resolution fluorescence spectra of adducts at these levels are described. Methods of overcoming factors such as photochemistry and nonphotochemical hole burning which limit detection limits are described. By generating line narrowed fluorescence spectra, it is possible to spectrally distinguish between various adduct possibilities

  15. Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy To Probe the Interaction of Bovine Serum Albumin with Graphene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Kundu, Niloy; Banik, Debasis; Roy, Arpita; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2015-12-29

    The interaction of graphene oxide (GO) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous buffer solution has been investigated with various spectroscopic and imaging techniques. At single molecular resolution this interaction has been performed using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) techniques. The conformational dynamics of BSA on GO's influence have been explored by FCS and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. For the FCS studies BSA was labeled covalently by a fluorophore, Alexa Fluor 488. On the addition of GO in phosphate buffer of 10 mM at pH 7.4 the diffusion time (τD) and the hydrodynamic radius (Rh) of BSA increase due to adsorption of BSA. Conformational relaxation time components of native BSA drastically vary with the addition of GO, signifying the change of conformational dynamics of BSA after addition of GO. The adsorption isotherm also indicates significant adsorption of BSA on the GO surface. Adsorption of BSA on the GO surface has shown in direct images of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and FLIM. Fluorescence quenching study of BSA with addition of GO also indicates that there is strong interaction between BSA and GO. PMID:26646418

  16. Instantaneous temperature imaging of diffusion flames using two-line atomic fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medwell, Paul R; Chan, Qing N; Kalt, Peter A M; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dally, Bassam B; Nathan, Graham J

    2010-02-01

    This work investigates the first demonstration of nonlinear regime two-line atomic fluorescence (NTLAF) thermometry in laminar non-premixed flames. The results show the expediency of the technique in the study of the reaction zone and reveals interesting findings about the indium atomization process. Indium fluorescence is observed to be strongest at the flame-front, where the temperature exceeds 1000 K. The uncertainty in the deduced temperature measurement is approximately 6%. The temperature profile across the reaction zone shows good agreement with laminar flame calculations. The advantages and inherent limitations of the technique are discussed. PMID:20149278

  17. The stationary resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom in a cat-state field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomilin, V. A.; Il'ichov, L. V.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom placed in non-classical field which is a superposition of Glauber coherent states. The source of this superposition known under the common name of 'Schrödinger cat'-states is explicitly incorporated into the model. This let us to explore the stationary regime. In the strong (multiphoton) field limit the steady-state of the atom+photons system is found. We evaluated the spectrum of the resonance fluorescence. It appears to be one-component in contrast to the case with the classical external field.

  18. Nitrogen atom detection in low-pressure flames by two-photon laser-excited fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Bittner, Jürgen; Lawitzki, Annette; Meier, Ulrich; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    1991-01-01

    Nitrogen atoms have been detected in stoichiometric flat premixed H2/O2/N2 flames at 33 and 96 mbar doped with small amounts of NH3, HCN, and (CN)2 using two-photon laser excitation at 211 nm and fluorescence detection around 870 nm. The shape of the fluorescence intensity profiles versus height above the burner surface is markedly different for the different additives. Using measured quenching rate coefficients and calibrating with the aid of known N-atom concentrations in a discharge flow r...

  19. (2+1) laser-induced fluorescence of spin-polarized hydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Everest, Michael A; Alexander, Andrew J; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2010-11-01

    We report the measurement of the spin polarization of hydrogen (SPH) atoms by (2+1) laser-induced fluorescence, produced via the photodissociation of thermal HBr molecules with circularly polarized 193 nm light. This scheme, which involves two-photon laser excitation at 205 nm and fluorescence at 656 nm, offers an experimentally simpler polarization-detection method than the previously reported vacuum ultraviolet detection scheme, allowing the detection of SPH atoms to be performed more straightforwardly, from the photodissociation of a wide range of molecules and from a variety of collision experiments. PMID:21054033

  20. Experimental and Theoretical Analysis of the Luminescence Spectroscopy of atomic Mercury and atomic Manganese isolated in Rare Gas Solids

    OpenAIRE

    Collier, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is primarily experimental but also contains an important theoretical extension to gain further insight into the optical spectroscopy of atomic ns2 metal atoms, mercury and manganese isolated in cryogenic thin films of rare gases argon, krypton and xenon. The luminescence spectroscopy of solid-state M/RG (M = Hg and Mn; RG = Ar, Kr and Xe) samples has been recorded employing both time-integrated (steady-state) and time-resolved methods. The impe...

  1. Quantitative analysis of essential oils of Thymus daenensis using laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshroo, H; Khadem, H; Bahreini, M; Tavassoli, S H; Hadian, J

    2015-11-10

    Laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy are used for the investigation of different genotypes of Thymus daenensis native to the Ilam province of Iran. Different genotypes of T. daenensis essential oils, labeled T1 through T7, possess slight differences with regard to the composition of the thymol. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method is performed to determine the concentration of each constituent as a reference method. The Raman spectra of different concentrations of pure thymol dissolved in hexane as standard samples are obtained via a laboratory prototype Raman spectroscopy setup for the calculation of the calibration curve. The regression coefficient and limit of detection are calculated. The possibility of the differentiation of different genotypes of T. daenensis is also examined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, although we do not know the exact amounts of their components. All the fluorescence spectral information is used jointly by cluster analysis to differentiate between 7 genotypes. Our results demonstrate the acceptable precision of Raman spectroscopy with GC-MS and corroborate the capacity of Raman spectroscopy in applications in the quantitative analysis field. Furthermore, the cluster analysis results show that laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy is an acceptable technique for the rapid classification of different genotypes of T. daenensis without having any previous information of their exact amount of constituents. So, the ability to rapidly and nondestructively differentiate between genotypes makes it possible to efficiently select high-quality herbs from many samples. PMID:26560783

  2. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atomic physics and foundations of spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unique, unified presentation of these partial fields and by this exclusive. With the highly reputed co-author Prof. Dr. Ingolf Volker Hertel. Eminent presentation makes it possible, together also over set connections. For bachelor/master and diploma curricula. The book applies primarily to graduate students of physics and physical chemistry until promotion. It offers a detailed introduction to the most important theme complexes of atomic and molecular physics and the methods of modern optical physics connected with this. In many selected partial fields it leads until the actual status of research. Simultaneously it also appeals to the active scientist and wants to be a standard work of the field. By the clearly stuctured chapters the reader is - starting from the foundations of quantum physics - step-wise made familiar with the most important phenomena and models of atomic and molecular physics and led wherever it is offered, to their actual developments in modern research. In the first part here present the to a certain degree canonical knowledge with the main topic structure of atoms and molecules and the competent spectroscopy is summarized. In the second part still being in work deepening knowledge for this is mediated, and selected chapters of modern optics, lase physics, cluster research, and scattering physics is treated, as well a short excursus in the world of cold atoms and molecules is given. At the whole both volumes of this textbook want to show to the interested reader that atomic, molecular, and optical physics, are still as usual an alive field of modern physical research

  3. Study of high density polyethylene under UV irradiation or mechanical stress by fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their diversity and their wide range of applications, polymers have emerged in our environment. For technical applications, these materials can be exposed to aggressive environment leading to an alteration of their properties. The effects of this degradation are linked to the concept of life duration, corresponding to the time required for a property to reach a threshold below which the material becomes unusable. Monitoring the ageing of polymer materials constitute a major challenge. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a technique able to provide accurate information concerning this issue. In this study, emphasis was placed on the use of fluorescence spectroscopy to study the phenomena involved in either the UV radiation or mechanical stresses of a polymer. In the case of high density polyethylene, the lack of intrinsic fluorescent signal leads to the use of a dye. This dye gives a fluorescent response depending on its microenvironment. All modifications in the macromolecular chain generate a shift of the fluorescent peak. This work can be dissociated in two major parts, on one hand the influence of UV aging on the fluorescent response and in another hand the influence of mechanical stresses. In the first part, complementary analyses like FTIR or DSC are used to correlate fluorescent results with known photo degradation mechanisms. The results show the great sensibility of the technique to the microstructural rearrangement in the polymer. In the second part, the dependence between the stress and the fluorescence emission gives opportunity to evaluate internal stresses in the material during cyclic solicitations. (author)

  4. New method for tissue indentification: resonance fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Walter

    1991-11-01

    The method proposed in this paper is based on the detection of resonantly enhanced fluorescence emission induced by a tunable dye laser. First test on anorganic samples exposed to air and to saline solution demonstrate the potential of this technique. A XeCl excimer-laser ((lambda) equals308 nm) pulse, guided by quartz fibers, causes an efficient ablation of the irradiated samples. The specific species to be detected in the ablation plume determines the wavelength of the narrow-band dye-laser radiation. Preferably, it is set to a strong transition of the selected ablation product. Taking into account the formation of the plume, the dye-laser pulse is applied with a certain delay in order to excite resonantly the chosen species in the plume. The resulting resonance fluorescence is then guided by optical fibers to an OMA system. Compared to the broad-band excimer-laser-indiced fluorescence during the ablation process, the resonance fluorescence signal shows a distinct and easily detectable sharp peak. The signal-to-background ratio is improved by one order of magnitude. The achieved increase in sensitivity as well as selectivity is for the benefit of a reliable identification of ablated tissue.

  5. Diagnosis of atherosclerotic tissue by resonance fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Walter; Haase, Karl K.; Tischler, Christian; Nyga, Ralf; Karsch, Karl R.

    1991-05-01

    Resonantly enhanced fluorescence emission induced by a tunable dye laser can be used for the identification of ablated atherosclerotic tissue. This method has been tested with anorganic samples exposed to air and to saline solution. A XeCl excimer laser pulse ((lambda) = 308 nm), delivered by a fused silica optical fiber, causes an efficient ablation of the irradiated samples. The wavelength of the narrow-band dye laser radiation is set to a strong transition of a specific species to be detected in the ablation plume. Taking into account the formation of the plume, the dye laser pulse is applied with a certain delay in order to excite resonantly the selected species in the plume. The resulting resonance fluorescence then is guided by optical fibers to an optical multi-channel analyzer system. Compared to the broad-band fluorescence during excimer laser ablation the resonance fluorescence signal shows a distinct and easily detectable sharp peak. The signal-to-background ratio is improved by one order of magnitude.

  6. Variation of fluorescence spectroscopy during the menstrual cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaulay, Calum; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Utzinger, Urs; Fedyk, Amanda; Neely Atkinson, E.; Cox, Dennis; Follen, Michele

    2002-06-01

    Cervical autofluorescence has been demonstrated to have potential for real-time diagnosis. Inter-patient and intra-patient variations in fluorescence intensity have been measured. Inter-patient measurements may vary by a factor of ten, while intra-patient measurements may vary by a factor of two. Age and menopausal status have been demonstrated to account for some of the variations, while race and smoking have not. In order to explore in detail the role of the menstrual cycle in intra-patient variation, a study was designed to measure fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMs) in patients daily throughout one cycle. Ten patients with a history of normal menstrual cycles and normal Papanicolaou smears underwent daily measurements of fluorescence EEMs from three colposcopically normal sites throughout one menstrual cycle. Changes in signals from porphyrin, NADH, and FAD fluorescence and blood absorption were noted when the data was viewed in a graphical format. Visually interpreted features of the EEMs in this graphical format did not appear to correlate with the day of the menstrual cycle with the exception that blood absorption features were more prominent during the menstrual phase (during which bleeding occurs), suggesting that measurements during the menstrual phase should be avoided. Variations in cycle date likely do not account for inter- or intra-patient variations.

  7. Fluorescence relaxation spectroscopy: light on dynamical structures of flavoproteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burten-Bastiaens, P.I.H.

    1992-01-01

    Refinements in technique and data analysis have opened new avenues for a detailed interpretation of protein fluorescence. What is more, by combining new insights in protein structure and dynamics with improved knowledge of photophysics of biological chromophores, the coupling between structure-funct

  8. Quantitative Tissue Spectroscopy of Near Infrared Fluorescent Nanosensor Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Nicole M; Bisker, Gili; Farias, Edgardo; Ivanov, Vsevolod; Ahn, Jiyoung; Wogan, Gerald N; Strano, Michael S

    2016-05-01

    Implantable, near infrared (nIR) fluorescent nanosensors are advantageous for in vivo monitoring of biological analytes since they can be rendered selective for a particular target molecule while utilizing their unique optical properties and the nIR tissue transparency window for information transfer without an internal power source or telemetry. However, basic questions remain regarding the optimal encapsulation platform, geometrical properties, and concentration ranges required for high signal to noise ratio and effective detection through biological tissue. In this work, we systematically explore these variables quantitatively to optimize the performance of such optical nanosensors for biomedical applications. We investigate both alginate and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as model hydrogel systems, encapsulating d(GT)15 ssDNA-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) as model fluorescent nanoparticle sensors, responsive to riboflavin. Hydrogel sensors implanted 0.5 mm into thick tissue samples exhibit 50% reduction of initial fluorescence intensity, allowing an optical detection limit of 5.4 mm and 5.1 mm depth in tissue for alginate and PEG gels, respectively, at a SWNT concentration of 10 mg L(-1), and 785 nm laser excitation of 80 mW and 30 s exposure. These findings are supported with in vivo nIR fluorescent imaging of SWNT hydrogels implanted subcutaneously in mice. For the case of SWNT, we find that the alginate system is preferable in terms of emission intensity, sensor response, rheological properties, and shelf life. PMID:27305824

  9. Optical and structural properties of plasma-treated Cordyceps bassiana spores as studied by circular dichroism, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geon Joon; Sim, Geon Bo; Choi, Eun Ha; Kwon, Young-Wan; Kim, Jun Young; Jang, Siun; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2015-01-01

    To understand the killing mechanism of fungal spores by plasma treatment, the optical, structural, and biological properties of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps bassiana spores were studied. A nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat the spores in aqueous solution. Optical emission spectra of the APPJ acquired in air indicated emission peaks corresponding to hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. When the APPJ entered the aqueous solution, additional reactive species were derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy confirmed the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-activated water (PAW). Spore counting showed that plasma treatment significantly reduced spore viability. Absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the DNA extracted from plasma-treated spores showed a reduction in spore DNA content. The magnitude of the dip in the CD spectrum was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, indicating that plasma treatment causes structural modifications and/or damage to cellular components. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, suggesting that plasma treatment modified cell wall proteins. Changes in spore viability and DNA content were attributed to structural modification of the cell wall by reactive species coming from the APPJ and the PAW. Our results provided evidence that the plasma radicals and the derived reactive species play critical roles in fungal spore inactivation.

  10. Optical and structural properties of plasma-treated Cordyceps bassiana spores as studied by circular dichroism, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Geon Joon, E-mail: gjlee@kw.ac.kr; Sim, Geon Bo; Choi, Eun Ha [Plasma Bioscience Research Center/Department of Electrical and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young-Wan [KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Young; Jang, Siun; Kim, Seong Hwan, E-mail: piceae@naver.com [Department of Microbiology and Institute of Basic Sciences, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-14

    To understand the killing mechanism of fungal spores by plasma treatment, the optical, structural, and biological properties of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps bassiana spores were studied. A nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat the spores in aqueous solution. Optical emission spectra of the APPJ acquired in air indicated emission peaks corresponding to hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. When the APPJ entered the aqueous solution, additional reactive species were derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy confirmed the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-activated water (PAW). Spore counting showed that plasma treatment significantly reduced spore viability. Absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the DNA extracted from plasma-treated spores showed a reduction in spore DNA content. The magnitude of the dip in the CD spectrum was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, indicating that plasma treatment causes structural modifications and/or damage to cellular components. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, suggesting that plasma treatment modified cell wall proteins. Changes in spore viability and DNA content were attributed to structural modification of the cell wall by reactive species coming from the APPJ and the PAW. Our results provided evidence that the plasma radicals and the derived reactive species play critical roles in fungal spore inactivation.

  11. Sub-doppler spectroscopy based on the transit relaxation of atomic particles in a thin gas cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the review of methods, achievements, and possibilities of the recently elaborated high-resolution laser spectroscopy based on sub-doppler absorption, fluorescence and polarization resonances (on centers of quantum transitions), which arise because of the specific optical selection of comparatively slow-speed atoms or molecules in a thin cell with a rarefied gas. It is considered two following mechanisms of such velocity selection of atomic particles connected with their flight durations between walls of the thin cell : 1) optical pumping of sublevels of the ground atomic term and 2) optical excitation of long-lived metastable quantum levels. Theoretical bases of elaborated spectroscopy methods are presented. In case of the optical pumping mechanism, experimental technique and results on the record of sub-doppler spectral structure of Cs and Rb atoms and on the frequency stabilization of diode lasers by given methods are described. Perspectives of further development and applications of this new direction of the high-resolution spectroscopy are discussed

  12. Arsenic speciation analysis by hydride generation – cryotrapping – atomic fluorescence spectrometry with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Milan; Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Rychlovský, P.; Dědina, Jiří

    Prague: Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, 2010 - (Nesměrák, K.), s. 19-22. (1). ISBN 978-80-7444-005-2. [International Students Conference "Modern Analytical Chemistry" /6./. Praha (CZ), 23.09.2010-24.09.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1783 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : arsenic speciation * cryogenic trapping * atomic fluorescence spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  13. Arsenic speciation analysis based on selective hydride generation and atomic fluorescence detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marschner, Karel; Rychlovský, P.; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    Praha, 2014. s. 107-107. ISBN 978-80-905704-1-2. [European Symposium on Atomic Spectrometry ESAS 2014 & Czech-Slovak Spectroscopic Conference /15./. 16.03.2014-21.03.2014, Praha] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200311202 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : arsenic speciation analysis * hydride generation * atomic fluorescence spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  14. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Okaba, Shoichi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturisation. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kKagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF) are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the $^1 S_0-{}^3P_1$ (m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibresHC-PCFs improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time.

  15. Changes and characteristics of dissolved organic matter in a constructed wetland system using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Yun-Zhen; Guo, Xu-Jing; Huang, Tao; Gao, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Ying-Pei; Yuan, Feng

    2016-06-01

    Domestic wastewater was treated by five constructed wetland beds in series. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) collected from influent and effluent samples from the constructed wetland was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy combined with fluorescence regional integration (FRI), parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis, and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS). This study evaluates the capability of these methods in detecting the spectral characteristics of fluorescent DOM fractions and their changes in constructed wetlands. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with FRI analysis showed that protein-like materials displayed a higher removal ratio compared to humic-like substances. The PARAFAC analysis of wastewater DOM indicated that six fluorescent components, i.e., two protein-like substances (C1 and C6), three humic-like substances (C2, C3 and C5), and one non-humic component (C4), could be identified. Tryptophan-like C1 was the dominant component in the influent DOM. The removal ratios of six fluorescent components (C1-C6) were 56.21, 32.05, 49.19, 39.90, 29.60, and 45.87 %, respectively, after the constructed wetland treatment. Furthermore, 2D-COS demonstrated that the sequencing of spectral changes for fluorescent DOM followed the order 298 nm → 403 nm → 283 nm (310-360 nm) in the constructed wetland, suggesting that the peak at 298 nm is associated with preferential tryptophan fluorescence removal. Variation of the fluorescence index (FI) and the ratio of fluorescence components indicated that the constructed wetland treatment resulted in the decrease of fluorescent organic pollutant with increasing the humification and chemical stability of the DOM. PMID:26976008

  16. Anatomy-Based Algorithms for Detecting Oral Cancer Using Reflectance and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Sasha; Mardirossian, Vartan; Elackattu, Alphi; Mirkovic, Jelena; Pistey, Robert; Gallagher, George; Kabani, Sadru; Yu, Chung-Chieh; Wang, Zimmern; Badizadegan, Kamran; Grillone, Gregory; Feld, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We used reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy to noninvasively and quantitatively distinguish benign from dysplastic/malignant oral lesions. We designed diagnostic algorithms to account for differences in the spectral properties among anatomic sites (gingiva, buccal mucosa, etc). METHODS: In vivo reflectance and fluorescence spectra were collected from 71 patients with oral lesions. The tissue was then biopsied and the specimen evaluated by histopathology. Quantitative par...

  17. Fluorescence spectroscopy measures yeast PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase interaction with liposome membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhi; Su, Wen-Min; Carman, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidate (PA) phosphatase, the enzyme that catalyzes the penultimate step in triacylglycerol synthesis, is a cytosolic enzyme that must associate with the membrane where its substrate PA resides. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the interaction of yeast PAH1-encoded PA phosphatase with model liposome membranes. PA phosphatase contains five tryptophan residues and exhibited inherit fluorescence that increased upon interaction with phosphatidylcholine liposomes. The interactio...

  18. Detection of plant oil addition to cheese by synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Dankowska, Anna; Małecka, Maria; Kowalewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The fraudulent addition of plant oils during the manufacturing of hard cheeses is a real issue for the dairy industry. Considering the importance of monitoring adulterations of genuine cheeses, the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of cheese adulteration with plant oils was investigated. Synchronous fluorescence spectra were collected within the range of 240 to 700 nm with different wavelength intervals. The lowest detection limits of adulteration, 3.0 and 4.4%, respect...

  19. Short communication: rapid detection of milk fat adulteration with vegetable oil by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntakatsane, M P; Liu, X M; Zhou, P

    2013-04-01

    This study assessed the potential application of fluorescence spectroscopy in detecting adulteration of milk fat with vegetable oil and characterizing the samples according to the source of the fat. Pure butterfat was adulterated with different vegetable oils at various concentrations (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40%). Nonfat and reduced-fat milk were also adulterated with vegetable oils to simulate full-fat milk (3.2%). The 2- and 3-dimensional front-face fluorescence spectroscopy and gas chromatography were used to obtain the fluorescence spectra and fatty acid profile, respectively. Principal component analysis and 3-way partial least squares regression analysis were applied to analyze the data. The pure and adulterated samples were discriminated based on the total concentration of saturated fatty acids and unsaturated fatty acids, and also on the 3 major fluorophores: tryptophan, tocopherols, and riboflavin. Fluorescence spectroscopy was able to detect up to 5% of adulteration of vegetable oil into the butterfat. The saturated fatty acids showed higher predictability than the unsaturated fatty acids (R(2) = 0.73-0.92 vs. 0.20-0.65, respectively). The study demonstrated the high potential of fluorescence spectroscopy to rapidly detect adulteration of milk fat with vegetable oil, and discriminate commercial butter and milk according to the source of the fat. PMID:23415535

  20. Americium characterization by X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in plutonium uranium mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are currently used in nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regard to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the atomic structure and next-neighbour environment of Am in the (Pu,U)O2 lattice in an irradiated (60 MW d kg−1) MOX sample was performed employing micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (µ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Am (∼0.66 wt%) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its peripheral zone (rim) of the fuel. In the irradiated sample Am builds up as Am3+ species within an [AmO8]13− coordination environment (e.g. >90%) and no (III XAFS spectra recorded for the irradiated MOX sub-sample in the rim zone for a 300 μm×300 μm beam size area investigated over six scans of 4 h. The records remain constant during multi-scan. The analysis of the XAFS signal shows that Am is found as trivalent in the UO2 matrix. This analytical work shall open the door of very challenging analysis (speciation of fission product and actinides) in irradiated nuclear fuels. - Highlights: • Americium was characterized by microX-ray absorption spectroscopy in irradiated MOX fuel. • The americium redox state as determined from XAS data of irradiated fuel material was Am(III). • In the sample, the Am3+ face an AmO813− coordination environment in the (Pu,U)O2 matrix. • The americium dioxide is reduced by the uranium dioxide matrix

  1. Structural and functional probing of the biogenic amine transporters by fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren G F; Adkins, Erika M; Carroll, F Ivy;

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy techniques have proven extremely powerful for probing the molecular structure and function of membrane proteins. In this review, it will be described how we have applied a series of these techniques to the biogenic amine transporters, which are responsible for the...... clearance of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin from the synaptic cleft. In our studies, we have focused on the serotonin transporter (SERT) for which we have established a purification procedure upon expression of the transporter in Sf-9 insect cells. Importantly, the purified transporter displays......, it will be described how we recently initiated the implementation of single-molecule confocal fluorescence spectroscopy techniques in our studies of the SERT....

  2. Quantitative frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy in tissues and tissue-like media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert Edward

    1999-09-01

    In the never-ending quest for improved medical technology at lower cost, modern near-infrared optical spectroscopy offers the possibility of inexpensive technology for quantitative and non-invasive diagnoses. Hemoglobin is the dominant chromophore in the 700-900 nm spectral region and as such it allows for the optical assessment of hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygenation by absorption spectroscopy. However, there are many other important physiologically relevant compounds or physiological states that cannot be effectively sensed via optical methods because of poor optical contrast. In such cases, contrast enhancements are required. Fluorescence spectroscopy is an attractive component of optical tissue spectroscopy. Exogenous fluorophores, as well as some endogenous ones, may furnish the desperately needed sensitivity and specificity that is lacking in near-infrared optical tissue spectroscopy. The main focus of this thesis was to investigate the generation and propagation of fluorescence photons inside tissues and tissue-like media (i.e., scattering dominated media). The standard concepts of fluorescence spectroscopy have been incorporated into a diffusion-based picture that is sometimes referred to as photon migration. The novelty of this work lies in the successful quantitative recovery of fluorescence lifetimes, absolute fluorescence quantum yields, fluorophore concentrations, emission spectra, and both scattering and absorption coefficients at the emission wavelength from a tissue-like medium. All of these parameters are sensitive to the fluorophore local environment and hence are indicators of the tissue's physiological state. One application demonstrating the capabilities of frequency-domain lifetime spectroscopy in tissue-like media is a study of the binding of ethidium bromide to bovine leukocytes in fresh milk. Ethidium bromide is a fluorescent dye that is commonly used to label DNA, and hence visualize chromosomes in cells. The lifetime of

  3. Intramolecular fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in a feedback tracking microscope

    OpenAIRE

    McHale, Kevin; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    We derive the statistics of the signals generated by shape fluctuations of large molecules studied by feedback tracking microscopy. We account for the influence of intramolecular dynamics on the response of the tracking system, and derive a general expression for the fluorescence autocorrelation function that applies when those dynamics are linear. We show that tracking provides enhanced sensitivity to translational diffusion, molecular size, heterogeneity and long time-scale decays in compar...

