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Sample records for atomic energy control board canada

  1. Atomic Energy Control Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackman, N.S.; Gummer, W.K.

    1982-02-01

    This paper has been prepared to provide an overview of the responsibilities and activities of the Atomic Energy Control Board. It is designed to address questions that are often asked concerning the establishment of the Atomic Energy Control Board, its enabling legislation, licensing and compliance activities, federal-provincial relationships, international obligations, and communications with the public

  2. The Atomic Energy Control Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doern, G.B.

    1976-01-01

    This study describes and assesses the regulatory and administrative processes and procedures of the Atomic Energy Control Board, the AECB. The Atomic Energy Control Act authorized the AECB to control atomic energy materials and equipment in the national interest and to participate in measures for the international control of atomic energy. The AECB is authorized to make regulations to control atomic energy materials and equipment and to make grants in support of atomic energy research. (author)

  3. The Atomic Energy Control Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shultz, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Certain aspects of the Atomic Energy Control Board's relationships with Cabinet, the Minister, Government officials, The licensees and the public are analyzed. The way some of the relationships would have been modified by the Nuclear Control and Administration Act proposed in 1977 is examined. (L.L.)

  4. Atomic energy control board. History backgrounder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) is a regulatory agency set up by the Government of Canada under the Atomic Energy Control Act of 1946 to assist the Government in its efforts to make provision for the control and supervision of the development, application and use of atomic energy and to enable Canada to participate effectively in measures of international control of atomic energy. It is also responsible for the administration of the Nuclear Liability Act, including the designation of nuclear installations and the prescription of basic insurance to be carried by the operators of such nuclear installations. An overview is presented of the AECB's evolution in chronological form, its major current activities, and some of the challenges expected in the next decade

  5. Atomic Energy Control Board vocabulary - preliminary edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolet, D.

    1995-09-01

    This preliminary edition was prepared at the Board's request to help it establish a standardized terminology. It was produced by scanning the 99 French and English documents listed at the end of this Vocabulary. The documents include legislation concerning atomic energy and the transportation of radioactive materials, as well as the Board's publications, such as the Consultative Documents, Regulatory Documents and Notices. The terms included from the following areas are: radiation protection, reactor technology, nuclear fuel cycle, radioactive material packaging and transportation, radioactive waste management, uranium mines, and medical and industrial applications of radioelements. Also included are the titles of publications and the names of organizations and units. The vocabulary contains 2,589 concepts, sometimes accompanied by definitions, contexts or usage examples. Where terms have been standardized by the Canadian Committee for the Standardization of Nuclear Terminology, this has been indicated. Where possible, we have verified the terms using the TERMIUM, the Government of Canada Linguistic Data Bank. (author)

  6. Atomic Energy Control Board vocabulary - preliminary edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolet, D [Public Works and Government Services Canada, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Terminology and Documentation Directorate

    1995-09-01

    This preliminary edition was prepared at the Board`s request to help it establish a standardized terminology. It was produced by scanning the 99 French and English documents listed at the end of this Vocabulary. The documents include legislation concerning atomic energy and the transportation of radioactive materials, as well as the Board`s publications, such as the Consultative Documents, Regulatory Documents and Notices. The terms included from the following areas are: radiation protection, reactor technology, nuclear fuel cycle, radioactive material packaging and transportation, radioactive waste management, uranium mines, and medical and industrial applications of radioelements. Also included are the titles of publications and the names of organizations and units. The vocabulary contains 2,589 concepts, sometimes accompanied by definitions, contexts or usage examples. Where terms have been standardized by the Canadian Committee for the Standardization of Nuclear Terminology, this has been indicated. Where possible, we have verified the terms using the TERMIUM, the Government of Canada Linguistic Data Bank. (author).

  7. Atomic Energy Control Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    This act provides for the establishment of the Atomic Energy Control Board. The board is responsible for the control and supervision of the development, application and use of atomic energy. The board is also considered necessary to enable Canada to participate effectively in measures of international control of atomic energy

  8. The Atomic Energy Control Board and the uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, R.M.

    The Atomic Energy Control Board controls prescribed substances and nuclear facilities through a licensing system. It is only recently that this system has been applied to the uranium industry. There are four stages in the licensing procedure before a Mine-Mill Facility Operating Licence is issued: exploration requires an underground exploration permit; site approval is needed before the start of the development stage; development approval is required before the construction of the mill and waste management facilities and depends on the information in a preliminary safety report; the granting of a final operating licence occurs after the Board is satisfied with the final safety report, operating policies and principles, tailings management, and decommissioning plans. The Board has resource management policies designed to ensure that uranium reserves are available to meet Canada's needs. The administration of safeguards is also the Board's responsibility. (LL)

  9. Atomic Energy Control Board and its role in the regulation of uranium and thorium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zgola, M.B.

    1981-02-01

    This brief, presented to the Northwest Territories legislative hearings into uranium exploration, provides an overview of the jurisdictional role and regulatory philosophy of the Atomic Energy Control Board in uranium mining in Canada

  10. The Atomic Energy Control Board's regulatory research and support program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    The purpose of the Regulatory Research and Support Program is to augment and extend the capability of the Atomic Energy Control Board's (AECB) regulatory program beyond the capability of in-house resources. The overall objective of the program is to produce pertinent and independent scientific and other knowledge and expertise that will assist the AECB in making correct, timely and credible decisions on regulating the development, application and use of atomic energy. The objectives are achieved through contracted research, development, studies, consultant and other kinds of projects administered by the Research and Radiation Protection Branch (RRB) of the AECB

  11. The role and structure of the Atomic Energy Control Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, P.E.

    1981-04-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is responsible for the control and supervision of the application and use of nuclear materials and the operation of nuclear facilities to ensure that the health and safety of people are protected and that the nuclear materials and equipment are used only in accordance with the government non-proliferation policy. Requirements for control and supervision are made into regulations subject to approval by the Governor in Council. They are applied through a comprehensive licensing system. The interpretation and implementation of the regulations are contained in a series of regulatory documents published from time to time by the Board. The functional organization of staff that assist the Board for the administration, the assessment and issuance of licenses, compliance and inspection, as well as for the management of the regulatory research program is described. (author) [fr

  12. The Canadian public's awareness and perception of the Atomic Energy Control Board. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective of the research is to measure how the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) stands with the Canadian public. The research examines the existing level of awareness and knowledge about the AECB and the image that people have about the Board. Another issue addressed in the research is the level of confusion within the public between the AECB and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The data in this report can also be used as a benchmark against which improvements can be measured from the AECB's communications programs and activities undertaken in the future

  13. The Atomic Energy Control Board requirements for the radioisotope licensing of a radiopharmaceutical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, P.

    1980-01-01

    Items that must be addressed by an applicant for a radioisotope license in Canada are described. Site, design and operating conditions, safety assessment, organization, emergency procedures and operating policies and procedures must be described to the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), in support of any license application. All information submitted in support of the application is subject to AECB's policy on public access to that information. (OT)

  14. A history of the Atomic Energy Control Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, G.H.E.

    1980-07-01

    Topics covered include the pre-history of the AECB, its creation, early operations and evolution, its relations with nuclear research, the uranium industry, and the nuclear power industry, its involvement with transportation and safeguards, and some current problems. The focus is on the Atomic Energy Control Act and regulations derived from the act

  15. Atomic Energy Control Board and its role in the regulation of uranium and thorium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, A.B.

    1980-05-01

    Laws governing the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), its structure and functions is described in the context of the Board's role in uranium and thorium mining. The licensing and compliance procedures are described as they pertain to the objectives of the AECB in protecting workers, the public and the environment during construction, operating and closure of uranium and thorium mining and milling facilities. (OT)

  16. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1987-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1988 covers: Research Company; CANDU Operations; Radiochemical Company; Medical Products Division; The Future; Financial Sections; Board of Directors and Officers; and AECL locations

  17. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1985-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1986 covers the following subjects: report from the chairman and the president; research company; CANDU operations; radiochemical company; employee performance; nuclear Canada; Financial section; and board of directors and officers

  18. Implementation of a program to recover the Atomic Energy Control Board's operating costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) has undertaken a preliminary study to examine the feasibility of recovering the costs of its regulatory activities in accordance with the Canadian federal government user-pay principle. This study has found that recovery of the AECB's entire budget of $25 million per year would not have a significant financial impact on its licensees. The AECB has prepared regulations and a fee schedule and carried out consultations with the nuclear industry and the public to determine the potential financial and economic impacts of this initiative

  19. Final report to the Atomic Energy Control Board on project management capabilities using NAOP as a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masters, P.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify practices of the Atomic Energy Control Board that support or detract from the implementation of collaborative cross-functional project management and to recommend ways and means of increasing the Board's ability to respond to projects. Ontario Hydro's Nuclear Asset Optimization Program (NAOP) and the Board's response to that program form the basis of a case study for the purposes of this report. Issues examined include: Whether the Board follows a logical project management framework when it addresses projects such as the NAOP; where the Board exhibits good practices in addressing project such as the NAOP; and where the Board needs to develop better practices

  20. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1986-87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1987 covers the followings subjects: report from the president; research company; CANDU operations; radiochemical company; the future; financial section and board of directors and officers

