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Sample records for atomic fluorescence detection

  1. Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhturova, N.F.; Yudelevich, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry, a comparatively new method for the analysis of trace quantities, has developed rapidly in the past ten years. Theoretical and experimental studies by many workers have shown that atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS) is capable of achieving a better limit than atomic absorption for a large number of elements. The present review examines briefly the principles of atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry and the types of fluorescent transition. The excitation sources, flame and nonflame atomizers, used in AFS are described. The limits of detection achieved up to the present, using flame and nonflame methods of atomization are given

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  3. High sensitivity detection of selenium by laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry using electrothermal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitmann, U.; Hese, A.; Schoknecht, G.; Gries, W.

    1995-01-01

    The high sensitivity detection of the trace element selenium is reported. The analytical method applied is Laser Excited Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry using Electrothermal Atomization within a graphite furnace atomizer. For the production of tunable laser radiation in the VUV spectral region a laser system was developed which consists of two dye lasers pumped by a Nd:YAG laser. The laser radiations are subsequently frequency doubled and sum frequency mixed by nonlinear optical KDP or BBO crystals, respectively. The system works with a repetition rate of 20 Hz and provides output energies of up to 100 μJ in the VUV at a pulse duration of 5 ns. The analytical investigations were focused on the detection of selenium in aqueous solutions and samples of human whole blood. From measurements on aqueous standards detection limits of 1.5 ng/l for selenium were obtained, with corresponding absolute detected masses of only 15 fg. The linear dynamic range spanned six orders of magnitude and good precision was achieved. In case of human whole blood samples the recovery was found to be within the range of 96% to 104%. The determination of the selenium content yielded medians of [119.5 ± 17.3] μg/l for 200 frozen blood samples taken in 1988 and [109.1 ± 15.6] μg/l for 103 fresh blood samples. (author)

  4. Evaluation of a tungsten coil atomization-laser-induced fluorescence detection approach for trace elemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezer, Muhsin; Elwood, Seth A.; Jones, Bradley T.; Simeonsson, Josef B.

    2006-01-01

    The analytical utility of a tungsten (W)-coil atomization-laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) approach has been evaluated for trace level measurements of elemental chromium (Cr), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), antimony (Sb), lead (Pb), tin (Sn), copper (Cu), thallium (Tl), indium (In), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn) and mercury (Hg). Measurements of As, Cr, In, Se, Sb, Pb, Tl, and Sn were performed by laser-induced fluorescence using a single dye laser operating near 460 nm whose output was converted by frequency doubling and stimulated Raman scattering to wavelengths ranging from 196 to 286 nm for atomic excitation. Absolute limits of detection (LODs) of 1, 0.3, 0.3, 0.2, 1, 6, 1, 0.2 and 0.8 pg and concentration LODs of 100, 30, 30, 20, 100, 600, 100, 20, and 80 pg/mL were achieved for As, Se, Sb, Sn, In, Cu, Cr, Pb and Tl, respectively. Determinations of Hg, Pb, Zn and Cd were performed using two-color excitation approaches and resulted in absolute LODs of 2, 30, 5 and 0.6 pg, respectively, and concentration LODs of 200, 3000, 500 and 60 pg/mL, respectively. The sensitivities achieved by the W-coil LIF approaches compare well with those reported by W-coil atomic absorption spectrometry, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, and graphite furnace electrothermal atomization-LIF approaches. The accuracy of the approach was verified through the analysis of a multielement reference solution containing Sb, Pb and Tl which each had certified performance acceptance limits of 19.6-20.4 μg/mL. The determined concentrations were 20.05 ± 2.60, 20.70 ± 2.27 and 20.60 ± 2.46 μg/mL, for Sb, Pb and Tl, respectively. The results demonstrate that W-coil LIF provides good analytical performance for trace analyses due to its high sensitivity, linearity, and capability to measure multiple elements using a single tunable laser and suggest that the development of portable W-coil LIF instrumentation using compact, solid-state lasers is feasible

  5. Evaluation of a tungsten coil atomization-laser-induced fluorescence detection approach for trace elemental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezer, Muhsin; Elwood, Seth A; Jones, Bradley T; Simeonsson, Josef B

    2006-06-30

    The analytical utility of a tungsten (W)-coil atomization-laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) approach has been evaluated for trace level measurements of elemental chromium (Cr), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), antimony (Sb), lead (Pb), tin (Sn), copper (Cu), thallium (Tl), indium (In), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn) and mercury (Hg). Measurements of As, Cr, In, Se, Sb, Pb, Tl, and Sn were performed by laser-induced fluorescence using a single dye laser operating near 460 nm whose output was converted by frequency doubling and stimulated Raman scattering to wavelengths ranging from 196 to 286 nm for atomic excitation. Absolute limits of detection (LODs) of 1, 0.3, 0.3, 0.2, 1, 6, 1, 0.2 and 0.8 pg and concentration LODs of 100, 30, 30, 20, 100, 600, 100, 20, and 80 pg/mL were achieved for As, Se, Sb, Sn, In, Cu, Cr, Pb and Tl, respectively. Determinations of Hg, Pb, Zn and Cd were performed using two-color excitation approaches and resulted in absolute LODs of 2, 30, 5 and 0.6 pg, respectively, and concentration LODs of 200, 3000, 500 and 60 pg/mL, respectively. The sensitivities achieved by the W-coil LIF approaches compare well with those reported by W-coil atomic absorption spectrometry, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, and graphite furnace electrothermal atomization-LIF approaches. The accuracy of the approach was verified through the analysis of a multielement reference solution containing Sb, Pb and Tl which each had certified performance acceptance limits of 19.6-20.4 microg/mL. The determined concentrations were 20.05+/-2.60, 20.70+/-2.27 and 20.60+/-2.46 microg/mL, for Sb, Pb and Tl, respectively. The results demonstrate that W-coil LIF provides good analytical performance for trace analyses due to its high sensitivity, linearity, and capability to measure multiple elements using a single tunable laser and suggest that the development of portable W-coil LIF instrumentation using compact, solid-state lasers is feasible.

  6. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    A method for a direct measurement of X-ray projections of the atomic structure is described. Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO 3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO 3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples

  7. In situ detection of atomic and molecular iodine using Resonance and Off-Resonance Fluorescence by Lamp Excitation: ROFLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Gómez Martín

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a new instrument for in situ detection of atmospheric iodine atoms and molecules based on atomic and molecular resonance and off-resonance ultraviolet fluorescence excited by lamp emission. The instrument combines the robustness, light weight, low power consumption and efficient excitation of radio-frequency discharge light sources with the high sensitivity of the photon counting technique. Calibration of I2 fluorescence is achieved via quantitative detection of the molecule by Incoherent Broad Band Cavity-enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy. Atomic iodine fluorescence signal is calibrated by controlled broad band photolysis of known I2 concentrations in the visible spectral range at atmospheric pressure. The instrument has been optimised in laboratory experiments to reach detection limits of 1.2 pptv for I atoms and 13 pptv for I2, for S/N = 1 and 10 min of integration time. The ROFLEX system has been deployed in a field campaign in northern Spain, representing the first concurrent observation of ambient mixing ratios of iodine atoms and molecules in the 1–350 pptv range.

  8. Electrochemical hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry for detection of tin in canned foods using polyaniline-modified lead cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Xianjuan [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Gan Wuer, E-mail: wgan@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wan Lingzhong; Deng Yun; Yang Qinghua; He Youzhao [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2010-12-15

    An electrochemical hydride generation system with polyaniline-modified lead cathode was developed for tin determination by coupling with atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The tin fluorescence signal intensity was improved evidently as the polyaniline membrane could facilitate the transformation process from atomic tin to the SnH{sub 4} and prevent the aggradation of Sn atom on Pb electrode surface. The effects of experimental parameters and interferences have been studied. The limit of detection (LOD) was 1.5 ng mL{sup -1} (3{sigma}) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 3.3% for 11 consecutive measurements of 50 ng mL{sup -1} Sn(IV) standard solution.

  9. Electrochemical hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry for detection of tin in canned foods using polyaniline-modified lead cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xianjuan; Gan, Wuer; Wan, Lingzhong; Deng, Yun; Yang, Qinghua; He, Youzhao

    2010-12-15

    An electrochemical hydride generation system with polyaniline-modified lead cathode was developed for tin determination by coupling with atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The tin fluorescence signal intensity was improved evidently as the polyaniline membrane could facilitate the transformation process from atomic tin to the SnH(4) and prevent the aggradation of Sn atom on Pb electrode surface. The effects of experimental parameters and interferences have been studied. The limit of detection (LOD) was 1.5 ng mL(-1) (3σ) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 3.3% for 11 consecutive measurements of 50 ng mL(-1) Sn(IV) standard solution. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples. PMID:21997909

  11. Determination of methyl mercury by aqueous phase Eehylation, followed by gas chromatographic separation with cold vapor atomic fluorescence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wild, John F.; Olsen, Mark L.; Olund, Shane D.

    2002-01-01

    A recent national sampling of streams in the United States revealed low methyl mercury concentrations in surface waters. The resulting median and mean concentrations, calculated from 104 samples, were 0.06 nanograms per liter (ng/L) and 0.15 ng/L, respectively. This level of methyl mercury in surface water in the United States has created a need for analytical techniques capable of detecting sub-nanogram per liter concentrations. In an attempt to create a U.S. Geological Survey approved method, the Wisconsin District Mercury Laboratory has adapted a distillation/ethylation/ gas-phase separation method with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy detection for the determination of methyl mercury in filtered and unfiltered waters. This method is described in this report. Based on multiple analyses of surface water and ground-water samples, a method detection limit of 0.04 ng/L was established. Precision and accuracy were evaluated for the method using both spiked and unspiked ground-water and surface-water samples. The percent relative standard deviations ranged from 10.2 to 15.6 for all analyses at all concentrations. Average recoveries obtained for the spiked matrices ranged from 88.8 to 117 percent. The precision and accuracy ranges are within the acceptable method-performance limits. Considering the demonstrated detection limit, precision, and accuracy, the method is an effective means to quantify methyl mercury in waters at or below environmentally relevant concentrations

  12. Speciation analysis of arsenic by selective hydride generation- cryotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometry with flame-in-gas- shield atomizer: Achieving extremely low detection limits with inexpensive instrumentation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Currier, J. M.; Stýblo, M.; Dědina, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 20 (2014), s. 10422-10428 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S; GA MŠk LH12040 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : speciation analysis of arsenic * selective hydride generation * flame-in-gas-shield atomizer * cryotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.636, year: 2014

  13. Flame emission, atomic absorption and fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horlick, G.

    1980-01-01

    Six hundred and thirty references are cited in this review. The information in the review is divided into 12 major areas: books, reviews, and bibliographies; fundamental studies in flames; developments in instrumentation; measurement techniques and procedure; flame emission spectrometry; flame atomic absorption spectrometry; flame molecular absorption spectrometry; electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectroscopy; hydride generation techniques; graphite furnace atomic emission spectrometry; atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and analytical comparisons

  14. Development of laser excited atomic fluorescence and ionization methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winefordner, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Progress report: May 1, 1988 to December 31, 1991. The research supported by DE-FG05-88ER13881 during the past (nearly) 3 years can be divided into the following four categories: (1) theoretical considerations of the ultimate detection powers of laser fluorescence and laser ionization methods; (2) experimental evaluation of laser excited atomic fluorescence; (3) fundamental studies of atomic and molecular parameters in flames and plasmas; (4) other studies

  15. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  16. Multielement methods of atomic fluorescence analysis of enviromental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigin, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    A multielement method of atomic fluorescence analysis of environmental samples based on sample decomposition by autoclave fluorination and gas-phase atomization of volatile compounds in inductive araon plasma using a nondispersive polychromator is suggested. Detection limits of some elements (Be, Sr, Cd, V, Mo, Te, Ru etc.) for different sample forms introduced in to an analyzer are given

  17. Laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation for detection of hydrogen atoms in a periphery region of high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee-Je; Kajiwara, Toshinori; Motoyama, Sumio; Muraoka, Katsunori; Akazaki, Masanori; Okada, Tatsuo; Maeda, Mitsuo

    1989-01-01

    For measurements of atomic hydrogen density in the periphery region of high temperature plasmas, laser fluorescence spectroscopy (LFS) by two-photon excitation (1s-3s, 3d) was developed. Based upon the theoretical estimates for laser source requirements, which indicated the laser energy and spectral width to be more than 10 mJ (assuming the pulse duration of 10 ns) and several tens of picometers around the wavelength of 205.1 nm, respectively, the first Stokes generation in deuterium gas of ArF laser output was adopted and shown to have the necessary performance. Through the LFS experiment employing the laser source, the minimum detectable limit of atomic hydrogen, normalized by a laser power and an observing solid angle, was demonstrated to be 1 x 10 14 [m -3 · MW · sr], which is usually sufficient for the above purpose, and the accuracy of the density determination was shown to be within a factor 2. (author)

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing in atomic vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, T.; Schuessler, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    The use of highly monochromatic light allows the selective excitation of atoms in vapors if excitation and detection of the fluorescence is carried out collinearly. The atoms capable of absorbing light then form an atomic beam of well defined velocity along the direction of the laser beam, but no velocity selection occurs perpendicular to it. The potential of the technique for Doppler-free atomic spectroscopy and for the study of excited atom collisions is demonstrated using the Na D 1 line as an example

  19. Single-atom-resolved fluorescence imaging of an atomic Mott insulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherson, Jacob; Weitenberg, Christof; Andres, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    in situ images of a quantum fluid in which each underlying quantum particle is detected. Here we report fluorescence imaging of strongly interacting bosonic Mott insulators in an optical lattice with single-atom and single-site resolution. From our images, we fully reconstruct the atom distribution...

  20. TRACE ANALYSIS BY LASER-EXCITED ATOMIC FLUORESCENCE WITH ATOMIZATION IN A PULSED PLASMA

    OpenAIRE

    Lunyov , O.; Oshemkov , S.; Petrov , A.

    1991-01-01

    The possibilities of plasma atomization for laser fluorescence trace analysis are discussed. Pulsed hot hollow cathode discharge was used for analysis of solutions and powdered samples. The high voltage spark and laser-induced breakdown (laser spark) were used as atomizers of metal-containing atmospheric aerosols. Detection limits were improved by means of temporal background selection.

  1. Resonance Fluorescence from an Artificial Atom in Squeezed Vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Toyli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental realization of resonance fluorescence in squeezed vacuum. We strongly couple microwave-frequency squeezed light to a superconducting artificial atom and detect the resulting fluorescence with high resolution enabled by a broadband traveling-wave parametric amplifier. We investigate the fluorescence spectra in the weak and strong driving regimes, observing up to 3.1 dB of reduction of the fluorescence linewidth below the ordinary vacuum level and a dramatic dependence of the Mollow triplet spectrum on the relative phase of the driving and squeezed vacuum fields. Our results are in excellent agreement with predictions for spectra produced by a two-level atom in squeezed vacuum [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 2539 (1987], demonstrating that resonance fluorescence offers a resource-efficient means to characterize squeezing in cryogenic environments.

  2. Ultratrace determination of lead in whole blood using electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, E P; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1996-09-15

    Laser-excited atomic fluorescence has been used to detect lead that was electrothermally atomized from whole blood in a graphite furnace. A 9 kHz repetition rate copper vapor laser pumped dye laser was used to excite the lead at 283.3 nm, and the resulting atomic fluorescence was detected at 405.8 nm. No matrix modification was used other than a 1:21 dilution of the whole blood with high-purity water. Using the atomic fluorescence peak area as the analytical measure and a background correction technique based upon a simultaneous measurement of the transmitted laser intensity, excellent agreement for NIST and CDC certified whole blood reference samples was obtained with aqueous standards. A limit of detection in blood of 10 fg/mL (100 ag absolute) was achieved.

  3. Laser fluorescence spectroscopy of sputtered uranium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.B.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy was used to study the sputtering of 99.8% 238 U metal foil when bombarded by normally incident 500 to 3000 eV Ne + , Ar + , Kr + , and O 2 + . A three-level atom model of the LIF processes is developed to interpret the observed fluorescent emission from the sputtered species. The model shows that close attention must be paid to the conditions under which the experiment is carried out as well as to the details of the collision cascade theory of sputtering. Rigorous analysis shows that when properly applied, LIF can be used to investigate the predictions of sputtering theory as regards energy distributions of sputtered particles and for the determination of sputtering yields. The possibility that thermal emission may occur during sputtering can also be tested using the proposed model. It is shown that the velocity distribution (either the number density or flux density distribution, depending upon the experimental conditions) of the sputtered particles can be determined using the LIF technique and that this information can be used to obtain a description of the basic sputtering mechanisms. These matters are discussed using the U-atom fluorescence measurements as a basis. The relative sputtering yields for various incident ions on uranium were also measured for the first time using the LIF technique. A surprisingly high fraction of the sputtered uranium atoms were found to occupy the low lying metastable energy levels of U(I). The population of the sputtered metastable atoms were found approximately to obey a Boltzman distribution with an effective temperature of 920 +- 100 0 K. 41 references

  4. State-dependent fluorescence of neutral atoms in optical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Dorantes, M.; Alt, W.; Gallego, J.; Ghosh, S.; Ratschbacher, L.; Meschede, D.

    2018-02-01

    Recently we have demonstrated scalable, nondestructive, and high-fidelity detection of the internal state of 87Rb neutral atoms in optical dipole traps using state-dependent fluorescence imaging [M. Martinez-Dorantes, W. Alt, J. Gallego, S. Ghosh, L. Ratschbacher, Y. Völzke, and D. Meschede, Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 180503 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.180503]. In this paper we provide experimental procedures and interpretations to overcome the detrimental effects of heating-induced trap losses and state leakage. We present models for the dynamics of optically trapped atoms during state-dependent fluorescence imaging and verify our results by comparing Monte Carlo simulations with experimental data. Our systematic study of dipole force fluctuations heating in optical traps during near-resonant illumination shows that off-resonant light is preferable for state detection in tightly confining optical potentials.

  5. Fluorescence detection of esophageal neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    White-light endoscopy is well-established and wide used modality. However, despite the many technological advances that have been occurred, conventional endoscopy is suboptimal and usually detects advanced stage lesions. The limitations of standard endoscopy initiate development of spectroscopic techniques, additional to standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most sensitive approaches is fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal mucosa for neoplasia detection. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20 mg/kg weight. Excitation source has max of emission at 405 nm and light is delivered by the standard light guide of the endoscopic equipment. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to reabsorption of blood. The lack of fluorescence peaks in the red spectral area for normal mucosa is an indication for selective accumulation of 5-ALA/PpIX only in abnormal sites Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  6. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Biryukova, T.; Sukhinina, A.; Vdovin, Yu

    2010-11-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 - 645 nm and 340 - 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy.

  7. [Atomic/ionic fluorescence in microwave plasma torch discharge with excitation of high current and microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp: Ca atomic/ionic fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhen-bin; Liang, Feng; Yang, Peng-yuan; Jin, Qin-han; Huang, Ben-li

    2002-02-01

    A system of atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry in microwave plasma torch (MPT) discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP HCL) has been developed. The operation conditions for Ca atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry have been optimized. Compared with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) in argon microwave induced plasma (MIP) and MPT with the excitation of direct current and conventional pulsed HCL, the system with HCMP HCL excitation can improve AFS and ionic fluorescence spectrometry (IFS) detection limits in MPT atomizer and ionizer. Detection limits (3 sigma) with HCMP HCL-MPT-AFS/IFS are 10.1 ng.mL-1 for Ca I 422.7 nm, 14.6 ng.mL-1 for Ca II 393.4 nm, and 37.4 ng.mL-1 for Ca II 396.8 nm, respectively.

  8. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH 4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l −1 and 1.0 ng l −1 , respectively. - Highlights: • We optimized and compared two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry. • Miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were optimized. • The limit of detection for arsenic was 1.0 ng l −1

  9. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschner, Karel, E-mail: karel.marschner@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Albertov 8, 128 43 Prague (Czech Republic); Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH{sub 4} in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l{sup −1} and 1.0 ng l{sup −1}, respectively. - Highlights: • We optimized and compared two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry. • Miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were optimized. • The limit of detection for arsenic was 1.0 ng l{sup −1}.

  10. Simultaneous determination of arsenic and antimony by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry with dielectric barrier discharge atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing Zhi [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory for Atomic and Molecular Nanosciences of the Education Ministry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kuermaiti, Biekesailike [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory for Atomic and Molecular Nanosciences of the Education Ministry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Products Quality Inspection Institute, Yili, Xinjiang 835000 (China); Wang Juan; Han Guojun; Zhang Sichun [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory for Atomic and Molecular Nanosciences of the Education Ministry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang Xinrong, E-mail: xrzhang@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory for Atomic and Molecular Nanosciences of the Education Ministry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Simultaneous determination of As and Sb by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry was developed with the dielectric barrier discharge plasma as the hydride atomizer. The low-temperature and atmospheric-pressure micro-plasma was generated in a quartz cylindrical configuration device, which was constructed by an axial internal electrode and an outer electrode surrounding outside of the tube. The optimization of the atomizer construction and parameters for hydride generation and fluorescence detection systems were carried out. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits for As and Sb were 0.04 and 0.05 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. In addition, the applicability of the present method was confirmed by the detection of As and Sb in reference materials of quartz sandstone (GBW07106) and argillaceous limestone (GBW07108). The present work provided a new approach to exploit the miniaturized hydride generation dielectric barrier discharge atomic fluorescence spectrometry system for simultaneous multi-element determination.

  11. Simultaneous determination of arsenic and antimony by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry with dielectric barrier discharge atomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhi; Kuermaiti, Biekesailike; Wang Juan; Han Guojun; Zhang Sichun; Zhang Xinrong

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneous determination of As and Sb by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry was developed with the dielectric barrier discharge plasma as the hydride atomizer. The low-temperature and atmospheric-pressure micro-plasma was generated in a quartz cylindrical configuration device, which was constructed by an axial internal electrode and an outer electrode surrounding outside of the tube. The optimization of the atomizer construction and parameters for hydride generation and fluorescence detection systems were carried out. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits for As and Sb were 0.04 and 0.05 μg L -1 , respectively. In addition, the applicability of the present method was confirmed by the detection of As and Sb in reference materials of quartz sandstone (GBW07106) and argillaceous limestone (GBW07108). The present work provided a new approach to exploit the miniaturized hydride generation dielectric barrier discharge atomic fluorescence spectrometry system for simultaneous multi-element determination.

  12. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  13. Atomization of volatile compounds for atomic absorption and atomic fluorescence spectrometry: On the way towards the ideal atomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedina, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    This review summarizes and discusses the individual atomizers of volatile compounds. A set of criteria important for analytical praxis is used to rank all the currently existing approaches to the atomization based on on-line atomization for atomic absorption (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) as well as on in-atomizer trapping for AAS. Regarding on-line atomization for AAS, conventional quartz tubes are currently the most commonly used devices. They provide high sensitivity and low baseline noise. Running and investment costs are low. The most serious disadvantage is the poor resistance against atomization interferences and often unsatisfactory linearity of calibration graphs. Miniature diffusion flame (MDF) is extremely resistant to interferences, simple, cheap and user-friendly. Its essential disadvantage is low sensitivity. A novel device, known as a multiatomizer, was designed to overcome disadvantages of previous atomizers. It matches performance of conventional quartz tubes in terms of sensitivity and baseline noise as well as in running and investment costs. The multiatomizer, however, provides much better (i) resistance against atomization interferences and (ii) linearity of calibration graphs. In-atomizer trapping enhances the sensitivity of the determination and eliminates the effect of the generation kinetics and of surges in gas flow on the signal shape. This is beneficial for the accuracy of the determination. It could also be an effective tool for reducing some interferences in the liquid phase. In-situ trapping in graphite furnaces (GF) is presently by far the most popular approach to the in-atomizer trapping. Its resistance against interferences is reasonably good and it can be easily automated. In-situ trapping in GF is a mature method well established in various application fields. These are the reasons to rank in-situ trapping in GF as currently the most convenient approach to hydride atomization for AAS. The recently suggested

  14. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A; Vdovin, Yu; Biryukova, T

    2010-01-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 – 645 nm and 340 – 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy

  15. Resonance fluorescence microscopy via three-dimensional atom localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchadhyayee, Pradipta; Dutta, Bibhas Kumar; Das, Nityananda; Mahapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A scheme is proposed to realize three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a driven two-level atomic system via resonance fluorescence. The field arrangement for the atom localization involves the application of three mutually orthogonal standing-wave fields and an additional traveling-wave coupling field. We have shown the efficacy of such field arrangement in tuning the spatially modulated resonance in all directions. Under different parametric conditions, the 3D localization patterns originate with various shapes such as sphere, sheets, disk, bowling pin, snake flute, flower vase. High-precision localization is achieved when the radiation field detuning equals twice the combined Rabi frequencies of the standing-wave fields. Application of a traveling-wave field of suitable amplitude at optimum radiation field detuning under symmetric standing-wave configuration leads to 100% detection probability even in sub-wavelength domain. Asymmetric field configuration is also taken into consideration to exhibit atom localization with appreciable precision compared to that of the symmetric case. The momentum distribution of the localized atoms is found to follow the Heisenberg uncertainty principle under the validity of Raman-Nath approximation. The proposed field configuration is suitable for application in the study of atom localization in an optical lattice arrangement.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence with an OPO system. Part II: direct determination of lead content in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, A; Lijour, Y; Giamarchi, P; Burel-Deschamps, L; Stephan, L

    2003-03-01

    Fluorescence was induced by coupling a laser with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to develop an analytical method for the direct determination of lead content, at ultra-trace level, in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF). The optimization of atomization conditions, laser pulse energy, and mainly temporal parameters allowed us to reach a 3 fg detection limit (0.3 ng L(-1)) despite the low repetition rate of the device. The expected error on predicted concentrations of lead, at trace levels, in seawater was below 15%.

  17. Designing of fluorescent and magnetic imprinted polymer for rapid, selective and sensitive detection of imidacloprid via activators regenerated by the electron transfer-atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET-ATRP) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Karfa, Paramita; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we report on a dual-behavior electrochemical/optical sensor for sensitive determination of Imidacloprid by fluorescent dye (fluorescein, FL) and imprinted polymer modified europium doped superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (FL@SPIONs@MIP). The imidacloprid (IMD)-imprinted polymer was directly synthesized on the Eu-SPIONs surface via Activators regenerated by the electron transfer-atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET-ATRP) technique. Preparation, characterization and application of the prepared FL@SPIONs@MIP were systematically investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), fluorescence spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. The electrochemical experiments exhibited a remarkable selectivity of the prepared sensor towards IMD. Determination of IMD by the square wave stripping voltammetry method represented a wide linear range of 0.059-0.791 μg L-1 with a detection limit of 0.0125 μg L-1. In addition, the fluorescence method shows a linear range of 0.039-0.942 μg L-1 and LOD of 0.0108 μg L-1. The fluorescence property of prepared FL@SPIONs@MIP was used for rapid, on-spot but selective detection of IMD in real samples. The proposed electrode displayed excellent repeatability and long-term stability and was successfully applied for quantitative and trace level determination of IMD in several real samples.

  18. Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine at 170 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, G. C.; Dyer, Mark J.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine is reported. A doubled dye laser at 286-nm is Raman shifted in H2 to 170 nm (sixth anti-Stokes order) to excite ground-state 2P(0)J fluorine atoms to the 2D(0)J level. The fluorine atoms are detected by one of two methods: observing the fluorescence decay to the 2PJ level or observing F(+) production through the absorption of an additional photon by the excited atoms. Relative two-photon absorption cross sections to and the radiative lifetimes of the 2D(0)J states are measured.

  19. Laser-excited atomic-fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal tube atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, J A; Leong, M B; Stevenson, C L; Petrucci, G; Winefordner, J D

    1989-12-01

    The performance of graphite-tube electrothermal atomizers is evaluated for laser-excited atomic-fluorescence spectrometry for several elements. Three pulsed laser systems are used to pump tunable dye lasers which subsequently are used to excite Pb, Ga, In, Fe, Ir, and Tl atoms in the hot graphite tube. The dye laser systems used are pumped by nitrogen, copper vapour and Nd:YAG lasers. Detection limits in the femtogram and subfemtogram range are typically obtained for all elements. A commercial graphite-tube furnace is important for the successful utilization of the laser-based method when the determination of trace elements is intended, especially when complicated matrices may be present.

  20. Pressure broadening of atomic oxygen two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinov, D.; Drag, C.; Blondel, C.; Guaitella, O.; Golda, J.; Klarenaar, B.L.M.; Engeln, R.A.H.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Booth, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, considered to be a determining reactant in plasma applications at ambient pressure, is routinely detected by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Here, pressure broadening of the (2p 4 3 P 2  →  3p 3 P J=0,1,2) two-photon transition in oxygen atoms was

  1. Resonance fluorescence based two- and three-dimensional atom localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Abdul; Rahmatullah; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-06-01

    Two- and three-dimensional atom localization in a two-level atom-field system via resonance fluorescence is suggested. For the two-dimensional localization, the atom interacts with two orthogonal standing-wave fields, whereas for the three-dimensional atom localization, the atom interacts with three orthogonal standing-wave fields. The effect of the detuning and phase shifts associated with the corresponding standing-wave fields is investigated. A precision enhancement in position measurement of the single atom can be noticed via the control of the detuning and phase shifts.

  2. Studying atomic-resolution by X-ray fluorescence holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hongyi; Chen Jianwen; Xie Honglan; Zhu Huafeng; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the results of numerical simulations of X-ray fluorescence holograms and the reconstructed atomic images for Fe single crystal are given. The influences of the recording angles ranges and the polarization effect on the reconstruction of the atomic images are discussed. The process for removing twin images by multiple energy fluorescence holography and expanding the energy range of the incident X-rays to improve the resolution of the reconstructed images is presented

  3. Resonance fluorescence from an atom in a squeezed vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, H. J.; Lane, A. S.; Walls, D. F.

    1987-06-01

    The fluorescent spectrum for a two-level atom which is damped by a squeezed vacuum shows striking differences from the spectrum for ordinary resonance fluorescence. For strong coherent driving fields the Mollow triplet depends on the relative phase of the driving field and the squeezed vacuum field. The central peak may have either subnatural linewidth or supernatural linewidth depending on this phase. The mean atomic polarization also shows a phase sensitivity.

  4. Atomic fluorescence spectrometry with the inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omenetto, N.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) is based on the radiational activation of atoms and ions produced in a suitable atomizer (ionizer) and the subsequent measurement of the resulting radiational deactivation, called fluorescence. Atomic fluorescence spectrometry has been of considerable interest to researchers in atomic spectrometry because of its use for both analytical and diagnostic purposes. Unfortunately, the analytical applications of AFS have suffered from the lack of commercial instrumentation until the recent marketing of the Baird multiple-element, hollow cathode lamp-excited inductively coupled plasma system. This chapter is concerned strictly with the use of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) as a cell and as a source for AFS. Many of the major references concerning the ICP in analytical AFS are categorized in Table 9.1, along with several reviews and diagnostical studies. For more detailed discussions of the fundamental aspects of AFS, the reader is referred to previous reviews

  5. Simultaneous detection of selenium by atomic fluorescence and sulfur by molecular emission by flow-injection hydride generation with on-line reduction for the determination of selenate, sulfate and sulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyson, J.F., E-mail: tyson@chem.umass.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Palmer, C.D. [Lead Poisoning Trace Elements Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, P.O. Box 509, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States)

    2009-10-12

    An inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ICP-AFS) instrument, was modified so that it was capable of monitoring transient chromatographic or flow-injection profiles and that sulfur molecular emission and selenium atomic fluorescence could be monitored simultaneously in an argon-hydrogen diffusion flame on a glass burner. The analytes were introduced as hydrogen selenide and hydrogen sulfide, generated on a flow-injection manifold. Selenate was reduced to hydride-forming selenite by microwave-assisted on-line reaction with hydrochloric acid, and sulfate, or sulfite, was reduced to hydride-forming sulfide by a mixture of hydriodic acid, acetic acid and sodium hypophosphite. The effects of the nature of reducing agent, flow rate, microwave power and coil length were studied. The limit of detection (3 s) for selenium was 10 {mu}g L{sup -1}, and for sulfide was 70 {mu}g L{sup -1} (200-{mu}L injection volume). The calibration was linear for selenium up to 2 mg L{sup -1} and to 10 mg L{sup -1} for sulfide. The throughput was 180 h{sup -1}. The three sulfur species could be differentiated on the basis of reactivity at various microwave powers.

  6. Fluorescence detection system for microfluidic droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Binyu; Han, Xiaoming; Su, Zhen; Liu, Quanjun

    2018-05-01

    In microfluidic detection technology, because of the universality of optical methods in laboratory, optical detection is an attractive solution for microfluidic chip laboratory equipment. In addition, the equipment with high stability and low cost can be realized by integrating appropriate optical detection technology on the chip. This paper reports a detection system for microfluidic droplets. Photomultiplier tubes (PMT) is used as a detection device to improve the sensitivity of detection. This system improves the signal to noise ratio by software filtering and spatial filter. The fluorescence intensity is proportional to the concentration of the fluorescence and intensity of the laser. The fluorescence micro droplets of different concentrations can be distinguished by this system.

  7. Theory of analytical curves in atomic fluorescence flame spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymayers, H.P.

    An explicit expression for the intensity of atomic resonance fluorescence as a function of atomic concentration in a flame is derived under certain idealized conditions. The expression is generally valid for a pure Doppler absorption line profile as well as for a combined Doppler and collisional

  8. Electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aucelio, R.Q.; Smith, B.W.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    A dye laser pumped by a high-repetition-rate copper vapor laser was used as the excitation source to determine indium at parts-per-trillion level by electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS). A comparison was made between wall atomization, in pyrolytic and nonpyrolytic graphite tubes, and platform atomization. The influence of several chemical modifiers either in solution or precoated in the graphite tube was evaluated. The influence of several acids and NaOH in the analyte solution was also studied. Optimization of the analytical conditions was carried out to achieve the best signal-to-background ratio and consequently an absolute limit of detection of 1 fg. Some possible interferents of the method were evaluated. The method was evaluated by determining indium in blood, urine, soil, and urban dust samples. Recoveries between 99.17 and 109.17% are reported. A precision of 4.1% at the 10 ng g -1 level in water standards was achieved. copyright 1998 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  9. Single molecule DNA detection with an atomic vapor notch filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhland, Denis; Rendler, Torsten; Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Wrachtrup, Joerg; Gerhardt, Ilja [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    The detection of single molecules has facilitated many advances in life- and material-science. Commonly the fluorescence of dye molecules is detected, which are attached to a non-fluorescent structure under study. For fluorescence microscopy one desires to maximize the detection efficiency together with an efficient suppression of undesired laser leakage. Here we present the use of the narrow-band filtering properties of hot atomic sodium vapor to selectively filter the excitation light from the red-shifted fluorescence of dye labeled single-stranded DNA molecules. A statistical analysis proves an enhancement in detection efficiency of more than 15% in a confocal and in a wide-field configuration. (orig.)

  10. Molecules for Fluorescence Detection of Specific Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, Steve

    2008-01-01

    A family of fluorescent dye molecules has been developed for use in on-off fluorescence detection of specific chemicals. By themselves, these molecules do not fluoresce. However, when exposed to certain chemical analytes in liquid or vapor forms, they do fluoresce (see figure). These compounds are amenable to fixation on or in a variety of substrates for use in fluorescence-based detection devices: they can be chemically modified to anchor them to porous or non-porous solid supports or can be incorporated into polymer films. Potential applications for these compounds include detection of chemical warfare agents, sensing of acidity or alkalinity, and fluorescent tagging of proteins in pharmaceutical research and development. These molecules could also be exploited for use as two-photon materials for photodynamic therapy in the treatment of certain cancers and other diseases. A molecule in this family consists of a fluorescent core (such as an anthracene or pyrene) attached to two end groups that, when the dye is excited by absorption of light, transfer an electron to the core, thereby quenching the fluorescence. The end groups can be engineered so that they react chemically with certain analytes. Upon reaction, electrons on the end groups are no longer available for transfer to the core and, consequently, the fluorescence from the core is no longer quenched. The chemoselectivity of these molecules can be changed by changing the end groups. For example, aniline end groups afford a capability for sensing acids or acid halides (including those contained in chemical warfare agents). Pyridine or bipyridyl end groups would enable sensing of metal ions. Other chemicals that can be selectively detected through suitable choice of end groups include glucose and proteins. Moreover, the fluorescent cores can be changed to alter light-absorption and -emission characteristics: anthracene cores fluoresce at wavelengths around 500 nm, whereas perylene cores absorb and emit at

  11. Molecular engineering and fluorescence for the detection of toxic cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souchon, V.

    2007-11-01

    This work is a part of the 'Toxicologie Nucleaire Environnementale' program which aims at studying the effects on the living of heavy metals or radionuclides involved in nuclear industry. Most particularly, it deals with the design of new fluorescent sensors for the selective detection of Pb 2+ , Cd 2+ and Cs + in biological media. Several fluorescent calixarenes possessing nitrogen atoms were synthesized and their properties as potential lead sensors were investigated. One of them could be used in experimental conditions close to biological media and new target compounds with amide functional groups were proposed. Many approaches were considered for the design of selective fluorescent sensors for cadmium. On the basis of literature results, many chelating compounds incorporating sulfur atoms were synthesized but showed no significant affinity towards cadmium. On the opposite, compounds functionalized with several pyridine-2'-yl-1,2,3-triazol fluorescent moieties linked to a β-cyclodextrin or a calix[4]arene showed good affinity for cadmium in methanol, but the selectivity was found to be insufficient. In contrast, very satisfying results in terms of both selectivity and sensitivity could be obtained with the commercial calcium sensor Rhod-5N in an aqueous medium at neutral pH. Lastly, micromolar detection limits for the selective detection of caesium were reached in an aqueous medium at neutral pH thanks to a new sulfonated fluorescent calixarene with two appended crown-ethers. An original complexation mechanism was proposed and validated by molecular modelling (DFT). (author)

  12. Detection of Counterfeit Tequila by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel de la Rosa Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultraviolet (UV light induced fluorescence study to discriminate fake tequila from genuine ones is presented. A portable homemade system based on four light emitting diodes (LEDs from 255 to 405 nm and a miniature spectrometer was used. It has been shown that unlike fake and silver tequila, which produce weak fluorescence signal, genuine mixed, rested, and aged tequilas show high fluorescence emission in the range from 400 to 750 nm. The fluorescence intensity grows with aging in 100% agave tequila. Such fluorescence differences can even be observed with naked eyes. The presented results demonstrate that the fluorescence measurement could be a good method to detect counterfeit tequila.

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence of se, as, and sb in an electrothermal atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, D J; Ezer, M; Pacquette, H L; Simeonsson, J B

    1998-04-01

    Trace detection of Se, As, and Sb atoms has been performed by electrothermal atomization laser-induced fluorescence (ETA-LIF) approaches. Production of far-UV radiation necessary for excitation of As atoms at 193.696 nm and Se atoms at 196.026 nm was accomplished by stimulated Raman shifting (SRS) of the output of a frequency-doubled dye laser operating near 230 nm. Both wavelengths were obtained as second-order anti-Stokes shifts of the dye laser radiation and provided up to 10 μJ/pulse, which was shown through power dependence studies to be sufficient for saturation in the ETA. An excited-state direct line fluorescence approach using excitation at 206.279 nm was also investigated for the LIF detection of Se. High-sensitivity LIF of Sb atoms was accomplished using 206.833-nm excitation and detection at 259.805 nm. The accuracy of the ETA-LIF approaches was demonstrated by determining the As and Se content of aqueous reference samples. The limits of detection (absolute mass) were 200 fg by ground-state LIF and 150 fg by excited-state direct line fluorescence for Se, 200 fg for As, and 10 fg for Sb; these LODs compare favorably with results reported previously in the literature for ETA-LIF, GFAAS, and ICP-MS methods.

  14. Imaging atoms from resonance fluorescence spectrum beyond the diffraction limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zeyang; Al-Amri, Mohammad; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2014-03-01

    We calculate the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a linear chain of two-level atoms driven by a gradient coherent laser field. The result shows that we can determine the positions of atoms from the spectrum even when the atoms locate within subwavelength range and the dipole-dipole interaction is significant. This far-field resonance fluorescence localization microscopy method does not require point-by-point scanning and it may be more time-efficient. We also give a possible scheme to extract the position information in an extended region without requiring more peak power of laser. We also briefly discuss how to do a 2D imaging based on our scheme. This work is supported by grants from the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and the Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF) under the NPRP project.

  15. Atomic emission and atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in the direct current plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrick, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Direct Current Plasma (DCP) was investigated as a source for Atomic Emission (AE) and Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (AFS). The DCP was optimized for AE analyses using simplex optimization and Box-Behnken partial factorial experimental design, varying argon flows, and plasma position. Results were compared with a univariate search carried out in the region of the simplex optimum. Canonical analysis demonstrated that no true optimum exists for sensitivity, precision, or drift. A stationary ridge, where combinations of conditions gave comparable instrumental responses, was found. The DCP as an excitation source for AFS in a flame was used for diagnostic studies of the DCP. Moving the aerosol introduction tube behind the DCP with respect to the flame improved the characteristics of the DCP as a narrow line source, although self-absorption was observed at high concentrations of metal salt solutions in the DCP. Detection limits for Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Zn, and Ni were in the low ng/mL region. Theoretical expressions for scatter correction with a two-line technique were derived, although no correction was necessary to achieve accurate results for standard reference materials

  16. Measurement of fluorescence emission spectrum of few strongly driven atoms using an optical nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manoj; Shirasaki, A; Nayak, K P; Morinaga, M; Le Kien, Fam; Hakuta, K

    2010-08-02

    We show that the fluorescence emission spectrum of few atoms can be measured by using an optical nanofiber combined with the optical heterodyne and photon correlation spectroscopy. The observed fluorescence spectrum of the atoms near the nanofiber shows negligible effects of the atom-surface interaction and agrees well with the Mollow triplet spectrum of free-space atoms at high excitation intensity.

  17. Detecting device of atomic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonenkov, N.V.

    1979-01-01

    Operation of an atomic-probe recording device is discussed in detail and its flowsheet is given. The basic elements of the atomic-probe recording device intented for microanalysis of metals and alloys in an atomic level are the storage oscillograph with a raster-sweep unit, a two-channel timer using frequency meters, a digital printer, and a control unit. The digital printer records information supplied by four digital devices (two frequency meters and two digital voltmeters) in a four-digit binary-decimal code. The described device provides simultaneous recording of two ions produced per one vaporation event

  18. Imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry for determination of mercury in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, Alain; Cabon, Jean-Yves; Deschamps, Laure; Giamarchi, Philippe

    2011-06-15

    In this study, direct determination of mercury at the nanogram per liter level in the complex seawater matrix by imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ITR-ETA-LEAFS) is described. In the case of mercury, the use of a nonresonant line for fluorescence detection with only one laser excitation is not possible. For measurements at the 253.652 nm resonant line, scattering phenomena have been minimized by eliminating the simultaneous vaporization of salts and by using temporal resolution and the imaging mode of the camera. Electrothermal conditions (0.1 M oxalic acid as matrix modifier, low atomization temperature) have been optimized in order to suppress chemical interferences and to obtain a good separation of specific signal and seawater background signal. For ETA-LEAFS, a specific response has been obtained for Hg with the use of time resolution. Moreover, an important improvement of the detection limit has been obtained by selecting, from the furnace image, pixels collecting the lowest number of scattered photons. Using optimal experimental conditions, a detection limit of 10 ng L(-1) for 10 μL of sample, close to the lowest concentration level of total Hg in the open ocean, has been obtained.

  19. Two-photon laser-induced fluorescence studies of HS radicals, DS radicals, and I atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiee, J J; Ferris, M J; Loge, G W; Wampler, F B

    1983-04-15

    A two-photon laser-induced excitation and fluorescence technique has been used to study the A /sup 2/..sigma../sup +/ - X/sup 2/PI transition of HS and DS radicals and various high-lying /sup 4/P/sup 0/, /sup 2/D/sup 0/, and /sup 4/D/sup 0/ states of the I atom. The two-photon excitation cross sections and detection sensitivity are discussed. 13 references, 5 figures.

  20. Spatial discrimination against background with different optical systems for collection of fluorescence in laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with a graphite tube electrothermal atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzefovsky, A I; Lonardo, R F; Michel, R G

    1995-07-01

    A single 90 degrees off-axis ellipsoidal mirror fragment was used in a dispersive detection system for electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The performance of the new optical arrangement was compared with those of optical arrangements that employed a plane mirror in combination with biconvex or plano-convex lenses. All the optical arrangements collected fluorescence in a scheme called front surface illustration. BEAM-4, an optical ray tracing program, was used for calculations of spatial ray distributions and optical collection efficiency for the various optical configurations. Experimentally, the best collection efficiency was obtained by use of the ellipsoidal mirror, in qualitative agreement with simulations done by use of the BEAM-4 software. The best detection limit for cobalt with the new optical arrangement was 20 fg, which was a factor of 5 better than that obtained with conventional optical arrangements with otherwise the same instrumentation. The signal-to-background ratio and the fluorescence collection efficiency were also studied as a function of position of the optical components for the various optical arrangements. For both cobalt and phosphorus, the signal-to-background ratio with the new optical arrangement remained stable within 10-20% during +/- 8 mm shifts in the position of the detection system from the focal plane of the optics. Overall, the new optical arrangement offered high collection efficiency, excellent sensitivity, and facile optical alignment due to efficient spatial separation between the fluorescence signal and the background radiation. The advantages of the new optical arrangement were particularly important during measurements in the presence of high levels of blackbody radiation.

  1. Numerical simulation study for atomic-resolution x-ray fluorescence holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Honglan; Gao Hongyi; Chen Jianwen; Xiong Shisheng; Xu Zhizhan; Wang Junyue; Zhu Peiping; Xian Dingchang

    2003-01-01

    Based on the principle of x-ray fluorescence holography, an iron single crystal model of a body-centred cubic lattice is numerically simulated. From the fluorescence hologram produced numerically, the Fe atomic images were reconstructed. The atomic images of the (001), (100), (010) crystallographic planes were consistent with the corresponding atomic positions of the model. The result indicates that one can obtain internal structure images of single crystals at atomic-resolution by using x-ray fluorescence holography

  2. Determination of mercury in microwave-digested soil by laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, S T; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1994-12-01

    A sample digestion procedure was developed which employs microwave heating of soil and sediment in concentrated nitric acid in a high-pressure closed vessel. Complete dissolution of mercury into the sample solution occurs within 5 min at 59 W/vessel without loss of analyte through overpressurization. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal atomization (LEAFS-ETA) was used as the detection method. The scheme uses a two-step excitation, with lambda(1) = 253.7 nm and lambda(2) = 435.8 nm. Direct line fluorescence was measured at 546.2 nm. The absolute instrumental limit of detection was 14 fg; 1.4 pg/ml with a 10 mul sample injection. The recoveries of mercury in two spiked samples were 94 and 98%. The SRM 8406 (Mercury in River Sediment) was digested and analyzed for mercury, and the results (58.4 +/- 1.8 ng/g) agreed well with the reference value of 60 ng/g. The results obtained by LEAFS-ETA with microwave sample digestion are in good agreement with those found by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with EPA Series Method 245.5 sample digestion, which is one of the most commonly used methods for the determination of mercury in soil.

  3. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, R. A.; Walker, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques for containerless study of high temperature processes and material properties was studied. Gas jet and electromagnetic levitation and electromagnetic and laser heating techniques are used with LIF in earth-based containerless high temperature experiments. Included are the development of an apparatus and its use in the studies of (1) chemical reactions on Al2O3, molybdenum, tungsten and LaB6 specimens, (2) methods for noncontact specimen temperature measurement, (3) levitation jet properties and (4) radiative lifetime and collisional energy transfer rates for electronically excited atoms.

  4. Observation of self-assembled fluorescent beads by scanning near-field optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y.J.; Jo, W.; Kim, Min-Gon; Kyu Park, Hyun; Hyun Chung, Bong

    2006-01-01

    Optical response and topography of fluorescent latex beads both on flat self-assembled monolayer and on a micron-patterned surface with poly(dimethylsiloxane) are studied. Scanning near-field optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy were utilized together for detecting fluorescence and imaging topography of the patterned latex beads, respectively. As a result, the micro-patterned latex beads where a specific chemical binding occurred show a strong signal, whereas no signals are observed in the case of nonspecific binding. With fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), it is convenient to measure fluorescence signal from the patterned beads allowing us to monitor the small balls of fluorescent latex

  5. Development of an electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry procedure for direct measurements of arsenic in diluted serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, D J; Simeonsson, J B

    1999-11-01

    A procedure for the direct determination of arsenic in diluted serum by electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS) is reported. Laser radiation needed to excite As at 193.696 and 197.197 nm is generated as the second anti-Stokes stimulated Raman scattering output of a frequency-doubled dye laser operating near 230.5 and 235.5 nm, respectively. Two different LEAFS schemes have been utilized and provide limits of detection of 200-300 fg for As in aqueous standards. When measurements of serum samples diluted 1:10 with deionized water are performed, a stable background signal is observed that can be accounted for by taking measurements with the laser tuned off-wavelength. No As is detected in any of the bovine or human serum samples analyzed. Measurements of 100 pg/mL standard additions of As to a diluted bovine serum sample utilizing either inorganic or organic As species demonstrate a linear relationship of the fluorescence signal to As spike concentration, but exhibit a sensitivity of approximately half that observed in pure aqueous standards. The limit of detection for As in 1:10 diluted serum samples is 65 pg/mL or 650 fg absolute mass, which corresponds to 0.65 ng/mL As in undiluted serum. To our knowledge, the ETA-LEAFS procedure is currently the only one capable of directly measuring As in diluted serum at these levels.

  6. 21 CFR 872.1745 - Laser fluorescence caries detection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laser fluorescence caries detection device. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1745 Laser fluorescence caries detection device. (a) Identification. A laser fluorescence caries detection device is a laser, a...

  7. Evaluation of a hydride generation-atomic fluorescence system for the determination of arsenic using a dielectric barrier discharge atomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhenli; Liu Jixin; Zhang Sichun; Na Xing; Zhang Xinrong

    2008-01-01

    A new atomizer based on atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was specially designed for atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) in order to be applied to the measurement of arsenic. The characteristics of the DBD atomizer and the effects of different parameters (power, discharge gas, gas flow rate, and KBH 4 concentration) were discussed in the paper. The DBD atomizer shows the following features: (1) low operation temperature (between 44 and 70 deg. C, depending on the operation conditions); (2) low power consumption; (3) operation at atmospheric pressure. The detection limit of As(III) using hydride generation (HG) with the proposed DBD-AFS was 0.04 μg L -1 . The analytical results obtained by the present method for total arsenic in reference materials, orchard leaves (SRM 1571) and water samples GBW(E) 080390, agree well with the certified values. The present HG-DBD-AFS is more sensitive and reliable for the determination of arsenic. It is a very promising technique allowing for field arsenic analysis based on atomic spectrometry

  8. Determination of iron in seawater by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and atomic fluorescence spectrometry: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabon, J.Y.; Giamarchi, P.; Le Bihan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Two methods available for direct determination of total Fe in seawater at low concentration level have been examined: electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and electrothermal atomization laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS). In a first part, we have optimized experimental conditions of ETAAS (electrothermal program, matrix chemical modification) for the determination of Fe in seawater by minimizing the chemical interference effects and the magnitude of the simultaneous background absorption signal. By using the best experimental conditions, a detection limit of 80 ng L -1 (20 μL, 3σ) for total Fe concentration was obtained by ETAAS. Using similar experimental conditions (electrothermal program, chemical modification), we have optimized experimental conditions for the determination of Fe by LEAFS. The selected experimental conditions for ETA-LEAFS: excitation wavelength (296.69 nm), noise attenuation and adequate background correction led to a detection limit (3σ) of 3 ng L -1 (i.e. 54 pM) for total Fe concentration with the use a 20 μL seawater sample. For the two methods, concentration values obtained for the analysis of Fe in a NASS-5 (0.2 μg L -1 ) seawater sample were in good agreement with the certified values.

  9. Determination of iron in seawater by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and atomic fluorescence spectrometry: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabon, J Y; Giamarchi, P; Le Bihan, A

    2010-04-07

    Two methods available for direct determination of total Fe in seawater at low concentration level have been examined: electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and electrothermal atomization laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS). In a first part, we have optimized experimental conditions of ETAAS (electrothermal program, matrix chemical modification) for the determination of Fe in seawater by minimizing the chemical interference effects and the magnitude of the simultaneous background absorption signal. By using the best experimental conditions, a detection limit of 80 ng L(-1) (20 microL, 3sigma) for total Fe concentration was obtained by ETAAS. Using similar experimental conditions (electrothermal program, chemical modification), we have optimized experimental conditions for the determination of Fe by LEAFS. The selected experimental conditions for ETA-LEAFS: excitation wavelength (296.69 nm), noise attenuation and adequate background correction led to a detection limit (3sigma) of 3 ng L(-1) (i.e. 54 pM) for total Fe concentration with the use a 20 microL seawater sample. For the two methods, concentration values obtained for the analysis of Fe in a NASS-5 (0.2 microg L(-1)) seawater sample were in good agreement with the certified values. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL): Atomic Fluorescence in Cool, Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Ken G.; Nielsen, Krister E.; Kober, Gladys V.; Rau, Gioia

    2018-01-01

    The "Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) Project: Cool Stars" (PI = T. Ayres) collected a definitive set of representative, high-resolution (R~46,000 in the FUV up to ~1700 Å, R~30,000 for 1700-2150 Å, and R~114,000 >2150 Å) and high signal/noise (S/N>100) UV spectra of eight F-M evolved cool stars. These extremely high-quality STIS UV echelle spectra are available from the HST archive and from the Univ. of Colorado (http://casa.colorado.edu/~ayres/ASTRAL/) and will enable investigations of a broad range of problems -- stellar, interstellar, and beyond -- for many years. In this paper, we extend our study of the very rich emission-line spectra of the four evolved K-M stars in the sample, Beta Gem (K0 IIIb), Gamma Dra (K5 III), Gamma Cru (M3.4 III), and Alpha Ori (M2 Iab), to study the atomic fluorescence processes operating in their outer atmospheres. We summarize the pumping transitions and fluorescent line products known on the basis of previous work (e.g. Carpenter 1988, etc.) and newly identified in our current, on-going analysis of these extraordinary ASTRAL STIS spectra.

  11. Laser resonant ionization spectroscopy and laser-induced resonant fluorescence spectra of samarium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Changtai

    1995-01-01

    We have measured new high-lying levels of Sm atom by two-colour resonant photoionisation spectroscopy; we have observed the isotope shifts of Sm atom by laser-induced resonant fluorescence spectroscopy; the lifetime of eight low-lying levels of Sm atom were measured by using pulsed laser-Boxcar technique in atomic beam.

  12. A simple and sensitive fluorescent probe for specific detection of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan-Fei Kang

    A fluorescent probe, with simplicity of structure and convenience of synthesis, is capable of detecting ... Yan-Fei Kang et al. .... Pastore A, Federici G, Bertini E and Ptemonte F 2003 ... Urano Y 2010 New Strategies for Fluorescent Probe.

  13. Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    Amoretti, M; Bonomi, G; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Collier, M; Doser, Michael; Filippini, V; Fine, K S; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Holzscheiter, M H; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, Rolf; Landua, Rolf; Lindelöf, D; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Marchesotti, M; Montagna, P; Pruys, H S; Regenfus, C; Riedler, P; Rochet, J; Rotondi, A; Rouleau, G; Testera, G; Van der Werf, D P; Variola, A; Watson, T L; CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical underpinning of the standard model of fundamental particles and interactions is CPT invariance, which requires that the laws of physics be invariant under the combined discrete operations of charge conjugation, parity and time reversal. Antimatter, the existence of which was predicted by Dirac, can be used to test the CPT theorem experimental investigations involving comparisons of particles with antiparticles are numerous. Cold atoms and anti-atoms, such as hydrogen and anti-hydrogen, could form the basis of a new precise test, as CPT invariance implies that they must have the same spectrum. Observations of antihydrogen in small quantities and at high energies have been reported at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and at Fermilab, but were not suited to precision comparison measurements. Here we demonstrate the production of antihydrogen atoms at very low energy by mixing trapped antiprotons and positrons in a cryogenic environment. The neutral anti-atoms have been detected...

  14. Using Fluorescent Viruses for Detecting Bacteria in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Qian, Xiaohua; Russo, Jaimie A.

    2009-01-01

    A method of detecting water-borne pathogenic bacteria is based partly on established molecular-recognition and fluorescent-labeling concepts, according to which bacteria of a species of interest are labeled with fluorescent reporter molecules and the bacteria can then be detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. The novelty of the present method lies in the use of bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to deliver the fluorescent reporter molecules to the bacteria of the species of interest.

  15. [Atomic/ionic fluorescence in microwave plasma torch discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp-europium atomic/ionic fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Z; Liang, F; Yang, P; Jin, Q; Huang, B

    1999-06-01

    Eu atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry in microwave plasma torch discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP HCL-MPT AFS/IFS) was studied. Operating conditions were optimized. The best detection limits for AFS and IFS obtained with a desolvated ultrasonic nebulization system were 42.0 ng/mL for Eu I 462.7 nm and 21.8 ng/mL for Eu II 381.97 nm, respectively, both were better than those given by the instruction manual of a Baird ICP AFS-2000 spectrometer using pneumatic concentric nebulizer with desolvation for AFS, but were significantly higher than those obtained by using the Baird spectrometer with a mini-monochromator and a ultrasonic nebulzer system.

  16. Optimal Fluorescence Waveband Determination for Detecting Defective Cherry Tomatoes Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Suck Baek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 410 nm excitation to determine the emission wavelengths for defect detection. The major emission wavelengths were 688 nm and 506 nm for the detection. Fluorescence images combined with the determined emission wavebands demonstrated the feasibility of detecting defective cherry tomatoes with >98% accuracy. Multi-spectral fluorescence imaging has potential utility in non-destructive quality sorting of cherry tomatoes.

  17. Fluorescence immunoassay for detecting periodontal bacterial pathogens in plaque.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, L F; Anderson, L; Sandberg, G P; Aeppli, D M; Shelburne, C E

    1991-01-01

    A particle concentration fluorescence immunoassay has been modified into a bacterial concentration fluorescence immunoassay (BCFIA) to rapidly detect periodontopathic bacteria in human plaque samples. The BCFIA utilizes fluorescently tagged monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against the lipopolysaccharide of selected gram-negative plaque bacteria. Microorganisms closely associated with periodontal disease that can be identified in plaque with the BCFIA include Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bac...

  18. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  19. Dual-detection confocal fluorescence microscopy: fluorescence axial imaging without axial scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Ryoung; Kim, Young-Duk; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Yoo, Hongki

    2013-07-29

    We propose a new method for high-speed, three-dimensional (3-D) fluorescence imaging, which we refer to as dual-detection confocal fluorescence microscopy (DDCFM). In contrast to conventional beam-scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy, where the focal spot must be scanned either optically or mechanically over a sample volume to reconstruct a 3-D image, DDCFM can obtain the depth of a fluorescent emitter without depth scanning. DDCFM comprises two photodetectors, each with a pinhole of different size, in the confocal detection system. Axial information on fluorescent emitters can be measured by the axial response curve through the ratio of intensity signals. DDCFM can rapidly acquire a 3-D fluorescent image from a single two-dimensional scan with less phototoxicity and photobleaching than confocal fluorescence microscopy because no mechanical depth scans are needed. We demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method by phantom studies.

  20. UV light-emitting-diode photochemical mercury vapor generation for atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaoling; Ai, Xi; Jiang, Xiaoming; Deng, Pengchi; Zheng, Chengbin; Lv, Yi

    2012-02-07

    A new, miniaturized and low power consumption photochemical vapor generation (PVG) technique utilizing an ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV-LED) lamp is described, and further validated via the determination of trace mercury. In the presence of formic acid, the mercury cold vapor is favourably generated from Hg(2+) solutions by UV-LED irradiation, and then rapidly transported to an atomic fluorescence spectrometer for detection. Optimum conditions for PVG and interferences from concomitant elements were investigated in detail. Under optimum conditions, a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.01 μg L(-1) was obtained, and the precision was better than 3.2% (n = 11, RSD) at 1 μg L(-1) Hg(2+). No obvious interferences from any common ions were evident. The methodology was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in National Research Council Canada DORM-3 fish muscle tissue and several water samples.

  1. Determination of Te in soldering tin using continuous flowing electrochemical hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xianjuan; Gan Wuer; Han Suping; He Youzhao

    2008-01-01

    An electrochemical hydride generation system was developed for the detection of Te by coupling an electrochemical hydride generator with atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Since TeH 2 is unstable and easily decomposes in solution, a reticular W filament cathode was used in the present system. The TeH 2 generated on the cathode surface was effectively driven out by sweeping gas from the cathode chamber. In addition, a low temperature electrochemical cell (10 deg. C) was applied to reduce the decomposition of TeH 2 in solution. The limit of detection (LOD) was 2.2 ng ml -1 and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 3.9% for nine consecutive measurements of standard solution. This method was successfully employed for determination of Te in soldering tin material

  2. Radio-isotopic apparatus for analyzing low atomic number elements by fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, Andre; Martinelli, Pierre; Daniel, Georges; Laflotte, Jean-Luc

    1969-10-01

    An apparatus is described for analyzing light elements of atomic number between 6 and 24 by X-fluorescence. The samples are excited by means of X or α isotopic sources. Various examples of analytical determinations are given. (author) [fr

  3. Multipumping flow system for improving hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometric determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio; Ruiz-Alcaraz, Irene; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The advantages of using membrane micropumps rather than peristaltic pumps to introduce both sample and reagent solutions for hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry are discussed. Arsenic was used as a test analyte to check the performance of the proposed manifold. Sample and reagent consumption was reduced 8-9 fold compared with continuous mode measurements made with peristaltic pumps, with no deterioration in sensitivity. The calibration graph was linear in the 0.05 to 2.5 μg l -1 As range using peak area as the analytical signal and maximum gain in the detector setting. A limit of detection (3σ) of 0.02 μg l -1 and relative standard deviation values close to 2% for 10 independent measurements of a 1 μg l -1 As solution were obtained. The sampling frequency increased from 45 to 102 h -1 with the subsequent saving in carrier gas used and reduction in wastes generated. The instrumental modification, which could be used for other elements currently determined by atomic fluorescence spectrometry, will permit hydride generators of more reduced dimensions to be constructed

  4. Molecular engineering and fluorescence for the detection of toxic cations; Ingenierie moleculaire et fluorescence pour la reconnaissance de cations toxiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, V

    2007-11-15

    This work is a part of the 'Toxicologie Nucleaire Environnementale' program which aims at studying the effects on the living of heavy metals or radionuclides involved in nuclear industry. Most particularly, it deals with the design of new fluorescent sensors for the selective detection of Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +} in biological media. Several fluorescent calixarenes possessing nitrogen atoms were synthesized and their properties as potential lead sensors were investigated. One of them could be used in experimental conditions close to biological media and new target compounds with amide functional groups were proposed. Many approaches were considered for the design of selective fluorescent sensors for cadmium. On the basis of literature results, many chelating compounds incorporating sulfur atoms were synthesized but showed no significant affinity towards cadmium. On the opposite, compounds functionalized with several pyridine-2'-yl-1,2,3-triazol fluorescent moieties linked to a {beta}-cyclodextrin or a calix[4]arene showed good affinity for cadmium in methanol, but the selectivity was found to be insufficient. In contrast, very satisfying results in terms of both selectivity and sensitivity could be obtained with the commercial calcium sensor Rhod-5N in an aqueous medium at neutral pH. Lastly, micromolar detection limits for the selective detection of caesium were reached in an aqueous medium at neutral pH thanks to a new sulfonated fluorescent calixarene with two appended crown-ethers. An original complexation mechanism was proposed and validated by molecular modelling (DFT). (author)

  5. Resonance fluorescence spectra of a three-level atom driven by two strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jinsheng.