  4. Lipid diffusion in planar membranes investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Hof, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1798, č. 7 (2010), s. 1377-1391. ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0114; GA AV ČR GEMEM/09/E006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : supported lipid bilayer * giant unilamellar vesicle * fluorescence recovery after photobleaching Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.647, year: 2010

  5. Elemental analysis of systems based on gold nanoparticles using of X-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějková, Stanislava; Janoušek, Jiří; Bělohradský, Martin; Řezanka, P.; Matějka, P.

    Bratislava : Comenius University in Bratislava, 2012 - (Kubová, J.; Bujdoš, M.). s. 165-165 ISBN 978-80-223-3292-7. [European Symposium on Atomic Spectrometry ESAS 2012. Slovak-Czech Spectroscopic Conference /22./. 07.10.2012-12.10.2012, Tatranská Lomnica] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy * ICP-OES * elemental analysis * gold nanoparticles Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  6. A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

  7. Using the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the differentiation between normal and neoplastichuman breast tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, R; Galhanone, P R; Zângaro, R A; Rodrigues, K C; Pacheco, M T T; Martin, A A; Netto, M M; Soares, F A; da Cunha, I W

    2003-01-01

    This article reports results of the in vitro study for potential evaluation of the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the differentiation between normal and neoplastic human breast tissue. A coumarine dye laser pumped by nitrogen laser generated an excitation light centered at 458 nm. In order to collect the fluorescence signal was used an optical fiber catheter coupled to a spectrometer and CCD detector. Fluorescence spectra were recorded from normal and neoplastic (benign and malignant) human breast tissue, adding up 94 different areas. The discrimination between normal and neoplasm groups reach a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. PMID:14505202

  8. Determination of changes in wastewater quality through a treatment works using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, John; Baker, Andy; Carliell-Marquet, Cynthia; Carstea, Elfrida

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize municipal wastewater at various stages of treatment in order to understand how its fluorescence signature changes with treatment and how the signal relates to biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). The impact of size fractionation on the fluorescence signal was also investigated. Fluorescence measurements were taken for unfiltered and filtered (0.45 and 0.20 microm) samples of crude, settled and secondary treated wastewater (activated sludge and trickling filter), and final effluent. Good correlations were observed for unfiltered, diluted wastewater samples between BOD and fluorescence intensity at excitation 280 nm, emission 350 nm (Peak T1) (r = 0.92) and between COD and Peak T1 intensity (r = 0.85). The majority of the T1 and T2 signal was found to be derived from the wastewater quality assessment and process control of wastewater treatment works. PMID:24617065

  9. In vivo study of the human skin by the method of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals of this study are to perform a preliminary evaluation of the diagnostic potential of noninvasive laser-induced auto-fluorescence spectroscopy (LIAFS) for human skin and optimize of detection and diagnosis of hollow organs and skin. In recent years, there has been growing interest in the use of laser-induced fluorescence to discriminate disease from normal surrounding tissue. The most fluorescence studies have used exogenous fluorophores of this discrimination. The laser-induced auto-fluorescence which is used for diagnosis of tissues in the human body avoids administration of any drugs. In this study a technique for optical biopsy of in vivo human skin is presented. The auto-fluorescence characterization of tissue relies on different spectral properties of tissues. It was demonstrated a differentiation between normal skin and skin with vitiligo. Two main endogenous fluorophores in the human skin account for most of the cellular auto-fluorescence for excitation wavelength 337 nm reduced from of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and collagen. The auto-fluorescence spectrum of human skin depend on main internal absorbers which are blood and melanin. In this study was described the effect caused by blood and melanin content on the shape of the auto-fluorescence spectrum of human skin. Human skin fluorescence spectrum might provide dermatologists with important information and such investigations are successfully used now in skin disease diagnostics, in investigation of the environmental factor impact or for evaluation of treatment efficiency. (authors)

  10. Polymerized LB films imaged with a combined atomic force microscope-fluorescence microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Hansma, Helen G.; Gaub, Hermann E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-01-01

    The first results obtained with a new stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a standard Zeiss optical fluorescence microscope are presented. The optical microscope allows location and selection of objects to be imaged with the high-resolution AFM. Furthermore, the combined microsc

  11. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Atomic Oxygen Measurements in Short Pulse Discharges by Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, Walter; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Mintusov, Eugene; Jiang, Naibo; Adamovich, Igor

    2007-10-01

    Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure time-dependent absolute oxygen atom concentrations in O2/He, O2/N2, and CH4/air plasmas produced with a 20 nanosecond duration, 20 kV pulsed discharge at 10 Hz repetition rate. Xenon calibrated spectra show that a single discharge pulse creates initial oxygen dissociation fraction of ˜0.0005 for air like mixtures at 40-60 torr total pressure. Peak O atom concentration is a factor of approximately two lower in fuel lean (φ=0.5) methane/air mixtures. In helium buffer, the initially formed atomic oxygen decays monotonically, with decay time consistent with formation of ozone. In all nitrogen containing mixtures, atomic oxygen concentrations are found to initially increase, for time scales on the order of 10-100 microseconds, due presumably to additional O2 dissociation caused by collisions with electronically excited nitrogen. Further evidence of the role of metastable N2 is demonstrated from time-dependent N2 2^nd Positive and NO Gamma band emission spectroscopy. Comparisons with modeling predictions show qualitative, but not quantitative, agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  13. Atomic Oscillator Strengths by Emission Spectroscopy and Lifetime Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, W. L.; Griesmann, U.; Kling, R.; Musielok, J.

    2002-11-01

    Over the last seven years, we have carried out numerous oscillator strength measurements for some light and medium heavy elements (Musielok et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000; Veres & Wiese 1996; Griesmann et al. 1997; Bridges & Wiese 1998; Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Gries- mann 2000; Bridges & Wiese to be published). Most recently we have determined numerous transitions of Mu II (Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Griesmann 2000) and are now working on Cl I (Bridges & Wiese to be published). See the summary statement at the end of the text. For the emission measurements, we have applied either a high-current wall-stabilized arc (described for example, in Musielok et al. (1999)), or a high-current hollow cathode, or a Penning discharge. The latter two sources were used for branching ratio measurements from common upper 1ev- els, while the wall-stabilized arc was operated at atmospheric pressure under the condition of partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, which allows the measurement of relative transition probabilities. Absolute data were obtained by combining the emission results with lifetime data measured by other research groups, especially the University of Hannover, with which we have closely collaborated. This group uses the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Our emission spectra were recorded for the light elements with a 2 m grating spectrometer, or, for Mu II, with an FT 700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. The radiometric calibration was carried out with a tungsten strip lamp for the visible part of the spectrum and with a deuterium lamp for the ultraviolet. All measurements were made under optically thin conditions, which was checked by doubling the path length with a focusing mirror setup. Typical uncertainties of the measured oscillator strengths are estimated to be in the range 15%-20% (one-standard deviation). However, discrepancies with advanced atomic structure theories are sometimes much larger. In Tables 1-3 and Fig. 1, we

  14. Far-field resonance fluorescence from a dipole-interacting laser-driven cold atomic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Ryan; Olmos, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the temporal response of the fluorescence light that is emitted from a dense gas of cold atoms driven by a laser. When the average interatomic distance is smaller than the wavelength of the photons scattered by the atoms, the system exhibits strong dipolar interactions and collective dissipation. We solve the exact dynamics of small systems with different geometries and show how these collective features are manifest in the scattered light properties such as the photon emission rate, the power spectrum and the second-order correlation function. By calculating these quantities beyond the weak driving limit, we make progress in understanding the signatures of collective behavior in these many-body systems. Furthermore, we clarify the role of disorder on the resonance fluorescence, of direct relevance for recent experimental efforts that aim at the exploration of many-body effects in dipole-dipole interacting gases of atoms.

  15. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T., E-mail: tomomi.fujita@riken.jp [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Shimoda, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan); Collaboration: OROCHI Collaboration

    2015-11-15

    A new laser spectroscopic method named “OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)” has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with {sup 84−87}Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  16. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new laser spectroscopic method named “OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)” has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with 84−87Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes

  17. Resonance fluorescence spectra of three-level atoms in a squeezed vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fluorescence field from one of the two allowed transitions in a three-level atom can sense squeezed fluctuations of a vacuum field coupled to the other transition. We examine the fluorescence spectra of strongly driven three-level atoms in Λ, V, and cascade configurations in which one of the two one-photon transitions is coupled to a finite-bandwidth squeezed vacuum field, when the bandwidth is much smaller than the difference in the atomic transition frequencies, though much larger than atomic decay rates and Rabi frequencies of the driving fields. The driving fields are on one-photon resonance, and the squeezed vacuum field is generated by a degenerate parameter oscillator. Details are only given for the Λ configuration. The extension to the V and cascade configurations is straightforward. We find that in all configurations the fluorescence spectra of the transition not coupled to the squeezed vacuum field are composed of five lines, one central and two pairs of sidebands, with intensities and widths strongly influenced by the squeezed vacuum field. However, only the central component and the outer sidebands exhibit a dependence on the squeezing phase. We also examine the fluorescence spectrum for the cascade configuration with a squeezed vacuum field on resonance with the two-photon transition between the ground and the most excited states and now generated by a nondegenerate parametric oscillator. In this case, where the squeezed vacuum field can be made coupled to both transitions, all spectral lines depend on the squeezing phase. The spectral features are explained in terms of the dressed-atom model of the system. We show that the coherent mixing of the atomic states by the strong driving fields modifies transition rates between the dressed states, which results in the selective phase dependence of the spectral features. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. 2-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy: Determining the Temperature-Dependent Conformations of Porphyrin Dimers and Nucleic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widom, Julia; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Marcus, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    I will describe spectroscopic studies on a covalently-linked zinc tetraphenylporphyrin dimer embedded in a phospholipid bilayer membrane. Using phase-modulation 2-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy (2D FS, a fluorescence-detected version of 2D electronic spectroscopy) along with linear absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, it was found that the dimer adopts two predominant conformations in the membrane, and that the relative populations of these two states change as a function of temperature. Simultaneously fitting the linear absorption spectrum and the 2D FS spectra at four different excitation wavelengths revealed a wealth of information about these two states, including their relative populations, relative fluorescence quantum yields, the strength of the exciton coupling present in each state, and the approximate angles between the electronic transition dipole moments of the two porphyrins. Ongoing analysis focuses on elucidating the relaxation and energy transfer dynamics of this system through the population time dependence of the 2D spectra. Finally, I will present preliminary results from experiments in which 2D FS was performed with ultraviolet excitation to study the conformations of DNA constructs labeled with a fluorescent analogue of guanine.

  19. Fluorescence kinetics of Trp-Trp dipeptide and its derivatives in water via ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Menghui; Yi, Hua; Chang, Mengfang; Cao, Xiaodan; Li, Lei; Zhou, Zhongneng; Pan, Haifeng; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Sanjun; Xu, Jianhua

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafast fluorescence dynamics of Tryptophan-Tryptophan (Trp-Trp/Trp2) dipeptide and its derivatives in water have been investigated using a picosecond resolved time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) apparatus together with a femtosecond resolved upconversion spectrophotofluorometer. The fluorescence decay profiles at multiple wavelengths were fitted by a global analysis technique. Nanosecond fluorescence kinetics of Trp2, N-tert-butyl carbonyl oxygen-N'-aldehyde group-l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan (NBTrp2), l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan methyl ester (Trp2Me), and N-acetyl-l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan methyl ester (NATrp2Me) exhibit multi-exponential decays with the average lifetimes of 1.99, 3.04, 0.72 and 1.22ns, respectively. Due to the intramolecular interaction between two Trp residues, the "water relaxation" lifetime was observed around 4ps, and it is noticed that Trp2 and its derivatives also exhibit a new decay with a lifetime of ∼100ps, while single-Trp fluorescence decay in dipeptides/proteins shows 20-30ps. The intramolecular interaction lifetime constants of Trp2, NBTrp2, Trp2Me and NATrp2Me were then calculated to be 3.64, 0.93, 11.52 and 2.40ns, respectively. Candidate mechanisms (including heterogeneity, solvent relaxation, quasi static self-quenching or ET/PT quenching) have been discussed. PMID:26111991

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy: a tool to characterize humic substances in soil colonized by microorganisms?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáčová, Veronika; Gryndler, Milan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2006), s. 215-221. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/03/0188 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : fluorescence spectroscopy * humic substances * microorganism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2006

  1. Speciation of actinides in aqueous solution by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) as a sensitive and selective method has been applied to the speciation of actinides in aqueous solution. Studies on hydrolysis and carbonate complexation of U(VI) and on determination of hydration number of Cm(III) are reported. (author)

  2. Capillary Electrophoresis and Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix Spectroscopy for Characterization of Humic Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence spectroscopy have been used in natural organic matter (NOM) studies. In this study, we characterized five fulvic acids, six humic acids and two unprocessed NOM samples obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) using these two ana...

  3. Combination of Micro-fluidic Chip with Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy for Single Molecule Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A single molecule detection technique was developed by the combination of a single channel poly (dimethylsiloxane)/glass micro-fluidic chip and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). This method was successfully used to determine the proportion of two model components in the mixture containing fluorescein and the rhodamine-green succinimidyl ester.

  4. Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy (FSCS) for probes with highly overlapping emission spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benda, A.; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin; Gaus, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2014), s. 2973-2988. ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400400904; GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : spectroscopy * fluorescence and luminiscence * confocal microscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014

  5. Characterization of Anabaena cylindrica Solution System Using Synchronous- Scan Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xian-li; DENG Nan-sheng; TAO Shu

    2005-01-01

    The characterization of the algae Anabaena cylindrica solu tion with Fe (Ⅲ) was investigated using fluorescence emission and syn chronous-scan spectroscopy. The ranges of concentrations of algae and Fe (Ⅲ) in aqueous solutions were 5. 0 × 107-2. 5 × 108 cell/L and 10-60μmol/L, respectively. The effective characterization method used was synchronous-scan fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS). The wavelength difference (△λ) of 90 nm was maintained between excitation wavelength (λex) and emission wavelength(λem ). The peak was observed at about λex 236 nm/λem 326 nm for synchronous-scan fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence quenching in system of algae-Fe( Ⅲ)-HA was studied using synchronous-scan spectroscopy for the first time. Fe(Ⅲ) was clearly the effective quencher. The relationship between I0 / I (quenching efficiency)and c (concentration of Fe (Ⅲ) added) was a linear correlation for the al gae solution with Fe(Ⅲ). Also, Aldrich humic acid (HA) was found to be an effective quencher.

  6. One-atom detection using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new measuring technique which can detect a single atom of a given kind, even in the presence of 1019 or more atoms of another kind, with good space and time resolution, was utilized to study the density fluctuation of less than 100 cesium atoms in a small volume of space filled with inert gases. Repeated measurements of the absolute number of atoms in a defined volume at an arbitrary time were recorded for the first time in order to obtain a statistical distribution giving the fluctuation of the number of atoms around the mean value. Numerous other physics applications of the one-atom detector are briefly described

  7. Nonlinear Theory of Anomalous Diffusion and Application to Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Jean Pierre; Lutsko, James F.

    2015-12-01

    The nonlinear theory of anomalous diffusion is based on particle interactions giving an explicit microscopic description of diffusive processes leading to sub-, normal, or super-diffusion as a result of competitive effects between attractive and repulsive interactions. We present the explicit analytical solution to the nonlinear diffusion equation which we then use to compute the correlation function which is experimentally measured by correlation spectroscopy. The theoretical results are applicable in particular to the analysis of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of marked molecules in biological systems. More specifically we consider the cases of fluorescently labeled lipids in the plasma membrane and of fluorescent apoferritin (a spherically shaped oligomer) in a crowded dextran solution and we find that the nonlinear correlation spectra reproduce very well the experimental data indicating sub-diffusive molecular motion.

  8. Laboratory micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy instrumentation and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Haschke, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Micro-X-ray fluorescence offers the possibility for a position- sensitive and non-destructive analysis that can be used for the analysis of non-homogeneous materials and layer systems. This analytical technique has shown a dynamic development in the last 15 years and is used for the analysis of small particles, inclusions, of elemental distributions for a wide range of different applications both in research and quality control. The first experiments were performed on synchrotrons but there is a requirement for laboratory instruments which offers a fast and immediate access for analytical results. The book discuss the main components of a µ-XRF instrument and the different measurement modes, it gives an overview about the various instruments types, considers the special requirements for quantification of non-homogeneous materials and presents a wide range of application for single point and multi-point analysis as well as for distribution analysis in one, two and three dimensions.

  9. Characterising organic matter in recirculating aquaculture systems with fluorescence EEM spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, A C; Arvin, E; Pedersen, L-F; Pedersen, P B; Seredyńska-Sobecka, B; Stedmon, C A

    2015-10-15

    The potential of recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) in the aquaculture industry is increasingly being acknowledged. Along with intensified application, the need to better characterise and understand the accumulated dissolved organic matter (DOM) within these systems increases. Mature RASs, stocked with rainbow trout and operated at steady state at four feed loadings, were analysed by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) analysis and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. The fluorescence dataset was then decomposed by PARAFAC analysis using the drEEM toolbox. This revealed that the fluorescence character of the RAS water could be represented by five components, of which four have previously been identified in fresh water, coastal marine water, wetlands and drinking water. The fluorescence components as well as the DOC showed positive correlations with feed loading, however there was considerable variation between the five fluorescence components with respect to the degree of accumulation with feed loading. The five components were found to originate from three sources: the feed; the influent tap water (groundwater); and processes related to the fish and the water treatment system. This paper details the first application of fluorescence EEM spectroscopy to assess DOM in RAS, and highlights the potential applications of this technique within future RAS management strategies. PMID:26141427

  10. Electric field strength measurements in a megavolt vacuum diode using laser induced fluorescence of an atomic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combined technique of an atomic beam probing and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFABS) is applied for measuring of local electric field in a 1 MV, 100 kJ, 4 μsec electron diode. Laser-produced lithium beam is stepwise excited by two resonant wide-band laser beams. Stark-splitted spontaneous emission from n=4 level is detected with a polychromator. Time dependence of the electric field was inferred from splitting of the 460.3 nm lithium line. The electric field strength F grows during a pulse from 160 to 260 kV/cm in the center of a 6 cm gap. By comparing calculated and experimental F-values, expansion of the emission boundaries of the cathode and anode plasmas was reconstructed

  11. Spatial Resolution of Combined Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy for Atomic Oxygen Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Makoto; Nakajima, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    For developments of thermal protection system, atomic oxygen plays important role. However, its measurement method has not been established because the pressure in front of TPS test materials is as high as a few kPa. Our group proposed combined wavelength modulation and integrated output spectroscopies based on the forbidden transition at OI 636 nm to measure the ground-state number densities. In this study, WM-ICOS system is developed and applied to a microwave oxygen plasma to evaluate measurable region. As a result, the estimated number density by ICOS could be measured as low as 1021 m21. For the condition, WM-ICOS was applied. The signal to noise ratio of the 2f signal was 40.4. Then, the sensitivity was improved about 26. This result corresponding to the measurement limit of the partial atomic oxygen pressure of 250 Pa. The sensitivity of WM-ICOS was found to enough to diagnose the shock layer in high enthalpy flows. However, the spatial resolution was as large as 8 mm. The size of the beam pattern depends on the cavity length, robust ness of the cavity and accuracy of the cavity alignment. In this presentation, the relationship among these parameters will be discussed.

  12. Fluorescence spectroscopy incorporating a ratiometric approach for the diagnosis and classification of urothelial carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Crisci, Alfonso; Nesi, Gabriella; Carini, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-02-01

    The current most popular clinical method for the screening of urothelial carcinoma is white light cystoscopy. This method has inherent disadvantages making a strong genesis towards developing more powerful diagnostic techniques. Laser induced intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy has been studied as an adjunct to current methods for the detection of tumors. This technique allows real time results based on the changes in spectral profile between normal and tumor tissues. We conducted a pilot study based on fluorescence spectroscopy at two wavelengths 378 and 445 nm excitation for the differentiation of urothelial carcinoma. At both the excitation wavelengths, the measured fluorescence signal showed an increased intensity at wavelengths greater than 520 nm. In addition, the emission profile showed modulation at 580 nm which is due to the reabsorption of emitted fluo- rescence due to hemoglobin. Additionally, we developed a tissue characterizing algorithm, based on fluorescence intensity ratios, F510/F600 and F520/F580 at 378 and 445 nm excitation wavelengths respectively. Further, the results were correlated with the pathologists assessment of urothelial carcinoma. This ratiometric classification algorithm yielded 81% sensitivity and 83% specificity at 378 nm and while at 445 nm excitation we achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 86% for classifying normal and tumor bladder tissues. In this study we have demonstrated the potential of a simple ratiometric algorithm based on fluorescence spectroscopy could be an alternative tool to tissue biopsy. Furthermore, this technique based fiber-based fluorescence spectroscopy could be integrated into an endoscopy system for use in the operating room.

  13. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy

  14. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy. (GHT)

  15. New insights into heat induced structural changes of pectin methylesterase on fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistor, Oana Viorela; Stănciuc, Nicoleta; Aprodu, Iuliana; Botez, Elisabeta

    2014-07-01

    Heat-induced structural changes of Aspergillus oryzae pectin methylesterase (PME) were studied by means of fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling, whereas the functional enzyme stability was monitored by inactivation studies. The fluorescence spectroscopy experiments were performed at two pH value (4.5 and 7.0). At both pH values, the phase diagrams were linear, indicating the presence of two molecular species induced by thermal treatment. A red shift of 7 nm was observed at neutral pH by increasing temperature up to 60 °C, followed by a blue shift of 4 nm at 70 °C, suggesting significant conformational rearrangements. The quenching experiments using acrylamide and iodide demonstrate a more flexible conformation of enzyme with increasing temperature, especially at neutral pH. The experimental results were complemented with atomic level observations on PME model behavior after performing molecular dynamics simulations at different temperatures. The inactivation kinetics of PME in buffer solutions was fitted using a first-order kinetics model, resulting in activation energy of 241.4 ± 7.51 kJ mol-1.

  16. Fluorescence studies on 20Na and excited neon atoms in proton-induced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, an experimental study on the application of the optical fluorescence technique for the detection of excited and ground-state atoms in a neon plasma produced by 20-MeV protons is presented. By making use of a continuous-wave dye laser tuned to the D2-line of sodium, the 20Na atoms, produced via the reaction 20Ne(p,h)20Na, were excited and the intensity of the fluorescence light measured for several positions in the reaction vessel. From the time dependence of the fluorescence signal after a period of production by the proton beam, the diffusion of the 20Na atoms through the reaction vessel could be studied. Using single-mode operation of the dye laser the absorption line shape of the 23Na D-lines and the isotope shift of the 20Na D-lines with respect to the 23Na D-lines were determined. The proton beam was used as a well-defined excitation source to study the kinetic behaviour of neon atoms in the 1S2, 1S4 and 1S5 states. To learn the effect of plasma conditions on the results of the experiments, the electron density and the electron temperature in the plasma were measured

  17. Rapid screening test for porphyria diagnosis using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, A.; Stepp, H.; Homann, C.; Hennig, G.; Brittenham, G. M.; Vogeser, M.

    2015-07-01

    Porphyrias are rare genetic metabolic disorders, which result from deficiencies of enzymes in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Depending on the enzyme defect, different types of porphyrins and heme precursors accumulate for the different porphyria diseases in erythrocytes, liver, blood plasma, urine and stool. Patients with acute hepatic porphyrias can suffer from acute neuropathic attacks, which can lead to death when undiagnosed, but show only unspecific clinical symptoms such as abdominal pain. Therefore, in addition to chromatographic methods, a rapid screening test is required to allow for immediate identification and treatment of these patients. In this study, fluorescence spectroscopic measurements were conducted on blood plasma and phantom material, mimicking the composition of blood plasma of porphyria patients. Hydrochloric acid was used to differentiate the occurring porphyrins (uroporphyrin-III and coproporphyrin-III) spectroscopically despite their initially overlapping excitation spectra. Plasma phantom mixtures were measured using dual wavelength excitation and the corresponding concentrations of uroporphyrin-III and coproporphyrin-III were determined. Additionally, three plasma samples of porphyria patients were examined and traces of coproporphyrin-III and uroporphyrin-III were identified. This study may therefore help to establish a rapid screening test method with spectroscopic differentiation of the occurring porphyrins, which consequently allows for the distinction of different porphyrias. This may be a valuable tool for clinical porphyria diagnosis and rapid or immediate treatment.

  18. Assembly and characterization of a fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system for skin lesions diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Texiera Rosa, Ramon Gabriel; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; D´Almeida, Camila de Paula; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime analysis in biological tissues has been presented as a technique of a great potential for tissue characterization for diagnostic purposes. The objective of this study is to assemble and characterize a fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system for diagnostic of clinically similar skin lesions in vivo. The fluorescence lifetime measurements were performed using the Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (Becker & Hickl, Berlin, Germany) technique. Two lasers, one emitting at 378 nm and another at 445 nm, are used for excitation with 20, 50 and 80 MHz repetition rate. A bifurcated optical fiber probe conducts the excitation light to the sample, the collected light is transmitted through bandpass filters and delivered to a hybrid photomultiplier tube detector. The fluorescence spectra were obtained by using a portable spectrometer (Ocean Optics USB-2000-FLG) with the same excitation sources. An instrument response function of about 300 ps was obtained and the spectrum and fluorescence lifetime of a standard fluorescent molecule (Rhodamine 6G) was measured for the calibration of the system ((4.1 +/- 0.3) ns). The assembled system was considered robust, well calibrated and will be used for clinical measurements of skin lesions.

  19. Ultrathin atomic vapor film transmission spectroscopy: analysis of Dicke narrowing structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yanpeng; Gan, Chenli

    2005-11-01

    Transmission sub-Doppler spectroscopy with confined atomic vapor film between two dielectric walls is theoretically studied. Because of atoms flying from wall to wall, where they get de-excited, the atom-field interaction time is anisotropic so that the contribution of slow atoms is enhanced, a sub-Doppler transmission spectroscopy (Dicke narrowing effect) can be obtained when the thickness of the film is much small or comparable with the wavelength even at small angle oblique incidence. It is feasible to get a sub-Doppler structure in a new region (L < ?/4) in experiments.