  1. Proposed general amendments to the atomic energy control regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Canada's Atomic Energy Control Act defines the powers and responsibilities of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). Among these is to make regulations to control the development, application and use of atomic energy. In these proposed general amendments to the Atomic Energy Control Regulations substantial changes are proposed in the designation of the authority of AECB staff, exemptions from licensing, international safeguards, duties of licensees and atomic radiation workers, security of information, and provision for hearings. The scope of the control of atomic energy has been redefined as relating to matters of health, safety, security, international safeguards, and the protection of the environment

  2. Description of how the Atomic Energy Control Board research and development program is administered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The Regulatory Research Program should be seen as augmenting and extending the capability of in-house resources. The overall objective of the research program is to produce pertinent and independent information that will assist the Board and its staff in making correct, timely and credible decisions on regulating atomic energy. Within the framework of the general objective, the specific objectives are: (i) to verify information, claims or analyses from licensees in support of licensing actions; (ii) to fill gaps in knowledge to enable the Board to contribute to the establishment of health and safety requirements or guidelines or to aid in arriving at licensing decisions; (iii) to stimulate licensees to do more work on certain topics relating to health, safety or security; (iv) to develop information on the regulatory process and the evaluation of the regulatory process; (v) to develop equipment or procedures to enhance health, safety or security in those cases where the industry is not competent or inclined to do so; and (vi) to enhance the competence of the Board and its credibility in the eyes of licensees and the public

  3. Atomic Energy Control Act, c A.19, s.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Revised Statutes of Canada 1985 entered into force on 12 December 1988, revoking the previous Atomic Energy Control Act and replacing it with a new version. The new Act (Chapter A-16 of the Revised Statutes) updates the previous text and makes some linguistic corrections. The Atomic Energy Control Act establishes the Atomic Energy Control Board and sets out its duties and powers which include, in particular, the making of regulations for developing, controlling and licensing the production, application and use of atomic energy [fr

  4. Atomic Energy Control Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is the consolidated text of the Atomic Energy Control Regulations of 17 March 1960, with amendments to 27 August 1992. The Regulations cover the licensing of nuclear facilities, radiation sources, including uranium mining, radiation protection questions, etc. (NEA)

  5. Memorandum of understanding between the Federal Minister for the Environment, nature conservation and nuclear safety of the Federal Republic of Germany and the atomic energy control board of Canada on cooperation and exchange of information respecting nuclear safety and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Memorandum of Understanding on co-operation and exchange of information respecting nuclear safety and radiation protection covers the period 23 May 1991 to 1 June 1996. The Parties may exchange information on any matter concerning the civil uses of nuclear energy within the other Party's jurisdiction and, in particular information on: nuclear installations, their siting, construction, operation and decommissioning; uranium mining and milling; nuclear fuel production; radioactive waste treatment, storage and disposal; transport of nuclear fuel and radioactive waste; radiation protection; legislation, regulations, standards. All information received and the results of activities carried out under this Memorandum of Understanding will be used exclusively for peaceful purposes [fr

  6. Nuclear energy and the responsibilities of the Atomic Energy Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Villiers, J.W.L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses nuclear energy and the responsibilities of the previous Atomic Energy Board, (now the Atomic Energy Corporation) of South Africa in this respect. The paper starts by giving a brief introduction to the Atomic Energy Board, its organization and its functions. Research is undertaken in various fields such as the exploitation of nuclear fuels, radiobiology, radioisotopes, etc. Certain activities of the Board was also more directly related to Koeberg. The paper covers four of these areas, namely the early studies of the feasibility of introducing nuclear power in South Africa; the services involving the Board's special expertise in certain areas which Escom makes use of; the regulatory function and the preparation for handling and disposal of radioactive waste

  7. Epp names new interim execs to head Atomic Energy Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Federal Energy Minister Jake Epp has named Mrs. Marnie Paiken as acting chairman and Bruce Howe as acting president of AECL (formerly Atomic Energy Canada Ltd.), the federal Crown corporation charged with the development and utilization of nuclear energy. Both appointments were made necessary by the resignations of Robert Ferchat as chairman and Stanley Hatcher as president, each citing deep differences in their respective approaches to the management of the corporation. Mrs. Paiken has been a member of AECL's board since 1985, and previously served as acting chairman from March 1989 to July 1990. Howe has been deputy minister of the federal energy department since 1988, a position he will retain while carrying out his duties as president of AECL. A search has begun to find permanent replacements

  8. The place of human-factors in the work of the Atomic Energy Control Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkow, B.

    1982-01-01

    The AECB do not effectively regulate human factors in nuclear power plants since they have no staff trained to do so. Two new positions are recommended and their activities are outlined. Special problems are identified in the certification of personnel, management information control, and in accommodating human factors to AECB style

  9. Negotiated settlements and the National Energy Board in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet, Joseph; Littlechild, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    In Canada, settlements between oil and gas pipelines and users have largely superseded the litigation of major pipeline toll cases since 1995. Quantitatively, from the first half to the second half of the period 1985-2007 the average number of pipeline toll hearing days in Canada fell by three-quarters. On average, settlements last more than twice as long as litigated outcomes and have cut regulatory processing times by about one third for gas pipelines and by about two thirds for oil pipelines, with the result that regulatory processing times per effective toll-year have fallen to 13% and 27% respectively of previous levels. Qualitatively, settlements have been used to determine prices, operating and capital cost projections, return on equity, service quality improvements, risk-sharing investments and information requirements. They were the vehicle by which multi-year incentive agreements developed rapidly for all pipelines. They have also been used to introduce light-handed regulation. They have provided a mechanism for fruitful collaboration between pipelines and their customers and have changed attitudes in the industry. Two key actions of the National Energy Board have facilitated settlements by clarifying expectations and property rights: its generic cost of capital decision that removes the market power of the pipeline and enables effective negotiation with users, and its willingness to judge a settlement by the reasonableness of the process leading up to it instead of imposing the Board's own values on the outcome.

  10. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 2007 annual financial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This is the annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2007 and summarizes the financial activities of AECL during the period 2006-2007. The highlights for this period include increase in consolidated commercial revenue by 40%, progress on the Cernavoda reactor, increased investment in the safety and performance of the CANDU fleet and a memorandum of understanding with Natural Resources Canada to govern implementation of a five-year waste management and decommissioning plan.

  11. Atomic energy: agreement between Canada and Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This agreement provides for the exchange of nuclear materials and equipment between Canada and Australia and specifies the safeguards and other protective measures that shall be employed to ensure the peaceful use of the nuclear technology shared between the two countries

  12. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, annual report, 1995-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The 1996 Annual Report of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is published and submitted to the Honourable member of Parliament, Minister of Natural Resources. Included in this report are messages from Marketing and Commercial Operation, Product Development, i e.CANDU and Research Reactors, CANDU research, Waste Management, Environmental Management, Financial Review and also included are copies of the financial statements.

  13. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, annual report, 1995-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The 1996 Annual Report of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is published and submitted to the Honourable member of Parliament, Minister of Natural Resources. Included in this report are messages from Marketing and Commercial Operation, Product Development, i e.CANDU and Research Reactors, CANDU research, Waste Management, Environmental Management, Financial Review and also included are copies of the financial statements

  14. Atomic Energy Board, nineteenth annual report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following: nuclear materials, nuclear power, application of radioisotopes and radiation, health and safety and fundamental studies undertaken in physics, chemistry, metallurgy, medicine and geology during 1975. The technical activities on the site are summarized as well as the external negotiations untertaken. The staff organization and finance is given. The report also contains a list of publications published during 1975 by staff members and bursars of the Board

  15. Administrative Arrangement between the Atomic Control Board of Canada and le Service central de surete des installations nucleaires du Ministere de l'Industrie et de l'Amenagement du Territoire de la Republique francaise for the Exchange of Technical Information and Cooperation in the Regulation of Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Arrangement between the Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada (AECB) and the French Central Service for the Safety of Nuclear Installations (SCSIN) entered into force on the date of its signature and will remain in effect for five years. The Arrangement provides for the exchange of information between both agencies on the regulation of nuclear facilities and intervention measures in cases of emergency. This includes information on regulatory procedures for the safety of designated nuclear facilities, notification of important events, such as serious operating incidents, reactor shutdowns ordered by the regulatory authorities, etc. (NEA) [fr

  16. Atomic Energy Board, twenty first annual report, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following: nuclear materials, nuclear power, application of radioisotopes and radiation, health and safety, and fundamental studies undertaken in the fields of physics, chemistry, metallurgy, medicine and geology during 1977. The supporting activities of the computer services, engineering sevices, waste disposal plant, instrumentation section, research reactor and analytical services are given for 1977. The report contains a bibliography of publications published by staff members and bursars of the Atomic Energy Board during 1977

  17. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1989-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1990, after a comprehensive industry review, the Canadian government announced that steps would be taken to revitalize the nuclear industry. Canada's nuclear utilities made a commitment to bear a large share of the cost of nuclear research and development. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) reported its first financial loss in twelve years, as anticipated at the start of the year. Four of the 20 CANDU reactors operating worldwide were in the top ten based on lifetime performance. By year-end one foreign and two domestic utilities had announced their intention to build more CANDU units. The federal government has agreed to stabilize AECL's research funding at 1989-90 levels ($31.5 million above levels planned in 1985), has authorized AECL to negotiate with New Brunswick to build Point Lepreau-2 as the prototype for the CANDU-3 reactor, and has allowed the restructuring of AECL so utility and private sector investors can become equity partners in AECL CANDU

  18. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 2002-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This is the annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2003 and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 2002-2003. It outlines the strategic objectives that include growing the market and market share, maximize return on resources, evolve the business structure to support business growth, grow knowledge assets, be a technology and knowledge-based innovative leader, leverage intellectual property to provide marketable products and services and establish nuclear power as a clean air and public policy solution.