    1986-12-01

    The resonance fluorescence of a three-level atom interacted with two high-power laser fields is investigated in strong field approximation. The fluorescence distribution is obtained by means of the theory of dressing transformation. (author). 15 refs, 2 figs

  6. Applicability of multisyringe chromatography coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry for mercury speciation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzmán-Mar, J.L.; Hinojosa-Reyes, L.; Serra, A.M.; Hernández-Ramírez, A.; Cerdà, V.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: An automatic system, based on the applicability of multisyringe chromatography (MSC) coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV/AFS) detection is developed for mercury speciation. Highlights: ► The on-line coupling of MSC to CV/AFS was developed for mercury speciation analysis. ► The speciation of MeHg + , Hg 2+ and EtHg + was achieved on a RP C18 monolithic column. ► The hyphenated system provided higher sample throughput compared to HPLC–CV/AFS. ► The limits of detection for mercury species were comparable or better than those reported by HPLC–CV/AFS. ► The developed method also provided low instrumental and operational costs. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel automatic approach for the speciation of inorganic mercury (Hg 2+ ), methylmercury (MeHg + ) and ethylmercury (EtHg + ) using multisyringe chromatography (MSC) coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV/AFS) was developed. For the first time, the separation of mercury species was accomplished on a RP C18 monolithic column using a multi-isocratic elution program. The elution protocol involved the use of 0.005% 2-mercapthoethanol in 240 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6)–acetonitrile (99:1, v/v), followed by 0.005% 2-mercapthoethanol in 240 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6)–acetonitrile (90:10, v/v). The eluted mercury species were then oxidized under post-column UV radiation and reduced using tin(II) chloride in an acidic medium. Subsequently, the generated mercury metal were separated from the reaction mixture and further atomized in the flame atomizer and detected by AFS. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the limits of detection (3σ) were found to be 0.03, 0.11 and 0.09 μg L −1 for MeHg + , Hg 2+ and EtHg + , respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 6) of the peak height for 3, 6 and 3 μg L −1 of MeHg + , Hg 2+ and EtHg + (as Hg) ranged from 2.4 to 4.0%. Compared with the conventional HPLC–CV/AFS hyphenated systems

  7. The detection of cold antihydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhongdong

    2007-01-01

    The ATRAP experiment at CERN's antiproton decelerator (AD) aims for a test of CPT violation and Lorentz invariance by a comparison of hydrogen to antihydrogen atom spectroscopy and a measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter atoms. The experiment is divided into two parts: ATRAP-I, where successfully antihydrogen atoms were produced and intensive studies on the charged clouds of positrons and antiprotons were performed, and ATRAP-II which was commissioned during the beam-time 2006. ATRAP-II includes a much larger superconducting solenoid bore allowing the installation of an extended detection system as well as an optimized combined Penning-Ioffe trap. Another essential part is a new positron accumulator and delivery system which will increase the ATRAP-II efficiency drastically. Thus ATRAP-II now allows for much larger flexibility, increased performance, higher robustness, and better efficiency for the production and storage of cold antihydrogen atoms. A general overview of the experimental setup for the second phase of the ATRAP experiment will be presented in this thesis. The antiproton annihilation detector system, consisting of several layers of scintillating fibers, counts the antihydrogen atoms and determines the annihilation vertex of the atoms. This diagnostic element will allow to optimize the production of cold antihydrogen sufficiently to permit optical observations and measurements. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations concerning the track fitting and vertex reconstruction have been developed during the planned interruption of antiproton production at AD in the year 2005. Different event generators, magnetic field distributions as well as data reconstruction algorithms on simulated data were established and the results were compared to data in 2006. To improve the detector position resolution, a constraint-fit procedure was adopted. Further possible improvements, by applying certain cuts on the data, were investigated. Real-time measurements

  8. Single atom spectroscopy: Decreased scattering delocalization at high energy losses, effects of atomic movement and X-ray fluorescence yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizei, Luiz H G; Iizumi, Yoko; Okazaki, Toshiya; Nakanishi, Ryo; Kitaura, Ryo; Shinohara, Hisanori; Suenaga, Kazu

    2016-01-01

    Single atom localization and identification is crucial in understanding effects which depend on the specific local environment of atoms. In advanced nanometer scale materials, the characteristics of individual atoms may play an important role. Here, we describe spectroscopic experiments (electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS, and Energy Dispersed X-ray spectroscopy, EDX) using a low voltage transmission electron microscope designed towards single atom analysis. For EELS, we discuss the advantages of using lower primary electron energy (30 keV and 60 keV) and higher energy losses (above 800 eV). The effect of atomic movement is considered. Finally, we discuss the possibility of using atomically resolved EELS and EDX data to measure the fluorescence yield for X-ray emission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Single atom spectroscopy: Decreased scattering delocalization at high energy losses, effects of atomic movement and X-ray fluorescence yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tizei, Luiz H.G.; Iizumi, Yoko; Okazaki, Toshiya; Nakanishi, Ryo; Kitaura, Ryo; Shinohara, Hisanori; Suenaga, Kazu

    2016-01-01

    Single atom localization and identification is crucial in understanding effects which depend on the specific local environment of atoms. In advanced nanometer scale materials, the characteristics of individual atoms may play an important role. Here, we describe spectroscopic experiments (electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS, and Energy Dispersed X-ray spectroscopy, EDX) using a low voltage transmission electron microscope designed towards single atom analysis. For EELS, we discuss the advantages of using lower primary electron energy (30 keV and 60 keV) and higher energy losses (above 800 eV). The effect of atomic movement is considered. Finally, we discuss the possibility of using atomically resolved EELS and EDX data to measure the fluorescence yield for X-ray emission.

  10. Sensitive turn-on fluorescent detection of tartrazine based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng Tian; Shi, Yan; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2012-01-18

    We introduce a sensitive, rapid, label-free and general fluorescent method for the determination of tartrazine by competitive binding to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) against fluorescein, and the fluorescence recovery upon fluorescein desorption from rGO provides a quantitative readout for tartrazine, giving a detection limit of 0.53 ng mL(-1).

  11. Tomato seeds maturity detection system based on chlorophyll fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiling; Wang, Xiu; Meng, Zhijun

    2016-10-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence intensity can be used as seed maturity and quality evaluation indicator. Chlorophyll fluorescence intensity of seed coats is tested to judge the level of chlorophyll content in seeds, and further to judge the maturity and quality of seeds. This research developed a detection system of tomato seeds maturity based on chlorophyll fluorescence spectrum technology, the system included an excitation light source unit, a fluorescent signal acquisition unit and a data processing unit. The excitation light source unit consisted of two high power LEDs, two radiators and two constant current power supplies, and it was designed to excite chlorophyll fluorescence of tomato seeds. The fluorescent signal acquisition unit was made up of a fluorescence spectrometer, an optical fiber, an optical fiber scaffolds and a narrowband filter. The data processing unit mainly included a computer. Tomato fruits of green ripe stage, discoloration stage, firm ripe stage and full ripe stage were harvested, and their seeds were collected directly. In this research, the developed tomato seeds maturity testing system was used to collect fluorescence spectrums of tomato seeds of different maturities. Principal component analysis (PCA) method was utilized to reduce the dimension of spectral data and extract principal components, and PCA was combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to establish discriminant model of tomato seeds maturity, the discriminant accuracy was greater than 90%. Research results show that using chlorophyll fluorescence spectrum technology is feasible for seeds maturity detection, and the developed tomato seeds maturity testing system has high detection accuracy.

  12. Phenylethynylpyrene excimer forming hybridization probes for fluorescence SNP detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokhorenko, Igor A.; Astakhova, Irina V.; Momynaliev, Kuvat T.

    2009-01-01

    Excimer formation is a unique feature of some fluorescent dyes (e.g., pyrene) which can be used for probing the proximity of biomolecules. Pyrene excimer fluorescence has previously been used for homogeneous detection of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on DNA. 1-Phenylethynylpyrene (1-1-PEPy...

  13. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis in humans by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Bernd; Dziekan, Thomas; Weissbach, Carmen; Mahler, Marianne; Schirner, Michael; Berliner, Birgitt; Bauer, Daniel; Voigt, Jan; Berliner, Michael; Bahner, Malte L.; Macdonald, Rainer

    2010-02-01

    The blood pool agent indo-cyanine green (ICG) has been investigated in a prospective clinical study for detection of rheumatoid arthritis using fluorescence imaging. Temporal behavior as well as spatial distribution of fluorescence intensity are suited to differentiate healthy and inflamed finger joints after i.v. injection of an ICG bolus.

  14. Evaluation of an inductively-coupled plasma with an extended-sleeve torch as an atomization cell for laser-excited fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinski, M A; Uchida, H; Winefordner, J D

    1983-05-01

    An inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) with an extended-sleeve torch has been evaluated as an atomization cell for laser-excited fluorescence spectrometry. Limits of detection for 20 lines are given. The detection power is almost equivalent to that obtained by excitation with a hollow-cathode lamp. Interelement effects and spectral interferences are discussed.

  15. Resonance fluorescence and quantum jumps in single atoms: Testing the randomness of quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erber, T.; Hammerling, P.; Hockney, G.; Porrati, M.; Putterman, S.; La Jolla Institute, La Jolla, California 92037; Department of Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90024)

    1989-01-01

    When a single trapped 198 Hg + ion is illuminated by two lasers, each tuned to an approximate transition, the resulting fluorescence switches on and off in a series of pulses resembling a bistable telegraph. This intermittent fluorescence can also be obtained by optical pumping with a single laser. Quantum jumps between successive atomic levels may be traced directly with multiple-resonance fluorescence. Atomic transition rates and photon antibunching distributions can be inferred from the pulse statistics and compared with quantum theory. Stochastic tests also indicate that the quantum telegraphs are good random number generators. During periods when the fluorescence is switched off, the radiationless atomic currents that generate the telegraph signals can be adjusted by varying the laser illumination: if this coherent evolution of the wave functions is sustained over sufficiently long time intervals, novel interactive precision measurements, near the limits of the time-energy uncertainty relations, are possible. Copyright 1989 Academic Press, Inc

  16. Determination of cadmium in seawater by chelate vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Ma, Guopeng; Duan, Xuchuan; Sun, Jinsheng

    2018-03-01

    A method for the determination of cadmium in seawater by chelate vapor generation (Che-VG) atomic fluorescence spectrometry is described. Several commercially available chelating agents, including ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), sodium dimethyl dithiocarbamate (DMDTC), ammonium dibutyl dithiophosphate (DBDTP) and sodium O,O-diethyl dithiophosphate (DEDTP), are compared with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) for the Che-VG of cadmium, and results showed that DDTC and DEDTP had very good cadmium signal intensity. The effect of the conditions of Che-VG with DDTC on the intensity of cadmium signal was investigated. Under the optimal conditions, 85 ± 3% Che-VG efficiency is obtained for cadmium. The detection limit (3σ) obtained in the optimal conditions was 0.19 ng ml- 1. The relative standard deviation (RSD, %) for ten replicate determinations at 2 ng ml- 1 Cd was 3.42%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the ultratrace determination of cadmium in seawater samples by the standard addition method.

  17. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 109, JUL (2015), s. 16-23 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200311202 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : hydride generation * arsenic * atomic fluorescence spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.289, year: 2015

  18. Design of Fluorescent Compounds for Scintillation Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna [Northern Illinois U.

    1990-01-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors for high energy physics applications require the development of new fluorescent compounds to meet the demands set by the future generation of particle accelerators such as the Superconducting Supercollider (SSe). Plastic scintillators are commonly based on a polymer matrix doped with two fluorescent compounds: the primary dopant and the wavelength shifter. Their main characteristics are fast response time and high quantum efficiency. The exposure to larger radiation doses and demands for larger light output questions their survivability in the future experiments. A new type of plastic scintillator - intrinsic scintillator - has been suggested. It uses a single dopant as primary and wavelength shifter, and should be less susceptible to radiation damage....

  19. Cooperative fluorescence from a strongly driven dilute cloud of atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Wubs, Martijn; Lodahl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We investigate cooperative fluorescence in a dilute cloud of strongly driven two-level emitters. Starting from the Heisenberg equations of motion, we compute the first-order scattering corrections to the saturation of the excited-state population and to the resonance-fluorescence spectrum, which...... both require going beyond the state-of-the-art linear-optics approach to describe collective phenomena. A dipole blockade is observed due to long-range dipole-dipole coupling that vanishes at stronger driving fields. Furthermore, we compute the inelastic component of the light scattered by a cloud...

  20. Dynamic fluorescence imaging with molecular agents for cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun Kuk

    Non-invasive dynamic optical imaging of small animals requires the development of a novel fluorescence imaging modality. Herein, fluorescence imaging is demonstrated with sub-second camera integration times using agents specifically targeted to disease markers, enabling rapid detection of cancerous regions. The continuous-wave fluorescence imaging acquires data with an intensified or an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device. The work presented in this dissertation (i) assessed dose-dependent uptake using dynamic fluorescence imaging and pharmacokinetic (PK) models, (ii) evaluated disease marker availability in two different xenograft tumors, (iii) compared the impact of autofluorescence in fluorescence imaging of near-infrared (NIR) vs. red light excitable fluorescent contrast agents, (iv) demonstrated dual-wavelength fluorescence imaging of angiogenic vessels and lymphatics associated with a xenograft tumor model, and (v) examined dynamic multi-wavelength, whole-body fluorescence imaging with two different fluorescent contrast agents. PK analysis showed that the uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) in xenograft tumor regions linearly increased with doses of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) up to 1.5 nmol/mouse. Above 1.5 nmol/mouse, the uptake did not increase with doses, suggesting receptor saturation. Target to background ratio (TBR) and PK analysis for two different tumor cell lines showed that while Kaposi's sarcoma (KS1767) exhibited early and rapid uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf), human melanoma tumors (M21) had non-significant TBR differences and early uptake rates similar to the contralateral normal tissue regions. The differences may be due to different compartment location of the target. A comparison of fluorescence imaging with NIR vs. red light excitable fluorescent dyes demonstrates that NIR dyes are associated with less background signal, enabling rapid tumor detection. In contrast, animals injected with red light excitable fluorescent dyes showed high autofluorescence. Dual

  1. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in atomic beams of radioactive nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebel, H.; Schatz, G.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the resonant scattering of light from CW tunable dye lasers, by a well collimated atomic beam, enable hyperfine splittings and optical isotope shifts to be determined with high precision and high sensitivity. Recent off-line atomic beam experiments with minute samples, comprising measurements with stable and unstable Ba, Ca and Pb isotopes are reviewed. The experimental methods and the analysis of the data are discussed. Information on the variation of the rms charge radii and on electromagnetic moments of nuclei in long isotopic chains is presented. (orig.) [de

  2. An Experimental Study of the Fluorescence Spectrum of Cesium Atoms in the Presence of a Buffer Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, V. G.; Kulyasov, V. N.

    2018-01-01

    A direct experiment is performed to determine the quantum efficiency of a cesium fluorescence filter. The fluorescence spectra of cesium atoms are recorded under excitation of the upper states of the second resonance doublet with a Bell-Bloom cesium lamp. Introduction of different noble gases into the cell with cesium leads to the appearance of additional fluorescence photons. It is found that a fluorescence filter based on atomic cesium vapor with addition of helium in the working cell has the highest efficiency and response rate of all known fluorescence filters based on alkali-metal atomic vapors.

  3. A fluorescence quenching test for the detection of flavonoid transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoefer, L; Braune, A; Blaut, M

    2001-11-13

    A novel fluorescence quenching test for the detection of flavonoid degradation by microorganisms was developed. The test is based on the ability of the flavonoids to quench the fluorescence of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). Several members of the anthocyanidins, flavones, isoflavones, flavonols, flavanones, dihydroflavanones, chalcones, dihydrochalcones and catechins were tested with regard to their quenching properties. The anthocyanidins were the most potent quenchers of DPH fluorescence, while the flavanones, dihydroflavanones and dihydrochalcones, quenched the fluorescence only weakly. The catechins had no visible impact on DPH fluorescence. The developed test allows a quick and easy differentiation between flavonoid-degrading and flavonoid-non-degrading bacteria. The investigation of individual reactions of flavonoid transformation with the developed test system is also possible.

  4. Smart phone based bacterial detection using bio functionalized fluorescent nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendran, Vinoth Kumar; Bakthavathsalam, Padmavathy; Ali, Baquir Mohammed Jaffar

    2014-01-01

    We are describing immunochromatographic test strips with smart phone-based fluorescence readout. They are intended for use in the detection of the foodborne bacterial pathogens Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli O157. Silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) were doped with FITC and Ru(bpy), conjugated to the respective antibodies, and then used in a conventional lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA). Fluorescence was recorded by inserting the nitrocellulose strip into a smart phone-based fluorimeter consisting of a light weight (40 g) optical module containing an LED light source, a fluorescence filter set and a lens attached to the integrated camera of the cell phone in order to acquire high-resolution fluorescence images. The images were analysed by exploiting the quick image processing application of the cell phone and enable the detection of pathogens within few minutes. This LFIA is capable of detecting pathogens in concentrations as low as 10 5 cfu mL −1 directly from test samples without pre-enrichment. The detection is one order of magnitude better compared to gold nanoparticle-based LFIAs under similar condition. The successful combination of fluorescent nanoparticle-based pathogen detection by LFIAs with a smart phone-based detection platform has resulted in a portable device with improved diagnosis features and having potential application in diagnostics and environmental monitoring. (author)

  5. Atomic layer deposition to prevent metal transfer from implants: An X-ray fluorescence study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilo, Fabjola [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Borgese, Laura, E-mail: laura.borgese@unibs.itl [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Prost, Josef; Rauwolf, Mirjam; Turyanskaya, Anna; Wobrauschek, Peter; Kregsamer, Peter; Streli, Christina [Atominstitut, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Pazzaglia, Ugo [Dipartimento Specialità Medico Chirurgiche Sc. Radiol. e Sanità Pubblica, University of Brescia, v.le Europa, 11, 25121 Brescia (Italy); Depero, Laura E. [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Co and Cr migrate from bare alloy implant to the surrounding tissue showing a cluster distribution. • Co and Cr migrate from the TiO{sub 2} coated implant to the surrounding tissue showing a decreasing gradient distribution from the alloy surface. • TiO{sub 2} coating layers obtained by ALD on Co–Cr alloy show a barrier effect for the migration of metals. • The thicker the TiO{sub 2} layer deposited by ALD, the lower the metal migration. • The migration of metals from bare alloy toward the surrounding tissue increases with time. This effect is not detected in the coated samples. - Abstract: We show that Atomic Layer Deposition is a suitable coating technique to prevent metal diffusion from medical implants. The metal distribution in animal bone tissue with inserted bare and coated Co–Cr alloys was evaluated by means of micro X-ray fluorescence mapping. In the uncoated implant, the migration of Co and Cr particles from the bare alloy in the biological tissues is observed just after one month and the number of particles significantly increases after two months. In contrast, no metal diffusion was detected in the implant coated with TiO{sub 2}. Instead, a gradient distribution of the metals was found, from the alloy surface going into the tissue. No significant change was detected after two months of aging. As expected, the thicker is the TiO{sub 2} layer, the lower is the metal migration.

  6. Recent development of fluorescent imaging for specific detection of tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Eiji; Morii, Takashi; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Increasing recent studies on fluorescent imaging for specific detection of tumors are described here on strategies of molecular targeting, metabolic specificity and hypoxic circumstance. There is described an instance of a conjugate of antibody and pH-activable fluorescent ligand, which specifically binds to the tumor cells, is internalized in the cellular lysozomes where their pH is low, and then is activated to become fluorescent only in viable tumor cells. For the case of metabolic specificity, excessive loading of the precursor (5-aminolevulinic acid) of protoporphyrin IX (ppIX), due to their low activity to convert ppIX to heme B, results in making tumors observable in red as ppIX emits fluorescence (red, 585 nm) when excited by blue ray of 410 nm. Similarly, imaging with indocyanine green which is accumulated in hepatoma cells is reported in success in detection of small lesion and metastasis when the dye is administered during operation. Reductive reactions exceed in tumor hypoxic conditions, of which feature is usable for imaging. Conjugates of nitroimidazole and fluorescent dye are reported to successfully image tumors by nitro reduction. Authors' UTX-12 is a non-fluorescent nitroaromatic derivative of pH-sensitive fluorescent dye seminaphtharhodafluor (SNARF), and is designed for the nitro group, the hypoxia-responding sensor, to be reduced in tumor hypoxic conditions and then for the aromatic moiety to be cleaved to release free SNARF. Use of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) for imaging has been also reported in many. As above, studies on fluorescent imaging for specific detection of tumors are mostly at fundamental step but its future is conceivably promising along with advances in other technology like fluorescent endoscopy and multimodal imaging. (author)

  7. Characteristics of subgingival calculus detection by multiphoton fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Oi-Hong; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin; Chen, How-Foo

    2011-06-01

    Subgingival calculus has been recognized as a major cause of periodontitis, which is one of the main chronic infectious diseases of oral cavities and a principal cause of tooth loss in humans. Bacteria deposited in subgingival calculus or plaque cause gingival inflammation, function deterioration, and then periodontitis. However, subgingival calculus within the periodontal pocket is a complicated and potentially delicate structure to be detected with current dental armamentaria, namely dental x-rays and dental probes. Consequently, complete removal of subgingival calculus remains a challenge to periodontal therapies. In this study, the detection of subgingival calculus employing a multiphoton autofluorescence imaging method was characterized in comparison with a one-photon confocal fluorescence imaging technique. Feasibility of such a system was studied based on fluorescence response of gingiva, healthy teeth, and calculus with and without gingiva covered. The multiphoton fluorescence technology perceived the tissue-covered subgingival calculus that cannot be observed by the one-photon confocal fluorescence method.

  8. Two-photon excited UV fluorescence for protein crystal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, Jeremy T.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2011-01-01

    Complementary measurements using SONICC and TPE-UVF allow the sensitive and selective detection of protein crystals. Two-photon excited ultraviolet fluorescence (TPE-UVF) microscopy is explored for sensitive protein-crystal detection as a complement to second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC). Like conventional ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF), TPE-UVF generates image contrast based on the intrinsic fluorescence of aromatic residues, generally producing higher fluorescence emission within crystals than the mother liquor by nature of the higher local protein concentration. However, TPE-UVF has several advantages over conventional UVF, including (i) insensitivity to optical scattering, allowing imaging in turbid matrices, (ii) direct compatibility with conventional optical plates and windows by using visible light for excitation, (iii) elimination of potentially damaging out-of-plane UV excitation, (iv) improved signal to noise through background reduction from out-of-plane excitation and (v) relatively simple integration into instrumentation developed for SONICC

  9. Highly selective and reversible chemosensor for Pd(2+) detected by fluorescence, colorimetry, and test paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Liu, Xiaomei; Lu, Huizhe; Wang, Hongmei; Qin, Zhaohai

    2015-01-21

    A "turn-on" fluorescent and colorimetric chemosensor (RBS) for Pd(2+) has been designed and synthesized through introduction of sulfur as a ligand atom to Rhodamine B. RBS exhibits high selectivity (freedom from the interference of Hg(2+ )in particular) and sensitivity toward Pd(2+) with a detection limit as low as 2.4 nM. RBS is also a reversible sensor, and it can be made into test paper to detect Pd(2+) in pure water. Compared to the chemosensors that introduced phosphorus to Rhodamine to detect Pd(2+), RBS can be synthesized more simply and economically.

  10. 5-ALA/PpIX fluorescence detection of gastrointestinal neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Ekaterina G.; Vladimirov, Borislav; Terziev, Ivan; Ivanova, Radina; Avramov, Latchezar

    2009-07-01

    In the recent study delta-ALA/PpIX is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus, stomach and colon. ALA is administered per os six to eight (depending on the lesion location) hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. High-power light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as an excitation source. Special opto-mechanical device is built for the LED to use the light guide of standard video-endoscopic system. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. The fluorescence detected from tumor sites has very complex spectral origins. It consists of autofluorescence, fluorescence from exogenous fluorophores and re-absorption from the chromophores accumulated in the tissue investigated. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to re-absorption of oxy-hemoglobin in this spectral area. Endogenous and exogenous fluorescence spectra are used to develop simple but effective algorithm, based on dimensionless ratio of the signals at 560 and 635 nm, for differentiation of normal/abnormal gastrointestinal tissues. Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  11. Satellite-detected fluorescence reveals global physiology of ocean phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Behrenfeld

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton photosynthesis links global ocean biology and climate-driven fluctuations in the physical environment. These interactions are largely expressed through changes in phytoplankton physiology, but physiological status has proven extremely challenging to characterize globally. Phytoplankton fluorescence does provide a rich source of physiological information long exploited in laboratory and field studies, and is now observed from space. Here we evaluate the physiological underpinnings of global variations in satellite-based phytoplankton chlorophyll fluorescence. The three dominant factors influencing fluorescence distributions are chlorophyll concentration, pigment packaging effects on light absorption, and light-dependent energy-quenching processes. After accounting for these three factors, resultant global distributions of quenching-corrected fluorescence quantum yields reveal a striking consistency with anticipated patterns of iron availability. High fluorescence quantum yields are typically found in low iron waters, while low quantum yields dominate regions where other environmental factors are most limiting to phytoplankton growth. Specific properties of photosynthetic membranes are discussed that provide a mechanistic view linking iron stress to satellite-detected fluorescence. Our results present satellite-based fluorescence as a valuable tool for evaluating nutrient stress predictions in ocean ecosystem models and give the first synoptic observational evidence that iron plays an important role in seasonal phytoplankton dynamics of the Indian Ocean. Satellite fluorescence may also provide a path for monitoring climate-phytoplankton physiology interactions and improving descriptions of phytoplankton light use efficiencies in ocean productivity models.

  12. Performance evaluation of spot detection algorithms in fluorescence microscopy images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabaso, M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available triggered the development of a highly sophisticated imaging tool known as fluorescence microscopy. This is used to visualise and study intracellular processes. The use of fluorescence microscopy and a specific staining method make biological molecules... was first used in astronomical applications [2] to detect isotropic objects, and was then introduced to biological applications [3]. Olivio-Marin[3] approached the problem of feature extraction based on undecimated wavelet representation of the image...

  13. Detection of Salmonella typhi utilizing bioconjugated fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Swati; Chattopadhyay, Sruti; Jackeray, Richa; Abid, Zainul; Singh, Harpal

    2016-01-01

    Present work demonstrates effective utilization of functionalized polymeric fluorescent nanoparticles as biosensing probe for the detection of Salmonella typhi bacteria on modified polycarbonate (PC) filters in about 3 h. Antibody modified-PC membranes were incubated with contaminated bacterial water for selective capturing which were detected by synthesized novel bioconjugate probe. Core–shell architecture of polymeric nanoparticles endows them with aqueous stabilization and keto-enolic functionalities making them usable for covalently linking S. typhi antibodies without any crosslinker or activator. Bradford analysis revealed that one nanoparticle has an average of 3.51 × 10"−"1"9 g or 21 × 10"4 bound S. typhi Ab molecules. Analysis of the regions of interest (ROI) in fluorescent micrographs of modified fluoroimmunoassay showed higher detection sensitivity of 5 × 10"2 cells/mL due to signal amplification unlike conventional naked dye FITC-Ab conjugate. Fluorescence of pyrene dye remained same on immobilization of biomolecules and nanoparticles showed stable fluorescent intensity under prolong exposure to laser owing to protective polymeric layer allowing accurate identification of bacteria. Surface-functionalized PC matrix and fluorescent label NPs permit covalent interactions among biomolecules enhancing signal acquisitions showing higher detection efficiency as compared to conventional microtiter plate-based system. Our novel immunoassay has the potential to be explored as rapid detection method for identifying S. typhi contaminations in water.Graphical Abstract

  14. Detection of Salmonella typhi utilizing bioconjugated fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Swati, E-mail: swatijain.iitd@gmail.com; Chattopadhyay, Sruti, E-mail: sruticiitd@gmail.com; Jackeray, Richa; Abid, Zainul; Singh, Harpal, E-mail: harpal2000@yahoo.com [Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Delhi (India)

    2016-05-15

    Present work demonstrates effective utilization of functionalized polymeric fluorescent nanoparticles as biosensing probe for the detection of Salmonella typhi bacteria on modified polycarbonate (PC) filters in about 3 h. Antibody modified-PC membranes were incubated with contaminated bacterial water for selective capturing which were detected by synthesized novel bioconjugate probe. Core–shell architecture of polymeric nanoparticles endows them with aqueous stabilization and keto-enolic functionalities making them usable for covalently linking S. typhi antibodies without any crosslinker or activator. Bradford analysis revealed that one nanoparticle has an average of 3.51 × 10{sup −19} g or 21 × 10{sup 4} bound S. typhi Ab molecules. Analysis of the regions of interest (ROI) in fluorescent micrographs of modified fluoroimmunoassay showed higher detection sensitivity of 5 × 10{sup 2} cells/mL due to signal amplification unlike conventional naked dye FITC-Ab conjugate. Fluorescence of pyrene dye remained same on immobilization of biomolecules and nanoparticles showed stable fluorescent intensity under prolong exposure to laser owing to protective polymeric layer allowing accurate identification of bacteria. Surface-functionalized PC matrix and fluorescent label NPs permit covalent interactions among biomolecules enhancing signal acquisitions showing higher detection efficiency as compared to conventional microtiter plate-based system. Our novel immunoassay has the potential to be explored as rapid detection method for identifying S. typhi contaminations in water.Graphical Abstract.

  15. The role of total-reflection x-ray fluorescence in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelg, G.; Klockenkaemper, R.

    1993-01-01

    Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is a universal and economic method for the simultaneous determination of elements with atomic numbers > 11 down to the lower pg-level. It is a microanalytical tool for the analysis of small sample amounts placed on flat carriers and for contaminations on flat sample surfaces. Analyses of stratified near-surface layers are made possible by varying the incident angle of the primary beam in the region of total-reflection. This non-destructive method is especially suitable for thin layers of a few nanometres, deposited on wafer material although not usable as a microprobe method with a high lateral resolution. Furthermore, depth profiles of biological samples can be recorded by means of microtome sectioning of only a few micrometres, as, for example in the gradient analysis of human organs. In addition to micro- and surface-layer analysis, TXRF is effectively applied to element trace analysis. Homogeneous solutions, for example aqueous solutions, high-purity acids or body fluids, are pipetted onto carriers and, after evaporation, the dry residues are analyzed directly down to the pg/ml region. Particularly advantageous is the absence of matrix effects, so that an easy calibration can be carried out by adding a single internal standard element. A digestion or separation step preceding the actual determination becomes necessary if a more complex matrix is to be analysed or especially low detection limits have to be reached. A critical evaluation of the recent developments in atomic spectroscopy places TXRF in a leading position. Its outstanding features compete with those of e.g. electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), microwave induced plasma optical emission spectroscopy (MIP-OES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in the field of micro- and trace analysis and with Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in the surface-layer analysis. (author)

  16. Applicability of multisyringe chromatography coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry for mercury speciation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Mar, J.L.; Hinojosa-Reyes, L. [Department of Chemistry Sciences, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Cd. Universitaria, Pedro de Alba s/n, C.P. 66451 San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Serra, A.M. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Hernandez-Ramirez, A. [Department of Chemistry Sciences, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Cd. Universitaria, Pedro de Alba s/n, C.P. 66451 San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Cerda, V., E-mail: victor.cerda@uib.es [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2011-12-05

    Graphical abstract: An automatic system, based on the applicability of multisyringe chromatography (MSC) coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV/AFS) detection is developed for mercury speciation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The on-line coupling of MSC to CV/AFS was developed for mercury speciation analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The speciation of MeHg{sup +}, Hg{sup 2+} and EtHg{sup +} was achieved on a RP C18 monolithic column. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hyphenated system provided higher sample throughput compared to HPLC-CV/AFS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The limits of detection for mercury species were comparable or better than those reported by HPLC-CV/AFS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The developed method also provided low instrumental and operational costs. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel automatic approach for the speciation of inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}), methylmercury (MeHg{sup +}) and ethylmercury (EtHg{sup +}) using multisyringe chromatography (MSC) coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV/AFS) was developed. For the first time, the separation of mercury species was accomplished on a RP C18 monolithic column using a multi-isocratic elution program. The elution protocol involved the use of 0.005% 2-mercapthoethanol in 240 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6)-acetonitrile (99:1, v/v), followed by 0.005% 2-mercapthoethanol in 240 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6)-acetonitrile (90:10, v/v). The eluted mercury species were then oxidized under post-column UV radiation and reduced using tin(II) chloride in an acidic medium. Subsequently, the generated mercury metal were separated from the reaction mixture and further atomized in the flame atomizer and detected by AFS. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the limits of detection (3{sigma}) were found to be 0.03, 0.11 and 0.09 {mu}g L{sup -1} for MeHg{sup +}, Hg{sup 2+} and EtHg{sup +}, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 6) of the

  17. EXAFS of dilute systems: fluorescence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    Since the first observations of the variation of the absorption coefficient for x-rays above the energy thresholds in the thirties until the early seventies, measurements and analysis of these variations were merely intended for the understanding of the underlying physics. Recently, with the understanding of the information available about the local atomic structure in the neighborhood of the absorbing species and the availability of high intensity synchrotron radiation sources, EXAFS has become a powerful structural tool. In these discussions, the details of the measurements for very dilute species are presented. It is shown that for the more dilute systems the measurement of the emission rather than the direct absorption is a more favorable technique

  18. Fluorescence detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma using Hyperflav

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Rawicz, Andrew H.; Zhang, Lewei

    2000-05-01

    A novel hypericin-based drug HyperflavTM has been evaluated for light-induced fluorescence detection of oral cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma was induced with carcinogenic agent in right pouches of forty hamsters (20/20 males/females). Solution of HyperflavTM was sprinkled into stomach with a single dose 0.2 - 4 mg of pure hypericin per kg b.w. and 4 - 8 hours before fluorescence analysis. In two animal groups with cancer symptoms the autofluorescence and hypericin-induced fluorescence were taken under 442 nm excitation. The buccal mucosa and adjacent areas were measured fiberoptically in-vivo and in-vitro using orange/green ratio (610/540). The in-vivo fluorescence imaging of malignant areas was conducted to assist the biopsy guidance and to compare with white-light images. Histological and morphological analyses were performed from biopsies. Oral squamous cell carcinoma in its early stage demonstrated specific higher 610/540 ratio for 37 tested hamsters. Advanced state involved another higher fluorescence maximum around 640 nm that in our opinion caused by strong porphyrin-induced native fluorescence. Such deformation of fluorescence spectra may lead to inadequate perception of diseased tissue area. To avoid this problem the autofluorescence spectra & images were added. HyperflavTM application is promising for demarcation of early oral cancer when combined with autofluorescence measurements.

  19. Determination of heavy metals in polar snow and ice by laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolshov, M.A.; Boutron, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    The new laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry technique offers unrivalled sensitivity for the determination of trace metals in a wide variety of samples. This has allowed the direct determination of Pb, Cd and Bi in Antarctic and Greenland snow and ice down to the sub pg/g level. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence of metal-atom impurities in a neutral beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, C.F.; Pyle, R.V.; Sabetimani, Z.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1984-10-01

    The need to limit impurities in fusion devices to low levels is well known. We have investigated, by the technique of laser-induced fluorescence, the concentration of heavy-metal atoms in a neutral beam caused by their evaporation from the hot filaments in a conventional high-current multifilament hydrogen-ion source

  1. Redox speciation analysis of antimony in soil extracts by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, Edwar; Pinochet, Hugo; Gregori, Ida de; Potin-Gautier, Martine

    2003-01-01

    A sensitive atomic spectrometric method for the redox speciation analysis of antimony in soils is described. The method is based on the selective generation of stibine from Sb(III) in a continuous flow system using atomic fluorescence spectrometry for detection. Sb(V) is masked by citric or oxalic acid in HCl medium. The procedure was optimized with synthetic solutions of Sb(III) and Sb(V). The effect of carboxylic acid and HCl concentration on the recovery of Sb(III) and Sb(V) species from standard solutions, and on the fluorescence signal were studied. Both species were extracted from soil with H 2 O, 0.05 mol l -1 EDTA and 0.25 mol l -1 H 2 SO 4 . Since the soil samples were collected from sites impacted by copper mining activities, the effect of Cu 2+ on the determination of antimony in synthetic solutions and soil extracts was studied. Cu 2+ decreased the Sb(III) signal, but had no effect on the total antimony determination. Therefore, the selective determination of Sb(III) was carried out in citric acid-HCl medium, using the analyte addition technique. Total antimony in soil extracts was determined using the standard calibration technique after reducing Sb(V) to Sb(III) at room temperature with KI-ascorbic acid. The Sb(V) concentration was calculated from the difference between total antimony and Sb(III). The limits of detection (PS Analytical, Excalibur Millennium model) were 17 and 10 ng l -1 for Sb(III) and total antimony, respectively, and the R.S.D. at the 0.5-μg l -1 level were 2.5 and 2.4%, respectively. The total antimony concentration of soils is in the mg kg -1 range; the Sb recovery from the different soils by the extracting solutions was between less than 0.02% and approximately 10%. Similar recoveries were obtained using EDTA and sulfuric acid solutions. Sb(V) was found to be the main antimony species extracted from soils

  2. Salicylimine-Based Colorimetric and Fluorescent Chemosensor for Selective Detection of Cyanide in Aqueous Buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Jin Young; Hwang, In Hong; Kim, Hyun; Song, Eun Joo; Kim, Kyung Beom; Kim, Cheal [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    A simple colorimetric and fluorescent anion sensor 1 based on salicylimine showed a high selectivity and sensitivity for detection of cyanide in aqueous solution. The receptor 1 showed high selectivity toward CN{sup -} ions in a 1:1 stoichiometric manner, which induces a fast color change from colorless to orange and a dramatic enhancement in fluorescence intensity selectively for cyanide anions over other anions. Such selectivity resulted from the nucleophilic addition of CN{sup -} to the carbon atom of an electron-deficient imine group. The sensitivity of the fluorescence-based assay (0.06 μM) is below the 1.9 μM suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the maximum allowable cyanide concentration in drinking water, capable of being a practical system for the monitoring of CN. concentrations in aqueous samples.

  3. Detection of intaoral lesions using a fluorescence camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Optical methods for the detection of carious lesions, calculus and plaque have the advantage of being minimally invasive. The use of endogeneous fluorescence markers like porphyrins could simplify the application of fluorescence techniques in the dental practice. It is known that porphyrins are produced by some of the bacterial species that are present in the oral cavity. Since porphyrins have an excitation band at about 400nm they have the potential to be used as fluorescent markers of locations in the oral cavity where the production of bacteria is out of the limits of healthy regions. Further, modern and efficient GaN-based semiconductor diodes emit light in this spectral range and thus make the implementation of fluorescence sensors with excitation at this wavelength easy. Carious lesions, calculus and plaque have been measured using a self build fluorescence camera using GaN-diodes for illumination at 405nm. Further, emission spectra under this excitation were recorded. For the latter purpose freshly extracted teeth were used. It has been found that already in the case of an initial carious lesion red porphyrin-fluorescence is emitted whereas it is absent in healthy enamel. In already brown coloured carious lesions the emission bands of porphyrin are present but the observed overall fluorescence intensity is lower, probably due to the absorption of the fluorescence by the carious defect itself. In dental calculus, dental plaque and subgingival concrements porphyrin originated luminescence was found as well. Since in these cases the emission spectra differ slightly it can be concluded that they originate from different types of porphyrins and thus also from different bacteria. These results show that this fluorescence technique can be a promising method to diagnose carious lesions, calculus and plaque.

  4. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the RIS technique, a laser is tuned to a wavelength which will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or nonresonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms; and since detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples are given of one-atom detection, including that of the noble gases, in order to show complementarity with AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81 Kr using RIS has interesting applications for solar neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Research of the absorbance detection and fluorescence detection for multifunctional nutrition analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhengyuan; Yan, Huimin; Ni, Xuxiang; Zhang, Xiuda

    2017-10-01

    The research of the multifunctional analyzer which integrates absorbance detection, fluorescence detection, time-resolved fluorescence detection, biochemical luminescence detection methods, can make efficient detection and analysis for a variety of human body nutrients. This article focuses on the absorbance detection and fluorescence detection system. The two systems are modular in design and controlled by embedded system, to achieve automatic measurement according to user settings. In the optical path design, the application of confocal design can improve the optical signal acquisition capability, and reduce the interference. A photon counter is used for detection, and a high performance counter module is designed to measure the output of photon counter. In the experiment, we use neutral density filters and potassium dichromate solution to test the absorbance detection system, and use fluorescein isothiocyanate FITC for fluorescence detection system performance test. The experimental results show that the absorbance detection system has a detection range of 0 4OD, and has good linearity in the detection range, while the fluorescence detection system has a high sensitivity of 1pmol/L concentration.

  6. Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence and Ionization in a Graphite Furnace for the Determination of Metals and Nonmetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, David James

    1990-01-01

    Here is reported novel instrumentation for atomic spectrometry that combined the use of a pulsed laser system as the light source and an electrothermal atomizer as the atom cell. The main goal of the research was to develop instrumentation that was more sensitive for elemental analysis than commercially available instruments and could be used to determine elements in real sample matrices. Laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (LEAFS) in an electrothermal atomizer (ETA) was compared to ETA atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) for the determination of thallium, manganese, and lead in food and agricultural standard reference materials (SRMs). Compared to ETA AAS, ETA LEAFS has a longer linear dynamic range (LDR) (5-7 orders of magnitude compared to 2-3 orders of magnitude) and higher sensitivity (10 ^{-16} to 10^{ -14} g as compared to 10^{ -13} to 10^{-11} g). Consequently, ETA LEAFS allows elemental analysis to be done over a wider range of concentrations with less dilution steps. Thallium was accurately determined in biological samples by ETA LEAFS at amounts five to one hundred times below the ETA AAS detection limit. ETA AAS and ETA LEAFS were compared for the determination of lead and manganese, and in general, the accuracies and precisions of ETA AAS were the same, with typical precisions between 3% and 6%. Fluorine was determined using laser excited molecular fluorescence spectrometry (LEMOFS) in an ETA. Molecular fluorescence from magnesium fluoride was collected, and the detection limit of 0.3 pg fluorine was two to six orders of magnitude more sensitive than other methods commonly used for the determination of fluorine. Significant interferences from ions were observed, but the sensitivity was high enough that fluorine could be determined in freeze dried urine SRMs by diluting the samples by a factor of one hundred to remove the interferences. Laser enhanced ionization (LEI) in an ETA was used for the determination of metals. For thallium, indium

  7. Resonance fluorescence spectra of three-level atoms in a squeezed vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, M.R.; Ficek, Z.; Dalton, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The fluorescence field from one of the two allowed transitions in a three-level atom can sense squeezed fluctuations of a vacuum field coupled to the other transition. We examine the fluorescence spectra of strongly driven three-level atoms in Λ, V, and cascade configurations in which one of the two one-photon transitions is coupled to a finite-bandwidth squeezed vacuum field, when the bandwidth is much smaller than the difference in the atomic transition frequencies, though much larger than atomic decay rates and Rabi frequencies of the driving fields. The driving fields are on one-photon resonance, and the squeezed vacuum field is generated by a degenerate parameter oscillator. Details are only given for the Λ configuration. The extension to the V and cascade configurations is straightforward. We find that in all configurations the fluorescence spectra of the transition not coupled to the squeezed vacuum field are composed of five lines, one central and two pairs of sidebands, with intensities and widths strongly influenced by the squeezed vacuum field. However, only the central component and the outer sidebands exhibit a dependence on the squeezing phase. We also examine the fluorescence spectrum for the cascade configuration with a squeezed vacuum field on resonance with the two-photon transition between the ground and the most excited states and now generated by a nondegenerate parametric oscillator. In this case, where the squeezed vacuum field can be made coupled to both transitions, all spectral lines depend on the squeezing phase. The spectral features are explained in terms of the dressed-atom model of the system. We show that the coherent mixing of the atomic states by the strong driving fields modifies transition rates between the dressed states, which results in the selective phase dependence of the spectral features. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  8. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in a pressure-controlled electrothermal atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonardo, R F; Yuzefovsky, A I; Irwin, R L; Michel, R G

    1996-02-01

    A theoretical model was developed to describe the loss of analyte atoms in graphite furnaces during atomization. The model was based on two functions, one that described the supply of analyte by vaporization, and another that described the removal of the analyte by diffusion. Variation in working pressure was shown to affect the competition between these two processes. Optimal atomization efficiency was predicted to occur at a pressure where the supply of the analyte was maximized, and gas phase interactions between the analyte and matrix were minimized. Experiments to test the model included the direct determination of phosphorus and tellurium in nickel alloys and of cobalt in glass. In all cases, reduction in working pressure from atmospheric pressure to 7 Pa decreased sensitivity by 2 orders of magnitude, but improved temporal peak shape. For the atomization of tellurium directly from a solid nickel alloy, and the atomization of cobalt from an aqueous solution, no change in sensitivity was observed as the working pressure was reduced from atmospheric pressure to approximately 70 kPa. If a reduction in working pressure affected only the diffusion of the analyte, poorer sensitivity should have been obtained. Only a commensurate increase in analyte vaporization could account for maintained sensitivity at lower working pressures. Overall, analyte vaporization was not dramatically improved at reduced working pressures, and maximum atomization efficiency was found to occur near atmospheric pressure.

  9. Detection of oxidative hair treatment using fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Silvana; Wunder, Cora; Paulke, Alexander; Verhoff, Marcel A; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-08-01

    In assessing abstinence from drug or alcohol abuse, hair analysis plays an important role. Cosmetic hair treatment influences the content of deposited drugs which is not always detectable during analysis. Since oxidation of melanin leads to an increase in fluorescence, a microscopic method was developed to distinguish natural from cosmetically treated hair. For validation, natural hair samples were treated with different types of cosmetics and inspected by fluorescence microscopy. Hair samples from 20 volunteers with documented cosmetic treatment and as a proof of concept 100 hair samples from forensic cases were analyzed by this method. Apart from autofluorescence with excitation at 365 nm, no obvious fluorescence was observed in untreated hair samples. Tinting and a natural plant product had no influence on fluorescence, but dyeing procedures including oxidation led to a marked increase in fluorescence. Proof of cosmetic treatment was achieved in hair samples from the 20 volunteers. In 100 forensic cases, 13 samples were characterized as oxidatively treated, which was in accordance with the respective disclosure except for one case where treatment was not admitted. This fluorescence microscopic procedure proved to be fast, easy, and reliable to identify oxidatively treated hair samples, which must be considered especially in evaluating cases of negative drug results. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence in the detection of esophageal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kenneth K.; Gutta, Kumar; Laukka, Mark A.; Densmore, John

    1995-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is a technique which can perform an 'optical biopsy' of gastrointestinal mucosa. LIF was performed in resected specimens using a pulsed N2-laser coupled fiberoptically to a probe. Fluorescence was measured using a 0.2 meter spectroscope with an intensified photodiode array. Measurements were made on fresh (esophagus, and adenocarcinoma. Each tissue section was examined using an optical probe consisting of a central fiber for delivering the excitation energy and a 6 fiber bundle surrounding the central fiber for detection of the fluorescence. An excitation wavelength of 337 nm was used which generated 3-ns pulses while fluorescence intensities were acquired from 300-800 nm. Spectra were obtained from each section in a standardized fashion and background spectra subtracted. Fluorescence readings were taken from 54 normal esophageal sections and 32 sections of adenocarcinoma. A fluorescence index obtained from the tumor sections was 0.68+/- 0.01 compared with 0.51+/- 0.01 for the normal sections (pesophagus with good accuracy.

  11. Continuous flow hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination and speciation of arsenic in wine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadjova, Irina B. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1 James Bourchier Blvd., Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria); Lampugnani, Leonardo [C.N.R. Istituto per i processi chimico-fisici, Area della Ricerca di Pisa, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: lampugnani@ipcf.cnr.it; Onor, Massimo [C.N.R. Istituto per i processi chimico-fisici, Area della Ricerca di Pisa, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); D' Ulivo, Alessandro [C.N.R. Istituto per i processi chimico-fisici, Area della Ricerca di Pisa, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Tsalev, Dimiter L. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1 James Bourchier Blvd., Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria)

    2005-07-15

    Methods for the atomic fluorescence spectrometric (AFS) determination of total arsenic and arsenic species in wines based on continuous flow hydride generation (HG) with atomization in miniature diffusion flame (MDF) are described. For hydride-forming arsenic, L-cysteine is used as reagent for pre-reduction and complexation of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate and dimethylarsinate. Concentrations of hydrochloric acid and tetrahydroborate are optimized in order to minimize interference by ethanol. Procedure permits determination of the sum of these four species in 5-10-fold diluted samples with limit of detection (LOD) 0.3 and 0.6 {mu}g l{sup -1} As in white and red wines, respectively, with precision between 2% and 8% RSD at As levels within 0.5-10 {mu}g l{sup -1}. Selective arsine generation from different reaction media is used for non-chromatographic determination of arsenic species in wines: citrate buffer at pH 5.1 for As(III); 0.2 mol l{sup -1} acetic acid for arsenite + dimethylarsinate (DMA); 8 mol l{sup -1} HCl for total inorganic arsenic [As(III) + As(V)]; and monomethylarsonate (MMA) calculated by difference. Calibration with aqueous and ethanol-matched standard solutions of As(III) is used for 10- and 5-fold diluted samples, respectively. The LODs are 0.4 {mu}g l{sup -1} for As(III) and 0.3 {mu}g l{sup -1} for the other three As species and precision is within 4-8% RSDs. Arsenic species in wine were also determined by coupling of ion chromatographic separation on an anion exchange column and HG-flame AFS detection. Methods were validated by means of recovery studies and comparative analyses by HG-AFS and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave digestion. The LODs were 0.12, 0.27, 0.15 and 0.13 {mu}g l{sup -1} (as As) and RSDs were 2-6%, 5-9%, 3-7% and 2-5% for As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA arsenic species, respectively. Bottled red and white wines from Bulgaria, Republic of Macedonia and Italy were analyzed by non

  12. Continuous flow hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination and speciation of arsenic in wine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Onor, Massimo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2005-01-01

    Methods for the atomic fluorescence spectrometric (AFS) determination of total arsenic and arsenic species in wines based on continuous flow hydride generation (HG) with atomization in miniature diffusion flame (MDF) are described. For hydride-forming arsenic, L-cysteine is used as reagent for pre-reduction and complexation of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate and dimethylarsinate. Concentrations of hydrochloric acid and tetrahydroborate are optimized in order to minimize interference by ethanol. Procedure permits determination of the sum of these four species in 5-10-fold diluted samples with limit of detection (LOD) 0.3 and 0.6 μg l -1 As in white and red wines, respectively, with precision between 2% and 8% RSD at As levels within 0.5-10 μg l -1 . Selective arsine generation from different reaction media is used for non-chromatographic determination of arsenic species in wines: citrate buffer at pH 5.1 for As(III); 0.2 mol l -1 acetic acid for arsenite + dimethylarsinate (DMA); 8 mol l -1 HCl for total inorganic arsenic [As(III) + As(V)]; and monomethylarsonate (MMA) calculated by difference. Calibration with aqueous and ethanol-matched standard solutions of As(III) is used for 10- and 5-fold diluted samples, respectively. The LODs are 0.4 μg l -1 for As(III) and 0.3 μg l -1 for the other three As species and precision is within 4-8% RSDs. Arsenic species in wine were also determined by coupling of ion chromatographic separation on an anion exchange column and HG-flame AFS detection. Methods were validated by means of recovery studies and comparative analyses by HG-AFS and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave digestion. The LODs were 0.12, 0.27, 0.15 and 0.13 μg l -1 (as As) and RSDs were 2-6%, 5-9%, 3-7% and 2-5% for As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA arsenic species, respectively. Bottled red and white wines from Bulgaria, Republic of Macedonia and Italy were analyzed by non-chromatographic and chromatographic procedures and the As

  13. Contraband Detection with Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence: Feasibility and Impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruet, J; Lange, D

    2007-01-01

    In this report they show that cargo interrogation systems developed to thwart trafficking of illicit nuclear materials could also be powerful tools in the larger fight against contraband smuggling. In particular, in addition to detecting special nuclear materials, cargo scanning systems that exploit nuclear resonance fluorescence to detect specific isotopes can be used to help find: chemical weapons; some drugs as well as some chemicals regulated under the controlled substances act; precious metals; materials regulated under export control laws; and commonly trafficked fluorocarbons

  14. Achieving 100% Efficient Postcolumn Hydride Generation for As Speciation Analysis by Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2016-04-05

    An experimental setup consisting of a flow injection hydride generator coupled to an atomic fluorescence spectrometer was optimized in order to generate arsanes from tri- and pentavalent inorganic arsenic species (iAs(III), iAs(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MAs(V)), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAs(V)) with 100% efficiency with the use of only HCl and NaBH4 as the reagents. The optimal concentration of HCl was 2 mol L(-1); the optimal concentration of NaBH4 was 2.5% (m/v), and the volume of the reaction coil was 8.9 mL. To prevent excessive signal noise due to fluctuations of hydride supply to an atomizer, a new design of a gas-liquid separator was implemented. The optimized experimental setup was subsequently interfaced to HPLC and employed for speciation analysis of arsenic. Two chromatography columns were tested: (i) ion-pair chromatography and (ii) ion exchange chromatography. The latter offered much better results for human urine samples without a need for sample dilution. Due to the equal hydride generation efficiency (and thus the sensitivities) of all As species, a single species standardization by DMAs(V) standard was feasible. The limits of detection for iAs(III), iAs(V), MAs(V), and DMAs(V) were 40, 97, 57, and 55 pg mL(-1), respectively. Accuracy of the method was tested by the analysis of the standard reference material (human urine NIST 2669), and the method was also verified by the comparative analyses of human urine samples collected from five individuals with an independent reference method.

  15. Determination of mercury in rice by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Maria Jose da [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Edificio de Investigacion, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50740-550 Recife, PE (Brazil); Paim, Ana Paula S. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50740-550 Recife, PE (Brazil); Pimentel, Maria Fernanda [Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Cervera, M. Luisa, E-mail: m.luisa.cervera@uv.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Edificio de Investigacion, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Guardia, Miguel de la [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Edificio de Investigacion, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2010-05-14

    A cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry method (CV-AFS) has been developed for the determination of Hg in rice samples at a few ng g{sup -1} concentration level. The method is based on the previous digestion of samples in a microwave oven with HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} followed by dilution with water containing KBr/KBrO{sub 3} and hydroxylamine and reduction with SnCl{sub 2} in HCl using external calibration. The matrix interferences and the effect of nitrogen oxide vapors have been evaluated and the method validated using a certified reference material. The limit of detection of the method was 0.9 ng g{sup -1} with a recovery percentage of 95 {+-} 4% at an added concentration of 5 ng g{sup -1}. The concentration level of Hg found in 24 natural rice samples from different origin ranged between 1.3 and 7.8 ng g{sup -1}.

  16. Discriminative detection of bivalent Cu by dual-emission ZnSe quantum dot fluorescence sensing via ratiometric fluorescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chunlei; Zhou, Shujie; Xu, Shuhong; Wang, Zhuyuan; Cui, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we showed that 1-thioglycerol (TG)-capped ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) with dual-emission could perform ideal QD fluorescence sensing for ratiometric fluorescence measurements. By comparing the fluorescence ratios at two emission peaks before and after the addition of cations, the discriminative detection of Cu(II) was realized, even in the case of co-existing with large amounts of other sensitive cations, such as Ag(I). The discriminative detection of Cu(II) is accurate with co-existing Ag(I) below 10 μmol L −1 . By a joint investigation of the ionic diffuse dynamics and carrier recombination dynamics, we found that the adsorbed layer of QDs plays a key role in the discriminative detection of Cu(II) from Ag(I) or other sensitive cations. The moderate adsorption capacity with a QD adsorbed layer makes Cu(II) capable of travelling across the QD double-layer structure, following a surface doping process via chemical reactions between Cu(II) and the QD surface atoms. As a result of Cu(II) doping, there were three major carrier recombination channels: the non-radiation recombination between the QD conduction band to the Cu(II) energy level, together with the non-radiation recombination and radiation recombination between the trap state energy levels and the Cu(II) energy level. As for Ag(I) and other sensitive cations, they have a strong adsorption capacity with the QD adsorbed layer, making them mainly present on the adsorbed layer. Due to the blocking of the ligand layer, we only observed weak coupling of the ZnSe conduction band with the Ag(I) energy level via a non-radiation recombination channel. (paper)

  17. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection in Noble Gas Solids for Measurements of Rare Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaideep; Bailey, Kevin G.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas P.; Xu, Chen-Yu; Tang, Xiaodong

    2013-04-01

    Optical detection of single atoms captured in solid noble gas matrices provides an alternative technique to study rare nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics. I will describe the prospects of applying this approach for cross section measurements of the ^22Ne,,),25Mg reaction, which is the crucial neutron source for the weak s process inside of massive stars. Noble gas solids are a promising medium for the capture, detection, and manipulation of atoms and nuclear spins. They provide stable and chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of guest species. Because noble gas solids are transparent at optical wavelengths, the guest atoms can be probed using lasers. We have observed that ytterbium in solid neon exhibits intersystem crossing (ISC) which results in a strong green fluorescence (546 nm) under excitation with blue light (389 nm). Several groups have observed ISC in many other guest-host pairs, notably magnesium in krypton. Because of the large wavelength separation of the excitation light and fluorescence light, optical detection of individual embedded guest atoms is feasible. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  18. Fluorescence-Based Multiplex Protein Detection Using Optically Encoded Microbeads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Hong Jeong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Potential utilization of proteins for early detection and diagnosis of various diseases has drawn considerable interest in the development of protein-based multiplex detection techniques. Among the various techniques for high-throughput protein screening, optically-encoded beads combined with fluorescence-based target monitoring have great advantages over the planar array-based multiplexing assays. This review discusses recent developments of analytical methods of screening protein molecules on microbead-based platforms. These include various strategies such as barcoded microbeads, molecular beacon-based techniques, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering-based techniques. Their applications for label-free protein detection are also addressed. Especially, the optically-encoded beads such as multilayer fluorescence beads and SERS-encoded beads are successful for generating a large number of coding.

  19. A novel portable fluorescence detection system for microfluidic card

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, B; Xie, Y; Irawan, R

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence based sensors are widely used in the field of biochemistry and medicine due to their high sensitivity and accuracy. But the cost and time required for each sample to be tested is high. If the diagnostic tools could be miniaturized, made simple to use and much less expensive, and readily available at the point of need such as emergency diagnosis, millions of people would be benefited from it. In this paper, we design a prototype of portable fluorescence detection system based on Fluorescence Filter Block and DAQ card which can emulate signal collection and processing functionalities. After the introduction of system structure and functional modules, we use a resolution approximation method to investigate the system performance. The evaluation shows that our prototype system has the sensitivity of 0.01 mMol/L (333.306 μg/mL) which meets most of the medical requirements.

  20. Detecting crop population growth using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heng; Qian, Xiangjie; Zhang, Lan; Xu, Sailong; Li, Haifeng; Xia, Xiaojian; Dai, Liankui; Xu, Liang; Yu, Jingquan; Liu, Xu

    2017-12-10

    For both field and greenhouse crops, it is challenging to evaluate their growth information on a large area over a long time. In this work, we developed a chlorophyll fluorescence imaging-based system for crop population growth information detection. Modular design was used to make the system provide high-intensity uniform illumination. This system can perform modulated chlorophyll fluorescence induction kinetics measurement and chlorophyll fluorescence parameter imaging over a large area of up to 45  cm×34  cm. The system can provide different lighting intensity by modulating the duty cycle of its control signal. Results of continuous monitoring of cucumbers in nitrogen deficiency show the system can reduce the judge error of crop physiological status and improve monitoring efficiency. Meanwhile, the system is promising in high throughput application scenarios.

  1. Detection at a distance of atomic bomb tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahmias, M E

    1954-01-01

    Nahmias describes the radioassay of air, rain, and snowfall as the basis for detecting atomic bomb tests. Tables and graphs give time vs. Ra equivalents, distance vs Roentgens/h of radiation, and distribution of radioelements which can be expected.