  20. In-vivo optical detection of cancer using chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photosensitizer based fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy is fast becoming a promising approach for cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) formulated in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a potential exogenous fluorophore for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopic detection of human cancer tissue xenografted in preclinical models as well as in a patient. Fluorescence imaging was performed on MGH human bladder tumor xenografted on both the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and the murine model using a fluorescence endoscopy imaging system. In addition, fiber optic based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed on tumors and various normal organs in the same mice to validate the macroscopic images. In one patient, fluorescence imaging was performed on angiosarcoma lesions and normal skin in conjunction with fluorescence spectroscopy to validate Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence visual assessment of the lesions. Margins of tumor xenografts in the CAM model were clearly outlined under fluorescence imaging. Ce6-PVP-induced fluorescence imaging yielded a specificity of 83% on the CAM model. In mice, fluorescence intensity of Ce6-PVP was higher in bladder tumor compared to adjacent muscle and normal bladder. Clinical results confirmed that fluorescence imaging clearly captured the fluorescence of Ce6-PVP in angiosarcoma lesions and good correlation was found between fluorescence imaging and spectral measurement in the patient. Combination of Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy could allow for optical detection and discrimination between cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. Ce6-PVP seems to be a promising fluorophore for fluorescence diagnosis of cancer

  1. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, David; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B; Okusanya, Olugbenga; Keating, Jane; Venegas, Ollin; Deshpande, Charuhas; Karakousis, Giorgos; Madajewski, Brian; Durham, Amy; Nie, Shuming; Yodh, Arjun G; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-07-01

    Surgery is the most effective method to cure patients with solid tumors, and 50% of all cancer patients undergo resection. Local recurrences are due to tumor cells remaining in the wound, thus we explore near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging to identify residual cancer cells after surgery. Fifteen canines and two human patients with spontaneously occurring sarcomas underwent intraoperative imaging. During the operation, the wounds were interrogated with NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. NIR monitoring identified the presence or absence of residual tumor cells after surgery in 14/15 canines with a mean fluorescence signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of ∼16 . Ten animals showed no residual tumor cells in the wound bed (mean SBRP1-year follow-up. In five animals, the mean SBR of the wound was >15 , and histopathology confirmed tumor cells in the postsurgical wound in four/five canines. In the human pilot study, neither patient had residual tumor cells in the wound bed, and both remain disease free at >1.5-year follow up. Intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in surgical wounds. These observations suggest that NIR imaging techniques may improve tumor resection during cancer operations. PMID:26160347

  2. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy in multiple-scattering environments: an application to biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio

    1999-07-01

    Over the past few years, there has been significant research activity devoted to the application of fluorescence spectroscopy to strongly scattering media, where photons propagate diffusely. Much of this activity focused on fluorescence as a source of contrast enhancement in optical tomography. Our efforts have emphasized the quantitative recovery of fluorescence parameters for spectroscopy. Using a frequency-domain diffusion-based model, we have successfully recovered the lifetime, the absolute quantum yield, the fluorophore concentration, and the emission spectrum of the fluorophore, as well as the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients at the emission wavelength of the medium in different measurements. In this contribution, we present a sensitive monitor of the binding between ethidium bromide and bovine cells in fresh milk. The spectroscopic contrast was the approximately tenfold increase in the ethidium bromide lifetime upon binding to DNA. The measurement clearly demonstrated that we could quantitatively measure the density of cells in the milk, which is an application vital to the tremendous economic burden of bovine subclinical mastitis detection. Furthermore, we may in principle use the spirit of this technique as a quantitative monitor of the binding of fluorescent drugs inside tissues. This is a first step towards lifetime spectroscopy in tissues.

  3. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, David; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Okusanya, Olugbenga; Keating, Jane; Venegas, Ollin; Deshpande, Charuhas; Karakousis, Giorgos; Madajewski, Brian; Durham, Amy; Nie, Shuming; Yodh, Arjun G.; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-07-01

    Surgery is the most effective method to cure patients with solid tumors, and 50% of all cancer patients undergo resection. Local recurrences are due to tumor cells remaining in the wound, thus we explore near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging to identify residual cancer cells after surgery. Fifteen canines and two human patients with spontaneously occurring sarcomas underwent intraoperative imaging. During the operation, the wounds were interrogated with NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. NIR monitoring identified the presence or absence of residual tumor cells after surgery in 14/15 canines with a mean fluorescence signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of ˜16. Ten animals showed no residual tumor cells in the wound bed (mean SBR1-year follow-up. In five animals, the mean SBR of the wound was >15, and histopathology confirmed tumor cells in the postsurgical wound in four/five canines. In the human pilot study, neither patient had residual tumor cells in the wound bed, and both remain disease free at >1.5-year follow up. Intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in surgical wounds. These observations suggest that NIR imaging techniques may improve tumor resection during cancer operations.

  4. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy to detect hepatic necrosis after normothermic ischemia: animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Renan A.; Vollet-Filho, Jose D.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Fernandez, Jorge L.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Castro-e-Silva, Orlando; Sankarankutty, Ajith K.

    2015-06-01

    Liver transplantation is a well-established treatment for liver failure. However, the success of the transplantation procedure depends on liver graft conditions. The tissue function evaluation during the several transplantation stages is relevant, in particular during the organ harvesting, when a decision is made concerning the viability of the graft. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy is a good option because it is a noninvasive and fast technique. A partial normothermic hepatic ischemia was performed in rat livers, with a vascular occlusion of both median and left lateral lobes, allowing circulation only for the right lateral lobe and the caudate lobe. Fluorescence spectra under excitation at 532 nm (doubled frequency Nd:YAG laser) were collected using a portable spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean Optics, USA). The fluorescence emission was collected before vascular occlusion, after ischemia, and 24 hours after reperfusion. A morphometric histology analysis was performed as the gold standard evaluation - liver samples were analyzed, and the percentage of necrotic tissue was obtained. The results showed that changes in the fluorescence emission after ischemia can be correlated with the amount of necrosis evaluated by a morphometric analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficient of the generated model was 0.90 and the root mean square error was around 20%. In this context, the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique after normothermic ischemia showed to be a fast and efficient method to differentiate ischemic injury from viable tissues.

  5. Assessing the photoaging process at sun exposed and non-exposed skin using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Kurachi, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Photoaging is the skin premature aging due to exposure to ultraviolet light, which damage the collagen, elastin and can induce alterations on the skin cells DNA, and, then, it may evolve to precancerous lesions, which are widely investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime. The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime analysis has been presented as a technique of great potential for biological tissue characterization at optical diagnostics. The main targeted fluorophores are NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide), which have free and bound states, each one with different average lifetimes. The average lifetimes for free and bound NADH and FAD change according to tissue metabolic alterations and may contribute to a non-invasive clinical investigation of injuries such as skin lesions. These lesions and the possible areas where they may develop can be interrogated using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy taking into account the variability of skin phototypes and the changes related to melanin, collagen and elastin, endogenous fluorophores which have emissions that spectrally overlap to the NADH and FAD emission. The objective of this study is to assess the variation on fluorescence lifetimes of normal skin at sun exposed and non-exposed areas and associate this variation to the photoaging process.

  6. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the RIS technique, a laser is tuned to a wavelength which will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or nonresonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms; and since detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples are given of one-atom detection, including that of the noble gases, in order to show complementarity with AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81Kr using RIS has interesting applications for solar neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Strengths and Weaknesses of Recently Engineered Red Fluorescent Proteins Evaluated in Live Cells Using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Amanda P.; Baird, Michelle A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Day, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    The scientific community is still looking for a bright, stable red fluorescent protein (FP) as functional as the current best derivatives of green fluorescent protein (GFP). The red FPs exploit the reduced background of cells imaged in the red region of the visible spectrum, but photophysical short comings have limited their use for some spectroscopic approaches. Introduced nearly a decade ago, mCherry remains the most often used red FP for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and other single molecule techniques, despite the advent of many newer red FPs. All red FPs suffer from complex photophysics involving reversible conversions to a dark state (flickering), a property that results in fairly low red FP quantum yields and potential interference with spectroscopic analyses including FCS. The current report describes assays developed to determine the best working conditions for, and to uncover the shortcoming of, four recently engineered red FPs for use in FCS and other diffusion and spectroscopic studies. All five red FPs assayed had potential shortcomings leading to the conclusion that the current best red FP for FCS is still mCherry. The assays developed here aim to enable the rapid evaluation of new red FPs and their smooth adaptation to live cell spectroscopic microscopy and nanoscopy. PMID:24129172

  8. Precise quantification of cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptides using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezgui, Rachid; Blumer, Katy; Yeoh-Tan, Gilbert; Trexler, Adam J; Magzoub, Mazin

    2016-07-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as a potentially powerful tool for drug delivery due to their ability to efficiently transport a whole host of biologically active cargoes into cells. Although concerted efforts have shed some light on the cellular internalization pathways of CPPs, quantification of CPP uptake has proved problematic. Here we describe an experimental approach that combines two powerful biophysical techniques, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to directly, accurately and precisely measure the cellular uptake of fluorescently-labeled molecules. This rapid and technically simple approach is highly versatile and can readily be applied to characterize all major CPP properties that normally require multiple assays, including amount taken up by cells (in moles/cell), uptake efficiency, internalization pathways, intracellular distribution, intracellular degradation and toxicity threshold. The FACS-FCS approach provides a means for quantifying any intracellular biochemical entity, whether expressed in the cell or introduced exogenously and transported across the plasma membrane. PMID:27033412

  9. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective

  10. Arsenic speciation analysis by HPLC postcolumn hydride generation and detection by atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Rychlovský, P.; Dědina, Jiří

    Prague: Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, 2014 - (Nesměrák, K.), s. 74-77 ISBN 978-80-7444-030-4. [International Students Conference "Modern Analytical Chemistry" /10./. Prague (CZ), 22.09.2014-23.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : arsenic speciation analysis * hydride generation * atomic fluorescence spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation http://www.natur.cuni.cz/isc-mac/

  11. Rapid detection of authenticity and adulteration of walnut oil by FTIR and fluorescence spectroscopy: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingning; Wang, Haixia; Zhao, Qiaojiao; Ouyang, Jie; Wu, Yanwen

    2015-08-15

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and fluorescence spectroscopy combined with soft independent modeling of class analogies (SIMCA) and partial least square (PLS) were used to detect the authenticity of walnut oil and adulteration amount of soybean oil in walnut oil. A SIMCA model of FTIR spectra could differentiate walnut oil and other oils into separate categories; the classification limit of soybean oil in walnut oil was 10%. Fluorescence spectroscopy could differentiate oil composition by the peak position and intensity of emission spectrum without multivariate analysis. The classification limit of soybean oil adulterated in walnut oil by fluorescence spectroscopy was below 5%. The deviation of the prediction model for fluorescence spectra was lower than that for FTIR spectra. Fluorescence spectroscopy was more applicable than FTIR in the adulteration detection of walnut oil, both from the determination limit and prediction deviation. PMID:25794716

  12. Portable fluorescence spectroscopy platform for Huanglongbing (HLB) citrus disease in situ detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Alessandro D.; Rossi, Giuliano; de Castro, Guilherme Cunha; Ortega, Tiago A.; de Castro N., Jarbas C.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the development of a portable fluorescence spectroscopy platform for Huanglongbing (HLB) citrus disease in situ detection is presented. The equipment consists of an excitation blue LED light source, a commercial miniature spectrometer and embedded software. Measurements of healthy, HLB-symptomatic and HLB-asymptomatic citrus leafs were performed. Leafs were excited with the blue LED and their fluorescence spectra collected. Embedded electronics and software were responsible for the spectrum processing and classification via partial least squares regression. Global success rates above 80% and 100% distinction of healthy and HLB-symptomatic leafs were obtained.

  13. Host-Guest Complexation Studied by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy: Adamantane–Cyclodextrin Inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajih Al-Soufi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The host-guest complexation between an Alexa 488 labelled adamantane derivative and β-cyclodextrin is studied by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS. A 1:1 complex stoichiometry and a high association equilibrium constant of K = 5.2 × 104 M-1 are obtained in aqueous solution at 25 °C and pH = 6. The necessary experimental conditions are discussed. FCS proves to be an excellent method for the determination of stoichiometry and association equilibrium constant of this type of complexes, where both host and guest are nonfluorescent and which are therefore not easily amenable to standard fluorescence spectroscopic methods.

  14. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate

  15. Far-field infrared super-resolution microscopy using picosecond time-resolved transient fluorescence detected IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Makoto; Kawashima, Yasutake; Takeda, Akihiro; Ohmori, Tsutomu; Fujii, Masaaki

    2007-05-01

    A new far-field infrared super-resolution microscopy combining laser fluorescence microscope and picosecond time-resolved transient fluorescence detected IR (TFD-IR) spectroscopy is proposed. TFD-IR spectroscopy is a kind of IR-visible/UV double resonance spectroscopy, and detects IR transitions by the transient fluorescence due to electronic transition originating from vibrationally excited level populated by IR light. IR images of rhodamine-6G solution and of fluorescent beads were clearly observed by monitoring the transient fluorescence. Super-resolution twice higher than the diffraction limit for IR light was achieved. The IR spectrum due to the transient fluorescence was also measured from spatial domains smaller than the diffraction limit.

  16. Atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy of individual electron trap states using force detected dynamic tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first atomic scale imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electron trap states in completely non-conducting surfaces by dynamic tunnelling force microscopy/spectroscopy. Single electrons are dynamically shuttled to/from individual states in thick films of hafnium silicate and silicon dioxide. The new method opens up surfaces that are inaccessible to the scanning tunnelling microscope for imaging and spectroscopy on an atomic scale.

  17. 7th Czechoslovak spectroscopic conference and VIIIth CANAS (Conference on analytical atomic spectroscopy). Abstracts. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference on spectroscopy held in Ceske Budejovice on June 18-22, 1984, proceeded in three sessions: atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy and special spectroscopic techniques. In the molecular spectroscopy session, 81 papers were read of which 12 were inputted in INIS. The subject of inputted papers was the use of NMR for the analysis of organic compounds and for the study of radiation defects in semiconductors, and the use of infrared spectroscopy for the analysis of nuclear and irradiated materials. (J.P.)

  18. Transmission and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy cell/flow reactor for powder samples under vacuum or in reactive atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, A S; Debefve, L M; Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, A; Ouldchikh, S; Bare, Simon R; Basset, J-M; Gates, B C

    2016-07-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is an element-specific technique for probing the local atomic-scale environment around an absorber atom. It is widely used to investigate the structures of liquids and solids, being especially valuable for characterization of solid-supported catalysts. Reported cell designs are limited in capabilities-to fluorescence or transmission and to static or flowing atmospheres, or to vacuum. Our goal was to design a robust and widely applicable cell for catalyst characterizations under all these conditions-to allow tracking of changes during genesis and during operation, both under vacuum and in reactive atmospheres. Herein, we report the design of such a cell and a demonstration of its operation both with a sample under dynamic vacuum and in the presence of gases flowing at temperatures up to 300 °C, showing data obtained with both fluorescence and transmission detection. The cell allows more flexibility in catalyst characterization than any reported. PMID:27475549

  19. Transmission and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy cell/flow reactor for powder samples under vacuum or in reactive atmospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Hoffman, A. S.

    2016-07-26

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is an element-specific technique for probing the local atomic-scale environment around an absorber atom. It is widely used to investigate the structures of liquids and solids, being especially valuable for characterization of solid-supported catalysts. Reported cell designs are limited in capabilities—to fluorescence or transmission and to static or flowing atmospheres, or to vacuum. Our goal was to design a robust and widely applicable cell for catalyst characterizations under all these conditions—to allow tracking of changes during genesis and during operation, both under vacuum and in reactive atmospheres. Herein, we report the design of such a cell and a demonstration of its operation both with a sample under dynamic vacuum and in the presence of gases flowing at temperatures up to 300 °C, showing data obtained with both fluorescence and transmission detection. The cell allows more flexibility in catalyst characterization than any reported.

  20. Transmission and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy cell/flow reactor for powder samples under vacuum or in reactive atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, A. S.; Debefve, L. M.; Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, A.; Ouldchikh, S.; Bare, Simon R.; Basset, J.-M.; Gates, B. C.

    2016-07-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is an element-specific technique for probing the local atomic-scale environment around an absorber atom. It is widely used to investigate the structures of liquids and solids, being especially valuable for characterization of solid-supported catalysts. Reported cell designs are limited in capabilities—to fluorescence or transmission and to static or flowing atmospheres, or to vacuum. Our goal was to design a robust and widely applicable cell for catalyst characterizations under all these conditions—to allow tracking of changes during genesis and during operation, both under vacuum and in reactive atmospheres. Herein, we report the design of such a cell and a demonstration of its operation both with a sample under dynamic vacuum and in the presence of gases flowing at temperatures up to 300 °C, showing data obtained with both fluorescence and transmission detection. The cell allows more flexibility in catalyst characterization than any reported.

  1. A Pragmatic Smoothing Method for Improving the Quality of the Results in Atomic Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bennun, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    A new smoothing method for the improvement on the identification and quantification of spectral functions based on the previous knowledge of the signals that are expected to be quantified, is presented. These signals are used as weighted coefficients in the smoothing algorithm. This smoothing method was conceived to be applied in atomic and nuclear spectroscopies preferably to these techniques where net counts are proportional to acquisition time, such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and other X-ray fluorescence spectroscopic methods, etc. This algorithm, when properly applied, does not distort the form nor the intensity of the signal, so it is well suited for all kind of spectroscopic techniques. This method is extremely effective at reducing high-frequency noise in the signal much more efficient than a single rectangular smooth of the same width. As all of smoothing techniques, the proposed method improves the precision of the results, but in this case we found also a systematic improvement on the...

  2. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of vitiligo skin in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Richer, Vincent; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Zandi, Soodabeh; Kollias, Nikiforos; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence signals depend on the intensity of the exciting light, the absorption properties of the constituent molecules, and the efficiency with which the absorbed photons are converted to fluorescence emission. The optical features and appearance of vitiligo have been explained primarily on the basis of reduced epidermal pigmentation, which results in abnormal white patches on the skin. The objective of this study is to explore the fluorescence properties of vitiligo and its adjacent normal skin using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. Thirty five (35) volunteers with vitiligo were acquired using a double-grating spectrofluorometer with excitation and emission wavelengths of 260-450 nm and 300-700 nm respectively. As expected, the most pronounced difference between the spectra obtained from vitiligo lesions compared to normally pigmented skin was that the overall fluorescence was much higher in vitiligo; these differences increased at shorter wavelengths, thus matching the characteristic spectral absorption of epidermal melanin. When comparing the fluorescence spectra from vitiligo to normal skin we detected three distinct spectral bands centered at 280nm, 310nm, and 335nm. The 280nm band may possibly be related to inflammation, whereas the 335 nm band may arise from collagen or keratin cross links. The source of the 310 nm band is uncertain; it is interesting to note its proximity to the 311 nm UV lamps used for vitiligo phototherapy. These differences are accounted for not only by changes in epidermal pigment content, but also by other optically active cutaneous biomolecules.

  3. Tissue and serum fluorescence spectroscopy as a marker to monitor radiation therapy in cancer of human uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the development of neoplasia epithelial tissues undergo biochemical and structural changes that can manifest in tissue auto-fluorescence. Several research groups have reported the tissue fluorescence spectroscopy for the discrimination of carcinoma or human uterine cervix. And also there have been several reports on using different biomarkers for the detection of cervical cancer. It is attempted to make use of fluorescence spectroscopy technique to monitor the radiation therapy in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of cervix. The clinical samples from 10 patients with stage II and stage III B cervical cancer were analysed. The results showed significant changes in spectral characteristics in tissue fluorescence before and after radiation

  4. Study of Complexation of Metal Ion-Humic Acid by Using Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of laser fluorescence spectroscopy for determining of complex formation of MIHA has been done. Principle of laser spectroscopy utility is to measure excitation energy emission of metal ion to form a specific spectrum which displayed through MCA detector. The results were found showed that by using this apparatus, the kinetic of complex formation of MIHA could be observed. High sensitivity of the apparatus is very useful to analyze a very low concentration of MI (-8 mol.l-1), however for supplying of the apparatus is rather expensive in price hence for long term application should be recognized wisely. (author)

  5. Study on some current aspects of plasma spectroscopic instrumentation using atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years we have developed different techniques for plasma instrumentation. Within the paper we briefly review the developments of spectroscopic equipment's for their current aspects under the plasma spectroscopy using the general formulations of atomic spectroscopy. Special emphasis will be place on the development simple technique for plasma spectroscopy with several its multidimensional aspects in present scenario of plasma science and nuclear materials. (author)

  6. Infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy for monitoring protein structure and interaction changes during cheese ripening

    OpenAIRE

    Mazerolles, Gérard; Devaux, Marie-Françoise; Duboz, Gabriel; Duployer, Marie-Hélène; Riou, Nadine; Dufour, Éric

    2001-01-01

    Contribution de spectroscopie infrarouge et de la spectroscopie de fluorescence au suivi des modifications de la structure des protéines du fromage pendant son affinage. Seize fromages expérimentaux de type pâte pressée présentant des taux variables d'humidité (de 42,1 à 49,8 % ), de matière grasse (de 23,7 à 31,1 % ) et de protéines (de 20,2 à 25,9 % ) ont été fabriqués et affinés en conditions contrôlées. Les spectres de fluorescence (tryptophane) et les spectres infrarouge (zone Amide I et...

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopy: A tool for the investigation of cheese melting - Correlation with rheological characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Karoui, Romdhane; Laguet, Arlette; Dufour, Éric

    2003-01-01

    La spectroscopie de fluorescence frontale : un outil pour l'étude de la fonte des fromages - Corrélations avec les données rhéologiques. L'évolution de la texture et de la structure de deux fromages à pâte pressée cuite (Comté et Emmental) et un fromage à pâte pressée non cuite (Raclette) en fonction de la température a été déterminée par des mesures rhéologiques (test d'oscillation) et par spectroscopie de fluorescence frontale. Le module d'élasticité (G$'$), le module de perte (G$''$) et la...

  8. Sizes of water-soluble luminescent quantum dots measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was applied to measure the size of water-soluble quantum dots (QDs). The measurements were performed on a home-built FCS system based on the Stokes-Einstein equation. The obtained results showed that for bare CdTe QDs the sizes from FCS were larger than the ones from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The brightness of QDs was also evaluated using FCS technique. It was found that the stability of the surface chemistry of QDs would be significantly improved by capping it with hard-core shell. Our data demonstrated that FCS is a simple, fast, and effective method for characterizing the fluorescent quantum dots, and is especially suitable for determining the fluorescent nanoparticles less than 10 nm in water solution

  9. Ultra-sensitive fluorescence spectroscopy of isolated surface-adsorbed molecules using an optical nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiebeiner, A; Rehband, O; Garcia-Fernandez, R; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2009-11-23

    The strong radial confinement and the pronounced evanescent field of the guided light in optical nanofibers yield favorable conditions for ultra-sensitive surface spectroscopy of molecules deposited on the fiber. Using the guided mode of the nanofiber for both excitation and fluorescence collection, we present spectroscopic measurements on 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride molecules (PTCDA) at ambient conditions. Surface coverages as small as 1 per thousand of a compact monolayer still give rise to fluorescence spectra with a good signal to noise ratio. Moreover, we analyze and quantify the self-absorption effects due to reabsorption of the emitted fluorescence light by circumjacent surface-adsorbed molecules distributed along the fiber waist. PMID:19997412

  10. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for the characterization of membranes : A short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS is a highly sensitive fluorescence microscopy technique that can be used to probe a wide range of biophysical processes including diffusion, Ligand-receptor binding and molecular aggregation on artificial and cell membranes. FCS is able to measure very small volumes at nanomolar concentrations. In this work, we review the different types of diffusion on cell membranes,describe the theory of FCS and illustrate several of its applications for the characterization of membranes and membrane associated proteins. For comparison with other techniques we discuss the differences of FCS and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP,a widely used technique for diffusion measurements on membranes, in detail

  11. Visible-super-resolution infrared microscopy using saturated transient fluorescence detected infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokor, Nándor; Inoue, Keiichi; Kogure, Satoshi; Fujii, Masaaki; Sakai, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    A scanning visible-super-resolution microscope based on the saturation behaviour of transient fluorescence detected infrared (TFD-IR) spectroscopy is proposed. A Gaussian IR beam, a Gaussian visible beam and a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) visible beam are used to obtain two separate two-color excitation fluorescence (2CF) images of the sample. The final image is obtained as the difference between the two recorded images. If the peak intensity of the LG beam is high enough to induce saturation in the fluorescence signal, the image can, in principle, have unlimited spatial resolution. A ˜3-fold improvement in transverse resolution over the visible diffraction limit (and far exceeding the IR diffraction limit) is easily achievable in present experimental setups.

  12. Fluorescence spectroscopy for assessment of liver transplantation grafts concerning graft viability and patient survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollet Filho, José D.; da Silveira, Marina R.; Castro-e-Silva, Orlando; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Evaluating transplantation grafts at harvest is essential for its success. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) can help monitoring changes in metabolic/structural conditions of tissue during transplantation. The aim of the present study is to correlate LIFSobtained spectra of human hepatic grafts during liver transplantation with post-operative patients' mortality rate and biochemical parameters, establishing a method to exclude nonviable grafts before implantation. Orthotopic liver transplantation, piggyback technique was performed in 15 patients. LIFS was performed under 408nm excitation. Collection was performed immediately after opening donor's abdominal cavity, after cold perfusion, end of back-table period, and 5 min and 1 h after warm perfusion at recipient. Fluorescence information was compared to lactate, creatinine, bilirubin and INR levels and to survival status. LIFS was sensitive to liver changes during transplantation stages. Study-in-progress; initial results indicate correlation between fluorescence and life/death status of patients.