  19. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 2008 annual financial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This is the annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2008 and summarizes the financial activities of AECL during the period 2007-2008. The major highlights for this period include increase of consolidated revenue by 4%, significant progress on Liquid Waste Transfer and Storage (LWTS) and the Fuel Packaging and Storage (FPS) project, feasibility study of a new ACR-1000 plant in New Brunswick and a memorandum of understanding with CNSC for pre project design review of ACR-1000.

  20. The Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) employee health study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.; Werner, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary examination of records relating to past Chalk River employees provides some reassurance that large numbers of cancer deaths that might be related to occupational radiation exposure do not exist in the groups of employees studied to the end of 1982. The lack of reliable information on deaths of ex-employees who left AECL for other employment prevented the inclusion of this group in this preliminary study. This information will presumably be obtained during the course of the more comprehensive Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. employee health study. 6 refs

  1. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 2000-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2001 and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 2000-2001. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with progress being reported in the construction of two CANDU 6 reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, the anticipated completion of Cernavoda unit 2, the completion of spent fuel storage at Cernavoda unit 1 in Romania, as well as the service business with New Brunswick Power, Ontario Power Generation, Bruce Power and Hydro Quebec in the refurbishment of operating, CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs discussions continue on funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for Materials Research (CNF) and progress on the Maple medical isotope reactor

  2. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1999-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2000, and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 1999-2000. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with the completion of the Wolsong unit 4 in the Republic of Korea, progress in the construction of two CANDU reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, as well as the service business with Ontario Power Generation in the rehabilitation and life extension of operating CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs there is on-going effort towards the next generation of reactor technologies for CANDU nuclear power plants, discussions continue on the funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for materials research (CNF) and progress being made on the Maple medical isotope reactor

  3. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1999-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2000, and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 1999-2000. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with the completion of the Wolsong unit 4 in the Republic of Korea, progress in the construction of two CANDU reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, as well as the service business with Ontario Power Generation in the rehabilitation and life extension of operating CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs there is on-going effort towards the next generation of reactor technologies for CANDU nuclear power plants, discussions continue on the funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for materials research (CNF) and progress being made on the Maple medical isotope reactor.

  4. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 2000-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2001 and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 2000-2001. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with progress being reported in the construction of two CANDU 6 reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, the anticipated completion of Cernavoda unit 2, the completion of spent fuel storage at Cernavoda unit 1 in Romania, as well as the service business with New Brunswick Power, Ontario Power Generation, Bruce Power and Hydro Quebec in the refurbishment of operating, CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs discussions continue on funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for Materials Research (CNF) and progress on the Maple medical isotope reactor.

  5. Tritium handling experience at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suppiah, S.; McCrimmon, K.; Lalonde, S.; Ryland, D.; Boniface, H.; Muirhead, C.; Castillo, I. [Atomic Energy of Canad Limited - AECL, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Canada has been a leader in tritium handling technologies as a result of the successful CANDU reactor technology used for power production. Over the last 50 to 60 years, capabilities have been established in tritium handling and tritium management in CANDU stations, tritium removal processes for heavy and light water, tritium measurement and monitoring, and understanding the effects of tritium on the environment. This paper outlines details of tritium-related work currently being carried out at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). It concerns the CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) process for detritiation, tritium-compatible electrolysers, tritium permeation studies, and tritium powered batteries. It is worth noting that AECL offers a Tritium Safe-Handling Course to national and international participants, the course is a mixture of classroom sessions and hands-on practical exercises. The expertise and facilities available at AECL is ready to address technological needs of nuclear fusion and next-generation nuclear fission reactors related to tritium handling and related issues.

  6. Annual report to the Atomic Energy Control Board on the Regulatory Research and Support Program April 1, 1994 - March 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The Regulatory Research and Support Program (RSP) is intended to augment and extend activities, undertaken by the Atomic Energy Control Board, beyond what would be possible with in-house resources. The overall objective of the research and support activity is to produce pertinent and independent information that will assist the Board and its staff in making sound, timely and credible decisions for the regulation of nuclear facilities and materials. Represented in this report is a cataloging of seven appendices. The membership of active review panels is given in Appendix A. Appendix B contains summary descriptions and information on the status of individual projects. Appendix C presents a list of those projects which were within the overall RSP but were not active during the year. Appendix D lists the projects undergoing review of final report or post-project evaluation. All projects which were worked on during the year are listed in Appendix E. Specific objectives set for the RSP for Fiscal Year 1994/95 and the degree to which the objectives were achieved are outlined in Appendix F. Appendix G lists the INFO-series reports that were published during Fiscal Year 1994/95. 157 tabs

  7. Annual report to the Atomic Energy Control Board on the Regulatory Research and Support Program April 1, 1994 - March 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The Regulatory Research and Support Program (RSP) is intended to augment and extend activities, undertaken by the Atomic Energy Control Board, beyond what would be possible with in-house resources. The overall objective of the research and support activity is to produce pertinent and independent information that will assist the Board and its staff in making sound, timely and credible decisions for the regulation of nuclear facilities and materials. Represented in this report is a cataloging of seven appendices. The membership of active review panels is given in Appendix A. Appendix B contains summary descriptions and information on the status of individual projects. Appendix C presents a list of those projects which were within the overall RSP but were not active during the year. Appendix D lists the projects undergoing review of final report or post-project evaluation. All projects which were worked on during the year are listed in Appendix E. Specific objectives set for the RSP for Fiscal Year 1994/95 and the degree to which the objectives were achieved are outlined in Appendix F. Appendix G lists the INFO-series reports that were published during Fiscal Year 1994/95. 157 tabs.

  8. Annual report to the Atomic Energy Control Board on the Regulatory Research and Support Program April 1, 1994 - March 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The Regulatory Research and Support Program (RSP) is intended to augment and extend activities, undertaken by the Atomic Energy Control Board, beyond what would be possible with in-house resources. The overall objective of the research and support activity is to produce pertinent and independent information that will assist the Board and its staff in making sound, timely and credible decisions for the regulation of nuclear facilities and materials. During Fiscal Year 1994/95, a total of $3.245M was spent of RSP research and support work. The range of activities included projects in the general fields of nuclear reactors, fuel cycle facilities, uranium mines and mills, waste management, dosimetry, health physics, regulations and regulatory process development, and other special support services. Some of this work was organized into sub-program groups, each of which addresses research and support effort in theme-related areas. Five sub-programs were launched during the year bringing to eight the total number of such sub-programs. Areas addressed in the sub-programs are environmental impact assessment and management, safety critical software, seismologic studies, pressure boundary integrity, integrity of containment and safety-related structures, human factors, internal dosimetry, and health effects in human populations. During the year, there were a total of 157 active projects

  9. The Atomic Energy Control Board criteria for identification and evaluation of fire hazards in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Luke

    1986-03-01

    This report presents criteria for the identification and evaluation of fire hazards in nuclear power stations. The report presents criteria that are consistent with the existing regulatory approach in Canada, and outlines engineering tools and analytical techniques currently available to deterministically analyse fire. The criteria presented cover the topics which should be included in a fire hazard analysis and provide details of each topic so that the accuracy of an analysis may be evaluated

  10. The Atomic Energy Control Board criteria for identification and evaluation of fire hazards in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, L.