  2. Colorful Polyelectrolytes: An Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization Route to Fluorescent Polystyrene Sulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberty, Wayne; Tong, Xiaowei; Balamurugan, Sreelatha; Deville, Kyle; Russo, Paul S; Zhang, Donghui

    2016-03-01

    A labeled green fluorescent polystyrene sulfonate (LNaPSS) has been synthesized using atom transfer radical polymerization of a styrene sulfonate monomer with a fluorescent co-monomer, fluorescein thiocyanate-vinyl aniline. As a result this 100 % sulfonated polymer contains no hydrophobic patches along the chain backbone besides the fluorescent marker itself. The concentration of the fluorescent monomer was kept low to maintain the characteristic properties of the anionic polyelectrolyte, LNaPSS. ATRP conditions facilitated the production of polymers spanning a range of molecular weights from 35,000 to 175,000 in gram-scale batches with polydispersity indices of 1.01-1.24. Molecular weight increased with the monomer to initiator ratio. Gel permeation chromatography results show a unimodal distribution, and the polymer structure was also confirmed by (1)H NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed covalent bonding of fluorescein isothiocyanate to the polymer, indicating that the polymer is suitable as a probe in fluorescence microscopy. To demonstrate this ability, the polymer was used to locate structural features in salt crystals formed during drying, as in the evaporation of sea mist. A second application to probe diffusion studies is also demonstrated.

  3. Snapshot imaging Fraunhofer line discriminator for detection of plant fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta Roy, S.; Kudenov, M. W.

    2015-05-01

    Non-invasive quantification of plant health is traditionally accomplished using reflectance based metrics, such as the normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI). However, measuring plant fluorescence (both active and passive) to determine photochemistry of plants has gained importance. Due to better cost efficiency, lower power requirements, and simpler scanning synchronization, detecting passive fluorescence is preferred over active fluorescence. In this paper, we propose a high speed imaging approach for measuring passive plant fluorescence, within the hydrogen alpha Fraunhofer line at ~656 nm, using a Snapshot Imaging Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (SIFOLD). For the first time, the advantage of snapshot imaging for high throughput Fraunhofer Line Discrimination (FLD) is cultivated by our system, which is based on a multiple-image Fourier transform spectrometer and a spatial heterodyne interferometer (SHI). The SHI is a Sagnac interferometer, which is dispersion compensated using blazed diffraction gratings. We present data and techniques for calibrating the SIFOLD to any particular wavelength. This technique can be applied to quantify plant fluorescence at low cost and reduced complexity of data collection.

  4. Direct detection of antihydrogen atoms using a BGO crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Y. [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei-shi, 184-8588 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Kuroda, N., E-mail: kuroda@phys.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Ohtsuka, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universitá di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Tajima, M.; Torii, H.A. [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Zurlo, N. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universitá di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Matsuda, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Venturelli, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universitá di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Yamazaki, Y. [Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan)

    2016-12-21

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed a detector consisting of a large size BGO crystal to detect an atomic antihydrogen beam, and performed the direct detection of antihydrogen atoms. Energy spectra from antihydrogen annihilation on the BGO crystal are discussed in comparison to simulation results from the GEANT4 toolkit. Background mainly originating from cosmic rays were strongly suppressed by analyzing the energy deposited in the BGO and requiring a multiplicity of charged pions. Thus antihydrogen events were identified.

  5. Hemoglobin detection using carbon dots as a fluorescence probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Ali; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2015-09-15

    Herein, we have described the application of high fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) without any surface modification as a simple and fast responding fluorescence probe for sensitive and selective determination of hemoglobin (Hb) in the presence of H2O2. Although Hb itself was able to quench the fluorescence of CDs, based on the inner filter effect (IFE) of the protein that affects both excitation and emission spectra of CDs, the presence of H2O2 resulted in further improvement of the sensitivity of Hb detection. The assay is based on the reaction of Hb with H2O2 that generates reactive oxygen species including hydroxyl (OH•) and superoxide (O2(•-)) radicals under heme degradation and/or iron release from Hb and the subsequent reaction of hydroxyl radicals, as strong oxidizing agents, with CDs resulting in high fluorescence quenching. The proposed probe was used for determination of Hb in concentration range of 1-100 nM with a detection limit of 0.4 nM. The method was successfully applied to the determination of Hb in human blood samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Parallel detection experiment of fluorescence confocal microscopy using DMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingqing; Zheng, Jihong; Wang, Kangni; Gui, Kun; Guo, Hanming; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-05-01

    Parallel detection of fluorescence confocal microscopy (PDFCM) system based on Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is reported in this paper in order to realize simultaneous multi-channel imaging and improve detection speed. DMD is added into PDFCM system, working to take replace of the single traditional pinhole in the confocal system, which divides the laser source into multiple excitation beams. The PDFCM imaging system based on DMD is experimentally set up. The multi-channel image of fluorescence signal of potato cells sample is detected by parallel lateral scanning in order to verify the feasibility of introducing the DMD into fluorescence confocal microscope. In addition, for the purpose of characterizing the microscope, the depth response curve is also acquired. The experimental result shows that in contrast to conventional microscopy, the DMD-based PDFCM system has higher axial resolution and faster detection speed, which may bring some potential benefits in the biology and medicine analysis. SCANNING 38:234-239, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Food toxin detection with atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Externally introduced toxins or internal spoilage correlated pathogens and their metabolites are all potential sources of food toxins. To prevent and protect unsafe food, many food toxin detection techniques have been developed to detect various toxins for quality control. Although several routine m...

  8. Fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen concentration in a dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořák, P.; Mrkvičková, M.; Obrusník, A.; Kratzer, J.; Dědina, J.; Procházka, V.

    2017-06-01

    Concentration of atomic oxygen was measured in a volume dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ignited in mixtures of Ar + O2(+ H2) at atmospheric pressure. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic oxygen was used and this method was calibrated by TALIF of Xe in a mixture of argon and a trace of xenon. The calibration was performed at atmospheric pressure and it was shown that quenching by three-body collisions has negligible effect on the life time of excited Xe atoms. The concentration of atomic oxygen in the DBD was around 1021 m-3 and it was stable during the whole discharge period. The concentration did not depend much on the electric power delivered to the discharge provided that the power was sufficiently high so that the visible discharge filled the whole reactor volume. Both the addition of hydrogen or replacing of argon by helium led to a significant decrease of atomic oxygen concentration. The TALIF measurements of O concentration levels in the DBD plasma performed in this work are made use of e.g. in the field analytical chemistry. The results contribute to understanding the processes of analyte hydride preconcentration and subsequent atomization in the field of trace element analysis where DBD plasma atomizers are employed.

  9. Detection of atomic oxygen in flames by absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheskis, S.; Kovalenko, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    The absolute concentration of atomic oxygen in an atmospheric pressure hydrogen/air flame has been measured using Intracavity Laser Spectroscopy (ICLS) based on a dye laser pumped by an argon-ion laser. Absorptions at the highly forbidden transitions at 630.030 nm and 636.380 nm were observed at an equivalent optical length of up to 10 km. The relatively low intensity of the dye laser avoids photochemical interferences that are inherent to some other methods for detecting atomic oxygen. The detection sensitivity is about 6x10 14 atom/cm 3 and can be improved with better flame and laser stabilization. (orig.)

  10. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A.; Martins, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate

  11. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A., E-mail: pieter.de-beule@inl.int [Applied Nano-Optics Laboratory, International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Avenida Mestre José Veiga, s/n, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal); Martins, Marco [Nano-ICs Group, International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Avenida Mestre José Veiga, s/n, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal)

    2015-09-15

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate.

  12. Pollution detection using the spectral fluorescent signatures (SFS technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Del Carmen Martín

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work has been developed in the Applied Physics Department at the University of Vigo within the line of research based on the treatment of the degraded water by pollutants through the use of microalgae, reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases through the absorption of CO2 in the process and the reuse of biomass as biofuel. Remote sensing techniques have contributed to a great extent to the development of oil pollution monitoring systems. However, the available detection methods, mainly designed for spaceborne and airborne long distance inspection, are too expensive and complex to be used in an operational way by relatively unskilled personnel. In the framework of DEOSOM project (European AMPERA project, an innovative water monitoring method was proposed, in two steps: early oil spill detection using a portable shipborne laser-induced fluorescence LIDAR (LIF/LIDAR, and analysis of suspicious water samples in laboratory using the Spectral Fluorescent Signature (SFS technique. This work is focused on the second technique. This system aims to optimize the production of microalgae for biofuel and contaminant cleaning applications and was developed and tested in photo-bioreactors in the University of Vigo within the EnerBioAlgae project (SUDOE. In this project, the SFS technique was used as a diagnostic tool employing the fluorescence analyzer INSTANT-SCREENER M53UVC. The Spectral Fluorescence Signature technique (SFS is based on compounds fluorescence properties. The fluorescence intensity of a sample is measured at different excitation and emission wavelengths to produce a 3-dimensional fluorescence matrix, which can also be presented as a 2-dimensional color image where the color shows the intensity of the fluorescence. These matrices offer qualitative and quantitative information, since they can be useful for the identification of different substances from their characteristic excitation and emission spectra of fluorescence. They also

  13. A nanocluster-based fluorescent sensor for sensitive hemoglobin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongqin; Meng, Huijie; Tu, Yifeng; Yan, Jilin

    2017-08-01

    In this report, a fluorescence sensor for sensitive detection of hemoglobin was developed. Gold nanoclusters were first synthesized with bovine serum albumin. It was found that both hydrogen peroxide and hemoglobin could weakly quench the fluorescence from the gold nanoclusters, but when these two were applied onto the nanolcusters simultaneously, a much improved quenching was resulted. This enhancing effect was proved to come from the catalytic generation of hydroxyl radical by hemoglobin. Under an optimized condition, the quenching linearly related to the concentration of hemoglobin in the range of 1-250nM, and a limit of detection as low as 0.36nM could be obtained. This provided a sensitive means for the quantification of Hb. The sensor was then successfully applied for blood analyses with simple sample pretreatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluorescence diffuse tomography for tumor detection and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balalaeva, Irina V.; Orlova, Anna G.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Kibraeva, Elena A.; Zagainova, Elena V.; Turchin, Ilya V.

    2007-05-01

    Strong light scattering and absorption limit visualization of the internal structure of biological tissue. Only special tools for turbid media imaging, such as optical diffuse tomography, enable noninvasive investigation of the internal biological tissues, including visualization and intravital monitoring of deep tumors. In this work the preliminary results of fluorescence diffuse tomography (FDT) of small animals are presented. Using of exogenous fluorophores, targeted specifically at tumor cells, and fluorescent proteins expressed endogenously can significantly increase the contrast of obtained images. Fluorescent compounds of different nature, such as sulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine (Photosens), red fluorescing proteins and CdTe/CdSe-core/shell nanocrystals (quantum dots) were applied. The animal was scanned in the transilluminative configuration by low-frequency modulated light (1 kHz) from Nd:YAG laser with second harmonic generation at the wavelength of 532 nm or semiconductor laser at the wavelength of 655 nm. Photosens was injected intravenously into linear mice with metastazing Lewis lung carcinoma in dose 4 mg/kg. Quantum dots (5x10 -11 M) or protein DsRed2 (1-5x10 -6 M) in glass capsules (inner diameter 2-3 mm) were placed inside the esophagus of 7-day-old hairless rats (18-20 g) to simulate marked tumors. Cells of HEK-293 Phoenix line, transitory transfected with Turbo-RFP protein gene, were injected hypodermically to immunodeficient mice. This work demonstrates potential capabilities of FDT method for detection and monitoring of deep fluorescent-labeled tumors in animal models. Strong advantages of fluorescent proteins and quantum dots over the traditional photosensitizer for FDT imaging are shown.

  15. Multicolor fluorescent biosensor for multiplexed detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rong; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Huan, Shuang-Yan; Wu, Cuichen; Fu, Ting; Tan, Weihong

    2014-05-20

    Development of efficient methods for highly sensitive and rapid screening of specific oligonucleotide sequences is essential to the early diagnosis of serious diseases. In this work, an aggregated cationic perylene diimide (PDI) derivative was found to efficiently quench the fluorescence emission of a variety of anionic oligonucleotide-labeled fluorophores that emit at wavelengths from the visible to NIR region. This broad-spectrum quencher was then adopted to develop a multicolor biosensor via a label-free approach for multiplexed fluorescent detection of DNA. The aggregated perylene derivative exhibits a very high quenching efficiency on all ssDNA-labeled dyes associated with biosensor detection, having efficiency values of 98.3 ± 0.9%, 97 ± 1.1%, and 98.2 ± 0.6% for FAM, TAMRA, and Cy5, respectively. An exonuclease-assisted autocatalytic target recycling amplification was also integrated into the sensing system. High quenching efficiency combined with autocatalytic target recycling amplification afforded the biosensor with high sensitivity toward target DNA, resulting in a detection limit of 20 pM, which is about 50-fold lower than that of traditional unamplified homogeneous fluorescent assay methods. The quencher did not interfere with the catalytic activity of nuclease, and the biosensor could be manipulated in either preaddition or postaddition manner with similar sensitivity. Moreover, the proposed sensing system allows for simultaneous and multicolor analysis of several oligonucleotides in homogeneous solution, demonstrating its potential application in the rapid screening of multiple biotargets.

  16. In Vivo Dual Fluorescence Imaging to Detect Joint Destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hongsik; Bhatti, Fazal-Ur-Rehman; Lee, Sangmin; Brand, David D; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Hasty, Karen A

    2016-10-01

    Diagnosis of cartilage damage in early stages of arthritis is vital to impede the progression of disease. In this regard, considerable progress has been made in near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) optical imaging technique. Arthritis can develop due to various mechanisms but one of the main contributors is the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), enzymes that can degrade components of the extracellular matrix. Especially, MMP-1 and MMP-13 have main roles in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis because they enhance collagen degradation in the process of arthritis. We present here a novel NIRF imaging strategy that can be used to determine the activity of MMPs and cartilage damage simultaneously by detection of exposed type II collagen in cartilage tissue. In this study, retro-orbital injection of mixed fluorescent dyes, MMPSense 750 FAST (MMP750) dye and Alexa Fluor 680 conjugated monoclonal mouse antibody immune-reactive to type II collagen, was administered in the arthritic mice. Both dyes were detected with different intensity according to degree of joint destruction in the animal. Thus, our dual fluorescence imaging method can be used to detect cartilage damage as well as MMP activity simultaneously in early stage arthritis. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. High performance liquid chromatography--atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of arsenic species in beer samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo Coelho, N.M.; Parrilla, Carmen; Cervera, M.L.; Pastor, A.; Guardia, M. de la

    2003-01-01

    A method has been developed for the direct determination of As(III), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and As(V) in beers by hydride generation--atomic fluorescence spectrometry after separation of arsenic species by high performance liquid chromatography. Compounds were separated by anion-exchange chromatography with isocratic elution using KH 2 PO 4 /K 2 HPO 4 as mobile phase with elution times of 1.67, 2.08, 6.52 and 10.72 min for As(III), DMA, MMA and As(V), respectively. Parameters affecting the hydride generation of all arsenic species were studied and the best conditions were established as a reaction coil of 150 cm, for a sample injected volume of 100 μl, a 4.0% (m/v) solution of sodium tetrahydroborate and 2.0 mol l -1 hydrochloric acid with flow rates of 2.7 and 1.7 ml min -1 , respectively and a flow rate of 500 ml min -1 for the argon carrier gas. Under the best experimental conditions, the detection limit was found to be 0.12, 0.20, 0.27 and 0.39 μg l -1 for As(III), DMA, MMA and As(V), respectively. The relative standard deviation for eight independent determinations varied from 3.9 till 8.9% for species considered at a concentration level of 10.0 μg l -1 . Recovery and comparative studies evidenced that the method is suitable for the accurate determination of arsenic species in water and beer samples

  18. High performance liquid chromatography--atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of arsenic species in beer samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo Coelho, N.M.; Parrilla, Carmen; Cervera, M.L.; Pastor, A.; Guardia, M. de la

    2003-04-10

    A method has been developed for the direct determination of As(III), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and As(V) in beers by hydride generation--atomic fluorescence spectrometry after separation of arsenic species by high performance liquid chromatography. Compounds were separated by anion-exchange chromatography with isocratic elution using KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}/K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} as mobile phase with elution times of 1.67, 2.08, 6.52 and 10.72 min for As(III), DMA, MMA and As(V), respectively. Parameters affecting the hydride generation of all arsenic species were studied and the best conditions were established as a reaction coil of 150 cm, for a sample injected volume of 100 {mu}l, a 4.0% (m/v) solution of sodium tetrahydroborate and 2.0 mol l{sup -1} hydrochloric acid with flow rates of 2.7 and 1.7 ml min{sup -1}, respectively and a flow rate of 500 ml min{sup -1} for the argon carrier gas. Under the best experimental conditions, the detection limit was found to be 0.12, 0.20, 0.27 and 0.39 {mu}g l{sup -1} for As(III), DMA, MMA and As(V), respectively. The relative standard deviation for eight independent determinations varied from 3.9 till 8.9% for species considered at a concentration level of 10.0 {mu}g l{sup -1}. Recovery and comparative studies evidenced that the method is suitable for the accurate determination of arsenic species in water and beer samples.

  19. Analysis of Indium Tin Oxide Film Using Argon Fluroide (ArF) Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence of Ablated Plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sut Kam; Garcia, Dario Machado

    2017-04-01

    A two-pulse laser-excited atomic fluorescence (LEAF) technique at 193 nm wavelength was applied to the analysis of indium tin oxide (ITO) layer on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film. Fluorescence emissions from analytes were induced from plumes generated by first laser pulse. Using this approach, non-selective LEAF can be accomplished for simultaneous multi-element analysis and it overcomes the handicap of strict requirement for laser excitation wavelength. In this study, experimental conditions including laser fluences, times for gating and time delay between pulses were optimized to reveal high sensitivity with minimal sample destruction and penetration. With weak laser fluences of 100 and 125 mJ/cm 2 for 355 and 193 nm pulses, detection limits were estimated to be 0.10% and 0.43% for Sn and In, respectively. In addition, the relation between fluorescence emissions and number of laser shots was investigated; reproducible results were obtained for Sn and In. It shows the feasibility of depth profiling by this technique. Morphologies of samples were characterized at various laser fluences and number of shots to examine the accurate penetration. Images of craters were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate the imperceptible destructiveness of film after laser shot. With such weak laser fluences and minimal destructiveness, this LEAF technique is suitable for thin-film analysis.

  20. REAL-TIME OBJECT DETECTION IN PARALLEL THROUGH ATOMIC TRANSACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Sivakumar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Object detection and tracking is important operation involved in embedded systems like video surveillance, Traffic monitoring, campus security system, machine vision applications and other areas. Detecting and tracking multiple objects in a video or image is challenging problem in machine vision and computer vision based embedded systems. Implementation of such a object detection and tracking systems are done in sequential way of processing and also it was implemented using hardware synthesize tools like verilog HDL with FPGA, achieves considerably lesser performance in speed and it does support lesser atomic transactions. There are many object detection and tracking algorithm were proposed and implemented, among them background subtraction is one of them. This paper proposes a implementation of detecting and tracking multiple objects based on background subtraction algorithm using java and .NET and also discuss about the architecture concept for object detection through atomic transactional, modern hardware synthesizes language called Bluespec.

  1. Concentration of atomic hydrogen in a dielectric barrier discharge measured by two-photon absorption fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořák, P.; Talába, M.; Obrusník, A.; Kratzer, J.; Dědina, J.

    2017-08-01

    Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) was utilized for measuring the concentration of atomic hydrogen in a volume dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ignited in mixtures of Ar, H2 and O2 at atmospheric pressure. The method was calibrated by TALIF of krypton diluted in argon at atmospheric pressure, proving that three-body collisions had a negligible effect on quenching of excited krypton atoms. The diagnostic study was complemented with a 3D numerical model of the gas flow and a zero-dimensional model of the chemistry in order to better understand the reaction kinetics and identify the key pathways leading to the production and destruction of atomic hydrogen. It was determined that the density of atomic hydrogen in Ar-H2 mixtures was in the order of 1021 m-3 and decreased when oxygen was added into the gas mixture. Spatially resolved measurements and simulations revealed a sharply bordered region with low atomic hydrogen concentration when oxygen was added to the gas mixture. At substoichiometric oxygen/hydrogen ratios, this H-poor region is confined to an area close to the gas inlet and it is shown that the size of this region is not only influenced by the chemistry but also by the gas flow patterns. Experimentally, it was observed that a decrease in H2 concentration in the feeding Ar-H2 mixture led to an increase in H production in the DBD.

  2. Behaviour of atomic oxygen in a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge measured by laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Ryo [High Temperature Plasma Center, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 227-8568 (Japan); Yamashita, Youta [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan); Takezawa, Kei [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan); Oda, Tetsuji [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2005-08-21

    Atomic oxygen is measured in a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). The ground-level atomic oxygen is excited to the 3p {sup 3}P state by two-photon absorption at 226 nm. Negative (-40 kV) or positive (+30 kV) pulsed DBD occurs in an O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} mixture at atmospheric pressure. The pulse width of the DBD current is approximately 50 ns. The TALIF experiment shows that the decay rate of atomic oxygen increases linearly with O{sub 2} concentration. This result proves that atomic oxygen decays mainly by the third-body reaction, O + O{sub 2} + M {yields} O{sub 3} + M. The rate coefficient of the third-body reaction is estimated to be 2.2 x 10{sup -34} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} in the negative DBD and 0.89 x 10{sup -34} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} in the positive DBD. It is shown that the decay rate of atomic oxygen increases linearly with humidity. This can explain the well-known fact that ozone production in DBD is suppressed by increasing humidity.

  3. Behaviour of atomic oxygen in a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge measured by laser-induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Ryo; Yamashita, Youta; Takezawa, Kei; Oda, Tetsuji

    2005-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is measured in a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). The ground-level atomic oxygen is excited to the 3p 3 P state by two-photon absorption at 226 nm. Negative (-40 kV) or positive (+30 kV) pulsed DBD occurs in an O 2 -N 2 mixture at atmospheric pressure. The pulse width of the DBD current is approximately 50 ns. The TALIF experiment shows that the decay rate of atomic oxygen increases linearly with O 2 concentration. This result proves that atomic oxygen decays mainly by the third-body reaction, O + O 2 + M → O 3 + M. The rate coefficient of the third-body reaction is estimated to be 2.2 x 10 -34 cm 6 s -1 in the negative DBD and 0.89 x 10 -34 cm 6 s -1 in the positive DBD. It is shown that the decay rate of atomic oxygen increases linearly with humidity. This can explain the well-known fact that ozone production in DBD is suppressed by increasing humidity

  4. Developing detection efficiency standards for atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosa, Ty J.; Geiser, Brian P.; Lawrence, Dan; Olson, David; Larson, David J.

    2014-08-01

    Atom Probe Tomography (APT) is a near-atomic-scale analytical technique which, due to recent advances in instrumentation and sample preparation techniques, is being used on a variety of 3D applications. Total system detection efficiency is a key parameter for obtaining accurate spatial reconstruction of atomic coordinates from detected ions, but experimental determination of efficiency can be difficult. This work explores new ways to measure total system detection efficiency as well as the specimen characteristics necessary for such measurements. Composite specimens composed of a nickel/chromium multilayer core, National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 2135c, encapsulated with silver, silicon, or nickel were used to demonstrate the suitability of this approach for providing a direct measurement of APT efficiency. Efficiency measurements based on this multilayer encapsulated in nickel are reported.

  5. Supersonic pulsed free-jet of atoms and molecules of refractory metals: laser induced fluorescence spectroscopic studies on zirconium atoms and zirconium oxide molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakhale, S.G.

    2004-11-01

    The experimental setup for generating supersonic pulsed free-jet containing atoms and molecules of refractory nature has been built. The technique of laser vaporization in conjunction with supersonic cooling is used to generate these species. The cooled atoms and molecules in supersonic free-jet are probed by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. In particular, the technique has been used to perform low-resolution laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy, limited by laser linewidth, on cold Zr atoms and ZrO molecules. The translational temperatures of ∼ 26.5 K and the rotational temperatures of ∼ 81 K have been achieved. It is possible to achieve the Doppler width of few tens of MHz allowing it to perform high-resolution spectroscopy on these atomic and molecular species. Also because of low rotational temperature of molecules the spectral congestion is greatly reduced. In general, this technique can be applied to perform spectroscopy on atoms and molecules of refractory nature. (author)

  6. X-ray fluorescence/Auger-electron coincidence spectroscopy of vacancy cascades in atomic argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arp, U.

    1996-01-01

    Argon L 2.3 -M 2.3 M 2.3 Auger-electron spectra were measured in coincidence with Kα fluorescent x-rays in studies of Ar K-shell vacancy decays at several photon energies above the K-threshold and on the 1s-4p resonance in atomic argon. The complex spectra recorded by conventional electron spectroscopy are greatly simplified when recorded in coincidence with fluorescent x-rays, allowing a more detailed analysis of the vacancy cascade process. The resulting coincidence spectra are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations which include shake-up transitions in the resonant case. Small energy shifts of the coincidence electron spectra are attributed to post-collision interaction with 1s photoelectrons

  7. X-ray fluorescence holography and multiple-energy x-ray holography: A critical comparison of atomic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Len, P.M.; Gog, T.; Fadley, C.S.; Materlik, G.

    1997-01-01

    We compare x-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) and multiple-energy x-ray holography (MEXH), two techniques that have recently been used to obtain experimental three-dimensional atomic images. For single-energy holograms, these methods are equivalent by virtue of the optical reciprocity theorem. However, XFH can only record holographic information at the characteristic fluorescence energies of the emitting species, while MEXH can record holographic information at any energy above the fluorescent edge of the emitter, thus enabling the suppression of real-twin overlaps and other aberrations and artifacts in atomic images. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  8. Novel DNA sequence detection method based on fluorescence energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Tamiya, E.; Karube, I.

    1987-01-01

    Recently the detection of specific DNA sequence, DNA analysis, has been becoming more important for diagnosis of viral genomes causing infections disease and human sequences related to inherited disorders. These methods typically involve electrophoresis, the immobilization of DNA on a solid support, hybridization to a complementary probe, the detection using labeled with /sup 32/P or nonisotopically with a biotin-avidin-enzyme system, and so on. These techniques are highly effective, but they are very time-consuming and expensive. A principle of fluorescene energy transfer is that the light energy from an excited donor (fluorophore) is transferred to an acceptor (fluorophore), if the acceptor exists in the vicinity of the donor and the excitation spectrum of donor overlaps the emission spectrum of acceptor. In this study, the fluorescence energy transfer was applied to the detection of specific DNA sequence using the hybridization method. The analyte, single-stranded DNA labeled with the donor fluorophore is hybridized to a probe DNA labeled with the acceptor. Because of the complementary DNA duplex formation, two fluorophores became to be closed to each other, and the fluorescence energy transfer was occurred

  9. Selective Detection of Neurotransmitters by Fluorescence and Chemiluminescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziqiang Wang; Edward S. Yeung

    2001-08-06

    In recent years, luminescence imaging has been widely employed in neurochemical analysis. It has a number of advantages for the study of neuronal and other biological cells: (1) a particular molecular species or cellular constituent can be selectively visualized in the presence of a large excess of other species in a heterogeneous environment; (2) low concentration detection limits can be achieved because of the inherent sensitivity associated with fluorescence and chemiluminescence; (3) low excitation intensities can be used so that long-term observation can be realized while the viability of the specimen is preserved; and (4) excellent spatial resolution can be obtained with the light microscope so subcellular compartments can be identified. With good sensitivity, temporal and spatial resolution, the flux of ions and molecules and the distribution and dynamics of intracellular species can be measured in real time with specific luminescence probes, substrates, or with native fluorescence. A noninvasive detection scheme based on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymatic assay combined with microscopy was developed to measure the glutamate release in cultured cells from the central nervous system (CNS). The enzyme reaction is very specific and sensitive. The detection limit with CCD imaging is down to {micro}M levels of glutamate with reasonable response time. They also found that chemiluminescence associated with the ATP-dependent reaction between luciferase and luciferin can be used to image ATP at levels down to 10 nM in the millisecond time scale. Similar imaging experiments should be feasible in a broad spectrum of biological systems.

  10. Community detection for fluorescent lifetime microscopy image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dandan; Sarder, Pinaki; Ronhovde, Peter; Achilefu, Samuel; Nussinov, Zohar

    2014-03-01

    Multiresolution community detection (CD) method has been suggested in a recent work as an efficient method for performing unsupervised segmentation of fluorescence lifetime (FLT) images of live cell images containing fluorescent molecular probes.1 In the current paper, we further explore this method in FLT images of ex vivo tissue slices. The image processing problem is framed as identifying clusters with respective average FLTs against a background or "solvent" in FLT imaging microscopy (FLIM) images derived using NIR fluorescent dyes. We have identified significant multiresolution structures using replica correlations in these images, where such correlations are manifested by information theoretic overlaps of the independent solutions ("replicas") attained using the multiresolution CD method from different starting points. In this paper, our method is found to be more efficient than a current state-of-the-art image segmentation method based on mixture of Gaussian distributions. It offers more than 1:25 times diversity based on Shannon index than the latter method, in selecting clusters with distinct average FLTs in NIR FLIM images.

  11. Chemical point detection using differential fluorescence from molecularly imprinted polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestov, Dmitry; Anderson, John E.; Nelson, Jean; Tepper, Gary C.

    2004-12-01

    Fluorescence represents one of the most attractive approaches for chemical sensing due to the abundant light produced by most fluorophores, resulting in excellent detection sensitivity. However, the broad and overlapping emission spectra of target and background species have made it difficult to perform species identification in a field instrument because of the need to perform spectral decomposition and analysis. This paper describes a new chemical sensing strategy based on differential fluorescence measurements from molecularly imprinted polymers, which eliminates the need to perform any spectral analysis. Species identification is accomplished by measuring the differential light output from a pair of polymers-one imprinted to a target species and the other identical, but not imprinted. The imprinted polymer selectively concentrates the target molecule and controls the energy (wavelength) of the emitted fluorescence signal and the differential output eliminates common mode signals associated with non-specific background interference. Because no spectral analysis is required, the sensors can be made extremely small and require very little power. Preliminary performance parameters from a prototype sensor are presented and discussed.

  12. Single photon counting fluorescence lifetime detection of pericellular oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Neveen A; Lee, David A; Knight, Martin M

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy offers a non-invasive method for quantifying local oxygen concentrations. However, existing methods are either invasive, require custom-made systems, or show limited spatial resolution. Therefore, these methods are unsuitable for investigation of pericellular oxygen concentrations. This study describes an adaptation of commercially available equipment which has been optimized for quantitative extracellular oxygen detection with high lifetime accuracy and spatial resolution while avoiding systematic photon pile-up. The oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye, tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) chloride hexahydrate [Ru(bipy)(3)](2+), was excited using a two-photon excitation laser. Lifetime was measured using a Becker & Hickl time-correlated single photon counting, which will be referred to as a TCSPC card. [Ru(bipy)(3)](2+) characterization studies quantified the influences of temperature, pH, cellular culture media and oxygen on the fluorescence lifetime measurements. This provided a precisely calibrated and accurate system for quantification of pericellular oxygen concentration based on measured lifetimes. Using this technique, quantification of oxygen concentrations around isolated viable chondrocytes, seeded in three-dimensional agarose gel, revealed a subpopulation of cells that exhibited significant spatial oxygen gradients such that oxygen concentration reduced with increasing proximity to the cell. This technique provides a powerful tool for quantifying spatial oxygen gradients within three-dimensional cellular models.

  13. Design and development of high-resolution atomic beam fluorescence spectroscopy facility for isotope shift and hyperfine structure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharyulu, G.V.S.G.; Sankari, M.; Kiran Kumar, P.V.; Suryanarayana, M.V.

    2012-01-01

    A high-resolution atomic beam fluorescence spectroscopy facility for the determination of isotope shifts and hyperfine structure in atomic species has been designed and developed. A resistively heated graphite tube atomic beam source was designed, tested and integrated into a compact interaction chamber for atomic beam fluorescence experiments. The design of the laser-atom interaction chamber and the source has been modified in a phased manner so as to achieve sub-Doppler resolution. The system has been used to record the hyperfine spectrum of the D2 transitions of Rb and K isotopes. The spectral resolution achieved is ∼ 26 MHz and is adequate to carry out high resolution measurement of isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of various atomic species. The other major advantage of the source is that it requires very small amounts of sample for achieving very good signal to noise ratio. (author)

  14. Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy of extremely neutron-deficient barium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, S.A.; Evans, D.E.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Eastham, D.A.; Groves, J.; Smith, J.R.H.; Tolfree, D.W.L.; Warner, D.D.; Billowes, J.; Grant, I.S.; Walker, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy (FACS) has been used to measure the nuclear mean square radii and moments of the extremely neutron-deficient isotopes 120-124 Ba. At N=65 an abrupt change in nuclear mean square charge radii is observed which can be understood in terms of the occupation of the spin-orbit partner g 7/2 5/2[413] neutron and g 9/2 9/2[404] proton orbitals and the consequent enhancement of the n-p interaction. (orig.)

  15. Ultra-trace determination of methylmercuy in seafood by atomic fluorescence spectrometry coupled with electrochemical cold vapor generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zu, Wenchuan, E-mail: zuhongshuai@126.com [Beijing Institute of Technology, College of Chemistry, Beijing 100081 (China); Beijing Center for Physical & Chemical Analysis, Beijing 100089 (China); Wang, Zhenghao [Beijing Normal University, College of Chemistry, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • Methylmercury detection by ECVG-AFS without pre-separation by HPLC is proposed. • Methylmercury is atomized by direct electrochemical reduction with no reductant. • Remarkably better sensitivity is obtained than the traditional HPLC-UV-AFS method. • Glassy carbon is the best cathode material to generate Hg vapor from methylmercury. - Abstract: A homemade electrochemical flow cell was adopted for the determination of methylmercury. The cold vapor of mercury atoms was generated from the surface of glassycarbon cathode through the method of electrolytic reduction and detected by atomic fluorescence spectroscopy subsequently. The operating conditions were optimized with 2 ng mL{sup −1} methylmercury standard solution. The caliberation curve was favorably linear when the concentrations of standard HgCH{sub 3}{sup +} solutions were in the range of 0.2–5 ng mL{sup −1}(as Hg). Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for methylmercury was 1.88 × 10{sup −3} ng mL{sup −1} and the precision evaluated by relative standard deviation was 2.0% for six times 2 ng mL{sup −1} standard solution replicates. The terminal analytical results of seafood samples, available from local market, showed that the methylmercury content ranged within 3.7–45.8 ng g{sup −1}. The recoveries for methylmercury spiked samples were found to be in the range of 87.6–103.6% and the relative standard deviations below 5% (n = 6)were acquired, which showed this method was feasible for real sample analysis.

  16. Microbial biofilm detection on food contact surfaces by macro-scale fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging methods were utilized to evaluate the potential of multispectral fluorescence methods for detection of pathogenic biofilm formations on four types of food contact surface materials: stainless steel, high density polyethylene (HDPE) commonly used for cutting boards,...

  17. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  18. Integrated Micro-Optical Fluorescence Detection System for Microfluidic Electrochromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALLERMAN, ANDREW A.; ARNOLD, DON W.; ASBILL, RANDOLPH E.; BAILEY, CHRISTOPHER G.; CARTER, TONY RAY; KEMME, SHANALYN A.; MATZKE, CAROLYN M.; SAMORA, SALLY; SWEATT, WILLIAM C.; WARREN, MIAL E.; WENDT, JOEL R.

    1999-01-01

    The authors describe the design and microfabrication of an extremely compact optical system as a key element in an integrated capillary-channel electrochromatograph with laser induced fluorescence detection. The optical design uses substrate-mode propagation within the fused silica substrate. The optical system includes a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) array, two high performance microlenses and a commercial photodetector. The microlenses are multilevel diffractive optics patterned by electron beam lithography and etched by reactive ion etching in fused silica. Two generations of optical subsystems are described. The first generation design is integrated directly onto the capillary channel-containing substrate with a 6 mm separation between the VCSEL and photodetector. The second generation design separates the optical system onto its own module and the source to detector length is further compressed to 3.5 mm. The systems are designed for indirect fluorescence detection using infrared dyes. The first generation design has been tested with a 750 nm VCSEL exciting a 10(sup -4) M solution of CY-7 dye. The observed signal-to-noise ratio of better than 100:1 demonstrates that the background signal from scattered pump light is low despite the compact size of the optical system and meets the system sensitivity requirements

  19. Fluorescence spectroscopy for throat cancer detection using human saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pavan; Singh, Ashutosh; Zaffar, Mohammad; Pradhan, Asima

    2018-02-01

    Throat precancer detection using fluorescence from human saliva is reported here. It may be noted that accessing the throat for investigation is cumbersome and use of saliva as a diagnostic medium may ease the process. The study has been conducted on three groups of patients: oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), dysplasia, and normal (control). An in-house developed compact set-up has been used for fluorescence measurements. The compact system consist of a 375 nm laser diode, collimating lens, long pass filter, fibers, and cuvette holder. Major and minor bands of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and porphyrin are observed in the spectra. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis has been used to evaluate the diagnostic performance. Area under the spectra has been chosen for discrimination among the groups and is able to differentiate OSCC to normal, dysplasia to normal, and OSCC to dysplasia with sensitivities 100% (48/48), 92% (32/35), 77% (37/48), and specificities 96% (50/52), 96% (50/52), 89% (31/35) with the accuracy of 98%, 94% and 82% respectively. Sensitivity and specificity, when differentiating OSCC to normal and dysplasia to normal, are significantly large, which indicates that human saliva may be an excellent diagnostic medium for early detection of throat cancer.

  20. Native Fluorescence Detection Methods, Devices, and Systems for Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Naphthalene, benzene, toluene, xylene, and other volatile organic compounds VOCs have been identified as serious health hazards. Embodiments of the invention are directed to methods and apparatus for near-real-time in-situ detection and accumulated dose measurement of exposure to naphthalene vapor and other hazardous gaseous VOCs. The methods and apparatus employ excitation of fluorophors native or endogenous to compounds of interest using light sources emitting in the ultraviolet below 300 nm and measurement of native fluorescence emissions in distinct wavebands above the excitation wavelength. The apparatus of some embodiments are cell-phone-sized sensor/dosimeter "badges" to be worn by personnel potentially exposed to hazardous VOCs. The badge sensor of some embodiments provides both real time detection and data logging of exposure to naphthalene or other VOCs of interest from which both instantaneous and accumulated dose can be determined.

  1. Colorectal cancer detection by hyperspectral imaging using fluorescence excitation scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Deal, Joshua; Hill, Shante; Martin, Will A.; Lall, Malvika; Lopez, Carmen; Rider, Paul F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2018-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging technologies have shown great promise for biomedical applications. These techniques have been especially useful for detection of molecular events and characterization of cell, tissue, and biomaterial composition. Unfortunately, hyperspectral imaging technologies have been slow to translate to clinical devices - likely due to increased cost and complexity of the technology as well as long acquisition times often required to sample a spectral image. We have demonstrated that hyperspectral imaging approaches which scan the fluorescence excitation spectrum can provide increased signal strength and faster imaging, compared to traditional emission-scanning approaches. We have also demonstrated that excitation-scanning approaches may be able to detect spectral differences between colonic adenomas and adenocarcinomas and normal mucosa in flash-frozen tissues. Here, we report feasibility results from using excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging to screen pairs of fresh tumoral and nontumoral colorectal tissues. Tissues were imaged using a novel hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning microscope, sampling a wavelength range of 360-550 nm, at 5 nm increments. Image data were corrected to achieve a NIST-traceable flat spectral response. Image data were then analyzed using a range of supervised and unsupervised classification approaches within ENVI software (Harris Geospatial Solutions). Supervised classification resulted in >99% accuracy for single-patient image data, but only 64% accuracy for multi-patient classification (n=9 to date), with the drop in accuracy due to increased false-positive detection rates. Hence, initial data indicate that this approach may be a viable detection approach, but that larger patient sample sizes need to be evaluated and the effects of inter-patient variability studied.

  2. Advances in low atomic number element analysis by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrebos, B.

    1996-01-01

    Traditionally, the analysis of low atomic number has been a chal1enging task for wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Among the most important factors influencing analysis of the low atomic number elements (from Z=11 downwards) are the fluorescence yield, absorption and the dispersion. The effect of each of these factors on the overall performance will be illustrated. The long wavelengths involved (longer than I nm) used to pose severe problems concerning the monochromator used. Early instruments relied on lead stearate or Blodgett Langmuir soap films for the diffraction of the characteristic radiation. Nowadays, synthetic multilayers are commonly used. The performance of these multilayers is determined by the reflectivity, the resolution and the absorption of the characteristic radiation to be diffracted. These parameters can be optimised by adequately selecting the composition of the materials involved. The sensitivity of the modem instruments is sufficient to allow quantitative analysis. However, this aspect of WDS XRF is still met with considerable scepticism. Examples of quantitative analysis will be given to illustrate the current capability

  3. Correlated Fluorescence-Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of the Clathrin Mediated Endocytosis in SKMEL Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steve; Hor, Amy; Luu, Anh; Kang, Lin; Scott, Brandon; Bailey, Elizabeth; Hoppe, Adam

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is one of the central pathways for cargo transport into cells, and plays a major role in the maintenance of cellular functions, such as intercellular signaling, nutrient intake, and turnover of plasma membrane in cells. The clathrin-mediated endocytosis process involves invagination and formation of clathrin-coated vesicles. However, the biophysical mechanisms of vesicle formation are still debated. We investigate clathrin vesicle formation mechanisms through the utilization of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy for high resolution topographical imaging in neutral buffer solution of unroofed cells exposing the inner membrane, combined with fluorescence imaging to definitively label intracellular constituents with specific fluorescent fusion proteins (actin filaments labeled with green phalloidin-antibody and clathrin coated vesicles with the fusion protein Tq2) in SKMEL (Human Melanoma) cells. Results from our work are compared against dynamical polarized total internal fluorescence (TIRF), super-resolution photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to draw conclusions regarding the prominent model of vesicle formation in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Funding provided by NSF MPS/DMR/BMAT award # 1206908.

  4. Detection of dengue group viruses by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquin Vincent

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue fever (DF and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF represent a global challenge in public health. It is estimated that 50 to 100 million infections occur each year causing approximately 20,000 deaths that are usually linked to severe cases like DHF and dengue shock syndrome. The causative agent of DF is dengue virus (genus Flavivirus that comprises four distinct serotypes (DENV-1 to DENV-4. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH has been used successfully to detect pathogenic agents, but has not been implemented in detecting DENV. To improve our understanding of DENV infection and dissemination in host tissues, we designed specific probes to detect DENV in FISH assays. Methods Oligonucleotide probes were designed to hybridize with RNA from the broadest range of DENV isolates belonging to the four serotypes, but not to the closest Flavivirus genomes. Three probes that fit the criteria defined for FISH experiments were selected, targeting both coding and non-coding regions of the DENV genome. These probes were tested in FISH assays against the dengue vector Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae. The FISH experiments were led in vitro using the C6/36 cell line, and in vivo against dissected salivary glands, with epifluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results The three 60-nt oligonucleotides probes DENV-Probe A, B and C cover a broad range of DENV isolates from the four serotypes. When the three probes were used together, specific fluorescent signals were observed in C6/36 infected with each DENV serotypes. No signal was detected in either cells infected with close Flavivirus members West Nile virus or yellow fever virus. The same protocol was used on salivary glands of Ae. albopictus fed with a DENV-2 infectious blood-meal which showed positive signals in the lateral lobes of infected samples, with no significant signal in uninfected mosquitoes. Conclusion Based on the FISH technique, we propose a way to design and use

  5. Development of a 2D temperature measurement technique for combustion diagnostics using 2-line atomic fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstroem, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the development and application of a novel planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique for temperature measurements in a variety of combusting flows. Accurate measurement of temperature is an essential task in combustion diagnostics, since temperature is one of the most fundamental quantities for the characterization of combustion processes. The technique is based on two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) from small quantities of atomic indium (In) seeded into the fuel. It has been developed from small-scale experiments in laboratory flames to the point where practical combustion systems can be studied. The technique is conceptually simple and reveals temperature information in the post-flame regions. The viability of the technique has been tested in three extreme measurement situations: in spark ignition engine combustion, in ultra-lean combustion situations such as lean burning aero-engine concepts and, finally, in fuel-rich combustion. TLAF was successfully applied in an optical Sl engine using isooctane as fuel. The wide temperature sensitivity, 700 - 3000 K, of the technique using indium atoms allowed measurements over the entire combustion cycle in the engine to be performed. In applications in lean combustion a potential problem caused by the strong oxidation processes of indium atoms was encountered. This limits measurement times due to deposits of absorbing indium oxide on measurement windows. The seeding requirement is a disadvantage of the technique and can be a limitation in some applications. The results from experiments performed in sooting flames are very promising for thermometry measurements in such environments. Absorption by hydrocarbons and other native species was found to be negligible. Since low laser energies and low seeding concentrations could be used, the technique did not, unlike most other incoherent optical thermometry techniques, suffer interferences from LII of soot particles or LIF from PAH

  6. [Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Detection of Cobalt Ions by Silver Triangular Nanoplates and Rhodamine 6G].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiu-qing; Peng, Jun; Ling, Jian; Liu, Chao-juan; Cao, Qiu-e; Ding, Zhong-tao

    2015-04-01

    In the present paper, the authors studied fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) phenomenon between silver triangular nanoplates and bovine serum albumin (BSA)/Rhodamine 6G fluorescence complex, and established a fluorescence method for the detection of cobalt ions. We found that when increasing the silver triangular nanoplates added to certain concentrations of fluorescent bovine serum albumin (BSA)/Rhodamine 6G complex, the fluorescence of Rhodamine 6G would be quenched up to 80% due to the FRET between the quencher and donor. However, in the presence of cobalt ions, the disassociation of the fluorescent complex from silver triangular nanoplates occurred and the fluorescence of the Rhodamine 6G recovered. The recovery of fluorescence intensity rate (I/I0) has a good relationship with the cobalt ion concentration (cCO2+) added. Thus, the authors developed a fluorescence method for the detection of cobalt ions based on the FRET of silver triangular nanoplates and Rhodamine 6G.

  7. Microcystin Detection Characteristics of Fluorescence Immunochromatography and High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyo, Dong Jin; Park, Geun Young; Choi, Jong Chon; Oh, Chang Suk

    2005-01-01

    Different detection characteristics of fluorescence immunochromatography method and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the analysis of cyanobacterial toxins were studied. In particular, low and high limits of detection, detection time and reproducibility and detectable microcystin species were compared when fluorescence immunochromatography method and high performance liquid chromatography method were applied for the detection of microcystin (MC), a cyclic peptide toxin of the freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. A Fluorescence immunochromatography assay system has the unique advantages of short detection time and low detection limit, and high performance liquid chromatography detection method has the strong advantage of individual quantifications of several species of microcystins

  8. Self-organized fluorescent nanosensors for ratiometric Pb2+ detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, Maria; Mancin, Fabrizio; Tecilla, Paolo; Tonellato, Umberto

    2007-07-31

    Silica nanoparticles (60 nm diameter) doped with fluorescent dyes and functionalized on the surface with thiol groups have been proved to be efficient fluorescent chemosensors for Pb2+ ions. The particles can detect a 1 microM metal ion concentration with a good selectivity, suffering only interference from Cu2+ ions. Analyte binding sites are provided by the simple grafting of the thiol groups on the nanoparticles. Once bound to the particles surface, the Pb2+ ions quench the emission of the reporting dyes embedded. Sensor performances can be improved by taking advantage of the ease of production of multishell silica particles. On one hand, signaling units can be concentrated in the external shells, allowing a closer interaction with the surface-bound analyte. On the other, a second dye can be buried in the particle core, far enough from the surface to be unaffected by the Pb2+ ions, thus producing a reference signal. In this way, a ratiometric system is easily prepared by simple self-organization of the particle components.

  9. X-ray fluorescence from the element with atomic number Z=120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fregeau, M.O.; Morjean, M.; Bonnet, E.; Chbihi, A.; Frankland, J.D.; Jacquet, D.; Rivet, M.F.; Tassan-Got, L.; Dechery, F.; Drouart, A.; Nalpas, L.; Ledoux, X.; Parlog, M.; Parlog, M.; Ciortea, C.; Dumitriu, D.; Fluerasu, D.; Gugiu, M.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V.L.; Marchi, T.; Marchi, T.; Fabris, D.; Corsi, A.; Barlini, S.

    2012-01-01

    An atomic clock based on x-ray fluorescence yields has been used to estimate the mean characteristic time for fusion followed by fission in reactions 238 U + 64 Ni at 6.6 MeV/A. Inner shell vacancies are created during the collisions in the electronic structure of the possibly formed Z = 120 compound nuclei. The filling of these vacancies accompanied by a x-ray emission with energies characteristic of Z = 120 can take place only if the atomic transitions occur before nuclear fission. Therefore, the x-ray yield characteristic of the united atom with 120 protons is strongly related to the fission time and to the vacancy lifetimes. K x rays from the element with Z = 120 have been unambiguously identified from a coupled analysis of the involved nuclear reaction mechanisms and of the measured photon spectra. A minimum mean fission time τ f = 2.5 * 10 -18 s has been deduced for Z = 120 from the measured x-ray multiplicity. (authors)

  10. Quenching of the OH and nitrogen molecular emission by methane addition in an Ar capacitively coupled plasma to remove spectral interference in lead determination by atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frentiu, T., E-mail: ftibi@chem.ubbcluj.r [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ponta, M., E-mail: mponta@chem.ubbcluj.r [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Mihaltan, A.I., E-mail: alinblaj2005@yahoo.co [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Darvasi, E., E-mail: edarvasi@chem.ubbcluj.r [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Frentiu, M., E-mail: frentiu.maria@yahoo.co [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cordos, E., E-mail: emilcordos@gmail.co [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2010-07-15

    A new method is proposed to remove the spectral interference on elements in atomic fluorescence spectrometry by quenching of the molecular emission of the OH radical (A{sup 2{Sigma}+} {yields} X{sup 2{Pi}}) and N{sub 2} second positive system (C{sup 3{Pi}}{sub u} {yields} B{sup 3{Sigma}}{sub g}) in the background spectrum of medium power Ar plasmas. The experiments were carried out in a radiofrequency capacitively coupled plasma (275 W, 27.12 MHz) by CH{sub 4} addition. The quenching is the result of the high affinity of OH radical for a hydrogen atom from the CH{sub 4} molecule and the collisions of the second kind between nitrogen excited molecules and CH{sub 4}, respectively. The decrease of the emission of N{sub 2} second positive system in the presence of CH{sub 4} is also the result of the deactivation of the metastable argon atoms that could excite the nitrogen molecules. For flow rates of 0.7 l min{sup -1} Ar with addition of 7.5 ml min{sup -1} CH{sub 4}, the molecular emission of OH and N{sub 2} was completely removed from the plasma jet spectrum at viewing heights above 60 mm. The molecular emission associated to CH and CH{sub 2} species was not observed in the emission spectrum of Ar/CH{sub 4} plasma in the ultraviolet range. The method was experimented for the determination of Pb at 283.31 nm by atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrodeless discharge lamp and a multichannel microspectrometer. The detection limit was 35 ng ml{sup -1}, 2-3 times better than in atomic emission spectrometry using the same plasma source, and similar to that in hollow cathode lamp microwave plasma torch atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  11. Detection of vitellogenin incorporation into zebrafish oocytes by FITC fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoi Hayato

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large volumes of lymph can be collected from the eye-sacs of bubble-eye goldfish. We attempted to induce vitellogenin (Vtg in the eye-sac lymph of bubble-eye goldfish and develop a method for visualizing Vtg incorporation by zebrafish oocytes using FITC-labeling. Methods Estrogen efficiently induced Vtg in the eye-sac lymph of goldfish. After FITC-labeled Vtg was prepared, it was injected into mature female zebrafish. Results Incorporation of FITC-labeled Vtg by zebrafish oocytes was detected in in vivo and in vitro experiments. The embryos obtained from zebrafish females injected with FITC-labeled Vtg emitted FITC fluorescence from the yolk sac and developed normally. Conclusion This method for achieving Vtg incorporation by zebrafish oocytes could be useful in experiments related to the development and endocrinology of zebrafish oocytes.

  12. Automated system for on-line determination of dimethylarsinic and inorganic arsenic by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaparro, L.L.; Leal, L.O. [Renewable Energy and Environmental Protection Department, Advanced Materials Research Center (CIMAV), Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Ferrer, L.; Cerda, V. [University of the Balearic Islands, Department of Chemistry, Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    A multisyringe flow-injection approach has been coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) with UV photo-oxidation for dimethylarsinic (DMA), inorganic As and total As determination, depending on the pre-treatment given to the sample (extraction or digestion). The implementation of a UV lamp allows on-line photo-oxidation of DMA and the following arsenic detection, whereas a bypass leads the flow directly to the HG-AFS system, performing inorganic arsenic determination. DMA concentration is calculated by the difference of total inorganic arsenic and measurement of the photo-oxidation step. The detection limits for DMA and inorganic arsenic were 0.09 and 0.47 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. The repeatability values accomplished were of 2.4 and 1.8 %, whereas the injection frequencies were 24 and 28 injections per hour for DMA and inorganic arsenic, respectively. This method was validated by means of a solid reference material BCR-627 (muscle of tuna) with good agreement with the certified values. Satisfactory results for DMA and inorganic arsenic determination were obtained in several water matrices. The proposed method offers several advantages, such as increasing the sampling frequency, low detection limits and decreasing reagents and sample consumption, which leads to lower waste generation. (orig.)

  13. Ultrasensitive determination of mercury in human saliva by atomic fluorescence spectrometry based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, C.-G.; Wang, J.; Jin, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a new, rapid and simple method for the determination of ultra-trace quantities of mercury ion in human saliva. It is based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction and detection by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS). Mercury ion was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate, and the hydrophobic complex was then extracted into fine droplets of 1-undecanol. By cooling in an ice bath after extraction, the droplets in solution solidify to form a single ball floating on the surface of solution. The solidified micro drop containing the mercury complex was then transferred for determination by CV-AFS. The effects of pH value, concentration of chelating reagent, quantity of 1-undecanol, sample volume, equilibration temperature and time were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the preconcentration of a 25-mL sample is accomplished with an enrichment factor of 182. The limit of detection is 2.5 ng L -1 . The relative standard deviation for seven replicate determinations at 0.1 ng mL -1 level is 4.1%. The method was applied to the determination of mercury in saliva samples collected from four volunteers. Two volunteers having dental amalgam fillings had 0.4 ng mL -1 mercury in their saliva, whereas mercury was not detectable in the saliva of two volunteers who had no dental fillings. (author)

  14. Antimony speciation analysis in sediment reference materials using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potin-Gautier, M.; Pannier, F.; Quiroz, W.; Pinochet, H.; Gregori, I. de

    2005-01-01

    This work presents the development of suitable methodologies for determination of the speciation of antimony in sediment reference samples. Liquid chromatography with a post-column photo-oxidation step and hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry as detection system is applied to the separation and determination of Sb(III), Sb(V) and trimethylantimony species. Post-column decomposition and hydride generation steps were studied for sensitive detection with the AFS detector. This method was applied to investigate the conditions under which speciation analysis of antimony in sediment samples can be carried out. Stability studies of Sb species during the extraction processes of solid matrices, using different reagents solutions, were performed. Results demonstrate that for the extraction yield and the stability of Sb species in different marine sediment extracts, citric acid in ascorbic acid medium was the best extracting solution for antimony speciation analysis in this matrix (between 55% and 65% of total Sb was recovered from CRMs, Sb(III) being the predominant species). The developed method allows the separation of the three compounds within 6 min with detection limits of 30 ng g -1 for Sb(III) and TMSbCl2 and 40 ng g -1 for Sb(V) in sediment samples

  15. An eco-friendly molecularly imprinted fluorescence composite material based on carbon dots for fluorescent detection of 4-nitrophenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Tongfan; Wei, Xiao; Nie, Yijing; Zhou, Zhiping; Xu, Yeqing; Yan, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    We on report an eco-friendly molecularly imprinted material based on carbon dots (C-dots) via a facile and efficient sol–gel polymerization for selective fluorescence detection of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). The amino-modified C-dots were firstly synthesized by a hydrothermal process using citric acid as the carbon source and poly(ethyleneimine) as the surface modifier, and then after a sol–gel molecular imprinting process, the molecularly imprinted fluorescence material was obtained. The material (MIP-C-dots) showed strong fluorescence from C-dots and high selectivity due to the presence of a molecular imprint. After the detection conditions were optimized, the relative fluorescence intensity (F_0/F) of MIP-C-dots presented a good linearity with 4-NP concentrations in the linear range of 0.2 − 50 μmol L"-"1 with a detection limit (3σ/k) of 0.06 μmol L"-"1. In addition, the correlation coefficient was 0.9978 and the imprinting factor was 2.76. The method was applicable to the determination of trace 4-NP in Yangtze River water samples and good recoveries from 92.6–107.3 % were obtained. The present study provides a general strategy to fabricate materials based on C-dots with good fluorescence property for selective fluorescence detection of organic pollutants. (author)

  16. Early Detection of Breast Cancer by Fluorescence Molecular Tomography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2007-01-01

    .... We have successfully completed all goals and achieved the three major aims of the proposal, i.e. i) the development of appropriate fluorescence imaging methods for highly reliable and quantitative fluorescence imaging ii...

  17. Efficient Means of Detecting Neutral Atoms in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinicola, W. N.

    2006-12-01

    This summer, The Society of Physics Students granted me the opportunity to participate in an internship for The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and The University of Maryland. Our chief interest was analyzing low energy neutral atoms that were created from random interactions of ions in space plasma. From detecting these neutrals one can project a image of what the plasma's composition is, and how this plasma changes through interactions with the solar wind. Presently, low energy neutral atom detectors have poor efficiency, typically in the range of 1%. Our goal was to increase this efficiency. To detect low energy neutrals we must first convert them from neutral molecules to negatively charged ions. Once converted, these "new" negatively charged ions can be easily detected and completely analyzed giving us information about their energy, mass, and instantaneous direction. The efficiency of the detector is drastically affected by the surface used for converting these neutrals. My job was first to create thin metal conversion surfaces. Then, using an X-ray photoelectron spectrometer, analyze atomic surface composition and gather work function values. Once the work function values were known we placed the surfaces in our neutral detector and measured their conversion efficiencies. Finally, a relation between the work function of the metal surface an its conversion efficiency was generated. With this relationship accurately measured one could use this information to help give suggestions on what surface would be the best to increase our detection efficiency. If we could increase the efficiency of these low energy neutral atom detectors by even 1% we would be able to decrease the size of the detector therefore making it cheaper and more applicable for space exploration.* * A special thanks to Dr. Michael Coplan of the University of Maryland for his support and guidance through all my research.

  18. Frequency modulation detection atomic force microscopy in the liquid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, S. P.; Ishida, T.; Uchihashi, T.; Nakayama, Y.; Tokumoto, H.

    True atomic resolution imaging using frequency modulation detection is already well established in ultra-high vacuum. In this paper we demonstrate that it also has great potential in the liquid environment. Using a combination of magnetic activation and high-aspect-ratio carbon nanotube probes, we show that imaging can be readily combined with point spectroscopy, revealing both the tip-sample interaction and the structure of the intermediate liquid.

  19. Mechanical Damage Detection of Indonesia Local Citrus Based on Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, T. H.; Ahmad, U.; Sutrisno; Maddu, A.

    2018-05-01

    Citrus experienced physical damage in peel will produce essential oils that contain polymethoxylated flavone. Polymethoxylated flavone is fluorescence substance; thus can be detected by fluorescence imaging. This study aims to study the fluorescence spectra characteristic and to determine the damage region in citrus peel based on fluorescence image. Pulung citrus from Batu district, East Java, as a famous citrus production area in Indonesia, was used in the experiment. It was observed that the image processing could detect the mechanical damage region. Fluorescence imaging can be used to classify the citrus into two categories, sound and defect citruses.

  20. Resonance Fluorescence of a Trapped Four-Level Atom with Bichromatic Driving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergou, J.; Jakob, M.; Abranyos, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The resonance fluorescence spectrum of a bichromatically driven four-level atom is polarization dependent. Very narrow lines occur in the incoherent parts of the spectrum for polarization directions which are different from that of the driving fields. The degree of squeezing has a maximum of 56% which should make it easily observable. The second-order correlation function exhibits anti bunching for zero time delay and strong super bunching for certain values of the interaction parameter and time delay. For these parameters resonant two-photon emission takes place in the form of polarization entangled photon pairs. The system can be a novel source of photons in the EPR and/or Bell states. Some experiments will be proposed which make use of this unique source. (Authors)

  1. Single-label kinase and phosphatase assays for tyrosine phosphorylation using nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Harekrushna; Hennig, Andreas; Florea, Mara; Roth, Doris; Enderle, Thilo; Nau, Werner M

    2007-12-26

    The collision-induced fluorescence quenching of a 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene-labeled asparagine (Dbo) by hydrogen atom abstraction from the tyrosine residue in peptide substrates was introduced as a single-labeling strategy to assay the activity of tyrosine kinases and phosphatases. The assays were tested for 12 different combinations of Dbo-labeled substrates and with the enzymes p60c-Src Src kinase, EGFR kinase, YOP protein tyrosine phosphatase, as well as acid and alkaline phosphatases, thereby demonstrating a broad application potential. The steady-state fluorescence changed by a factor of up to 7 in the course of the enzymatic reaction, which allowed for a sufficient sensitivity of continuous monitoring in steady-state experiments. The fluorescence lifetimes (and intensities) were found to be rather constant for the phosphotyrosine peptides (ca. 300 ns in aerated water), while those of the unphosphorylated peptides were as short as 40 ns (at pH 7) and 7 ns (at pH 13) as a result of intramolecular quenching. Owing to the exceptionally long fluorescence lifetime of Dbo, the assays were alternatively performed by using nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence (Nano-TRF) detection, which leads to an improved discrimination of background fluorescence and an increased sensitivity. The potential for inhibitor screening was demonstrated through the inhibition of acid and alkaline phosphatases by molybdate.

  2. Protein assisted fluorescence enhancement of a dansyl containing fluorescent reagent: detection of Hg+ ion in aqueous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Priyanka; Shahid, Mohammad; Misra, Arvind

    2011-07-21

    Intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) based fluorescent reagents containing a dansyl fluorophore have been synthesized and characterized. The reagent 1 and its complex, 1+Hg(2+) in sodium acetate buffer (pH 6.7) revealed considerable fluorescence enhancement (switched-on) in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with 10 ppb detection sensitivity. (1)H NMR spectral analysis suggests complexation between 1 and Hg(2+) ion involving the N,N-dimethylamino and carboxylic functions.