  13. Quantitative Diffuse Reflectance and Fluorescence Spectroscopy: A Tool to Monitor Tumor Physiology In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Viola, Ronald J.; Schroeder, Thies; Yarmolenko, Pavel S.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2009-01-01

    This study demonstrates the use of optical spectroscopy for monitoring tumor oxygenation and metabolism in response to hyperoxic gas breathing. Hemoglobin saturation and redox ratio were quantified for a set of 14 and 9 mice, respectively, measured at baseline and during carbogen breathing (95% O2, 5% CO2). In particular, significant increases in hemoglobin saturation and fluorescence redox ratio were observed upon carbogen breathing. These data were compared to that obtained concurrently usi...

  14. Detection of hyaluronidase activity using fluorescein labeled hyaluronic acid and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, Ryan M.; Mummert, Mark; Foldes-Papp, Zeno; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Fudala, Rafal

    2012-01-01

    The over-expression of hyaluronidase has been observed in many types of cancer, suggesting that it may have utility for diagnosis. Here we present a technique for the detection of hyaluronidase using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). Hyaluronan macromolecules (HAs) have been heavily labeled with fluorescein amine resulting in strong self-quenching. In the presence of hyaluronidase, HA is cleaved into smaller, fluorescein-labeled fragments and the self-quenching is released. Such cl...

  15. Fusion of time-correlated single photon counting and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kapusta, P.; Wahl, M.; Benda, Aleš; Hof, Martin; Enderlain, J.

    Santarém : Sociedade Portuguesa de Química , 2005 - (Tavares, E.). s. 146 ISBN 972-99080-7-9. [MAF 9. International Conference on Methods and Applications of Fluorescence. Spectroscopy, Imaging and Probes /9./. 4.9. - 7.9. 2005, Lisbon] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : TCSPC * TTTR * FCS microscope Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  16. Fluorescence Spectroscopy: An Adjunct Diagnostic Tool to Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsy of the Breast

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Changfang; Burnside, Elizabeth S.; Sisney, Gale A.; Salkowski, Lonie R.; Harter, Josephine M.; Yu, Bing; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2009-01-01

    We explored the use of a fiber-optic probe for in vivo fluorescence spectroscopy of breast tissues during percutaneous image-guided breast biopsy. A total of 121 biopsy samples with accompanying histological diagnosis were obtained clinically and investigated in this study. The tissue spectra were analyzed using partial least-squares analysis and represented using a set of principal components (PCs) with dramatically reduced data dimension. For nonmalignant tissue samples, a set of PCs that a...

  17. Different level of fluorescence at Raman spectroscopy of selected clay minerals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ritz, M.; Vaculíková, Lenka; Zdrálková, J.; Plevová, Eva; Bartoňová, L.

    Ostrava: VŠB TUO, 2015. s. 53-53. ISBN 978-80-248-3745-1. [Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Meeting, Nano Ostrava 2015 /4./. 18.05.2015-21.05.2015, Ostrava] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * fluorescence * clay minerals Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  18. Fluorescence spectroscopy: a rapid tool for assessing tetracycline resistance in Bifidobacterium longum

    OpenAIRE

    Ammor, Mohammed Salim; Flórez García, Ana Belén; Margolles Barros, Abelardo; Mayo Pérez, Baltasar

    2006-01-01

    [EN]The tetracycline uptake kinetics of 35 Bifidobacterium longum strains isolated from the human gastrointestinal tract were examined by fluorescence spectroscopy, and the suitability of the technique as a screening tool of tetracycline resistance or susceptibility was determined. The strains were first grouped into three classes based on their corresponding minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of tetracycline, as established by the microdilution method: susceptible (MICs ≤1 µg mL-1), se...

  19. Systematic studies of protein immobilization by surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jing

    2005-01-01

    The research interest of this study is to investigate surface immobilization strategies for proteins and other biomolecules by the surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) technique. The recrystallization features of the S-layer proteins and the possibility of combining the S-layer lattice arrays with other functional molecules make this protein a prime candidate for supramolecular architectures. The recrystallization behavior on gold or on the secondary cell wall po...

  20. Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy combined with lifetime tuning: New perspectives in supported phospholipid bilayer research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benda, Aleš; Fagulová, Veronika; Deyneka, Alexander; Enderlain, J.; Hof, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 23 (2006), s. 9580-9585. ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/2308; GA MŠk LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : spectroscopy * fluorescence * FLCS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.902, year: 2006

  1. Isotopically selective counting of noble gas atoms, using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is being extended to develop a means for counting individual atoms of a selected isotope of a noble gas. In this method, lasers are used for RIS to obtain atomic species (Z) selectivity and a small quadrupole mass spectrometer provides isotopic (A) selectivity. A progress report on the objective of counting each atom of a particular isotope of a noble gas is given. (author)

  2. Isotopically selective counting of noble gas atoms, using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is being extended to develop a means for counting individual atoms of a selected isotope of a noble gas. In this method, lasers are used for RIS to obtain atomic species (Z) selectivity and a small quadrupole mass spectrometer provides isotopic (A) selectivity. A progress report on the objective of counting each atom of a particular isotope of a noble gas is given. 10 references, 4 figures

  3. Updated Atomic Data and Calculations for X-ray Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, A R; Smith, R K; Brickhouse, N S

    2012-01-01

    We describe the latest release of AtomDB, version 2.0.2, a database of atomic data and a plasma modeling code with a focus on X-ray astronomy. This release includes several major updates to the fundamental atomic structure and process data held within AtomDB, incorporating new ionization balance data, state-selective recombination data, and updated collisional excitation data for many ions, including the iron L-shell ions from Fe$^{+16}$ to Fe$^{+23}$ and all of the hydrogen- and helium-like sequences. We also describe some of the effects that these changes have on calculated emission and diagnostic line ratios, such as changes in the temperature implied by the He-like G-ratios of up to a factor of 2.

  4. Precise atomic radiative lifetime via photoassociative spectroscopy of ultracold lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have obtained spectra of the high-lying vibrational levels of the 13Σ+g state of 6Li2 via photoassociation of ultracold 6Li atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap. The 13Σ+g state of the diatomic molecule correlates to a 2S1/2 state atom plus a 2P1/2 state atom. The long-range part of the molecular interaction potential for this state depends on the 2P atomic radiative lifetime. By calculating the energy eigenvalues of a model potential for the 13Σ+g state and fitting them to the experimentally measured vibrational levels, we have extracted a value for the 2P lifetime of 26.99±0.16 ns. The precision is currently limited by the accuracy of a region of the model potential provided by ab initio calculations

  5. Noise spectroscopy with large clouds of cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kashanian, Samir Vartabi; Guerin, William; Lintz, Michel; Fouché, Mathilde; Kaiser, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Noise measurement is a powerful tool to investigate many phenomena from laser characterization to quantum behavior of light. In this paper, we report on intensity noise measurements obtained when a laser beam is transmitted through a large cloud of cold atoms. While this measurement could possibly investigate complex processes such as the influence of atomic motion, one is first limited by the conversion of the intrinsic laser frequency noise to intensity noise via the atomic resonance. We show that a simple model, based on a mean-field approach, which corresponds to describing the atomic cloud by a dielectric susceptibility, is sufficient to understand the main features of this conversion observed in the experimental intensity noise spectrum.

  6. Plasma jet desorption atomization-atomic fluorescence spectrometry and its application to mercury speciation by coupling with thin layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhifu; Zhu, Zhenli; Zheng, Hongtao; Hu, Shenghong

    2012-12-01

    A novel plasma jet desorption atomization (PJDA) source was developed for atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) and coupled on line with thin layer chromatography (TLC) for mercury speciation. An argon dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, which is generated inside a 300 μm quartz capillary, interacts directly with the sample being analyzed and is found to desorb and atomize surface mercury species rapidly. The effectiveness of this PJDA surface sampling technique was demonstrated by measuring AFS signals of inorganic Hg(2+), methylmercury (MeHg), and phenylmercury (PhHg) deposited directly on TLC plate. The detection limits of the proposed PJDA-AFS method for inorganic Hg(2+), MeHg, and PhHg were 0.51, 0.29, and 0.34 pg, respectively, and repeatability was 4.7%, 2.2%, and 4.3% for 10 pg Hg(2+), MeHg, and PhHg. The proposed PJDA-AFS was also successfully coupled to TLC for mercury speciation. Under optimized conditions, the measurements of mercury dithizonate (Hg-D), methylmercury dithizonate (MeHg-D), and phenylmercury dithizonate (PhHg-D) could be achieved within 3 min with detection limits as low as 8.7 pg. The combination of TLC with PJDA-AFS provides a simple, cost-effective, relatively high-throughput way for mercury speciation. PMID:23153091

  7. Single-atom electron energy loss spectroscopy of light elements

    OpenAIRE

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-01-01

    Light elements such as alkali metal (lithium, sodium) or halogen (fluorine, chlorine) are present in various substances and indeed play significant roles in our life. Although atomic behaviours of these elements are often a key to resolve chemical or biological activities, they are hardly visible in transmission electron microscope because of their smaller scattering power and higher knock-on probability. Here we propose a concept for detecting light atoms encaged in a nanospace by means of e...

  8. Blood perfusion and pH monitoring in organs by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Papazoglou, Theodore G.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Stavridi, Marigo; Snyder, Wendy J.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Thomas, Reem; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitivity of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) in detecting a change in tissue pH, and blood perfusion was determined. Rabbits were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. The arterial and venous blood supplies of the kidney were isolated and ligated to alter the perfusion. The femoral artery was cannulated to extract samples for blood gas analysis. A 308-nm XeCl was used as an excitation source. A 600 micrometers core diameter fiber was used for fluorescence acquisition, and the spectra analyzed by an optical multichannel analyzer (EG & G, OMA III). the corresponding intensity ratio R equals INADH / ICOLL was used as an index for respiratory acidosis. Blood perfusion was assessed using the following algorithm: (IELAS minus ICOLL) divided by (INADH minus ICOLL). The intensity ratio linearly decreased with the reduction of blood perfusion. When we totally occluded the artery the ratio decreased tenfold when compared to the ratio of a fully perfused kidney. Results of monitoring blood acidosis by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy shows a significant trend between pH and intensity ratio. Since all the slopes were negative, there is an obvious significant correlation between the pH and NADH.COLLAGEN RATIO. Blue-light-induced fluorescence measurements and ratio fluorometry is a sensitive method for monitoring blood perfusion and acidity or alkalinity of an organ.

  9. Freshness estimation of intact frozen fish using fluorescence spectroscopy and chemometrics of excitation-emission matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElMasry, Gamal; Nagai, Hiroto; Moria, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Naho; Tsuta, Mizuki; Sugiyama, Junichi; Okazaki, Emiko; Nakauchi, Shigeki

    2015-10-01

    The current study attempted to provide a convenient, non-invasive and time-saving method to estimate the freshness of intact horse mackerel (Trachurus japonicus) fish in a frozen state using autofluorescence spectroscopy in tandem with multivariate analysis of fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEM). The extracted fluorescence data from different freshness conditions were pretreated, masked and reorganized to resolve fish fluorescence spectra from overlapping signals and scattering profiles for detecting and characterizing freshness changes. The real freshness values of the examined fish samples were then traditionally determined by the hard chemical analysis using the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and expressed as K-values. The fluorescence EEM data and the real freshness values were modeled using partial least square (PLS) regression and a novel algorithm was proposed to identify the ideal combinations of excitation and emission wavelengths being used as perfect predictors. The results revealed that freshness of frozen fish could be accurately predicted with R(2) of 0.89 and root mean square error estimated by cross validation (RMSECV) of 9.66%. This work substantially demonstrated that the autofluorescence spectroscopy associated with the proposed technical approaches has a high potential in non-destructive sensing of fish freshness in the frozen state. PMID:26078142

  10. Interaction of antihypertensive drug amiloride with metal ions in micellar medium using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gujar, Varsha; Pundge, Vijaykumar; Ottoor, Divya, E-mail: divya@chem.unipune.ac.in

    2015-05-15

    Steady state and life time fluorescence spectroscopy have been employed to study the interaction of antihypertensive drug amiloride with biologically important metal ions i.e. Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} in various micellar media (anionic SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate), nonionic TX-100 (triton X-100) and cationic CTAB (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide)). It was observed that fluorescence properties of drug remain unaltered in the absence of micellar media with increasing concentration of metal ions. However, addition of Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} caused fluorescence quenching of amiloride in the presence of anionic micelle, SDS. Binding of drug with metal ions at the charged micellar interface could be the possible reason for this pH-dependent metal-mediated fluorescence quenching. There were no remarkable changes observed due to metal ions addition when drug was present in cationic and nonionic micellar medium. The binding constant and bimolecular quenching constant were evaluated and compared for the drug–metal complexes using Stern–Volmer equation and fluorescence lifetime values. - Highlights: • Interaction of amiloride with biologically important metal ions, Fe{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. • Monitoring the interaction in various micelle at different pH by fluorescence spectroscopy. • Micelles acts as receptor, amiloride as transducer and metal ions as analyte in the present system. • Interaction study provides pH dependent quenching and binding mechanism of drug with metal ions.

  11. Applications of Fluorescence Spectroscopy for dissolved organic matter characterization in wastewater treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, Angélique; Guérin, Sabrina; Rocher, Vincent; Varrault, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) influences wastewater treatment plants efficiency (WTTP): variations in its quality and quantity can induce a foaming phenomenon and a fouling event inside biofiltration processes. Moreover, in order to manage denitrification step (control and optimization of the nitrate recirculation), it is important to be able to estimate biodegradable organic matter quantity before biological treatment. But the current methods used to characterize organic matter quality, like biological oxygen demand are laborious, time consuming and sometimes not applicable to directly monitor organic matter in situ. In the context of MOCOPEE research program (www.mocopee.com), this study aims to assess the use of optical techniques, such as UV-Visible absorbance and more specifically fluorescence spectroscopy in order to monitor and to optimize process efficiency in WWTP. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy was employed to prospect the possibility of using this technology online and in real time to characterize dissolved organic matter in different effluents of the WWTP Seine Centre (240,000 m3/day) in Paris, France. 35 sewage water influent samples were collected on 10 days at different hours. Data treatment were performed by two methods: peak picking and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). An evolution of DOM quality (position of excitation - emission peaks) and quantity (intensity of fluorescence) was observed between the different treatment steps (influent, primary treatment, biological treatment, effluent). Correlations were found between fluorescence indicators and different water quality key parameters in the sewage influents. We developed different multivariate linear regression models in order to predict a variety of water quality parameters by fluorescence intensity at specific excitation-emission wavelengths. For example dissolved biological oxygen demand (r2=0,900; p<0,0001) and ammonium concentration (r2=0,898; p<0

  12. Modulation Transfer Spectroscopy of Ytterbium Atoms in a Hollow Cathode Lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the experimental study of modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp. The dependences of its linewidth, slope and magnitude on the various experimental parameters are measured and fitted by the well-known theoretical expressions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We have observed the Dicke narrowing effect by increasing the current of the hollow cathode lamp. It is also found that there are the optimal current and laser power to generate the better modulation transfer spectroscopy signal, which can be employed for locking the laser frequency to the atomic transition. (atomic and molecular physics)

  13. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Morrissey, Michael J; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining ground in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension on this work to molecules will be introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for particular applications.

  14. Ultra-trace determination of methylmercuy in seafood by atomic fluorescence spectrometry coupled with electrochemical cold vapor generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Wenchuan; Wang, Zhenghao

    2016-03-01

    A homemade electrochemical flow cell was adopted for the determination of methylmercury. The cold vapor of mercury atoms was generated from the surface of glassycarbon cathode through the method of electrolytic reduction and detected by atomic fluorescence spectroscopy subsequently. The operating conditions were optimized with 2 ng mL(-1) methylmercury standard solution. The caliberation curve was favorably linear when the concentrations of standard HgCH3(+) solutions were in the range of 0.2-5 ng mL(-1)(as Hg). Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for methylmercury was 1.88×10(-3)ng mL(-1) and the precision evaluated by relative standard deviation was 2.0% for six times 2 ng mL(-1) standard solution replicates. The terminal analytical results of seafood samples, available from local market, showed that the methylmercury content ranged within 3.7-45.8 ng g(-1). The recoveries for methylmercury spiked samples were found to be in the range of 87.6-103.6% and the relative standard deviations below 5% (n=6) were acquired, which showed this method was feasible for real sample analysis. PMID:26615576

  15. A semiclassical study of laser-induced atomic fluorescence from Na2, K2 and NaK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J.-M.; Bhattacharyya, D. K.; George, T. F.

    1982-01-01

    A semiclassical treatment of laser-induced atomic fluorescence for the alkali-dimer systems Na2, K2 and NaK is presented. The variation of the fluorescence intensity with the frequency of the exciting laser photon is studied and a comparison of theoretical results with a set of experimental data is presented.

  16. Photoluminescence Enhancement in Nanotextured Fluorescent SiC Passivated by Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas;

    2016-01-01

    The influence of thickness of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films on nano-textured fluorescent 6H-SiC passivation is investigated. The passivation effect on the light emission has been characterized by photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence at room temperature. The results show that...... passivation in fluorescent SiC based white LEDs applications....

  17. Time-resolved and doppler-reduced laser spectroscopy on atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiative lifetimes have been studied in neutral boron, carbon, silicon and strontium, in singly ionized gadolinium and tantalum and in molecular carbon monoxide and C2. The time-resolved techniques were based either on pulsed lasers or pulse-modulated CW lasers. Several techniques have been utilized for the production of free atoms and ions such as evaporation into an atomic beam, sputtering in hollow cathodes and laser-produced plasmas. Hyperfine interactions in boron, copper and strontium have been examined using quantum beat spectroscopy, saturation spectroscopy and collimated atomic beam spectroscopy. Measurement techniques based on effusive hollow cathodes as well as laser produced plasmas in atomic physics have been developed. Investigations on laser produced plasmas using two colour beam deflection tomography for determination of electron densities have been performed. Finally, new possibilities for view-time-expansion in light-in-flight holography using mode-locked CW lasers have been demonstrated. (au)

  18. Time-resolved two-photon excitation fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy using a high repetition rate streak camera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Li-xin; QU Ju-le; LIN Zi-yang; WANG Lei; FU Zhe; GUO Bao-ping; NIU Han-ben

    2007-01-01

    We present a time-resolved two-photon excitation fluorescence spectroscopy and a simultaneous time- and spectrumresolved multifocal multiphoton microscopy system that is based on a high repetition rate picosecond streak camera for providing time- and spectrum- resolved measurement and imaging in biomedicine. The performance of the system is tested and characterized by the fluorescence spectrum and lifetime analysis of several standard fluorescent dyes and their mixtures.Spectrum-resolved fluorescence lifetime images of fluorescence beads are obtained. Potential applications of the system include clinical diagnostics and cell biology etc.

  19. Cure monitoring of an epoxy-anhydride system by means of fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, D.H.; Kim, D.S.; Lee, J.K. [Kumoh National Univeristy of Technology, Kumi (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    In the present study the cure behavior of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) using an anhydride-based hardener in the presence of N,N-dimethyl benzyl amine (BDMA) or 1-cyanoethyl-2-ethyl-4-methyl imidazole (2E4MZ-CN) as an accelerator has been monitored and interpreted from the viewpoint of photophysical properties by means of fluorescence spectroscopy. To do this, 1,3-bis-(1-pyrene)propane (BPP) was well incorporated in the epoxy resin system by mechanical blending. The BPP probe, which is very sensitive to conformational change of the molecule influenced by the surrounding medium, successfully formed intramolecular excimer fluorescence. It is susceptible to the micro-viscosity or local viscosity and molecular mobility according to the epoxy cure. The cure behavior was explained with monomer fluorescence intensity (I{sub M}), excimer fluorescence intensity (I{sub E}) and I{sub M}/I{sub E} ratio as a function of cure time, cure temperature and accelerator. The present work agreed with the previous report on the cure behavior of an epoxy-anhydride system studied using DSc or torsion pendulum method. This study also suggests that the use of fluorescence technique may provide information on cure behavior of a thermosetting resin in a low temperature region, which has not been well interpreted by other analytical methods. (author). 31 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Study of the interaction between 5-sulfosalicylic acid and bovine serum albumin by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Juan, E-mail: zhangjuano13@126.com [Department of Chemistry, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan City, Ningxia Province 750004 (China); Yan, Qianshun; Liu, Jianping; Lu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Yanshu [Department of Chemistry, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan City, Ningxia Province 750004 (China); Wang, Jie; Wang, Shujing [Medical Science Research Center, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan City, Ningxia Province 750004 (China)

    2013-02-15

    The interaction between 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) at pH 7.40 was studied by fluorescence and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy at different temperatures. The results revealed that SSA caused the fluorescence quenching of BSA through a static quenching procedure. The binding constant K was measured by fluorescence quenching method. The thermodynamic parameters, {Delta}H and {Delta}S, were calculated to be 23.16 kJ mol{sup -1}>0 and 162.37 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}>0, respectively, which suggested that the hydrophobic force played a major role in the reaction of SSA on BSA. The distance r between donor (BSA) and acceptor (SSA) was obtained according to the Foerster non-radiation energy transfer theory. The results of synchronous fluorescence spectra, three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and far-UV circular dichroism spectra showed that the interaction between BSA and SSA induced conformational changes in BSA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of BSA with SSA was investigated by FL, UV-vis and CD spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {Delta}H, {Delta}G, {Delta}S, K{sub q}, K{sub sv}, K and r were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrophobic interaction played a major role in the reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conformation of BSA was changed in the presence of SSA.

  1. Study of the interaction between 5-sulfosalicylic acid and bovine serum albumin by fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) at pH 7.40 was studied by fluorescence and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy at different temperatures. The results revealed that SSA caused the fluorescence quenching of BSA through a static quenching procedure. The binding constant K was measured by fluorescence quenching method. The thermodynamic parameters, ΔH and ΔS, were calculated to be 23.16 kJ mol−1>0 and 162.37 J mol−1 K−1>0, respectively, which suggested that the hydrophobic force played a major role in the reaction of SSA on BSA. The distance r between donor (BSA) and acceptor (SSA) was obtained according to the Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory. The results of synchronous fluorescence spectra, three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and far-UV circular dichroism spectra showed that the interaction between BSA and SSA induced conformational changes in BSA. - Highlights: ► Interaction of BSA with SSA was investigated by FL, UV–vis and CD spectra. ► ΔH, ΔG, ΔS, Kq, Ksv, K and r were calculated. ► Hydrophobic interaction played a major role in the reaction. ► Conformation of BSA was changed in the presence of SSA.

  2. Ground state C2 density measurement in carbon plume using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of C2 molecules produced by laser ablation of a graphite target is studied using optical emission spectroscopy, dynamic imaging and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) investigations. We observe peculiar bifurcation of carbon plume into two parts; stationary component close to the target surface and a component moving away from the target surface which splits further in two parts as the plume expands. The two distinct plumes are attributed to recombination of carbon species and formation of nanoparticles. The molecular carbon C2 moves with a faster velocity and dies out at ∼ 800 ns whereas the clusters of nanoparticle move with a slower velocity due to their higher mass and can be observed even after 1600 ns. C2 molecules in the d3Πg state were probed for laser-induced fluorescence during ablation of graphite using the Swan (0,0) band at 516.5 nm. The fluorescence spectrum and images of fluorescence d3Πg - a3Πu(0,1)(λ = 563.5 nm) are recorded using a spectrograph attached to the ICCD camera. To get absolute ground state C2 density from fluorescence images, the images are calibrated using complimentary absorption experiment. This study qualitatively helps to get optimum conditions for nanoparticle formation using the laser ablation of graphite target and hence deducing optimum conditions for thin film deposition.

  3. Time-resolved fluorescence polarization spectroscopy of visible and near infrared dyes in picosecond dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) dyes absorb and emit light within the range from 700 to 900 nm have several benefits in biological studies for one- and/or two-photon excitation for deeper penetration of tissues. These molecules undergo vibrational and rotational motion in the relaxation of the excited electronic states, Due to the less than ideal anisotropy behavior of NIR dyes stemming from the fluorophores elongated structures and short fluorescence lifetime in picosecond range, no significant efforts have been made to recognize the theory of these dyes in time-resolved polarization dynamics. In this study, the depolarization of the fluorescence due to emission from rotational deactivation in solution will be measured with the excitation of a linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulse and a streak camera. The theory, experiment and application of the ultrafast fluorescence polarization dynamics and anisotropy are illustrated with examples of two of the most important medical based dyes. One is NIR dye, namely Indocyanine Green (ICG) and is compared with Fluorescein which is in visible range with much longer lifetime. A set of first-order linear differential equations was developed to model fluorescence polarization dynamics of NIR dye in picosecond range. Using this model, the important parameters of ultrafast polarization spectroscopy were identified: risetime, initial time, fluorescence lifetime, and rotation times.

  4. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen and the Proton Size Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udem, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Precise determination of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference. A recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct. We hope to contribute to the resolution of this so called `proton size puzzle' by providing additional experimental input from the hydrogen side.