    1986-03-01

    This report presents information for the identification and evaluation of fire hazards in nuclear power stations. The report consists of two volumes. Volume 1 contains background material which outlines tools and analytical techniques currently available to deterministically analyse fire hazards. Volume 2 presents criteria for evaluating fire hazard reports. The criteria are consistent with the existing AECB regulatory approach in Canada and cover the topics which should be included in a fire hazard analysis. This volume also provides details of each topic so that the quality of an analysis may be evaluated

  11. Waste management program at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, P.C.F.; Chan, N.; Hawrelluk, K. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) Waste Management Program establishes requirements for waste management activities at AECL sites in Canada. It ensures that activities involving planning for, handling, processing, transporting, storage and long-term management of wastes are performed in a manner that protects the workers, the public, and the environment, and are in compliance with applicable regulatory and licence requirements. The program translates applicable legal requirements into program requirements appropriate for AECL, and assists AECL management in implementing those requirements. The Waste Management Program was formally established at AECL in 2007 as one of the nuclear programs. The activities conducted in the first two years (2007 - 09) were mainly focused on program development. Currently the program is executing the waste management improvement initiatives based on the Waste Management Program Improvement Plan. During the program implementation, close collaboration between the Waste Management Program and other departments resulted in improved waste management performance at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). This included increased segregation of the waste at the source, reduction in waste generation, improved labeling and identification of waste packages, improved recyclables collection and initiating recycling of selected hazardous wastes. In accordance with pollution prevention, the quantities and degree of hazard of wastes requiring long-term management shall be minimized, following the principles of Prevent, Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle. The annual volume of solid waste generated is one of the key indicators for waste management performance. AECL has been successful in reduction of operational waste and diversion of materials for recycling at CRL. From 2007 to 2010, the annual volume of solid waste, including inactive and radioactive wastes, generated from routine operations at CRL decreased by 26%, and the annual amount of recyclables sent

  12. Waste management program at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, P.C.F.; Chan, N.; Hawrelluk, K.

    2011-01-01

    The Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) Waste Management Program establishes requirements for waste management activities at AECL sites in Canada. It ensures that activities involving planning for, handling, processing, transporting, storage and long-term management of wastes are performed in a manner that protects the workers, the public, and the environment, and are in compliance with applicable regulatory and licence requirements. The program translates applicable legal requirements into program requirements appropriate for AECL, and assists AECL management in implementing those requirements. The Waste Management Program was formally established at AECL in 2007 as one of the nuclear programs. The activities conducted in the first two years (2007 - 09) were mainly focused on program development. Currently the program is executing the waste management improvement initiatives based on the Waste Management Program Improvement Plan. During the program implementation, close collaboration between the Waste Management Program and other departments resulted in improved waste management performance at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). This included increased segregation of the waste at the source, reduction in waste generation, improved labeling and identification of waste packages, improved recyclables collection and initiating recycling of selected hazardous wastes. In accordance with pollution prevention, the quantities and degree of hazard of wastes requiring long-term management shall be minimized, following the principles of Prevent, Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle. The annual volume of solid waste generated is one of the key indicators for waste management performance. AECL has been successful in reduction of operational waste and diversion of materials for recycling at CRL. From 2007 to 2010, the annual volume of solid waste, including inactive and radioactive wastes, generated from routine operations at CRL decreased by 26%, and the annual amount of recyclables sent

  13. Annual report to the Atomic Energy Control Board on the regulatory research and support program April 1, 1995 - March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The Regulatory Research and Support Program (RSP) is intended to augment and extend activities, undertaken by the Atomic Energy Control Board, beyond what would be possible with in-house resources. The overall objective of the research and support activity is to produce pertinent and independent information that will assist the Board and its staff in making sound, timely and credible decisions for the regulation of nuclear facilities and materials. During Fiscal Year 1995/96, a total of $3,029M was spent on RSP research and support work. The range of activities included projects in the general fields of nuclear reactors, fuel cycle facilities, uranium mines and mills, waste management, dosimetry, health physics, regulations and regulatory process development, and other special support services. Some of this work was organized into sub-program groups. Four sub-programs were launched during the year bringing to twelve the total number. Areas addressed in the sub-programs are environmental impact assessment and management, safety-related computerized systems, seismologic studies, pressure boundary integrity, integrity of containment and safety-related structures, human factors, internal dosimetry, health effects in human populations, physics and fuel studies, probabilistic safety assessment, emergency preparedness, and radiobiology. During the year, there were a total of 118 active projects. This number included projects planned for the year, others which remained incomplete from the previous year and a significant number of projects which were initiated in response to new, high-priority needs. This report presents information on the scope of RSP activities during the year and describes how the program was managed, organized and implemented. Overviews are presented of research and support work undertaken in each field of activity and some highlights of results obtained are included. (Abstract Truncated)

  14. Annual report to the Atomic Energy Control Board on the regulatory research and support program April 1, 1995 - March 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The Regulatory Research and Support Program (RSP) is intended to augment and extend activities, undertaken by the Atomic Energy Control Board, beyond what would be possible with in-house resources. The overall objective of the research and support activity is to produce pertinent and independent information that will assist the Board and its staff in making sound, timely and credible decisions for the regulation of nuclear facilities and materials. During Fiscal Year 1995/96, a total of $3,029M was spent on RSP research and support work. The range of activities included projects in the general fields of nuclear reactors, fuel cycle facilities, uranium mines and mills, waste management, dosimetry, health physics, regulations and regulatory process development, and other special support services. Some of this work was organized into sub-program groups, each of which addresses research and support effort in theme-related areas. Four sub-programs were launched during the year bringing to twelve the total number of such sub-programs. Areas addressed in the sub-programs are environmental impact assessment and management, safety-related computerized systems, seismologic studies, pressure boundary integrity, integrity of containment and safety-related structures, human factors, internal dosimetry, health effects in human populations, physics and fuel studies, probabilistic safety assessment, emergency preparedness, and radiobiology. During the year, there were a total of 118 active projects. This number included projects planned for the year, others which remained incomplete from the previous year and a significant number of projects which were initiated in response to new, high-priority needs. This report presents information on the scope of RSP activities during the year and describes how the program was managed, organized and implemented. Overviews are presented of research and support work undertaken in each field of activity and some highlights of results obtained are

  15. The Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) employee health study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Health Study formally began in April 1980. The purpose of the study is to determine the causes of death among a population of radiation workers and to compare this information with data available for the causes of death in the general population. The study population and the implementation are briefly discussed. The aim of the study is to determine the real occupational risk of being a radiation worker. 3 refs

  16. Atomic energy: agreement between Canada and the Socialist Republic of Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The governments of Canada and Romania agreed to cooperate in the development and application of atomic energy for peaceful purposes, including joint research and development projects, the application of atomic energy for electricity generation and other peaceful purposes, industrial enterprises; the supply of information, material, nuclear material, equipment and facilities; licensing arrangements; access to equipment and facilities; technical assistance; scientific visits; and training. Reprocessing, enrichment, and heavy water technology are excluded. Safeguards measures are spelled out. (LL)

  17. National Energy Board Emergency Management Program : annex to Natural Resources Canada Civil Emergency Plan no. 004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lever, G.; LeMay, R.

    2006-01-01

    As a matter of primary public interest, safety is included in the National Energy Board's (NEB) mandate. The Board is responsible for ensuring companies involved with energy development and pipelines comply with regulations concerning the safety of employees, the public, and the environment. The purpose of the NEB's Emergency Management Program is to establish a prompt and coordinated response to an emergency which occurs at any facility or operation regulated by the NEB; promote safety and security and assure compliance with regulatory requirements in order to protect the public, workers, property and the environment during the life cycle of facilities and operations; and, have a documented set of procedures that accomplish these objectives. The Board ensures that companies identify and manage the potential hazards associated with their facilities; conduct a risk analysis of those hazards; and, manage the risks in order to protect the public and personnel, the security of the facilities and the environment. All companies under the Board's jurisdiction are responsible for developing and maintaining an Emergency Response and Preparedness Program for all aspects of their operations. In the event an emergency occurs, the regulated company is responsible for responding to the emergency and coordinating emergency response activities. Typically, the NEB responds on site to incidents that result in death or serious injury; involve a significant release of hydrocarbons; could result in potential or real impact due to loss of service; pose imminent threats identified by Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada or other agencies; attract significant media attention, or on the advice of Natural Resources Canada or other federal Agencies. The first part of this document described the initial response check list while the second part outlined the Emergency response framework. 2 tabs., 3 figs., 15 appendices

  18. Atomic energy: exchange of letters between Canada and the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Letters exchanged between the Charge d'affaires, mission of Canada to the European Communites and the Commissioner of the European Communities, concerning safeguards, levels of physical protection, and further intra-Community trade of nuclear materials exported from Canada to the European Community

  19. Annual report 1993-94 (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ottawa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Annual report of AECL, the legal name of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. This annual report presents information on research, CANDU, and AECL around the world. A financial review is included, along with management responsibility, an Auditor`s report, financial statements, a five-year financial summary, and a list of directors and locations.