  3. Fluorescence-Based Bioassays for the Detection and Evaluation of Food Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Nishi, Kentaro; Isobe, Shin-Ichiro; Zhu, Yun; Kiyama, Ryoiti

    2015-01-01

    We summarize here the recent progress in fluorescence-based bioassays for the detection and evaluation of food materials by focusing on fluorescent dyes used in bioassays and applications of these assays for food safety, quality and efficacy. Fluorescent dyes have been used in various bioassays, such as biosensing, cell assay, energy transfer-based assay, probing, protein/immunological assay and microarray/biochip assay. Among the arrays used in microarray/biochip assay, fluorescence-based mi...

  4. Fluorescence detection of natural RNA using rationally designed "clickable" oligonucleotide probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Anders; Kjems, Jørgen; Astakhova, Kira

    2014-01-01

    Herein a reliable approach to the design of effective fluorescent probes for RNA detection is described. The fluorescence signalling of hybridization by internally positioned polyaromatic hydrocarbons and rhodamine dyes was achieved with a low fluorescence background signal, high fluorescence qua...... quantum yields at ambient and elevated temperature, high selectivity and signal specificity of the probes when binding to miR-7 and circRNA targets....

  5. Heavy atom induced room temperature fluorescence quenching of PAH from a glucose glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlow, Matt, E-mail: matthew.marlow@nicholls.edu

    2017-06-15

    Sugar glasses are a relatively new matrix for solid-matrix luminescence. Molecular interactions within the sugar glass are not well understood. Fluorescence quenching was used to investigate molecular interactions within the sugar glass matrix. The room temperature fluorescence quenching of pyrene and naphthalene was observed from a glucose glass. The heavy atom salt NaI was the quencher. Two solvent compositions 50/50 and 60/40 MeOH/water, used for glass preparation, were examined for their effect on glass rigidity and molecular interactions. A complex static mechanism was observed for glasses prepared with 50/50 MeOH/water. This data was fit to the sphere of action model and associations constants determined. A Stern-Volmer static mechanism of quenching was observed for glasses prepared with 60/40 MeOH/water. This data fit the Stern-Volmer equation and association constants were determined. A larger association constant was observed for pyrene compared to naphthalene for both solvent systems used. Pyrene had a larger association constant with a sugar glass prepared with 60/40 MeOH/water compared to 50/50 MeOH/water implying a greater association between pyrene and iodide. The greater association is a reflection of a more rigid internal environment for the sugar glass prepared with 60/40 MeOH/water.

  6. Determination of arsenic speciation in sulfidic waters by Ion Chromatography Hydride-Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (IC-HG-AFS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Nicole S; Stefánsson, Andri; Sigfússon, Bergur

    2014-10-01

    A method for the analysis of arsenic species in aqueous sulfide samples is presented. The method uses an ion chromatography system connected with a Hydride-Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometer (IC-HG-AFS). With this method inorganic As(III) and As(V) species in water samples can be analyzed, including arsenite (HnAs(III)O3(n-3)), thioarsenite (HnAs(III)S3(n-3)), arsenate (HnAs(V)O4(n-3)), monothioarsenate (HnAs(V)SO3(n-3)), dithioarsenate (HnAs(V)S2O2(n-3)), trithioarsenate (HnAs(V)S3O(n-3)) and tetrathioarsenate (HnAs(V)S4(n-3)). The peak identification and retention times were determined based on standard analysis of the various arsenic compounds. The analytical detection limit was ~1-3 µg L(-1) (LOD), depending on the quality of the baseline. This low detection limit makes this method also applicable to discriminate between waters meeting the drinking water standard of max. 10 µg L(-1) As, and waters that do not meet this standard. The new method was successfully applied for on-site determination of arsenic species in natural sulfidic waters, in which seven species were unambiguously identified. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasensitive fluorescence immunoassay for detection of ochratoxin A using catalase-mediated fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaolin; Zhan, Shengnan; Xu, Hengyi; Meng, Xianwei; Xiong, Yonghua; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-04-01

    Herein, for the first time we report an improved competitive fluorescent enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced fluorescence quenching of mercaptopropionic acid-modified CdTe quantum dots (QDs). In this immunoassay, catalase (CAT) was labeled with OTA as a competitive antigen to connect the fluorescence signals of the QDs with the concentration of the target. Through the combinatorial use of H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs as a fluorescence signal output and the ultrahigh catalytic activity of CAT to H2O2, our proposed method could be used to perform a dynamic linear detection of OTA ranging from 0.05 pg mL-1 to 10 pg mL-1. The half maximal inhibitory concentration was 0.53 pg mL-1 and the limit of detection was 0.05 pg mL-1. These values were approximately 283- and 300-folds lower than those of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-based conventional ELISA, respectively. The reported method is accurate, highly reproducible, and specific against other mycotoxins in agricultural products as well. In summary, the developed fluorescence immunoassay based on H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs can be used for the rapid and highly sensitive detection of mycotoxins or haptens in food safety monitoring.Herein, for the first time we report an improved competitive fluorescent enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced fluorescence quenching of mercaptopropionic acid-modified CdTe quantum dots (QDs). In this immunoassay, catalase (CAT) was labeled with OTA as a competitive antigen to connect the fluorescence signals of the QDs with the concentration of the target. Through the combinatorial use of H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs as a fluorescence signal output and the ultrahigh catalytic activity of CAT to H2O2, our proposed method could be used to

  8. Fluorescent Receptor Binding Assay for Detecting Ciguatoxins in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, D Ransom; Holland, William C; McCall, Jennifer R; Bourdelais, Andrea J; Baden, Daniel G; Darius, H Taiana; Chinain, Mireille; Tester, Patricia A; Shea, Damian; Quintana, Harold A Flores; Morris, James A; Litaker, R Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning is an illness suffered by > 50,000 people yearly after consumption of fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs). One of the current methodologies to detect ciguatoxins in fish is a radiolabeled receptor binding assay (RBA(R)). However, the license requirements and regulations pertaining to radioisotope utilization can limit the applicability of the RBA(R) in certain labs. A fluorescence based receptor binding assay (RBA(F)) was developed to provide an alternative method of screening fish samples for CTXs in facilities not certified to use radioisotopes. The new assay is based on competition binding between CTXs and fluorescently labeled brevetoxin-2 (BODIPY®-PbTx-2) for voltage-gated sodium channel receptors at site 5 instead of a radiolabeled brevetoxin. Responses were linear in fish tissues spiked from 0.1 to 1.0 ppb with Pacific ciguatoxin-3C (P-CTX-3C) with a detection limit of 0.075 ppb. Carribean ciguatoxins were confirmed in Caribbean fish by LC-MS/MS analysis of the regional biomarker (C-CTX-1). Fish (N = 61) of six different species were screened using the RBA(F). Results for corresponding samples analyzed using the neuroblastoma cell-based assay (CBA-N2a) correlated well (R2 = 0.71) with those of the RBA(F), given the low levels of CTX present in positive fish. Data analyses also showed the resulting toxicity levels of P-CTX-3C equivalents determined by CBA-N2a were consistently lower than the RBA(F) affinities expressed as % binding equivalents, indicating that a given amount of toxin bound to the site 5 receptors translates into corresponding lower cytotoxicity. Consequently, the RBA(F), which takes approximately two hours to perform, provides a generous estimate relative to the widely used CBA-N2a which requires 2.5 days to complete. Other RBA(F) advantages include the long-term (> 5 years) stability of the BODIPY®-PbTx-2 and having similar results as the commonly used RBA(R). The RBA(F) is cost-effective, allows high sample

  9. Fluorescent Receptor Binding Assay for Detecting Ciguatoxins in Fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Ransom Hardison

    Full Text Available Ciguatera fish poisoning is an illness suffered by > 50,000 people yearly after consumption of fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs. One of the current methodologies to detect ciguatoxins in fish is a radiolabeled receptor binding assay (RBA(R. However, the license requirements and regulations pertaining to radioisotope utilization can limit the applicability of the RBA(R in certain labs. A fluorescence based receptor binding assay (RBA(F was developed to provide an alternative method of screening fish samples for CTXs in facilities not certified to use radioisotopes. The new assay is based on competition binding between CTXs and fluorescently labeled brevetoxin-2 (BODIPY®-PbTx-2 for voltage-gated sodium channel receptors at site 5 instead of a radiolabeled brevetoxin. Responses were linear in fish tissues spiked from 0.1 to 1.0 ppb with Pacific ciguatoxin-3C (P-CTX-3C with a detection limit of 0.075 ppb. Carribean ciguatoxins were confirmed in Caribbean fish by LC-MS/MS analysis of the regional biomarker (C-CTX-1. Fish (N = 61 of six different species were screened using the RBA(F. Results for corresponding samples analyzed using the neuroblastoma cell-based assay (CBA-N2a correlated well (R2 = 0.71 with those of the RBA(F, given the low levels of CTX present in positive fish. Data analyses also showed the resulting toxicity levels of P-CTX-3C equivalents determined by CBA-N2a were consistently lower than the RBA(F affinities expressed as % binding equivalents, indicating that a given amount of toxin bound to the site 5 receptors translates into corresponding lower cytotoxicity. Consequently, the RBA(F, which takes approximately two hours to perform, provides a generous estimate relative to the widely used CBA-N2a which requires 2.5 days to complete. Other RBA(F advantages include the long-term (> 5 years stability of the BODIPY®-PbTx-2 and having similar results as the commonly used RBA(R. The RBA(F is cost-effective, allows high sample

  10. Sensitized fluorescence in thallium induced in collisions with Hg(6/sup 3/P/sub 1/) atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, M K; Czajkowski, M; Krause, L [Windsor Univ., Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Physics

    1978-07-01

    The transfer of excitation from excited mercury atoms to ground-state thallium atoms was investigated using techniques of sensitized fluorescence. A Hg-Tl vapor mixture contained in a quartz cell was irradiated with Hg 2537 A resonance radiation which caused the mercury atoms to become excited to the 6/sup 3/P/sub 1/ state. Subsequent collisions between the Hg(6/sup 3/P/sub 1/) and Tl(6/sup 2/Psub(1/2)) atoms resulted in the population of the 8/sup 2/Ssub(1/2), 6/sup 2/D, and 7/sup 2/Ssub(1/2) thallium states, whose decay gave rise to sensitized fluorescence of wavelengths 3231, 3520, 3776, and 5352 A. Intensity measurements on the sensitized fluorescence and on the Hg 2537 A resonance fluorescence, observed at right angles to the direction of excitation, yielded cross sections of 3.0, 0.3, and 0.05 A/sup 2/ for collisional excitation transfer from Hg(6/sup 3/P/sub 1/) to the 8/sup 2/Ssub(1/2), 6/sup 2/D, and 7/sup 2/Ssub(1/2) states in thallium, respectively. The results are fully consistent with previously determined cross sections for excitation transfer in other binary metallic vapor systems.

  11. Stratum corneum lipid organization as observed by atomic force, confocal and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlén, Lars; Plasencia Gil, Maria Inés; Bagatolli, Luis

    2008-01-01

    -related biophysical techniques (e.g. atomic force microscopy and confocal/two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy), it was recently shown that reconstituted membranes composed of extracted decontaminated human stratum corneum lipids do not form a fluid phase, but exclusively a single-gel phase that segregates...

  12. Application of laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation into atomic hydrogen density measurement in reactive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajiwara, Toshinori; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kim, Hee Je; Park, Won Zoo; Muraoka, Katsunori; Akazaki, Masanori; Okada, Tatsuo; Maeda, Mitsuo.

    1990-01-01

    Density profiles of hydrogen atoms in reactive plasmas of hydrogen and methane gases were measured, for the first time, using the laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation of Lyman beta transition and observation at the Balmer alpha radiation. Absolute density determinations showed atomic densities of around 3 x 10 17 m -3 , or the degree of dissociation to be 10 -4 . Densities along the axis perpendicular to the RF electrode showed peaked profiles, which were due to the balance of atomic hydrogen production by electron impact on molecules against diffusion loss to the walls. (author)

  13. Atomic imaging by x-ray-fluorescence holography and electron-emission holography: A comparative theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Len, P.M.; Thevuthasan, S.; Fadley, C.S.; Kaduwela, A.P.; Van Hove, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    We consider from a theoretical viewpoint the direct imaging of atoms at and near the surfaces of solids by both x-ray-fluorescence holography (XFH) and electron-emission holography (EEH). The more ideal nature of x-ray scattering makes XFH images superior to those in single-energy EEH. The overlap of real and twin features for pairs of atoms at ±a can cause their XFH or EEH atomic images to cancel for certain combinations of wave vector and |a|. The relative merits of XFH and EEH for structure studies are considered

  14. A low-cost 2D fluorescence detection system for mm sized beads on-chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segerink, Loes Irene; Koster, Maarten J.; Sprenkels, A.J.; van den Berg, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a compact fluorescence detection system for on-chip analysis of beads, comprising a low-cost optical HD-DVD pickup. The complete system consists of a fluorescence detection unit, a control unit and a microfluidic chip containing microchannels and optical markers. With these

  15. Sensitive detection of nucleic acids by PNA hybridization directed co-localization of fluorescent beads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Büscher, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    )avidin-coated fluorescent beads, differing in size and color [green beads (1 µm) and red beads (5.9 µm)], thereby allowing distinct detection of each PNA probe by conventional fluorescence microscopy. These two PNA beads showed easily detectable co-localization when simultaneously hybridizing to a target nucleic acid...

  16. A fluorescence model of the murine lung for optical detection of pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkee, Madeleine S.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2017-07-01

    We present a computer model of intravital excitation and external fluorescence detection in the murine lungs validated with a three-dimensional lung tissue phantom. The model is applied to optical detection of pulmonary tuberculosis infection.

  17. A Fluorescence Based Miniaturized Detection Module for Toxin Producing Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieger, S. E.; Mistlberger, G.; Troi, L.; Lang, A.; Holly, C.; Klimant, I.

    2016-12-01

    Algal blooms are sensitive to external environmental conditions and may pose a serious threat to marine and human life having an adverse effect on the ecosystem. Harmful algal blooms can produce different toxins, which can lead to massive fish kills or to human disorders. Facing these problems, miniaturized and low-cost instrumentation for an early detection and identification of harmful algae classes has become more important over the last years. 1,2Based on the characteristic pigment pattern of different algae classes, we developed a miniaturized detection module, which is able to detect and identify algae classes after analyzing their spectral behavior. Our device combines features of a flow-cytometer and fluorimeter and is build up as a miniaturized and low-cost device of modular design. Similar to a fluorimeter, it excites cells in the capillary with up to 8 different excitation wavelengths recording the emitted fluorescence at 4 different emission channels. Furthermore, the device operates in a flow-through mode similar to a flow-cytometer, however, using only low-cost elements such as LEDs and photodiodes. Due to its miniaturized design, the sensitivity and selectivity increase, whereas background effects are reduced. With a sampling frequency of 140 Hz, we try to detect and count particular cell events even at a concentration of 2 cells / 7.3 µL illuminated volume. Using a self-learning multivariate algorithm, the data are evaluated autonomously on the device enabling an in-situ analysis. The flexibility in choosing excitation and emission wavelengths as well as the high sampling rate enables laboratory applications such as measuring induction kinetics. However, in its first application, the device is part of an open and modular monitoring system enabling the sensing of chemical compounds such as toxic and essential Hg, Cd, Pb, As and Cu trace metal species, nutrients and species related to the carbon cycle, VOCs and potentially toxic algae classes (FP7

  18. Detection methods for atoms and radicals in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, W.

    This report lists atoms and free radicals in the gas phase which are of interest for environmental and flame chemistry and have been detected directly. The detection methods which have been used are discussed with respect to their range of application, specificity and sensitivity. In table 1, detection methods for the five atoms of group IV (C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and about 60 radicals containing at least one atom of group IV are summarized (CH, Cd, Cf, CC1, CBr, Cn, Cs, CSe, CH2, CD2, Chf, Cdf, CHC1, CHBr, CF2, CC12, CBr2, CFC1, CFBr, CH3, CD3, CF3, CH2F, CH2C1, CH2Br, CHF2, CHC12, CHBr2, Hco, Fco, CH30, CD30, CH2OH, CH3S, Nco, CH4N, CH302, CF302; C2, C2N, C2H, C20, C2HO, C2H3, C2F3, C2H5, C2HsO, C2H4OH, CH3CO, CD3CO, C2H3O, C2H502, CH3COO2, C2H4N, C2H6N, C3; Si, SiF, SiF2, SiO, SiC, Si2; Ge, GeC, GeO, GeF, GeF2, GeCl2, Sn, SnF, SnO, SnF2, Pb, PbF, PbF2, PbO, PbS). In table 2 detection methods for about 25 other atoms and 60 radicals are listed: (H, D, O, O2, Oh, Od, HO2, DO2, F, Ci, Br, I, Fo, Cio, BrO, Io, FO2, C1O2, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, N, N3, Nh, Nd, Nf, Nci, NBr, NH2, ND2, Nhd, Nhf, NF2, NC12, N2H3, No, NO2, NO3, Hno, Dno, P, Ph, Pd, Pf, Pci, PH2, PD2, PF2, Po, As, AsO, AsS, Sb, Bi, S, S2, Sh, Sd, Sf, SF2, So, Hso, Dso, Sn, Se, Te, Se2, SeH, SeD, SeF, SeO, SeS, SeN, TeH, TeO, Bh, BH2, Bo, Bn, B02, Cd, Hg, UF5). The tables also cite some recent kinetic applications of the various methods.

  19. Ratiometric Fluorescence Sensing and Real-Time Detection of Water in Organic Solvents with One-Pot Synthesis of Ru@MIL-101(Al)-NH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hua-Qing; Yang, Ji-Chun; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2017-12-19

    Ratiometric fluorescence detection attracts much attention because of its decreased environmental influence and easy-to-differentiate color and intensity change. Herein, a guest-encapsulation metal-organic framework (MOF), Ru@MIL-NH 2 , is prepared with 2-aminoterephthalic acid, AlCl 3 , and Ru(bpy) 3 2+ by a simple one-pot method for ratiometric fluorescence sensing of water in organic solvents. The rational selection of the excitation wavelength provides dual emission at 465 and 615 nm from Ru@MIL-NH 2 under a single excitation of 300 nm. High sensitivity, low detection limit (0.02% v/v), wide response range (0-100%), and fast response (less than 1 min) are obtained for ratiometric fluorescence sensing of water under single excitation with Ru@MIL-NH 2 as the probe. Moreover, the result of water content is independent of the concentration of Ru@MIL-NH 2 as the merit of ratiometric fluorescence detection. The response mechanism reveals that the protonation of the nitrogen atom of the MIL-NH 2 , the π-conjugation system, and the stable fluorescence of Ru(bpy) 3 2+ achieve the ratiometric fluorescence. The analysis of real spirit samples confirms the proposed method. A test strip is prepared with Ru@MIL-NH 2 for convenient use. We believe that such turn-on ratiometric host-guest MOFs and the rational selection of excitation wavelength will offer guidance for ratiometric fluorescence detection with wide applications.

  20. Spectral and physiological information from chlorophyll fluorescence signals in the detection of pine damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinander, O. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Air Quality Dept.; Somersalo, S. [Helsinki Univ., Helsinki (Finland). Dept. of Plant Biology

    1995-12-31

    Photosynthesis is often among the first targets of the air pollution stress of plants. As chlorophyll fluorescence is a process competing with photosynthetic electron transport it can be employed to study the potential photosynthetic capacity and to detect damage to the photosynthetic apparatus. Many previous studies have shown that chlorophyll fluorescence can be a powerful tool in the detection of forest damage. In this preliminary study, singular value analysis of the fluorescence induction curves was used together with the traditional way of analyzing fluorescence measurements. The experimental data were collected from ozone and carbon dioxide fumigated Scots pine saplings. (author)

  1. Spectral and physiological information from chlorophyll fluorescence signals in the detection of pine damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinander, O [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Air Quality Dept.; Somersalo, S [Helsinki Univ., Helsinki (Finland). Dept. of Plant Biology

    1996-12-31

    Photosynthesis is often among the first targets of the air pollution stress of plants. As chlorophyll fluorescence is a process competing with photosynthetic electron transport it can be employed to study the potential photosynthetic capacity and to detect damage to the photosynthetic apparatus. Many previous studies have shown that chlorophyll fluorescence can be a powerful tool in the detection of forest damage. In this preliminary study, singular value analysis of the fluorescence induction curves was used together with the traditional way of analyzing fluorescence measurements. The experimental data were collected from ozone and carbon dioxide fumigated Scots pine saplings. (author)

  2. Cutaneous porphyrins exhibit anti-stokes fluorescence that is detectable in sebum (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Giselle; Zeng, Haishan; Zhao, Jianhua; Wu, Zhenguo; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Lui, Harvey; Mclean, David I.

    2016-02-01

    Porphyrins produced by Propionibacterium acnes represent the principal fluorophore associated with acne, and appear as orange-red luminescence under the Wood's lamp. Assessment of acne based on Wood's lamp (UV) or visible light illumination is limited by photon penetration depth and has limited sensitivity for earlier stage lesions. Inducing fluorescence with near infrared (NIR) excitation may provide an alternative way to assess porphyrin-related skin disorders. We discovered that under 785 nm CW laser excitation PpIX powder exhibits fluorescence emission in the shorter wavelength range of 600-715 nm with an intensity that is linearly dependent on the excitation power. We attribute this shorter wavelength emission to anti-Stokes fluorescence. Similar anti-Stokes fluorescence was also detected focally in all skin-derived samples containing porphyrins. Regular (Stokes) fluorescence was present under UV and visible light excitation on ex vivo nasal skin and sebum from uninflamed acne, but not on nose surface smears or sebum from inflamed acne. Co-registered CW laser-excited anti-Stokes fluorescence and fs laser-excited multi-photon fluorescence images of PpIX powder showed similar features. In the skin samples because of the anti-Stokes effect, the NIR-induced fluorescence was presumably specific for porphyrins since there appeared to be no anti-Stokes emission signals from other typical skin fluorophores such as lipids, keratins and collagen. Anti-Stokes fluorescence under NIR CW excitation is more sensitive and specific for porphyrin detection than UV- or visible light-excited regular fluorescence and fs laser-excited multi-photon fluorescence. This approach also has higher image contrast compared to NIR fs laser-based multi-photon fluorescence imaging. The anti-Stokes fluorescence of porphyrins within sebum could potentially be applied to detecting and targeting acne lesions for treatment via fluorescence image guidance.

  3. Application of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging in the detection of a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Lixin; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2017-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently an advanced optical technology in medical applications. However, the application of PDT is limited by the detection of photosensitizers. This work focuses on the application of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging in the detection of an effective photosenzitizer, hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME). Optical properties of HMME were measured and analyzed based on its absorption and fluorescence spectra. The production mechanism of its fluorescence emission was analyzed. The detection device for HMME based on fluorescence spectroscopy was designed. Ratiometric method was applied to eliminate the influence of intensity change of excitation sources, fluctuates of excitation sources and photo detectors, and background emissions. The detection limit of this device is 6 μg/L, and it was successfully applied to the diagnosis of the metabolism of HMME in the esophageal cancer cells. To overcome the limitation of the point measurement using fluorescence spectroscopy, a two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence imaging system was established. The algorithm of the 2D fluorescence imaging system is deduced according to the fluorescence ratiometric method using bandpass filters. The method of multiple pixel point addition (MPPA) was used to eliminate fluctuates of signals. Using the method of MPPA, SNR was improved by about 30 times. The detection limit of this imaging system is 1.9 μg/L. Our systems can be used in the detection of porphyrins to improve the PDT effect.

  4. Detection of hepatocarcinoma in rats by integration of the fluorescence spectrum: Experimental model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcassa, J. C.; Ferreira, J.; Zucoloto, S.; Castro E Silva, O., Jr.; Marcassa, L. G.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2006-05-01

    The incorporation of spectroscopic techniques into diagnostic procedures may greatly improve the chances for precise diagnostics. One promising technique is fluorescence spectroscopy, which has recently been used to detect many different types of diseases. In this work, we use laser-induced tissue fluorescence to detect hepatocarcinoma in rats using excitation light at wavelengths of 443 and 532 nm. Hepatocarcinoma was induced chemically in Wistar rats. The collected fluorescence spectrum ranges from the excitation wavelength up to 850 nm. A mathematical procedure carried out on the spectrum determines a figure of merit value, which allows the detection of hepatocarcinoma. The figure of merit involves a procedure which evaluates the ratio between the backscattered excitation wavelength and the broad emission fluorescence band. We demonstrate that a normalization allowed by integration of the fluorescence spectra is a simple operation that may allow the detection of hepatocarcinoma.

  5. Compact point-detection fluorescence spectroscopy system for quantifying intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio in brain cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan; Grant, Gerald; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Fangyao; Li, Shuqin; Wilson, Christy; Chen, Kui; Bigner, Darell; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2011-03-01

    We report the development of a compact point-detection fluorescence spectroscopy system and two data analysis methods to quantify the intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio and diagnose brain cancer in an orthotopic brain tumor rat model. Our system employs one compact cw diode laser (407 nm) to excite two primary endogenous fluorophores, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide. The spectra were first analyzed using a spectral filtering modulation method developed previously to derive the intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio, which has the advantages of insensitivty to optical coupling and rapid data acquisition and analysis. This method represents a convenient and rapid alternative for achieving intrinsic fluorescence-based redox measurements as compared to those complicated model-based methods. It is worth noting that the method can also extract total hemoglobin concentration at the same time but only if the emission path length of fluorescence light, which depends on the illumination and collection geometry of the optical probe, is long enough so that the effect of absorption on fluorescence intensity due to hemoglobin is significant. Then a multivariate method was used to statistically classify normal tissues and tumors. Although the first method offers quantitative tissue metabolism information, the second method provides high overall classification accuracy. The two methods provide complementary capabilities for understanding cancer development and noninvasively diagnosing brain cancer. The results of our study suggest that this portable system can be potentially used to demarcate the elusive boundary between a brain tumor and the surrounding normal tissue during surgical resection.

  6. Time-resolved production and detection of reactive atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.W.; Hurst, G.S.

    1977-09-01

    Cesium iodide in the presence of a buffer gas was dissociated with a pulsed ultraviolet laser, which will be referred to as the source laser. This created a population of atoms at a well defined time and in a compact, well defined volume. A second pulsed laser, with a beam that completely surrounded that of the first, photoionized the cesium after a known time delay. This laser will be referred to as the detector laser. It was determined that for short time delays, all of the cesium atoms were easily ionized. When focused, the source laser generated an extremely intense fluence. By accounting for the beam intensity profile it was shown that all of the molecules in the central portion of the beam can be dissociated and detected. Besides proving the feasibility of single-molecule detection, this enabled a determination of the absolute photodissociation cross section as a function of wavelength. Initial studies of the time decay of the cesium signal at low argon pressures indicated a non-exponential decay. This was consistent with a diffusion mechanism transporting cesium atoms out of the laser beam. Therefore, it was desired to conduct further experiments using a tightly focused source beam, passing along the axis of the detector beam. The theoretical behavior of this simple geometry accounting for diffusion and reaction is easily calculated. A diffusion coefficient can then be extracted by data fitting. If reactive decay is due to impurities constituting a fixed percentage of the buffer gas, then two-body reaction rates will scale linearly with pressure and three-body reaction rates will scale quadratically. Also, the diffusion coefficient will scale inversely with pressure. At low pressures it is conceivable that decay due to diffusion would be sufficiently rapid that all other processes can be neglected. Extraction of a diffusion coefficient would then be quite direct. Finally, study of the reaction of cesium and oxygen was undertaken

  7. Determination of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid in cereals by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos Reyes, M.N. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Department of Chemistry, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente, 225, 22453-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cervera, M.L. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: m.luisa.cervera@uv.es; Campos, R.C. [Department of Chemistry, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente, 225, 22453-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Guardia, M. de la [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    A fast, sensitive and simple non-chromatographic analytical method was developed for the speciation analysis of toxic arsenic species in cereal samples, namely rice and wheat semolina. An ultrasound-assisted extraction of the toxic arsenic species was performed with 1 mol L{sup -1} H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and 0.1% (m/v) Triton XT-114. After extraction, As(III), As(V), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) concentrations were determined by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry using a series of proportional equations corresponding to four different experimental reduction conditions. The detection limits of the method were 1.3, 0.9, 1.5 and 0.6 ng g{sup -1} for As(III), As(V), DMA and MMA, respectively, expressed in terms of sample dry weight. Recoveries were always greater than 90%, and no species interconversion occurred. The speciation analysis of a rice flour reference material certified for total arsenic led to coherent results, which were also in agreement with other speciation studies made on the same certified reference material.

  8. Determination of total and inorganic mercury in fish samples with on-line oxidation coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Lijun; Gan Wuer; Su Qingde

    2006-01-01

    An atomic fluorescence spectrometry system for determination of total and inorganic mercury with electromagnetic induction-assisted heating on-line oxidation has been developed. Potassium peroxodisulphate was used as the oxidizing agent to decompose organomercury compounds. Depending on the temperature selected, inorganic or total mercury could be determined with the same manifold. Special accent was put on the study of the parameters influencing the on-line digestion efficiency. The tolerance to the interference of coexisting ions was carefully examined in this system. Under optimal conditions, the detection limits (3σ) were evaluated to be 2.9 ng l -1 for inorganic mercury and 2.6 ng l -1 for total mercury, respectively. The relative standard deviations for 10 replicate determinations of 1.0 μg l -1 Hg were 2.4 and 3.2% for inorganic mercury and total mercury, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of total and inorganic mercury in fish samples

  9. Determination of lead in environmental waters with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction prior to atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Zhao, Na; Xie, Guohong

    2011-01-01

    This paper established a new, rapid and sensitive method for the determination of lead in water samples preconcentrated by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) prior to atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Dithizone was used as the chelating agent. In the DLLME procedure, lead formed lead-dithizone complex and migrated into the carbon tetrachloride micro-droplets. Important factors that would affect the extraction efficiency had been investigated including the kind and volume of extraction solvent and dispersive solvent, sample pH, the amount of chelating agent, extraction time and centrifugation time. The results showed that the coexisting ions containing in water samples had no obvious negative effect on the determination of lead. The experimental results indicated that the proposed method had a good linear range of 0.01-100 ng mL -1 (r 2 = 0.9990). The precision was 2.12% (RSD, n = 7) and the detection limit was 0.95 ng L -1 . Proposed method was validated with four real environmental samples and the results indicated that the proposed method was excellent for the future use and satisfied spiked recoveries were in the range of 92.9-97.4%.

  10. Engineering of near IR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles for in vivo detection of colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Sarit

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of near-infrared (NIR fluorescence imaging techniques has gained great interest for early detection of cancer because water and other intrinsic biomolecules display negligible absorption or autofluorescence in this region. Novel fluorescent nanoparticles with potential to improve neoplasm detection sensitivity may prove to be a valuable tool in early detection of colon tumors. Methods The present study describes the synthesis and use of NIR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles as a diagnostic tool for detection of colon cancer. These fluorescent nanoparticles were prepared by a precipitation process of human serum albumin (HSA in aqueous solution in the presence of a carboxylic acid derivative of the NIR dye IR-783 (CANIR. Tumor-targeting ligands such as peanut agglutinin (PNA, anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies (anti-CEA and tumor associated glycoprotein-72 monoclonal antibodies (anti-TAG-72 were covalently conjugated to the albumin nanoparticles via the surface carboxylate groups by using the carbodiimide activation method. Results and discussion Leakage of the encapsulated dye into PBS containing 4% HSA or human bowel juice was not detected. This study also demonstrates that the encapsulation of the NIR fluorescent dye within the HSA nanoparticles reduces the photobleaching of the dye significantly. Specific colon tumor detection in a mouse model was demonstrated for PNA, anti-CEA and anti-TAG-72 conjugated NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles. These bioactive NIR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles also detected invisible tumors that were revealed as pathological only subsequent to histological analysis. Conclusions These results may suggest a significant advantage of NIR fluorescence imaging using NIR fluorescent nanoparticles over regular colonoscopy. In future work we plan to broaden this study by encapsulating cancer drugs, such as paclitaxel and doxorubicin, within these biodegradable NIR fluorescent HSA

  11. Engineering of near IR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles for in vivo detection of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sarit; Margel, Shlomo

    2012-08-14

    The use of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging techniques has gained great interest for early detection of cancer because water and other intrinsic biomolecules display negligible absorption or autofluorescence in this region. Novel fluorescent nanoparticles with potential to improve neoplasm detection sensitivity may prove to be a valuable tool in early detection of colon tumors. The present study describes the synthesis and use of NIR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles as a diagnostic tool for detection of colon cancer. These fluorescent nanoparticles were prepared by a precipitation process of human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous solution in the presence of a carboxylic acid derivative of the NIR dye IR-783 (CANIR). Tumor-targeting ligands such as peanut agglutinin (PNA), anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies (anti-CEA) and tumor associated glycoprotein-72 monoclonal antibodies (anti-TAG-72) were covalently conjugated to the albumin nanoparticles via the surface carboxylate groups by using the carbodiimide activation method. Leakage of the encapsulated dye into PBS containing 4% HSA or human bowel juice was not detected. This study also demonstrates that the encapsulation of the NIR fluorescent dye within the HSA nanoparticles reduces the photobleaching of the dye significantly. Specific colon tumor detection in a mouse model was demonstrated for PNA, anti-CEA and anti-TAG-72 conjugated NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles. These bioactive NIR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles also detected invisible tumors that were revealed as pathological only subsequent to histological analysis. These results may suggest a significant advantage of NIR fluorescence imaging using NIR fluorescent nanoparticles over regular colonoscopy. In future work we plan to broaden this study by encapsulating cancer drugs, such as paclitaxel and doxorubicin, within these biodegradable NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles, in order to use them for both detection as well as therapy of colon

  12. Homogenization optics to improve detectability of a fluorescence response to a single laser pulse: Detection of feces on apples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecal contamination of produce is a known food safety risk. Measuring fluorescence responses to UV excitation is an established method for detecting such contamination. One measurement system utilizes a pulsed UV laser to induce a fluorescence response from fecal material and a gated intensified cam...

  13. Structure-activity relationships for the fluorescence of ochratoxin A: Insight for detection of ochratoxin A metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenette, Christine; Paugh, Robert J. [Departments of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Tozlovanu, Mariana; Juzio, Maud [ENSAT, UMR CNRS 5503, 1 Avenue Agrobiopole 31326 Auzeville-Tolosane (France); Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie [ENSAT, UMR CNRS 5503, 1 Avenue Agrobiopole 31326 Auzeville-Tolosane (France)], E-mail: leszkowicz@ensat.fr; Manderville, Richard A. [Departments of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: rmanderv@uoguelph.ca

    2008-06-09

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium that is widely found as a contaminant of food products. The toxin is a renal carcinogen in male rats, the cause of mycotoxicoses in pigs and has been associated with chronic human kidney diseases. Bioactivation has been implicated in OTA-mediated toxicity, although inconsistent results have been reported, due, in part, to the difficulty in detecting OTA metabolites in vivo. Liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with fluorescence detection (FLD) is the most widely used analytical detection method for OTA. Under acidic conditions the toxin generates blue fluorescence (465 nm) that is due to an excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) process that generates an emissive keto tautomer. Disruption of this ESIPT process quenches fluorescence intensity and causes a blue shift in emission maxima. The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of the C5-chlorine atom, the lactone moiety and the amide bond on OTA fluorescence and derive optical parameters for OTA metabolites that have been detected in vitro. Our results highlight the limitations of LC/FLD for OTA metabolites that do not undergo ESIPT. For emissive derivatives, our absorption and emission data improves the sensitivity of LC/FLD (3-4-fold increase in the limit of detection (LOD)) for OTA analogues bearing a C5-OH group, such as the hydroquinone (OTHQ) metabolite and the glutathione conjugate of OTA (OTA-GSH). This increased sensitivity may facilitate the detection of OTA metabolites bearing a C5-OH group in biological fluids and enhance our understanding of OTA-mediated toxicity.

  14. Detecting aromatic compounds on planetary surfaces using ultraviolet time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshelman, E.; Daly, M. G.; Slater, G.; Cloutis, E.

    2018-02-01

    Many aromatic organic molecules exhibit strong and characteristic fluorescence when excited with ultraviolet radiation. As laser excitation in the ultraviolet generates both fluorescence and resonantly enhanced Raman scattering of aromatic vibrational modes, combined Raman and fluorescence instruments have been proposed to search for organic compounds on Mars. In this work the time-resolved fluorescence of a suite of 24 compounds composed of 2-5 ringed alternant, non-alternant, and heterocyclic PAHs was measured. Fluorescence instrumentation with similar specifications to a putative flight instrument was capable of observing the fluorescence decay of these compounds with a sub-ns resolution. Incorporating time-resolved capabilities was also found to increase the ability to discriminate between individual PAHs. Incorporating time-resolved fluorescence capabilities into an ultraviolet gated Raman system intended for a rover or lander can increase the ability to detect and characterize PAHs on planetary surfaces.

  15. Laser induced fluorescence technique for detecting organic matter in East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Wang, Tianyu; Pan, Delu; Huang, Haiqing

    2017-10-01

    A laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique for fast diagnosing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in water is discussed. We have developed a new field-portable laser fluorometer for rapid fluorescence measurements. In addtion, the fluorescence spectral characteristics of fluorescent constituents (e.g., CDOM, chlorophyll-a) were analyzed with a spectral deconvolution method of bi-Gaussian peak function. In situ measurements by the LIF technique compared well with values measured by conventional spectrophotometer method in laboratory. A significant correlation (R2 = 0.93) was observed between fluorescence by the technique and absorption by laboratory spectrophotometer. Influence of temperature variation on LIF measurement was investigated in lab and a temperature coefficient was deduced for fluorescence correction. Distributions of CDOM fluorescence measured using this technique in the East China Sea coast were presented. The in situ result demonstrated the utility of the LIF technique for rapid detecting dissolved organic matter.

  16. [Research on optimization of mathematical model of flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Zhao, Xue-Hong; Wang, Yan; Xiao, Ya-Bing; Jiang, Xue-Hui; Dai, Li

    2014-01-01

    Flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry was a widely used method in the industries of health, environmental, geological and metallurgical fields for the merit of high sensitivity, wide measurement range and fast analytical speed. However, optimization of this method was too difficult as there exist so many parameters affecting the sensitivity and broadening. Generally, the optimal conditions were sought through several experiments. The present paper proposed a mathematical model between the parameters and sensitivity/broadening coefficients using the law of conservation of mass according to the characteristics of hydride chemical reaction and the composition of the system, which was proved to be accurate as comparing the theoretical simulation and experimental results through the test of arsanilic acid standard solution. Finally, this paper has put a relation map between the parameters and sensitivity/broadening coefficients, and summarized that GLS volume, carrier solution flow rate and sample loop volume were the most factors affecting sensitivity and broadening coefficients. Optimizing these three factors with this relation map, the relative sensitivity was advanced by 2.9 times and relative broadening was reduced by 0.76 times. This model can provide a theoretical guidance for the optimization of the experimental conditions.

  17. Elasticity maps of living neurons measured by combined fluorescence and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spedden, Elise; White, James D; Naumova, Elena N; Kaplan, David L; Staii, Cristian

    2012-09-05

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here, we combine atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy with fluorescence microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglion, and P-19 (mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells) neurons. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon disruption of microtubules of the cell. We find reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules. We also report that cortical and P-19 neurons have similar elasticity maps, with elastic moduli in the range 0.1-2 kPa, with typical average values of 0.4 kPa (P-19) and 0.2 kPa (cortical). In contrast, dorsal root ganglion neurons are stiffer than P-19 and cortical cells, yielding elastic moduli in the range 0.1-8 kPa, with typical average values of 0.9 kPa. Finally, we report no measurable influence of substrate protein coating on cell body elasticity for the three types of neurons. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Detection of Pathogenic Biofilms with Bacterial Amyloid Targeting Fluorescent Probe, CDy11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jun Young; Sahu, Srikanta; Yau, Yin Hoe

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are responsible for a wide range of persistent infections. In the clinic, diagnosis of biofilm-associated infections relies heavily on culturing methods, which fail to detect nonculturable bacteria. Identification of novel fluorescent probes for biofilm imaging will greatly...... facilitate diagnosis of pathogenic bacterial infection. Herein, we report a novel fluorescent probe, CDy11 (compound of designation yellow 11), which targets amyloid in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix through a diversity oriented fluorescent library approach (DOFLA). CDy11 was further demonstrated...

  19. Screen-printed fluorescent sensors for rapid and sensitive anthrax biomarker detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Inkyu; Oh, Wan-Kyu; Jang, Jyongsik

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •We fabricated flexible anthrax sensors with a simple screen-printing method. •The sensors selectively detected B. anthracis biomarker. •The sensors provide the visible alarm against anthrax attack. -- Abstract: Since the 2001 anthrax attacks, efforts have focused on the development of an anthrax detector with rapid response and high selectivity and sensitivity. Here, we demonstrate a fluorescence sensor for detecting anthrax biomarker with high sensitivity and selectivity using a screen-printing method. A lanthanide–ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid complex was printed on a flexible polyethersulfone film. Screen-printing deposition of fluorescent detecting moieties produced fluorescent patterns that acted as a visual alarm against anthrax

  20. Development of laser-induced fluorescence detection to assay DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, M.; Freund, H.G.

    1991-01-01

    A precolumn derivation method has been developed for high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of DNA damage using fluorescence detection. The modified nucleotide, having excised enzymatically from the exposed DNA, is enriched from the normal nucleotides and labeled with a fluorescent reagent. The labeling procedure involves phosphoramidation of the nucleotide with ethylenediamine (EDA) followed by conjugation of the free amino end of the phosphoramidate with 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene 1-sulfonyl chloride, commonly known as Dansyl chloride. The dansylated nucleotide can be analyzed with a sub-picomole limit of detection (LOD) by conventional HPLC using a conventional fluorescence detector. By combining microbore HPLC with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection, the authors present the development of an analytical system that has sub-femtomole LOD for real-time analysis of the dansylated nucleotide. In this paper the application of the developed system in fluorescence postlabeling assay of a small alkyl-modified nucleotide (5-methyl CMP) in calf-thymus DNA is discussed

  1. Poly(o-phenylenediamine) colloid-quenched fluorescent oligonucleotide as a probe for fluorescence-enhanced nucleic acid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jingqi; Li, Hailong; Luo, Yonglan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yingwei; Sun, Xuping

    2011-02-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that chemical oxidation polymerization of o-phenylenediamine (OPD) by potassium bichromate at room temperature results in the formation of submicrometer-scale poly(o-phenylenediamine) (POPD) colloids. Such colloids can absorb and quench dye-labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) very effectively. In the presence of a target, a hybridization event occurs, which produces a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) that detaches from the POPD surface, leading to recovery of dye fluorescence. With the use of an oligonucleotide (OND) sequence associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a model system, we demonstrate the proof of concept that POPD colloid-quenched fluorescent OND can be used as a probe for fluorescence-enhanced nucleic acid detection with selectivity down to single-base mismatch.

  2. Synthesis of a Novel Fluorescent Sensor Bearing Dansyl Fluorophores for the Highly Selective Detection of Mercury (II Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Grudpan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A new macromolecule possessing two dansyl moieties and based on 2-[4-(2-aminoethylthiobutylthio]ethanamine was prepared as a fluorescent sensor and its mercury sensing properties toward various transition metal, alkali, and alkali earth ions were investigated. The designed compound exhibited pronounced Hg2+-selective ON-OFF type fluorescence switching upon binding. The new compoundprovided highly selective sensing to Hg2+ in acetonitrile-water solvent mixtures with a detection limit of 2.49 x 10-7 M or 50 ppb. The molecular modeling results indicated that ions-recognition of the sensor originated from a self assembly process of the reagentand Hg2+ to form a helical wrapping structure with the favorable electrostatic interactions of Hg2+coordinated with sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen atoms and aromatic moieties.

  3. Toehold-mediated nonenzymatic amplification circuit on graphene oxide fluorescence switching platform for sensitive and homogeneous microRNA detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ru; Liao, Yuhui; Zhou, Xiaoming, E-mail: zhouxm@scnu.edu.cn; Xing, Da, E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn

    2015-08-12

    A novel graphene oxide (GO) fluorescence switch-based homogenous system has been developed to solve two problems that are commonly encountered in conventional GO-based biosensors. First, with the assistance of toehold-mediated nonenzymatic amplification (TMNA), the sensitivity of this system greatly surpasses that of previously described GO-based biosensors, which are always limited to the nM range due to the lack of efficient signal amplification. Second, without enzymatic participation in amplification, the unreliability of detection resulting from nonspecific desorption of DNA probes on the GO surface by enzymatic protein can be avoided. Moreover, the interaction mechanism of the double-stranded TMNA products contains several single-stranded toeholds at two ends and GO has also been explored with combinations of atomic force microscopy imaging, zeta potential detection, and fluorescence assays. It has been shown that the hybrids can be anchored to the surface of GO through the end with more unpaired bases, and that the other end, which has weaker interaction with GO, can escape GO adsorption due to the robustness of the central dsDNA structures. We verified this GO fluorescence switch-based detection system by detecting microRNA 21, an overexpressed non-encoding gene in a variety of malignant cells. Rational design of the probes allowed the isothermal nonenzymatic reaction to achieve more than 100-fold amplification efficiency. The detection results showed that our strategy has a detection limit of 10 pM and a detection range of four orders of magnitude. - Highlights: • This paper explored the interaction mechanism of TMNA products with GO surface. • This homogeneous and isothermal system permits a detection limit of 10 pM for microRNA. • This nonenzymatic strategy can avoid nonspecific desorption caused by enzyme protein. • The interaction model can be used to explore the application ability of nonenzymatic circuit.

  4. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; Wiegant, J.C.A.G.; Raap, A.K.; Greve, Jan; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization o­n human metaphase chromosomes is detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy. This combination of cytochemical and scanning probe techniques enables the localization and identification of several fluorescently labelled genomic DNA fragments o­n a single

  5. Multispectral fluorescence imaging for detection of bovine feces on Romaine lettuce and baby spinach leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging with ultraviolet-A excitation was used to evaluate the feasibility of two-waveband fluorescence algorithms for the detection of bovine fecal contaminants on the abaxial and adaxial surfaces of Romaine lettuce and baby spinach leaves. Correlation analysis was used t...

  6. Detection of fecal residue on poultry carcasses by laser induced fluorescence imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential use of laser-induced fluorescence imaging techniques was investigated for the detection of diluted fecal matters from various parts of the digestive tract, including colon, ceca, small intestine, and duodenum, on poultry carcasses. One of the challenges for using fluorescence imaging f...

  7. Multispectral fluorescence image algorithms for detection of frass on mature tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multispectral algorithm derived from hyperspectral line-scan fluorescence imaging under violet LED excitation was developed for the detection of frass contamination on mature tomatoes. The algorithm utilized the fluorescence intensities at five wavebands, 515 nm, 640 nm, 664 nm, 690 nm, and 724 nm...

  8. Using Quenching to Detect Corrosion on Sculptural Metalwork: A Real-World Application of Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensen, Cory; Clare, Tami Lasseter; Barbera, Jack

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy experiments are a frequently taught as part of upper-division teaching laboratories. To expose undergraduate students to an applied fluorescence technique, a corrosion detection method, using quenching, was adapted from authentic research for an instrumental analysis laboratory. In the experiment, students acquire…

  9. Fluorescence imaging in the upper gastrointestinal tract for the detection of dysplasic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukowski, Uwe; Ebert, Bernd; Ortner, Marianne; Mueller, Karsten; Voderholzer, W.; Weber-Eibel, J.; Dietel, M.; Lochs, Herbert; Rinneberg, Herbert H.

    2001-10-01

    During endoscopy of the esophagus fluorescence images were recorded at a delay of 20 ns after pulsed laser excitation simultaneously with conventional reflected white light images. To label malignant cells (dysplasia, tumor) 5-aminolaevulinic acid was applied prior to fluorescence guided bi-opsy. In this way pre-malignant and malignant lesions were detected not seen previously during routine endoscopy.

  10. Multi-flux-transformer MRI detection with an atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukov, Igor; Karaulanov, Todor

    2014-12-01

    Recently, anatomical ultra-low field (ULF) MRI has been demonstrated with an atomic magnetometer (AM). A flux-transformer (FT) has been used for decoupling MRI fields and gradients to avoid their negative effects on AM performance. The field of view (FOV) was limited because of the need to compromise between the size of the FT input coil and MRI sensitivity per voxel. Multi-channel acquisition is a well-known solution to increase FOV without significantly reducing sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate twofold FOV increase with the use of three FT input coils. We also show that it is possible to use a single atomic magnetometer and single acquisition channel to acquire three independent MRI signals by applying a frequency-encoding gradient along the direction of the detection array span. The approach can be generalized to more channels and can be critical for imaging applications of non-cryogenic ULF MRI where FOV needs to be large, including head, hand, spine, and whole-body imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Gravitational Wave Detection with Single-Laser Atom Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Tinto, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A new design for a broadband detector of gravitational radiation relies on two atom interferometers separated by a distance L. In this scheme, only one arm and one laser are used for operating the two atom interferometers. The innovation here involves the fact that the atoms in the atom interferometers are not only considered as perfect test masses, but also as highly stable clocks. Atomic coherence is intrinsically stable, and can be many orders of magnitude more stable than a laser.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of fluorescence microlymphography for detecting limb lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keo, H H; Husmann, M; Groechenig, E; Willenberg, T; Gretener, S B

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescence microlymphography (FML) is a minimally invasive technique for visualization of the cutaneous lymphatic network. The aim of the study was to assess the accuracy and safety of FML in patients with unilateral lymphedema. This was a cross sectional study. Patients with unilateral leg swelling were assessed and compared with the unaffected contralateral limb. FML was performed in all index legs and the contralateral leg by injecting 0.1 mL of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran intradermally in both limbs at the same level. The most prominent swelling of the affected limb was the anatomical reference. The spread of the dye in the lymphatic capillaries of the skin was measured in all dimensions by epiluminator intravital microscopy and the maximum dye spread value 10 min after injection was used for statistical analysis. The contralateral leg served as control. Test accuracy and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess threshold values that best predict lymphedema. Between March 2008 and February 2014 seventy patients with unilateral chronic leg swelling were clinically diagnosed with lymphedema. The median age was 45 (IQR 27-56) years. Of those, 46 (65.7%) were female and 71.4% had primary and 28.6% secondary lymphedema. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio, and positive and negative predictive value were 94.3%, 78.6%, 4.40, 0.07, 81.5%, and 93.2% for the 12 mm cut off level and 91.4%, 85.7%, 6.40, 0.10, 86.5%, and 90.9% for the 14 mm cut off level, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.83-0.95). No major adverse events were observed. FML is an almost atraumatic and safe technique for detecting lymphedema in patients with leg swelling. In this series the greatest accuracy was observed at a cut off level of ≥14 mm maximum spread. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a new light collection and detection system optimized for ion beam induced fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Mi, Zhaohong; Koh, Long Cheng; Tao, Ye; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Watt, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Ion beam induced fluorescence microscopy is a new imaging technique which has the potential to achieve sub-50 nm spatial resolution fluorescence images. Currently the resolution of the technique has been limited to around 150 nm mainly because of inefficient collection and detection of emitted photons from the sample. To overcome this limitation, a new light collection system based on a custom made parabolic mirror is employed to enhance the fluorescence collection. The custom made mirror is designed so as to obtain both structural (scanning transmission ion microscopy) and ion beam induced fluorescence imaging simultaneously. The design and characterization of the parabolic mirror is discussed in detail

  14. A PDMS-based cylindrical hybrid lens for enhanced fluorescence detection in microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bor-Shyh; Yang, Yu-Ching; Ho, Chong-Yi; Yang, Han-Yu; Wang, Hsiang-Yu

    2014-02-13

    Microfluidic systems based on fluorescence detection have been developed and applied for many biological and chemical applications. Because of the tiny amount of sample in the system; the induced fluorescence can be weak. Therefore, most microfluidic systems deploy multiple optical components or sophisticated equipment to enhance the efficiency of fluorescence detection. However, these strategies encounter common issues of complex manufacturing processes and high costs. In this study; a miniature, cylindrical and hybrid lens made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to improve the fluorescence detection in microfluidic systems is proposed. The hybrid lens integrates a laser focusing lens and a fluorescence collecting lens to achieve dual functions and simplify optical setup. Moreover, PDMS has advantages of low-cost and straightforward fabrication compared with conventional optical components. The performance of the proposed lens is first examined with two fluorescent dyes and the results show that the lens provides satisfactory enhancement for fluorescence detection of Rhodamine 6G and Nile Red. The overall increments in collected fluorescence signal and detection sensitivity are more than 220% of those without lens, and the detection limits of Rhodamine 6G and Nile red are lowered to 0.01 μg/mL and 0.05 μg/mL, respectively. The hybrid lens is further applied to the detection of Nile red-labeled Chlorella vulgaris cells and it increases both signal intensity and detection sensitivity by more than 520%. The proposed hybrid lens also dramatically reduces the variation in detected signal caused by the deviation in incident angle of excitation light.

  15. Single-atom detection on a chip: from realization to application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stibor, A; Bender, H; Kuehnhold, S; Fortagh, J; Zimmermann, C; Guenther, A, E-mail: aguenth@pit.physik.uni-tuebingen.d [CQ Center for Collective Quantum Phenomena and their Applications, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    In this paper, we describe the preparation and detection of ultracold atoms on a microchip with single-atom sensitivity. The detection scheme is based on multi-photon ionization of atoms and the subsequent guiding of the generated ions by ion optics to a channel electron multiplier. We resolve single atoms with a detection efficiency above 60%. The detector is suitable for real-time observations of static and dynamic processes in ultracold quantum gases. Although the ionization is destructive, sampling a small subset of the atomic distribution is sufficient for the determination of the desired information. We take full high-resolution spectra of ultracold atoms by ionizing only 5% of the atoms. Using an additional microwave near 6.8 GHz, the detection scheme becomes energy, position and state selective. This can be used for in situ determination of the energy distribution and temperature of atom clouds inside the trap and applied for future correlation measurements.

  16. Hybrid phosphorescence and fluorescence native spectroscopy for breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimova, Alexandra; Katz, A; Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Budansky, Yuri; Bykov, Alexei A; Zeylikovich, Roman; Alfano, R R

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence and phosphorescence measurements are performed on normal and malignant ex vivo human breast tissues using UV LED and xenon lamp excitation. Tryptophan (trp) phosphorescence intensity is higher in both normal glandular and adipose tissue when compared to malignant tissue. An algorithm based on the ratio of trp fluorescence intensity at 345 nm to phosphorescence intensity at 500 nm is successfully used to separate normal from malignant tissue types. Normal specimens consistently exhibited a low I(345)I(500) ratio (15). The ratio analysis correlates well with histopathology. Intensity ratio maps with a spatial resolution of 0.5 mm are generated in which local regions of malignancy could be identified.

  17. New fluorescent probes for detection and characterization of amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbenko, Galyna; Trusova, Valeriya; Kirilova, Elena; Kirilov, Georgiy; Kalnina, Inta; Vasilev, Aleksey; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Deligeorgiev, Todor

    2010-08-01

    The applicability of the novel fluorescent probes, aminoderivative of benzanthrone ABM, squaraine dye SQ-1 and polymethine dye V2 to identification and structural analysis of amyloid fibrils has been evaluated using the lysozyme model system in which fibrillar aggregates have been formed in concentrated ethanol solution. The association constant, binding stoichiometry and molar fluorescence of the bound dye have been determined. ABM was found to surpass classical amyloid marker ThT in the sensitivity to the presence of fibrillar aggregates. Resonance energy transfer measurements involving ABM-SQ-1 and SQ-1-V2 donor-acceptor pairs yielded the limits for fractal-like dimension of lysozyme fibrils.

  18. Sensitive detection and separation of fluorescent derivatives using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection with 532nm Nd:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrabel, Patrik; Taborsky, Petr; Ryvolova, Marketa; Havel, Josef; Preisler, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CELIF) is a powerful tool for separation and sensitive determination of fluorescent species. Biologically active compounds, such as amino acids, peptides and proteins may exhibit native fluorescence, which is however often low and/or an expensive laser is required for excitation in UV. Therefore, labelling of the analytes with a fluorescent dye is usually necessary. In this work, a home-built CELIF instrument with diode pumped frequency-doubled continuous wave Nd:YAG excitation laser with feedback power regulation (532nm) was constructed. The suitability of this type of laser for LIF detection in a separation method was found excellent. A limit of detection (LOD) (S/N=3) of 2x10 -13 mol/l was achieved with rhodamine B, which is comparable to those obtained using similar instruments with Ar + laser [Y.F. Cheng, N.J. Dovichi, Science 242 (1988) 562, E.S. Yeung et al., J. Chromatogr. 608 (1992) 73]. LOD of a protein derivatized according to modified procedures [M.J. Little et al., Anal. Chim. Acta 339 (1997) 279, A. Chersi et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1336 (1997) 83] was determined. Detection of the derivatives was found to be limited by insufficient reaction recovery at low analyte concentration, chemical noise, separation efficiency and quality of the derivatizing reagent rather than by the detector performance. As a consequence, a huge gap between the detection ability of CELIF instruments and LOD determined in real samples is revealed

  19. Selective detection of heavy metal ions by calixarene-based fluorescent molecular sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Faye, Djibril; Zhang, Han; Lefevre, Jean-Pierre; Delaire, J. A.; Leray, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    The synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and complexing properties of calixarene-based fluorescent sensors are reported. The calixarene bearing four dansyl fluorophores (Calix-DANS4) exhibits a very high affinity for the detection of lead. A fluorimetric micro-device based on the use of a Y-shape microchannel was developed and allows lead detection with a 5 ppb detection limit. For mercury detection, a fluorescent molecular sensor containing a calixarene anchored with four 8-quinolinoloxy groups (Calix-Q) has been synthesized. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of this sensor are sensitive to the presence of metal cations. An efficient fluorescence quenching is observed upon mercury complexation because of a photoinduced electron transfer from the fluorophore to the bound mercury. Calix-Q shows a high selectivity towards Hg2+ over interfering cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+) and a 70 ppb sensitivity.

  20. DETECTION OF BACTERIAL BIOFILM ON STAINLESS STEEL BY HYPERSPECTRAL FLUORESCENCE IMAGING

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, hyperspectral fluorescence imaging techniques were investigated for detection of microbial biofilm on stainless steel plates typically used to manufacture food processing equipment. Stainless steel coupons were immersed in bacterium cultures consisting of nonpathogenic E. coli, Pseudo...

  1. Design of a confocal microfluidic particle sorter using fluorescent photon burst detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, B.H.; Schots, A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2004-01-01

    An instrumental system is described for detecting and sorting single fluorescent particles such as microspheres, bacteria, viruses, or even smaller macromolecules in a flowing liquid. The system consists of microfluidic chips (biochips), computer controlled high voltage power supplies, and a

  2. Highly selective and sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for femtomolar detection of silver ion in aqueous medium

    OpenAIRE

    Arulraj, Abraham Daniel; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2015-01-01

    The chemical sensing for the trace level detection of silver ion in aqueous solution still remains a challenge using simple, rapid, and inexpensive method. We report that thionine can be used as a fluorescent probe for the detection of Ag+ ion. The successive addition of Ag+ ion to the solution containing thionine quenches (turns-off) the fluorescence intensity of thionine. Association and quenching constants have been estimated by the Benesi–Hildebrand method and Stern–Volmer plot, respectiv...

  3. A novel fluorescent in situ hybridization technique for detection of Rickettsia spp. in archival samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Claus Bo; Boye, Mette; Struve, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    A novel, sensitive and specific method for detecting Rickettsia spp. in archival samples is described. The method involves the use of fluorescently marked oligonucleotide probes for in situ hybridization. Specific hybridization of Ricekttsia was found without problems of cross-reactions with bact......A novel, sensitive and specific method for detecting Rickettsia spp. in archival samples is described. The method involves the use of fluorescently marked oligonucleotide probes for in situ hybridization. Specific hybridization of Ricekttsia was found without problems of cross...

  4. Performance of LED fluorescence microscopy for the detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) bright-field microscopy is time-consuming, with poor sensitivity, even under optimal conditions. Introduction of Primo Star iLED fluorescent microscopy (FM) may improve TB case finding at referral hospitals in Rwanda. The study aimed to determine the acceptability and effectiveness of iLED ...

  5. Beta-induced fluorescence detection in liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolme-Lawes, D.J.; Massey, S.; Warwick, P.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of beta-induced fluorescence is used to determine the factors which influence the sensitivity of the technique as applied to liquid chromatography. Equations are presented for detector response and for signal-to-noise ratios and the theoretical response for a typical detector is compared with experimentally determined values. (author)

  6. Detection of vegetation stress from laser-induced fluorescence signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhash, N.

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signatures of UV irradiated Salvia splendens plants were measured using an Optical Multichannel Analyser (OMA) system with Nitrogen laser excitation. The LIF spectra which consisted of the blue-green and the red chlorophyll bands were analysed with a non-linear interactive procedure using Gaussian spectral functions. The fluorescence intensity ratios of the various bands obtained from curve fitted parameters were found to be more sensitive to changes in the photosynthetic activity of the plant. The variation in the intensity ratio for the chlorophyll bands for nutrient stressed sunflower, cotton and groundnut plants as well as the nutrient and water stressed rice plants are also presented. It is observed that vegetation stress not only changes the fluorescence intensity ratios and the vitality index of the plant but also changes the peak position of the emission bands, in some cases. It is also seen that analysis of the fluorescence spectra in vegetation remote sensing applications would require a deconvolution procedure to evaluate the exact contribution of each band in the total spectra. (author). 23 refs, 8 figs, 5 tabs

  7. Quantitative wavelenght-resolved fluorescence detection for microchip capillary electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, S.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and application of a new wavelengthresolved CCD-based fluorescence detector for microchip separations. In recent years, miniaturization has been one of the major trends in the development of new analytical separation systems. As the manipulated sample amounts

  8. [A cell-based detection of ciguatoxin using sodium fluorescence probe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jian-hui; Yang, Hui; Tang, Huan-wen; Huang, Wei; Xu, Xin-yun; Liu, Jian-jun; Ke, Yue-bin; Cheng, Jin-quan; Zhuang, Zhi-xiong

    2011-04-01

    To establish a cell-based detection method of ciguatoxin using fluorescence assay. Mouse neuroblastoma N-2A cells were exposed to ouabain and veratridine and different concentrations of standard ciguatoxin samples (P-CTX-1) to establish the curvilinear relationship between the toxin dosage and fluorescence intensity using the sodium fluorescence probe CoroNaTM Green. The toxicity curvilinear relationship was also generated between the toxin dosage and cell survival using CCK-8 method. Based on these standard curves, the presence of ciguatoxin was detected in 33 samples of deep-sea coral fish. A correlation was found between the detection results of cell-based fluorescence assay and cytotoxicity assay, whose detection limit reached 103 g/ml and 1012 g/ml, respectively. The cell-based fluorescent assay sensitivity showed a higher sensitivity than cytotoxicity assay with a 2-4 h reduction of the detection time. The cell-based fluorescent assay can quickly and sensitively detect ciguatoxin and may serve as a good option for preliminary screening of the toxin.