  5. Probing local conformation and dynamics of molecular complexes using phase-selective fluorescence correlation and coherence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Geoffrey Adam

    When two or more fluorescent chromophores are closely spaced in a macromolecular complex, dipolar coupling leads to delocalization of the excited states, forming excitons. The relative transition frequencies and magnitudes are sensitive to conformation, which can then be studied with optical spectroscopy. Non-invasive fluorescence spectroscopy techniques are useful tools for the study of dilute concentrations of such naturally fluorescent or fluorescently labeled biological systems. This dissertation presents two phase-selective fluorescence spectroscopy techniques for the study of dynamical processes in bio-molecular systems across a wide range of timescales. Polarization-modulated Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy (PM-FICS) is a novel phase-selective fluorescence spectroscopy for simultaneous study of translational and conformational dynamics. We utilize modulated polarization and intensity gratings with phase-sensitive signal collection to monitor the collective fluctuations of an ensemble of fluorescent molecules. The translational and conformational dynamics can be separated and analyzed separately to generate 2D spectral densities and joint probability distributions. We present results of PM-FICS experiments on DsRed, a fluorescent protein complex. Detailed information on thermally driven dipole-coupled optical switching pathways is found, for which we propose a conformation transition mechanism. 2D phase-modulation electronic coherence spectroscopy is a third-order nonlinear spectroscopy that uses collinear pulse geometry and acousto-optic phase modulation to isolate rephasing and nonrephasing contributions to the collected fluorescence signal. We generate 2D spectra, from which we are able to determine relative dipole orientations, and therefore structural conformation, in addition to detailed coupling information. We present results of experiments on magnesium tetraphenylporphyrin dimers in lipid vesicle bilayers. The 2D spectra show clearly

  6. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in fogwater by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, J.E.; Valsaraj, K.T.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in fogwater samples collected in southeastern Louisiana and central-eastern China has been characterized using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy. The goal of the study was to illustrate the utility of fluorescence for obtaining information on the large fraction of organic carbon in fogwaters (typically >40% by weight) that defies characterization in terms of specific chemical compounds without the difficulty inherent in obtaining sufficient fogwater volume to isolate DOM for assessment using other spectroscopic and chemical analyses. Based on the findings of previous studies using other characterization methods, it was anticipated that the unidentified organic carbon fraction would have characteristic peaks associated with humic substances and fluorescent amino acids. Both humic- and protein-like fluorophores were observed in the fogwater spectra and fluorescence-derived indices for the fogwater had similar values to those of soil and sediment porewater. Greater biological character was observed in samples with higher organic carbon concentrations. Fogwaters are shown to contain a mixture of terrestrially- and microbially-derived fluorescent organic material, which is expected to be derived from an array of different sources, such as suspended soil and dust particles, biogenic emissions and organic substances generated by atmospheric processes. The fluorescence results indicate that much of the unidentified organic carbon present in fogwater can be represented by humic-like and biologically-derived substances similar to those present in other aquatic systems, though it should be noted that fluorescent signatures representative of DOM produced by atmospheric processing of organic aerosols may be contributing to or masked by humic-like fluorophores. ?? 2010.

  7. PEGylated Fluorescent Nanoparticles from One-Pot Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization and “Click Chemistry”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qun Xu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of PEGylated fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs based on atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP and “click chemistry” in one-pot synthesis is presented. First, poly(p-chloromethyl styrene-alt-N-propargylmaleimide (P(CMS-alt-NPM copolymer was prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization. Subsequently, the azido-containing fluorene-based polymer, poly[(9,9-dihexylfluorene-alt-(9,9-bis-(6-azidohexylfluorene] (PFC6N3, was synthesized via Suzuki coupling polymerization, followed by azidation. Finally, the PEGylated fluorescent NPs were prepared via simultaneous intermolecular “click” cross-linking between P(CMS-alt-NPM and PFC6N3 and the ATRP of poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMMA using P(CMS-alt-NPM as the macroinitiator. The low cytotoxicity of the PEGylated fluorescent NPs was revealed by incubation with KB cells, a cell line derived from carcinoma of the nasopharynx, in an in vitro experiment. The biocompatible PEGylated fluorescent NPs were further used as a labeling agent for KB cells.

  8. On mechanism of intermediate-sized circular DNA compaction mediated by spermine: Contribution of fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Humpolíčková, Jana; Štěpánek, M.; Kral, Teresa; Benda, Aleš; Procházka, K.; Hof, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 18, 3-4 (2008), s. 679-684. ISSN 1053-0509 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400621; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : DNA compaction * fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * dynamic light scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.880, year: 2008

  9. Spectroscopy of cold rubidium Rydberg atoms for applications in quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Ryabtsev, I I; Tretyakov, D B; Entin, V M; Yakshina, E A

    2016-01-01

    Atoms in highly excited (Rydberg) states have a number of unique properties which make them attractive for applications in quantum information. These are large dipole moments, lifetimes and polarizabilities, as well as strong long-range interactions between Rydberg atoms. Experimental methods of laser cooling and precision spectroscopy enable the trapping and manipulation of single Rydberg atoms and applying them for practical implementation of quantum gates over qubits of a quantum computer based on single neutral atoms in optical traps. In this paper, we give a review of the experimental and theoretical work performed by the authors at the Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS and Novosibirsk State University on laser and microwave spectroscopy of cold Rb Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap and on their possible applications in quantum information. We also give a brief review of studies done by other groups in this area.

  10. A comparative evaluation of Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy for optical diagnosis of oral neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, S. K.; Krishna, H.; Sidramesh, M.; Chaturvedi, P.; Gupta, P. K.

    2011-08-01

    We report the results of a comparative evaluation of in vivo fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy for diagnosis of oral neoplasia. The study carried out at Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, involved 26 healthy volunteers and 138 patients being screened for neoplasm of oral cavity. Spectral measurements were taken from multiple sites of abnormal as well as apparently uninvolved contra-lateral regions of the oral cavity in each patient. The different tissue sites investigated belonged to one of the four histopathology categories: 1) squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 2) oral sub-mucous fibrosis (OSMF), 3) leukoplakia (LP) and 4) normal squamous tissue. A probability based multivariate statistical algorithm utilizing nonlinear Maximum Representation and Discrimination Feature for feature extraction and Sparse Multinomial Logistic Regression for classification was developed for direct multi-class classification in a leave-one-patient-out cross validation mode. The results reveal that the performance of Raman spectroscopy is considerably superior to that of fluorescence in stratifying the oral tissues into respective histopathologic categories. The best classification accuracy was observed to be 90%, 93%, 94%, and 89% for SCC, SMF, leukoplakia, and normal oral tissues, respectively, on the basis of leave-one-patient-out cross-validation, with an overall accuracy of 91%. However, when a binary classification was employed to distinguish spectra from all the SCC, SMF and leukoplakik tissue sites together from normal, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy were seen to have almost comparable performances with Raman yielding marginally better classification accuracy of 98.5% as compared to 94% of fluorescence.

  11. Multiphoton microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging and optical spectroscopy for the diagnosis of neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skala, Melissa Caroline

    2007-12-01

    the ultraviolet to visible wavelength range indicated that the most diagnostic optical signals originate from sub-surface tissue layers. Optical properties extracted from these spectroscopy measurements showed a significant decrease in the hemoglobin saturation, absorption coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and fluorescence intensity (at 400 nm excitation) in neoplastic compared to normal tissues. The results from these studies indicate that multiphoton microscopy and optical spectroscopy can non-invasively provide information on tissue structure and function in vivo that is related to tissue pathology.

  12. Fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity: analysis of 30 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, A. L. N.; Correr, W. R.; Azevedo, L. H.; Galletta, V. K.; Pinto, C. A. L.; Kowalski, L. P.; Kurachi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer is a major health problem worldwide and although early diagnosis of potentially malignant and malignant diseases is associated with better treatment results, a large number of cancers are initially misdiagnosed, with unfortunate consequences for long-term survival. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a noninvasive modality of diagnostic approach using induced fluorescence emission in tumors that can improve diagnostic accuracy. The objective of this study was to determine the ability to discriminate between normal oral mucosa and potentially malignant disorders by fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence investigation under 408 and 532 nm excitation wavelengths was performed on 60 subjects, 30 with potentially malignant disorders and 30 volunteers with normal mucosa. Data was analyzed to correlate fluorescence patterns with clinical and histopathological diagnostics. Fluorescence spectroscopy used as a point measurement technique resulted in a great variety of spectral information. In a qualitative analysis of the fluorescence spectral characteristics of each type of injury evaluated, it was possible to discriminate between normal and abnormal oral mucosa. The results show the potential use of fluorescence spectroscopy for an improved discrimination of oral disorders.

  13. Electronic energy transport and fluorescence spectroscopy for structural insights into proteins, regular protein aggregates and lipid systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikaelsson, T.; Šachl, Radek; Johansson, L. B. A.

    Hardcover : Springer, 2009 - (Geddes, C.), s. 53-91 ISBN 978-0-387-88721-0. - (Reviews in Fluorescence. Annual volumes 2007) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : fluorescence spectroscopy * electronic energy transfer/migration * donor-acceptor energy transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity: analysis of 30 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral cancer is a major health problem worldwide and although early diagnosis of potentially malignant and malignant diseases is associated with better treatment results, a large number of cancers are initially misdiagnosed, with unfortunate consequences for long-term survival. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a noninvasive modality of diagnostic approach using induced fluorescence emission in tumors that can improve diagnostic accuracy. The objective of this study was to determine the ability to discriminate between normal oral mucosa and potentially malignant disorders by fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence investigation under 408 and 532 nm excitation wavelengths was performed on 60 subjects, 30 with potentially malignant disorders and 30 volunteers with normal mucosa. Data was analyzed to correlate fluorescence patterns with clinical and histopathological diagnostics. Fluorescence spectroscopy used as a point measurement technique resulted in a great variety of spectral information. In a qualitative analysis of the fluorescence spectral characteristics of each type of injury evaluated, it was possible to discriminate between normal and abnormal oral mucosa. The results show the potential use of fluorescence spectroscopy for an improved discrimination of oral disorders. (paper)

  15. A simple preparation of Ag@graphene nanocomposites for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of fluorescent anticancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ying; Yan, Xueying; Wang, Yi

    2016-05-01

    A simple method was developed to synthesize Ag@graphene nanocomposites with rough Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) conjugated with graphene nanosheets, and the nanocomposites could be used as substrates for effective surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of fluorescent anticancer drug (Dox) since they could not only enhance the Raman signals but also suppress the fluorescent signals.

  16. Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Niering, M

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the present thesis the internal structure of the hydrogen atom is studied by means of optical spectroscopic methods. The main interest is thereby devoted to the transition of the 1S ground-state into the metastable 2S-state.

  17. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and <1 ms per point measurement, respectively, for the detection of tissue autofluorescent components. Organic and biological chromophores with lifetimes that spanned a 0.8–7 ns range were used for system validation, and the measured lifetimes from the organic fluorophores deviated by less than 10% from values reported in the literature. Multi-spectral lifetime images of organic dye solutions contained in glass capillary tubes were recorded by raster scanning the single fiber probe in a 2D plane to validate the system as an imaging tool. The lifetime measurement variability was measured indicating that the system provides reproducible results with a standard deviation smaller than 50 ps. The ms-TRFS is a compact apparatus that makes possible the fast, accurate, and precise multispectral time-resolved fluorescence

  18. Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an atmospheric pressure air plasma jet

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, Jim; Gogna, G; Gaman, C.; Turner , MM; Daniels, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Atomic Oxygen density is measured in an air atmospheric jet system using Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF). The TALIF system is calibrated using photolysis of molecular oxygen (O2). The RF power coupled into the plasma is varied and the resulting atomic oxygen density in the plasma plume measured.

  19. Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy for analysis of vegetable oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigri S.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and fluorescence spectroscopy, combined with chemometric approaches have been developed to analysis of extra virgin olive oil adulterated with pomace olive oil. The measurements were made on pure vegetable oils: extra virgin oil, pomace olive oil and that adulterated with varying concentration of pomace olive oil. Today, the application of FTIR spectroscopy has increased in food studied, and particularly has become a powerful analytical tool in the study of edible oils and fats. The spectral regions where the variations were observed chosen for developing models and cross validation was used. The synchronous fluorescence spectrometry takes advantage of the hardware capability to vary both the excitation and emission wavelengths during the analysis with constant wavelength difference is maintained between the two. The region between 300 and 400 nm is attributed to the tocopherols and phenols, the derivatives of vitamin E are associated with the region 400–600 nm and the bands in the region of 600–700 nm are attributed to the chlorophyll and peophytin pigments. The results presented in this study suggest that FTIR and fluorescence may be a useful tool for analysis and detecting adulteration of extra virgin olive oil with pomace oil.

  20. Structural changes of soy proteins at the oil-water interface studied by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerati-u-rai, Maneephan; Miriani, Matteo; Iametti, Stefania; Bonomi, Francesco; Corredig, Milena

    2012-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to acquire information on the structural changes of proteins at the oil/water interface in emulsions prepared by using soy protein isolate, glycinin, and β-conglycinin rich fractions. Spectral changes occurring from differences in the exposure of tryptophan residues to the solvent were evaluated with respect to spectra of native, urea-denatured, and heat treated proteins. The fluorescence emission maxima of the emulsions showed a red shift with respect to those of native proteins, indicating that the tryptophan residues moved toward a more hydrophilic environment after adsorption at the interface. The heat-induced irreversible transitions were investigated using microcalorimetry. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies indicated that while the protein in solution underwent irreversible structural changes with heating at 75 and 95°C for 15 min, the interface-adsorbed proteins showed very little temperature-induced rearrangements. The smallest structural changes were observed in soy protein isolate, probably because of the higher extent of protein-protein interactions in this material, as compared to the β-conglycinin and to the glycinin fractions. This work brings new evidence of structural changes of soy proteins upon adsorption at the oil water interface, and provides some insights on the possible protein exchange events that may occur between adsorbed and unadsorbed proteins in the presence of oil droplets. PMID:22227018

  1. Tissue classification and diagnostics using a fiber probe for combined Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchi, Riccardo; Anand, Suresh; Crisci, Alfonso; Giordano, Flavio; Rossari, Susanna; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Maio, Vincenza; Massi, Daniela; Nesi, Gabriella; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Guerrini, Renzo; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-07-01

    Two different optical fiber probes for combined Raman and fluorescence spectroscopic measurements were designed, developed and used for tissue diagnostics. Two visible laser diodes were used for fluorescence spectroscopy, whereas a laser diode emitting in the NIR was used for Raman spectroscopy. The two probes were based on fiber bundles with a central multimode optical fiber, used for delivering light to the tissue, and 24 surrounding optical fibers for signal collection. Both fluorescence and Raman spectra were acquired using the same detection unit, based on a cooled CCD camera, connected to a spectrograph. The two probes were successfully employed for diagnostic purposes on various tissues in a good agreement with common routine histology. This study included skin, brain and bladder tissues and in particular the classification of: malignant melanoma against melanocytic lesions and healthy skin; urothelial carcinoma against healthy bladder mucosa; brain tumor against dysplastic brain tissue. The diagnostic capabilities were determined using a cross-validation method with a leave-one-out approach, finding very high sensitivity and specificity for all the examined tissues. The obtained results demonstrated that the multimodal approach is crucial for improving diagnostic capabilities. The system presented here can improve diagnostic capabilities on a broad range of tissues and has the potential of being used for endoscopic inspections in the near future.

  2. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy as a tool for determining quality of sparkling wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elcoroaristizabal, Saioa; Callejón, Raquel M; Amigo, Jose M; Ocaña-González, Juan A; Morales, M Lourdes; Ubeda, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Browning in sparkling wines was assessed by the use of excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy combined with PARAllel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC). Four different cava sparkling wines were monitored during an accelerated browning process and subsequently storage. Fluorescence changes observed during the accelerated browning process were monitored and compared with other conventional parameters: absorbance at 420nm (A420) and the content of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF). A high similarity of the spectral profiles for all sparkling wines analyzed was observed, being explained by a four component PARAFAC model. A high correlation between the third PARAFAC factor (465/530nm) and the commonly used non-enzymatic browning indicators was observed. The fourth PARAFAC factor (280/380nm) gives us also information about the browning process following a first order kinetic reaction. Hence, excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy, together with PARAFAC, provides a faster alternative for browning monitoring to conventional methods, as well as useful key indicators for quality control. PMID:27041327

  3. The modified fluorescence based vesicle fluctuation spectroscopy technique for determination of lipid bilayer bending properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabik, Dominik; Przybyło, Magda; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Iglič, Aleš; Langner, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Lipid bilayer is the main constitutive element of biological membrane, which confines intracellular space. The mechanical properties of biological membranes may be characterized by various parameters including membrane stiffness or membrane bending rigidity, which can be measured using flicker noise spectroscopy. The flicker noise spectroscopy exploits the spontaneous thermal undulations of the membrane. The method is based on the quantitative analysis of a series of microscopic images captured during thermal membrane fluctuations. Thus, measured bending rigidity coefficient depends on the image quality as well as the selection of computational tools for image processing and mathematical model used. In this work scanning and spinning disc confocal microscopies were used to visualize fluctuating membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles. The bending rigidity coefficient was calculated for different acquisition modes, using different fluorescent probes and different image processing methods. It was shown that both imaging approaches gave similar bending coefficient values regardless of acquisition time. Using the developed methodology the effect of fluorescent probe type and aqueous phase composition on the value of the membrane bending rigidity coefficient was measured. Specifically it was found that the bending rigidity coefficient of DOPC bilayer in water is smaller than that determined for POPC membrane. It has been found that the POPC and DOPC bending rigidities coefficient in sucrose solution was lower than that in water. Fluorescence imaging makes possible the quantitative analysis of membrane mechanical properties of inhomogeneous membrane. PMID:26615919

  4. X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms at SIDDHARTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargnelli, M.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Curceanu, C.; d'Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Ghio, F.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Levi Sandri, P.; Marton, J.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Quaglia, R.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Tatsuno, H.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Wünschek, B.; Zmeskal, J.

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray measurements of kaonic atoms play an important role for understanding the low-energy QCD in the strangeness sector. The SIDDHARTA experiment studied the X-ray transitions of 4 light kaonic atoms (H, D, 3He, and 4He) using the DAFNE electron-positron collider at LNF (Italy). Most precise values of the shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s state were determined, which have been now used as fundamental information for the low-energy K-p interaction in theoretical studies. An upper limit of the X-ray yield of kaonic deuterium was derived, important for future K-d experiments. The shifts and widths of the kaonic 3He and 4He 2p states were obtained, confirming the end of the "kaonic helium puzzle". In this contribution also the plans for new experiments of kaonic deuterium are being presented.

  5. X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms at SIDDHARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cargnelli M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The X-ray measurements of kaonic atoms play an important role for understanding the low-energy QCD in the strangeness sector. The SIDDHARTA experiment studied the X-ray transitions of 4 light kaonic atoms (H, D, 3He, and 4He using the DAFNE electron-positron collider at LNF (Italy. Most precise values of the shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s state were determined, which have been now used as fundamental information for the low-energy K−p interaction in theoretical studies. An upper limit of the X-ray yield of kaonic deuterium was derived, important for future K−d experiments. The shifts and widths of the kaonic 3He and 4He 2p states were obtained, confirming the end of the “kaonic helium puzzle”. In this contribution also the plans for new experiments of kaonic deuterium are being presented.

  6. Surface spectroscopy using inelastic scattering of He atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low energy (∼0 meV) neutral helium atomic beam has been scattered from crystal surfaces. Energy gain and face phonons may be measured by time-of-flight analysis of single phonon scattering dominates, allowing the frequency and wave vector of individual surface phonons to be determined and their dispersion relations plotted. Resonant interaction with bound states of the helium in the surface potential well is found to greatly affect the inelastic scattering cross-sections. 23 references, 27 figures

  7. Precision Spectroscopy of Kaonic Atoms at DAΦNE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scordo A.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The SIDDHARTA experiment aims at a precise measurement of K -series kaonic hydrogen x-rays and the first-ever measurement of the kaonic deuterium x-rays to determine the strong-interaction energy-level shift and width of the lowest lying atomic states. These measurements offer a unique possibility to precisely determine the isospin-dependent $ar{K}$-nucleon scattering lengths.

  8. Electrochemical hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry for detection of tin in canned foods using polyaniline-modified lead cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electrochemical hydride generation system with polyaniline-modified lead cathode was developed for tin determination by coupling with atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The tin fluorescence signal intensity was improved evidently as the polyaniline membrane could facilitate the transformation process from atomic tin to the SnH4 and prevent the aggradation of Sn atom on Pb electrode surface. The effects of experimental parameters and interferences have been studied. The limit of detection (LOD) was 1.5 ng mL-1 (3σ) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 3.3% for 11 consecutive measurements of 50 ng mL-1 Sn(IV) standard solution.

  9. Investigation of the inclusion behavior between p-sulfoniccalix[8]arene and norfloxacin by fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The host-guest complexation between p-sulfoniccalix[8]arene (SC8A) and norfloxacin (NFLX) in aqueous solution was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. Strong fluorescence intensity of the NFLX aqueous solution alone and obvious fluorescence quenching of NFLX solution in the presence of SC8A were observed. The fluorescence lifetimes of NFLX and SC8A-NFLX inclusion complex were determined and the effect of temperature on SC8A-NFLX inclusion complex was studied. The static quenching of the inclusion was obtained, that is the SC8A can form a nonfluorescent ground-state inclusion complex with NFLX. As the results show, the combined ratio (n) was 1:1 and association constant K was 1.17x105 L/mol. Based on the experimental results, the mechanism of the inclusion complex was explored. The space matching, electrostatic force and hydrogen bond play important effects in the inclusion process. Subsequently, the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution led to the recovery of fluorescence intensity. It is indicated that BSA can liberate the NFLX into the solution by destructing the SC8A-NFLX inclusion complex. Hence SC8A may be used for controlled-release drug delivery in the pharmaceutical industry. - Highlights: → Fluorescence lifetimes of NFLX and SC8A-NFLX inclusion complex were determined. → Mechanism of the SC8A-NFLX inclusion complex was explored. → It is proved that SC8A can form a nonfluorescent ground-state inclusion complex with NFLX.

  10. Serial Femtosecond Crystallography and Ultrafast Absorption Spectroscopy of the Photoswitchable Fluorescent Protein IrisFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Sliwa, Michel; Gallat, François-Xavier; Sugahara, Michihiro; Guillon, Virginia; Schirò, Giorgio; Coquelle, Nicolas; Woodhouse, Joyce; Roux, Laure; Gotthard, Guillaume; Royant, Antoine; Uriarte, Lucas Martinez; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Joti, Yasumasa; Byrdin, Martin; Mizohata, Eiichi; Nango, Eriko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Adam, Virgile; Cammarata, Marco; Schlichting, Ilme; Bourgeois, Dominique; Weik, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins find growing applications in cell biology, yet mechanistic details, in particular on the ultrafast photochemical time scale, remain unknown. We employed time-resolved pump-probe absorption spectroscopy on the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein IrisFP in solution to study photoswitching from the nonfluorescent (off) to the fluorescent (on) state. Evidence is provided for the existence of several intermediate states on the pico- and microsecond time scales that are attributed to chromophore isomerization and proton transfer, respectively. Kinetic modeling favors a sequential mechanism with the existence of two excited state intermediates with lifetimes of 2 and 15 ps, the second of which controls the photoswitching quantum yield. In order to support that IrisFP is suited for time-resolved experiments aiming at a structural characterization of these ps intermediates, we used serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free electron laser and solved the structure of IrisFP in its on state. Sample consumption was minimized by embedding crystals in mineral grease, in which they remain photoswitchable. Our spectroscopic and structural results pave the way for time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography aiming at characterizing the structure of ultrafast intermediates in reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins. PMID:26866390

  11. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, Stanislav; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-04-01

    A number of fluorescence microscopy techniques are described to study dynamics of fluorescently labeled proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and whole organelles. However, for studies of plant plasma membrane (PM) proteins, the number of these techniques is still limited because of the high complexity of processes that determine the dynamics of PM proteins and the existence of cell wall. Here, we report on the usage of raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for studies of integral PM proteins in suspension-cultured tobacco cells and show its potential in comparison with the more widely used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method. For RICS, a set of microscopy images is obtained by single-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence fluctuations are subsequently correlated between individual pixels and the information on protein mobility are extracted using a model that considers processes generating the fluctuations such as diffusion and chemical binding reactions. As we show here using an example of two integral PM transporters of the plant hormone auxin, RICS uncovered their distinct short-distance lateral mobility within the PM that is dependent on cytoskeleton and sterol composition of the PM. RICS, which is routinely accessible on modern CLSM instruments, thus represents a valuable approach for studies of dynamics of PM proteins in plants. PMID:27041337

  12. Fluorescence spectroscopy of collagen crosslinking: non-invasive and in situ evaluation of corneal stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Walfre; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Ruisheng; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2015-03-01

    Collagen is a long fibrous structural protein that imparts mechanical support, strength and elasticity to many tissues. The state of the tissue mechanical environment is related to tissue physiology, disease and function. In the cornea, the collagen network is responsible for its shape and clarity; disruption of this network results in degradation of visual acuity, for example in the keratoconus eye disease. The objective of the present study is to investigate the feasibility of using the endogenous fluorescence of collagen crosslinks to evaluate variations in the mechanical state of tissue, in particular, the stiffness of cornea in response to different degrees of photo-crosslinking or RGX treatment—a novel keratoconus treatment. After removing the epithelium, rabbit corneas were stained with Rose Bengal and then irradiated with a 532 nm solid-state laser. Analysis of the excitation spectra obtained by fluorescence spectroscopy shows a correlation between the fluorescence intensity at 370/460 nm excitation/emission wavelengths and the mechanical properties. In principle, it may be feasible to use the endogenous fluorescence of collagen crosslinks to evaluate the mechanical stiffness of cornea non-invasively and in situ.

  13. Laser cooling of dense atomic gases by collisional redistribution of radiation and spectroscopy of molecular dimers in a dense buffer gas environment

    CERN Document Server

    Saß, Anne; Christopoulos, Stavros; Knicker, Katharina; Moroshkin, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We study laser cooling of atomic gases by collisional redistribution of fluorescence. In a high pressure buffer gas regime, frequent collisions perturb the energy levels of alkali atoms, which allows for the absorption of a far red detuned irradiated laser beam. Subsequent spontaneous decay occurs close to the unperturbed resonance frequency, leading to a cooling of the dense gas mixture by redistribution of fluorescence. Thermal deflection spectroscopy indicates large relative temperature changes down to and even below room temperature starting from an initial cell temperature near 700 K. We are currently performing a detailed analysis of the temperature distribution in the cell. As we expect this cooling technique to work also for molecular-noble gas mixtures, we also present initial spectroscopic experiments on alkali-dimers in a dense buffer gas surrounding.