  20. A study on the health of the employees of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, L.H.; Werner, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd (AECL) Employee Health Study commenced in 1980 July following the issue of a Company-Wide General Notice of 1980 April by the President of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mr. James Donnelly. The study was set up to determine the causes of death of the AECL study population as compared to a similar group in the general population and to determine if there is a relationship between cause of death and occupational exposure to ionising radiation. Previous AECL reports have outlined how the study has been set up and implemented. The purpose of this report is to describe the reasons for and the methods of upgrading the data base for the AECL Employee Health Study. Some description of procedures used during the first linkage and recommendations for future linkages are included

  1. Atomic Energy Board, Republic of South Africa, twenty second annual report, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following: nuclear materials, nuclear power, application of radioisotopes and radiation, health and safety and fundamental studies undertaken in the fields of physics, chemistry, metallurgy, medicine and geology during 1978. The supporting activities of the computer services, engineering services, waste disposal plant, instrumentation section, research reactor and analytical services are given for 1978. The report contains a bibliography of publications published by staff members and bursars of the Atomic Energy Board during 1978

  2. The safety of Ontario's nuclear power reactors. A scientific and technical review. A submission to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review by Atomic Energy Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This submission comments on the evolution of the Canadian nuclear program, the management of safety, and the reactor design, analysis, operation and research programs that contribute to the safety of the CANDU reactor and provide assurance of safety to the regulatory agency and to the public. The CANDU reactor system has been designed and developed with close cooperation between Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL), utilities, manufacturers, and the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The AECB has the responsibility, on behalf of the public, for establishing acceptable standards with respect to public risk and for establishing through independent review that these standards are satisfied. The plant designer has responsibility for defining how those standards will be met. The plant operator has responsibility for operating within the framework of those standards. The Canadian approach to safety design is based on the philosophy of defence in depth. Defence in depth is achieved through a high level of equipment quality, system redundancy and fail-safe design; regulating and process systems designed to maintain all process systems within acceptable operating parameters; and, independent safety systems to shut down the reactor, provide long-term cooling, and contain potential release of radioactivity in the event of an accident. The resulting design meets regulatory requirements not only in Canada but also in other countries. Probabilistic safety and risk evaluations show that the CANDU design offers a level of safety and least as good as other commercially available reactor designs

  3. A study of the health of the employees of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.L.; Johnston, L.H.

    1984-09-01

    The Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Employee Health Study is a program that was established in 1980 to determine, over the long term, the causes of death in a population consisting of some 14 000 AECL employees and past employees. In a previous report (AECL-6813) the steps taken to set up the study were described. The present report is a description of the way in which the study was implemented, and includes discussion of some recent developments that have had a bearing on epidemiological studies of the health of radiation workers

  4. Implementation of dose management system at radiation protection board of Ghana Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasford, F.; Amoako, J. K.; Darko, E. O.; Emi-reynolds, G.; Sosu, E. K.; Otoo, F.; Asiedu, G. O.

    2012-01-01

    The dose management system (DMS) is a computer software developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency for managing data on occupational exposure to radiation sources and intake of radionuclides. It is an integrated system for the user-friendly storage, processing and control of all existing internal and external dosimetry data. The Radiation Protection Board (RPB) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission has installed, customised, tested and using the DMS as a comprehensive DMS to improve personnel and area monitoring in the country. Personnel dose records from the RPBs database from 2000 to 2009 are grouped into medical, industrial and education/research sectors. The medical sector dominated the list of monitored institutions in the country over the 10 y period representing ∼87 %, while the industrial and education/research sectors represent ∼9 and ∼4 %, respectively. The number of monitored personnel in the same period follows a similar trend with medical, industrial and education/research sectors representing ∼74, ∼17 and ∼9 %, respectively. Analysis of dose data for 2009 showed that there was no instance of a dose above the annual dose limit of 20 mSv, however, 2.7 % of the exposed workers received individual annual doses >1 mSv. The highest recorded individual annual dose and total collective dose in all sectors were 4.73 mSv and 159.84 man Sv, respectively. Workers in the medical sector received higher individual doses than in the other two sectors, and average dose per exposed worker in all sectors is 0.25 mSv. (authors)

  5. Preliminary assessment on the competency of technical staff of Atomic Energy Licensing Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marina Mishar; Redzuwan Yahya

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to carry out a preliminary assessment on the competency level of technical staff of Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB), the nuclear regulatory body in Malaysia for effectively monitoring and supervising the activities of the first nuclear power plant in Malaysia. The study is conducted out on the whole group of AELB technical staff, comprising 81 personnel from the supporting and professional categories. Findings showed that AELB technical staff who have been in the workforce for more than ten years have the required competency level for legal and regulatory processes competencies, regulatory practices competencies and effectiveness in personal and inter-personal competencies. Regression analysis between competency and working experience (length of service) showed a weak positive correlation, which could be contributed by job not related to the competency parameters for major functions of a regulatory body in controlling nuclear activity of a nuclear power plant. Results obtained could assist AELB in manpower development once Malaysia makes the decision to embark on a nuclear power programme. (author)

  6. Atomic Energy Board, Republic of South Africa, twenty third annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In this report progress for 1979 is reported on the following: nuclear materials, nuclear power, application of radioisotopes and radiation, health and safety, fundamental studies undertaken in the fields of nuclear physics, plasma physics, theoretical physics, radiation chemistry, solid-state physics and the medical and biological sciences. The supporting activities of the research reactor, instrumentation, waste disposal plant, analytical services, engineering services and computing services are discussed. The activities of the external relations division and licensing division are also discussed. The report contains a bibliography of publications published by staff members and bursars of the Atomic Energy Board during 1979

  7. 76 FR 77561 - Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; In the Matter of Progress Energy Florida, Inc.; (Levy County...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ...] Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; In the Matter of Progress Energy Florida, Inc.; (Levy County Nuclear....\\1\\ On February 23, 2009, this Board was established to handle the matter and to preside over any... resulting from active and passive dewatering; 2. Impacts resulting from the connection of the site to the...

  8. A study of the health of the employees of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.; Chiarelli, A.M.; Etezadi-Amoli, J.; Miller, A.B.; Weeks, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A follow-up study of 13,570 individuals employed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited has been conducted by linking the records for the cohort to Canadian mortality data for the period between 1950 and 1981. Approximately 60 percent of the individuals in this cohort had some radiation exposure recorded during their employment. A total of 150 deaths from cancer were observed in those males with some radiation exposure, compared to 166 expected, giving a standardized mortality ratio of 0.90. No individual cancer shows a significantly increased death rate compared to the population rate. In general, these results provide useful evidence that the currently accepted risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer are reasonable for low dose rate experience

  9. Management of experimental and exotic fuels by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) has been engaged in nuclear research and development at its Chalk River Laboratories since the 1940's. During this time, a wide variety of irradiated research reactor and experimental fuels have been stored in a variety of storage facilities. Some of these fuels are of unique composition and configuration, and some fuels have been degraded as a result of research activities. In preparing decommissioning plans for these storage facilities, AECL has developed a strategy that identifies how each type of fuel will be dispositioned in the future. The goal of this strategy is to ensure that the fuels are maintained in a safe stable state until a repository for these fuels becomes available. This paper describes the current storage facilities, options considered for long-term fuel management, and the strategy selected to manage these fuels. (author)

  10. A study of the health of the employees of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.L.

    1981-09-01

    This report summarizes the status of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.'s health study of its present and past employees, and is a description of the steps which have been taken up to the time of writing. During the design phase there was a shift in the emphasis of the study. What was originally proposed as a study of mortality in a population of radiation workers, related spacifically to radiation exposure, has become a study of mortality data for all AECL employees. The interest in mortality as a function of occupational radiation expksure remains, but it is recognized that the data available to the study will probably be inadequate for the definition of a dose-effect relationship, although it will be useful in conjuction with other similar studies. The importance of cancer incidence is recognized, and the possibility of linking the AECL data to that contained in the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System is being pursued

  11. Atomic Energy Control Regulations: interpretation of revisions relating to industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide assistance to those affected by section 18 to 18.23 of the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Regulations. Words, phrases, and concepts that are specific to these Regulations are explained herein. However, the corresponding sections of the Regulations should be examined to obtain the exact wording. Although sections 18 to 18.23 of the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Regulations apply to both neutron and gamma radiography, this guide has been written for only the latter. Persons engaged in neutron radiography should consult the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB)

  12. The bungling giant : Atomic Energy Canada Limited and next-generation nuclear technology, 1980-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, I.J.

    2003-01-01

    From 1980-1994 Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL), the Crown Corporation responsible for the development of nuclear technology in Canada, ventured into the market for small-scale, decentralized power systems with the Slowpoke Energy System (SES), a 10MW nuclear reactor for space heating in urban and remote areas. The SES was designed to be 'passively' or 'inherently' safe, such that even the most catastrophic failure of the system would not result in a serious accident (e.g. a meltdown or an explosion). This Canadian initiative, a beneficiary of the National Energy Program, was the first and by far the most successful attempt at a passively safe, decentralized nuclear power system anywhere in the world. Part one uses archival documentation and interviews with project leaders to reconstruct the history of the SES. The standard explanations for the failure of the project, cheap oil, public resistance to the technology, and lack of commercial expertise, are rejected. Part two presents an alternative explanation for the failure of AECL to commercialize the SES. In short, technological momentum towards large-scale nuclear designs led to structural restrictions for the SES project. These restrictions manifested themselves internally to the company (e.g., marginalization of the SES) and externally to the company (e.g., licensing). In part three, the historical lessons of the SES are used to refine one of the central tenets of Popper's political philosophy, 'piecemeal social engineering.' Popper's presentation of the idea is lacking in detail; the analysis of the SES provides some empirical grounding for the concept. I argue that the institutions surrounding traditional nuclear power represent a form utopian social engineering, leading to consequences such as the suspension of civil liberties to guarantee security of the technology. The SES project was an example of a move from the utopian social engineering of large-scale centralized nuclear technology to the piecemeal

  13. The bungling giant: Atomic Energy Canada Limited and next-generation nuclear technology, 1980--1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Ian James