  9. Sentinel lymph nodes detection with an imaging system using Patent Blue V dye as fluorescent tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, F.; Steibel, J.; Chabrier, R.; Rodier, J. F.; Pourroy, G.; Poulet, P.

    2013-03-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy is the gold standard to detect metastatic invasion from primary breast cancer. This method can help patients avoid full axillary chain dissection, thereby decreasing the risk of morbidity. We propose an alternative to the traditional isotopic method, to detect and map the sentinel lymph nodes. Indeed, Patent Blue V is the most widely used dye in clinical routine for the visual detection of sentinel lymph nodes. A Recent study has shown the possibility of increasing the fluorescence quantum yield of Patent Blue V, when it is bound to human serum albumin. In this study we present a preclinical fluorescence imaging system to detect sentinel lymph nodes labeled with this fluorescent tracer. The setup is composed of a black and white CCD camera and two laser sources. One excitation source with a laser emitting at 635 nm and a second laser at 785 nm to illuminate the region of interest. The prototype is operated via a laptop. Preliminary experiments permitted to determine the device sensitivity in the μmol.L-1 range as regards the detection of PBV fluorescence signals. We also present a preclinical evaluation performed on Lewis rats, during which the fluorescence imaging setup detected the accumulation and fixation of the fluorescent dye on different nodes through the skin.

  10. Fluorescent Gold Nanoprobes for the Sensitive and Selective Detection for Hg2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Fang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A simple, cost-effective yet rapid and sensitive sensor for on-site and real-time Hg2+ detection based on bovine serum albumin functionalized fluorescent gold nanoparticles as novel and environmentally friendly fluorescent probes was developed. Using this probe, aqueous Hg2+ can be detected at 0.1 nM in a facile way based on fluorescence quenching. This probe was also applied to determine the Hg2+ in the lake samples, and the results demonstrate low interference and high sensitivity.

  11. A novel dansyl-based fluorescent probe for highly selective detection of ferric ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Sun, Mingtai; Zhang, Zhongping; Wang, Suhua

    2013-02-15

    A novel dansyl-based fluorescent probe was synthesized and characterized. It exhibits high selectivity and sensitivity towards Fe(3+) ion. This fluorescent probe is photostable, water soluble and pH insensitive. The limit of detection is found to be 0.62 μM. These properties make it a good fluorescent probe for Fe(3+) ion detection in both chemical and biological systems. Spike recovery test confirms its practical application in tap water samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fluorescence detection of a protein-bound 2Fe2S cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Kevin G; Goodlitt, Rochelle; Li, Rui; Smolke, Christina D; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2009-03-02

    A fluorescent biosensor is described for 2Fe2S clusters that is composed of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to glutaredoxin 2 (Grx2), as illustrated here. 2Fe2S detection is based on the reduction of GFP fluorescence upon the 2Fe2S-induced dimerization of GFP-Grx2. This assay is sufficiently sensitive to detect submicromolar changes in 2Fe2S levels, thus making it suitable for high-throughput measurements of metallocluster degradation and synthesis reactions.

  13. A ratiometric nanoprobe based on silver nanoclusters and carbon dots for the fluorescent detection of biothiols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuming; Lin, Bixia; Yu, Ying; Cao, Yujuan; Guo, Manli; Shui, Lingling

    2018-04-01

    Ratiometric fluorescent probes could eliminate the influence from experimental factors and improve the detection accuracy. In this article, a ratiometric nanoprobe was constructed based on silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) with nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) and used for the detection of biothiols. The fluorescence peak of AgNCs was observed at 650 nm with excitation wavelength at 370 nm. In order to construct the ratiometric fluorescent probe, NCDs with the excitation and emission wavelengths at 370 nm and 450 nm were selected. After adding AgNCs, the fluorescence of NCDs was quenched. The mechanism of the fluorescence quenching was studied by fluorescence, UV-Vis absorption and the fluorescence lifetime spectra. The results indicated that the quenching could be ascribed to the inner filter effect (IFE). With the addition of biothiols, the fluorescence of AgNCs at 650 nm decreased due to the breakdown of AgNCs, and the fluorescence of NCDs at 450 nm recovered accordingly. Thus, the relationship between the ratio of the fluorescence intensities (I450/I650) and biothiol concentration was used to establish the determination method for biothiols. Cysteine (Cys) was taken as the model of biothiols, and the working curve for Cys was I450/I650 = 0.60CCys - 1.86 (CCys: μmol/L) with the detection limit of 0.14 μmol/L (S/N = 3). Then, the method was used for the detection of Cys in human urine and serum samples with satisfactory accuracy and recovery ratios. Furthermore, the probe could be applied for the visual semi-quantitative determination of Cys by naked eyes.

  14. Sensitive detection of alkaline phosphatase by switching on gold nanoclusters fluorescence quenched by pyridoxal phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawa, Mohamed Ibrahim; Gao, Wenyue; Saqib, Muhammad; Kitte, Shimeles Addisu; Wu, Fengxia; Xu, Guobao

    2017-09-15

    In this work, we designed highly sensitive and selective luminescent detection method for alkaline phosphatase using bovine serum albumin functionalized gold nanoclusters (BSA-AuNCs) as the nanosensor probe and pyridoxal phosphate as the substrate of alkaline phosphatase. We found that pyridoxal phosphate can quench the fluorescence of BSA-AuNCs and pyridoxal has little effect on the fluorescence of BSA-AuNCs. The proposed mechanism of fluorescence quenching by PLP was explored on the basis of data obtained from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), UV-vis spectrophotometry, fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence decay time measurements and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the hydrolysis of pyridoxal phosphate to generate pyridoxal, restoring the fluorescence of BSA-AuNCs. Therefore, a recovery type approach has been developed for the sensitive detection of alkaline phosphatase in the range of 1.0-200.0U/L (R 2 =0.995) with a detection limit of 0.05U/L. The proposed sensor exhibit excellent selectivity among various enzymes, such as glucose oxidase, lysozyme, trypsin, papain, and pepsin. The present switch-on fluorescence sensing strategy for alkaline phosphatase was successfully applied in human serum plasma with good recoveries (100.60-104.46%), revealing that this nanosensor probe is a promising tool for ALP detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Femtosecond, two-photon laser-induced-fluorescence imaging of atomic oxygen in an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jacob B.; Sands, Brian L.; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Roy, Sukesh; Scofield, James; Gord, James R.

    2015-06-01

    Femtosecond, two-photon-absorption laser-induced-fluorescence (fs-TALIF) spectroscopy is employed to measure space- and time-resolved atomic-oxygen distributions in a nanosecond, repetitively pulsed, externally grounded, atmospheric-pressure plasma jet flowing helium with a variable oxygen admixture. The high-peak-intensity, low-average-energy femtosecond pulses result in increased TALIF signal with reduced photolytic inferences. This allows 2D imaging of absolute atomic-oxygen number densities ranging from 5.8   ×   1015 to 2.0   ×   1012cm-3 using a cooled CCD with an external intensifier. Xenon is used for signal and imaging-system calibrations to quantify the atomic-oxygen fluorescence signal. Initial results highlight a transition in discharge morphology from annular to filamentary, corresponding with a change in plasma chemistry from ozone to atomic oxygen production, as the concentration of oxygen in the feed gas is changed at a fixed voltage-pulse-repetition rate. In this configuration, significant concentrations of reactive oxygen species may be remotely generated by sustaining an active discharge beyond the confines of the dielectric capillary, which may benefit applications that require large concentrations of reactive oxygen species such as material processing or biomedical devices.

  16. Distribution of Fe atom density in a dc magnetron sputtering plasma source measured by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibagaki, K.; Nafarizal, N.; Sasaki, K.; Toyoda, H.; Iwata, S.; Kato, T.; Tsunashima, S.; Sugai, H.

    2003-10-01

    Magnetron sputtering discharge is widely used as an efficient method for thin film fabrication. In order to achieve the optimized fabrication, understanding of the kinetics in plasmas is essential. In the present work, we measured the density distribution of sputtered Fe atoms using laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. A dc magnetron plasma source with a Fe target was used. An area of 20 × 2 mm in front of the target was irradiated by a tunable laser beam having a planar shape. The picture of laser-induced fluorescence on the laser beam was taken using an ICCD camera. In this way, we obtained the two-dimensional image of the Fe atom density. As a result, it has been found that the Fe atom density observed at a distance of several centimeters from the target is higher than that adjacent to the target, when the Ar gas pressure was relatively high. It is suggested from this result that some gas-phase production processes of Fe atoms are available in the plasma. This work has been performed under the 21st Century COE Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan.

  17. Sensitive detection of individual neutral atoms in a strong coupling cavity QED system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Pengfei; Zhang Yuchi; Li Gang; Du Jinjin; Zhang Yanfeng; Guo Yanqiang; Wang Junmin; Zhang Tiancai; Li Weidong

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate real-time detection of individual cesium atoms by using a high-finesse optical micro-cavity in a strong coupling regime. A cloud of cesium atoms is trapped in a magneto-optical trap positioned at 5 mm above the micro-cavity center. The atoms fall down freely in gravitation after shutting off the magneto-optical trap and pass through the cavity. The cavity transmission is strongly affected by the atoms in the cavity, which enables the micro-cavity to sense the atoms individually. We detect the single atom transits either in the resonance or various detunings. The single atom vacuum-Rabi splitting is directly measured to be Ω = 2π × 23.9 MHz. The average duration of atom-cavity coupling of about 110 μs is obtained according to the probability distribution of the atom transits. (authors)

  18. A zinc fluorescent sensor used to detect mercury (II) and hydrosulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Min; Lee, Jae Jun; Nam, Eunju; Lim, Mi Hee; Kim, Cheal; Harrison, Roger G

    2017-05-05

    A zinc sensor based on quinoline and morpholine has been synthesized. The sensor selectively fluoresces in the presence of Zn 2+ , while not for other metal ions. Absorbance changes in the 350nm region are observed when Zn 2+ binds, which binds in a 1:1 ratio. The sensor fluoresces due to Zn 2+ above pH values of 6.0 and in the biological important region. The Zn 2+ -sensor complex has the unique ability to detect both Hg 2+ and HS - . The fluorescence of the Zn 2+ -sensor complex is quenched when it is exposed to aqueous solutions of Hg 2+ with sub-micromolar detection levels for Hg 2+ . The fluorescence of the Zn 2+ -sensor complex is also quenched by aqueous solutions of hydrosulfide. The sensor was used to detect Zn 2+ and Hg 2+ in living cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluorescent QDs-polystyrene composite nanospheres for highly efficient and rapid protein antigen detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Changhua; Mao, Mao [Henan University, Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education (China); Yuan, Hang [Tsinghua University, Life Science Division, Graduate School at Shenzhen (China); Shen, Huaibin [Henan University, Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education (China); Wu, Feng; Ma, Lan, E-mail: malan@sz.tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University, Life Science Division, Graduate School at Shenzhen (China); Li, Lin Song, E-mail: lsli@henu.edu.cn [Henan University, Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education (China)

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, high-quality carboxyl-functionalized fluorescent (red, green, and blue emitting) nanospheres (46-103 nm) consisting of hydrophobic quantum dots (QDs) and polystyrene were prepared by a miniemulsion polymerization approach. This miniemulsion polymerization approach induced a homogeneous distribution and high aqueous-phase transport efficiency of fluorescent QDs in composite nanospheres, which proved the success of our encoding QDs strategy. The obtained fluorescent nanospheres exhibited high stability in aqueous solution under a wide range of pH, different salt concentrations, PBS buffer, and thermal treatment at 80 Degree-Sign C. Based on the red emitting composite nanosphere, we performed fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) strips for high-sensitivity and rapid alpha-fetal protein detection. The detection limit reached 0.1 ng/mL, which was 200 times higher than commercial colloidal gold-labeled LFIA strips, and it reached similar detection level in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit.

  20. Detection of mechanical and disease stresses in citrus plants by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belasque, J., Jr.; Gasparoto, M. C. G.; Marcassa, L. G.

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the detection of mechanical and disease stresses in citrus plants (Citrus limonia [L.] Osbeck) using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Due to its economic importance we have chosen to investigate the citrus canker disease, which is caused by the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri bacteria. Mechanical stress was also studied because it plays an important role in the plant's infection by such bacteria. A laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy system, composed of a spectrometer and a 532 nm10 mW excitation laser was used to perform fluorescence spectroscopy. The ratio of two chlorophyll fluorescence bands allows us to detect and discriminate between mechanical and disease stresses. This ability to discriminate may have an important application in the field to detect citrus canker infected trees.

  1. Bifunctional fluorescent probes for detection of amyloid aggregates and reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Lisa-Maria; Weber, Judith; Fyfe, James W B; Kabia, Omaru M; Do, Dung T; Klimont, Ewa; Zhang, Yu; Rodrigues, Margarida; Dobson, Christopher M; Ghandi, Sonia; Bohndiek, Sarah E; Snaddon, Thomas N; Lee, Steven F

    2018-02-01

    Protein aggregation into amyloid deposits and oxidative stress are key features of many neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. We report here the creation of four highly sensitive bifunctional fluorescent probes, capable of H 2 O 2 and/or amyloid aggregate detection. These bifunctional sensors use a benzothiazole core for amyloid localization and boronic ester oxidation to specifically detect H 2 O 2 . We characterized the optical properties of these probes using both bulk fluorescence measurements and single-aggregate fluorescence imaging, and quantify changes in their fluorescence properties upon addition of amyloid aggregates of α-synuclein and pathophysiological H 2 O 2 concentrations. Our results indicate these new probes will be useful to detect and monitor neurodegenerative disease.

  2. Bifunctional fluorescent probes for detection of amyloid aggregates and reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Lisa-Maria; Weber, Judith; Fyfe, James W. B.; Kabia, Omaru M.; Do, Dung T.; Klimont, Ewa; Zhang, Yu; Rodrigues, Margarida; Dobson, Christopher M.; Ghandi, Sonia; Bohndiek, Sarah E.; Snaddon, Thomas N.; Lee, Steven F.

    2018-02-01

    Protein aggregation into amyloid deposits and oxidative stress are key features of many neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. We report here the creation of four highly sensitive bifunctional fluorescent probes, capable of H2O2 and/or amyloid aggregate detection. These bifunctional sensors use a benzothiazole core for amyloid localization and boronic ester oxidation to specifically detect H2O2. We characterized the optical properties of these probes using both bulk fluorescence measurements and single-aggregate fluorescence imaging, and quantify changes in their fluorescence properties upon addition of amyloid aggregates of α-synuclein and pathophysiological H2O2 concentrations. Our results indicate these new probes will be useful to detect and monitor neurodegenerative disease.

  3. Automated detection of fluorescent cells in in-resin fluorescence sections for integrated light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpiano, J; Pizarro, L; Peddie, C J; Jones, M L; Griffin, L D; Collinson, L M

    2018-04-26

    Integrated array tomography combines fluorescence and electron imaging of ultrathin sections in one microscope, and enables accurate high-resolution correlation of fluorescent proteins to cell organelles and membranes. Large numbers of serial sections can be imaged sequentially to produce aligned volumes from both imaging modalities, thus producing enormous amounts of data that must be handled and processed using novel techniques. Here, we present a scheme for automated detection of fluorescent cells within thin resin sections, which could then be used to drive automated electron image acquisition from target regions via 'smart tracking'. The aim of this work is to aid in optimization of the data acquisition process through automation, freeing the operator to work on other tasks and speeding up the process, while reducing data rates by only acquiring images from regions of interest. This new method is shown to be robust against noise and able to deal with regions of low fluorescence. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Microscopy published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Intermolecular G-quadruplex structure-based fluorescent DNA detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2013-03-15

    Adopting multi-donors to pair with one acceptor could improve the performance of fluorogenic detection probes. However, common dyes (e.g., fluorescein) in close proximity to each other would self-quench the fluorescence, and the fluorescence is difficult to restore. In this contribution, we constructed a novel "multi-donors-to-one acceptor" fluorescent DNA detection system by means of the intermolecular G-quadruplex (IGQ) structure-based fluorescence signal enhancement combined with the hairpin oligonucleotide. The novel IGQ-hairpin system was characterized using the p53 gene as the model target DNA. The proposed system showed an improved assay performance due to the introduction of IGQ-structure into fluorescent signaling probes, which could inhibit the background fluorescence and increase fluorescence restoration amplitude of fluoresceins upon target DNA hybridization. The proof-of-concept scheme is expected to provide new insight into the potential of G-quadruplex structure and promote the application of fluorescent oligonucleotide probes in fundamental research, diagnosis, and treatment of genetic diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of near IR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles for optical detection of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Sarit; Pellach, Michal [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Kam, Yossi [Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12065, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Grinberg, Igor; Corem-Salkmon, Enav [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Rubinstein, Abraham [Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12065, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Margel, Shlomo, E-mail: shlomo.margel@mail.biu.ac.il [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2013-03-01

    Near IR (NIR) fluorescent human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles hold great promise as contrast agents for tumor diagnosis. HSA nanoparticles are considered to be biocompatible, non-toxic and non-immunogenic. In addition, NIR fluorescence properties of these nanoparticles are important for in vivo tumor diagnostics, with low autofluorescence and relatively deep penetration of NIR irradiation due to low absorption of biomatrices. The present study describes the synthesis of new NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles, by entrapment of a NIR fluorescent dye within the HSA nanoparticles, which also significantly increases the photostability of the dye. Tumor-targeting ligands such as peanut agglutinin (PNA) and anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies (anti-CEA) were covalently conjugated to the NIR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles, increasing the potential fluorescent signal in tumors with upregulated corresponding receptors. Specific colon tumor detection by the NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles was demonstrated in a chicken embryo model and a rat model. In future work we also plan to encapsulate cancer drugs such as doxorubicin within the NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles for both colon cancer imaging and therapy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Near IR human serum albumin nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles were shown to be physically and chemically stable and photostable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumor-targeting ligands were covalently conjugated to the nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific colon cancer tumor detection was demonstrated in chicken-embryo and rat models.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of near IR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles for optical detection of colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Sarit; Pellach, Michal; Kam, Yossi; Grinberg, Igor; Corem-Salkmon, Enav; Rubinstein, Abraham; Margel, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    Near IR (NIR) fluorescent human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles hold great promise as contrast agents for tumor diagnosis. HSA nanoparticles are considered to be biocompatible, non-toxic and non-immunogenic. In addition, NIR fluorescence properties of these nanoparticles are important for in vivo tumor diagnostics, with low autofluorescence and relatively deep penetration of NIR irradiation due to low absorption of biomatrices. The present study describes the synthesis of new NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles, by entrapment of a NIR fluorescent dye within the HSA nanoparticles, which also significantly increases the photostability of the dye. Tumor-targeting ligands such as peanut agglutinin (PNA) and anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies (anti-CEA) were covalently conjugated to the NIR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles, increasing the potential fluorescent signal in tumors with upregulated corresponding receptors. Specific colon tumor detection by the NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles was demonstrated in a chicken embryo model and a rat model. In future work we also plan to encapsulate cancer drugs such as doxorubicin within the NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles for both colon cancer imaging and therapy. - Highlights: ► Near IR human serum albumin nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized. ► Nanoparticles were shown to be physically and chemically stable and photostable. ► Tumor-targeting ligands were covalently conjugated to the nanoparticles. ► Specific colon cancer tumor detection was demonstrated in chicken-embryo and rat models.

  7. Molecularly imprinted fluorescent probe based on FRET for selective and sensitive detection of doxorubicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhifeng, E-mail: 897061147@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Deng, Peihong; Li, Junhua [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Xu, Li [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Tang, Siping [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • FRET-based molecularly imprinted probe for detection of doxorubicin was prepared. • The detection limit of the probe was 13.8 nM for doxorubicin. • The FRET-based probe had a higher selectivity for the template than ordinary MIMs. - Abstract: In this work, a new type of fluorescent probe for detection of doxorubicin has been constructed by the combined use of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and molecular imprinting technique (MIT). Using doxorubicin as the template, the molecularly imprinted polymer thin layer was fabricated on the surfaces of carbon dot (CD) modified silica by sol-gel polymerization. The excitation energy of the fluorescent donor (CDs) could be transferred to the fluorescent acceptor (doxorubicin). The FRET based fluorescent probe demonstrated high sensitivity and selectivity for doxorubicin. The detection limit was 13.8 nM. The fluorescent probe was successfully applied for detecting doxorubicin in doxorubicin-spiked plasmas with a recovery of 96.8–103.8%, a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.3–2.8%. The strategy for construction of FRET-based molecularly imprinted materials developed in this work is very promising for analytical applications.

  8. [Improvement of the method for methylmercury determination in aquatic products using liquid chromatography online coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xiaohong; Zhao, Yunfeng; Zhang, Lei; Li, Xiaowei; Wu, Yongning

    2011-07-01

    The improvement method was developed for methylmercury determination using liquid chromatography online coupled with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (LC-CV-AFS). Cysteine was used as complexing agent in mobile phase instead of mercaptoethanol. Under the optimized conditions, baseline separation of mercury species could be achieved within 8 min on a C18 column with a mobile phase of 5% (v/v) acetonitrile-1 g/L L-cysteine-50 mmol/L ammonium acetate aqueous solution. The linear range of calibration curve of methylmercury was 1-50 microg/L and the limit of detection (S/N = 3) for methylmercury was 0.3 microg/L. Ultrasonication assisted hydrochloric acid extraction was used to extract methylmercury from seafood samples. The sample extract was cleaned up by a C18 solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. For validation of the method, certified reference materials and spiked seafood samples were analyzed. The determined methylmercury contents of certified reference materials NIST1566b, BCR464 and GBW10029 agreed well with the certified values. The determined methylmercury values for Food Analysis Performance Assessment Scheme (FAPAS) sample 07115 were satisfied. The recoveries of methylmercury in seafood samples at three spiked levels (10, 50 and 500 microg/kg) ranged from 89% to 112%, including cooked seafood food. The precision of the method based on relative standard deviation (RSD) was not more than 7%. The present method of LC-CV-AFS is accurate, sensitive, simple, and can meet the demand of methylmercury determination in seafood.

  9. Cloud point extraction for trace inorganic arsenic speciation analysis in water samples by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shan, E-mail: ls_tuzi@163.com; Wang, Mei, E-mail: wmei02@163.com; Zhong, Yizhou, E-mail: yizhz@21cn.com; Zhang, Zehua, E-mail: kazuki.0101@aliyun.com; Yang, Bingyi, E-mail: e_yby@163.com

    2015-09-01

    A new cloud point extraction technique was established and used for the determination of trace inorganic arsenic species in water samples combined with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HGAFS). As(III) and As(V) were complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and molybdate, respectively. The complexes were quantitatively extracted with the non-ionic surfactant (Triton X-114) by centrifugation. After addition of antifoam, the surfactant-rich phase containing As(III) was diluted with 5% HCl for HGAFS determination. For As(V) determination, 50% HCl was added to the surfactant-rich phase, and the mixture was placed in an ultrasonic bath at 70 °C for 30 min. As(V) was reduced to As(III) with thiourea–ascorbic acid solution, followed by HGAFS. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detection of 0.009 and 0.012 μg/L were obtained for As(III) and As(V), respectively. Concentration factors of 9.3 and 7.9, respectively, were obtained for a 50 mL sample. The precisions were 2.1% for As(III) and 2.3% for As(V). The proposed method was successfully used for the determination of trace As(III) and As(V) in water samples, with satisfactory recoveries. - Highlights: • Cloud point extraction was firstly established to determine trace inorganic arsenic(As) species combining with HGAFS. • Separate As(III) and As(V) determinations improve the accuracy. • Ultrasonic release of complexed As(V) enables complete As(V) reduction to As(III). • Direct HGAFS analysis can be performed.

  10. A new miniaturized multiarray biosensor system for fluorescence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibuzzi, A; Rea, G; Pezzotti, G; Esposito, D; Johanningmeier, U; Giardi, M T

    2007-01-01

    A miniaturized biosensor-based optical instrument has been designed and fabricated for multiarray fluorescence measurements of several biomediators in series, with applications in environmental monitoring and agrofood analysis. It is a multicell system featuring two arrays of five static cells (1 x 1 x 2 cm 3 ) which are sealed to avoid contamination. Every cell is made up by two modular sections: the bottom compartment with optical LED light excitations and a photodiode detector for fluorescence emission capture, and the top biocompatible compartment where the biosample is deposited. The system (0.250 kg without batteries and case, 100 x 100 x 150 mm 3 internal case dimensions) is equipped with electronic control boards, a flash memory card for automatic data storage, and internal batteries, thus being portable and versatile. The instrument allows one to perform simultaneous and multiparametric analyses and offers a large applicability in biosensor technology. The first prototype has been implemented with genetically modified oxygenic photosynthetic algae that were employed in the instrument experimental testing by monitoring pesticide pollution in water. Pesticides modify the photosystem II (PSII) activity in terms of fluorescence quenching. The PSII complex features a natural nanostructure and can be considered a sophisticated molecular device. Results from measurements employing several PSII mutants and six different pesticides at increasing concentrations and incubation times are presented and discussed

  11. Comparison of sensitivities and detection limits between direct excitation and secondary excitation modes in energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artz, B.E.; Short, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison was made between the direct tube excitation mode and the secondary target excitation mode using a Kevex 0810 energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence system. Relative sensitivities and detection limits were determined with two system configurations. The first configuration used a standard, high power, x-ray fluorescence tube to directly excite the specimen. Several x-ray tubes, including chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten, both filtered and not filtered, were employed. The second configuration consisted of using the x-ray tube to excite a secondary target which in turn excited the specimen. Appropriate targets were compared to the direct excitation results. Relative sensitivities and detection limits were determined for K-series lines for elements from magnesium to barium contained in a low atomic number matrix and in a high atomic number matrix

  12. Chair-side detection of Prevotella Intermedia in mature dental plaque by its fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yoshiaki; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Okamoto, Masaaki; Sogabe, Kaoru; Okada, Ayako; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2017-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens is one of the well-known pathogens causing periodontal diseases, and the red florescence excited by the visible blue light caused by the protoporphyrin IX in the bacterial cells could be useful for the chair-side detection. The aim of this study was to evaluated levels of periodontal pathogen, especially P. intermedia in clinical samples of red fluorescent dental plaque. Thirty two supra gingival plaque samples from six individuals were measured its fluorescence at 640nm wavelength excited by 409nm. Periodontopathic bacteria were counted by the Invader PLUS PCR assay. Co-relations the fluorescence intensity and bacterial counts were analyzed by Person's correlation coefficient and simple and multiple regression analysis. Positive and negative predictive values of the fluorescence intensities for with or without P. intermedia in supragingival plaque was calculated. When relative fluorescence unit (RFU) were logarithmic transformed, statistically significant linear relations between RFU and bacterial counts were obtained for P. intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia. By the multiple regression analysis, only P. intermedia had statistically significant co-relation with fluorescence intensities. All of the fluorescent dental plaque contained P. intermedia m. In contrast, 28% of non-fluorescent plaques contained P. intermedia. To check the fluorescence dental plaque in the oral cavity could be the simple chair-side screening of the mature dental plaque before examining the periodontal pathogens especially P. intermedia by the PCR method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Speciation analysis of arsenic compounds in seafood by ion chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tingting; Ji, Hongwei; Li, Huixin; Cui, He; Song, Tian; Duan, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Qianlin; Cai, Feng; Zhang, Li

    2017-06-01

    Ion chromatography-ultra violet-hydride generation-Atomic Florescence Spectrometry was applied to detect 5 arsenic species in seafoods. The arsenic species studied include arsenobetaine (AsB), arsenite (As(III)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and arsenate (As(V)), which were extracted from samples using 2% formic acid. Gradient elution using 33 mmol L-1 CH3COONH4 and 15 mmol L-1 Na2CO3 with 10 mL CH3CH2OH at pH 8.4 allowed the chromatographic separation of all the species on a Hamilton PRP-X100 anion-exchange column in less than 8 min. In this study, an ultrasound extraction method was used to extract arsenic species from seafood. The extraction efficiency was good and the recoveries from spiked samples were in the range of 72.6%-109%; the precision between sample replicates was higher than 3.6% for all determinations. The detection limits were 3.543 μg L-1 for AsB, 0.426 μg L-1 for As(III), 0.216 μg L-1 for DMA, 0.211 μg L-1 for MMA, and 0.709 μg L-1 for As(V), and the linear coefficients were greater than 0.999. We also developed an application of this method for the determination of arsenic species in bonito, Euphausia superba, and Enteromorpha with satisfactory results. Therefore, it was confirmed that this method was appropriate for the detection of arsenic species in seafood.

  14. Fluorescence hyperspectral imaging technique for foreign substance detection on fresh-cut lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Changyeun; Kim, Giyoung; Kim, Moon S; Lim, Jongguk; Cho, Hyunjeong; Barnaby, Jinyoung Yang; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2017-09-01

    Non-destructive methods based on fluorescence hyperspectral imaging (HSI) techniques were developed to detect worms on fresh-cut lettuce. The optimal wavebands for detecting the worms were investigated using the one-way ANOVA and correlation analyses. The worm detection imaging algorithms, RSI-I (492-626)/492 , provided a prediction accuracy of 99.0%. The fluorescence HSI techniques indicated that the spectral images with a pixel size of 1 × 1 mm had the best classification accuracy for worms. The overall results demonstrate that fluorescence HSI techniques have the potential to detect worms on fresh-cut lettuce. In the future, we will focus on developing a multi-spectral imaging system to detect foreign substances such as worms, slugs and earthworms on fresh-cut lettuce. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Label free selective detection of estriol using graphene oxide-based fluorescence sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, H. S.; Sao, Reshma; Vaish, Rahul

    2014-07-01

    Water-soluble and fluorescent Graphene oxide (GO) is biocompatible, easy, and economical to synthesize. Interestingly, GO is also capable of quenching fluorescence. On the basis of its fluorescence and quenching abilities, GO has been reported to serve as an energy acceptor in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensor. GO-based FRET biosensors have been widely reported for sensing of proteins, nucleic acid, ATP (Adenosine triphosphate), etc. GO complexes with fluorescent dyes and enzymes have been used to sense metal ions. Graphene derivatives have been used for sensing endocrine-disrupting chemicals like bisphenols and chlorophenols with high sensitivity and good reproducibility. On this basis, a novel GO based fluorescent sensor has been successfully designed to detect estriol with remarkable selectivity and sensitivity. Estriol is one of the three estrogens in women and is considered to be medically important. Estriol content of maternal urine or plasma acts as an important screening marker for estimating foetal growth and development. In addition, estriol is also used as diagnostic marker for diseases like breast cancer, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance, lupus erythematosus, endometriosis, etc. In this present study, we report for the first time a rapid, sensitive with detection limit of 1.3 nM, selective and highly biocompatible method for label free detection of estriol under physiological conditions using fluorescence assay.

  16. DNA-hosted copper nanoclusters/graphene oxide based fluorescent biosensor for protein kinase activity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengke; Lin, Zihan; Liu, Qing; Jiang, Shan; Liu, Hua; Su, Xingguang

    2018-07-05

    A novel fluorescent biosensor for protein kinase activity (PKA) detection was designed by applying double-strands DNA-hosted copper nanoclusters (dsDNA-CuNCs) and graphene oxide (GO). One DNA strand of the dsDNA consisted of two domains, one domain can hybridize with another complementary DNA strand to stabilize the fluorescent CuNCs and another domain was adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) aptamer. ATP aptamer of the dsDNA-CuNCs would be spontaneously absorbed onto the GO surface through π-π stacking interactions. Thus GO can efficiently quench the fluorescence (FL) of dsDNA-CuNCs through fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In the present of ATP, ATP specifically combined with ATP aptamer to form ATP-ATP aptamer binding complexes, which had much less affinity to GO, resulting in the fluorescence recovery of the system. Nevertheless, in the presence of PKA, ATP could be translated into ADP and ADP could not combine with ATP aptamer resulting in the fluorescence quenching of dsDNA-CuNCs again. According to the change of the fluorescence signal, PKA activity could be successfully monitored in the range of 0.1-5.0 U mL -1 with a detection limit (LOD) of 0.039 U mL -1 . Besides, the inhibitory effect of H-89 on PKA activity was studied. The sensor was performed for PKA activity detection in cell lysates with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Oligonucleotide-stabilized fluorescent silver nanoclusters for the specific and sensitive detection of biotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Jingjin; Zhao, Shulin

    2016-02-21

    A novel biotin fluorescent probe based on oligonucleotide-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) was synthesized by employing a biotinylated cytosine-rich sequence as a synthesized template. The fluorescence properties of the DNA-AgNCs are related to the modified position of the DNA. When biotin is linked to the middle thymine base of the DNA sequence, the DNA-AgNCs emit the strongest fluorescence. Moreover, the stability of the DNA-AgNCs was affected by avidin through biotin-avidin binding, quenching the fluorescence of the DNA-AgNCs. In contrast, if free biotin is further introduced into this system, the quenching is apparently weakened by competition, leading to the restoration of fluorescence. This phenomenon can be utilized for the detection of biotin. Under the optimal conditions, the fluorescence recovery is linearly proportional to the concentration of biotin in the range of 10 nM-1.0 μM with a detection limit of 6.0 nM. This DNA-AgNCs probe with excellent fluorescent properties is sensitive and selective for the detection of biotin and has been applied for the determination of biotin in wheat flour.

  18. Detecting many-body-localization lengths with cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuefei; Li, Xiaopeng

    2018-03-01

    Considering ultracold atoms in optical lattices, we propose experimental protocols to study many-body-localization (MBL) length and criticality in quench dynamics. Through numerical simulations with exact diagonalization, we show that in the MBL phase the perturbed density profile following a local quench remains exponentially localized in postquench dynamics. The size of this density profile after long-time-dynamics defines a localization length, which tends to diverge at the MBL-to-ergodic transition as we increase the system size. The determined localization transition point agrees with previous exact diagonalization calculations using other diagnostics. Our numerical results provide evidence for violation of the Harris-Chayes bound for the MBL criticality. The critical exponent ν can be extracted from our proposed dynamical procedure, which can then be used directly in experiments to determine whether the Harris-Chayes-bound holds for the MBL transition. These proposed protocols to detect localization criticality are justified by benchmarking to the well-established results for the noninteracting three-dimensional Anderson localization.

  19. Intraoperative Detection of Superficial Liver Tumors by Fluorescence Imaging Using Indocyanine Green and 5-aminolevulinic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaibori, Masaki; Matsui, Kosuke; Ishizaki, Morihiko; Iida, Hiroya; Okumura, Tadayoshi; Sakaguchi, Tatsuma; Inoue, Kentaro; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Asano, Hiroaki; Kon, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG) and the porphyrin precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) have been approved as fluorescence imaging agents in the clinical setting. This study evaluated the usefulness of fluorescence imaging with both ICG and 5-ALA for intraoperative identification of latent small liver tumors. There were 48 patients who had main tumors within 5 mm of the liver surface. 5-ALA hydrochloride was orally administered to patients 3 h before surgery. ICG had been intravenously injected within 14 days prior to surgery. Intraoperatively, after visual inspection, manual palpation and ultrasonography fluorescence images of the liver surface were obtained with ICG and 5-ALA prior to resection. With ICG, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting the preoperatively identified main tumors were 96%, 50% and 94%, respectively. Twelve latent small tumors were newly detected on the liver surface using ICG, five of which proved to be carcinomas. With 5-ALA, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting the main tumors were 57%, 100% and 58%, respectively. Five latent small tumors were newly detected using 5-ALA; all were carcinomas. Overall, five new tumors were detected by both ICG and 5-ALA fluorescence imaging; two were hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and three were metastases of colorectal cancer. The sensitivity and specificity of ICG fluorescence imaging for main tumor detection were relatively high and low, respectively, but the opposite was true of 5-ALA imaging. Fluorescence imaging using 5-ALA may provide greater specificity in the detection of surface-invisible malignant liver tumors than using ICG fluorescence imaging alone. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. High-performance fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads as microfluidic protein chip supports for AFP detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Xiaoqun [School of Life Sciences, Tianjin Engineering Center of Micro-Nano Biomaterials and Detection-Treatment Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Yan, Huan; Yang, Jiumin [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, 300052 (China); Wu, Yudong; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Yingyi [School of Life Sciences, Tianjin Engineering Center of Micro-Nano Biomaterials and Detection-Treatment Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu, Ping [Bioscience (Tianjin) Diagnostic Technology CO., LTD, Tianjin, 300300 (China); Wang, Huiquan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin, 300387 (China); Hu, Zhidong, E-mail: huzhidong27@163.com [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, 300052 (China); Chang, Jin, E-mail: jinchang@tju.edu.cn [School of Life Sciences, Tianjin Engineering Center of Micro-Nano Biomaterials and Detection-Treatment Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2016-10-05

    Fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads (FEMMs), with the fluorescence encoding ability of quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic enrichment and separation functions of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, have been widely used for multiple biomolecular detection as microfluidic protein chip supports. However, the preparation of FEMMs with long-term fluorescent encoding and immunodetection stability is still a challenge. In this work, we designed a novel high-temperature chemical swelling strategy. The QDs and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were effectively packaged into microbeads via the thermal motion of the polymer chains and the hydrophobic interaction between the nanoparticles and microbeads. The FEMMs obtained a highly uniform fluorescent property and long-term encoding and immunodetection stability and could be quickly magnetically separated and enriched. Then, the QD-encoded magnetic microbeads were applied to alpha fetoprotein (AFP) detection via sandwich immunoreaction. The properties of the encoded microspheres were characterized using a self-designed detecting apparatus, and the target molecular concentration in the sample was also quantified. The results suggested that the high-performance FEMMs have great potential in the field of biomolecular detection. - Graphical abstract: We designed a novel strategy to prepare a kind of high-performance fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads as microfluidic protein chip support with long-time fluorescent encoding and immunodetection stability for AFP detection. - Highlights: • A novel strategy combined the high temperature with chemical swelling technology is designed. • Based on hydrophobic interaction and polymer thermal motion, QDs and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} were effectively packaged into microbeads. • The fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads show long-term fluorescent encoding and immunodetection stability.

  1. Ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots for the detection of mercury ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yusha; Mei, Jing; Bai, Jianliang; Chen, Xu; Ren, Lili

    2018-05-01

    A novel ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots has been synthesized via bonding rhodamine B hydrazide to the carbon dots surface by an amide reaction. The ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor showed only a single blue fluorescence emission around 450 nm. While, as mercury ion was added, due to the open-ring of rhodamine moiety bonded on the CDs surface, the orange emission of the open-ring rhodamine would increase obviously according to the concentration of mercury ion, resulting in the distinguishable dual emissions at 450 nm and 575 nm under a single 360 excitation wavelength. Meanwhile, the ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots we prepared is more sensitive to qualitative and semi-quantitative detection of mercury ion in the range of 0–100 μM, because fluorescence changes gradually from blue to orange emission under 365 nm lamp with the increasing of mercury ion in the tested solution.

  2. Combining electrophoresis with detection under ultraviolet light and multiple ultrafiltration for isolation of humic fluorescence fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskaya, Olga E; Shaloiko, Lubov A; Demin, Dmitrii V; Marchenkov, Victor V; Proskuryakov, Ivan I; Coelho, Christian; Trubetskoj, Oleg A

    2011-04-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of chernozem soil humic acids (HAs) followed by observation under UV (312 nm) excitation light reveals new low molecular weight (MW) fluorescent fractions. Ultrafiltration of HAs sample in 7 M urea on a membrane of low nominal MW retention (NMWR, 5 kDa) was repetitively used for separation of fluorescent and non-fluorescent species. Thirty ultrafiltrates and the final retentate R were obtained. Fluorescence maxima of separate ultrafiltrates were different and non-monotonously changed in the range of 475-505 nm. Fluorescence maxima of less than 490 nm were detected only in the four first utrafiltrates. For further physical-chemical analyses all utrafiltrates were combined into a fraction called UFchernozem soil HAs complex. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhancing early bladder cancer detection with fluorescence-guided endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y. T.; Xie, T. Q.; Du, C. W.; Bastacky, S.; Meyers, S.; Zeidel, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    We report an experimental study of the possibility of enhancing early bladder cancer diagnosis with fluorescence-image-guided endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT). After the intravesical instillation of a 10% solution of 5-aminolevulinic acid, simultaneous fluorescence imaging (excitation of 380-420 nm, emission of 620-700 nm) and OCT are performed on rat bladders to identify the photochemical and morphological changes associated with uroepithelial tumorigenesis. The preliminary results of our ex vivo study reveal that both fluorescence and OCT can identify early uroepithelial cancers, and OCT can detect precancerous lesions (e.g., hyperplasia) that fluorescence may miss. This suggests that a cystoscope combining 5-aminolevulinic acid fluorescence and OCT imaging has the potential to enhance the efficiency and sensitivity of early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  4. A fluorescent optical fibre chemosensor for mercury detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Stephen P.; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2015-09-01

    A proof-of-concept mercury probe was developed based on covalent attachment of a chemical coating to optical fibre. The sensing element comprised a dansyl derivative and crown ether moiety, acting as fluorophore and metal ion chelator respectively. An ON-OFF type fluorescence (quench) occurred upon binding of mercury ions, via an intramolecular charge transfer mechanism, in aqueous solution in the 909nM-90.9μM (247 ppb -24.7 ppm) concentration range. A washing protocol was identified for sensor regeneration allowing the probe to be re-used.

  5. Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence of atomic oxygen in the afterglow of pulsed positive corona discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ryo; Takezawa, Kei; Oda, Tetsuji

    2009-08-01

    Atomic oxygen is measured in the afterglow of pulsed positive corona discharge using time-resolved two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence. The discharge occurs in a 14 mm point-to-plane gap in dry air. After the discharge pulse, the atomic oxygen density decreases at a rate of 5×104 s-1. Simultaneously, ozone density increases at almost the same rate, where the ozone density is measured using laser absorption method. This agreement between the increasing rate of atomic oxygen and decreasing rate of ozone proves that ozone is mainly produced by the well-known three-body reaction, O+O2+M→O3+M. No other process for ozone production such as O2(v)+O2→O3+O is observed. The spatial distribution of atomic oxygen density is in agreement with that of the secondary streamer luminous intensity. This agreement indicates that atomic oxygen is mainly produced in the secondary streamer channels, not in the primary streamer channels.

  6. Fluorescent detection of C-reactive protein using polyamide beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesh, Shreesha; Chen, Lu; Aitchison, Stewart

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infection causes Sepsis which is one of the leading cause of mortality in hospitals. This infection can be quantified from blood plasma using C - reactive protein (CRP). A quick diagnosis at the patient's location through Point-of- Care (POC) testing could give doctors the confidence to prescribe antibiotics. In this paper, the development and testing of a bead-based procedure for CRP quantification is described. The size of the beads enable them to be trapped in wells without the need for magnetic methods of immobilization. Large (1.5 mm diameter) Polyamide nylon beads were used as the substrate for capturing CRP from pure analyte samples. The beads captured CRP either directly through adsorption or indirectly by having specific capture antibodies on their surface. Both methods used fluorescent imaging techniques to quantify the protein. The amount of CRP needed to give a sufficient fluorescent signal through direct capture method was found suitable for identifying bacterial causes of infection. Similarly, viral infections could be quantified by the more sensitive indirect capture method. This bead-based assay can be potentially integrated as a disposable cartridge in a POC device due to its passive nature and the small quantities needed.

  7. A benzothiazole-based fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid detection and imaging in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khac Hong; Hao, Yuanqiang; Zeng, Ke; Fan, Shengnan; Li, Fen; Yuan, Suke; Ding, Xuejing; Xu, Maotian; Liu, You-Nian

    2018-06-01

    A benzothiazole-based turn-on fluorescent probe with a large Stokes shift (190 nm) has been developed for hypochlorous acid detection. The probe displays prompt fluorescence response for HClO with excellent selectivity over other reactive oxygen species as well as a low detection limit of 0.08 μM. The sensing mechanism involves the HClO-induced specific oxidation of oxime moiety of the probe to nitrile oxide, which was confirmed by HPLC-MS technique. Furthermore, imaging studies demonstrated that the probe is cell permeable and can be applied to detect HClO in living cells.

  8. A turn-on fluorescent rhodamine-acyl hydrazide for selective detection of Cu"2"+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jung Won; Jeong, Hyuk; Lee, Min Hee

    2017-01-01

    We present a rhodamine-based probe that can detect Cu"2"+ ions via Cu"2"+-promoted hydrolysis in aqueous solutions. In solution, the probe is non-fluorescent and colorless, but gives a strong fluorescence at 586 nm and shows a color change to pink on the addition of Cu"2"+ ions. We demonstrate that the rhodamine-based probe undergoes Cu"2"+-promoted hydrolysis with a moderate reaction time (within 3 min) and provides a fluorescence off–on change, even in the presence of other competitive metal ions. The rhodamine-based probe shows a linear correlation between increasing fluorescence at 586 nm and the Cu"2"+ concentration, and can detect Cu"2"+ at nanomolar levels (10 nM) in CH_3CN:H_2O (v/v, 90:10)

  9. Early detection of tumor masses by in vivo hematoporphyrin-mediated fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autiero, Maddalena; Celentano, Luigi; Cozzolino, Rosanna; Laccetti, Paolo; Marotta, Marcello; Mettivier, Giovanni; Cristina Montesi, Maria; Quarto, Maria; Riccio, Patrizia; Roberti, Giuseppe; Russo, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the capability of fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) for the early detection of surface tumors in mice. We used a hematoporphyrin (HP) compound (HP dichlorohydrate) as a red fluorescent marker and a low noise, high sensitivity, digital CCD camera for fluorescence imaging. In this preliminary study, highly malignant anaplastic human thyroid carcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously in one mouse and their growth was monitored daily for 5 days by FRI. The selective HP uptake by the tumor tissues was successfully observed: we observed the fluorescence of tumor only 3 days after cancer cells injection, i.e. when the tumor mass was neither visible (to the naked eye) or palpable. These measurements indicate that FRI is a suitable technique to detect minute subcutaneous tumor masses. This FRI system will be coupled to a radionuclide imaging system based on a CdTe detector for in vivo multimodal imaging in mice

  10. Interpenetrated Binary Supramolecular Nanofibers for Sensitive Fluorescence Detection of Six Classes of Explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhu, Qijian; Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Chen; Che, Yanke; Zhao, Jincai

    2018-04-03

    In this work, we develop a sequential self-assembly approach to fabricate interpenetrated binary supramolecular nanofibers consisting of carbazole oligomer 1-cobalt(II) (1-Co 2+ ) coordination nanofibers and oligomer 2 nanofibers for the sensitive detection of six classes of explosives. When exposed to peroxide explosives (e.g., H 2 O 2 ), Co 2+ in 1-Co 2+ coordination nanofibers can be reduced to Co + that can transfer an electron to the excited 2 nanofibers and thereby quench their fluorescence. On the other hand, when exposed to the other five classes of explosives, the excited 2 nanofibers can transfer an electron to explosives to quench their fluorescence. On the basis of the distinct fluorescence quenching mechanisms, six classes of explosives can be sensitively detected. Herein, we provide a new strategy to design broad-band fluorescence sensors for a rich identification of threats.

  11. Improvement of the qualitative and quantitative detection of simultaneously present fluorescent tracers by systematic sample treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, H.

    1982-01-01

    The selective instrumental detection of individual fluorescent tracers in mixtures containing further fluorescent dyes is limited by spectral interferences. Therefore additional separations or other suitable procedures have to be included into the analytic technique. With the method described below, the respective tracer to be detected remains with its initial concentration in the sample and is analysed under the appropriate conditions, whereas the interfering tracers are separated or suppressed. The techniques applied for this base on the facts that 1) the fluorescence intensity of the tracers varies differently when the pH-value changes; 2) the tracers show different absorption behaviour and 3) they provide different degrees of light sensitivity. The procedures permit for example to detect uranin when eosin is present in a higher concentration or to detect eosin when amidorhodamin G is present. (orig.) [de

  12. Sentinel lymph nodes fluorescence detection and imaging using Patent Blue V bound to human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, Franklin; Steibel, Jérôme; Chabrier, Renée; Blé, François Xavier; Tubaldo, Hervé; Rasata, Ravelo; Chambron, Jacques; Duportail, Guy; Simon, Hervé; Rodier, Jean-François; Poulet, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Patent Blue V (PBV), a dye used clinically for sentinel lymph node detection, was mixed with human serum albumin (HSA). After binding to HSA, the fluorescence quantum yield increased from 5 × 10−4 to 1.7 × 10−2, which was enough to allow fluorescence detection and imaging of its distribution. A detection threshold, evaluated in scattering test objects, lower than 2.5 nmol × L−1 was obtained, using a single-probe setup with a 5-mW incident light power. The detection sensitivity using a fluorescence imaging device was in the µmol × L−1 range, with a noncooled CCD camera. Preclinical evaluation was performed on a rat model and permitted to observe inflamed nodes on all animals. PMID:23024922

  13. Fluorescence hyperspectral imaging technique for the foreign substance detection on fresh-cut lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nondestructive methods based on fluorescence hyperspectral imaging (HSI) techniques were developed in order to detect worms on fresh-cut lettuce. The optimal wavebands for detecting worms on fresh-cut lettuce were investigated using the one-way ANOVA analysis and correlation analysis. The worm detec...

  14. Micromotor-based on-off fluorescence detection of sarin and soman simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Virendra V; Kaufmann, Kevin; Orozco, Jahir; Li, Jinxing; Galarnyk, Michael; Arya, Gaurav; Wang, Joseph

    2015-06-30

    Self-propelled micromotor-based fluorescent "On-Off" detection of nerve agents is described. The motion-based assay utilizes Si/Pt Janus micromotors coated with fluoresceinamine toward real-time "on-the-fly" field detection of sarin and soman simulants.

  15. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid in foods, using HPLC with fluorescence detection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, D.P.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Janssen, P.L.T.M.K.; Katan, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    We developed a specific and sensitive HPLC method with fluorescence detection for the determination of free acetylsalicylic acid, free salicylic acid, and free salicylic acid plus salicylic acid after alkaline hydrolysis (free-plus-bound) in foods. Acetylsalicylic acid was detected after postcolumn

  16. Electrophoresis microchip with integrated waveguides for simultaneous native UV fluorescence and absorbance detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlsson, Pelle Daniel; Sala, Olga Ordeig; Mogensen, Klaus Bo

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous label-free detection of UV absorbance and native UV-excited fluorescence in an electrophoresis microchip is presented. UV transparent integrated waveguides launch light at a wavelength of 254 nm from a mercury lamp along the length of a 1-mm. long detection cell. Transmitted UV light...

  17. Detecting Kerogen as a Biosignature Using Colocated UV Time-Gated Raman and Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolyar, Svetlana; Eshelman, Evan J; Farmer, Jack D; Hamilton, David; Daly, Michael G; Youngbull, Cody

    2018-04-01

    The Mars 2020 mission will analyze samples in situ and identify any that could have preserved biosignatures in ancient habitable environments for later return to Earth. Highest priority targeted samples include aqueously formed sedimentary lithologies. On Earth, such lithologies can contain fossil biosignatures as aromatic carbon (kerogen). In this study, we analyzed nonextracted kerogen in a diverse suite of natural, complex samples using colocated UV excitation (266 nm) time-gated (UV-TG) Raman and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopies. We interrogated kerogen and its host matrix in samples to (1) explore the capabilities of UV-TG Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies for detecting kerogen in high-priority targets in the search for possible biosignatures on Mars; (2) assess the effectiveness of time gating and UV laser wavelength in reducing fluorescence in Raman spectra; and (3) identify sample-specific issues that could challenge rover-based identifications of kerogen using UV-TG Raman spectroscopy. We found that ungated UV Raman spectroscopy is suited to identify diagnostic kerogen Raman bands without interfering fluorescence and that UV fluorescence spectroscopy is suited to identify kerogen. These results highlight the value of combining colocated Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies, similar to those obtainable by SHERLOC on Mars 2020, to strengthen the confidence of kerogen detection as a potential biosignature in complex natural samples. Key Words: Raman spectroscopy-Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy-Mars Sample Return-Mars 2020 mission-Kerogen-Biosignatures. Astrobiology 18, 431-453.

  18. Highly selective ratiometric fluorescent detection of Fe{sup 3+} with a polyphenyl derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhan-Xian, E-mail: lizx@zzu.edu.cn [The College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Zhou, Wan; Zhang, Li-Feng; Yuan, Rui-Li; Liu, Xing-Jiang; Wei, Liu-He [The College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Yu, Ming-Ming, E-mail: yumm@zzu.edu.cn [The College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Compared with other fluorescent probes, ratiometric fluorescence responses are more attractive because the ratio between the two emission intensities can be used to measure the analyte concentration and provide a built-in correction for environmental effects. A highly selective and sensitive ratiometric fluorescent probe for Fe{sup 3+} was synthesized, which exhibits an enhanced fluorescence with a large red-shift in emission from 361 to 455 nm upon addition of Fe{sup 3+}. The red-shift of the emission peak can be ascribed to the reformed orbital, and the increase of emission intensity may be ascribed to the inhibition of the rotation of C–C bonds between each two aromatic rings. -- Graphical abstract: A highly selective and sensitive ratiometric fluorescent probe for Fe{sup 3+} was synthesized, which exhibits an enhanced fluorescence with a large red-shift in emission from 361 to 455 nm upon addition of Fe{sup 3+}. Highlights: ► A ratiometric fluorescent probe for Fe{sup 3+} was synthesized. ► The probe exhibits an enhanced fluorescence with a red-shift upon addition of Fe{sup 3+}. ► Inhibition of the rotation of C–C bonds was possible detection mechanism for Fe{sup 3+}.

  19. Green Synthesis of Fluorescent Carbon Dots for Selective Detection of Tartrazine in Food Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Yang, Xiupei; Li, Gu; Zhao, Chuan; Liao, Xiangjun

    2015-08-05

    A simple, economical, and green method for the preparation of water-soluble, high-fluorescent carbon quantum dots (C-dots) has been developed via hydrothermal process using aloe as a carbon source. The synthesized C-dots were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence spectrophotometer, UV-vis absorption spectra as well as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results reveal that the as-prepared C-dots were spherical shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and emit bright yellow photoluminescence (PL) with a quantum yield of approximately 10.37%. The surface of the C-dots was rich in hydroxyl groups and presented various merits including high fluorescent quantum yield, excellent photostability, low toxicity and satisfactory solubility. Additionally, we found that one of the widely used synthetic food colorants, tartrazine, could result in a strong fluorescence quenching of the C-dots through a static quenching process. The decrease of fluorescence intensity made it possible to determine tartrazine in the linear range extending from 0.25 to 32.50 μM, This observation was further successfully applied for the determination of tartrazine in food samples collected from local markets, suggesting its great potential toward food routine analysis. Results from our study may shed light on the production of fluorescent and biocompatible nanocarbons due to our simple and environmental benign strategy to synthesize C-dots in which aloe was used as a carbon source.

  20. Use of a Novel Rover-mounted Fluorescence Imager and Fluorescent Probes to Detect Biological Material in the Atacama Desert in Daylight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, S.; Pane, D.; Warren-Rhodes, K.; Cockell, C.; Ernst, L. A.; Minkley, E.; Fisher, G.; Emani, S.; Wettergreen, D. S.; Wagner, M.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an imaging system, the Fluorescence Imager (FI), for detecting fluorescence signals from sparse microorganisms and biofilms during autonomous rover exploration. The fluorescence signals arise both from naturally occurring chromophores, such as chlorophyll of cyanobacteria and lichens, and from fluorescent probes applied to soil and rocks. Daylight imaging has been accomplished by a novel use of a high-powered flashlamp synchronized to a CCD camera. The fluorescent probes are cell permanent stains that have extremely low intrinsic fluorescence (quantum yields less than 0.01) and a large fluorescence enhancement (quantum yields greater than 0.4) when bound to the target. Each probe specifically targets either carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids or membrane lipids, the four classes of macromolecules found in terrestrial life. The intent of the probes is to interrogate the environment for surface and endolithic life forms.

  1. Mercury in Environmental and Biological Samples Using Online Combustion with Sequential Atomic Absorption and Fluorescence Measurements: A Direct Comparison of Two Fundamental Techniques in Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizdziel, James V.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students quantitatively determine the concentration of an element (mercury) in an environmental or biological sample while comparing and contrasting the fundamental techniques of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A mercury analyzer based on sample combustion,…

  2. A virus-MIPs fluorescent sensor based on FRET for highly sensitive detection of JEV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Caishuang; Wang, Huan; He, Kui; Chen, Chunyan; Chen, Xiaoming; Gong, Hang; Cai, Changqun

    2016-11-01

    Major stumbling blocks in the recognition and detection of virus are the unstable biological recognition element or the complex detection means. Here a fluorescent sensor based on virus-molecular imprinted polymers (virus-MIPs) was designed for specific recognition and highly sensitive detection of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). The virus-MIPs were anchored on the surface of silica microspheres modified by fluorescent dye, pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde (PC). The fluorescence intensity of PC can be enhanced by the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), where virus acted as energy donor and PC acted as energy acceptor. The enhanced fluorescence intensity was proportional to the concentration of virus in the range of 24-960pM, with a limit of detection (LOD, 3σ) of 9.6pM, and the relative standard deviation was 1.99%. In additional, the specificity study confirmed the resultant MIPs has high-selectivity for JEV. This sensor would become a new key for the detection of virus because of its high sensitive, simple operation, high stability and low cost. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Ultra-sensitive and selective Hg{sup 2+} detection based on fluorescent carbon dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruihua; Li, Haitao; Kong, Weiqian; Liu, Juan [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Yang, E-mail: yangl@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Tong, Cuiyan, E-mail: tongcy959@nenu.edu.cn [Chemisty Department, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Zhang, Xing [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Kang, Zhenhui, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Fluorescent carbon dots were efficiently synthesized by one-step sodium hydroxide-assisted reflux method from PEG and demonstrated to show high selectivity toward Hg2+ ions detection. - Highlights: • FCDs were synthesized by one-step sodium hydroxide-assisted reflux method from PEG. • The FCDs emit blue photoluminescence and have upconversion fluorescent property. • The FCDs show ultra-sensitive detective ability for Hg{sup 2+} ions. - Abstract: Fluorescent carbon dots (FCDs) were efficiently synthesized by one-step sodium hydroxide-assisted reflux method from poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The obtained FCDs exhibit excellent water-solubility and high stability. Under the UV irradiation, the FCDs could emit bright blue photoluminescence, and also they were found to show excellent up-conversion fluorescence. It was further demonstrated that such FCDs can serve as effective fluorescent sensing platform for Hg{sup 2+} ions detection with ultra-sensitivity and selectivity. The sensing system achieved a limit of detection as low as 1 fM, which is much lower than all the previous reported sensing systems for Hg{sup 2+} ions detection. This FCDs sensing system has been successfully applied for the analysis of Hg{sup 2+} ions in water samples from river, lake, and tap water, showing good practical feasibility.

  4. Bioconjugated fluorescent silica nanoparticles for the rapid detection of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemadi, Ahmad; Ekrami, Alireza; Oormazdi, Hormozd; Meamar, Ahmad Reza; Akhlaghi, Lame; Samarbaf-Zadeh, Ali Reza; Razmjou, Elham

    2015-05-01

    Rapid detection of Entamoeba histolytica based on fluorescent silica nanoparticle (FSNP) indirect immunofluorescence microscopy was evaluated. Silica nanoparticles were synthesized using Stöber's method, with their surface activated to covalently bind to, and immobilize, protein A. For biolabeling, FSNP was added to conjugated E. histolytica trophozoites with monoclonal anti-E. histolytica IgG1 for microscopic observation of fluorescence. Fluorescent silica nanoparticle sensitivity was determined with axenically cultured E. histolytica serially diluted to seven concentrations. Specificity was evaluated using other intestinal protozoa. Fluorescent silica nanoparticles detected E. histolytica at the lowest tested concentration with no cross-reaction with Entamoeba dispar, Entamoeba moshkovskii, Blastocystis sp., or Giardia lamblia. Visualization of E. histolytica trophozoites with anti-E. histolytica antibody labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was compared with that using anti-E. histolytica antibody bioconjugated FSNP. Although FITC and FSNP produced similar results, the amount of specific antibody required for FITC to induce fluorescence of similar intensity was fivefold that for FSNP. Fluorescent silica nanoparticles delivered a rapid, simple, cost-effective, and highly sensitive and specific method of detecting E. histolytica. Further study is needed before introducing FSNP for laboratory diagnosis of amoebiasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A ratiometric fluorescent quantum dots based biosensor for organophosphorus pesticides detection by inner-filter effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xu; Li, Hongxia; Han, Xiaosong; Su, Xingguang

    2015-12-15

    In this work, we develop a novel and sensitive sensor for the detection of organophosphorus pesticides based on the inner-filter effect (IFE) between gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and ratiometric fluorescent quantum dots (RF-QDs). The RF-QDs has been designed by hybridizing two differently colored CdTe QDs, in which the red emissive QDs entrapped in the silica sphere acting as the reference signal, and the green emissive QDs covalently attached on the silica surface serving as the response signal.The fluorescence of RF-QDs could be quenched by AuNPs based on IFE. Protamine could effectively turn on the fluorescence due to the electrostatic attraction between protamine and AuNPs. Trypsin can easily hydrolyze protamine, leading to the quench of the fluorescence. Then, the fluorescence could be recovered again by the addition of parathion-methyl (PM) which could inhibit the activity of trypsin. By measuring the fluorescence of RF-QDs, the inhibition efficiency of PM to trypsin activity was evaluated. Under the optimized conditions, the inhibition efficiency was proportional to the logarithm of PM concentration in the range of 0.04-400 ng mL(-1), with a detection limit of 0.018 ng mL(-1). Furthermore, the simple and convenient method had been used for PM detection in environmental and agricultural samples with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Highly selective detection of glutathione using a NIP/Cu2+ complex fluorescent probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Wenrui; Zhao Zhi; Zhang Yang; Wang Qiusheng; Zhao Xin; Ouyang Jie

    2012-01-01

    A novel fluorescent compound, 4-(trimethyl ammonium chloride)acetamide-2-(1H-naphtho[2,3-d]imidazol-2-yl)phenol (TMACA-NIP), was synthesized and used as a fluorescent probe for detecting glutathione reduced (GSH). The new NIP-based probe exhibited high fluorescence in water, which was quenched during the presence of copper (II) due to the complexation between TMACA-NIP and Cu 2+ . But after adding GSH into the TMACA-NIP and Cu 2+ system, the fluorescence of TMACA-NIP was recovered because the binding force between GSH and Cu 2+ is stronger than that between TMACA-NIP and Cu 2+ , which destroys the equilibrium between NIP and copper (II) ions and releases the fluorescence probe of TMACA-NIP. This three-component competing system of NIP/Cu 2+ /GSH can be used to detect GSH simply and rapidly. - Highlights: ► A novel fluorescence probe was developed to detect GSH that operates in aqueous solution. ► TMACA-NIP was synthesized and employed as “read-out” units of NIP/Cu 2+ /GSH. ► NIP-based probe shows high selectivity over other sulfhydryl compounds.