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool for quality assessment of humic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguta, Patrycja

    2016-04-01

    *The studies were partly carried out within the framework of a research project. The project was financed from funds of National Science Center on the base of decision number DEC-2013/11/D/NZ9/02545. Fluorescence spectroscopy belongs to modern, non-destructive, rapid and relatively cheap methods, as well as for many years it was successfully used in studies of organic compounds in the fields of medicine, biology and chemistry. On the other hand, soil organic matter is a group of compounds with a complex spatial structure showing a large number of groups with different kinds of fluorophores. This could suggest the possibility of application of fluorescence spectroscopy in assessing the quality of humic substances as well as in monitoring of their chemical transformations. The aim of study was chemical description of humic and fulvic acids based on fluorescence spectra, as well as an attempt of evaluation of changes occurring under the influence of different pH and during interactions with various concentrations of metal. The humic and fulvic acids were isolated from chemically different soils. The measurements were carried out on Hitachi fluorescence spectrometer in solutions with a concentration of humic acids 40mg dm-3, at pH from 3 to 7, and for the evaluation of the metal impact: with increasing Zn concentrations (0-50mg dm-3). The fluorescence spectra were recorded in the form of synchronous and emission-excitation matrices (EEM). Studies have shown the presence of different groups of fluorophores. Synchronous spectra were characterized by a well-separated bands showing fluorescence in the area of low, medium and high wavelengths, suggesting the presence of structures, both weakly and strongly humified. EEM spectra revealed map of fluorophores within wide ranges of emission and excitation. Fluorophores differed in both position and intensity. The highest intensity was observed for compounds with the lowest humification degree which might be due to high amount

  15. Artificial neural networks for processing fluorescence spectroscopy data in skin cancer diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the years various optical spectroscopic techniques have been widely used as diagnostic tools in the discrimination of many types of malignant diseases. Recently, synchronous fluorescent spectroscopy (SFS) coupled with chemometrics has been applied in cancer diagnostics. The SFS method involves simultaneous scanning of both emission and excitation wavelengths while keeping the interval of wavelengths (constant-wavelength mode) or frequencies (constant-energy mode) between them constant. This method is fast, relatively inexpensive, sensitive and non-invasive. Total synchronous fluorescence spectra of normal skin, nevus and melanoma samples were used as input for training of artificial neural networks. Two different types of artificial neural networks were trained, the self-organizing map and the feed-forward neural network. Histopathology results of investigated skin samples were used as the gold standard for network output. Based on the obtained classification success rate of neural networks, we concluded that both networks provided high sensitivity with classification errors between 2 and 4%. (paper)

  16. What information is contained in the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy curves, and where

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, S. M. J.; Hille, C.; Löhmannsröben, H.-G.; Sokolov, I. M.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the application of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) for characterization of anomalous diffusion of tracer particles in crowded environments. While the fact of anomaly may be detected by the standard fitting procedure, the value of the exponent α of anomalous diffusion may be not reproduced correctly for non-Gaussian anomalous diffusion processes. The important information is however contained in the asymptotic behavior of the fluorescence autocorrelation function at long and at short times. Thus, analysis of the short-time behavior gives reliable values of α and of lower moments of the distribution of particles' displacement, which allows us to confirm or reject its Gaussian nature. The method proposed was tested on the FCS data obtained in artificial crowded fluids and in living cells.

  17. Measurement of the temperature-dependent diffusion properties of nanoparticles by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chanbae; Lee, Jaeran; Kang, Manil; Kim, Sokwon [University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Changes in the diffusion properties of three kinds of fluorescent particles, Alexa Fluor 647, Q-dots (quantum dots), and beads, with temperature were investigated with a home-built fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system based on a confocal microscope. In all samples, as the temperature was increased, the diffusion times were reduced, indicating an increase in the diffusion coefficient. In particular, of all the particles, Alexa Fluor 647 having the smallest size of ∼1 nm, showed a hydrodynamic radius that increased with increasing temperature of the solvent. However, for the Q-dots and beads with larger sizes, the hydrodynamic radius of the particles was inversely proportional to the temperature. These results show that diffusion coefficient obtained by changing the temperature has an influence on the hydrodynamic radius of the particles.

  18. Fluorescence spectroscopy to study dissolved organic matter interactions with agrochemicals applied in Swiss vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daouk, Silwan; Frege, Carla; Blanc, Nicolas; Mounier, Stéphane; Redon, Roland; Merdy, Patricia; Lucas, Yves; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf

    2015-06-01

    UV/Vis fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the possible interactions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) with the herbicide glyphosate and copper-based fungicide used in vineyards. The study focused on the role of DOM in the transport of these micropollutants from parcels to surface waters (river, lake). Soil solution and river water samples were collected in the Lavaux vineyard area, western Switzerland. Their fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEM) were decomposed using parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis, and compared to their content in glyphosate and copper. PARAFAC analysis of EEM of both types of samples showed the contribution of protein-like and humic-like fluorophores. In soil water samples, complexes between fulvic-like and humic-like fluorophores of DOM, copper, and glyphosate were likely formed. In surface water, DOM-copper and glyphosate-copper interactions were observed, but not between glyphosate and DOM. PMID:25592914

  19. Direct Vpr-Vpr Interaction in Cells monitored by two Photon Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mély Yves

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 encodes several regulatory proteins, notably Vpr which influences the survival of the infected cells by causing a G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Such an important role of Vpr in HIV-1 disease progression has fuelled a large number of studies, from its 3D structure to the characterization of specific cellular partners. However, no direct imaging and quantification of Vpr-Vpr interaction in living cells has yet been reported. To address this issue, eGFP- and mCherry proteins were tagged by Vpr, expressed in HeLa cells and their interaction was studied by two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Results Results show that Vpr forms homo-oligomers at or close to the nuclear envelope. Moreover, Vpr dimers and trimers were found in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Point mutations in the three α helices of Vpr drastically impaired Vpr oligomerization and localization at the nuclear envelope while point mutations outside the helical regions had no effect. Theoretical structures of Vpr mutants reveal that mutations within the α-helices could perturb the leucine zipper like motifs. The ΔQ44 mutation has the most drastic effect since it likely disrupts the second helix. Finally, all Vpr point mutants caused cell apoptosis suggesting that Vpr-mediated apoptosis functions independently from Vpr oligomerization. Conclusion We report that Vpr oligomerization in HeLa cells relies on the hydrophobic core formed by the three α helices. This oligomerization is required for Vpr localization at the nuclear envelope but not for Vpr-mediated apoptosis.

  20. Theoretical Studies on Electronic Structures and Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Arylamino Fumaronitrile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-peng Chen; Yu-qi Ding; Qi-wen Teng

    2008-01-01

    A new series of fluorescent arylamino fumarinitrile derivatives was designed and optimized using density function theory at the B3LYP/6-31G* level.Based on the optimized geometries,the electronic,fluorescent and 13C NMR spectra are calculated with INDO/CIS,CIS-ZINDO TD,and B3LYP/6-31G* methods,re-spectively.Starting with the first of the series,the LUMO-HOMO energy gaps of the derivatives become wider and the fluorescent wavelengths and the main peaks in the electronic spectra axe blue-shifted owing to the large steric effect of naphthyl rings.On the contrary,the energy gaps of the derivatives turn narrow,and the fluorescent wavelengths and the main peaks in the electronic spectra are red-shifted since hydroxyl groups improve the symmetry and extend the conjugation system.The chemical shifts of sp2-C on the phenyl rings are moved upfield,while chemical shifts of carbon atoms on the cyano groups and those connected with the cyano groups are changed downfield in the presence of hydroxyl groups.

  1. A heated chamber burner for atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venghiattis, A A

    1968-07-01

    A new heated chamber burner is described. The burner is of the premixed type, and burner heads of the types conventionally used in atomic absorption may be readily adapted to it. This new sampling system has been tested for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Si, Ti, and Zn in aqueous solutions. An improvement of the order of ten times has been obtained in sensitivity, and in detection limits as well, for the elements determined. Interferences controllable are somewhat more severe than in conventional burners but are controllable. PMID:20068792

  2. Magnetic field modulation spectroscopy of rubidium atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Pradhan; R Behera; A K Das

    2012-04-01

    The magnetically modulated saturation absorption profile is studied for a wide range of external DC magnetic field. The salient features of Doppler-free signal generated by laser frequency modulation and atomic energy level modulation are compared. The DC offset of the signal profile is found to be unstable as the external DC magnetic field is changed. The technical difficulty of tuning laser frequency under locked condition over a large frequency span is discussed along with possible solutions.

  3. Experimental parameters of vanadium determination by atomic-absorption spectroscopy with graphite-furnace atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was found that impregnation of a graphite cuvette (HGA-72) with salts of elements which form stable carbides (Ta, Si, Nb, Zr, W, La) decreases the absorbance signal for vanadium. The slope of the atomization curves indicates that formation of vanadium atoms is inhibited, probably by formation of a ternary compound between the impregnating element, vanadium and graphite. On the contrary bigger signals and better repeatability of results may be achieved when the cuvette is coated with pyrolytic graphite and methane is added to the sheath gas. The presence of methane increases the atomization efficiency and compensates for the disadvantageous influence of any air present in the sheath gas. (author)

  4. PETOS-BASIC programs for treating data and reporting results in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A PETOS-BASIC program was written which provides the off-line treatment of data in optical emission spectroscopy, flame photometry and, atomic absorption spectroscopy. Polynomial calibration functions are fitted in overlapped steps by the least squares method. The calculated concentrations in unknown samples are stored in sequential files (one per element, up to four), from which they can be read to be reported in a second program. (Author) 7 refs

  5. Petos-Basic programs for treating data and reporting results in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Petos-Basic program was written which provides the off-line treatment of data in optical emission spectroscopy, flame photometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Polynomial calibration functions are fitted in overlapped steps by the leastsquares method. The calculated concentrations in unknown samples are stored in sequential files (one per element, up to four), from which they can be read to be reported in a second program. (author)

  6. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb

    OpenAIRE

    Fortier, T. M.; Coq, Y Le; Stalnaker, J. E.; Ortega, D.; Diddams, S. A.; Oates, C. W.; Hollberg, L.

    2006-01-01

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrat...

  7. Sample preparation of waste water to determine metallic contaminants by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy analysis in liquid samples is preceded by sample preparation, which usually consists in the precipitation of the metallic ions and concentration over a thin cellulose filter. The samples preparation of waste water by this method is not efficient, due to the great amount of organic and insoluble matter that they contain. The purpose of this work was to determine the optimal value of pH in order to adsorbe all the insoluble matter contained in a waste water sample in the activated charcoal, so that the metallic ions could be precipitated and concentrated on a thin filter and determinated by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. A survey about the adsorption of some ions in activated charcoal in function of the pH was made for the following: Cr3+, Fe3+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Se2+, Hg2+, and Pb2+. It was observed that at pH 0, the ions are not adsorbed, but Cu2+ and Zn2+ are adsorbed in small amount; at pH 14, the ions are adsorbed, excluding Se, which is not adsorbed at any value of pH. If a waste water sample is treated at pH 0 with activated charcoal to adsorbe the organic and insoluble matter, most of the metallic ions are not adsorbed by the activated charcoal and could be precipitated with APDC (ammonium 1-pirrolidine dithio carbamate salt) and concentrated on a thin filter. The analysis of the metallic ions contained on the filter and those adsorbed in the activated charcoal by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, gave the total amount of the ions in the sample. (author)

  8. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field $\\phi = \\phi_0 \\cos(m_\\phi t)$, can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the Standard Model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive new limits on ...

  9. Determination of vanadium in food and traditional Chinese medicine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Various experimental conditions were described for the vanadium determination by graphite furnace atomic ab-sorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). The experiments showed that when atomization took place under the conditions where thecombination of a pyrolytic coating graphite tube and fast raising temperature were used and the temperature was stable, thesignal peak shapes could be improved, the sensitivity was enhanced, and the memory effect was removed. The vanadium infood and traditional Chinese medicinal herbs can be accurately determined using the standard curve method.

  10. Interactions between fluorescence of atomically layered graphene oxide and metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Shao-Sian; Yeh, Yun-Chieh; Yu, Chen-Chieh; Chen, Hsuen-Li; Li, Feng-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Chun-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) demonstrates interesting photoluminescence (PL) because of its unique heterogeneous atomic structure, which consists of variable sp2- and sp3-bonded carbons. In this study, we report the interaction between the luminescence of GO ranging from a single atomic layer to few-layered thin films and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). The photoluminescence of GO in the vicinity of the Ag NPs is enhanced significantly due to the near-field plasmonic effect by coupling electron-hole pairs of GO with oscillating electrons in Ag NPs, leading to an increased PL intensity and a decreased PL decay lifetime. The maxima 30-fold enhancement in PL intensity is obtained with an optimized film thickness of GO, and the luminescence image from a single atomic layer GO sheet is successfully observed with the assistance of the LSPR effect. The results provide an ideal platform for exploring the interactions between the fluorescence of two-dimensional layered materials and the LSPR effect.Graphene oxide (GO) demonstrates interesting photoluminescence (PL) because of its unique heterogeneous atomic structure, which consists of variable sp2- and sp3-bonded carbons. In this study, we report the interaction between the luminescence of GO ranging from a single atomic layer to few-layered thin films and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). The photoluminescence of GO in the vicinity of the Ag NPs is enhanced significantly due to the near-field plasmonic effect by coupling electron-hole pairs of GO with oscillating electrons in Ag NPs, leading to an increased PL intensity and a decreased PL decay lifetime. The maxima 30-fold enhancement in PL intensity is obtained with an optimized film thickness of GO, and the luminescence image from a single atomic layer GO sheet is successfully observed with the assistance of the LSPR effect. The results provide an ideal platform for exploring the

  11. Detection of citrus canker and Huanglongbing using fluorescence imaging spectroscopy and support vector machine technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, Caio Bruno; Felipe de Oliveira Neves, Ruan; Belasque, José; Marcassa, Luis Gustavo

    2016-01-10

    Citrus canker and Huanglongbing (HLB) are citrus diseases that represent a serious threat to the citrus production worldwide and may cause large economic losses. In this work, we combined fluorescence imaging spectroscopy (FIS) and a machine learning technique to discriminate between these diseases and other ordinary citrus conditions that may be present at citrus orchards, such as citrus scab and zinc deficiency. Our classification results are highly accurate when discriminating citrus canker from citrus scab (97.8%), and HLB from zinc deficiency (95%). These results show that it is possible to accurately identify citrus diseases that present similar symptoms. PMID:26835778

  12. A single-molecule study of polycrystalline microstructure by fluorescence polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of n-hexadecane polycrystalline matrices is examined with single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy at a temperature of 1.7 K. Some single chromophores exhibit spectral dynamics during experiments: their resonances either jump between two frequencies or split into two components. By means of polarization measurements, we investigate the molecular spectra in order to distinguish between the case of two spatially unresolved molecules and the case of chromophore - two level system (TLS) pair. For closely spaced molecules two-dimensional Gaussian function fitting is applied to extract the spatial coordinates of the molecules. For TLS-chromophore systems, parameters of the TLSs are estimated

  13. Host-Guest Complexation Studied by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy: Adamantane–Cyclodextrin Inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Wajih Al-Soufi; Mercedes Novo; Maria Jesus Pérez-Alvite; Jorge Bordello; Daniel Granadero

    2010-01-01

    The host-guest complexation between an Alexa 488 labelled adamantane derivative and β-cyclodextrin is studied by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). A 1:1 complex stoichiometry and a high association equilibrium constant of K = 5.2 × 104 M-1 are obtained in aqueous solution at 25 °C and pH = 6. The necessary experimental conditions are discussed. FCS proves to be an excellent method for the determination of stoichiometry and association equilibrium constant of this type of complexes,...

  14. Simulation and Characterization of Single Photon Detectors for Fluorescence Lifetime Spectroscopy and Gamma-ray Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Benetti, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray and Fluorescence Lifetime Spectroscopies are driving the development of non-imaging silicon photon sensors and, in this context, Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPM)s are leading the starring role. They are 2D array of optical diodes called Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPAD)s, and are normally fabricated with a dedicated silicon process. SPADs amplify the charge produced by the single absorbed photon in a way that recalls the avalanche amplification exploited in Photo-Multiplier Tube...

  15. Effect of different agents onto multidrug resistant cells revealed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, C.; Roche, Y.; Jaffiol, R.; Millot, J.-M.; Millot, C.; Plain, J.; Deturche, R.; Jeannesson, P.; Manfait, M.; Royer, P.

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which is a sensitive and non invasive technique, has been used to characterize the plasma membrane fluidity and heterogeneity of multidrug resistant living cells. At the single cell level, the effects of different membrane agents present in the extra-cellular medium have been analyzed. Firstly, we reveal a modification of plasma membrane microviscosity according to the addition of a fluidity modulator, benzyl alcohol. In the other hand, revertant such as verapamil and cyclosporin-A appears to act more specifically on the slow diffusion sites as microdomains.

  16. Study on the interaction of anticancer drug mitoxantrone with DNA by fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lingjuan; Sun, Zhenrong; Guo, Jianyu; Wang, Zugeng

    2006-02-01

    Mitoxantrone, a clinically useful antitumour antibiotic for leukaemia and breast cancer, has received more attentions. In this paper, the interaction between mitoxantrone and calf thymus DNA is investigated by Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies, and the binding site of mitoxantrone to calf thymus DNA is explored. The results showed that mitoxantrone interacts with calf thymus DNA bases by the intercalation of anthracycline into the base pair plane of adenine (A) and thymine (T), and it results in the disruption of the hydrogen bonds between calf thymus DNA bases, and thus the calf thymus DNA double-strand can be disrupted into the B-form DNA double-strand segments.

  17. Study of vitamin A distribution in rats by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We applied the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) to investigate intestinal and liver tissues of normal male Wistar rats fed with vitamin A. The special procedure based on intensity spectral functions fitting was developed for the recognition of vitamin A in different tissues. Based on this procedure it is demonstrated that the LIFS can be used to monitor vitamin A deposition and distribution in the body of rat, which is essential for understanding the mechanism of formation of the vitamin A rich droplets, as the mechanism of vitamin A mobilization

  18. Study on the interaction of anticancer drug mitoxantrone with DNA by fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingjuan Tang; Zhenrong Sun; Jianyu Guo; Zugeng Wang

    2006-01-01

    @@ Mitoxantrone, a clinically useful antitumour antibiotic for leukaemia and breast cancer, has received more attentions. In this paper, the interaction between mitoxantrone and calf thymus DNA is investigated by Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies, and the binding site of mitoxantrone to calf thymus DNA is explored. The results showed that mitoxantrone interacts with calf thymus DNA bases by the intercalation of anthracycline into the base pair plane of adenine (A) and thymine (T), and it results in the disruption of the hydrogen bonds between calf thymus DNA bases, and thus the calf thymus DNA double-strand can be disrupted into the B-form DNA double-strand segments.

  19. Analysis of the Peiting Woman Using Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauerochse, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Portable X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy was applied to the skeletal remains of 13 bog bodies and their bog burial environments. The objective was to create a better understanding of Northern European bog environmental chemistry and its diagenetic effects on interred bog bodies, determine bog body geographic disparity and/or origin, and identify if post-discovery preservation procedures were applied to the bog body remains. This paper summarizes the findings for one of those 13 bog bodies: the Peiting Woman from Bavaria, Germany. The elements analyzed include Antimony, Cobalt, Copper, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Lead, Strontium, Titanium, Zinc, and Zirconium.

  20. Nuclear moments and isotopic variation of the mean square charge radii of strontium nuclei by atomic beam laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperfine structure and optical isotope shift measurements have been performed on a series of stable and radioactive strontium isotopes (A = 80 to 90), including two isomers 85m and 87m. The spectroscopy applied continuous wave dye laser induced fluorescence of free atoms at λ=293.2 nm in a well collimated atomic beam. The 293.2 nm ultraviolet light was generated by frequency doubling the output of a dye laser in either a temperature tuned Ammonium Dihydrogen Arsenate (ADA) crystal or an angle tuned Lithium Iodate crystal. A special radio frequency (rf) technique was used to tune the dye laser frequency with long term stability. Radioactive Sr isotopes were produced either by neutron capture of stable strontium or by (α,xn) reactions from krypton gas. The samples were purified by an electromagnetic mass separator and their sizes were of order 100 pg, which corresponds to 1011 atoms. The observed results of the hyperfine structure components are evaluated in terms of nuclear magnetic dipole moments and electric quadrupole moments. Changes in mean square charge radii of strontium nuclei which were extracted from the isotope shift measurements, exhibit a distinct shell effect at the neutron magic number N=50. The experimental data are analysed and compared with some theoretical nuclear model predictions. The strong increase of the nuclear charge radii with decreasing neutron number of isotopes below N=50 is in agreement with the variation of the mean square deformation extracted from measured B(E2) values. (orig.)

  1. Emission, optical--optical double resonance, and excited state absorption spectroscopy of matrix isolated chromium and molybdenum atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Making use of a combination of time-resolved emission, optical--optical double resonance, and excited state absorption spectroscopy, it has been possible to assign virtually all spectral features with energies below the z7P0 state of matrix isolated Cr atoms. The a5S state located at 7593 cm-1 in the free gaseous Cr atom has lifetimes of 6.32 and 5.1 s in Ar and Kr matrices, respectively. Matrix perturbations on Cr emission lines are small (-1). The dependence of nonradiative decay rates on the local density of states is elucidated. The magnitude of matrix shifts for a particular transition is correlated with the electronic configurations of ground and excited states and it is pointed out that states having only ''s'' electrons in addition to ''d'' electrons maintain their gas phase energy relationships in the matrix environment. Direct fluorescence is observed from the z7P0 level of Mo to the 7s ground state. The spin-orbit splitting of the ''relaxed'' z7P0 state is 690 cm-1, slightly lower than the 707 cm-1 splitting of the free gaseous Mo atom

  2. Development of a 2D temperature measurement technique for combustion diagnostics using 2-line atomic fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstroem, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the development and application of a novel planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique for temperature measurements in a variety of combusting flows. Accurate measurement of temperature is an essential task in combustion diagnostics, since temperature is one of the most fundamental quantities for the characterization of combustion processes. The technique is based on two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) from small quantities of atomic indium (In) seeded into the fuel. It has been developed from small-scale experiments in laboratory flames to the point where practical combustion systems can be studied. The technique is conceptually simple and reveals temperature information in the post-flame regions. The viability of the technique has been tested in three extreme measurement situations: in spark ignition engine combustion, in ultra-lean combustion situations such as lean burning aero-engine concepts and, finally, in fuel-rich combustion. TLAF was successfully applied in an optical Sl engine using isooctane as fuel. The wide temperature sensitivity, 700 - 3000 K, of the technique using indium atoms allowed measurements over the entire combustion cycle in the engine to be performed. In applications in lean combustion a potential problem caused by the strong oxidation processes of indium atoms was encountered. This limits measurement times due to deposits of absorbing indium oxide on measurement windows. The seeding requirement is a disadvantage of the technique and can be a limitation in some applications. The results from experiments performed in sooting flames are very promising for thermometry measurements in such environments. Absorption by hydrocarbons and other native species was found to be negligible. Since low laser energies and low seeding concentrations could be used, the technique did not, unlike most other incoherent optical thermometry techniques, suffer interferences from LII of soot particles or LIF from PAH

  3. Photon emission spectroscopy of ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystroem, B.

    1995-10-01

    Emission cross sections for the 1snp{sup 1}P{sub 1}-levels have been measured by photon emission spectroscopy for the collision systems He{sup +} + He at 10 keV and He{sup 2+} + He at 10-35 keV. Photon spectra of Krypton (Kr VIII) and Xenon (Xe V - IX) have also been obtained using 10q keV beams of Kr{sup q+} (q=7-9) and Xe{sup q+} (q=5-9) colliding with Helium and Argon. The Lifetimes of 3p{sup 2}P-levels in Na-like Nb are reported together with lifetime for the 3s3p{sup 3}P{sub 1}-level in Mg-like Ni, Kr, Y, Zr and Nb where this level has an intercombination transition to the ground state. 45 refs, 20 figs.

  4. Characterization of laser - induced plasmas by atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Pace, Diego M; Bertuccelli, Graciela; D' Angelo, Cristian A, E-mail: ddiaz@exa.unicen.edu.ar, E-mail: gbertucc@exa.unicen.edu.ar, E-mail: cdangelo@exa.unicen.edu.ar [Instituto de Fisica ' Arroyo Seco' , Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, U.N.C.P.B.A., Campus Universitario, Paraje Arroyo Seco, (B7000GHG) Tandil, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-01-01

    In this work, Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to characterization of plasmas generated in air at atmospheric pressure from a calcium hydroxide sample with a known concentration of Mg by using an infrared Nd:YAG laser. The influence of laser irradiance on plasma morphology and emission intensity was studied. Spatially-integrated intensities of Mg I-II lines along the line-of-sight were measured for different laser energies and delay times. The plasma temperature and the electron density were determined in each case by using and algorithm that calculates the optical thickness of the spectral lines and reproduces their experimental profiles in a framework of an homogeneous plasma in LTE that takes into account the effects of self-absorption. The results obtained showed the usefulness of this approach to provide additional information retrieved from the optical thickness of spectral lines for plasma characterization in LIBS experiments.

  5. Photon emission spectroscopy of ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emission cross sections for the 1snp1P1-levels have been measured by photon emission spectroscopy for the collision systems He+ + He at 10 keV and He2+ + He at 10-35 keV. Photon spectra of Krypton (Kr VIII) and Xenon (Xe V - IX) have also been obtained using 10q keV beams of Krq+ (q=7-9) and Xeq+ (q=5-9) colliding with Helium and Argon. The Lifetimes of 3p2P-levels in Na-like Nb are reported together with lifetime for the 3s3p3P1-level in Mg-like Ni, Kr, Y, Zr and Nb where this level has an intercombination transition to the ground state. 45 refs, 20 figs

  6. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Havener, C. C.; Mattolat, C.; Vane, C. R.; Wendt, K.

    2013-12-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  7. Ionization potential of neutral atomic plutonium determined by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionization potential of the neutral plutonium atom, Pu i, has been determined by two- and three-step resonance photoionization observation of the threshold of ionization and of the Rydberg series. The Rydberg series were observed by field ionization as series that converge to the first ionization limit and as autoionizing series the converge to the second and to several higher convergence limits. The threshold and Rydberg series were obtained through a number of two- and three-step pathways. The photoionization threshold value for the 239Pu i ionization potential is 48 582(30) cm-1, and the more accurate value from the Rydberg series is 48 604(1) cm-1 or 6.0262(1) eV

  8. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm−1 for the ionization potential of iron. (paper)

  9. Resonant three-Photon Ionization Spectroscopy of Atomic Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuan [ORNL; Gottwald, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Havener, Charles C [ORNL; Mattolat, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

    2013-01-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti:Sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63737.686 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  10. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb

    CERN Document Server

    Fortier, T M; Stalnaker, J E; Ortega, D; Diddams, S A; Oates, C W; Hollberg, L

    2006-01-01

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrates the potential for high-resolution absolute-frequency spectroscopy over the entire spectrum of the frequency comb output using a single high-finesse optical reference cavity.