    From 1980--1994 Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL), the Crown Corporation responsible for the development of nuclear technology in Canada, ventured into the market for small-scale, decentralized power systems with the Slowpoke Energy System (SES), a 10MW nuclear reactor for space heating in urban and remote areas. The SES was designed to be "passively" or "inherently" safe, such that even the most catastrophic failure of the system would not result in a serious accident (e.g. a meltdown or an explosion). This Canadian initiative, a beneficiary of the National Energy Program, was the first and by far the most successful attempt at a passively safe, decentralized nuclear power system anywhere in the world. Part one uses archival documentation and interviews with project leaders to reconstruct the history of the SES. The standard explanations for the failure of the project, cheap oil, public resistance to the technology, and lack of commercial expertise, are rejected. Part two presents an alternative explanation for the failure of AECL to commercialize the SES. In short, technological momentum towards large-scale nuclear designs led to structural restrictions for the SES project. These restrictions manifested themselves internally to the company (e.g., marginalization of the SES) and externally to the company (e.g., licensing). In part three, the historical lessons of the SES are used to refine one of the central tenets of Popper's political philosophy, "piecemeal social engineering." Popper's presentation of the idea is lacking in detail; the analysis of the SES provides some empirical grounding for the concept. I argue that the institutions surrounding traditional nuclear power represent a form utopian social engineering, leading to consequences such as the suspension of civil liberties to guarantee security of the technology. The SES project was an example of a move from the utopian social engineering of large-scale centralized nuclear technology to the piecemeal

  14. Waste Management Improvement Initiatives at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - 13091

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Nicholas; Adams, Lynne; Wong, Pierre [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) has been in operation for over 60 years. Radioactive, mixed, hazardous and non-hazardous wastes have been and continue to be generated at CRL as a result of research and development, radioisotope production, reactor operation and facility decommissioning activities. AECL has implemented several improvement initiatives at CRL to simplify the interface between waste generators and waste receivers: - Introduction of trained Waste Officers representing their facilities or activities at CRL; - Establishment of a Waste Management Customer Support Service as a Single-Point of Contact to provide guidance to waste generators for all waste management processes; and - Implementation of a streamlined approach for waste identification with emphasis on early identification of waste types and potential disposition paths. As a result of implementing these improvement initiatives, improvements in waste management and waste transfer efficiencies have been realized at CRL. These included: 1) waste generators contacting the Customer Support Service for information or guidance instead of various waste receivers; 2) more clear and consistent guidance provided to waste generators for waste management through the Customer Support Service; 3) more consistent and correct waste information provided to waste receivers through Waste Officers, resulting in reduced time and resources required for waste management (i.e., overall cost); 4) improved waste minimization and segregation approaches, as identified by in-house Waste Officers; and 5) enhanced communication between waste generators and waste management groups. (authors)

  15. 77 FR 51832 - Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; In the Matter of Progress Energy Florida, Inc. (Levy County...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ...] Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; In the Matter of Progress Energy Florida, Inc. (Levy County Nuclear... testimony are being heard, all of the proceedings will be open to the public. See 10 CFR 2.328. A. Matters.... Impacts resulting from active and passive dewatering; 2. Impacts resulting from the connection of the site...

  16. A registry for the study of the health of radiation workers employed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.L.

    1979-05-01

    Factors to be considered in formulating a study of the health of radiation workers are discussed, and a proposal is made for the establishment of such a study in relation to the employees of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. By setting up a registry of AECL radiation workers, data could be accumulated suitable for the long-term followup of their health, and for preparing periodic interim reports on mortality and morbidity. (author)

  17. Proposed Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. 99Mo waste calcination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramey, D.W.; Haas, P.A.; Malkemus, D.W.; McGinnis, C.P.; Meyers, E.S.; Patton, B.D.; Birdwell, J.F.; Jubin, R.T.; Coltharp, K.A.

    1994-10-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), at its Chalk River Laboratory, generates from 3000 to 5000 L/year of high-level fissile waste solution from the production of 99 Mo. In this Mo process, highly enriched uranium (93 wt % 235 U, total uranium basis) contained in uranium-aluminum alloy target rods is irradiated to produce the 99 Mo product. The targets are removed from the reactor and dissolved in a mercury nitrate-catalyzed reaction with nitric acid. The 99 Mo product is then recovered by passing the solution through an alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) column. During discussions with personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 10, 1992, the ORNL-developed technology formerly applied to the solidification of aqueous uranium waste (Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Program or CEUSP) was judged potentially applicable to the AECL 99 Mo waste. Under a Work-for-Others contract (no. ERD-92-1132), which began May 24, 1993, ORNL was tasked to determine the feasibility of applying the CEUSP (or a similar) calcination process to solidify AECL's 99 Mo waste for > 30 years of safe dry storage. This study was to provide sufficient detailed information on the applicability of a CEUSP-type waste solidification process to allow AECL to select the process which best suited its needs. As with the CEUSP process, evaporation of the waste and a simultaneously partial destruction of acid by reaction with formaldehyde followed by in situ waste can thermal denitration waste was chosen as the best means of solidification. Unlike the CEUSP material, the 99 Mo waste has a considerable number of problem volatile and semivolatile constituents which must be recovered in the off-gas treatment system. Mercury removal before calcination was seen as the best option

  18. Canada - Atomic Energy Control Board, Canada. Summary of a common cause failure event which occurred in a Canadian utility. 'Failure to Verify Poison Isotopic'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Operating Policies and Principles (OP and Ps) are referenced in the reactor operating license. They contain not only general safety principles, but also define safety parameters and their numerical values for the operation of the nuclear power plant. The event described highlights the difficulties to implement the OP and Ps into detailed purchase orders. In Candu reactors gadolinium nitrate and boric oxide are used as neutron absorbers in the moderator. The concentration of neutron absorbers in the moderator is safety significant because a small change in concentration in coincidence with other failures (e.g. LOCA) can result in a sudden increase of power. To ensure that new shipments of gadolinium nitrate or boric acid meet the required specifications, these must undergo quarantine so that samples could be taken and forwarded for analysis. The chemistry unit of the NPP issued this requirements in a 'note to file'. In the event, two separated purchase orders, one for gadolinium nitrate and one for boric oxide, were placed. The purchase orders did not stipulate the requirements to quarantine, inform the chemistry unit or to analyse samples. They only stated that correct isotopic and chemical purity were required. The gadolinium nitrate as well as the boron oxide were both not quarantined and even the purity was not verified. The chemistry unit felt that a 'note to file' memo was sufficient to ensure that the OP and Ps are met taking into account the low shipment rate and sufficient experiences before. The analysis of the event revealed several causal factors. Four main factors were pointed out: - Work practices, - Resource Management, - Written communication, - Managerial methods. The actions taken after the event focused on the identified deficiencies

  19. Protocol Additional to the Agreement between Canada and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The text of the Protocol Additional to the Safeguards Agreement concluded between Canada and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Additional Protocol was approved by the Board of Governors on 11 June 1998. It was signed in Vienna on 24 September 1998 [fr

  20. Analytical quality control services of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suschny, O.

    1986-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency provides quality control services to analytical laboratories. These services which include the provision of reference materials and the organisation of intercomparisons are rendered for the purpose of assisting laboratories in determining the accuracy of their analytical work. The following classes of materials are presently available: nuclear materials, environmental materials, animal and plant materials, materials for biomedical studies and materials of marine origin. (orig.) [de

  1. The control of emissions from nuclear power reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, D.J.; Neil, B.C.J.; Chatterjee, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power reactors in Canada are of the CANDU pressurised heavy water design. These are located in the provinces of Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick. Most of the nuclear generating capacity is in the province of Ontario which has 16 commissioned reactors with a total capacity of 11,500 MWe. There are four reactors under construction with an additional capacity of 3400 MWe. Nuclear power currently accounts for approximately 50% of the electrical power generation of Ontario. Regulation of the reactors is a Federal Government responsibility administered by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) which licenses the reactors and sets occupational and public dose limits

  2. Canada's radiation scandal?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    In July 1990, Greenpeace distributed a 16-page treatise entitled 'Canada's Radiation Scandal' to a wide audience. The bottom line of the Greenpeace critique was that 'Canada's radiation limits are among the worst in the developed world'. This is a commentary on the Greenpeace pamphlet from the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), the body that sets and enforces radiation standards covering the use of nuclear energy in Canadian industry, science and medicine

  3. Atomic Energy of Canada study says nuclear cheaper power for oilsands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2003-07-01

    The Canadian Energy Research Institute, an independent research organization, reports in a study sponsored by AECL, a federal Crown corporation, that nuclear power is cheaper than gas in creating steam if prices for natural gas remain above $US 3.50 per million BTU. Oil sands producers use natural gas to create steam, which is injected into the ground to melt the bitumen; gas is also used in parts of the oilsands upgrading process. According to reliable estimates some $50 billion of future oilsands investment is now on the drawing board; all of that could be jeopardized by high gas prices. AECL, which has sold only three nuclear reactors since 1996, hopes that the prospect of a continuing high price of natural gas will put it in a favorable position to displace natural gas with nuclear energy as the energy source for creating steam. Environmentalists consider AECL's suggestion of building a nuclear reactor for generating steam for oilsands production as unrealistic, and one that is based on 'nothing but a hope and a prayer'.