  7. Molecular Detection of Bladder Cancer by Fluorescence Microsatellite Analysis and an Automated Genetic Analyzing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarel Halachmi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the ability of an automated fluorescent analyzing system to detect microsatellite alterations, in patients with bladder cancer. We investigated 11 with pathology proven bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC for microsatellite alterations in blood, urine, and tumor biopsies. DNA was prepared by standard methods from blood, urine and resected tumor specimens, and was used for microsatellite analysis. After the primers were fluorescent labeled, amplification of the DNA was performed with PCR. The PCR products were placed into the automated genetic analyser (ABI Prism 310, Perkin Elmer, USA and were subjected to fluorescent scanning with argon ion laser beams. The fluorescent signal intensity measured by the genetic analyzer measured the product size in terms of base pairs. We found loss of heterozygocity (LOH or microsatellite alterations (a loss or gain of nucleotides, which alter the original normal locus size in all the patients by using fluorescent microsatellite analysis and an automated analyzing system. In each case the genetic changes found in urine samples were identical to those found in the resected tumor sample. The studies demonstrated the ability to detect bladder tumor non-invasively by fluorescent microsatellite analysis of urine samples. Our study supports the worldwide trend for the search of non-invasive methods to detect bladder cancer. We have overcome major obstacles that prevented the clinical use of an experimental system. With our new tested system microsatellite analysis can be done cheaper, faster, easier and with higher scientific accuracy.

  8. Simulation and detection of massive Dirac fermions with cold atoms in one-dimensional optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Yafei, E-mail: yfyuks@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Shan Chuanjia [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Science, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China); Mei Feng; Zhang Zhiming [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2012-09-15

    We propose a simple but feasible experimental scheme to simulate and detect Dirac fermions with cold atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattice. In our scheme, through tuning the laser intensity, the one-dimensional optical lattice can have two sites in each unit cell and the atoms around the low energy behave as massive Dirac fermions. Furthermore, we show that these relativistic quasiparticles can be detected experimentally by using atomic density profile measurements and Bragg scattering.

  9. Fluorescence ELISA for sensitive detection of ochratoxin A based on glucose oxidase-mediated fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang, 330047 (China); Jiangxi-OAI Joint Research Institute, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Huang, Xiaolin [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang, 330047 (China); Yu, Ruijin [College of Science, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Zhou, Yaofeng [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang, 330047 (China); Xiong, Yonghua, E-mail: yhxiongchen@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang, 330047 (China); Jiangxi-OAI Joint Research Institute, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China)

    2016-09-14

    The present study described a novel fluorescence enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) used to detect ochratoxin A (OTA) by using the glucose oxidase (GOx)-mediated fluorescence quenching of mercaptopropionic acid-capped CdTe quantum dots (MPA-QDs), in which GOx was used as an alternative to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for the oxidization of glucose into hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and gluconic acid. The MPA-QDs were used as a fluorescent signal output, whose fluorescence variation was extremely sensitive to the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or hydrogen ions in the solution. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed fluorescence ELISA demonstrated a good linear detection of OTA in corn extract from 2.4 pg mL{sup −1} to 625 pg mL{sup −1} with a limit of detection of 2.2 pg mL{sup −1}, which was approximately 15-fold lower than that of conventional HRP-based ELISA. Our developed fluorescence immunoassay was also similar to HRP-based ELISA in terms of selectivity, accuracy, and reproducibility. In summary, this study was the first to use the GOx-mediated fluorescence quenching of QDs in immunoassay to detect OTA, offering a new possibility for the analysis of other mycotoxins and biomolecules. - Highlights: • A novel fluorescence ELISA was first developed for the detection of OTA by using GOx-mediated fluorescence quenching of QDs. • The pH- and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-sensitive MPA-capped CdTe QDs were used as a fluorescent signal output to improve the detection sensitivity. • This novel method open up a different vision to detect other mycotoxins and biomolecules.

  10. Fluorescence ELISA for sensitive detection of ochratoxin A based on glucose oxidase-mediated fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Yi; Huang, Xiaolin; Yu, Ruijin; Zhou, Yaofeng; Xiong, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    The present study described a novel fluorescence enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) used to detect ochratoxin A (OTA) by using the glucose oxidase (GOx)-mediated fluorescence quenching of mercaptopropionic acid-capped CdTe quantum dots (MPA-QDs), in which GOx was used as an alternative to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for the oxidization of glucose into hydrogen peroxide (H_2O_2) and gluconic acid. The MPA-QDs were used as a fluorescent signal output, whose fluorescence variation was extremely sensitive to the presence of H_2O_2 or hydrogen ions in the solution. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed fluorescence ELISA demonstrated a good linear detection of OTA in corn extract from 2.4 pg mL"−"1 to 625 pg mL"−"1 with a limit of detection of 2.2 pg mL"−"1, which was approximately 15-fold lower than that of conventional HRP-based ELISA. Our developed fluorescence immunoassay was also similar to HRP-based ELISA in terms of selectivity, accuracy, and reproducibility. In summary, this study was the first to use the GOx-mediated fluorescence quenching of QDs in immunoassay to detect OTA, offering a new possibility for the analysis of other mycotoxins and biomolecules. - Highlights: • A novel fluorescence ELISA was first developed for the detection of OTA by using GOx-mediated fluorescence quenching of QDs. • The pH- and H_2O_2-sensitive MPA-capped CdTe QDs were used as a fluorescent signal output to improve the detection sensitivity. • This novel method open up a different vision to detect other mycotoxins and biomolecules.

  11. A new Technique for ultrafast velocity distribution measurements of atomic species by post-ionization laser induced fluorescence (PILIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabares, F.L.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for single shot velocity distribution measurement of metallic impurities of relevance for studies involving continuous sources, such as limiter experiments in fusion devices or sputtering experiments, based in the combination of Resonant Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is proposed. High ionization yield and good time resolution are expected according to the numerical simulation of the experiment that has been run for several atomic species. Other possible applications of REMPI to plasma edge physics and to conventional techniques for velocity distribution measurements are briefly addressed. (author)

  12. A new technique for ultrafast velocity distribution measurements of atomic species by post-ionization laser induced fluorescent (PILIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabares, F.L.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for single shot velocity distribution measurement of metallic impurities of relevance for studies involving continuous sources, such as limiter experiments in fusion devices or sputtering experiments, based in the combination of Resonant Enhanced Multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is proposed. High ionization yield and good time resolution are expected according to the numerical simulation of the experiment that has been run for several atomic species. Other possible applications of REMPI to plasma edge physics and to conventional techniques for velocity distribution measurements are briefly addressed. (Author) 8 refs

  13. A new technique for ultrafast velocity distribution measurements of atomic species by post-ionization laser induced fluorescent (PILIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F.L.

    1992-07-01

    A new method for single shot velocity distribution measurement of metallic impurities of relevance for studies involving continuous sources, such as limiter experiments in fusion devices or sputtering experiments, based in the combination of Resonant Enhanced Multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is proposed. High ionization yield and good time resolution are expected according to the numerical simulation of the experiment that has been run for several atomic species. Other possible applications of REMPI to plasma edge physics and to conventional techniques for velocity distribution measurements are briefly addressed. (Author) 8 refs.

  14. Rapid and sensitive detection of ketamine in blood using novel fluorescence genosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yanjun; Li, Xingmei; Guo, Yadong; Yan, Jie; Ling, Jiang; Li, Weichen; Lan, Lingmei; Chang, Yunfeng; Cai, Jifeng; Zha, Lagabaiyla

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, drug abuse has been considered as a most challenging social problem that aroused public attention. Ketamine has increased in unregulated use as a 'recreational drug' in teenagers. However, there is no suitable and maneuverable detection method for ketamine in situ at the moment. Fluorescence sensor technique, with predominant recognition and simple operation, is a good potential application in drug detection. Here, we first reported a highly sensitive and selective fluorescence genosensor for rapid detection of ketamine based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) probes, in which the DNA sequence could specially recognize ketamine with high affinity. Parameters affecting detection efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under optimum conditions, the as-prepared genosensor can allow for the determination of ketamine in the concentration range of 0.0001-20 μg/mL with two linear equations: one is y = 2.84x-7.139 (R 2 = 0.987) for 0.0001-0.1 μg/mL, and the other is y = 1.87x-0.091 (R 2 = 0.962) for 0.1-20 μg/mL, and the estimated detection limit of ketamine is 0.06 ng/mL. Moreover, the feasibility of this proposed method was also demonstrated by analyzing forensic blood samples. Compared with official gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), this fluorescence genosensor is simple, rapid, and accurate for quantitative determination of ketamine in blood for pharmaceutical and forensic analysis. Overall, it is the first report on a fluorescence genosensor for detecting ketamine directly in blood. This research may provide a new insight for the analyst to band fluorescence genosensor technology together with drug monitoring in the battle against drug abuse and forensic examination. Graphical abstract High selectively detection of ketamine using a novel fluorescence genosensor based on DNA-AgNCs probe.

  15. Detection of bacterial infection of agave plants by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Martinez, Jesus; Flores-Hernandez, Ricardo; Rodriguez-Garay, Benjamin; Santacruz-Ruvalcaba, Fernando

    2002-05-01

    Greenhouse-grown plants of Agave tequilana Weber var. azul were inoculated with Erwinia carotovora, the causal agent of stem soft rot. We investigated the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of agave plants to determine whether LIF can be used as a noninvasive sensing tool for pathological studies. The LIF technique was also investigated as a means of detecting the effect of the polyamine biosynthesis inhibitor beta-hydroxyethylhydrazine as a bactericide against the pathogenic bacterium Erwinia carotovora. A He-Ne laser at 632.8 nm was used as the excitation source, and in vivo fluorescence emission spectra were recorded in the 660-790-range. Fluorescence maxima were at 690 and 740 nm. The infected plants that were untreated with the bactericide showed a definite increase in fluorescence intensity at both maxima within the first three days after infection. Beginning on the fifth day, a steady decrease in fluorescence intensity was observed, with a greater effect at 740 than at 690 nm. After 30 days there was no fluorescence. The infected plants that had been treated with the bactericide showed no significant change in fluorescence compared with that of the uninfected plants. The ratio of fluorescence intensities was determined to be F 690 nm/F 740 nm for all treatments. These studies indicate that LIF measurements of agave plants may be used for the early detection of certain types of disease and for determining the effect of a bactericide on bacteria. The results also showed that fluorescence intensity ratios can be used as a reliable indicator of the progress of disease.

  16. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  17. Production and detection of atomic hexadecapole at Earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, V M; Auzinsh, M; Gawlik, W; Grisins, P; Higbie, J M; Jackson Kimball, D F; Krzemien, L; Ledbetter, M P; Pustelny, S; Rochester, S M; Yashchuk, V V; Budker, D

    2008-07-21

    Optical magnetometers measure magnetic fields with extremely high precision and without cryogenics. However, at geomagnetic fields, important for applications from landmine removal to archaeology, they suffer from nonlinear Zeeman splitting, leading to systematic dependence on sensor orientation. We present experimental results on a method of eliminating this systematic error, using the hexadecapole atomic polarization moment. In particular, we demonstrate selective production of the atomic hexadecapole moment at Earth's magnetic field and verify its immunity to nonlinear Zeeman splitting. This technique promises to eliminate directional errors in all-optical atomic magnetometers, potentially improving their measurement accuracy by several orders of magnitude.

  18. Hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of As, Bi, Sb, Se(IV) and Te(IV) in aqua regia extracts from atmospheric particulate matter using multivariate optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscoso-Perez, Carmen; Moreda-Pineiro, Jorge; Lopez-Mahia, Purificacion; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Fernandez-Fernandez, Esther; Prada-Rodriguez, Dario

    2004-01-01

    A highly sensitive and simple method, based on hydride generation and atomic fluorescence detection, has been developed for the determination of As, Bi, Sb, Se(IV) and Te(IV) in aqua regia extracts from atmospheric particulate matter samples. Atmospheric particulates matter was collected on glass fiber filters using a medium volume sampler (PM1 particulate matter). Two-level factorial designs have been used to optimise the hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) procedure. The effects of several parameters affecting the hydride generation efficiency (hydrochloric acid, sodium tetrahydroborate and potassium iodide concentrations and flow rates) have been evaluated using a Plackett-Burman experimental design. In addition, parameters affecting the hydride measurement (delay, analysis and memory times) have been also investigated. The significant parameters obtained (sodium tetrahydroborate concentration, sodium tetrahydroborate flow rate and analysis time for As; hydrochloric acid concentration and sodium tetrahydroborate flow rate for Se(IV); and sodium tetrahydroborate concentration and sodium tetrahydroborate flow rate for Te(IV)) have been optimized by using 2 n + star central composite design. Hydrochloric acid concentration and sodium tetrahydroborate flow rate were the significant parameters obtained for Sb and Bi determination, respectively. Using a univariate approach these parameters were optimized. The accuracy of methods have been verified by using several certified reference materials: SRM 1648 (urban particulate matter) and SRM 1649a (urban dust). Detection limits in the range of 6 x 10 -3 to 0.2 ng m -3 have been achieved. The developed methods were applied to several atmospheric particulate matter samples corresponding to A Coruna city (NW Spain)

  19. Non-chromatographic speciation analysis of mercury by flow injection on-line preconcentration in combination with chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Chemistry, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Jin Yan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Han Weiying [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Miao, Qiang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Bi Shuping [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)]. E-mail: bisp@nju.edu.cn

    2006-07-15

    A novel non-chromatographic approach for direct speciation of mercury, based on the selective retention inorganic mercury and methylmercury on the inner wall of a knotted reactor by using ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate and dithizone as complexing agents respectively, was developed for flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration coupled with chemical vapor generation non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. With the sample pH kept at 2.0, the preconcentration of inorganic mercury on the inner walls of the knotted reactor was carried out based on the exclusive retention of Hg-DDP complex in the presence of methylmercury via on-line merging the sample solution with ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate solution, and selective preconcentration methylmercury was achieved with dithizone instead of ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate. A 15% (v/v) HCl was introduced to elute the retained mercury species and merge with KBH{sub 4} solution for atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the sample throughputs of inorganic mercury and methylmercury were 30 and 20 h{sup -1} with the enhancement factors of 13 and 24. The detection limits were found to be 3.6 ng l{sup -1} for Hg{sup 2+} and 2.0 ng l{sup -1} for CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}. The precisions (RSD) for the 11 replicate measurements of each 0.2 {mu}g l{sup -1} of Hg{sup 2+} and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} were 2.2% and 2.8%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (simulated natural water, rice flour and pork) and by recovery measurements on spiked samples, and was applied to the determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in biological and environmental water samples.

  20. Non-chromatographic speciation analysis of mercury by flow injection on-line preconcentration in combination with chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hong; Jin Yan; Han Weiying; Miao, Qiang; Bi Shuping

    2006-01-01

    A novel non-chromatographic approach for direct speciation of mercury, based on the selective retention inorganic mercury and methylmercury on the inner wall of a knotted reactor by using ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate and dithizone as complexing agents respectively, was developed for flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration coupled with chemical vapor generation non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. With the sample pH kept at 2.0, the preconcentration of inorganic mercury on the inner walls of the knotted reactor was carried out based on the exclusive retention of Hg-DDP complex in the presence of methylmercury via on-line merging the sample solution with ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate solution, and selective preconcentration methylmercury was achieved with dithizone instead of ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate. A 15% (v/v) HCl was introduced to elute the retained mercury species and merge with KBH 4 solution for atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the sample throughputs of inorganic mercury and methylmercury were 30 and 20 h -1 with the enhancement factors of 13 and 24. The detection limits were found to be 3.6 ng l -1 for Hg 2+ and 2.0 ng l -1 for CH 3 Hg + . The precisions (RSD) for the 11 replicate measurements of each 0.2 μg l -1 of Hg 2+ and CH 3 Hg + were 2.2% and 2.8%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (simulated natural water, rice flour and pork) and by recovery measurements on spiked samples, and was applied to the determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in biological and environmental water samples

  1. Fiber optic fluorescence detection of low-level porphyrin concentrations in preclinical and clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Thomas S.; McGinnis, Carolyn; Khan, S.

    1990-07-01

    A significant clinical problem in the local treatment of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer (by any modality--surgery, radiation therapy or photodynainic therapy) is the fact that the disease almost always extends beyond the boundary of visible lesions in the form of microscopic deposits. These deposits may be distant from the site of visible disease but are often in close proximity to it and are manifested sooner or later by the development of recurrent lesions at the border of the treated area, thus the "marginal miss" in radiation therapy, the "rim recurrence" in photodynamic therapy, and the "incisional recurrence" following surgical excision. More intelligent use of these treatment modalities demands the ability to detect microscopic deposits of tumor cells using non-invasive methodology. In vivo fluorescence measurements have been made possible by the development of an extremely sensitive fiber optic in vivo fluorescence photometer. The instrument has been used to verify that fluorescence correlated with injected porphyrin levels in various tissues. The delivery of light to excite and detect background fluorescence as well as photosensitizer fluorescence in tissues has been accomplished using two HeNe lasers emitting at 632.8 nm and 612 nm delivered through a single quartz fiber optic. Chopping at different frequencies, contributions of fluorescence may be separated. Fluorescence is picked up via a 400 micron quartz fiber optic positioned appropriately near the target tissue. Validation of these levels was made by extraction of the drug from the tissues with resultant quantitation. Recently, an extensive study was undertaken to determine if fluorescence could be used for the detection of occult, clinically non-palpable metastases in the lymph node of rats. This unique model allowed for the detection of micrometastases in lymph nodes using very low injected doses of the photosensitizer Photofrin II. Data obtained revealed the ability to detect on the order

  2. Hybridization chain reaction amplification for highly sensitive fluorescence detection of DNA with dextran coated microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Li, Jing; Peng, Hongzhen; Su, Shao; Li, Qian; Zhu, Changfeng; Zuo, Xiaolei; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lianhui; Wang, Lihua

    2016-07-15

    Microarrays of biomolecules hold great promise in the fields of genomics, proteomics, and clinical assays on account of their remarkably parallel and high-throughput assay capability. However, the fluorescence detection used in most conventional DNA microarrays is still limited by sensitivity. In this study, we have demonstrated a novel universal and highly sensitive platform for fluorescent detection of sequence specific DNA at the femtomolar level by combining dextran-coated microarrays with hybridization chain reaction (HCR) signal amplification. Three-dimensional dextran matrix was covalently coated on glass surface as the scaffold to immobilize DNA recognition probes to increase the surface binding capacity and accessibility. DNA nanowire tentacles were formed on the matrix surface for efficient signal amplification by capturing multiple fluorescent molecules in a highly ordered way. By quantifying microscopic fluorescent signals, the synergetic effects of dextran and HCR greatly improved sensitivity of DNA microarrays, with a detection limit of 10fM (1×10(5) molecules). This detection assay could recognize one-base mismatch with fluorescence signals dropped down to ~20%. This cost-effective microarray platform also worked well with samples in serum and thus shows great potential for clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluorescence turn-on detection of target sequence DNA based on silicon nanodot-mediated quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Ning, Xinping; Mao, Guobin; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2018-05-01

    We have developed a new enzyme-free method for target sequence DNA detection based on the dynamic quenching of fluorescent silicon nanodots (SiNDs) toward Cy5-tagged DNA probe. Fascinatingly, the water-soluble SiNDs can quench the fluorescence of cyanine (Cy5) in Cy5-tagged DNA probe in homogeneous solution, and the fluorescence of Cy5-tagged DNA probe can be restored in the presence of target sequence DNA (the synthetic target miRNA-27a). Based on this phenomenon, a SiND-featured fluorescent sensor has been constructed for "turn-on" detection of the synthetic target miRNA-27a for the first time. This newly developed approach possesses the merits of low cost, simple design, and convenient operation since no enzymatic reaction, toxic reagents, or separation procedures are involved. The established method achieves a detection limit of 0.16 nM, and the relative standard deviation of this method is 9% (1 nM, n = 5). The linear range is 0.5-20 nM, and the recoveries in spiked human fluids are in the range of 90-122%. This protocol provides a new tactic in the development of the nonenzymic miRNA biosensors and opens a promising avenue for early diagnosis of miRNA-associated disease. Graphical abstract The SiND-based fluorescent sensor for detection of S-miR-27a.

  4. Surface-modified CdS nanoparticles as a fluorescent probe for the selective detection of cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negi, Devendra P S; Chanu, T Inakhunbi

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel method for the selective detection of cysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, which plays a crucial role in many important biological functions such as protein folding. Surface-modified colloidal CdS nanoparticles have been used as a fluorescent probe to selectively detect cysteine in the presence of other amino acids in the micromolar concentration range. Cysteine quenches the emission of CdS in the 0.5-10 μM concentration range, whereas the other amino acids do not affect its emission. Among the other amino acids, histidine is most efficient in quenching the emission of the CdS nanoparticles. The sulfur atom of cysteine plays a crucial role in the quenching process in the 0.5-10 μM concentration range. Cysteine is believed to quench the emission of the CdS nanoparticles by binding to their surface via its negatively charged sulfur atom. This method can potentially be applied for its detection in biological samples.

  5. A fluorescent sensor for selective detection of cyanide using mesoporous graphitic carbon(IV) nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Zoo; Lee, Sun Uk; Heo, Nam-Su; Stucky, Galen D; Jun, Young-Si; Hong, Won Hi

    2012-04-25

    A turn-on fluorescence sensor, Cu(2+)-c-mpg-C(3)N(4), was developed for detection of CN(-) in aqueous solution by simply mixing cubic mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (c-mpg-C(3)N(4)) and aqueous solution of Cu(NO(3))(2). The highly sensitive detection of CN(-) with a detection limit of 80 nM is not only possible in aqueous solution but also in human blood serum.

  6. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Atomic Oxygen Measurements in Short Pulse Discharges by Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, Walter; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Mintusov, Eugene; Jiang, Naibo; Adamovich, Igor

    2007-10-01

    Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure time-dependent absolute oxygen atom concentrations in O2/He, O2/N2, and CH4/air plasmas produced with a 20 nanosecond duration, 20 kV pulsed discharge at 10 Hz repetition rate. Xenon calibrated spectra show that a single discharge pulse creates initial oxygen dissociation fraction of ˜0.0005 for air like mixtures at 40-60 torr total pressure. Peak O atom concentration is a factor of approximately two lower in fuel lean (φ=0.5) methane/air mixtures. In helium buffer, the initially formed atomic oxygen decays monotonically, with decay time consistent with formation of ozone. In all nitrogen containing mixtures, atomic oxygen concentrations are found to initially increase, for time scales on the order of 10-100 microseconds, due presumably to additional O2 dissociation caused by collisions with electronically excited nitrogen. Further evidence of the role of metastable N2 is demonstrated from time-dependent N2 2^nd Positive and NO Gamma band emission spectroscopy. Comparisons with modeling predictions show qualitative, but not quantitative, agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Two sugar-rhodamine "turn-on" fluorescent probes for the selective detection of Fe3 +

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Fang, Zhijie

    2018-03-01

    Two new sugar-rhodamine fluorescent probes (RDG1 and RDG2) have been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and HRMS. Their UV-Vis, fluorescence spectra and fluorescence-response to Fe3 + are investigated and discussed. RDG1 had a very nice linear relationship between UV absorbance and Fe3 + concentration with the correlation coefficient as high as 0.997 and the detection limit is 3.46 × 10- 6 M. Upon the addition of Fe3 +, the spirolactam ring of RDG1 was opened and a 1:1 metal ligand complex was formed from Job's plot. The results showed that RDG1 can be used as an effective fluorescent probe for selective detection of Fe3 + in water. RDG2 was incorporated the well-known rhodamine group and a water-soluble D-glucose group within one molecule and can be used for detecting Fe3 + in natural water as a selective fluorescent sensor. The addition of Fe3 + into RDG2 resulted in a strongly enhanced fluorescence as well as color change of solution from colorless to pink. Job's plot of RDG2 indicated 1:1 stoichiometry of RDG2-Fe3 +. RDG2 can serve as a probe for Fe3 + between pH = 4.0 to 7.0 and it's detection limit is 2.09 × 10- 6 M. The OFF-ON fluorescent mechanisms of RDG1-Fe3 + and RDG2-Fe3 + are proposed.

  8. Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles in the Detection and Control of the Growth of Pathogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitra, K.; Annadurai, G.

    2013-01-01

    In this present study the bio conjugated fluorescent silica nanoparticles give an efficient fluorescent-based immunoassay for the detection of pathogen. The synthesized silica nanoparticles were poly dispersed and the size of the silica nanoparticles was in the range of 114-164 nm. The energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometer showed the presence of silica at 1.8 keV and the selected area diffractometer showed amorphous nature of silica nanoparticles. The FTIR spectrum confirmed the attachment of dye and carboxyl group onto the silica nanoparticles surface. The fluorescent silica nanoparticles showed highly efficient fluorescence and the fluorescent emission of silica nanoparticles occurred at 536 nm. The SEM image showed the aggregation of nanoparticles and bacteria. The growth of the pathogenic E. coli was controlled using silica nanoparticles; therefore silica nanoparticles could be used in food packaging material, biomedical material, and so forth. This work provides a rapid, simple, and accurate method for the detection of pathogen using fluorescent-based immunoassay.

  9. Rapid and sensitive detection of clenbuterol using a fluorescence nanosensor based on diazo coupling mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Hop Tran, Thi; Huong Do, Thi Mai; Hoang, Mai Ha; Tuyen Nguyen, Duc; Le, Quang Tuan; Nghia Nguyen, Duc; Ngo, Trinh Tung

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) effect has been used for fabrication of nanosensor for the detection of clenbuterol. In the nanosensor, the CdTe quantum dots (QDs) are the donors while the acceptor is the super-macromolecule formed by the diazoation coupling mechanism between diazo clenbuterol and naphthylethylene diamine. Changes in fluorescence intensities of nanosensor were used to determine the clenbuterol concentration. We have successfully fabricated a nanosensor for detection of clenbuterol sensible to clenbuterol concentration of 10-12 g ml-1.

  10. Highly Sensitive Fluorescence Probe Based on Functional SBA-15 for Selective Detection of Hg2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaoyu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An inorganic–organic hybrid fluorescence chemosensor (DA/SBA-15 was prepared by covalent immobilization of a dansylamide derivative into the channels of mesoporous silica material SBA-15 via (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES groups. The primary hexagonally ordered mesoporous structure of SBA-15 was preserved after the grafting procedure. Fluorescence characterization shows that the obtained inorganic–organic hybrid composite is highly selective and sensitive to Hg2+ detection, suggesting the possibility for real-time qualitative or quantitative detection of Hg2+ and the convenience for potential application in toxicology and environmental science.

  11. Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Mann, Grace

    2010-12-28

    Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Receptors are exposed to at least one potential binder and arrayed on a substrate support. Each member of the array is exposed to X-ray radiation. The magnitude of a detectable X-ray fluorescence signal for at least one element can be used to determine whether a binding event between a binder and a receptor has occurred, and can provide information related to the extent of binding between the binder and receptor.

  12. The physics of fluorescent lamps: Do we understand the atomic processes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, Graeme G.

    2002-01-01

    Numerical models have provided insight into the operation of 'standard' fluorescent lamps for more than 40 years. Recent developments in the lighting industry have led to products with much higher power loadings, for which modeling has been less successful in reproducing the experimental results. One of the potential weaknesses of the models is the absence of fundamental data to describe important phenomena in these 'highly loaded lamps'. The current state of our knowledge of available data is reviewed, together with an overview of the recently completed ALITE 1 project to reexamine the fundamental properties of fluorescent lamp operation

  13. Detection of Sn(II) ions via quenching of the fluorescence of carbon nanodots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Yazid, S.N.A.; Chin, S.F.; Pang, S.C.; Ng, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report that fluorescent carbon nanodots (C-dots) can act as an optical probe for quantifying Sn(II) ions in aqueous solution. C-dots are synthesized by carbonization and surface oxidation of preformed sago starch nanoparticles. Their fluorescence is significantly quenched by Sn(II) ions, and the effect can be used to determine Sn(II) ions. The highest fluorescence intensity is obtained at a concentration of 1.75 mM of C-dots in aqueous solution. The probe is highly selective and hardly interfered by other ions. The quenching mechanism appears to be predominantly of the static (rather than dynamic) type. Under optimum conditions, there is a linear relationship between fluorescence intensity and Sn(II) ions concentration up to 4 mM, and with a detection limit of 0.36 μM. (author)

  14. In vivo fluorescent detection of Fe-S clusters coordinated by human GRX2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Kevin G; Culler, Stephanie J; Nguyen, Peter Q; McGuire, Ryan M; Silberg, Jonathan J; Smolke, Christina D

    2009-12-24

    A major challenge to studying Fe-S cluster biosynthesis in higher eukaryotes is the lack of simple tools for imaging metallocluster binding to proteins. We describe the first fluorescent approach for in vivo detection of 2Fe2S clusters that is based upon the complementation of Venus fluorescent protein fragments via human glutaredoxin 2 (GRX2) coordination of a 2Fe2S cluster. We show that Escherichia coli and mammalian cells expressing Venus fragments fused to GRX2 exhibit greater fluorescence than cells expressing fragments fused to a C37A mutant that cannot coordinate a metallocluster. In addition, we find that maximal fluorescence in the cytosol of mammalian cells requires the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins ISCU and NFS1. These findings provide evidence that glutaredoxins can dimerize within mammalian cells through coordination of a 2Fe2S cluster as observed with purified recombinant proteins. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Metal Nanoparticles/Porous Silicon Microcavity Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Fluorescence for the Detection of DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A porous silicon microcavity (PSiMC with resonant peak wavelength of 635 nm was fabricated by electrochemical etching. Metal nanoparticles (NPs/PSiMC enhanced fluorescence substrates were prepared by the electrostatic adherence of Au NPs that were distributed in PSiMC. The Au NPs/PSiMC device was used to characterize the target DNA immobilization and hybridization with its complementary DNA sequences marked with Rhodamine red (RRA. Fluorescence enhancement was observed on the Au NPs/PSiMC device substrate; and the minimum detection concentration of DNA ran up to 10 pM. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR of the MC substrate; which is so well-positioned to improve fluorescence enhancement rather the fluorescence enhancement of the high reflection band of the Bragg reflector; would welcome such a highly sensitive in biosensor.

  16. Metal Nanoparticles/Porous Silicon Microcavity Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Fluorescence for the Detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Jia, Zhenhong

    2018-02-23

    A porous silicon microcavity (PSiMC) with resonant peak wavelength of 635 nm was fabricated by electrochemical etching. Metal nanoparticles (NPs)/PSiMC enhanced fluorescence substrates were prepared by the electrostatic adherence of Au NPs that were distributed in PSiMC. The Au NPs/PSiMC device was used to characterize the target DNA immobilization and hybridization with its complementary DNA sequences marked with Rhodamine red (RRA). Fluorescence enhancement was observed on the Au NPs/PSiMC device substrate; and the minimum detection concentration of DNA ran up to 10 pM. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the MC substrate; which is so well-positioned to improve fluorescence enhancement rather the fluorescence enhancement of the high reflection band of the Bragg reflector; would welcome such a highly sensitive in biosensor.

  17. Synchronizing atomic force microscopy force mode and fluorescence microscopy in real time for immune cell stimulation and activation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazaux, Séverine; Sadoun, Anaïs; Biarnes-Pelicot, Martine; Martinez, Manuel; Obeid, Sameh [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Bongrand, Pierre [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); APHM, Hôpital de la Conception, Laboratoire d’Immunologie, Marseille F-13385 (France); Limozin, Laurent [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Puech, Pierre-Henri, E-mail: pierre-henri.puech@inserm.fr [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France)

    2016-01-15

    A method is presented for combining atomic force microscopy (AFM) force mode and fluorescence microscopy in order to (a) mechanically stimulate immune cells while recording the subsequent activation under the form of calcium pulses, and (b) observe the mechanical response of a cell upon photoactivation of a small G protein, namely Rac. Using commercial set-ups and a robust signal coupling the fluorescence excitation light and the cantilever bending, the applied force and activation signals were very easily synchronized. This approach allows to control the entire mechanical history of a single cell up to its activation and response down to a few hundreds of milliseconds, and can be extended with very minimal adaptations to other cellular systems where mechanotransduction is studied, using either purely mechanical stimuli or via a surface bound specific ligand. - Highlights: • A signal coupling AFM and fluorescence microscopy was characterized for soft cantilevers. • It can be used as an intrinsic timer to synchronize images and forces. • Mechanical stimulation of single immune cells while recording calcium fluxes was detailed. • Light-induced mechanical modifications of lymphocytes using a PA-Rac protein were demonstrated. • The precautions and limitations of use of this effect were presented.

  18. Simultaneous Laser-induced Fluorescence of Nitric Oxide and Atomic Oxygen in the Hypersonic Materials Environment Test System Arcjet Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Craig; Lincoln, Daniel; Bathel, Brett; Inman, Jennifer; Danehy, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous nitric oxide (NO) and atomic oxygen (O) laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments were performed in the Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The data serves as an experimental database for validation for chemical and thermal nonequilibrium models used in hypersonic flows. Measurements were taken over a wide range of stagnation enthalpies (6.7 - 18.5 MJ/kg) using an Earth atmosphere simulant with a composition of 75% N2, 20% O2, and 5% Ar (by volume). These are the first simultaneous measurements of NO and O LIF to be reported in literature for the HYMETS facility. The maximum O LIF mean signal intensity was observed at a stagnation enthalpy of approximately 12 MJ/kg while the maximum NO LIF mean signal intensity was observed at a stagnation enthalpy of 6.7 MJ/kg. Experimental results were compared to simple fluorescence model that assumes equilibrium conditions in the plenum and frozen chemistry in the isentropic nozzle expansion (Mach 5). The equilibrium calculations were performed using CANTERA v2.1.1 with 16 species. The fluorescence model captured the correlation in mean O and NO LIF signal intensities over the entire range of stagnation enthalpies tested. Very weak correlations between single-shot O and NO LIF intensities were observed in the experiments at all of the stagnation enthalpy conditions.

  19. The detection of melamine base on a turn-on fluorescence of DNA-Ag nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Peisi [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Analysis and Detection Technology for Food Safety, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong (China); Zhan, Yuanjin; Wu, Mei; Guo, Longhua; Lin, Zhenyu [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Analysis and Detection Technology for Food Safety, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Qiu, Bin, E-mail: summer328cn@163.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Analysis and Detection Technology for Food Safety, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Chen, Guonan [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Analysis and Detection Technology for Food Safety, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Cai, Zongwei [State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong (China)

    2017-06-15

    A label-free, ultra-sensitive and turn-on fluorescence method to detect melamine has been developed. The strategy uses the DNA-Ag nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) as the fluorescence probe. The fluorescence of DNA-AgNCs can be quenched in presence of Hg{sup 2+}. However, When Hg{sup 2+} and melamine were reacted for 15 min at 1000 rmp then introduced into DNA-AgNCs solution, a strong fluorescence recovery could be found. Based on this methodology, the changing fluorescent intensity has a linear relationship with melamine in the range of 0.2 μM to 4 μM (R{sup 2}=0.997). The detection limit down to 0.1 μM was obtained, which is 200 times lower than the melamine safety limit of 20 μM estimated by the US Food and Drug Administration. In addition, we had been successfully applied this method to detect melamine in milk powder and raw milk.

  20. Detection of DNA hybridization based on SnO2 nanomaterial enhanced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Cuiping; Huang Jiarui; Ni Ning; Li Minqiang; Liu Jinhuai

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, enhanced fluorescence emissions were firstly investigated based on SnO 2 nanomaterial, and its application in the detection of DNA hybridization was also demonstrated. The microarray of SnO 2 nanomaterial was fabricated by the vapour phase transport method catalyzed by patterned Au nanoparticles on a silicon substrate. A probe DNA was immobilized on the substrate with patterned SnO 2 nanomaterial, respectively, by covalent and non-covalent linking schemes. When a fluorophore labelled target DNA was hybridized with a probe DNA on the substrate, fluorescence emissions were only observed on the surface of SnO 2 nanomaterial, which indicated the property of enhancing fluorescence signals from the SnO 2 nanomaterial. By comparing the different fluorescence images from covalent and non-covalent linking schemes, the covalent method was confirmed to be more effective for immobilizing a probe DNA. With the combined use of SnO 2 nanomaterial and the covalent linking scheme, the target DNA could be detected at a very low concentration of 10 fM. And the stability of SnO 2 nanomaterial under the experimental conditions was also compared with silicon nanowires. The findings strongly suggested that SnO 2 nanomaterial could be extensively applied in detections of biological samples with enhancing fluorescence property and high stability

  1. Tools for the quantitative analysis of sedimentation boundaries detected by fluorescence optical analytical ultracentrifugation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaying Zhao

    Full Text Available Fluorescence optical detection in sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation allows the study of macromolecules at nanomolar concentrations and below. This has significant promise, for example, for the study of systems of high-affinity protein interactions. Here we describe adaptations of the direct boundary modeling analysis approach implemented in the software SEDFIT that were developed to accommodate unique characteristics of the confocal fluorescence detection system. These include spatial gradients of signal intensity due to scanner movements out of the plane of rotation, temporal intensity drifts due to instability of the laser and fluorophores, and masking of the finite excitation and detection cone by the sample holder. In an extensive series of experiments with enhanced green fluorescent protein ranging from low nanomolar to low micromolar concentrations, we show that the experimental data provide sufficient information to determine the parameters required for first-order approximation of the impact of these effects on the recorded data. Systematic deviations of fluorescence optical sedimentation velocity data analyzed using conventional sedimentation models developed for absorbance and interference optics are largely removed after these adaptations, resulting in excellent fits that highlight the high precision of fluorescence sedimentation velocity data, thus allowing a more detailed quantitative interpretation of the signal boundaries that is otherwise not possible for this system.

  2. Photoionisation detection of single 87Rb-atoms using channel electron multipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkel, Florian Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Fast and efficient detection of single atoms is a universal requirement concerning modern experiments in atom physics, quantum optics, and precision spectroscopy. In particular for future quantum information and quantum communication technologies, the efficient readout of qubit states encoded in single atoms or ions is an elementary prerequisite. The rapid development in the field of quantum optics and atom optics in the recent years has enabled to prepare individual atoms as quantum memories or arrays of single atoms as qubit registers. With such systems, the implementation of quantum computation or quantum communication protocols seems feasible. This thesis describes a novel detection scheme which enables fast and efficient state analysis of single neutral atoms. The detection scheme is based on photoionisation and consists of two parts: the hyperfine-state selective photoionisation of single atoms and the registration of the generated photoion-electron pairs via two channel electron multipliers (CEMs). In this work, both parts were investigated in two separate experiments. For the first step, a photoionisation probability of p ion =0.991 within an ionisation time of t ion =386 ns is achieved for a single 87 Rb-atom in an optical dipole trap. For the second part, a compact detection system for the ionisation fragments was developed consisting of two opposing CEM detectors. Measurements show that single neutral atoms can be detected via their ionisation fragments with a detection efficiency of η atom =0.991 within a detection time of t det =415.5 ns. In a future combined setup, this will allow the state-selective readout of optically trapped, single neutral 87 Rb-atoms via photoionisation detection with an estimated detection efficiency η=0.982 and a detection time of t tot = 802 ns. Although initially developed for single 87 Rb-atoms, the concept of photoionisation detection is in principle generally applicable to any atomic or molecular species. As efficient

  3. Photoionisation detection of single {sup 87}Rb-atoms using channel electron multipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkel, Florian Alexander

    2011-09-02

    Fast and efficient detection of single atoms is a universal requirement concerning modern experiments in atom physics, quantum optics, and precision spectroscopy. In particular for future quantum information and quantum communication technologies, the efficient readout of qubit states encoded in single atoms or ions is an elementary prerequisite. The rapid development in the field of quantum optics and atom optics in the recent years has enabled to prepare individual atoms as quantum memories or arrays of single atoms as qubit registers. With such systems, the implementation of quantum computation or quantum communication protocols seems feasible. This thesis describes a novel detection scheme which enables fast and efficient state analysis of single neutral atoms. The detection scheme is based on photoionisation and consists of two parts: the hyperfine-state selective photoionisation of single atoms and the registration of the generated photoion-electron pairs via two channel electron multipliers (CEMs). In this work, both parts were investigated in two separate experiments. For the first step, a photoionisation probability of p{sub ion}=0.991 within an ionisation time of t{sub ion}=386 ns is achieved for a single {sup 87}Rb-atom in an optical dipole trap. For the second part, a compact detection system for the ionisation fragments was developed consisting of two opposing CEM detectors. Measurements show that single neutral atoms can be detected via their ionisation fragments with a detection efficiency of {eta}{sub atom}=0.991 within a detection time of t{sub det}=415.5 ns. In a future combined setup, this will allow the state-selective readout of optically trapped, single neutral {sup 87}Rb-atoms via photoionisation detection with an estimated detection efficiency {eta}=0.982 and a detection time of t{sub tot} = 802 ns. Although initially developed for single {sup 87}Rb-atoms, the concept of photoionisation detection is in principle generally applicable to any

  4. Metal-atom fluorescence from the quenching of metastable rare gases by metal carbonyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollingsworth, W.E.

    1982-11-01

    A flowing afterglow apparatus was used to study the metal fluorescence resulting from the quenching of metastable rare-gas states by metal carbonyls. The data from the quenching or argon, neon, and helium by iron and nickel carbonyl agreed well with a restricted degree of freedom model indicating a concerted bond-breaking dissociation

  5. ISS Ammonia Leak Detection Through X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan; Barthelmy, Scott; Skinner, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia leaks are a significant concern for the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS has external transport lines that direct liquid ammonia to radiator panels where the ammonia is cooled and then brought back to thermal control units. These transport lines and radiator panels are subject to stress from micrometeorites and temperature variations, and have developed small leaks. The ISS can accommodate these leaks at their present rate, but if the rate increased by a factor of ten, it could potentially deplete the ammonia supply and impact the proper functioning of the ISS thermal control system, causing a serious safety risk. A proposed ISS astrophysics instrument, the Lobster X-Ray Monitor, can be used to detect and localize ISS ammonia leaks. Based on the optical design of the eye of its namesake crustacean, the Lobster detector gives simultaneously large field of view and good position resolution. The leak detection principle is that the nitrogen in the leaking ammonia will be ionized by X-rays from the Sun, and then emit its own characteristic Xray signal. The Lobster instrument, nominally facing zenith for its astrophysics observations, can be periodically pointed towards the ISS radiator panels and some sections of the transport lines to detect and localize the characteristic X-rays from the ammonia leaks. Another possibility is to use the ISS robot arm to grab the Lobster instrument and scan it across the transport lines and radiator panels. In this case the leak detection can be made more sensitive by including a focused 100-microampere electron beam to stimulate X-ray emission from the leaking nitrogen. Laboratory studies have shown that either approach can be used to locate ammonia leaks at the level of 0.1 kg/day, a threshold rate of concern for the ISS. The Lobster instrument uses two main components: (1) a microchannel plate optic (also known as a Lobster optic) that focuses the X-rays and directs them to the focal plane, and (2) a CCD (charge

  6. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takalkar, Sunitha; Baryeh, Kwaku; Liu, Guodong

    2017-12-15

    We report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle (FCN)-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle with a diameter of around 15nm was used as a tag to label a detection DNA probe, which was complementary with the part of target DNA. A capture DNA probe was immobilized on the test zone of the lateral flow biosensor. Sandwich-type hybridization reactions among the FCN-labeled DNA probe, target DNA and capture DNA probe were performed on the lateral flow biosensor. In the presence of target DNA, FCNs were captured on the test zone of the biosensor and the fluorescent intensity of the captured FCNs was measured with a portable fluorescent reader. After systematic optimizations of experimental parameters (the components of running buffers, the concentration of detection DNA probe used in the preparation of FCN-DNA conjugates, the amount of FCN-DNA dispensed on the conjugate pad and the dispensing cycles of the capture DNA probes on the test-zone), the biosensor could detect a minimum concentration of 0.4 fM DNA. This study provides a rapid and low-cost approach for DNA detection with high sensitivity, showing great promise for clinical application and biomedical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An integrated fluorescence detection system in poly(dimethylsiloxane) for microfluidic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabinyc, M L; Chiu, D T; McDonald, J C; Stroock, A D; Christian, J F; Karger, A M; Whitesides, G M

    2001-09-15

    This paper describes a prototype of an integrated fluorescence detection system that uses a microavalanche photodiode (microAPD) as the photodetector for microfluidic devices fabricated in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The prototype device consisted of a reusable detection system and a disposable microfluidic system that was fabricated using rapid prototyping. The first step of the procedure was the fabrication of microfluidic channels in PDMS and the encapsulation of a multimode optical fiber (100-microm core diameter) in the PDMS; the tip of the fiber was placed next to the side wall of one of the channels. The optical fiber was used to couple light into the microchannel for the excitation of fluorescent analytes. The photodetector, a prototype solid-state microAPD array, was embedded in a thick slab (1 cm) of PDMS. A thin (80 microm) colored polycarbonate filter was placed on the top of the embedded microAPD to absorb scattered excitation light before it reached the detector. The microAPD was placed below the microchannel and orthogonal to the axis of the optical fiber. The close proximity (approximately 200 microm) of the microAPD to the microchannel made it unnecessary to incorporate transfer optics; the pixel size of the microAPD (30 microm) matched the dimensions of the channels (50 microm). A blue light-emitting diode was used for fluorescence excitation. The microAPD was operated in Geiger mode to detect the fluorescence. The detection limit of the prototype (approximately 25 nM) was determined by finding the minimum detectable concentration of a solution of fluorescein. The device was used to detect the separation of a mixture of proteins and small molecules by capillary electrophoresis; the separation illustrated the suitability of this integrated fluorescence detection system for bioanalytical applications.

  8. A novel fluorescent biosensor for adrenaline detection and tyrosinase inhibitor screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziping; Liu, Shasha

    2018-04-17

    In this work, a novel simple fluorescent biosensor for the highly sensitive and selective detection of adrenaline was established. Firstly, water-soluble CuInS 2 quantum dots (QDs) capped by L-Cys were synthesized via a hydrothermal synthesis method. Then, the positively charged adrenaline was assembled on the surface of CuInS 2 QDs due to the electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding, which led to the formation of adrenaline-CuInS 2 QD (Adr-CuInS 2 QD) electrostatic complexes. Tyrosinase (TYR) can catalyze adrenaline to generate H 2 O 2 , and additionally oxidize the adrenaline to adrenaline quinone. Both the H 2 O 2 and the adrenaline quinone can quench the fluorescence of the CuInS 2 QDs through the electron transfer (ET) process. Thus, the determination of adrenaline could be facilely achieved by taking advantage of the fluorescence "turn off" feature of CuInS 2 QDs. Under the optimum conditions, the fluorescence quenching ratio I f /I f0 (I f and I f0 were the fluorescence intensity of Adr-CuInS 2 QDs in the presence and absence of TYR, respectively) was proportional to the logarithm of adrenaline concentration in the range of 1 × 10 -8 -1 × 10 -4  mol L -1 with the detection limit of 3.6 nmol L -1 . The feasibility of the proposed biosensor in real sample assay was also studied and satisfactory results were obtained. Significantly, the proposed fluorescent biosensor can also be utilized to screen TYR inhibitors. Graphical abstract Schematic illustration of the fluorescent biosensor for adrenaline detection (A) and tyrosinase inhibitor screening (B).

  9. Distributed Sensor Particles for Remote Fluorescence Detection of Trace Analytes: UXO/CW; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SINGH, ANUP K.; GUPTA, ALOK; MULCHANDANI, ASHOK; CHEN, WILFRED; BHATIA, RIMPLE B.; SCHOENIGER, JOSEPH S.; ASHLEY, CAROL S.; BRINKER, C. JEFFREY; HANCE, BRADLEY G.; SCHMITT, RANDAL L.; JOHNSON, MARK S.; HARGIS JR. PHILIP J.; SIMONSON, ROBERT J.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the development of sensor particles for remote detection of trace chemical analytes over broad areas, e.g residual trinitrotoluene from buried landmines or other unexploded ordnance (UXO). We also describe the potential of the sensor particle approach for the detection of chemical warfare (CW) agents. The primary goal of this work has been the development of sensor particles that incorporate sample preconcentration, analyte molecular recognition, chemical signal amplification, and fluorescence signal transduction within a ''grain of sand''. Two approaches for particle-based chemical-to-fluorescence signal transduction are described: (1) enzyme-amplified immunoassays using biocompatible inorganic encapsulants, and (2) oxidative quenching of a unique fluorescent polymer by TNT

  10. Development of a dielectrophoresis-assisted surface plasmon resonance fluorescence biosensor for detection of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Chiaki; Iizuka, Ryota; Ohki, Yoshimichi; Fujimaki, Makoto

    2018-05-01

    To detect biological substances such as bacteria speedily and accurately, a dielectrophoresis-assisted surface plasmon resonance (SPR) fluorescence biosensor is being developed. Using Escherichia coli as a target organism, an appropriate voltage frequency to collect E. coli cells on indium tin oxide quadrupole electrodes by dielectrophoresis is analyzed. Then, E. coli is stained with 4‧,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). To clearly detect fluorescence signals from DAPI-stained E. coli cells, the sensor is optimized so that we can excite SPR on Al electrodes by illuminating 405 nm photons. As a result, the number of fluorescence signals is increased on the electrodes by the application of a low-frequency voltage. This indicates that E. coli cells with a lower permittivity than the surrounding water are collected by negative dielectrophoresis onto the electrodes where the electric field strength is lowest.

  11. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: Ultrasensitive detection in clear and turbid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahari, Abdel Kader

    In this work, I describe the development of a simple, inexpensive, and powerful alternative technique to detect and analyze, without enrichment, extremely low concentrations of cells, bacteria, viruses, and protein aggregates in turbid fluids for clinical and biotechnological applications. The anticipated applications of this technique are many. They range from the determination of the somatic cell count in milk for the dairy industry, to the enumeration and characterization of microorganisms in environmental microbiology and the food industry, and to the fast and ultrasensitive detection of protein aggregates for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases in clinical medicine. A prototype instrument has been built and allowed the detection and quantification of particles down to a few per milliliter in short scanning times. It consists of a small microscope that has a horizontal geometry and a mechanical instrument that holds a cylindrical cuvette (1 cm in diameter) with two motors that provide a rotational and a slower vertical inversion motions. The illumination focus is centered about 200 mum from the wall of the cuvette inside the sample. The total volume that is explored is large (˜1ml/min for bright particles). The data is analyzed with a correlation filter program based on particle passage pattern recognition. I will also describe further work on improving the sensitivity of the technique, expanding it for multiple-species discrimination and enumeration, and testing the prototype device in actual clinical and biotechnological applications. The main clinical application of this project seeks to establish conditions and use this new technique to quantify and size-analyze oligomeric complexes of the Alzheimer's disease beta-peptide in cerebrospinal fluid and other body fluids as a molecular biomarker for persons at risk of Alzheimer's disease dementia. The technology could potentially be extended to the diagnosis and therapeutic

  12. CARIES DETECTION WITH LASER FLUORESCENCE DEVICES. LIMITATIONS OF THEIR USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Spaveras

    2017-03-01

    Data synthesis: DD and DDPen are useful devices for caries detection on the occlusal tooth surfaces. Their main advantages are the very high reproducibility of measurements (>0.90, the ease of handling and the quantification and monitoring capacity. Their main limitations are the relatively low specificity for enamel lesions, the necessity of unstained surfaces and absence of plaque and pastes during measurements and the absence of a universal, clinically functional calibration value (COV. Conclusion: Further studies are required for more reliable data analysis and clinical interpretation of the relevant results.

  13. Multiplexed Detection of Attomoles of Nucleic Acids Using Fluorescent Nanoparticle Counting Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xiaojing; Yin, Haoyan; Lai, Tiancheng; Zhang, Junlong; Liu, Feng; Xu, Xiao; Li, Na

    2018-01-16

    The sensitive multiplexed detection of nucleic acids in a single sample by a simple manner is of pivotal importance for the diagnosis and therapy of human diseases. Herein, we constructed an automatic fluorescent nanoparticle (FNP) counting platform with a common fluorescence microscopic imaging setup for nonamplification multiplexed detection of attomoles of nucleic acids. Taking the advantages of the highly bright, multicolor emitting FNPs and magnetic separation, the platform enables sensitive multiplexed detection without the need for extra fluorescent labels. Quantification for multiplex DNAs, multiplex microRNAs (miRNA), as well as a DNA and miRNA mixture was achieved with a similar dynamic range, a limit of detection down to 5 amol (5 μL detection volume), and a 81-115% spike recovery from different biological sample matrices. In particular, the sensitivity for multiplex miRNA is by far among the highest without using amplification or the lock nucleic acid hybridization enhancement strategy. Results regarding miRNA-141 from four different cell lines were agreeable with those of the quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Simultaneous detection of miRNA-141 and miRNA-21 in four different cell lines yielded consistent results with publications, indicating the potential for monitoring multiplex miRNA expression associated with the collaborative regulation of important cellular events. This work expands the rule set of multiplex nucleic acid detection strategies and shows promising potential application in clinical diagnosis.

  14. Peptide-assembled graphene oxide as fluorescent turn-on sensor for ultrasensitive Lipopolysaccharide (Endotoxin detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seng Koon Lim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, or endotoxin, a major component in the outer cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is a very powerful and toxic inflammatory stimulator, resulting in sepsis or septic shock, a significant medical problem affecting about 700 000 patients and causing 250 000 casualties annually in the United States itself. The detection of LPS is highly importance. However, the currently used enzymatic limulus amebocyte lysate assay is highly susceptible to changes in temperature and pH, interference factors, and requires cumbersome sample preparation. A more cost-effective, sensitive and robust detection method is needed. Objective: To design and develop biosensor for LPS detection by assembling a LPS-binding peptide (as LPS receptor with graphene oxide (GO, as fluorescence quencher. Methods: GO was synthesized using a modified Hummer’s method. A synthetic LPS-binding peptide was designed, fluorescent labelled, and assembled with GO in PBS buffer solution. The fluorescence recovery of the peptide-GO was measured upon addition of LPS from Gram negative bacteria: E. coli, K. pneumoniae, Samonella Thyphosa, P. aeruginosa, as well as living pathogenic bacteria. Specificity tests were conducted with various biological molecules to evaluate the sensing performance. Results & Discussion: Specific binding of LPS with peptide release the peptides from GO, resulting in fluorescence recovery, allowing ultrasensitive detection of LPS with the limit of detection of 130 pM, the most sensitive synthetic LPS sensors to-date. The LPS sensor is highly selective to LPS than other biological species. Conclusion: We developed a peptide-GO assembled fluorescence sensor for ultrasensitive and specific LPS/endotoxin detection. This is the most sensitive synthetic LPS sensor reported in the world.

  15. Vector dark matter detection using the quantum jump of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiaoli; Di, Haoran

    2018-05-01

    The hidden sector U(1) vector bosons created from inflationary fluctuations can be a substantial fraction of dark matter if their mass is around 10-5 eV. The creation mechanism makes the vector bosons' energy spectral density ρcdm / ΔE very high. Therefore, the dark electric dipole transition rate in atoms is boosted if the energy gap between atomic states equals the mass of the vector bosons. By using the Zeeman effect, the energy gap between the 2S state and the 2P state in hydrogen atoms or hydrogen like ions can be tuned. The 2S state can be populated with electrons due to its relatively long life, which is about 1/7 s. When the energy gap between the semi-ground 2S state and the 2P state matches the mass of the cosmic vector bosons, induced transitions occur and the 2P state subsequently decays into the 1S state. The 2 P → 1 S decay emitted Lyman-α photons can then be registered. The choices of target atoms depend on the experimental facilities and the mass ranges of the vector bosons. Because the mass of the vector boson is connected to the inflation scale, the proposed experiment may provide a probe to inflation.

  16. Improved detection of urothelial carcinoma in situ with hexaminolevulinate fluorescence cystoscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidbauer, J.; Witjes, J.A.; Schmeller, N.; Donat, R.; Susani, M.; Marberger, M.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: In this European multicenter study we compared hexaminolevulinate (HAL) fluorescence cystoscopy and standard white light cystoscopy for the detection of carcinoma in situ (CIS) in patients suspected of having high risk bladder cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was a prospective

  17. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in the Gastric Mucosa by Fluorescence In Vivo Hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fontenete, Silvia; Leite, Marina; Figueiredo, Céu

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe a fluorescence in vivo hybridization (FIVH) protocol, using nucleic acid probes, for the detection of the bacterium Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa of an infected C57BL/6 mouse model. This protocol should be easily extended to other microorganisms not only...

  18. Improved detection of soma location and morphology in fluorescence microscopy images of neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayasandik, Cihan Bilge; Labate, Demetrio

    2016-12-01

    Automated detection and segmentation of somas in fluorescent images of neurons is a major goal in quantitative studies of neuronal networks, including applications of high-content-screenings where it is required to quantify multiple morphological properties of neurons. Despite recent advances in image processing targeted to neurobiological applications, existing algorithms of soma detection are often unreliable, especially when processing fluorescence image stacks of neuronal cultures. In this paper, we introduce an innovative algorithm for the detection and extraction of somas in fluorescent images of networks of cultured neurons where somas and other structures exist in the same fluorescent channel. Our method relies on a new geometrical descriptor called Directional Ratio and a collection of multiscale orientable filters to quantify the level of local isotropy in an image. To optimize the application of this approach, we introduce a new construction of multiscale anisotropic filters that is implemented by separable convolution. Extensive numerical experiments using 2D and 3D confocal images show that our automated algorithm reliably detects somas, accurately segments them, and separates contiguous ones. We include a detailed comparison with state-of-the-art existing methods to demonstrate that our algorithm is extremely competitive in terms of accuracy, reliability and computational efficiency. Our algorithm will facilitate the development of automated platforms for high content neuron image processing. A Matlab code is released open-source and freely available to the scientific community. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of Water Contamination Events Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Alternating Trilinear Decomposition Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The method based on conventional index and UV-vision has been widely applied in the field of water quality abnormality detection. This paper presents a qualitative analysis approach to detect the water contamination events with unknown pollutants. Fluorescence spectra were used as water quality monitoring tools, and the detection method of unknown contaminants in water based on alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD is proposed to analyze the excitation and emission spectra of the samples. The Delaunay triangulation interpolation method was used to make the pretreatment of three-dimensional fluorescence spectra data, in order to estimate the effect of Rayleigh and Raman scattering; ATLD model was applied to establish the model of normal water sample, and the residual matrix was obtained by subtracting the measured matrix from the model matrix; the residual sum of squares obtained from the residual matrix and threshold was used to make qualitative discrimination of test samples and distinguish drinking water samples and organic pollutant samples. The results of the study indicate that ATLD modeling with three-dimensional fluorescence spectra can provide a tool for detecting unknown organic pollutants in water qualitatively. The method based on fluorescence spectra can be complementary to the method based on conventional index and UV-vision.

  20. Red to far-red multispectral fluorescence image fusion for detection of fecal contamination on apples

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research developed a multispectral algorithm derived from hyperspectral line-scan fluorescence imaging under violet/blue LED excitation for detection of fecal contamination on Golden Delicious apples. Using a hyperspectral line-scan imaging system consisting of an EMCCD camera, spectrograph, an...

  1. Determination of ammonium on an integrated microchip with LED-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shuhua; Uchiyama, Katsumi; Li, Hai-Fang

    2012-01-01

    A simply fabricated microfluidic device integrated with a fluorescence detection system has been developed for on-line determination of ammonium in aqueous samples. A 365-nm light-emitting diode (LED) as an excitation source and a minor band pass filter were mounted into a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microchip for the purpose of miniaturization of the entire analytical system. The ammonium sample reacted with o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) on-chip with sodium sulfite as reducing reagent to produce a fluorescent isoindole derivative, which can emit fluorescence signal at about 425 nm when excited at 365 nm. Effects of pH, flow rate of solutions, concentrations of OPA-reagent, phosphate and sulfite salt were investigated. The calibration curve of ammonium in the range of 0.018-1.8 microg/mL showed a good linear relationship with R2 = 0.9985, and the detection limit was (S/N = 3) 3.6 x 10(-4) microg/mL. The relative standard deviation was 2.8% (n = 11) by calculating at 0.18 microg/mL ammonium for repeated detection. The system was applied to determine the ammonium concentration in rain and river waters, even extent to other analytes fluorescence detection by the presented device.