  11. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, T M; Coq, Y Le; Stalnaker, J E; Ortega, D; Diddams, S A; Oates, C W; Hollberg, L

    2006-10-20

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrates the potential for high-resolution absolute-frequency spectroscopy over the entire spectrum of the frequency comb output using a single high-finesse optical reference cavity. PMID:17155398

  12. Speciation analysis of arsenic by selective hydride generation- cryotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometry with flame-in-gas- shield atomizer: Achieving extremely low detection limits with inexpensive instrumentation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Currier, J. M.; Stýblo, M.; Dědina, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 20 (2014), s. 10422-10428. ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S; GA MŠk LH12040 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : speciation analysis of arsenic * selective hydride generation * flame-in-gas-shield atomizer * cryotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.636, year: 2014

  13. Development of atomic spectroscopy methods in geological institutes of Faculty of Natural Sciences Comenius University and Slovak Academy of Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of atomic spectrochemistry methods in Geological Institute of Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University (GI FNS CU) is connected with its establishment in 1957. Its instrumental equipment and location resulted from the already existing Laboratory in the Chair for Mineralogy and Crystallography of FNS CU. In Geological Institute of Slovak Academy of Science (GI SAS) the development of atomic spectroscopy methods started later, only since 1963, when the Member of Academy, Prof. RNDr. B. Cambel, DrSc. became its director. In both institutes the methods of atomic emission spectrography were used as first. A new quality in the development started since 1969 when the Institutes moved to common buildings in Petrzalka (Bratislava), the first atomic absorption spectrometers were acquired and the Institutes were 'strengthened' by coming of Prof. Ing. E. Plsko, DrSc. In the following years the Institutes started to collaborate with some other organisations which were equipped with new facilities, e.g. in 1975 with X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, electron microprobe and in 1985 with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. This enabled to improve essentially the quality of research activities of both institutes in the chemical characterisation of geological materials, as well as in pedagogical work (students practice, diploma works and dissertations). In the present time characterized by new economic conditions a reduction of GI SAS laboratory activities has been realised. The laboratories of the GI FNS CU have, thanks to their director Ing. V. Stresko, PhD. shown also hence-forward a rich research, pedagogical and society activities what can be documented by numerous publications, citations, obtained awards, representations in professional societies and commissions, local and foreign advisory boards, accreditation boards etc. (author)

  14. Electron microscopy and spectroscopy with the single-atom sensitivity on metallofullerene molecules in peapods

    CERN Document Server

    Suenaga, K

    2002-01-01

    Electron microscopy and spectroscopy with the single-atom sensitivity enables us to obtain a direct image of the intra-molecular structure and chemical identification of individual metallofullerenes encapsulated inside single-walled carbon nanotubes, so-called peapods. By a comparison of high resolution images with a simulation to extract the relative atom positions for encaged metal atom in each molecule, distribution of molecular orientation and its interaction between adjacent molecules in metallofullerene-peapods have been statistically analyzed. Moreover the techniques described here demonstrates the possibilities to observe individual chemical reaction inside carbon nanotubes.

  15. An atomic hydrogen beam to test ASACUSA’s apparatus for antihydrogen spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diermaier, M., E-mail: martin.diermaier@oeaw.ac.at; Caradonna, P.; Kolbinger, B. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics (Austria); Malbrunot, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Massiczek, O.; Sauerzopf, C.; Simon, M. C.; Wolf, M.; Zmeskal, J.; Widmann, E. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    The ASACUSA collaboration aims to measure the ground state hyperfine splitting (GS-HFS) of antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart to atomic hydrogen. Comparisons of the corresponding transitions in those two systems will provide sensitive tests of the CPT symmetry, the combination of the three discrete symmetries charge conjugation, parity, and time reversal. For offline tests of the GS-HFS spectroscopy apparatus we constructed a source of cold polarised atomic hydrogen. In these proceedings we report the successful observation of the hyperfine structure transitions of atomic hydrogen with our apparatus in the earth’s magnetic field.

  16. Determination of methyl mercury by aqueous phase Eehylation, followed by gas chromatographic separation with cold vapor atomic fluorescence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wild, John F.; Olsen, Mark L.; Olund, Shane D.

    2002-01-01

    A recent national sampling of streams in the United States revealed low methyl mercury concentrations in surface waters. The resulting median and mean concentrations, calculated from 104 samples, were 0.06 nanograms per liter (ng/L) and 0.15 ng/L, respectively. This level of methyl mercury in surface water in the United States has created a need for analytical techniques capable of detecting sub-nanogram per liter concentrations. In an attempt to create a U.S. Geological Survey approved method, the Wisconsin District Mercury Laboratory has adapted a distillation/ethylation/ gas-phase separation method with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy detection for the determination of methyl mercury in filtered and unfiltered waters. This method is described in this report. Based on multiple analyses of surface water and ground-water samples, a method detection limit of 0.04 ng/L was established. Precision and accuracy were evaluated for the method using both spiked and unspiked ground-water and surface-water samples. The percent relative standard deviations ranged from 10.2 to 15.6 for all analyses at all concentrations. Average recoveries obtained for the spiked matrices ranged from 88.8 to 117 percent. The precision and accuracy ranges are within the acceptable method-performance limits. Considering the demonstrated detection limit, precision, and accuracy, the method is an effective means to quantify methyl mercury in waters at or below environmentally relevant concentrations

  17. Study of high density polyethylene under UV irradiation or mechanical stress by fluorescence spectroscopy; Etude du comportement du polyethylene haute densite sous irradiation ultraviolette ou sollicitation mecanique par spectroscopie de fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douminge, L.

    2010-05-15

    Due to their diversity and their wide range of applications, polymers have emerged in our environment. For technical applications, these materials can be exposed to aggressive environment leading to an alteration of their properties. The effects of this degradation are linked to the concept of life duration, corresponding to the time required for a property to reach a threshold below which the material becomes unusable. Monitoring the ageing of polymer materials constitute a major challenge. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a technique able to provide accurate information concerning this issue. In this study, emphasis was placed on the use of fluorescence spectroscopy to study the phenomena involved in either the UV radiation or mechanical stresses of a polymer. In the case of high density polyethylene, the lack of intrinsic fluorescent signal leads to the use of a dye. This dye gives a fluorescent response depending on its microenvironment. All modifications in the macromolecular chain generate a shift of the fluorescent peak. This work can be dissociated in two major parts, on one hand the influence of UV aging on the fluorescent response and in another hand the influence of mechanical stresses. In the first part, complementary analyses like FTIR or DSC are used to correlate fluorescent results with known photo degradation mechanisms. The results show the great sensibility of the technique to the microstructural rearrangement in the polymer. In the second part, the dependence between the stress and the fluorescence emission gives opportunity to evaluate internal stresses in the material during cyclic solicitations. (author)

  18. Real-Time Near-Field Terahertz Imaging with Atomic Optical Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, Christopher G; de Melo, Natalia R; Kondo, Jorge M; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) near-field imaging is a flourishing discipline [1], with applications from fundamental studies of beam propagation [2,3] to the characterisation of metameterials [4,5] and waveguides [6,7]. Beating the diffraction limit typically involves rastering structures or detectors with length scale shorter than the radiation wavelength; in the THz domain this has been achieved using a number of techniques including scattering tips [8,9] and apertures [10]. Alternatively, mapping THz fields onto an optical wavelength and imaging the visible light removes the requirement for scanning a local probe, speeding up image collection times [11,12]. Here we report THz to optical conversion using a gas of highly excited `Rydberg' atoms. By collecting THz-induced optical fluorescence we demonstrate a real-time image of a THz standing wave and we use well-known atomic properties to calibrate the THz field strength. The mono-atomic gas does not distort the THz field and offers the potential to immerse structures wit...

  19. Present status for the determination of metallic impurities in nuclear fuels by atomic emission spectroscopy (review report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present status for the determination of metallic impurities in nuclear fuels by atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) is reviewed. In the first chapter of introduction, brief progress of the developments of AES is described. In the second chapter, emission spectrograph with direct current arc (DCA) or inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source is shown with the emphasis on the confinement of plutonium. In the third chapter, impurity elements and maximum concentration limits in various nuclear fuels and equivalent boron content factors are given on the base of ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) standards in 1987. In the fourth chapter, examples of the analyses of nuclear fuels by DCA-AES and carrier distillation method, and the results of standard uranium oxide analysis conducted by 15 AEC-connected laboratories in U.S.A. are presented. In the fifth chapter, the determination of rare earth elements by DCA-AES after the chemical separation of U and Pu by solvent extraction, ion-exchange and so on. In the sixth and seventh chapters, the determination of U and Pu, and metallic impurities in U and Pu fuels by ICP-AES are described, respectively. In the eighth chapter, the determination of Am by ICP-AES is explained. In the ninth chapter, a comparison of the detection limits in aqueous solutions for various spectrometric techniques including recently developed laser-induced atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF) and laser-enhaned ionization spectroscopy (LEI) are given. In the last chapter, experimental plan using DCA-AES and ICP-AES installed this time at Plutonium Fuel Research Laboratory of Oarai Research Establishment is introduced. (author)

  20. Magnetic-sublevel atomic kinetics modeling for line polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the mechanism of polarized X-ray line emission in plasmas, its connection to plasma anisotropy, and introduce an atomic kinetics model and code (POLAR) [1] based on the population kinetics of magnetic sublevels. POLAR represents a multi-level, multi-process approach to the problem of polarized spectra in plasmas, and hence it is well suited for plasma applications where cascade effects and alignment transfer can become important. Polarization degrees of X-ray spectral lines computed with POLAR were successfully benchmarked against calculations done with other formalisms, and experimental results obtained at the EBIT facility of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We also investigated the polarization of He-like Si X-ray satellite lines as spectral signatures of anisotropy in the electron distribution function. A comprehensive modeling study was performed taking into account hydrodynamics and electron kinetics. We find that two satellite lines connecting singlet states develop a noticeable polarization while the triplet lines remain unpolarized. These results suggest a scenario where triplet lines could be used as a reference while the singlets could be used as polarized markers of plasma anisotropy. (author)

  1. Continuation of Atomic Spectroscopy on Alkali Isotopes at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Laser optical measurements on Rb, Cs and Fr have already been performed at ISOLDE in 1978-79. The hyperfine structure and isotope shift of |7|6|-|9|8Rb, |1|1|8|-|1|4|5Cs, |2|0|8|-|2|1|3Fr and 14 of their isomers have been studied. Among the wealth of information which has been obtained, the most important are the first observation of an optical transition of the element Fr, the evidence of the onset of nuclear deformation at N~=~60 for Rb isotopes and the shape isomerism isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ From both the atomic and nuclear physics point of view, new studies seem very promising: \\item - the search for new optical transitions in Fr; the shell effect in the rms charge radius at N~=~126 for Fr isotopes \\item - the study of a possible onset of deformation for Cs isotopes beyond |1|4|5Cs \\item - the study of a region of static deformation in neutron-deficient Rb isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ \\end{enumerate} A new apparatus has been built. The principle remains the same as used in our earlier experiments. The improvements concern ess...

  2. Spatially Resolved Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy in Microelectronics Processing Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebner, G.A.

    1998-10-14

    Plasma processing of microelectronic materials is strongly dependent on the generation and control of neutral radial and ion species generated in a plasma. For example, process uniformity across a #er is drken by a combination of plasma charged particle and neutral uniformity. Due to extensive rexarch and engineering the current generation of commercial plasma reactors can generate very radially uniform ion distributions, usually better than ~ 2 perwnt as determined by ion saturation measurements. Due in part to the difficulty associated with determining the neutral radial distributions, control of the neutral radical uniformity is less well developed. This abstract will review our recent measurements of the spatial distribution of severaI important atomic and molecukw species in inductively coupled plasmas through C12 / BCIJ / Ar containing gas mixtures. Measured species include the ground state Cl and BC1 densities as well as the metastable argon density. The fbeus of this review will be on the experimental techniques and results. In addition to assisting in the development of a fbndarnental understanding of the important pkunna physics, these measurements have been used to benchmark multi dimensional plasma discharge codes.

  3. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy: The determination of trace impurities in uranium hexafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, M. A.; Morrow, R. W.; Farrar, R. B.

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace impurities in high-purity uranium hexafluoride using liquid-liquid extraction of the uranium from the trace impurities followed by analysis with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Detection limits, accuracy, and precision data are presented.

  4. The use of solid-phase fluorescence spectroscopy in the characterisation of organic matter transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, R; Verrecchia, E; Pfeifer, H-R

    2015-03-01

    Given its high sensitivity and non-destructive nature, fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy is widely used to differentiate changes and transformations of dissolved or water-extracted organic matter (OM) in natural environments. The same technique applied directly on solid samples (solid-phase fluorescence spectroscopy, SPF-EEM) provides accurate results when used with pharmaceutical products or food samples, but only a few studies have considered natural OM. This study reports on the use of SPF-EEM on solid compost samples and emphasises the way the different maturation phases can be distinguished with fluorophores closely resembling those found in dissolved samples. A very good correlation has been found with data from Rock-Eval pyrolysis, nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C CPMAS NMR), and humic-fulvic acid ratios determined by conventional NaOH-extraction. SPF-EEM appears as a much simpler method than the conventional ones to detect transformations in natural OM samples with low mineral contents. However, direct application to soil samples requires some additional studies. PMID:25618693

  5. A rapid and noninvasive method to detect dried saliva stains from human skin using fluorescent spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanwar Deep Singh Nanda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Saliva is one of the vital fluids secreted in human beings. Significant amount of saliva is deposited on the skin during biting, sucking or licking, and can act as an important source in forensic evidence. An enzyme, α amylase, gives a characteristic emission spectrum at 345-355 nm when excited at 282 nm and this can be identified by using fluorescent spectroscopy and can help in forensic identification. This study describes a rapid method to detect dried saliva on the human skin by fluorescent spectroscopy. Materials and Methods: This study included 10 volunteers, who deposited their own saliva on skin of their ventral forearm by licking and water on the contralateral arm as control. This study was carried out at Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai. Study design: Ten volunteers deposited their own saliva on skin of their ventral forearm by licking. A control sample of water was deposited at the contralateral arm. Each sample was excited at 282 nm and emission spectrum was recorded. Results: The emission spectra of 10 swab samples taken from dried saliva were characterized at the primary peak of 345 to 355 nm whereas the emission spectrum of water as a control was recorded at 362 nm. Conclusion: The presence of emission spectrum at 345-355 nm with excitation at 282 nm proves to be a strong indicator of saliva deposited on human skin.

  6. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry in the diagnostics of alopecia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomorokha, Diana P.; Pigoreva, Yulia N.; Salmin, Vladimir V.

    2016-04-01

    Development of optical biopsy methods has a great interest for medical diagnostics. In clinical and experimental studies it is very important to analyze blood circulation quickly and accurately, thereby laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is widely used. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (UV LIFS) is express highly sensitive and widely-spread method with no destructive impact, high excitation selectivity and the possibility to use in highly scattering media. The goal of this work was to assess a correlation of UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry parameters, and a possibility to identify or to differentiate various types of pathological changes in tissues according to their autofluorescence spectra. Three groups of patients with diffuse (symptomatic) alopecia, androgenic alopecia, and focal alopecia have been tested. Each groups consisted of not less than 20 persons. The measurements have been done in the parietal and occipital regions of the sculls. We used the original automated spectrofluorimeter to record autofluorescence spectra, and standard laser Doppler flowmeter BLF-21 (Transonic Systems, Inc., USA) to analyze the basal levels of blood circulation. Our results show that UV LIFS accurately distinguishes the zones with different types of alopecia. We found high correlation of the basal levels of blood circulation and the integrated intensity of autofluorescence in the affected tissue.

  7. Spectroscopy detection of green and red fluorescent proteins in genetically modified plants using a fiber optics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Oi Wah; Asundi, Anand K.; Chen, Jun-Wei; Chew, Yiwen; Yu, Shangjuan; Yeo, Gare H.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, fiber optic spectroscopy is developed to detect and quantify recombinant green (EGFP) and red (DsRED) fluorescent proteins in vitro and in vivo. The bacterial expression vectors carrying the coding regions of EGFP and DsRED were introduced into Escherichia coli host cells and fluorescent proteins were produced following induction with IPTG. Soluble EGFP and DsRED proteins were isolated from lysed bacterial cells and serially diluted for quantitative analysis by fiber optic spectroscopy. Fluorescence at the appropriate emission wavelengths could be detected up to 64X dilution for EGFP and 40X dilution for DsRED. To determine the capability of spectroscopy detection in vivo, transgenic potato hairy roots expressing EGFP and DsRED were regenerated. This was achieved by cloning the EGFP and DsRED genes into the plant binary vector, pTMV35S, to create the recombinant vectors pGLOWGreen and pGLOWRed. These latter binary vectors were introduced into Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain A4T. Infection of potato cells with transformed agrobacteria was used to insert the fluorescent protein genes into the potato genome. Genetically modified potato cells were then regenerated into hairy roots. A panel of transformed hairy roots expressing varying levels of fluorescent proteins was selected by fluorescence microscopy. We are now assessing the capability of spectroscopic detection system for in vivo quantification of green and red fluorescence levels in transformed roots.

  8. Use of fluorescence spectroscopy to measure molecular autofluorescence in diabetic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) comprises a complex metabolic syndrome, caused by reduced or absent secretion of insulin by pancreatic beta cells, leading to hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia promotes glycation of proteins and, consequently, the appearance of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Currently, diabetic patients are monitored by determining levels of glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). The complications caused by hyperglycemia may be divided into micro and macrovascular complications, represented by retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy and cardiovascular disease. Albumin (HSA) is the most abundant serum protein in the human body and is subject to glycation. The Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) is the precursor molecule of heme synthesis, structural component of hemoglobin. The in vitro and animals studies have indicated that hyperglycemia promotes a decrease in its concentration in erythrocytes. The fluorescence spectroscopy is a technique widely used in biomedical field. The autofluorescence corresponds to the intrinsic fluorescence present in some molecules, this being associated with the same structure. The aim of this study was to use fluorescence spectroscopy to measure levels of erythrocyte PpIX autofluorescence and AGE-HSA in diabetic and healthy subjects and compare them with levels of blood glucose and HbA1c. This study was conducted with 151 subjects (58 controls and 93 diabetics). Epidemiological data of patients and controls were obtained from medical records. For control subjects, blood glucose levels were obtained from medical records and levels of Hb1Ac obtained by using commercial kits. The determination of the PpIX autofluorescence was performed with excitation at 405 nm and emission at 632 nm. Determination of AGE-HSA was performed with excitation at 370 nm and emission at 455 nm. Approximately 50% of diabetic had micro and macrovascular lesions resulting from hyperglycemia. There were no significant differences in the PpIX emission intensity values

  9. Characterization of simian virus 40 on its infectious entry pathway in cells using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacchi, S; Mueller, G; Langowski, J; Waldeck, W

    2004-11-01

    SV40 (simian virus 40) is a double-stranded DNA virus and is strongly oncogenic in experimental animals. SV40 enters cells by atypical endocytosis mediated by caveolae, transporting the virus to its usual destination, namely the endoplasmic reticulum. The cellular mechanisms of capsid disassembly (uncoating) and deliverance of the viral genome into the cellular nucleus remain unknown. Here, we study (i) the formation of caveolae after viral infection and the diffusion of caveosome vesicles in the cytoplasm and (ii) the capsid disassembly and the mobility of the viral genome on its way to the nucleus, using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. To follow the viral genome and capsids separately, the histone components of SV40 minichromosomes were labelled with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein and the capsid was labelled with a fluorescent red dye, Alexa568. We characterized the diffusion of caveosomes, the capsid disassembly process in the cytoplasm and the mobility of the viral genome in the nucleus, using two kinds of permissive cells. PMID:15494004

  10. Studies on the formation and stability of triplex DNA using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongyan; Huang, Xiangyi; Ren, Jicun

    2016-05-01

    Triplex DNA has become one of the most useful recognition motifs in the design of new molecular biology tools, therapeutic agents and sophisticated DNA-based nanomaterials because of its direct recognition of natural double-stranded DNA. In this paper, we developed a sensitive and microscale method to study the formation and stability characterization of triplex DNA using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The principle of this method is mainly based on the excellent capacity of FCS for sensitively distinguishing between free single-strand DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes and fluorescent probe-double-strand DNA (dsDNA) hybridized complexes. First, we systematically investigated the experimental conditions of triplex DNA formation. Then, we evaluated the equilibrium association constants (Ka ) under different ssDNA probe lengths, composition and pH. Finally, we used FCS to measure the hybridization fraction of a 20-mer perfectly matched ssDNA probe and three single-base mismatched ssDNA probes with 146-mer dsDNA. Our data illustrated that FCS is a useful tool for the direct determination of the thermodynamic parameters of triplex DNA formation and discrimination of a single-base mismatch of triplex DNA without denaturation. Compared with current methods, our method is characterized by high sensitivity, good universality and small sample and reagent requirements. More importantly, our method has the potential to become a platform for triplex DNA research in vitro. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26377428

  11. Probing GFP-actin diffusion in living cells using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells is continuously remodeled by polymerization and depolymerization of actin. Consequently, the relative content of polymerized filamentous actin (F-actin) and monomeric globular actin (G-actin) is subject to temporal and spatial fluctuations. Since fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) can measure the diffusion of fluorescently labeled actin it seems likely that FCS allows us to determine the dynamics and hence indirectly the structural properties of the cytoskeleton components with high spatial resolution. To this end we investigate the FCS signal of GFP-actin in living Dictyostelium discoideum cells and explore the inherent spatial and temporal signatures of the actin cytoskeleton. Using the free green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reference, we find that actin diffusion inside cells is dominated by G-actin and slower than diffusion in diluted cell extract. The FCS signal in the dense cortical F-actin network near the cell membrane is probed using the cytoskeleton protein LIM and is found to be slower than cytosolic G-actin diffusion. Furthermore, we show that polymerization of the cytoskeleton induced by Jasplakinolide leads to a substantial decrease of G-actin diffusion. Pronounced fluctuations in the distribution of the FCS correlation curves can be induced by latrunculin, which is known to induce actin waves. Our work suggests that the FCS signal of GFP-actin in combination with scanning or spatial correlation techniques yield valuable information about the local dynamics and concomitant cytoskeletal properties

  12. Development of ultrasensitive spectroscopic analysis technology -Development of atomic spectroscopy technology-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project, three principal techniques are developed. The laser photoionization spectrometry (LAPIS) is used for the ultrasensitive detection for heavy metals such as Pb and Cd. The Laser atomic fluorescence spectrometry is applied to the quantitative analysis of the lanthanide and actinide elements. And the DIAL remote sensing system is used for monitoring the ozone concentration and the atmospheric pollution. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer and a high efficient atomic beam generator were designed and manufactured. Various spectroscopic parameters and optimum analytical condition were investigated. By using the laser fluorescence technique, U, Eu and Sm in solution were quantitatively analyzed. The basic researches for the direct analytical method of solid samples were also carried out. The DIAL system for ozone remote sensing was developed and ozone concentration above Taejon were obtained. (Author)

  13. European Group for Atomic Spectroscopy. Summaries of contributions, eleventh annual conference, Paris-Orsay, July 10-13, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    Summaries are presented of talks given at the eleventh conference of the European group for atomic spectroscopy. Topics covered include: lifetimes; collisions; line shape; hyperfine structure; isotope shifts; saturation spectroscopy; Hanle effect; Rydberg levels; quantum beats; helium and helium-like atoms; metrology; and molecules. (GHT)

  14. Probing intra-molecular mechanics of single circularly permuted green fluorescent protein with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the mechanical unfolding of single circularly permuted green fluorescent protein (cpGFP) with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The molecule was stretched from its N- and C-termini by an external force causing an elongation of the polypeptide chain up to its full length. The features of the force-extension (F-E) curves were found to depend on the stretching speed. At fast speeds, we detected one peak in the F-E curves before final rupture of the extended molecule, which we interpreted as the unfolding of two terminal halves within cpGFP. We observed several more force peaks in a sawtooth pattern at much slower speeds, and explained the appearance of such force peaks as cooperative unfolding of the hidden sub-structures inside each terminal half

  15. Atomic layer deposition to prevent metal transfer from implants: An X-ray fluorescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilo, Fabjola; Borgese, Laura; Prost, Josef; Rauwolf, Mirjam; Turyanskaya, Anna; Wobrauschek, Peter; Kregsamer, Peter; Streli, Christina; Pazzaglia, Ugo; Depero, Laura E.

    2015-12-01

    We show that Atomic Layer Deposition is a suitable coating technique to prevent metal diffusion from medical implants. The metal distribution in animal bone tissue with inserted bare and coated Co-Cr alloys was evaluated by means of micro X-ray fluorescence mapping. In the uncoated implant, the migration of Co and Cr particles from the bare alloy in the biological tissues is observed just after one month and the number of particles significantly increases after two months. In contrast, no metal diffusion was detected in the implant coated with TiO2. Instead, a gradient distribution of the metals was found, from the alloy surface going into the tissue. No significant change was detected after two months of aging. As expected, the thicker is the TiO2 layer, the lower is the metal migration.