  4. Energy in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This discussion paper was prepared by the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources Canada to provide information about Canada's resource potential, the contribution of energy to the Canadian economy, Canada's place in the world energy market, and the outlook for the development of Canadian energy resources. In addition, it provides background information on issues such as: energy and the environment, energy security, Canadian ownership of energy resources, energy R and D, and energy conservation. Finally, it concludes with an indication of some of the key challenges facing the energy sector. The paper is intended to inform the public and to serve as a reference document for those participating in the review of Canada's energy options. The paper was prepared before Canada and the U.S. agreed in principle on a free trade agreement (FTA) and does not include a discussion of the FTA or its potential impacts on the energy sector

  5. Protocol Additional to the agreement between Canada and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The text of the Protocol Additional to the Safeguards Agreement concluded between Canada and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Additional Protocol was approved by the Board of Governors on 11 June 1998. It was signed in Vienna on 24 September 1998. Pursuant to Article 17 of the Additional Protocol, the Protocol entered into force on the date on which the Agency received from Canada written notification that Canada's statutory and/or constitutional requirements for entry into force have been met, i.e. on 8 September 2000

  6. Atomic energy: protocol between Canada and the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This agreement amends an agreement signed June 15, 1955 between the governments of Canada and the United States of America concerning the exchange of nulcear technology, information, and materials between the two countries

  7. Radioactive waste mangement in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didyk, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    The objectives of the Canadian radioactive waste management program are to manage the wastes so that the potential hazards of the material are minimized, and to manage the wastes in a manner which places the minimum possible burden on future generations. The Atomic Energy Control Board regulates all activities in the nuclear field in Canada, including radioactive waste management facility licensing. The Atomic Energy Control Act authorizes the Board to make rules for regulating its proceedings and the performance of its functions. The Atomic Energy Control Regulations define basic regulatory requirements for the licensing of facilities, equipment and materials, including requirements for records and inspection, for security and for health and safety

  8. SOR/88-144, Atomic Energy Control Regulations, amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These amendments dated 25 February 1988 mainly concern naturally-occurring radioactive prescribed substances (namely, uranium, thorium, radium, etc.). Any naturally-occurring radioactive material in a mineral or other material which has not been related to an activity associated with the development, application or use of atomic energy, is exempted from the scope of the Regulations. The Regulations will therefore not apply to such radioactive substances present in building materials or in minerals commonly used in industrial activities which are not associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. This exemption does not apply to such material in connection with import control and preparation for transport. (NEA)

  9. Comparison between Canadian probabilistic safety assessment methods formulated by Atomic Energy of Canada limited and probabilistic risk assessment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, H.S.; Smith, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The procedures used by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to perform probabilistic safety assessments (PRAs) differ somewhat from conventionally accepted probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) procedures used elsewhere. In Canada, PSA is used by AECL as an audit tool for an evolving design. The purpose is to assess the safety of the plant in engineering terms. Thus, the PSA procedures are geared toward providing engineering feedback so that necessary changes can be made to the design at an early stage, input can be made to operating procedures, and test and maintenance programs can be optimized in terms of costs. Most PRAs, by contrast, are performed in plants that are already built. Their main purpose is to establish the core melt frequency and the risk to the public due to core melt. Also, any design modification is very expensive. The differences in purpose and timing between PSA and PRA have resulted in differences in methodology and scope. The PSA procedures are used on all plants being designed by AECL

  10. Non-proliferation and the control of atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1977-01-01

    The non-proliferation problem has never ceased to haunt and to influence those responsible for the development of atomic energy. During and after the Second World War, Anglo-American co-operation was reflected in restrictions on the exchange of enrichment and reprocessing know-how. Between 1945 and 1955, the Anglo-Saxon powers continued with the policy of secrecy and uranium monopoly decided on in 1943 at the Quebec summit conference. Starting in 1955, the failure of this policy led - at the suggestion of the United States of America - to a freer flow of information and to the creation of the International Atomic Energy Agency with its safeguards, which permitted widespread application of the policy of technical assistance subject to controls and widespread commerce in research and power reactors - mainly fuelled with enriched uranium and manufactured in the USA. There followed periods characterized by general legal blocks, with two unilateral renunciation treaties - the Partial Test Ban Treaty of 1963, covering non-underground tests, and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, of 1968, covering nuclear explosive devices and the entire fuel cycle. The Indian atomic explosion and the acceleration of nuclear programmes owing to the oil crisis prompted - in 1974 - efforts by supplier countries to limit the transfer of sensitive technology and the possession of plants capable of producing substances which could be used in the production of nuclear weapons; the USA has even proposed the curtailment of plutonium extraction and of breeder construction, although these are considered by many countries to be essential to the independence of their energy development programmes. This policy of reserving the sensitive stages of the fuel cycles to a few advanced countries and the questioning of existing nuclear agreements have created, in the relations between supplier and recipient countries, a regrettable intensification of the distrust which must be dispelled

  11. The promotion and control functions of atomic energy law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1998-01-01

    The question about the purpose of atomic energy law may sound superfluous in Germany, a country where a highly differential legal framework for the peaceful utilization of nuclear power has existed for nearly 40 years in the Basic Law, the Atomic Energy Act, and its ordinances, and a comprehensive body of case laws. Yet, it is justified in view of the declared intention of the German federal government to establish an environmental code into which atomic energy law, hitherto an independent branch of the law, would be integrated, and it is justified also in view of persistent complaints that the present rules and regulations stifled investment activities. A look into some codes of law may help answer the question. Already in 1959, the authors of the Atomic Energy Act outlined the purposes of the legislation in relatively clear terms in Section 1. Besides the two foreign policy aspects of security and loyalty under treaties, which do not concern us in this connection, the key purposes of atomic energy law are stated there as promotion and protection. The protection purpose, which implies the need to protect life, health, and property from the hazards of nuclear energy and harmful effects of ionizing radiation, ranks second in the Act. In accordance with the ruling in 1972 of the Federal Administrative Court, however, it should rank at the top. (orig.) [de

  12. Wellons Canada energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Wellons Canada is a British Columbia-based company that specializes in the manufacture and installation of lumber drying and energy conversion equipment. This brochure provided details of the Wellons energy system designed for oriented strand board (OSB) plants. The brochure outlined the system's scope of supply, and provided illustrations of system procedures from the initial wet fuel bin through to the electric precipitator used for air clean-up. During the process, fuel was conveyed from the bin to metering bins into combustors and through a cyclo-blast cell. Forced draft fan systems were then used to provide primary and secondary combustion air. Radiant heaters were then used. A drop-out chamber was supplied to allow for complete combustion of fuel particles and to provide a drop-out of ash. A fan was then used to deliver diluent air to maintain the set point temperature in the hot gas stream. Refractory lined hot gas ducts were used to deliver heat to the dryers. Hot gas was then drawn through a multi-cyclone collector for ash removal. Electrostatic precipitators were used to clean up emissions on a continuous operating basis. An automatic system was used to collect ash from the combustion system grates and other areas. Details of installation services provided by the company were also included. 42 figs.

  13. Atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanna, R.

    1978-01-01

    Development of nuclear science in India, particularly the research and development work at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay, is described. Among the wide range of materials developed for specific functions under rigorous conditions are nuclear pure grade uranium, zirconium and beryllium, and conventional materials like aluminium, carbon steel and stainless steels. Radioisotopes are produced and used for tracer studies in various fields. Various types of nuclear gauges and nuclear instruments are produced. Radiations have been used to develop new high yielding groundnut mutants with large kernals. The sterile male technique for pest control and radiosterilization technique to process potatoes, onions and marine foods for storage are ready for exploitation. Processes and equipment have been developed for production of electrolytic hydrogen, electrothermal phosphorus and desalinated water. Indigenously manufactured components and materials are now being used for the nuclear energy programme. Indian nuclear power programme strategy is to build heavy water reactors and to utilise their byproduct plutonium and depleted uranium to feed fast breeder reactors which will produce more fissile material than burnt. Finally a special mention has been made of the manpower development programme of the BARC. BARC has established a training school in 1957 giving advanced training in physics, chemistry and various branches of engineering and metallurgy

  14. AECL'S (Atomic Energy Canada Limited) R and D program in health and environmental sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, R.V.