  2. Detection of chromosome abnormalities by quantitative fluorescent PCR in ectopic pregnancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goddijn, Mariette; van Stralen, Marja; Schuring-Blom, Heleen; Redeker, Bert; van Leeuwen, Liesbeth; Repping, Sjoerd; Leschot, Nico; van der Veen, Fulco

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the potential value of quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR) in the detection of chromosome abnormalities in ectopic pregnancies. Methods: Seventy chorionic villi samples of ectopic pregnancies were studied by QF-PCR. Primers for chromosomes 16, 21, X and

  3. Fluorescence detection of flavonols in HPLC by postcolumn chelation with aluminum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollman, Peter C H; Van Trijp, J. M P; Buysman, Michel N C P

    1996-01-01

    Flavonols are dietary antioxidants which may prevent coronary heart disease. To be able to study absorption of flavonols in humans, we developed a postcolumn derivatization with aluminum for HPLC with fluorescence detection. Variables governing postcolumn chelation, such as water content, buffer,

  4. An on-line system using ion-imprinted polymer for preconcentration and determination of bismuth in seawater employing atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Caio S A; Silva, Darllen G; Andrade, Heloysa M C; Riatto, Valeria B; Victor, Mauricio M; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2018-07-01

    This work proposes an on-line preconcentration system using ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) for determination of bismuth in seawater employing atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). The polymer was synthesized using 2- (5-bromo-2-pyridylazo) -5-diethylaminophenol (Br-PADAP) for complex formation, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA), cross-linking reagent and methacrylic acid (AMA) reagents, used as the functional monomer, 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile was used as the radical initiator. The polymer was characterized employing the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The determination of bismuth was performed employing hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG AFS) and the experimental conditions were optimized using a Box Behnken design involving the factors sample pH, eluent concentration and sodium tetrahydroborate concentration. So, using the optimized conditions the system allows the determination of bismuth with limits of detection and quantification of 26 and 88 ng L -1 , a preconcentration factor of 19.8. All these parameters were determined using a sample volume of 25 mL. The precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD%) was 3.7% for a bismuth(III) solution of concentration 0.25 µg L -1 . The system proposed was applied for the determination of bismuth in four seawater samples collected in Salvador City, Bahia State, Brazil. The concentrations obtained varied from 0.38 to 0.45 μg L -1 . The accuracy was evaluated by addition/recovery test, and the recoveries found varied from 92% to 101%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Enzyme-enhanced fluorescence detection of DNA on etched optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shu-yan; Li, Quan-yi; Ren, Rui; Zhang, Shu-sheng

    2009-05-15

    A novel DNA biosensor based on enzyme-enhanced fluorescence detection on etched optical fibers was developed. The hybridization complex of DNA probe and biotinylated target was formed on the etched optical fiber, and was then bound with streptavidin labeled horseradish peroxidase (streptavidin-HRP). The target DNA was quantified through the fluorescent detection of bi-p,p'-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (DBDA) generated from the substrate 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (p-HPA) under the catalysis of HRP, with a detection limit of 1 pM and a linear range from 1.69 pM to 169 pM. It is facile to regenerate this sensor through surface treatment with concentrated urea solution. It was discovered that the sensor can retain 70% of its original activity after three detection-regeneration cycles.

  6. Bio-inspired photonic-crystal microchip for fluorescent ultratrace detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jue; Zhang, Huacheng; Yang, Qiang; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei

    2014-06-02

    Ultratrace detection attracts great interest because it is still a challenge to the early diagnosis and drug testing. Enriching the targets from highly diluted solutions to the sensitive area is a promising method. Inspired by the fog-collecting structure on Stenocara beetle's back, a photonic-crystal (PC) microchip with hydrophilic-hydrophobic micropattern was fabricated by inkjet printing. This device was used to realize high-sensitive ultratrace detection of fluorescence analytes and fluorophore-based assays. Coupled with the fluorescence enhancement effect of a PC, detection down to 10(-16) mol L(-1) was achieved. This design can be combined with biophotonic devices for the detection of drugs, diseases, and pollutions of the ecosystem. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Enzyme-Free Detection of Mutations in Cancer DNA Using Synthetic Oligonucleotide Probes and Fluorescence Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miotke, Laura; Maity, Arindam; Ji, Hanlee

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rapid reliable diagnostics of DNA mutations are highly desirable in research and clinical assays. Current development in this field goes simultaneously in two directions: 1) high-throughput methods, and 2) portable assays. Non-enzymatic approaches are attractive for both types...... 1000-fold above the potential detection limit. CONCLUSION: Overall, the novel assay we describe could become a new approach to rapid, reliable and enzyme-free diagnostics of cancer or other associated DNA targets. Importantly, stoichiometry of wild type and mutant targets is conserved in our assay...... of methods since they would allow rapid and relatively inexpensive detection of nucleic acids. Modern fluorescence microscopy is having a huge impact on detection of biomolecules at previously unachievable resolution. However, no straightforward methods to detect DNA in a non-enzymatic way using fluorescence...

  8. Red fluorescence imaging for dental plaque detection and quantification: pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao; Gomez, Juliana; Khan, Soniya; Peru, Debbie; Ellwood, Roger

    2017-09-01

    The red fluorescence of dental plaque originating from porphyrins in oral bacteria may allow visualization, detection, and scoring of plaque without disclosing agents. Two studies were conducted. The first included 24 healthy participants who abstained from oral hygiene for 24 h. Dental plaque was collected from tooth surfaces, and a 10% solution was prepared. These were scanned by a molecular spectrometer to identify the optimum excitation and emission wavelengths of plaque for developing a red fluorescence imaging system. Fourteen healthy subjects completed the second study. After a washout period (1 week), participants had a prophylaxis at baseline and abstained from oral hygiene during the study. They were monitored using the fluorescence imaging system at baseline, 24 h, and 48 h. A dentist clinically assessed plaque after disclosing and on red fluorescence images. Three descriptors were extracted from images and a RUSBoost classifier derived computer fluorescence scores through cross-validation. Red fluorescence plaque levels increased during the 48-h accumulation. Plaque progression was identified by dentist assessment and computer analysis, presenting significant differences between visits at tooth and subject levels (phygiene assessment.

  9. Sensitive and selective detection of adenine using fluorescent ZnS nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerabai Devi, L; Negi, Devendra P S

    2011-01-01

    We have used fluorescent ZnS nanoparticles as a probe for the determination of adenine. A typical 2 x 10 -7 M concentration of adenine quenches 39.3% of the ZnS fluorescence. The decrease in ZnS fluorescence as a function of adenine concentration was found to be linear in the concentration range 5 x 10 -9 -2 x 10 -7 M. The limit of detection (LOD) of adenine by this method is 3 nM. Among the DNA bases, only adenine quenched the fluorescence of ZnS nanoparticles in the submicromolar concentration range, thus adding selectivity to the method. The amino group of adenine was important in determining the quenching efficiency. Steady-state fluorescence experiments suggest that one molecule of adenine is sufficient to quench the emission arising from a cluster of ZnS consisting of about 20 molecules. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements indicate that the adenine molecules block the sites on the surface of ZnS responsible for emission with the longest lifetime component. This method may be applied for the determination of adenine in biological samples since the measurements have been carried out at pH 7.

  10. Spectroscopic detection of fluorescent protein marker gene activity in genetically modified plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, O. W.; Chong, Jenny P. C.; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This work focuses on developing a portable fibre optic fluorescence analyser for rapid identification of genetically modified plants tagged with a fluorescent marker gene. Independent transgenic tobacco plant lines expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene were regenerated following Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Molecular characterisation of these plant lines was carried out at the DNA level by PCR screening to confirm their transgenic status. Conventional transgene expression analysis was then carried out at the RNA level by RT-PCR and at the protein level by Western blotting using anti-GFP rabbit antiserum. The amount of plant-expressed EGFP on a Western blot was quantified against known amounts of purified EGFP by scanning densitometry. The expression level of EGFP in transformed plants was found to range from 0.1 - 0.6% of total extractable protein. A comparison between conventional western analysis of transformants and direct spectroscopic quantification using the fibre optic fluorescence analyser was made. The results showed that spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence emission from strong EGFP expressors correlated positively with Western blot data. However, the fluorescence analyser was also able to identify weakly expressing plant transformants below the detection limit of colorimetric Western blotting.

  11. Application of Atomic Fluorescence to Measurement of Combustion Temperature in Solid Propellants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-04

    into a cytal (yttrium- aluminum -garnet) is shown to be an ideal seed, the fluoresce. f which is stimulated by the ultra-violet output of a Nd:YAG...been successfully employed in atmospheric flames for making thermometric measurements. However, because of the amorphous nature of energetic materials...be determined. R. 6 A .6 An example of this type of behavior is found in trivalent dysprosium, doped at 3% in yttrium- aluminum -garnet (Dy+3 :YAG

  12. Holographic method for site-resolved detection of a 2D array of ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Daniel Kai; Deissler, Benjamin; Limmer, Wolfgang; Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel approach to site-resolved detection of a 2D gas of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A near-resonant laser beam is coherently scattered by the atomic array, and after passing a lens its interference pattern is holographically recorded by superimposing it with a reference laser beam on a CCD chip. Fourier transformation of the recorded intensity pattern reconstructs the atomic distribution in the lattice with single-site resolution. The holographic detection method requires only about two hundred scattered photons per atom in order to achieve a high reconstruction fidelity of 99.9 %. Therefore, additional cooling during detection might not be necessary even for light atomic elements such as lithium. Furthermore, first investigations suggest that small aberrations of the lens can be post-corrected in imaging processing.

  13. Сomparative Analysis of 0.266 and 0.355 µm Fluorescence Excitation Wavelengths for Laser Fluores-Cence Monitoring of Oil Pollution Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Belov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The on-line detection of pipeline spillage is really essential for the fast oil spill response to the ecological and economical consequences. However existing on-line pipelines spillage detection systems have a sensibility of 0.2 – 1 % of pipe flow and do not detect the smaller-sized spillages.For unpeopled or sparsely populated regions an advanced technique for detection of pipeline spillages (including low-intensity ones is to monitor oil pollution (petroleum spills on the earth surface along the pipeline using, for example, an air drone.The laser remote sensing method is an effective method to detect the pipelines spillage.The paper is dedicated to development of laser fluorescence detection method of oil pollution. The remote sensing laser method to monitor oil pollution is based on the fluorescence excitation of oil in UV spectral band and on the data record of the earth surface laser-induced fluorescence radiation.For laser fluorescence method of monitoring oil pollution the paper presents a comparative analysis  of 0.266 and 0.355 µm wavelengths of the fluorescence excitation in terms of earth atmosphere propagation, eye-safety, laser characteristics, and petroleum fluorescence excitation efficiency.It is shown that in terms of eye-safety, laser characteristics, and propagation in the earth atmosphere a 0.355 µm laser wavelength of the fluorescence excitation has a sure advantage.In the context of petroleum fluorescence excitation efficiency a 0.266 µm laser wavelength of the fluorescence excitation has the advantage, but this advantage depends heavily on the petroleum base. For low-sulfur (sweet oil for instance,  it is not that big.At large, in solving the task of oil pollution detection because of the oil pipeline spillages the 0.355 µm wavelength of fluorescence excitation ought to be preferable. However, when creating a monitoring system for the pipeline with a specific petroleum base the irreversible decision depends on the

  14. In-vivo optical detection of cancer using chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, William WL; Thong, Patricia SP; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Soo, Khee Chee; Heng, Paul WS; Olivo, Malini

    2009-01-01

    Photosensitizer based fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy is fast becoming a promising approach for cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) formulated in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a potential exogenous fluorophore for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopic detection of human cancer tissue xenografted in preclinical models as well as in a patient. Fluorescence imaging was performed on MGH human bladder tumor xenografted on both the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and the murine model using a fluorescence endoscopy imaging system. In addition, fiber optic based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed on tumors and various normal organs in the same mice to validate the macroscopic images. In one patient, fluorescence imaging was performed on angiosarcoma lesions and normal skin in conjunction with fluorescence spectroscopy to validate Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence visual assessment of the lesions. Margins of tumor xenografts in the CAM model were clearly outlined under fluorescence imaging. Ce6-PVP-induced fluorescence imaging yielded a specificity of 83% on the CAM model. In mice, fluorescence intensity of Ce6-PVP was higher in bladder tumor compared to adjacent muscle and normal bladder. Clinical results confirmed that fluorescence imaging clearly captured the fluorescence of Ce6-PVP in angiosarcoma lesions and good correlation was found between fluorescence imaging and spectral measurement in the patient. Combination of Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy could allow for optical detection and discrimination between cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. Ce6-PVP seems to be a promising fluorophore for fluorescence diagnosis of cancer

  15. Detection of Bacterial Endospores in Soil by Terbium Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brandes Ammann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spore formation is a survival mechanism of microorganisms when facing unfavorable environmental conditions resulting in “dormant” states. We investigated the occurrence of bacterial endospores in soils from various locations including grasslands (pasture, meadow, allotment gardens, and forests, as well as fluvial sediments. Bacterial spores are characterized by their high content of dipicolinic acid (DPA. In the presence of terbium, DPA forms a complex showing a distinctive photoluminescence spectrum. DPA was released from soil by microwaving or autoclaving. The addition of aluminium chloride reduced signal quenching by interfering compounds such as phosphate. The highest spore content (up to 109 spores per gram of dry soil was found in grassland soils. Spore content is related to soil type, to soil depth, and to soil carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. Our study might provide a basis for the detection of “hot spots” of bacterial spores in soil.

  16. Capillary array electrophoresis using laser-excited confocal fluorescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, X.C.; Quesada, M.A.; Mathies, R.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-04-15

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has found widespread application in analytical and biomedical research, and the scope and sophistication of CE is still rapidly advancing. Gel-filled capillaries have been employed for the rapid separation and analysis of synthetic polynucleotides, DNA sequencing fragments, and DNA restriction fragments. Open-tube capillary electrophoresis has attained subattomole detection levels in amino acid separations 14 and proven its utility for the separation of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. Separation of the optical isomers of dansyl amino acids has also been successfully demonstrated. Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, isoelectric focusing, and on-column derivatization can all be performed on CE columns, demonstrating the utility of capillary electrophoresis as an analytical and micropreparative tool. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Specific detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus by fluorescence quenching immunoassay based on quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Zhang, Junxian; Bai, Haili; Li, Xuan; Lv, Pintian; Guo, Ailing

    2014-07-01

    In this study, anti-Vibrio parahaemolyticus polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were prepared through intradermal injection immune and lymphocyte hybridoma technique respectively. CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized at pH 9.3, 98 °C for 1 h with stabilizer of 2.7:1. The fluorescence intensity was 586.499, and the yield was 62.43%. QD probes were successfully prepared under the optimized conditions of pH 7.4, 37 °C for 1 h, 250 μL of 50 mg/mL EDC · HCl, 150 μL of 4 mg/mL NHS, buffer system of Na2HPO4-citric acid, and 8 μL of 2.48 mg/mL polyclonal antibodies. As gold nanoparticles could quench fluorescence of quantum dots, the concentration of V. parahaemolyticus could be detected through measuring the reduction of fluorescence intensity in immune sandwich reaction composed of quantum dot probe, gold-labeled antibody, and the sample. For pure culture, fluorescence intensity of the system was proportional with logarithm concentration of antigen, and the correlation coefficient was 99.764%. The fluorescence quenching immunoassay based on quantum dots is established for the first time to detect Vibrio parahaemolyticus. This method may be used as rapid testing procedure due to its high simplicity and sensitivity.

  18. Detection of association and fusion of giant vesicles using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunami, Takeshi; Caschera, Filippo; Morita, Yuuki; Toyota, Taro; Nishimura, Kazuya; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Hanczyc, Martin M; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2010-10-05

    We have developed a method to evaluate the fusion process of giant vesicles using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). Three fluorescent markers and FACS technology were used to evaluate the extent of association and fusion of giant vesicles. Two fluorescent markers encapsulated in different vesicle populations were used as association markers; when these vesicles associate, the two independent markers should be observed simultaneously in a single detection event. The quenched fluorescent marker and the dequencher, which were encapsulated in separate vesicle populations, were used as the fusion marker. When the internal aqueous solutions mix, the quenched marker is liberated by the dequencher and emits the third fluorescent signal. Although populations of pure POPC vesicles showed no detectable association or fusion, the same populations, oppositely charged by the exogenous addition of charged amphiphiles, showed up to 50% association and 30% fusion upon population analysis of 100,000 giant vesicles. Although a substantial fraction of the vesicles associated in response to a small amount of the charged amphiphiles (5% mole fraction compared to POPC alone), a larger amount of the charged amphiphiles (25%) was needed to induce vesicle fusion. The present methodology also revealed that the association and fusion of giant vesicles was dependent on size, with larger giant vesicles associating and fusing more frequently.

  19. Intrinsic fluorescence for cervical precancer detection using polarized light based in-house fabricated portable device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Bharat Lal; Singh, Pankaj; Sah, Amar Nath; Pandey, Kiran; Agarwal, Asha; Pantola, Chayanika; Pradhan, Asima

    2018-01-01

    An in-house fabricated portable device has been tested to detect cervical precancer through the intrinsic fluorescence from human cervix of the whole uterus in a clinical setting. A previously validated technique based on simultaneously acquired polarized fluorescence and polarized elastic scattering spectra from a turbid medium is used to extract the intrinsic fluorescence. Using a diode laser at 405 nm, intrinsic fluorescence of flavin adenine dinucleotide, which is the dominant fluorophore and other contributing fluorophores in the epithelium of cervical tissue, has been extracted. Different grades of cervical precancer (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia; CIN) have been discriminated using principal component analysis-based Mahalanobis distance and linear discriminant analysis. Normal, CIN I and CIN II samples have been discriminated from one another with high sensitivity and specificity at 95% confidence level. This ex vivo study with cervix of whole uterus samples immediately after hysterectomy in a clinical environment indicates that the in-house fabricated portable device has the potential to be used as a screening tool for in vivo precancer detection using intrinsic fluorescence.

  20. Dynamics of an atomic wave packet in a standing-wave cavity field: A cavity-assisted single-atom detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chough, Young-Tak; Nha, Hyunchul; Kim, Sang Wook; An, Kyungwon; Youn, Sun-Hyun

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the single-atom detection system using an optical standing-wave cavity, from the viewpoint of the quantized center-of-mass motion of the atomic wave packet. We show that since the atom-field coupling strength depends upon the overlap integral of the atomic wave packet and the field mode function, the effect of the wave-packet spreading via the momentum exchange process brings about a significant effect in the detection efficiency. We find that, as a result, the detection efficiency is not sensitive to the individual atomic trajectory for reasonably slow atoms. We also address an interesting phenomenon of the atomic wave-packet splitting occurring when an atom passes through a node of the cavity field

  1. A miniaturised image based fluorescence detection system for point-of-care-testing of cocaine abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Rafał; Krüger, Jan; Moynihan, Shane

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we describe a miniaturised image-based fluorescence detection system and demonstrate its viability as a highly sensitive tool for point-of-care-analysis of drugs of abuse in human sweat with a focus on monitor individuals for drugs of abuse. Investigations of miniaturised and low power optoelectronic configurations and methodologies for real-time image analysis were successfully carried out. The miniaturised fluorescence detection system was validated against a reference detection system under controlled laboratory conditions by analysing spiked sweat samples in dip stick and then strip with sample pad. As a result of the validation studies, a 1 ng mL-1 limit of detection of cocaine in sweat and full agreement of test results with the reference detection system can be reported. Results of the investigations open the way towards a detection system that integrates a hand-held fluorescence reader and a wearable skinpatch, and which can collect and in situ analyse sweat for the presence of cocaine at any point for up to tenths hours.

  2. Integrated three-dimensional optical MEMS for chip-based fluorescence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kuo-Yung; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Khoo, Hwa-Seng

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents a novel fluorescence sensing chip for parallel protein microarray detection in the context of a 3-in-1 protein chip system. This portable microchip consists of a monolithic integration of CMOS-based avalanche photo diodes (APDs) combined with a polymer micro-lens, a set of three-dimensional (3D) inclined mirrors for separating adjacent light signals and a low-noise transformer-free dc-dc boost mini-circuit to power the APDs (ripple below 1.28 mV, 0-5 V input, 142 V and 12 mA output). We fabricated our APDs using the planar CMOS process so as to facilitate the post-CMOS integration of optical MEMS components such as the lenses. The APD arrays were arranged in unique circular patterns appropriate for detecting the specific fluorescently labelled protein spots in our study. The array-type APDs were designed so as to compensate for any alignment error as detected by a positional error signal algorithm. The condenser lens was used as a structure for light collection to enhance the fluorescent signals by about 25%. This element also helped to reduce the light loss due to surface absorption. We fabricated an inclined mirror to separate two adjacent fluorescent signals from different specimens. Excitation using evanescent waves helped reduce the interference of the excitation light source. This approach also reduced the number of required optical lenses and minimized the complexity of the structural design. We achieved detection floors for anti-rabbit IgG and Cy5 fluorescent dye as low as 0.5 ng/µl (~3.268 nM). We argue that the intrinsic nature of point-to-point and batch-detection methods as showcased in our chip offers advantages over the serial-scanning approach used in traditional scanner systems. In addition, our system is low cost and lightweight.

  3. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  4. Entanglement detection from interference fringes in atom-photon systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Jun; Nemoto, Kae; Miniatura, Christian

    2010-01-01

    A measurement scheme of atomic qubits pinned at given positions is studied by analyzing the interference pattern obtained when they emit photons spontaneously. In the case of two qubits, a well-known relation is revisited in which the interference visibility is equal to the concurrence of the state in the infinite spatial separation limit of the qubits. By taking into account the superradiant and subradiant effects, it is shown that a state tomography is possible when the qubit spatial separation is comparable to the wavelength of the atomic transition. In the case of three qubits, the relations between various entanglement measures and the interference visibility are studied, where the visibility is defined from the two-qubit case. A qualitative correspondence among these entanglement relations is discussed. In particular, it is shown that the interference visibility is directly related to the maximal bipartite negativity.

  5. Highly selective and rapidly responsive fluorescent probe for hydrogen sulfide detection in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Jialin; Yang, Shaoxiang; Tian, Hongyu; Liu, Yongguo; Sun, Baoguo

    2018-08-15

    A new fluorescent probe 6-(2, 4-dinitrophenoxy)-2-naphthonitrile (probe 1) was designed and synthesized for the selective detection of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S). The addition of H 2 S to a solution of probe 1 resulted in a marked fluorescence turn-on alongside a visual color change from colorless to light yellow. Importantly, this distinct color response indicated that probe 1 could be used as a visual sensor for H 2 S. Moreover, probe 1 was successfully used as a signal tool to determine the H 2 S levels in beer and red wine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis by evaluation of normalized variances of fluorescence time correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekan, Thomas; Weissbach, Carmen; Voigt, Jan; Ebert, Bernd; MacDonald, Rainer; Bahner, Malte L.; Mahler, Marianne; Schirner, Michael; Berliner, Michael; Berliner, Birgitt; Osel, Jens; Osel, Ilka

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence imaging using the dye indocyanine green as a contrast agent was investigated in a prospective clinical study for the detection of rheumatoid arthritis. Normalized variances of correlated time series of fluorescence intensities describing the bolus kinetics of the contrast agent in certain regions of interest were analyzed to differentiate healthy from inflamed finger joints. These values are determined using a robust, parameter-free algorithm. We found that the normalized variance of correlation functions improves the differentiation between healthy joints of volunteers and joints with rheumatoid arthritis of patients by about 10% compared to, e.g., ratios of areas under the curves of raw data.

  7. Supramolecular assembly affording a ratiometric two-photon fluorescent nanoprobe for quantitative detection and bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Hong-Wen; Xiong, Mengyi; Yin, Sheng-Yan; Yang, Yue; Hu, Xiao-Xiao; Yin, Xia; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence quantitative analyses for vital biomolecules are in great demand in biomedical science owing to their unique detection advantages with rapid, sensitive, non-damaging and specific identification. However, available fluorescence strategies for quantitative detection are usually hard to design and achieve. Inspired by supramolecular chemistry, a two-photon-excited fluorescent supramolecular nanoplatform ( TPSNP ) was designed for quantitative analysis with three parts: host molecules (β-CD polymers), a guest fluorophore of sensing probes (Np-Ad) and a guest internal reference (NpRh-Ad). In this strategy, the TPSNP possesses the merits of (i) improved water-solubility and biocompatibility; (ii) increased tissue penetration depth for bioimaging by two-photon excitation; (iii) quantitative and tunable assembly of functional guest molecules to obtain optimized detection conditions; (iv) a common approach to avoid the limitation of complicated design by adjustment of sensing probes; and (v) accurate quantitative analysis by virtue of reference molecules. As a proof-of-concept, we utilized the two-photon fluorescent probe NHS-Ad-based TPSNP-1 to realize accurate quantitative analysis of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), with high sensitivity and good selectivity in live cells, deep tissues and ex vivo -dissected organs, suggesting that the TPSNP is an ideal quantitative indicator for clinical samples. What's more, TPSNP will pave the way for designing and preparing advanced supramolecular sensors for biosensing and biomedicine.

  8. Chemodosimeter-based fluorescent detection of L-cysteine after extracted by molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jinhua; Zhang, Zhong; Wang, Gang; Song, Xingliang; You, Jinmao; Chen, Lingxin

    2014-03-01

    A chemodosimeter-based fluorescent detection method coupled with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) extraction was developed for determination of L-cysteine (L-Cys) by combining molecular imprinting technique with fluorescent chemodosimeter. The MIPs prepared by precipitation polymerization with L-Cys as template, possessed high specific surface area of 145 m(2)/g and good thermal stability without decomposition lower than 300 °C, and were successfully applied as an adsorbent with excellent selectivity for L-Cys over other amino acids, and enantioselectivity was also demonstrated. A novel chemodosimeter, rhodamine B1, was synthesized for discriminating L-Cys from its structurally similar homocysteine and glutathione as well as various possibly co-existing biospecies in aqueous solutions with notable fluorescence enhancement when adding L-Cys. As L-Cys was added with increasing concentrations, an emission band peaked at 580 nm occurred and significantly increased in fluorescence intensity, by which the L-Cys could be sensed optically. High detectability up to 12.5 nM was obtained. An excellent linearity was found within the wide range of 0.05-50 μM (r=0.9996), and reasonable relative standard deviations ranging from 0.3% to 3.5% were attained. Such typical features as high selectivity, high sensitivity, easy operation and low cost enabled this MIPs-fluorometry to be potentially applicable for routine detection of trace L-Cys. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  10. Concentrations of Nicotinamide in Plasma by RP-HPLC With Fluorescence Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to establish a new method for detecting nicotinamide concentration in plasma. In the experiment, the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method was used, with a fluorescence detector. The nicotinamide in the plasma was first converted to N1- methylnicotinamide, then reacted with acetophenone under certain conditions to produce fluorescent derivatives for testing. The method is a kind of highly sensitive detection, of which the lower limit is 10 ng/mL, the recovery rate is between 92.75% and 105.13%, and the relative standard deviation (RSD is between 3.76% and 4.43%. The results showed that this measurement method is accurate, sensitive and rapid. It meets the requirements of the experiment, and applies to the detection of nicotinamide concentration in plasma.

  11. Design of a smartphone-camera-based fluorescence imaging system for the detection of oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthoff, Ross

    Shown is the design of the Smartphone Oral Cancer Detection System (SOCeeDS). The SOCeeDS attaches to a smartphone and utilizes its embedded imaging optics and sensors to capture images of the oral cavity to detect oral cancer. Violet illumination sources excite the oral tissues to induce fluorescence. Images are captured with the smartphone's onboard camera. Areas where the tissues of the oral cavity are darkened signify an absence of fluorescence signal, indicating breakdown in tissue structure brought by precancerous or cancerous conditions. With this data the patient can seek further testing and diagnosis as needed. Proliferation of this device will allow communities with limited access to healthcare professionals a tool to detect cancer in its early stages, increasing the likelihood of cancer reversal.

  12. Detection of biological warfare agents using ultra violet-laser induced fluorescence LIDAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Deepti; Kumar, Deepak; Maini, Anil K; Sharma, Ramesh C

    2013-08-01

    This review has been written to highlight the threat of biological warfare agents, their types and detection. Bacterial biological agent Bacillus anthracis (bacteria causing the disease anthrax) which is most likely to be employed in biological warfare is being discussed in detail. Standoff detection of biological warfare agents in aerosol form using Ultra violet-Laser Induced Fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectroscopy method has been studied. Range-resolved detection and identification of biological aerosols by both nano-second and non-linear femto-second LIDAR is also discussed. Calculated received fluorescence signal for a cloud of typical biological agent Bacillus globigii (Simulants of B. anthracis) at a location of ~5.0 km at different concentrations in presence of solar background radiation has been described. Overview of current research efforts in internationally available working UV-LIF LIDAR systems are also mentioned briefly. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Interactions of Insolation and Shading on Ability to Use Fluorescence Imaging to Detect Fecal Contaminated Spinach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M. Lefcourt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fecal contamination of produce in fields is a recognized food safety risk, and it is a requirement that fields be surveyed for evidence of fecal contamination. It may be possible to increase the efficacy of such surveys using imaging techniques that rely on detection of fluorescence responses of fecal material to UV excitation. However, fluorescence responses are easily masked by ambient illumination. This study investigated the potential of using a shroud to reduce the impact of ambient illumination on responses measured using relatively inexpensive optical components. During periods of near peak insolation, even with full shrouding, results indicate that reliable detection would be problematic. Towards dusk, effective imaging could be accomplished even with a gap of 250 cm at the bottom of the shroud. Results suggest that imaging using relatively inexpensive components could provide the basis for detection of fecal contamination in produce fields if surveys were conducted during dawn or dusk, or at night.

  14. Protein A Detection Based on Quantum Dots-Antibody Bioprobe Using Fluorescence Coupled Capillary Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Qiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, fluorescence detection coupled capillary electrophoresis (CE-FL was used to detect Protein A. Antibody was first labeled with Cy5 and then mixed with quantum dots (QDs to form QDs-antibody bioprobe. Further, we observed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET from QDs donor to Cy5 acceptor. The bioprobe was formed and brought QDs and Cy5 close enough to allow FRET to occur. After adding protein A, the FRET system was broken and caused the FRET signal to decrease. Thus, a new method for the determination of protein A was proposed based on the FRET signal changes. This study provides a new trail of thought for the detection of protein.

  15. Rapid fluorescence detection of pathogenic bacteria using magnetic enrichment technique combined with magnetophoretic chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yulan; Xu, Yi; Wang, Renjie; Chen, Li

    2017-08-01

    A rapid and sensitive analytical method was developed to detect pathogenic bacteria which combined magnetic enrichment, fluorescence labeling with polyethylene glycol (PEG) magnetophoretic chromatography. As pathogenic bacteria usually exist in complex matrixes at low concentration, an efficient enrichment is essential for diagnosis. In order to capture series types of pathogenic bacteria in samples, amino-modified magnetic nanoparticles (Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 -NH 2 ) were prepared for efficient enrichment by the electrostatic interaction with pathogenic bacteria. It was shown that the capture efficiency reached up to 95.4% for Escherichia coli (E. coli). Furthermore, quantitative analysis of the bacteria was achieved by using acridine orange (AO) as a fluorescence probe for the captured E. coli due to its ability of staining series types of bacteria and rapid labeling. In order to remove the free magnetic nanoparticles and redundant fluorescent reagent, the labeled suspension was poured into a PEG separation column and was separated by applying an external magnetic field. The presence of 100 cfu mL -1 E. coli could be detected for semi-quantitative analysis by observing the separation column with the naked eye, and the concentration could be further evaluated by fluorescence detection. All the above processes were finished within 80 min. It was demonstrated that a good linear relationship existed between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of E. coli ranging from 10 2 to 10 6  cfu mL -1 , with a detection limit of 100 cfu mL -1 when E. coli acted as target bacteria. The recovery rate of E. coli was 93.6∼102.0% in tap water and cooked meat samples, and the RSD was lower than 7% (n = 6); the result coincided with the conventional plate count method. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  16. The use of fluorescent intrabodies to detect endogenous gankyrin in living cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinaldi, Anne-Sophie; Freund, Guillaume; Desplancq, Dominique; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Baltzinger, Mireille; Rochel, Natacha; Mély, Yves; Didier, Pascal; Weiss, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Expression of antibody fragments in mammalian cells (intrabodies) is used to probe the target protein or interfere with its biological function. We previously described the in vitro characterisation of a single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragment (F5) isolated from an intrabody library that binds to the oncoprotein gankyrin (GK) in solution. Here, we have isolated several other scFvs that interact with GK in the presence of F5 and tested whether they allow, when fused to fluorescent proteins, to detect by FRET endogenous GK in living cells. The binding of pairs of scFvs to GK was analysed by gel filtration and the ability of each scFv to mediate nuclear import/export of GK was determined. Binding between scFv-EGFP and RFP-labelled GK in living cells was detected by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). After co-transfection of two scFvs fused to EGFP and RFP, respectively, which form a tri-molecular complex with GK in vitro, FRET signal was measured. This system allowed us to observe that GK is monomeric and distributed throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus of several cancer cell lines. Our results show that pairs of fluorescently labelled intrabodies can be monitored by FLIM–FRET microscopy and that this technique allows the detection of lowly expressed endogenous proteins in single living cells. Highlights: ► Endogenous GK in living cells was targeted with pairs of fluorescently-tagged scFvs. ► Tri-molecular complexes containing two scFvs and one molecule GK were formed. ► GK was detected using fluorescence lifetime-based FRET imaging. ► GK is monomeric and homogeneously distributed in several cancer cell lines. ► This technique may have many applications in live-cell imaging of endogenous proteins

  17. The use of fluorescent intrabodies to detect endogenous gankyrin in living cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, Anne-Sophie; Freund, Guillaume; Desplancq, Dominique; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Baltzinger, Mireille [Ecole Supérieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, UMR 7242, CNRS/Université de Strasbourg, boulevard Sébastien Brant, 67412 Illkirch (France); Rochel, Natacha [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, UMR 7104, CNRS/INSERM/Université de Strasbourg, rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Mély, Yves; Didier, Pascal [Faculté de Pharmacie, UMR 7213, CNRS/Université de Strasbourg, route du Rhin, 67401 Illkirch (France); Weiss, Etienne, E-mail: eweiss@unistra.fr [Ecole Supérieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, UMR 7242, CNRS/Université de Strasbourg, boulevard Sébastien Brant, 67412 Illkirch (France)

    2013-04-01

    Expression of antibody fragments in mammalian cells (intrabodies) is used to probe the target protein or interfere with its biological function. We previously described the in vitro characterisation of a single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragment (F5) isolated from an intrabody library that binds to the oncoprotein gankyrin (GK) in solution. Here, we have isolated several other scFvs that interact with GK in the presence of F5 and tested whether they allow, when fused to fluorescent proteins, to detect by FRET endogenous GK in living cells. The binding of pairs of scFvs to GK was analysed by gel filtration and the ability of each scFv to mediate nuclear import/export of GK was determined. Binding between scFv-EGFP and RFP-labelled GK in living cells was detected by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). After co-transfection of two scFvs fused to EGFP and RFP, respectively, which form a tri-molecular complex with GK in vitro, FRET signal was measured. This system allowed us to observe that GK is monomeric and distributed throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus of several cancer cell lines. Our results show that pairs of fluorescently labelled intrabodies can be monitored by FLIM–FRET microscopy and that this technique allows the detection of lowly expressed endogenous proteins in single living cells. Highlights: ► Endogenous GK in living cells was targeted with pairs of fluorescently-tagged scFvs. ► Tri-molecular complexes containing two scFvs and one molecule GK were formed. ► GK was detected using fluorescence lifetime-based FRET imaging. ► GK is monomeric and homogeneously distributed in several cancer cell lines. ► This technique may have many applications in live-cell imaging of endogenous proteins.

  18. Biosynthesis of CdS nanoparticles: A fluorescent sensor for sulfate-reducing bacteria detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Peng; Zhang, Dun; Zeng, Yan; Wan, Yi

    2016-01-15

    CdS nanoparticles were synthesized with an environmentally friendly method by taking advantage of the characteristic metabolic process of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), and used as fluorescence labels for SRB detection. The presence of CdS nanoparticles was observed within and immediately surrounded bacterial cells, indicating CdS nanoparticles were synthesized both intracellularly and extracellularly. Moreover, fluorescent properties of microbial synthesized CdS nanoparticles were evaluated for SRB detection, and a linear relationship between fluorescence intensity and the logarithm of bacterial concentration was obtained in the range of from 1.0×10(2) to 1.0×10(7)cfu mL(-1). The proposed SRB detection method avoided the use of biological bio-recognition elements which are easy to lose their specific recognizing abilities, and the bacterial detection time was greatly shortened compared with the widely used MPN method which would take up to 15 days to accomplish the detection process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ratio-metric sensor to detect riboflavin via fluorescence resonance energy transfer with ultrahigh sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jilong; Su, Siheng; Wei, Junhua; Bahgi, Roya; Hope-Weeks, Louisa; Qiu, Jingjing; Wang, Shiren

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) ration-metric fluorescent probe based on heteroatom N, S doped carbon dots (N, S-CDs) was developed to determine riboflavin in aqueous solutions. The ratio of two emission intensities at different wavelengths is applied to determine the concentration of riboflavin (RF). This method is more effective in reducing the background interference and fluctuation of diverse conditions. Therefore, this probe obtains high sensitivity with a low limit of detection (LOD) of 1.9 nM (0.7 ng/ml) which is in the highest level of all riboflavin detection approaches and higher than single wavelength intensity detection (1.9 μM). In addition, this sensor has a high selectivity of detecting riboflavin in deionized water (pH=7) with other biochemical like amino acids. Moreover, riboflavin in aqueous solution is very sensitive to sunlight and can be degraded to lumiflavin, which is toxic. Because the N, S doped carbon dots cannot serve as an energy donor for N, S doped carbon dots and lumiflavin system, this system makes it easy to determine whether the riboflavin is degraded or not, which is first to be reported. This platform may provide possibilities to build a new and facile fluorescence resonance energy transfer based sensor to detect analytes and metamorphous analytes in aqueous solution.

  20. Direct fluorescence detection of VirE2 secretion by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakov, Noga; Barak, Yoav; Pereman, Idan; Christie, Peter J.; Elbaum, Michael

    2017-01-01

    VirE2 is a ssDNA binding protein essential for virulence in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. A tetracysteine mutant (VirE2-TC) was prepared for in vitro and in vivo fluorescence imaging based on the ReAsH reagent. VirE2-TC was found to be biochemically active as it binds both ssDNA and the acidic secretion chaperone VirE1. It was also biologically functional in complementing virE2 null strains transforming Arabidopsis thaliana roots and Nicotiana tabacum leaves. In vitro experiments demonstrated a two-color fluorescent complex using VirE2-TC/ReAsH and Alexa Fluor 488 labeled ssDNA. In vivo, fluorescent VirE2-TC/ReAsH was detected in bacteria and in plant cells at time frames relevant to transformation. PMID:28403156

  1. A Fluorescent Probe for Sensitive Detection of Hydrazine and Its Application in Red Wine and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jialin; Wang, Hao; Yang, Shaoxiang; Tian, Hongyu; Liu, Yongguo; Hao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Jie; Sun, Baoguo

    2018-01-01

    A fluorescent probe, 7-(diethylamino)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-4-carbaldehyde (probe 1), was designed and synthesized for the sensitive detection of hydrazine. The addition of N 2 H 4 caused the fluorescence intensity of probe 1 to decrease. The probe's fluorescence was turn-off after adding N 2 H 4 , which could be observed under UV light at 365 nm. Moreover, once treated with different concentrations N 2 H 4 solutions, the solution color change could be distinguished, which indicates that probe 1 could be used as a visual sensor for hydrazine. Moreover, probe 1 can be used as a signal tool to determine hydrazine levels in solutions, such as red wine and water.

  2. Detection of ultra-low oxygen concentration based on the fluorescence blinking dynamics of single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ruixiang; Chen, Ruiyun; Zhou, Haitao; Qin, Yaqiang; Zhang, Guofeng; Qin, Chengbing; Gao, Yan; Gao, Yajun; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2018-01-01

    We present a sensitive method for detection of ultra-low oxygen concentrations based on the fluorescence blinking dynamics of single molecules. The relationship between the oxygen concentration and the fraction of time spent in the off-state, stemming from the population and depopulation of triplet states and radical cationic states, can be fitted with a two-site quenching model in the Stern-Volmer plot. The oxygen sensitivity is up to 43.42 kPa-1 in the oxygen partial pressure region as low as 0.01-0.25 kPa, which is seven times higher than that of the fluorescence intensity indicator. This method avoids the limitation of the sharp and non-ignorable fluctuations that occur during the measurement of fluorescence intensity, providing potential applications in the field of low oxygen-concentration monitoring in life science and industry.

  3. Detection of potassium deficiency on palm oil tree (Elaeis guineensis (jacq)) by laser induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diomande, K.; Konate, A.; Krou Adjo, V.; Soro, A.; Ebby, N.; Ballo, K.

    1998-02-01

    The potassium is the main nutrient element which plays a significant role on oil palm tree (Elaeis guineensis (jacq)) production and its resistance to the dry season. One can observe 30% decrease of the production in case of potassium deficiency. The potassium nutrition control of an oil palm tree field is a very important activity and leads to the fertilization policy. The Laser Induced Fluorescence (L.I.F.) is a fast and simple method compared to the classical one, ''Diagnostic Foliaire'', usually used in agronomy. We used the L.I.F. method to detect the oil palm tree stress caused by potassium deficiency, analysing the fluorescence spectrum of the chlorophyll a. We proved that the intensity ratio of the fluorescence spectrum R=F690/F73S is superior to 0.5 when the tree is under stress and its value is around 0.4 in case of intact tree. (author)

  4. Multiplex and high-throughput DNA detection using surface plasmon mediated fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Zhong

    The overall objective of this research project was to develop a user-friendly and sensitive biosensor for nucleic acid aptamers with multiplexing and high-throughput capability. The sensing was based on the fluorescence signals emitted by the fluorophores coupling with plamonic nanoparticle (gold nanorod) deposited on a patterned substrate. Gold nanorods (GNRs) were synthesized using a binary mixture of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium oleate (NaOL) in seed mediated growth method. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) printed glass slides were selectively coated with a gold thin-film to define hydrophilic areas for GNR deposition. Due to the wettablity contrast, GNR solution dropped on the slide was induced to assemble exclusively in the hydrophilic spots. By controlling temperature and humidity of the evaporation process, vertically-standing GNR arrays were achieved on the pattered slide. Fluorescence was conjugated to GNR surface via DNA double strand with tunable length. Theoretical simulation predicted a flat layer ( 30 nm thick) of uniform "hot spots" presented on the GNR tips, which could modify the nearby fluorescence. Experimentally, the vertical GNR arrays yielded metallic enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effect, which was dependent on the spectrum overlap and GNR-fluorophore distance. Specifically, the maximum enhancement of Quasar 670 and Alexa 750 was observed when it was coupled with GNR664 (plasmonic wavelength 664 nm) and GNR778 respectively at a distance of 16 nm, while the carboxyfluorescein (FAM) was at maximal intensity when attached to gold nanosphere520. This offers an opportunity for multiplexed DNA sensing. Based on this, we developed a novel GNR mediated fluorescence biosensor for DNA detection. Fluorescence labeled haipin-DNA probes were introduced to designated spots of GNR array with the matching LSPR wavelengths on the substrate. The fluorescence was quenched originally because of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) effect

  5. Europium-decorated graphene quantum dots as a fluorescent probe for label-free, rapid and sensitive detection of Cu{sup 2+} and L-cysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Liping [College of Life Sciences, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, 350002 (China); Song, Xinhong; Chen, Yiying; Rong, Mingcong; Wang, Yiru [Department of Chemistry and the MOE Key Laboratory of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); Zhao, Li; Zhao, Tingting [Xiamen Huaxia College, Xiamen, 361024 (China); Chen, Xi, E-mail: xichen@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and the MOE Key Laboratory of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China)

    2015-09-03

    In this work, europium-decorated graphene quantum dots (Eu-GQDs) were prepared by treating three-dimensional Eu-decorated graphene (3D Eu-graphene) via a strong acid treatment. Various characterizations revealed that Eu atoms were successfully complexed with the oxygen functional groups on the surface of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with the atomic ratio of 2.54%. Compared with Eu free GQDs, the introduction of Eu atoms enhanced the electron density and improved the surface chemical activities of Eu-GQDs. Therefore, the obtained Eu-GQDs were used as a novel “off-on” fluorescent probe for the label-free determination of Cu{sup 2+} and L-cysteine (L-Cys) with high sensitivity and selectivity. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs was quenched in the presence of Cu{sup 2+} owing to the coordination reaction between Cu{sup 2+} and carboxyl groups on the surface of the Eu-GQDs. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs recovered with the subsequent addition of L-Cys because of the strong affinity of Cu{sup 2+} to L-Cys via the Cu–S bond. The experimental results showed that the fluorescence variation of the proposed approach had a good linear relationship in the range of 0.1–10 μM for Cu{sup 2+} and 0.5–50 μM for L-Cys with corresponding detection limits of 0.056 μM for Cu{sup 2+} and 0.31 μM for L-Cys. The current approach also displayed a special response to Cu{sup 2+} and L-Cys over the other co-existing metal ions and amino acids, and the results obtained from buffer-diluted serum samples suggested its applicability in biological samples. - Highlights: • The europium-decorated graphene quantum dots (Eu-GQDs) have been successfully prepared. • Various characterizations results proved that Eu atoms were successfully introduced into graphene quantum dots. • The introduced Eu atoms changed the electron density and surface chemical activities of Eu-GQDs. • Eu-GQDs were used as an “off-on” fluorescent probe for Cu{sup 2+} and L-cysteine detection

  6. Use of selenium to detect mercury in water and cells: an enhancement of the sensitivity and specificity of a seleno fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo; Ding, Baiyu; Xu, Kehua; Tong, Lili

    2009-01-01

    Seleno fluorescent probe: An organoselenium fluorescent probe (FSe-1) for mercury was designed based on the irreversible deselenation mechanism. FSe-1 exhibits an ultrahigh selectivity and sensitivity for Hg(2+) detection only for reactive selenium atom sites, due the strong affinity between Se and Hg. Furthermore, the new probe has been successfully used for imaging mercury ions in RAW 264.7 cells (a mouse macrophage cell line; see figure).Inspired by the antitoxic function of selenium towards heavy-metal ions, we designed an organoselenium fluorescent probe (FSe-1) for mercury. The reaction of FSe-1 and Hg(2+) is an irreversible deselenation mechanism based on the selenophilic character of mercury. FSe-1 exhibits an ultrahigh selectivity and sensitivity for Hg(2+) detection only for reactive selenium atom sites due to the strong affinity between Se and Hg. The experimental results proved that FSe-1 was selective for Hg(2+) ions over other relevant metal ions and bioanalytes, and also showed an enhancement in sensitivity of up to 1.0 nM, which is lower than the current Environmental Protection Agency standard for drinking water. Furthermore, the new probe has been successfully applied to the imaging of mercury ions in RAW 264.7 cells (a mouse macrophage cell line) with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  7. Metal plasmon-coupled fluorescence imaging and label free coenzyme detection in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Metal nanoparticle for fluorescence cell imaging. ► Non-invasive emission detection of coenzyme in cell on time-resolved confocal microscope. ► Near-field interaction of flavin adenine dinucleotide with silver substrate. ► Isolation of emissions by coenzymes from cellular autofluorescence on fluorescence cell imaging. -- Abstract: Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a key metabolite in cellular energy conversion. Flavin can also bind with some enzymes in the metabolic pathway and the binding sites may be changed due to the disease progression. Thus, there is interest on studying its expression level, distribution, and redox state within the cells. FAD is naturally fluorescent, but it has a modest extinction coefficient and quantum yield. Hence the intrinsic emission from FAD is generally too weak to be isolated distinctly from the cellular backgrounds in fluorescence cell imaging. In this article, the metal nanostructures on the glass coverslips were used as substrates to measure FAD in cells. Particulate silver films were fabricated with an optical resonance near the absorption and the emission wavelengths of FAD which can lead to efficient coupling interactions. As a result, the emission intensity and quantum yield by FAD were greatly increased and the lifetime was dramatically shortened resulting in less interference from the longer lived cellular background. This feature may overcome the technical limits that hinder the direct observation of intrinsically fluorescent coenzymes in the cells by fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence cell imaging on the metallic particle substrates may provide a non-invasive strategy for collecting the information of coenzymes in cells.

  8. Metal plasmon-coupled fluorescence imaging and label free coenzyme detection in cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jian, E-mail: jian@cfs.bioment.umaryland.edu [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Fu, Yi [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Li, Ge [Division of Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Zhao, Richard Y. [Division of Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Microbiology-Immunology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal nanoparticle for fluorescence cell imaging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-invasive emission detection of coenzyme in cell on time-resolved confocal microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Near-field interaction of flavin adenine dinucleotide with silver substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation of emissions by coenzymes from cellular autofluorescence on fluorescence cell imaging. -- Abstract: Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a key metabolite in cellular energy conversion. Flavin can also bind with some enzymes in the metabolic pathway and the binding sites may be changed due to the disease progression. Thus, there is interest on studying its expression level, distribution, and redox state within the cells. FAD is naturally fluorescent, but it has a modest extinction coefficient and quantum yield. Hence the intrinsic emission from FAD is generally too weak to be isolated distinctly from the cellular backgrounds in fluorescence cell imaging. In this article, the metal nanostructures on the glass coverslips were used as substrates to measure FAD in cells. Particulate silver films were fabricated with an optical resonance near the absorption and the emission wavelengths of FAD which can lead to efficient coupling interactions. As a result, the emission intensity and quantum yield by FAD were greatly increased and the lifetime was dramatically shortened resulting in less interference from the longer lived cellular background. This feature may overcome the technical limits that hinder the direct observation of intrinsically fluorescent coenzymes in the cells by fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence cell imaging on the metallic particle substrates may provide a non-invasive strategy for collecting the information of coenzymes in cells.

  9. Local mobility in lipid domains of supported bilayers characterized by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankel, Daniel J.; Buranda, T. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Burns, Alan Richard

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is used to examine mobility of labeled probes at specific sites in supported bilayers consisting of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid domains in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). Those sites are mapped beforehand with simultaneous atomic force microscopy and submicron confocal fluorescence imaging, allowing characterization of probe partitioning between gel DPPC and disordered liquid DOPC domains with corresponding topography of domain structure. We thus examine the relative partitioning and mobility in gel and disordered liquid phases for headgroup- and tailgroup-labeled GM1 ganglioside probes and for headgroup- and tailgroup-labeled phospholipid probes. For the GM1 probes, large differences in mobility between fluid and gel domains are observed; whereas unexpected mobility is observed in submicron gel domains for the phospholipid probes. We attribute the latter to domain heterogeneities that could be induced by the probe. Furthermore, fits to the FCS data for the phospholipid probes in the DOPC fluid phase require two components (fast and slow). Although proximity to the glass substrate may be a factor, local distortion of the probe by the fluorophore could also be important. Overall, we observe nonideal aspects of phospholipid probe mobility and partitioning that may not be restricted to supported bilayers.

  10. Detection of {alpha} particles with the aid of a fluorescence counter; Detection des particules {alpha} a l'aide d'un compteur a fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koechlin, Y

    1951-07-01

    The operation principle of the fluorescence counter, used as {alpha} particles detector, is analyzed in the first part. Detection can be done in two ways: by counting the pulses due to each {alpha} particle, or by integrating all pulses and measuring the average current obtained. In the second part, three series of measurements are presented: 1 - two fluorescent substances (zinc sulfate and anthracene) are placed in front of the photocathode of three types of photomultipliers (RCA 931A, EMI 4588, and EMI 5311). These substances are bombarded with the {alpha} radiations of a Po source and then irradiated by the {beta} and {gamma} radiations of a Ra source in order to study the light emission of these thin film substances when submitted to the three types of radiations. The results show that thanks to the amplitude of the emitted light pulses, the fluorescence counter, when submitted to the three types of radiations, allows to distinguish between the {alpha} radiations of the polonium and the {beta} and {gamma} radiations of the radium source. The output current of a 931A, when measured with a galvanometer, allows to detect Po sources with an intensity of about 10{sup -6} curie. This is observed when its photocathode receives the light from a ZnS-Ag coating bombarded by the {alpha} particles of Po. The quantum efficiency of the counter is close to 100% for the {alpha} particles of Po. This efficiency is evaluated by comparison with the efficiency of a thin wall Geiger-Mueller counter. Moreover, when a thin crystal of anthracene is used as detector, the energy of the incident particles can be measured with a 2% preciseness. (J.S.)

  11. Real-time label-free quantitative fluorescence microscopy-based detection of ATP using a tunable fluorescent nano-aptasensor platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Sajal; Sohn, Il-Yung; Son, Young-Min; Lee, Won-Il; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2015-12-14

    Although real-time label-free fluorescent aptasensors based on nanomaterials are increasingly recognized as a useful strategy for the detection of target biomolecules with high fidelity, the lack of an imaging-based quantitative measurement platform limits their implementation with biological samples. Here we introduce an ensemble strategy for a real-time label-free fluorescent graphene (Gr) aptasensor platform. This platform employs aptamer length-dependent tunability, thus enabling the reagentless quantitative detection of biomolecules through computational processing coupled with real-time fluorescence imaging data. We demonstrate that this strategy effectively delivers dose-dependent quantitative readouts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) Gr and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) surfaces, thereby providing cytotoxicity assessment. Compared with conventional fluorescence spectrometry methods, our highly efficient, universally applicable, and rational approach will facilitate broader implementation of imaging-based biosensing platforms for the quantitative evaluation of a range of target molecules.

  12. Measurement of fluorescent probes concentration ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenic process of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, begins years before the clinical diagnosis. Here, we suggest a novel method which may detect AD up to nine years earlier than current exams, minimally invasive, with minimal risk, pain and side effects. The method is based on previous reports which relate the concentrations of biomarkers in the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) (Aβ and Tau proteins) to the future development of AD in mild cognitive impairment patients. Our method, which uses fluorescence measurements of the relative concentrations of the CSF biomarkers, replaces the lumbar puncture process required for CSF drawing. The process uses a miniature needle coupled trough an optical fiber to a laser source and a detector. The laser radiation excites fluorescent probes which were prior injected and bond to the CSF biomarkers. Using the ratio between the fluorescence intensities emitted from the two biomarkers, which is correlated to their concentration ratio, the patient's risk of developing AD is estimated. A theoretical model was developed and validated using Monte Carlo simulations, demonstrating the relation between fluorescence emission and biomarker concentration. The method was tested using multi-layered tissue phantoms simulating the epidural fat, the CSF in the sub-arachnoid space and the bone. These phantoms were prepared with different scattering and absorption coefficients, thicknesses and fluorescence concentrations in order to simulate variations in human anatomy and in the needle location. The theoretical and in-vitro results are compared and the method's accuracy is discussed.

  13. Breaking the color barrier - a multi-selective antibody reporter offers innovative strategies of fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Eugenio; Jarvik, Jonathan W

    2017-08-01

    A novel bi-partite fluorescence platform exploits the high affinity and selectivity of antibody scaffolds to capture and activate small-molecule fluorogens. In this report, we investigated the property of multi-selectivity activation by a single antibody against diverse cyanine family fluorogens. Our fluorescence screen identified three cell-impermeant fluorogens, each with unique emission spectra (blue, green and red) and nanomolar affinities. Most importantly, as a protein fusion tag to G-protein-coupled receptors, the antibody biosensor retained full activity - displaying bright fluorogen signals with minimal background on live cells. Because fluorogen-activating antibodies interact with their target ligands via non-covalent interactions, we were able to perform advanced multi-color detection strategies on live cells, previously difficult or impossible with conventional reporters. We found that by fine-tuning the concentrations of the different color fluorogen molecules in solution, a user may interchange the fluorescence signal (onset versus offset), execute real-time signal exchange via fluorogen competition, measure multi-channel fluorescence via co-labeling, and assess real-time cell surface receptor traffic via pulse-chase experiments. Thus, here we inform of an innovative reporter technology based on tri-color signal that allows user-defined fluorescence tuning in live-cell applications. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Conditional-sampling spectrograph detection system for fluorescence measurements of individual airborne biological particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, Paul; Pinnick, R. G.; Hill, Steven C.; Chen, Gang; Chang, Richard K.; Mayo, Michael W.; Fernandez, Gilbert L.

    1996-03-01

    We report the design and operation of a prototype conditional-sampling spectrograph detection system that can record the fluorescence spectra of individual, micrometer-sized aerosols as they traverse an intense 488-nm intracavity laser beam. The instrument's image-intensified CCD detector is gated by elastic scattering or by undispersed fluorescence from particles that enter the spectrograph's field of view. It records spectra only from particles with preselected scattering-fluorescence levels (a fiber-optic-photomultiplier subsystem provides the gating signal). This conditional-sampling procedure reduces data-handling rates and increases the signal-to-noise ratio by restricting the system's exposures to brief periods when aerosols traverse the beam. We demonstrate these advantages by reliably capturing spectra from individual fluorescent microspheres dispersed in an airstream. The conditional-sampling procedure also permits some discrimination among different types of particles, so that spectra may be recorded from the few interesting particles present in a cloud of background aerosol. We demonstrate such discrimination by measuring spectra from selected fluorescent microspheres in a mixture of two types of microspheres, and from bacterial spores in a mixture of spores and nonfluorescent kaolin particles.

  15. Highly sensitive rapid fluorescence detection of protein residues on surgical instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalev, Valeri I; Bartona, James S; Richardson, Patricia R; Jones, Anita C

    2006-01-01

    There is a risk of contamination of surgical instruments by infectious protein residues, in particular, prions which are the agents for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in humans. They are exceptionally resistant to conventional sterilization, therefore it is important to detect their presence as contaminants so that alternative cleaning procedures can be applied. We describe the development of an optimized detection system for fluorescently labelled protein, suitable for in-hospital use. We show that under optimum conditions the technique can detect ∼10 attomole/cm 2 with a scan speed of ∼3-10 cm 2 /s of the test instrument's surface. A theoretical analysis and experimental measurements will be discussed

  16. Production mechanism of atomic nitrogen in atmospheric pressure pulsed corona discharge measured using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teramoto, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2012-01-01

    To study the production mechanism of atomic nitrogen, the temporal profile and spatial distribution of atomic nitrogen are measured in atmospheric pressure pulsed positive corona discharge using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence. The absolute atomic nitrogen density in the streamer filaments is estimated from decay rate of atomic nitrogen in N 2 discharge. The results indicate that the absolute atomic nitrogen density is approximately constant against discharge energy. When the discharge voltage is 21.5 kV, production yield of atomic nitrogen produced by an N 2 discharge pulse is estimated to be 2.9 - 9.8 × 10 13 atoms and the energy efficiency of atomic nitrogen production is estimated to be about 1.8 - 6.1 × 10 16 atoms/J. The energy efficiency of atomic nitrogen production in N 2 discharge is constant against the discharge energy, while that in N 2 /O 2 discharge increases with discharge energy. In the N 2 /O 2 discharge, two-step process of N 2 dissociation plays significant role for atomic nitrogen production.

  17. Quaternary ammonium promoted ultra selective and sensitive fluorescence detection of fluoride ion in water and living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Ji, Yuzhuo; Tang, Xinjing

    2014-10-21

    Highly selective and sensitive fluorescent probes with a quaternary ammonium moiety have been rationally designed and developed for fast and sensitive fluorescence detection of fluoride ion (F(-) from NaF, not TBAF) in aqueous solution and living cells. With the sequestration effect of quaternary ammonium, the detection time was less than 2 min and the detection limit of fluoride ion was as low as 0.57 ppm that is among the lowest detection limits in aqueous solutions of many fluoride fluorescence probes in the literature.

  18. Real-time label-free quantitative fluorescence microscopy-based detection of ATP using a tunable fluorescent nano-aptasensor platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Sajal; Sohn, Il-Yung; Son, Young-Min; Lee, Won-Il; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2015-11-01

    Although real-time label-free fluorescent aptasensors based on nanomaterials are increasingly recognized as a useful strategy for the detection of target biomolecules with high fidelity, the lack of an imaging-based quantitative measurement platform limits their implementation with biological samples. Here we introduce an ensemble strategy for a real-time label-free fluorescent graphene (Gr) aptasensor platform. This platform employs aptamer length-dependent tunability, thus enabling the reagentless quantitative detection of biomolecules through computational processing coupled with real-time fluorescence imaging data. We demonstrate that this strategy effectively delivers dose-dependent quantitative readouts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) Gr and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) surfaces, thereby providing cytotoxicity assessment. Compared with conventional fluorescence spectrometry methods, our highly efficient, universally applicable, and rational approach will facilitate broader implementation of imaging-based biosensing platforms for the quantitative evaluation of a range of target molecules.Although real-time label-free fluorescent aptasensors based on nanomaterials are increasingly recognized as a useful strategy for the detection of target biomolecules with high fidelity, the lack of an imaging-based quantitative measurement platform limits their implementation with biological samples. Here we introduce an ensemble strategy for a real-time label-free fluorescent graphene (Gr) aptasensor platform. This platform employs aptamer length-dependent tunability, thus enabling the reagentless quantitative detection of biomolecules through computational processing coupled with real-time fluorescence imaging data. We demonstrate that this strategy effectively delivers dose-dependent quantitative readouts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) Gr and reduced graphene oxide (r

  19. Optical Reflectance and Fluorescence for Detecting Nitrogen Needs in Zea mays L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrey, J. E.; Middleton, E. M.; Corp. L. A.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Butcher, L. M.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) status in field grown corn (Zea mays L.) was assessed using spectral techniques. Passive reflectance remote sensing and, both passive and active fluorescence sensing methods were investigated. Reflectance and fluorescence methods are reported to detect changes in the primary plant pigments (chlorophylls a and b; carotenoids) in higher plant species. As a general rule, foliar chlorophyll a (Chl a) and chlorophyll b (Chl b) usually exist in approx.3:l ratio. In plants under stress, Chl b content is affected before Chl a reductions occur. For reflectance, a version of the chlorophyll absorption in reflectance index (CARI) method was tested with narrow bands from the Airborne Imaging Spectroradiometer for Applications (ASIA). CARI minimizes the effects of soil background on the signal from green canopies. A modified CARI (MCARI) was used to track total Chl a levels in the red dip of the spectrum from the corn canopy. A second MCARI was used to track the auxiliary plant pigments (Chl b and the carotenoids) in the yellow/orange/red edge part of the reflectance spectrum. The difference between these two MCARI indices detected variations in N levels across the field plot canopies using ASIA data. At the leaf level, ratios of fluorescence emissions in the blue, green, red and far-red wavelengths sensed responses that were associated with the plant pigments, and were indicative of energy transfer in the photosynthetic process. N stressed corn stands could be distinguish from those with optimally applied N with fluorescence emission spectra obtained from individual corn leaves. Both reflectance and fluorescence methods are sensitive in detecting corn N needs and may be especially powerful in monitoring crop conditions if both types of information can be combined.