  16. Intraoperative delineation of primary brain tumors using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butte, Pramod V; Fang, Qiyin; Jo, Javier A; Yong, William H; Pikul, Brian K; Black, Keith L; Marcu, Laura

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study is to determine the potential of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) as an adjunctive tool for delineation of brain tumor from surrounding normal tissue in order to assist the neurosurgeon in near-complete tumor excision. A time-domain TR-LIFS prototype apparatus (gated photomultiplier detection, fast digitizer) was used for recording tissue autofluorescence in normal cortex (NC), normal white matter (NWM), and various grades of gliomas intraoperatively. Tissue fluorescence was induced with a pulsed nitrogen laser (337 nm, 700 ps), and the intensity decay profiles were recorded in the 360- to 550-nm spectral range (10-nm interval). Histopathological analysis (hematoxylin & eosin) of the biopsy samples taken from the site of TR-LIFS measurements was used for validation of spectroscopic results. Preliminary results on 17 patients demonstrate that normal cortex (N=16) and normal white matter (N=3) show two peaks of fluorescence emission at 390 nm (lifetime=1.8+/-0.3 ns) and 460 nm (lifetime=0.8+/-0.1 ns). The 390-nm emission peak is absent in low-grade glioma (N=5; lifetime=1.1 ns) and reduced in high-grade glioma (N=9; lifetime=1.7+/-0.4 ns). The emission characteristics at 460 nm in all tissues correlated with the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence (peak: 440 to 460 nm; lifetime: 0.8 to 1.0 ns). These findings demonstrate the potential of using TR-LIFS as a tool for enhanced delineation of brain tumors during surgery. In addition, this study evaluates similarities and differences between TR-LIFS signatures of brain tumors obtained in vivo and those previously reported in ex vivo brain tumor specimens. PMID:20459282

  17. Intraoperative delineation of primary brain tumors using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butte, Pramod V.; Fang, Qiyin; Jo, Javier A.; Yong, William H.; Pikul, Brian K.; Black, Keith L.; Marcu, Laura

    2010-03-01

    The goal of this study is to determine the potential of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) as an adjunctive tool for delineation of brain tumor from surrounding normal tissue in order to assist the neurosurgeon in near-complete tumor excision. A time-domain TR-LIFS prototype apparatus (gated photomultiplier detection, fast digitizer) was used for recording tissue autofluorescence in normal cortex (NC), normal white matter (NWM), and various grades of gliomas intraoperatively. Tissue fluorescence was induced with a pulsed nitrogen laser (337 nm, 700 ps), and the intensity decay profiles were recorded in the 360- to 550-nm spectral range (10-nm interval). Histopathological analysis (hematoxylin & eosin) of the biopsy samples taken from the site of TR-LIFS measurements was used for validation of spectroscopic results. Preliminary results on 17 patients demonstrate that normal cortex (N=16) and normal white matter (N=3) show two peaks of fluorescence emission at 390 nm (lifetime=1.8+/-0.3 ns) and 460 nm (lifetime=0.8+/-0.1 ns). The 390-nm emission peak is absent in low-grade glioma (N=5; lifetime=1.1 ns) and reduced in high-grade glioma (N=9; lifetime=1.7+/-0.4 ns). The emission characteristics at 460 nm in all tissues correlated with the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence (peak: 440 to 460 nm lifetime: 0.8 to 1.0 ns). These findings demonstrate the potential of using TR-LIFS as a tool for enhanced delineation of brain tumors during surgery. In addition, this study evaluates similarities and differences between TR-LIFS signatures of brain tumors obtained in vivo and those previously reported in ex vivo brain tumor specimens.

  18. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio

  19. Chemometric classification of Chinese lager beers according to manufacturer based on data fusion of fluorescence, UV and visible spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jin; Li, Rong; Jiang, Zi-Tao

    2015-10-01

    We report an application of data fusion for chemometric classification of 135 canned samples of Chinese lager beers by manufacturer based on the combination of fluorescence, UV and visible spectroscopies. Right-angle synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) at three wavelength difference Δλ=30, 60 and 80 nm and visible spectra in the range 380-700 nm of undiluted beers were recorded. UV spectra in the range 240-400 nm of diluted beers were measured. A classification model was built using principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). LDA with cross-validation showed that the data fusion could achieve 78.5-86.7% correct classification (sensitivity), while those rates using individual spectroscopies ranged from 42.2% to 70.4%. The results demonstrated that the fluorescence, UV and visible spectroscopies complemented each other, yielding higher synergic effect. PMID:25872423

  20. Development of atomic spectroscopy technologies - Hyperfine structure of 2 period atoms using optogalvanic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Nam Ic [Hankuk University of foreign studies, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The source of anomalous broad linewidth of 3{sup 3}P{sub 1},{sub 2},{sub 3}-3{sup 3}D{sub 2},{sub 3},4(3s') transition was explained. The broad optogalvanic spectrum was consisted of two gaussian peaks of different linewidths, and they are separated by 250 MHz. The Narrow peak, which has linewidth of room temperature, is from oxygen atoms already separated, and the shifted broad peak, which has linewidth corresponding to a temperature of 9000 K, is from weakly bound molecular ions. Obtained hyperfine spectrum of fluorine atom at the expected frequency, was too weak to analyze hyperfine structure constants. Microwave discharge might be necessary for higher density of excited state. 16 refs., 11 figs. (Author)

  1. Fluorescence and atomic force microscopy to visualize the interaction of HDL particles with lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: High density lipoprotein (HDL) plays a key role in cholesterol homeostasis: cholesterol-loaded HDL particles are transported from non-hepatic peripheral tissue to the liver, where they unload their cargo via receptor-mediated selective uptake. It is astonishing that – although blood levels of HDL are broadly used in diagnosis for the prognosis of developing cardiovascular disease – the cholesterol uptake mechanisms are still poorly understood. Particularly, it remains unclear how the amphipathic cholesterol crosses the aqueous phase between the HDL particle and the cell membrane. We applied state-of-the-art high-resolution and ultra-sensitive force and fluorescence microscopy techniques to image directly the interaction of HDL particles with the target membrane. Using highspeed atomic-force microscopy (AFM) we made a surprising discovery: when added to membranes, we observed HDL particles to integrate into the interleaflet core of the bilayer, generating 'nanoblisters' with a size below 10 nm. Amphipathic cargo was able to leave such blisters, whereas hydrophobic cargo such as cholesteryl-ester remained associated with the particles. Using a combined fluorescence and force microscopy system we could directly visualize the transfer of single cargo molecules into supported lipid bilayers. Particularly, we compared the transfer of the fluorescently labelled amphiphilic DiI and Bodipy-labelled cholesterol with the hydrophobic Bodipy-labelled cholesteryl- ester. Our experiments revealed that i) cargo transfer requires contact; ii) only amphiphilic cargo is transferred. Interestingly, membrane elasticity was found to be crucial for the fusion: only highly elastic (and thus cholesterol-poor) membranes facilitate particle fusion, whereas inelastic cholesterol-rich membranes prevented the fusion. Live cell experiments show that the plasma membrane itself regulates a cell’s cholesterol demand: high cholesterol levels act repulsive, low cholesterol levels

  2. Atomic oxygen in a cold argon plasma jet: TALIF spectroscopy in ambient air with modelling and measurements of ambient species diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By investigating the atomic oxygen density in its effluent, two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) spectroscopy measurements are for the first time performed in a cold argon/oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The measurements are carried out in ambient air and quenching by inflowing air species is considered. We propose a novel absorption technique in the VUV spectral range, where emission originating from within the discharge is used as light source to determine the inflow of atmospheric oxygen into the effluent. Furthermore, we propose a modelling solution for the on-axis density of inflowing ambient air based on the stationary convection–diffusion equation. (paper)

  3. Laser spectroscopy of the antiprotonic helium atom – its energy levels and state lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hidetoshi, Yamaguchi

    2003-01-01

    The antiprotonic atom is a three-body exotic system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus. Its surprising longevity was found and has been studied for more than 10 years. In this work, transition energies and lifetimes of this exotic atom were systematically studied by using the antiproton beam of AD(Antiproton Decelerator) facility at CERN, with an RFQ antiproton decelerator, a narrow-bandwidth laser, Cerenkov counters with fast-response photomultiplier tubes, and cryogenic helium target systems. Thirteen transition energies were determined with precisions of better than 200 ppb by a laser spectroscopy method, together with the elimination of the shift effect caused by collisions with surrounding atoms. Fifteen lifetimes (decay rates) of short-lived states were determined from the time distributions of the antiproton-annihilation signals and the resonance widths of the atomic spectral lines. The relation between the magnitude of the decay rates and the transition multipolarity was inv...

  4. Precision spectroscopy of light kaonic atom X-rays in the SIDDHARTA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargnelli, M.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Bombelli, L.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Curceanu, C.; Fiorini, C.; Frizzi, T.; Ghio, F.; Girolami, B.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Kienle, P.; Lechner, P.; Sandri, P. Levi; Longoni, A.; Lucherini, V.; Marton, J.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Vidal, A. Romero; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.-X.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.; Tatsuno, H.; Doce, O. Vazquez; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2011-10-01

    The KN system at rest makes a sensitive testing ground for low energy QCD. At the DAΦNE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati we study kaonic atoms, taking advantage of the low-energy kaons from Φ-mesons decaying nearly at rest. The DEAR (DAΦNE Exotic Atom Research) experiment at LNF delivered the most precise data on kaonic hydrogen up to now. DEAR and its follow-up experiment SIDDHARTA (Silicon Drift Detector for Hadronic Atom Research by Timing Application) are using X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms to measure the strong interaction induced shift and width of the ground state. SIDDHARTA is the first experiment on kaonic helium-3 and deuterium ever, and kaonic hydrogen was remeasured with improved precision.

  5. Precision spectroscopy of light kaonic atom X-rays in the SIDDHARTA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The KN system at rest makes a sensitive testing ground for low energy QCD. At the DAΦNE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati we study kaonic atoms, taking advantage of the low-energy kaons from Φ-mesons decaying nearly at rest. The DEAR (DAΦNE Exotic Atom Research) experiment at LNF delivered the most precise data on kaonic hydrogen up to now. DEAR and its follow-up experiment SIDDHARTA (Silicon Drift Detector for Hadronic Atom Research by Timing Application) are using X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms to measure the strong interaction induced shift and width of the ground state. SIDDHARTA is the first experiment on kaonic helium-3 and deuterium ever, and kaonic hydrogen was remeasured with improved precision.

  6. Microneedles rollers as a potential device to increase ALA diffusion and PpIX production: evaluations by wide-field fluorescence imaging and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracielli Sousa, R. Phamilla; de Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Fujita, Alessandra K. L.; Requena, Michelle B.; Govone, Angelo Biassi; Escobar, André; de Nardi, Andrigo B.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2014-03-01

    One of the limitations of topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is the poor ability to penetrate biological barriers of skin and the recurrence rates in treatments. This study aimed to identify possible signs of increased diffusion of ALA-induced PpIX by fluorescence images and fluorescence spectroscopy. The research was done using in vivo porcine skin model. Before the cream application, microholes was performed with microneedles rollers in only one direction, afterward the ALA cream was applied at a 2.5cm2 area in triplicate and an occlusive dressing was placed. PpIX production was monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy collected at skin surface after 70, 100, 140, and 180 minutes of ALA incubation. About 100 fluorescence spectra of each treatment were collected, distributed by about five points for each site. Wide-field fluorescence imaging was made after 70, 90, and 170 minutes after treatment. The results obtained by imaging analysis indicated increase of the PpIX diffusion in the skin surface using the microneedles rollers (MNs) before ALA application. Circular regions of red fluorescence around the microholes were observed. In addition, the fluorescence spectra showed a greater intensity (2 times as many) in groups microneedles rollers associated. In conclusion, our data shown greater homogeneity and PpIX production in the groups pre-treated with microneedles indicating that the technique can be used to greater uniformity of PpIX production throughout the area to be treated reducing the chances of recurrent tumor as well as has potential for decreasing the time of therapy. (FUNDING SUPPORT:CAPES, CNPq and FAPESP)

  7. The Effect of a Fluorophore Photo-Physics on the Lipid Vesicle Diffusion Coefficient Studied by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabik, Dominik; Przybyło, Magda; Sikorski, Aleksander; Langner, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) is a technique, which allows determination of the diffusion coefficient and concentration of fluorescent objects suspended in the solution. The measured parameter is the fluctuation of the fluorescence signal emitted by diffusing molecules. When 100 nm DOPC vesicles labeled with various fluorescent dyes (Fluorescein-PE, NBD-PE, Atto488 DOPE or βBodipy FL) were measured, different values of diffusion coefficients have been obtained. These diffusion coefficients were different from the expected values measured using the dynamic light scattering method (DLS). The FCS was initially developed for solutions containing small fluorescent molecules therefore the observed inconsistency may result from the nature of vesicle suspension itself. The duration of the fluorescence signal may depend on the following factors: the exposure time of the labeled object to the excitation beam, the photo-physical properties (e.g., stability) of a fluorophore, the theoretical model used for the calculations of the diffusion coefficient and optical properties of the vesicle suspension. The diffusion coefficients determined for differently labeled liposomes show that its dependence on vesicle size and quantity of fluorescent probed used for labeling was significant demonstrating that the fluorescence properties of the fluorophore itself (bleaching and/or blinking) were critical factors for a correct outcome of FCS experiment. The new, based on combined FCS and DLS measurements, method for the determination of the focal volume prove itself to be useful for the evaluation of a fluorescence dye with respect to its applicability for FCS experiment. PMID:26695945

  8. Z-Scan Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy: A Powerful Tool for Determination of Lateral Diffusion in Biological Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štefl, Martin; Macháň, Radek; Hof, Martin

    New York : KLUWER ACADEMIC/PLENUM PUBL, 2011 - (Geddes, C.), s. 321-344 ISBN 978-1-4419-9671-8. - (Reviews in Fluorescence. Vol. 6) R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/1090; GA ČR GAP208/10/0376 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : image correlation spectroscopy * single particle tracking * spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  9. The use of one- and two- photon induced fluorescence spectroscopy for the optical characterization of carcinogenic aflatoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeesters, L.; Meulebroeck, W.; Raeymaekers, S.; Thienpont, H.

    2014-09-01

    Carcinogenic and toxic contaminants in food and feed products are nowadays mostly detected by destructive, time-consuming chemical analyses, like HPLC and LC-MS/MS methods. However, as a consequence of the severe and growing regulations on food products by the European Union, there arose an increased demand for the ultra-fast, high-sensitive and non-destructive detection of contaminants in food and feed products. Therefore, we have investigated fluorescence spectroscopy for the characterization of carcinogenic aflatoxins. With the use of a tunable titanium-sapphire laser in combination with second and third harmonic wavelength generation, both one- and two-photon induced fluorescence excitation wavelengths could be generated using the same setup. We characterized and compared the one- and two-photon induced fluorescence spectra of pure aflatoxin powder, after excitation with 365nm and 730nm respectively. Moreover, we investigated the absolute fluorescence intensity as function of the excitation power density. Afterwards, we applied our characterization setup to the detection of aflatoxins in maize grains. The fluorescence spectra of both healthy and contaminated maize samples were experimentally characterized. In addition to the fluorescence spectrum of the pure aflatoxin, we observed an unwanted influence of the intrinsic fluorescence of the maize. Depending on the excitation wavelength, a varying contrast between the fluorescence spectra of the healthy and contaminated samples was obtained. After a comparison of the measured fluorescence signals, a detection criterion for the optical identification of the contaminated maize samples could be defined. As a result, this illustrates the use of fluorescence spectroscopy as a valuable tool for the non-destructive, real-time and high-sensitive detection of aflatoxins in maize.

  10. Fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with PARAFAC and PLS DA for characterization and classification of honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, Lea; Bro, Rasmus; Zeković, Ivana; Dramićanin, Tatjana; Dramićanin, Miroslav D

    2015-05-15

    Fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and Partial least squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS DA) were used for characterization and classification of honey. Excitation emission spectra were obtained for 95 honey samples of different botanical origin (acacia, sunflower, linden, meadow, and fake honey) by recording emission from 270 to 640 nm with excitation in the range of 240-500 nm. The number of fluorophores present in honey, excitation and emission spectra of each fluorophore, and their relative concentration are determined using a six-component PARAFAC model. Emissions from phenolic compounds and Maillard reaction products exhibited the largest difference among classes of honey of different botanical origin. The PLS DA classification model, constructed from PARAFAC model scores, detected fake honey samples with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Honey samples were also classified using PLS DA with errors of 0.5% for linden, 10% for acacia, and about 20% for both sunflower and meadow mix. PMID:25577082

  11. Experimental study and verification of the residence time distribution using fluorescence spectroscopy and color measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigner, Michael; Lepschi, Alexander; Aigner, Jakob; Garmendia, Izaro; Miethlinger, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    We report on the inline measurement of residence time (RT) and residence time distribution (RTD) by means of fluorescence spectroscopy [1] and optical color measurements [2]. Measurements of thermoplastics in a variety of single-screw extruders were conducted. To assess the influence of screw configurations, screw speeds and mass throughput on the RT and RTD, tracer particles were introduced into the feeding section and the RT was measured inline in the plasticization unit. Using special measurement probes that can be inserted into 1/2″ - 20 UNF (unified fine thread) bore holes, the mixing ability of either the whole plasticization unit or selected screw regions, e.g., mixing parts, can be validated during the extrusion process. The measurement setups complement each other well, and their combined use can provide further insights into the mixing behavior of single-screw plasticization units.

  12. Confocal X-ray fluorescence micro-spectroscopy experiment in tilted geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a generalized mathematical model to describe the intensity of primary X-ray fluorescence radiation collected in the tilted confocal geometry mode, where the collimating optics is rotated over an angle relative to a horizontal plane. The influence of newly introduced terms, which take into account the tilted geometry mode, is discussed. The model is verified with a multi-layer test sample scanned in depth. It is proved that for low-Z matrices, the rotation of the detection channel does not induce any significant differences in a reconstruction of the thickness and chemical composition of layers, so that it may safely be ignored. - Highlights: • A mathematical model for confocal XRF spectroscopy in tilted geometry was derived. • Tilted geometry influenced the analytical capabilities of XRF instrument slightly. • Thickness and the chemical composition of multi-layers were determined

  13. A multi-channel monolithic Ge detector system for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Construction and performance of a monolithic quad-pixel Ge detector for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at synchrotron radiation sources are described. The detector semiconductor element has an active surface area of 4.0 cm2 which is electrically separated into four 1.0 cm2 pixels, with little interfacial dead volume. Spatial response of the array shows that cross-talk between adjacent pixels is 55Fe test source (MnKα, 5.9 keV), energy resolution of better than 200 eV is achieved with a 4 μsec peaking time. At 0.5 μsec peaking time, pulse pileup results in a 75% throughput efficiency for an incoming count rate of 100 kHz. Initial XAS fluoresncece measurements at the beamline 4 wiggler end stations at SSRL show that the detector system has several advantages over commercial x-ray spectrometers for low-concentration counting

  14. Construction and performance of a time-multiplex multiple-slit flame atomic fluorescence spectrometer for multi-element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and performance characteristics of a new multi-element flame atomic fluorescence spectrometer are presented. Radiation from four-hollow-cathode tubes is directed onto an unsheathed air-hydrogen flame. The resulting atomic fluorescence is viewed by a special monochromator with a separate exit slit for each element. The light exiting from all slits is directed onto a single photomultiplier tube. The fluorescence signals from different elements are distinguished by a time multiplex approach. Single-element detection limits for ten elements and multi-element detection limits for four elements are presented. The degradation of detection limits by flame background emission noise and effect of flame composition on performance are discussed. Better than 10% is obtained for moderate analyte concentrations. (Auth.)

  15. [Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-ming; Zhu, Feng-rong; Zhang, Zi-bin; Ren, Xiang-jun; Deng, Hu; Zhai, Li-hua; Zhang, Li-xing

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the investigation of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atoms by three-step three-color resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS). Twenty-seven odd-parity highly excited levels, whose transition probability is high, were used in this research. One hundred and forty-one autoionization states were found by these channels with the third-step laser scanning in the wavelength range of 634-670 nm. The ionization probabilities of different channels, which had higher cross sections, were compared. On the basis of this, eight optimal photoionization schemes of cerium atom have been given. PMID:15828309

  16. Photoassociation spectroscopy of cold alkaline earth atoms near the intercombination line

    OpenAIRE

    Ciurylo, R.; Tiesinga, E.; Kotochigova, S.; P.S. Julienne

    2004-01-01

    The properties of photoassociation (PA) spectra near the intercombination line (the weak transition between $^{1}S_{0}$ and $^{3}P_{1}$ states) of group II atoms are theoretically investigated. As an example we have carried out a calculation for Calcium atoms colliding at ultra low temperatures of 1 mK, 1 $\\mu$K, and 1 nK. Unlike in most current photoassociation spectroscopy the Doppler effect can significantly affect the shape of the investigated lines. Spectra are obtained using Ca--Ca and ...

  17. Fluorescence Spectroscopy: An Adjunct Diagnostic Tool to Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsy of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Changfang; Burnside, Elizabeth S.; Sisney, Gale A.; Salkowski, Lonie R.; Harter, Josephine M.; Yu, Bing

    2009-01-01

    We explored the use of a fiber-optic probe for in vivo fluorescence spectroscopy of breast tissues during percutaneous image-guided breast biopsy. A total of 121 biopsy samples with accompanying histological diagnosis were obtained clinically and investigated in this study. The tissue spectra were analyzed using partial least-squares analysis and represented using a set of principal components (PCs) with dramatically reduced data dimension. For nonmalignant tissue samples, a set of PCs that account for the largest amount of variance in the spectra displayed correlation with the percent tissue composition. For all tissue samples, a set of PCs was identified using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test as showing statistically significant differences between: 1) malignant and fibrous/benign; 2) malignant and adipose; and 3) malignant and nonmalignant breast samples. These PCs were used to distinguish malignant from other nonmalignant tissue types using a binary classification scheme based on both linear and nonlinear support vector machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR). For the sample set investigated in this study, the SVM classifier provided a cross-validated sensitivity and specificity of up to 81% and 87%, respectively, for discrimination between malignant and fibrous/benign samples, and up to 81% and 81%, respectively, for discriminating between malignant and adipose samples. Classification based on LR was used to generate receiver operator curves with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.87 for discriminating malignant versus fibrous/benign tissues, and an AUC of 0.84 for discriminating malignant from adipose tissue samples. This study demonstrates the feasibility of performing fluorescence spectroscopy during clinical core needle breast biopsy, and the potential of this technique for identifying breast malignancy in vivo. PMID:19272976

  18. Fluorescence spectroscopy of single molecules at room temperature and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Taekjip

    1996-12-01

    We performed fluorescence spectroscopy of single and pairs of dye molecules on a surface at room temperature. Near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and far field scanning optical microscope with multi-color excitation/detection capability were built. The instrument is capable of optical imaging with 100nm resolution and has the sensitivity necessary for single molecule detection. A variety of dynamic events which cannot be observed from an ensemble of molecules is revealed when the molecules are probed one at a time. They include (1) spectral jumps correlated with dark states, (2) individually resolved quantum jumps to and from the meta-stable triplet state, (3) rotational jumps due to desorption/readsorption events of single molecules on the surface. For these studies, a computer controlled optical system which automatically and rapidly locates and performs spectroscopic measurements on single molecules was developed. We also studied the interaction between closely spaced pairs of molecules. In particular, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a single resonant pair of donor and acceptor molecules was measured. Photodestruction dynamics of the donor or acceptor were used to determine the presence and efficiency of energy transfer Dual molecule spectroscopy was extended to a non-resonant pair of molecules to obtain high resolution differential distance information. By combining NSOM and dual color scheme, we studied the co-localization of parasite proteins and host proteins on a human red blood cell membrane infected with malaria. These dual-molecule techniques can be used to measure distances, relative orientations, and changes in distances/orientations of biological macromolecules with very good spatial, angular and temporal resolutions, hence opening new capabilities in the study of such systems.

  19. Evaluating fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool to characterize cyanobacteria intracellular organic matter upon simulated release and oxidation in natural water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korak, Julie A; Wert, Eric C; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular organic matter (IOM) from cyanobacteria may be released into natural waters following cell death in aquatic ecosystems and during oxidation processes in drinking water treatment plants. Fluorescence spectroscopy was evaluated to identify the presence of IOM from three cyanobacteria species during simulated release into natural water and following oxidation processes (i.e. ozone, free chlorine, chloramine, chlorine dioxide). Peak picking and the fluorescence index (FI) were explored to determine which IOM components (e.g., pigments) provide unique and persistent fluorescence signatures with minimal interferences from the background dissolved organic matter (DOM) found in Colorado River water (CRW). When IOM was added to ultrapure water, the fluorescence signature of the three cyanobacteria species showed similarities to each other. Each IOM exhibited a strong protein-like fluorescence and fluorescence at Ex 370 nm and Em 460 nm (FDOM), where commercial fluorescence sensors monitor. All species also had strong phycobiliprotein fluorescence (i.e. phycocyanin or phycoerythrin) in the higher excitation range (500-650 nm). All three IOM isolates had FI values greater than 2. When IOM was added to CRW, phycobiliprotein fluorescence was quenched through interactions between IOM and CRW-DOM. Mixing IOM and CRW demonstrated that protein-like and FDOM intensity responses were not a simple superposition of the starting material intensities, indicating that interactions between IOM and CRW-DOM fluorescing moieties were important. Fluorescence intensity in all regions decreased with exposure to ozone, free chlorine, and chlorine dioxide, but the FI still indicated compositional differences compared to CRW-DOM. The phycobiliproteins in IOM are not promising as a surrogate for IOM release, because their fluorescence intensity is quenched by interactions with DOM and decreased during oxidation processes. Increases in both FDOM intensity and FI are viable qualitative

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy of electrochemically self-assembled ZnSe and Mn:ZnSe nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report room temperature fluorescence spectroscopy (FL) studies of ZnSe and Mn-doped ZnSe nanowires of different diameters (10, 25, 50 nm) produced by an electrochemical self-assembly technique. All samples exhibit increasing blue-shift in the band edge fluorescence with decreasing wire diameter because of quantum confinement. The 10 nm ZnSe nanowires show four distinct emission peaks due to band-to-band recombination, exciton recombination, recombination via surface states and via band gap (trap) states. The exciton binding energy in these nanowires exhibits a giant increase (∼10-fold) over the bulk value due to quantum confinement, since the effective wire radius (taking into account side depletion) is smaller than the exciton Bohr radius in bulk ZnSe. The 25 and 50 nm diameter wires show only a single FL peak due to band-to-band electron-hole recombination. In the case of Mn-doped ZnSe nanowires, the band edge luminescence in 10 nm samples is significantly quenched by Mn doping but not the exciton luminescence, which remains relatively unaffected. We observe additional features due to Mn2+ ions. The spectra also reveal that the emission from Mn2+ states increases in intensity and is progressively red-shifted with increasing Mn concentration