  20. Fluorescent cadmium sulfide nanoparticles for selective and sensitive detection of toxic pesticides in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walia, Shanka; Acharya, Amitabha

    2014-01-01

    The detection of pesticide residues in ground water, food, or soil samples is extremely important. The currently available laboratory techniques have several drawbacks and needs to be replaced. Fluorescent chemosensors for pesticide detection were reported in the literature, with few reports published on quantum dot-based pesticide sensors, but none of these were focused toward differentiating organophosphorus and organochlorine pesticides specifically. In this respect, glutathione-coated CdS nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized. The TEM studies of the nanoparticles suggested mostly monodispersed spherical particles, with size in the range of 11.5±1 nm. The prepared fluorescent nanoparticles were found to selectively recognize organochlorine pesticide dicofol among all the other pesticides studied, by increasing the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles ∼ 2.5 times. Similar studies carried out with organophosphorous pesticide dimethoate did not result any change in the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles. Further studies carried out with commercially available pesticide solutions, also confirmed similar results. The TEM, SEM, and DLS studies suggested aggregation of the nanoparticles in the presence of dicofol. Control experiments suggested possible role of both amine and carboxylic acid functional groups of glutathione in the recognition of dicofol. The limit of detection of dicofol was found to be ∼ 55±11 ppb.Graphical AbstractGlutathione-coated CdS nanoparticles selectively recognize organochlorine pesticide dicofol among all the other pesticides studied, by increasing the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles. The TEM, SEM, and DLS studies suggested aggregation of the nanoparticles in the presence of dicofol

  1. Fluorescent cadmium sulfide nanoparticles for selective and sensitive detection of toxic pesticides in aqueous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walia, Shanka; Acharya, Amitabha, E-mail: amitabhachem@gmail.com [CSIR-Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, Biotechnology Division (India)

    2014-12-15

    The detection of pesticide residues in ground water, food, or soil samples is extremely important. The currently available laboratory techniques have several drawbacks and needs to be replaced. Fluorescent chemosensors for pesticide detection were reported in the literature, with few reports published on quantum dot-based pesticide sensors, but none of these were focused toward differentiating organophosphorus and organochlorine pesticides specifically. In this respect, glutathione-coated CdS nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized. The TEM studies of the nanoparticles suggested mostly monodispersed spherical particles, with size in the range of 11.5±1 nm. The prepared fluorescent nanoparticles were found to selectively recognize organochlorine pesticide dicofol among all the other pesticides studied, by increasing the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles ∼ 2.5 times. Similar studies carried out with organophosphorous pesticide dimethoate did not result any change in the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles. Further studies carried out with commercially available pesticide solutions, also confirmed similar results. The TEM, SEM, and DLS studies suggested aggregation of the nanoparticles in the presence of dicofol. Control experiments suggested possible role of both amine and carboxylic acid functional groups of glutathione in the recognition of dicofol. The limit of detection of dicofol was found to be ∼ 55±11 ppb.Graphical AbstractGlutathione-coated CdS nanoparticles selectively recognize organochlorine pesticide dicofol among all the other pesticides studied, by increasing the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles. The TEM, SEM, and DLS studies suggested aggregation of the nanoparticles in the presence of dicofol.

  2. Automatic segmentation of lesions for the computer-assisted detection in fluorescence urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kage, Andreas; Legal, Wolfgang; Kelm, Peter; Simon, Jörg; Bergen, Tobias; Münzenmayer, Christian; Benz, Michaela

    2012-03-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers in the western world. The diagnosis in Germany is based on the visual inspection of the bladder. This inspection performed with a cystoscope is a challenging task as some kinds of abnormal tissues do not differ much in their appearance from their surrounding healthy tissue. Fluorescence Cystoscopy has the potential to increase the detection rate. A liquid marker introduced into the bladder in advance of the inspection is concentrated in areas with high metabolism. Thus these areas appear as bright "glowing". Unfortunately, the fluorescence image contains besides the glowing of the suspicious lesions no more further visual information like for example the appearance of the blood vessels. A visual judgment of the lesion as well as a precise treatment has to be done using white light illumination. Thereby, the spatial information of the lesion provided by the fluorescence image has to be guessed by the clinical expert. This leads to a time consuming procedure due to many switches between the modalities and increases the risk of mistreatment. We introduce an automatic approach, which detects and segments any suspicious lesion in the fluorescence image automatically once the image was classified as a fluorescence image. The area of the contour of the detected lesion is transferred to the corresponding white light image and provide the clinical expert the spatial information of the lesion. The advantage of this approach is, that the clinical expert gets the spatial and the visual information of the lesion together in one image. This can save time and decrease the risk of an incomplete removal of a malign lesion.

  3. Fluorescent sensors for selective detection of thiols: expanding the intramolecular displacement based mechanism to new chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-Ya; Zheng, Hai-Rong; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2014-03-21

    Biological thiols, including cysteine (Cys), homocystein (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH), play crucial roles in maintaining the appropriate redox status of biological systems. An abnormal level of biothiols is associated with different diseases, therefore, the discrimination between them is of great importance. Herein, we present two fluorescent sensors for selective detection of biothiols based on our recently reported intramolecular displacement mechanism. We expanded this mechanism to commercially available chromophores, 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-Cl) and heptamethine cyanine dye IR-780. The sensors operate by undergoing displacement of chloride by thiolate. The amino groups of Cys/Hcy further replace the thiolate to form amino-substituted products, which exhibit dramatically different photophysical properties compared to sulfur-substituted products from the reaction with GSH. NBD-Cl is highly selective towards Cys/Hcy and exhibits significant fluorescence enhancement. IR-780 showed a variation in its fluorescence ratio towards Cys over other thiols. Both of the sensors can be used for live-cell imaging of Cys. The wide applicability of the mechanism may provide a powerful tool for developing novel fluorescent sensors for selective detection of biothiols.

  4. Detection of nitrite based on fluorescent carbon dots by the hydrothermal method with folic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haitao; Ding, Liyun; Zhang, Bingyu; Huang, Jun

    2018-05-01

    A fluorescent carbon dots probe for the detection of aqueous nitrite was fabricated by a one-pot hydrothermal method, and the transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffractometer, UV-Vis absorption spectrometer and fluorescence spectrophotometer were used to study the property of carbon dots. The fluorescent property of carbon dots influenced by the concentration of aqueous nitrite was studied. The interaction between the electron-donating functional groups and the electron-accepting nitrous acid could account for the quenching effect on carbon dots by adding aqueous nitrite. The products of the hydrolysis of aqueous nitrite performed a stronger quenching effect at lower pH. The relationship between the relative fluorescence intensity of carbon dots and the concentration of nitrite was described by the Stern-Volmer equation (I0/I - 1 = 0.046[Q]) with a fine linearity (R2 = 0.99). The carbon dots-based probe provides a convenient method for the detection of nitrite concentration.

  5. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Quantum Dots as Fluorescent Probes for Sensitive and Selective Detection of Nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibiao Feng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrites are the upstream precursors of the carcinogenic nitrosamines, which are widely found in the natural environment and many food products. It is important to develop a simple and sensitive sensor for detecting nitrites. In this work, a fluorescence probe based on nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CQDs was developed for the sensitive and selective determination of nitrites. At pH 2, the fluorescence of N-CQDs can be selectively quenched by nitrite due to the fact N-nitroso compounds can be formed in the reaction of amide groups with nitrous acid, which results in fluorescence static quenching. Under optimal conditions, fluorescence intensity quenching upon addition of nitrite gives a satisfactory linear relationship covering the linear range of 0.2–20 μM, and the limit of detection (LOD is 40 nM. Moreover, this method has been successfully applied to the determination of nitrites in tap water, which indicates its great potential for monitoring of nitrites in environmental samples.

  6. Fluorescent nanoscale detection of biotin-streptavidin interaction using near-field scanning optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Gokarna, Anisha; Hulme, John P; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2008-01-01

    We describe a nanoscale strategy for detecting biotin-streptavidin binding using near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) that exploits the fluorescence properties of single polydiacetylene (PDA) liposomes. NSOM is more useful to observe nanomaterials having optical properties with the help of topological information. We synthesized amine-terminated 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) monomer (PCDA-NH 2 ) and used this derivatized monomer to prepare PCDA liposomes. PCDA-NH 2 liposomes were immobilized on an aldehyde-functionalized glass surface followed by photopolymerization by using a 254 nm light source. To measure the biotin-streptavidin binding, we conjugated photoactivatable biotin to immobilized PCDA-NH 2 liposomes by UV irradiation (365 nm) and subsequently allowed them to interact with streptavidin. We analyzed the fluorescence using a fluorescence scanner and observed single liposomes using NSOM. The average height and NSOM signal observed in a single liposome after binding were ∼31.3 to 8.5 ± 0.5 nm and 0.37 to 0.16 ± 0.6 kHz, respectively. This approach, which has the advantage of not requiring a fluorescent label, could prove highly beneficial for single molecule detection technology

  7. Assessment of variable fluorescence fluorometry as an approach for rapidly detecting living photoautotrophs in ballast water

    Science.gov (United States)

    First, Matthew R.; Robbins-Wamsley, Stephanie H.; Riley, Scott C.; Drake, Lisa A.

    2018-03-01

    Variable fluorescence fluorometry, an analytical approach that estimates the fluorescence yield of chlorophyll a (F0, a proximal measure of algal concentration) and photochemical yield (FV/FM, an indicator of the physiological status of algae) was evaluated as a means to rapidly assess photoautotrophs. Specifically, it was used to gauge the efficacy of ballast water treatment designed to reduce the transport and delivery of potentially invasive organisms. A phytoflagellate, Tetraselmis spp. (10-12 μm) and mixed communities of ambient protists were examined in both laboratory experiments and large-scale field trials simulating 5-d hold times in mock ballast tanks. In laboratory incubations, ambient organisms held in the dark exhibited declining F0 and FV/FM measurements relative to organisms held under lighted conditions. In field experiments, increases and decreases in F0 and FV/FM over the tank hold time corresponded to those of microscope counts of organisms in two of three trials. In the third trial, concentrations of organisms ≥ 10 and protists) increased while F0 and FV/FM decreased. Rapid and sensitive, variable fluorescence fluorometry is appropriate for detecting changes in organism concentrations and physiological status in samples dominated by microalgae. Changes in the heterotrophic community, which may become more prevalent in light-limited ballast tanks, would not be detected via variable fluorescence fluorometry, however.

  8. Fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymer based on Navicula sp. frustules for optical detection of lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Guat Wei; Lim, Jit Kang; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Chan, Derek Juinn Chieh

    2016-03-01

    The direct correlation between disease and lysozyme (LYZ) levels in human body fluids makes the sensitive and convenient detection of LYZ the focus of scientific research. Fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymer has emerged as a new alternative for LYZ detection in order to resolve the limitation of immunoassays, which are expensive, unstable, require complex preparation, and are time consuming. In this study, a novel fluorescence molecularly imprinted polymer based on Navicula sp. frustules (FITC-MIP) has been synthesized via post-imprinting treatment for LYZ detection. Navicula sp. frustules were used as supported material because of their unique properties of moderate surface area, reproducibility, and biocompatibility, to address the drawbacks of nanoparticle core material with low adsorption capacity. The FITC acts as recognition signal and optical readout, whereas MIP provides LYZ selectivity. The synthesized FITC-MIP showed a response time as short as 5 min depending on the concentration of LYZ. It is found that the LYZ template can significantly quench the fluorescence intensity of FITC-MIP linearly within a concentration range of 0 to 0.025 mg mL(-1), which is well described by Stern-Volmer equation. The FITC-MIP can selectively and sensitively detect down to 0.0015 mg mL(-1) of LYZ concentration. The excellent sensing performance of FITC-MIP suggests that FITC-MIP is a potential biosensor in clinical diagnosis applications.

  9. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation in chromosome aberration detection in subjects occupationally exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeljezic, D.; Garaj-Vrhovac, V.

    2005-01-01

    For more than two decades, chromosomal aberration analysis has been used to detect structural chromosomal aberrations as sensitive biodosimeters of occupational exposure to ionising radiation. Its use is also recommended by the World Health Organisation. Changes in chromosome structure detected by that method are considered to be early biomarkers of a possible malignant disease. Aberrations detected by the method are unstable and can be found in the lymphocytes of irradiated personnel only within a limited time after exposure. To detect stable chromosomal aberrations, which persist after exposure, multicolour fluorescent in situ hybridisation has to be used. Using DNA probes labelled with different fluorochromes, it dyes each pair of chromosomes with different colour. Due to the dynamic of unstable aberration formation, chromosomal aberration analysis is more suitable in genome damage assessment of recent exposures. On the other hand, fluorescence in situ hybridisation gives the information on chromosome instability caused by long-term occupational exposure to ionising radiation. Considering the high costs of fluorescence in situ hybridisation and the uncertainty of the result, it should be used in biodosimetry only when it is absolutely necessary.(author)

  10. Smart detection of microRNAs through fluorescence enhancement on a photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquardini, L; Potrich, C; Vaghi, V; Lunelli, L; Frascella, F; Descrovi, E; Pirri, C F; Pederzolli, C

    2016-04-01

    The detection of low abundant biomarkers, such as circulating microRNAs, demands innovative detection methods with increased resolution, sensitivity and specificity. Here, a biofunctional surface was implemented for the selective capture of microRNAs, which were detected through fluorescence enhancement directly on a photonic crystal. To set up the optimal biofunctional surface, epoxy-coated commercially available microscope slides were spotted with specific anti-microRNA probes. The optimal concentration of probe as well as of passivating agent were selected and employed for titrating the microRNA hybridization. Cross-hybridization of different microRNAs was also tested, resulting negligible. Once optimized, the protocol was adapted to the photonic crystal surface, where fluorescent synthetic miR-16 was hybridized and imaged with a dedicated equipment. The photonic crystal consists of a dielectric multilayer patterned with a grating structure. In this way, it is possible to take advantage from both a resonant excitation of fluorophores and an angularly redirection of the emitted radiation. As a result, a significant fluorescence enhancement due to the resonant structure is collected from the patterned photonic crystal with respect to the outer non-structured surface. The dedicated read-out system is compact and based on a wide-field imaging detection, with little or no optical alignment issues, which makes this approach particularly interesting for further development such as for example in microarray-type bioassays. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fluorescence detection of glutathione and oxidized glutathione in blood with a NIR-excitable cyanine probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-hui; Qi, Feng-pei; Wen, Fu-bin; Long, Li-ping; Liu, Ai-juan; Yang, Rong-hua

    2018-04-01

    Cyanine has been widely utilized as a near infrared (NIR) fluorophore for detection of glutathione (GSH). However, the excitation of most of the reported cyanine-based probes was less than 800 nm, which inevitably induce biological background absorption and lower the sensitivity, limiting their use for detection of GSH in blood samples. To address this issue, here, a heptamethine cyanine probe (DNIR), with a NIR excitation wavelength at 804 nm and a NIR emission wavelength at 832 nm, is employed for the detection of GSH and its oxidized form (GSSG) in blood. The probe displays excellent selectivity for GSH over GSSG and other amino acids, and rapid response to GSH, in particular a good property for indirect detection of GSSG in the presence of enzyme glutathione reductase and the reducing agent nicotinamideadenine dinucleotide phosphate, without further separation prior to fluorescent measurement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to explore NIR fluorescent approach for the simultaneous assay of GSH and GSSG in blood. As such, we expect that our fluorescence sensors with both NIR excitation and NIR emission make this strategy suitable for the application in complex physiological systems.

  12. Improvement of LOD in Fluorescence Detection with Spectrally Nonuniform Background by Optimization of Emission Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galievsky, Victor A; Stasheuski, Alexander S; Krylov, Sergey N

    2017-10-17

    The limit-of-detection (LOD) in analytical instruments with fluorescence detection can be improved by reducing noise of optical background. Efficiently reducing optical background noise in systems with spectrally nonuniform background requires complex optimization of an emission filter-the main element of spectral filtration. Here, we introduce a filter-optimization method, which utilizes an expression for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of (i) all noise components (dark, shot, and flicker), (ii) emission spectrum of the analyte, (iii) emission spectrum of the optical background, and (iv) transmittance spectrum of the emission filter. In essence, the noise components and the emission spectra are determined experimentally and substituted into the expression. This leaves a single variable-the transmittance spectrum of the filter-which is optimized numerically by maximizing SNR. Maximizing SNR provides an accurate way of filter optimization, while a previously used approach based on maximizing a signal-to-background ratio (SBR) is the approximation that can lead to much poorer LOD specifically in detection of fluorescently labeled biomolecules. The proposed filter-optimization method will be an indispensable tool for developing new and improving existing fluorescence-detection systems aiming at ultimately low LOD.

  13. Oil leakage detection for electric power equipment based on ultraviolet fluorescence effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Jian-hui; Xu, Bin; Huang, Zhi-dong; Huang, Lan-tao

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a method to detect the oil leakage of high voltage power equipment based on ultraviolet fluorescence effect. The method exploits the principle that the insulating oil has the fluorescent effect under the irradiation of specific ultraviolet light. The emission spectrum of insulating oil under excitation light with different wavelengths is measured and analyzed first. On this basis, a portable oil leakage detective device for high voltage power equipment is designed and developed with a selected 365 nm ultraviolet as the excitation light and the low light level camera as the fluorescence image collector. Then, the feasibility of the proposed method and device in different conditions is experimentally verified in the laboratory environment. Finally, the developed oil leakage detective device is applied to 500 kV Xiamen substation and Quanzhou substation. And the results show that the device can detect the oil leakage of high voltage electrical equipment quickly and conveniently even under the condition of a slight oil leakage especially in the low light environment.

  14. Atomically precise arrays of fluorescent silver clusters: a modular approach for metal cluster photonics on DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Stacy M; Schultz, Danielle E; Swasey, Steven; Gwinn, Elisabeth G

    2015-03-24

    The remarkable precision that DNA scaffolds provide for arraying nanoscale optical elements enables optical phenomena that arise from interactions of metal nanoparticles, dye molecules, and quantum dots placed at nanoscale separations. However, control of ensemble optical properties has been limited by the difficulty of achieving uniform particle sizes and shapes. Ligand-stabilized metal clusters offer a route to atomically precise arrays that combine desirable attributes of both metals and molecules. Exploiting the unique advantages of the cluster regime requires techniques to realize controlled nanoscale placement of select cluster structures. Here we show that atomically monodisperse arrays of fluorescent, DNA-stabilized silver clusters can be realized on a prototypical scaffold, a DNA nanotube, with attachment sites separated by <10 nm. Cluster attachment is mediated by designed DNA linkers that enable isolation of specific clusters prior to assembly on nanotubes and preserve cluster structure and spectral purity after assembly. The modularity of this approach generalizes to silver clusters of diverse sizes and DNA scaffolds of many types. Thus, these silver cluster nano-optical elements, which themselves have colors selected by their particular DNA templating oligomer, bring unique dimensions of control and flexibility to the rapidly expanding field of nano-optics.

  15. Determination of arsenic species in seafood samples from the Aegean Sea by liquid chromatography-(photo-oxidation)-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffer, Richard [Department of Applied Chemistry, Corvinus University, Villanyi ut 29-35, 1118 Budapest (Hungary); Soeroes, Csilla [Department of Applied Chemistry, Corvinus University, Villanyi ut 29-35, 1118 Budapest (Hungary); Ipolyi, Ildiko [Department of Applied Chemistry, Corvinus University, Villanyi ut 29-35, 1118 Budapest (Hungary); Fodor, Peter [Department of Applied Chemistry, Corvinus University, Villanyi ut 29-35, 1118 Budapest (Hungary); Thomaidis, Nikolaos S. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Athens, Panepistiomopolis Zografou, 15776 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: ntho@chem.uoa.gr

    2005-08-15

    In this study arsenic compounds were determined in mussels (Mytulis galloprovincialis), anchovies (Engraulis encrasicholus), sea-breams (Sparus aurata), sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and sardines (Sardina pilchardus) collected from Aegean Sea using liquid chromatography-photo-oxidation-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry [LC-(PO)-HG-AFS] system. Twelve arsenicals were separated and determined on the basis of their difference in two properties: (i) the pK {sub a} values and (ii) hydride generation capacity. The separation was carried out both with an anion- and a cation-exchange column, with and without photo-oxidation. In all the samples arsenobetaine, AB was detected as the major compound (concentrations ranging between 2.7 and 23.1 {mu}g g{sup -1} dry weight), with trace amounts of arsenite, As(III), dimethylarsinic acid, DMA and arsenocholine, AC, also present. Arsenosugars were detected only in the mussel samples (in concentrations of 0.9-3.6 {mu}g g{sup -1} dry weight), along with the presence of an unknown compound, which, based on its retention time on the anion-exchange column Hamilton PRP-X100 and a recent communication [E. Schmeisser, R. Raml, K.A. Francesconi, D. Kuehnelt, A. Lindberg, Cs. Soeroes, W. Goessler, Chem. Commun. 16 (2004) 1824], is supposed to be a thio-arsenic analogue.

  16. Detection of microbial biofilms on food processing surfaces: hyperspectral fluorescence imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Won; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kaunglin; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Roberts, Michael S.; McNaughton, James L.

    2009-05-01

    We used a portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system to evaluate biofilm formations on four types of food processing surface materials including stainless steel, polypropylene used for cutting boards, and household counter top materials such as formica and granite. The objective of this investigation was to determine a minimal number of spectral bands suitable to differentiate microbial biofilm formation from the four background materials typically used during food processing. Ultimately, the resultant spectral information will be used in development of handheld portable imaging devices that can be used as visual aid tools for sanitation and safety inspection (microbial contamination) of the food processing surfaces. Pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella cells were grown in low strength M9 minimal medium on various surfaces at 22 +/- 2 °C for 2 days for biofilm formation. Biofilm autofluorescence under UV excitation (320 to 400 nm) obtained by hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system showed broad emissions in the blue-green regions of the spectrum with emission maxima at approximately 480 nm for both E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella biofilms. Fluorescence images at 480 nm revealed that for background materials with near-uniform fluorescence responses such as stainless steel and formica cutting board, regardless of the background intensity, biofilm formation can be distinguished. This suggested that a broad spectral band in the blue-green regions can be used for handheld imaging devices for sanitation inspection of stainless, cutting board, and formica surfaces. The non-uniform fluorescence responses of granite make distinctions between biofilm and background difficult. To further investigate potential detection of the biofilm formations on granite surfaces with multispectral approaches, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed using the hyperspectral fluorescence image data. The resultant PCA score images revealed distinct contrast between

  17. Engineering of near infrared fluorescent proteinoid-poly(L-lactic acid) particles for in vivo colon cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolitz-Domb, Michal; Grinberg, Igor; Corem-Salkmon, Enav; Margel, Shlomo

    2014-08-12

    The use of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging techniques has gained great interest for early detection of cancer owing to the negligible absorption and autofluorescence of water and other intrinsic biomolecules in this region. The main aim of the present study is to synthesize and characterize novel NIR fluorescent nanoparticles based on proteinoid and PLLA for early detection of colon tumors. The present study describes the synthesis of new proteinoid-PLLA copolymer and the preparation of NIR fluorescent nanoparticles for use in diagnostic detection of colon cancer. These fluorescent nanoparticles were prepared by a self-assembly process in the presence of the NIR dye indocyanine green (ICG), a FDA-approved NIR fluorescent dye. Anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody (anti-CEA), a specific tumor targeting ligand, was covalently conjugated to the P(EF-PLLA) nanoparticles through the surface carboxylate groups using the carbodiimide activation method. The P(EF-PLLA) nanoparticles are stable in different conditions, no leakage of the encapsulated dye into PBS containing 4% HSA was detected. The encapsulation of the NIR fluorescent dye within the P(EF-PLLA) nanoparticles improves significantly the photostability of the dye. The fluorescent nanoparticles are non-toxic, and the biodistribution study in a mouse model showed they evacuate from the body over 24 h. Specific colon tumor detection in a chicken embryo model and a mouse model was demonstrated for anti-CEA-conjugated NIR fluorescent P(EF-PLLA) nanoparticles. The results of this study suggest a significant advantage of NIR fluorescence imaging using NIR fluorescent P(EF-PLLA) nanoparticles over colonoscopy. In future work we plan to broaden this study by encapsulating cancer drugs such as paclitaxel and/or doxorubicin, within these biodegradable NIR fluorescent P(EF-PLLA) nanoparticles, for both detection and therapy of colon cancer.

  18. Rapid determination of ampicillin in bovine milk by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, C.Y.W.; Luo, Wenhong [National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatographic (LC) method was developed for the determination of ampicillin residues in raw bovine milk, processed skim milk, and pasteurized, homogenized whole milk with vitamin D. Milk samples were deproteinized with trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and acetonictrile. After centrifugation, the clear supernatant was reacted with formaldehyde and TCA under heat. The major fluorescent derivative of ampicillin was then determined by reversed-phase LC with fluorescence detection. Average recoveries of ampicillin fortified at 5, 10, and 20 ppb (ng/mL) were all >85% with coefficients of variation <10%. Limits of detection ranged from 0.31 to 0.51 ppb and limits of quantitation, from 0.66 to 1.2 ppb. After appropriate validation, this method should be suitable for rapid analysis of milk for ampicillin residues at the tolerance level of 10 ppb. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Three-dimensional fluorescent microscopy via simultaneous illumination and detection at multiple planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Khademhosseinieh, Bahar; Huang, Eric; Qian, Haoliang; Bakowski, Malina A; Troemel, Emily R; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-08-16

    The conventional optical microscope is an inherently two-dimensional (2D) imaging tool. The objective lens, eyepiece and image sensor are all designed to capture light emitted from a 2D 'object plane'. Existing technologies, such as confocal or light sheet fluorescence microscopy have to utilize mechanical scanning, a time-multiplexing process, to capture a 3D image. In this paper, we present a 3D optical microscopy method based upon simultaneously illuminating and detecting multiple focal planes. This is implemented by adding two diffractive optical elements to modify the illumination and detection optics. We demonstrate that the image quality of this technique is comparable to conventional light sheet fluorescent microscopy with the advantage of the simultaneous imaging of multiple axial planes and reduced number of scans required to image the whole sample volume.

  20. Ambient-temperature trap/release of arsenic by dielectric barrier discharge and its application to ultratrace arsenic determination in surface water followed by atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel dielectric barrier discharge reactor (DBDR) was utilized to trap/release arsenic coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HGAFS). On the DBD principle, the precise and accurate control of trap/release procedures was fulfilled at ambient temperature, and an analytical m...

  1. An expression for the atomic fluorescence and thermal-emission intensity under conditions of near saturation and arbitrary self-absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omenetto, N.; Winefordner, J.D.; Alkemade, C.T.J.

    An expression for the effect of self-absorption on the fluorescence and thermal emission intensities is derived by taking into account stimulated emission. A simple, idealized case is considered, consisting of a two level atomic system, in a flame, homogeneous with respect to temperature and

  2. Liquid nitrogen-assisted synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots from Blueberry and their performance in Fe3+ detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslandaş, Ayşe Merve; Balcı, Neslihan; Arık, Mustafa; Şakiroğlu, Halis; Onganer, Yavuz; Meral, Kadem

    2015-11-01

    Fluorescent carbon dots (C-dots) were synthesized by a facile method containing liquid N2 treatment and centrifuge processes. The photophysical properties of the C-dots in an aqueous solution were examined at various conditions such as concentration, temperature, pH and excitation wavelength by using UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. The C-dots emitted a broad fluorescence between approximately 350-550 nm and their fluorescence was tuned by changing excitation wavelength. The as-prepared C-dots were applied to Fe3+ detection from aqueous solution. Spectroscopic data revealed that the as-prepared C-dots were used to detect Fe3+ in the range of 12.5 μM to 100 μM as a fluorescence sensor.

  3. Naked eye and smartphone applicable detection of toxic mercury ions using fluorescent carbon nanodots

    OpenAIRE

    BAÇ, BURCU; GENÇ, RÜKAN

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan passivated carbon nanodots (C-Dots$_{CHIT})$ were synthesized from expired molasses via a simple and green thermal synthesis procedure. As-synthesized C-Dots were nitrogen-doped (NC-Dots$_{CHIT})$ by posttreatment with liquid ammonia and used as nanoprobes for fluorometric detection of mercury ions (Hg(II)$_{aq.})$. Fluorescence response of NC-Dots$_{CHIT}$ in the presence of mercury was evaluated and compared with that of the polyethylene glycol passivated C-Dots$_{PEG}$. This sensi...

  4. Fundus auto fluorescence and spectral domain ocular coherence tomography in the early detection of chloroquine retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Megan B. Goodman; Ari Ziskind

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the sensitivity of spectral domain ocular coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and fundus auto fluorescence (FAF) images as a screening test to detect early changes in the retina prior to the onset of chloroquine retinopathy. Method: The study was conducted using patients taking chloroquine (CQ), referred by the Rheumatology Department to the Ophthalmology Department at Tygerberg Academic Hospital. Group A consisted of 59 patients on CQ for less than 5 years, and Group B co...

  5. A highly sensitive and selective fluorescent sensor for detection of sulfide anion based on the steric hindrance effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanfan; Tang, Mengzhuo; Fu, Xiufang; Cheng, Fenmin; Zou, Xianghua; Wang, Jingpei; Zeng, Rongjin

    2018-01-01

    Sulfide anions are not only generated as a byproduct from industrial processes but also as a crucial kind of element in biological systems. Therefore, fluorescent probes for detecting sulfide anion with sensitive and selective characters are highly popular. In this study, we report a highly sensitive and selective fluorescent sensor M1 for detection of sulfide anion based on the steric hindrance effect, where the recognition unit, dinitrobenzenesulfonate ester group is linked to aromatic ortho-position in the porphyrin, and correspondingly the fluorescence of fluorescein is efficiently quenched. Compared with the sensors with recognition unit linked to the other aromatic positions, the fluorescent sensor M1 has a lower fluorescence background. Furthermore, the corresponding fluorescence responses (F/F0) of M1 for mercapto amino-acid GSH, Hcy and Cys, were all far lower than the relative fluorescence ratio F/F0 values for S2-. It means that M1 is sensitive and selective to detection of S2-, and has an anti-disturbance ability to the biologically-relevant thiols, GSH, Hcy and Cys, and has the prospect of application in the exact detection of sulfide anions in living organisms. This approach offers some useful insights for realizing sensitive and selective fluorescent turn-on sensing in the detection assays for other analytes.

  6. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen using functional magnetic and fluorescent nanoparticles in magnetic separators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H. Y., E-mail: annetsai@csmu.edu.tw [Chung Shan Medical University, Department of Applied Chemistry (China); Chang, C. Y.; Li, Y. C.; Chu, W. C.; Viswanathan, K.; Bor Fuh, C., E-mail: cbfuh@ncnu.edu.tw [National Chi Nan University, Department of Applied Chemistry (China)

    2011-06-15

    We combined a sandwich immunoassay, anti-CEA/CEA/anti-CEA, with functional magnetic ({approx}80 nm) and fluorescent ({approx}180 nm) nanoparticles in magnetic separators to demonstrate a detection method for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Determination of CEA in serum can be used in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of tumor-related diseases. The CEA concentrations in samples were deduced and determined based on the reference plot using the measured fluorescent intensity of sandwich nanoparticles from the sample. The linear range of CEA detection was from 18 ng/mL to 1.8 pg/mL. The detection limit of CEA was 1.8 pg/mL. In comparison with most other detection methods, this method had advantages of lower detection limit and wider linear range. The recovery was higher than 94%. The CEA concentrations of two serum samples were determined to be 9.0 and 55 ng/mL, which differed by 6.7% (9.6 ng/mL) and 9.1% (50 ng/mL) from the measurements of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The analysis time can be reduced to one third of ELISA. This method has good potential for other biomarker detections and biochemical applications.

  7. Post-PCR detection of nucleic acids using metalloporphyrin labels and time-resolved fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shea, Desmond J.; O'Sullivan, Paul J.; Ponomarev, Gelii V.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorescent platinum(II)-coproporphyrin label (PtCP) was evaluated in post-PCR detection of nucleic acids by time-resolved fluorescence (TR-F) using three common formats. PtCP-labelled oligonucleotide primers and PtCP-dUTP were incorporated in a PCR to produce labelled amplified target -173 or 305 bp DNA. Alternatively, aminoallyl-dUTP was incorporated in a PCR and the product was subsequently labelled with PtCP. The resulting PCR mixtures containing labelled dsDNA were separated on 1.5% agarose gels and then analysed by ethidium bromide staining and by direct detection of PtCP label on a commercial TR-F plate reader Victor 2 (Perkin Elmer Life Sciences) used in scanning mode. In all cases label incorporation and high yields of amplified DNA were observed. Direct TR-F detection of PtCP-labelled DNA from a gel provided high sensitivity and signal to noise ratio, with limits of detection in the range of 9-22 pg for all three formats. The sensitivity achieved with PtCP label was considerably better than that achieved with ethidium bromide staining (∼1 ng of dsDNA) or with conventional fluorescent label FITC. Neither the FITC label nor ethidium bromide staining interfered with PtCP detection, thus allowing multiplexed detection

  8. Atomic-resolution single-spin magnetic resonance detection concept based on tunneling force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, A.; Ambal, K.; Boehme, C.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single-electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated qubit states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  9. Fluorescent probe encapsulated hydrogel microsphere for selective and reversible detection of Hg{sup 2+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Zhenhu; Wang, Fang; Qiang, Jian; Zhang, Zhijie; Chen, Yahui; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaoqiang

    2017-03-15

    We developed a simple and sensitive hydrogel sensor in the form of microspheres by using fluorescence probe encapsulated within a hydrogel matrix for the detection of Hg{sup 2+}. The traditional fluorescence probes suspended in solution are not transportable and recoverable. To overcome these disadvantages, we devised poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate-based hydrogel microspheres in which fluorescence probe (R19S) was embedded at high density. The functionalized hydrogel microspheres were prepared by combining a microfluidic device with UV light. The hydrogel microspheres-based sensor exhibited good selectivity to Hg{sup 2+} among various metal ions and high sensitivity with a detection limit of 90 nM. Furthermore, after binding with Hg{sup 2+}, the R19S encapsulated hydrogel microspheres can be separated from testing samples easily and treated with the solution containing KI to remove Hg{sup 2+} and realize reusable detection. The current work may offer a new method for Hg{sup 2+} recognition with a more efficient manner.

  10. Highly selective and sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for femtomolar detection of silver ion in aqueous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Daniel Arulraj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemical sensing for the trace level detection of silver ion in aqueous solution still remains a challenge using simple, rapid, and inexpensive method. We report that thionine can be used as a fluorescent probe for the detection of Ag+ ion. The successive addition of Ag+ ion to the solution containing thionine quenches (turns-off the fluorescence intensity of thionine. Association and quenching constants have been estimated by the Benesi–Hildebrand method and Stern–Volmer plot, respectively. From the plot, the nature of the fluorescence quenching was confirmed as static quenching. An important feature of our chemosensor is high selectivity towards the determination of silver ion in aqueous solution over the other competitive metal ions. The detection limit of the sensor achieved 5 fM for Ag+ ion, which is superior to all previously reported chemosensors. The NMR and FT-IR studies were also carried out to support the complex formation between thionine and Ag+ ion. The practicality of the proposed chemosensor for determination of Ag+ ion was carried in untreated water samples.

  11. A small azide-modified thiazole-based reporter molecule for fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Wolfram

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular probes are widely used tools in chemical biology that allow tracing of bioactive metabolites and selective labeling of proteins and other biomacromolecules. A common structural motif for such probes consists of a reporter that can be attached by copper(I-catalyzed 1,2,3-triazole formation between terminal alkynes and azides to a reactive headgroup. Here we introduce the synthesis and application of the new thiazole-based, azide-tagged reporter 4-(3-azidopropoxy-5-(4-bromophenyl-2-(pyridin-2-ylthiazole for fluorescence, UV and mass spectrometry (MS detection. This small fluorescent reporter bears a bromine functionalization facilitating the automated data mining of electrospray ionization MS runs by monitoring for its characteristic isotope signature. We demonstrate the universal utility of the reporter for the detection of an alkyne-modified small molecule by LC–MS and for the visualization of a model protein by in-gel fluorescence. The novel probe advantageously compares with commercially available azide-modified fluorophores and a brominated one. The ease of synthesis, small size, stability, and the universal detection possibilities make it an ideal reporter for activity-based protein profiling and functional metabolic profiling.

  12. Direct and indirect fluorescent detection of tetracyclines using dually emitting carbon dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Fei; Sun, Zhe; Liu, Dongya; Zhao, Xianen; You, Jinmao

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe dual-emission carbon nanodots containing blue emitters (BE; peak emission at 385 nm under 315 nm excitation) and yellow emitters (YE; peak emission at 530 nm under 365 nm excitation), and how they can be applied to direct and indirect determination of tetracyclines (TCs). The direct detection scheme is based on the finding that tetracycline (TET), oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline and doxycycline quench the two emissions of the carbon dots. While direct determination is rapid and convenient, it cannot differentiate between TCs. The indirect detection scheme, in contrast, is based on the finding that Al (III) ions enhance the fluorescence of the YE in the carbon dots, and that they cause a blue shift in emission. It is, however, known that TET forms a strong complex with Al (III), and this can inhibit the interaction between Al (III) and the YE, so that the fluorescence of YE is not enhanced and blue-shifted by Al (III) in the presence of TET. This finding is exploited in a fluorescence turn-on/off assay for TET that can distinguish TET from other TCs. The linear range of indirect determination for TET extends from 1 nM to 30 μM, and the limit of detection is 0.52 nM. The indirect method was successfully applied to the determination of TET in spiked milk, fish and pork, and recoveries ranged from 91.7 to 102 %. (author)

  13. Light emitting diode, photodiode-based fluorescence detection system for DNA analysis with microchip electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Gordon H; Glerum, D Moira; Backhouse, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Electrophoretic separation of fluorescently end-labeled DNA after a PCR serves as a gold standard in genetic diagnostics. Because of their size and cost, instruments for this type of analysis have had limited market uptake, particularly for point-of-care applications. This might be changed through a higher level of system integration and lower instrument costs that can be realized through the use of LEDs for excitation and photodiodes for detection--if they provide sufficient sensitivity. Here, we demonstrate an optimized microchip electrophoresis instrument using polymeric fluidic chips with fluorescence detection of end-labeled DNA with a LOD of 0.15 nM of Alexa Fluor 532. This represents orders of magnitude improvement over previously reported instruments of this type. We demonstrate the system with an electrophoretic separation of two PCR products and their respective primers. We believe that this is the first LED-induced fluorescence microchip electrophoresis system with photodiode-based detection that could be used for standard applications of PCR and electrophoresis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Blue emitting copper nanoclusters as colorimetric and fluorescent probe for the selective detection of bilirubin

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S., Aparna; J. S., Anjali Devi; John, Nebu; Abha, K.; S. S., Syamchand; George, Sony

    2018-06-01

    Hurdles to develop point of care diagnostic methods restrict the translation of progress in the health care sector from bench side to bedside. In this article a simple, cost effective fluorescent as well as colorimetric nanosensor was developed for the early and easy detection of hyperbilirubinemia. A stable, water soluble bovine serum albumin stabilised copper nanocluster (BSA CuNC) was used as the fluorescent probe which exhibited strong blue emission (404 nm) upon 330 nm excitation. The fluorescence of the BSA CuNC can be effectively quenched by the addition of bilirubin by the formation of copper-bilirubin complex. Meanwhile the copper-bilirubin complex resulted in an observable colour change from pale violet to green facilitating colorimetric detection. The prepared sensor displayed good selectivity and sensitivity over other co-existing molecules, and can be used for quantifying bilirubin with a detection limit down to 257 fM. Additionally, the as-prepared probe was coated on a paper strip to develop a portable paper strip sensor of bilirubin. Moreover, the method was successfully applied in real sample analysis and obtained promising result.

  15. Detecting thermal phase transitions in corneal stroma by fluorescence micro-imaging analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, P.; Rossi, F.; Ratto, F.; Bruno, I.; Nesi, P.; Pini, R.

    2008-02-01

    Thermal modifications induced in corneal stroma were investigated by the use of fluorescence microscopy. Freshly extracted porcine corneas were immersed for 5 minutes in a water bath at temperatures in the 35-90°C range and stored in formalin. The samples were then sliced in 200-μm-thick transversal sections and analyzed under a stereomicroscope to assess corneal shrinkage. Fluorescence images of the thermally treated corneal samples were acquired using a slow-scan cooled CCD camera, after staining the slices with Indocyanine Green (ICG) fluorescent dye which allowed to detect fluorescence signal from the whole tissue. All measurements were performed using an inverted epifluorescence microscope equipped with a mercury lamp. The thermally-induced modifications to the corneal specimens were evaluated by studying the grey level distribution in the fluorescence images. For each acquired image, Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) and entropy analyses were performed. The spatial distribution of DFT absolute value indicated the spatial orientation of the lamellar planes, while entropy was used to study the image texture, correlated to the stromal structural transitions. As a result, it was possible to indicate a temperature threshold value (62°C) for high thermal damage, resulting in a disorganization of the lamellar planes and in full agreement with the measured temperature for corneal shrinkage onset. Analysis of the image entropy evidenced five strong modifications in stromal architecture at temperatures of ~45°C, 53°C, 57°C, 66°C, 75°C. The proposed procedure proved to be an effective micro-imaging method capable of detecting subtle changes in corneal tissue subjected to thermal treatment.

  16. Detection of protease activity by fluorescent protein FRET sensors: from computer simulation to live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryashchenko, Alexander S.; Khrenova, Maria G.; Savitsky, Alexander P.

    2018-04-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors are widely used for the detection of protease activity in vitro and in vivo. Usually they consist of a FRET pair connected with a polypeptide linker containing a specific cleavage site for the relevant protease. Use of the fluorescent proteins as components of the FRET pair allows genetic encoding of such sensors and solves the problem of their delivery into live cells and animals. There are several ways to improve the properties of such sensors, mainly to increase FRET efficiency and therefore the dynamic range. One of the ways to achieve this is to use a non-fluorescent chromoprotein as an acceptor. Molecular dynamic simulations may assist in the construction of linker structures connecting donor and acceptor molecules. Estimation of the orientation factor κ 2 can be obtained by methods based on quantum theory and combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approaches. The linker can be structured by hydrophobic interactions, bringing it into a closed conformation that shortens the distance between donor and acceptor and, consequently, increases FRET efficiency. We analyzed the effects of different linker structures on the detection of caspase-3 activity using a non-fluorescent acceptor. Also we have constructed the Tb3+- TagRFP sensor in which a complex of the terbium ion and terbium-binding peptide is used as a donor. This allowed us to use the unique property of lanthanide ions—fluorescence lifetime up to milliseconds—to perform measurements with time delay and exclude the nanosecond-order fluorescence. Using our systems as a starting point, by changing the recognition site in the linker it is possible to perform imaging of different protease activity in vitro or in vivo.

  17. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.

    2011-11-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  18. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  19. Europium-decorated graphene quantum dots as a fluorescent probe for label-free, rapid and sensitive detection of Cu(2+) and L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liping; Song, Xinhong; Chen, Yiying; Rong, Mingcong; Wang, Yiru; Zhao, Li; Zhao, Tingting; Chen, Xi

    2015-09-03

    In this work, europium-decorated graphene quantum dots (Eu-GQDs) were prepared by treating three-dimensional Eu-decorated graphene (3D Eu-graphene) via a strong acid treatment. Various characterizations revealed that Eu atoms were successfully complexed with the oxygen functional groups on the surface of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with the atomic ratio of 2.54%. Compared with Eu free GQDs, the introduction of Eu atoms enhanced the electron density and improved the surface chemical activities of Eu-GQDs. Therefore, the obtained Eu-GQDs were used as a novel "off-on" fluorescent probe for the label-free determination of Cu(2+) and l-cysteine (L-Cys) with high sensitivity and selectivity. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs was quenched in the presence of Cu(2+) owing to the coordination reaction between Cu(2+) and carboxyl groups on the surface of the Eu-GQDs. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs recovered with the subsequent addition of L-Cys because of the strong affinity of Cu(2+) to L-Cys via the Cu-S bond. The experimental results showed that the fluorescence variation of the proposed approach had a good linear relationship in the range of 0.1-10 μM for Cu(2+) and 0.5-50 μM for L-Cys with corresponding detection limits of 0.056 μM for Cu(2+) and 0.31 μM for L-Cys. The current approach also displayed a special response to Cu(2+) and L-Cys over the other co-existing metal ions and amino acids, and the results obtained from buffer-diluted serum samples suggested its applicability in biological samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fluorescent quenching immune chromatographic strips with quantum dots and upconversion nanoparticles as fluorescent donors for visual detection of sulfaquinoxaline in foods of animal origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Gaoshuang; Sheng, Wei; Li, Jingmin; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Junping; Wang, Shuo

    2017-01-01

    In this study, two novel fluorescence quenching immune chromatographic strips (FQICS) were developed to detect sulfaquinoxaline (SQX) in foods of animal origin. These proposed FQICSs were based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from fluorescence donors (quantum dots or upconversion nanoparticles) to fluorescence acceptors (colloidal gold nanoparticles). Compared with traditional colloidal gold-based immune chromatographic strips (ICS), these FQICSs showed positive correlation between the fluorescent signals and the targets, and allowed user to get test results from weak fluorescent signals. The visual detection limits of these two FQICSs were both 1 ng mL −1 in standard solution and 8 μg kg −1 in samples, while the visual detection limit of the colloidal gold-based ICS was 10 ng mL −1 in standard solution and 80 μg kg −1 in samples. Besides, the results we obtained by the use of FQICS showed high agreement with those obtained by the use of commercial ELISA kits, indicating the good accuracy of these strips. As a conclusion, these proposed FQICS based on quantum dots and upconversion nanoparticles can be applied in sensitive, rapid and on-site detection of SQX in foods of animal origin. - Highlights: • Two novel FQICS based on FRET were developed for the first time. • QDs and UCNPs were used as fluorescent donors in the FQICS. • The proposed FQICS showed low LOD compared with traditional ICS. • The proposed FQICS were applied in real samples analysis. • The proposed FQICS were verified by commercial ELISA kits.

  1. Detection of residual rifampicin in urine via fluorescence quenching of gold nanoclusters on paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Kuo, Chiung Wen; Chen, Ann; Chen, Peilin

    2015-06-26

    Rifampicin or rifampin (R) is a common drug used to treat inactive meningitis, cholestatic pruritus and tuberculosis (TB), and it is generally prescribed for long-term administration under regulated dosages. Constant monitoring of rifampicin is important for controlling the side effects and preventing overdose caused by chronic medication. In this study, we present an easy to use, effective and less costly method for detecting residual rifampicin in urine samples using protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA)-stabilized gold nanoclusters (BSA-Au NCs) adsorbed on a paper substrate in which the concentration of rifampicin in urine can be detected via fluorescence quenching. The intensity of the colorimetric assay performed on the paper-based platforms can be easily captured using a digital camera and subsequently analyzed. The decreased fluorescence intensity of BSA-Au NCs in the presence of rifampicin allows for the sensitive detection of rifampicin in a range from 0.5 to 823 µg/mL. The detection limit for rifampicin was measured as 70 ng/mL. The BSA-Au NCs were immobilized on a wax-printed paper-based platform and used to conduct real-time monitoring of rifampicin in urine. We have developed a robust, cost-effective, and portable point-of-care medical diagnostic platform for the detection of rifampicin in urine based on the ability of rifampicin to quench the fluorescence of immobilized BSA-Au NCs on wax-printed papers. The paper-based assay can be further used for the detection of other specific analytes via surface modification of the BSA in BSA-Au NCs and offers a useful tool for monitoring other diseases.

  2. Fluorescence/depolarization lidar for mid-range stand-off detection of biological agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierczyk, Z.; Kopczyński, K.; Zygmunt, M.; Wojtanowski, J.; Młynczak, J.; Gawlikowski, A.; Młodzianko, A.; Piotrowski, W.; Gietka, A.; Knysak, P.; Drozd, T.; Muzal, M.; Kaszczuk, M.; Ostrowski, R.; Jakubaszek, M.

    2011-06-01

    LIDAR system for real-time standoff detection of bio-agents is presented and preliminary experimental results are discussed. The detection approach is based on two independent physical phenomena: (1) laser induced fluorescence (LIF), (2) depolarization resulting from elastic scattering on non-spherical particles. The device includes three laser sources, two receiving telescopes, depolarization component and spectral signature analyzing spectrograph. It was designed to provide the stand-off detection capability at ranges from 200 m up to several kilometers. The system as a whole forms a mobile platform for vehicle or building installation. Additionally, it's combined with a scanning mechanics and advanced software, which enable to conduct the semi-automatic monitoring of a specified space sector. For fluorescence excitation, 3-rd (355 nm) and 4-th (266 nm) harmonics of Nd:YAG pulsed lasers are used. They emit short (~6 ns) pulses with the repetition rate of 20 Hz. Collecting optics for fluorescence echo detection and spectral content analysis includes 25 mm diameter f/4 Newton telescope, Czerny Turner spectrograph and 32-channel PMT. Depending on the grating applied, the spectral resolution from 20 nm up to 3 nm per channel can be achieved. The system is also equipped with an eye-safe (1.5 μm) Nd:YAG OPO laser for elastic backscattering/depolarization detection. The optical echo signal is collected by Cassegrain telescope with aperture diameter of 12.5 mm. Depolarization detection component based on polarizing beam-splitter serves as the stand-off particle-shape analyzer, which is very valuable in case of non-spherical bio-aerosols sensing.

  3. A fluorescence detection of D-penicillamine based on Cu(2+)-induced fluorescence quenching system of protein-stabilized gold nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Li, Bang Lin; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2015-01-25

    In this contribution, a luminescent gold nanoclusters which were synthesized by bovine serum albumin as novel fluorescent probes were successfully utilized for the determination of D-penicillamine for the first time. Cupric ion was employed to quench the strong fluorescence of the gold nanoclusters, whereas the addition of D-penicillamine caused obvious restoration of fluorescence intensity of the Cu(2+)-gold nanoclusters system. Under optimum conditions, the increment in fluorescence intensity of Cu(2+)-gold nanoclusters system caused by D-penicillamine was linearly proportional to the concentration of D-penicillamine in the range of 2.0×10(-5)-2.39×10(-4) M. The detection limit for D-penicillamine was 5.4×10(-6) M. With the off-on fluorescence signal at 650 nm approaching the near-infrared region, the present sensor for D-penicillamine detection had high sensitivity and low spectral interference. Furthermore, the novel gold nanoclusters-based fluorescent sensor has been applied to the determination of D-penicillamine in real biological samples with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A rapid-screening approach to detect and quantify microplastics based on fluorescent tagging with Nile Red

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Thomas; Jessop, Rebecca; Wellner, Nikolaus; Haupt, Karsten; Mayes, Andrew G.

    2017-03-01

    A new approach is presented for analysis of microplastics in environmental samples, based on selective fluorescent staining using Nile Red (NR), followed by density-based extraction and filtration. The dye adsorbs onto plastic surfaces and renders them fluorescent when irradiated with blue light. Fluorescence emission is detected using simple photography through an orange filter. Image-analysis allows fluorescent particles to be identified and counted. Magnified images can be recorded and tiled to cover the whole filter area, allowing particles down to a few micrometres to be detected. The solvatochromic nature of Nile Red also offers the possibility of plastic categorisation based on surface polarity characteristics of identified particles. This article details the development of this staining method and its initial cross-validation by comparison with infrared (IR) microscopy. Microplastics of different sizes could be detected and counted in marine sediment samples. The fluorescence staining identified the same particles as those found by scanning a filter area with IR-microscopy.

  5. Determination of Mercury in Milk by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence: A Green Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Sergio; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Green analytical chemistry principles were introduced to undergraduate students in a laboratory experiment focused on determining the mercury concentration in cow and goat milk. In addition to traditional goals, such as accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and limits of detection in method selection and development, attention was paid to the…

  6. New concepts of fluorescent probes for specific detection of DNA sequences: bis-modified oligonucleotides in excimer and exciplex detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbaj, A; Bichenkova, Ev; Walsh, L; Savage, He; Sardarian, Ar; Etchells, Ll; Gulati, A; Hawisa, S; Douglas, Kt

    2009-12-01

    The detection of single base mismatches in DNA is important for diagnostics, treatment of genetic diseases, and identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Highly sensitive, specific assays are needed to investigate genetic samples from patients. The use of a simple fluorescent nucleoside analogue in detection of DNA sequence and point mutations by hybridisation in solution is described in this study. The 5'-bispyrene and 3'-naphthalene oligonucleotide probes form an exciplex on hybridisation to target in water and the 5'-bispyrene oligonucleotide alone is an adequate probe to determine concentration of target present. It was also indicated that this system has a potential to identify mismatches and insertions. The aim of this work was to investigate experimental structures and conditions that permit strong exciplex emission for nucleic acid detectors, and show how such exciplexes can register the presence of mismatches as required in SNP analysis. This study revealed that the hybridisation of 5'-bispyrenyl fluorophore to a DNA target results in formation of a fluorescent probe with high signal intensity change and specificity for detecting a complementary target in a homogeneous system. Detection of SNP mutations using this split-probe system is a highly specific, simple, and accessible method to meet the rigorous requirements of pharmacogenomic studies. Thus, it is possible for the system to act as SNP detectors and it shows promise for future applications in genetic testing.

  7. Detection of helium atoms in irradiated metals using positron annihilation radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Q.; Sato, K.; Yoshiie, T.; Ishizaki, T.; Nagata, S.

    2007-01-01

    Iron alloys are used widely in the nuclear industry. The production of He atoms induced by nuclear reaction increases with increasing neutron energy, and the interaction between He and defects becomes important in the fusion reactor. A new composition analysis method, coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) of positron annihilation radiation, was employed to detect He atoms in ion irradiated Fe. The results of positron lifetime showed that the microvoids and voids were formed in ion irradiated Fe. The results of CDB measurement indicated that He atoms exited in the microvoids, and they exited in the microvoids even after annealing at 1223 K in ion irradiated Fe. CDB measurement, which is a nondestructive technique for testing materials, is an available method to detect He atoms. (authors)

  8. A cubic boron nitride film-based fluorescent sensor for detecting Hg2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. M.; Zhao, W. W.; Zhang, H. Y.; Wang, P. F.; Chong, Y. M.; Ye, Q.; Zou, Y. S.; Zhang, W. J.; Zapien, J. A.; Bello, I.; Lee, S. T.

    2009-05-01

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) film-based sensors for detecting Hg2+ ions were developed by surface functionalization with dansyl chloride. To immobilize dansyl chloride, 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane was modified on hydroxylated cBN surfaces to form an amino-group-terminated self-assembled monolayer. The covalent attachment of the amino groups was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The selectivity and sensitivity of the sensors to detect diverse metal cations in ethanol solutions were studied by using fluorescence spectroscopy, revealing a great selectivity to Hg2+ ions. Significantly, the dansyl-chloride-functionalized cBN film sensors were recyclable after the sensing test.

  9. Fluorescence-based bioassays for the detection and evaluation of food materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Kentaro; Isobe, Shin-Ichiro; Zhu, Yun; Kiyama, Ryoiti

    2015-10-13

    We summarize here the recent progress in fluorescence-based bioassays for the detection and evaluation of food materials by focusing on fluorescent dyes used in bioassays and applications of these assays for food safety, quality and efficacy. Fluorescent dyes have been used in various bioassays, such as biosensing, cell assay, energy transfer-based assay, probing, protein/immunological assay and microarray/biochip assay. Among the arrays used in microarray/biochip assay, fluorescence-based microarrays/biochips, such as antibody/protein microarrays, bead/suspension arrays, capillary/sensor arrays, DNA microarrays/polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based arrays, glycan/lectin arrays, immunoassay/enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based arrays, microfluidic chips and tissue arrays, have been developed and used for the assessment of allergy/poisoning/toxicity, contamination and efficacy/mechanism, and quality control/safety. DNA microarray assays have been used widely for food safety and quality as well as searches for active components. DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling may be useful for such purposes due to its advantages in the evaluation of pathway-based intracellular signaling in response to food materials.

  10. Fluorescence-Based Bioassays for the Detection and Evaluation of Food Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Nishi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We summarize here the recent progress in fluorescence-based bioassays for the detection and evaluation of food materials by focusing on fluorescent dyes used in bioassays and applications of these assays for food safety, quality and efficacy. Fluorescent dyes have been used in various bioassays, such as biosensing, cell assay, energy transfer-based assay, probing, protein/immunological assay and microarray/biochip assay. Among the arrays used in microarray/biochip assay, fluorescence-based microarrays/biochips, such as antibody/protein microarrays, bead/suspension arrays, capillary/sensor arrays, DNA microarrays/polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based arrays, glycan/lectin arrays, immunoassay/enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA-based arrays, microfluidic chips and tissue arrays, have been developed and used for the assessment of allergy/poisoning/toxicity, contamination and efficacy/mechanism, and quality control/safety. DNA microarray assays have been used widely for food safety and quality as well as searches for active components. DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling may be useful for such purposes due to its advantages in the evaluation of pathway-based intracellular signaling in response to food materials.

  11. Detection of Colorectal Cancer by a Quantitative Fluorescence Determination of DNA Amplification in Stool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Calistri

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA amplification of exfoliated cells in stool repre sents an inexpensive and rapid test, but has only 50% to 60% sensitivity. A new quantitative method, calle( fluorescence long DNA, was developed and validate( in our laboratory on stool obtained from 86 patient., with primary colorectal cancer and from 62 health individuals. It consists of the amplification of stoo DNA with fluorescence primers and the quantification of the amplification using a standard curve. Results are arbitrarily expressed in nanograms. The potential of thi new method compared to the conventional approact was analyzed in a subgroup of 94 individuals (51 patients and 38 healthy volunteers. In the presen series, DNA amplification analysis showed a specific ity of 97% and a sensitivity of only 50%. Conversely fluorescence DNA evaluation, using the best cutoff o 25 ng, showed a sensitivity of about 76% and a spec ificity of 93%. Similar sensitivity was observed regard less of Dukes stage, tumor location, and size, thu., also permitting the detection of early-stage tumors The present study seems to indicate that quantitative fluorescence DNA determination in stool successfully identifies colorectal cancer patients with a sensitivity comparable, if not superior, to that of multiple gene analysis but at a lower cost and in a shorter time.

  12. Ratiometric fluorescent detection of chromium(VI) in real samples based on dual emissive carbon dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunxia; Chen, Yonglei; Liu, Juanjuan; Han, Yangxia; Ma, Sudai; Chen, Xingguo

    2018-08-01

    As we know, hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was usually used as an additive to improve the color fastness during the printing and dyeing process, and thus posing tremendous threat to our health and living quality. In this work, the dual emissive carbon dots (DECDs) were synthesized through hydrothermal treatment of m-aminophenol and oxalic acid. The obtained DECDs not only exhibited dual emission fluorescence peaks (430 nm, 510 nm) under the single excitation wavelength of 380 nm, but also possessed good water solubility and excellent fluorescence stability. A ratiometric fluorescent method for the determination of Cr(VI) was developed using the DECDs as a probe. Under the optimal conditions, a linear range was obtained from 2 to 300 μM with a limit of detection of 0.4 μM. Furthermore, the proposed ratiometric fluorescent method was applied to the analysis of Cr(VI) in textile, steel, industrial wastewater and chromium residue samples with satisfactory recoveries (88.4-106.8%). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Selective fluorescence detection of Cu{sup 2+} in aqueous solution and living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, Muhammad; Lee, Ki-Hwan, E-mail: khlee@kongju.ac.kr

    2014-01-15

    A rhodamine B semicarbazide 3 was synthesized by the reaction of rhodamine B acid chloride 2 with hydrazine carboxamide hydrochloride under reflux with triethyl amine in acetonitrile. It was used as selective fluorescent and colorimetric sensor for visual detection of Cu{sup 2+} over competitive ions (Fe{sup 3+},Fe{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Ag{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, Cs{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Li{sup +}) in aqueous methanol (1:1, v/v), exhibiting a fast response time, less than few second and a detection limit of 1.6×10{sup −7} mol/L at neutral pH. The proposed sensing system can be successfully applicable for determination of Cu{sup 2+} in waste water samples showing turn on fluorescence response and for further monitoring of intracellular Cu{sup 2+} levels in living cells with high sensitivity and selectivity at micro molar level concentrations using confocal fluorescence spectroscopy. The synthesis of probe 3 was confirmed by {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR and mass spectrometric analysis. -- Highlights: • New chemosensor rhodamine B semicarbazide 3 was synthesized. • Addition of Cu{sup +2} ion into aqueous solution of probe 3 gave visual color changes as well as fluorescent off/on observations. • The proposed spirolactam ring opening mechanism of the synthesized probe triggered by copper ion was revealed by using mass spectrum. • High selectivity and sensitivity of probe 3 towards Cu{sup +2} are excellent enough to detect micromolar level of Cu{sup +2} ion even in aqueous media and living cells.

  14. Native fluorescence detection of biomolecular and pharmaceutical compounds in capillary electrophoresis: detector designs, performance and applications: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kort, B.J.; de Jong, G.J.; Somsen, G.W.

    2013-01-01

    This review treats the coupling of capillary electrophoresis (CE) with fluorescence detection (Flu) for the analysis of natively fluorescent biomolecular and pharmaceutical compounds. CE-Flu combines the excellent separation efficiency of CE with the high selectivity and sensitivity of Flu. In

  15. Aptamer-based turn-on fluorescent four-branched quaternary ammonium pyrazine probe for selective thrombin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shengyong; Huang, Rong; Zhou, Yangyang; Zhang, Ming; Deng, Minggang; Wang, Xiaolin; Weng, Xiaocheng; Zhou, Xiang

    2011-01-28

    In this thrombin detection system, the bright fluorescence of TASPI is almost eliminated by the DNA aptamer TBA (turn-off); however, in the presence of thrombin, it specifically binds to TBA by folding unrestricted TBA into an anti-parallel G-quadruplex structure and then releasing TASPI molecules, resulting in vivid and facile fluorescence recovery (turn-on).

  16. A simple rhodamine hydrazide-based turn-on fluorescent probe for HOCl detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Zou, Yuan; Deng, Chengquan; Meng, Liesu

    2016-06-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) plays a crucial role in daily life and mediates a variety of physiological processes,