    1996-01-01

    Radiological protection is a fundamental requirement in any nuclear technology endeavour. It is also an area where public concerns are often expressed. If protection is inadequate, or is believed to be so, or if concerns are not addressed, the beneficial application of nuclear technologies is inhibited. Historically. AECL, as the driver of nuclear technology in Canada, has ensured that the growing Canadian nuclear industry and other users of the technology have a sound technical base to support, explain and confirm all aspects of radiological protection. Meeting this need has meant developing and maintaining R%D programs in environmental sciences, health physics, radiation biology, and radiological health matters in general. The programs undertaken encompass the links from sources of radiation exposure and radionuclides to potential impact on biota and on human health. The behaviours of radionuclides released to the atmosphere, surface waters, or ground waters are examined and described quantitatively to enable predictions to be made of the radiation doses received in different parts of the biosphere and by people. Radiation properties and human physiological and biokinetic processes are studied to provide quantitative links from exposure to radiation dose in tissues and organs. Biological processes involved in determining whether there are any consequences to health from small absorbed doses are identified at levels ranging from molecular level, to cells in tissue culture, and animals. Throughout the programs, required measurement technologies are developed. The results of the R%D have contributed to radiological protection programs being soundly based and, equally important, are being seen to be soundly based. (author)

  15. The Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Through the Atomic Energy Act, Congress made is possible for the public to get a full and fair hearing on civilian nuclear matters. Individuals who are directly affected by any licensing action involving a facility producing or utilizing nuclear materials may participate in a formal hearing, on the record, before independent judges on the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel (ASLBP or Panel). Frequently, in deciding whether a license, permit, amendment, or extension should be granted to a particular applicant, the Panel members must be more than mere umpires. If appropriate, they are authorized to go beyond the issues the parties place before them in order to identify, explore, and resolve significant questions involving threats to the public health and safety that come to a board's attention during the proceedings. This brochure explains the purpose of the panel. Also addressed are: type of hearing handled; method of public participation; formality of hearings; high-level waste; other panel responsibilities and litigation technology

  16. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited-Chemical Company Annual review of operations, 1980-81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Record production of heavy water was achieved: the plants at Glace Bay and Port Hawkesbury, Nova Scotia, produced a total of 560 megagrams. A shipment of 500 Mg was delivered on time to the Wolsung CANDU reactor in Korea. Energy conservation and waste heat utilization programs included the construction of a greenhouse at the Glace Bay site. Long-term protection of the La Prade site is essentially complete. The company has reorganized its marketing and engineering division and assumed a greater international role

  17. Canada's hydrogen energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, T.B.

    2009-01-01

    Canada produces the most hydrogen per capita of any Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country. The majority of this hydrogen is produced by steam methane reforming for industrial use (predominantly oil upgrading and fertilizer production). Canada also has a world leading hydrogen and fuel cell sector. This sector is seeking new methods for making hydrogen for its future energy needs. The paper will discuss Canada's hydrogen and fuel cell sector in the context of its capabilities, its demonstration and commercialization activities and its stature on the world stage. (author)

  18. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited monitoring tritiated water in air and water effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, R.V.; Tepley, N.W

    1978-01-01

    Current on-line methods of monitoring effluents for tritium (as tritiated water, HTO) measure concentrations in air above 250 nCi/m 3 (approx. 10 kBq/m 3 ) and in water above 1 uCi/kg (approx. 40 kBq/kg). Some of the problems encountered in such monitoring are the presence of fission and activation products in the effluents and, particularly in water monitoring, the often dirty quality of the sample. In a new design of monitor, HTO is collected directly from air by a flow of liquid scintillator (LS). For water monitoring a flow of air continuously samples the water and transports HTO to the LS. The key features of the new design are that the high detection efficiency of LS is realizable, that the rate of use of LS is only approx. 2 mm 3 /s, that the controlled evaporation and metering of air provides the low flow of HTO needed for mixing with LS, and that accurate metering of a dirty effluent is not needed. The sensitivities for detecing tritium on-line are improved by at least an order of magnitude

  19. Arrangement for Cooperation and Exchange of Information between the Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada and the Health and Safety Executive of the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Under this Arrangement which covers the period 31 May 1991 to 1 June 1996, the Parties may exchange information on administrative, regulatory and technical questions as well as on press and public reactions to incidents. The information could concern the nuclear installation itself (siting, decommissioning), or safety (assessments, research and development work) or treatment of radioactive wastes. The Arrangement also covers information concerning any event that has a major radiological significance and the remedial actions undertaken in response. In addition, the Arrangement lists excepted information, for example for national security or commercial reasons. (NEA) [fr

  20. Energy utilization in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klassen, J.

    1976-04-01

    The situation of the energy supply of Canada is characterized by its geographic location and by the dispersal of the energy consumers over a wide area. At present, the energy supply leaving the successful CANDU nuclear energy programme out of account, is based mainly on crude oil, natural gas, and electricity as well as on coal imported from the USA. The targets of Canadian enery policies and energy research are stated as follows: a) Reducing and optimizing energy consumption, b) introducing district heating, and c) utilizing the extensive local coal deposits. (GG) [de

  1. Energy cascades in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, A. C.; Brown, T. D.

    1979-03-15

    Combining energy uses in a cascade can result in significant overall reductions in fuel requirements. The simplest applications for a cascade are in the recovery of waste heat from existing processes using special boilers or turbines. Specific applications of more-complex energy cascades for Canada are discussed. A combined-cycle plant at a chemical refinery in Ontario is world leader in energy efficiency. Total-energy systems for commercial buildings, such as one installed in a school in Western Canada, offer attractive energy and operating cost benefits. A cogeneration plant proposed for the National Capital Region, generating electricity as well as steam for district heating, allows the use of a low-grade fossil fuel (coal), greatly improves energy-transformation efficiency, and also utilizes an effectively renewable resource (municipal garbage). Despite the widespread availability of equipment and technology of energy cascades, the sale of steam and electricity across plant boundaries presents a barrier. More widespread use of cascades will require increased cooperation among industry, electric utilities and the various levels of government if Canada is to realize the high levels of energy efficiency potential available.

  2. Atomic Energy Commission reports. Volume 6. Opinions and decisions of the Atomic Energy Commission with selected orders, January 1, 1973 to December 31, 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    Issuances of the Atomic Energy Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and the Board of Contract Appeals including the Contract Adjustment Board are presented. (U.S.)

  3. Modified source of a fast neutral atom beam with a controlled energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gostev, V.A.; Elakhovskij, D.V.; Khakhaev, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    A source of a metastable helium atom beam with a controlled energy based on a phenomenon of resonant ion neutralization on the surface of a solid body is described. The neutral particle energy control is carried out by changing ion velocities before their transformation into metastable atoms. The results of experiments with a modified construction of atomic beam source are stated. These experiments were conducted to find the possibilities to control velocities of atoms in a flow as well as to elucidate the peculiarities of operation of a collimator-converter of this construction. Dependences of a halfwidth of the ion velocity distribution function on the ion source parameters have been investigated. The possibility for particle energy control in a collimated flow of fast neutral. atoms has been experimentally shown, it is also shown that a mean value of atom energy in a beam coincides with a value of mean energy of ions from which atoms are produced by the resonant neutralization method; the construction of the source provides the possibility to realize the method of ''overtaking beams'' for neutral atoms and as a result of this to give a possibility for studying atom-atom collisions in a wide energy range at relatively high densities of flows

  4. Energy in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.

    1980-12-01

    Canada's historical energy consumption, its current consumption and its likely requirements by the turn of the century are reviewed. It is estimated that at least 50% more energy will be required in the year 2000 than is consumed now, assuming a minimum 2% growth rate in primary energy consumption. Both non-renewable and renewable energy resources are examined in the light of these future energy requirements and the need to substitute alternative energy sources for conventional oil in various end uses. The comparative risks involved in energy production are also reviewed. Most of the increase in energy consumption and the substitution of oil over the next 20 years is likely to be met by conventional energy sources, since indigenous reserves are extensive and the relevant technologies well-established. Coal, nuclear and hydro reserves could cover the increase in energy demand until well into the next century, and natural gas reserves are sufficient to bridge the gap during conversion from oil to other energy sources. Nuclear power using advanced fuel cycles and oil from tar sands offer Canada long-term security. The penetration of unconventional energy sources is likely to be relatively small during the next 20 years. However, the most promising may become significant in the next century. (author)

  5. Energy in Canada 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This publication provides a panoramic overview of Canada's energy situation at the beginning of the 21st century, presenting the issues that drive the country's energy policy, and a look at the various technologies by which energy is produced, its sources, transformation and the infrastructure required to deliver it to the consumer. Energy consumption by sectors of the economy, energy conservation and energy conservation issues are analyzed, and details of the lines of actions designed by the federal government to achieve its energy policy objectives are explained. Appendix One provides more detail on the complex issue of climate change, while Appendix Two provides some energy-related statistics, extracted from a database of energy statistics which are also available in graphic or spreadsheet format at http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/es/ener2000. 12 tabs., 40 figs

  6. Atomic Energy Act 1946

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1946-01-01

    This Act provides for the development of atomic energy in the United Kingdom and for its control. It details the duties and powers of the competent Minister, in particular his powers to obtain information on and to inspect materials, plant and processes, to control production and use of atomic energy and publication of information thereon. Also specified is the power to search for and work minerals and to acquire property. (NEA) [fr

  7. An assessment of the Atomic Energy Control Board consultation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This report analyzes the consultation process followed by the AECB in discharging its responsibility for regulation development. It shows how the process could be improved by better targeting of the consultation towards groups that can be expected to provide valuable input. It also addresses the question of how best to convey to members of those groups the information they need before making comments on proposed regulatory changes. The study also looks at how effective the process is and at possible procedural improvements that might facilitate the preparation of comments by outside groups and improve the understanding among the public of the role played by the AECB and of the issues surrounding nuclear facilities and the use and handling of prescribed substances

  8. A cooperative agreement for research on radioactive waste management between the United States Department of Energy and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormuth, K.W.; Levich, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) have a history of more than ten years of bilateral cooperation in the management of high level radioactive waste. In 1982, the USDOE and AECL executed a five year information-exchange agreement, for open-quotes Cooperation in Radioactive Waste Managementclose quotes. Since that time, this bilateral umbrella agreement has been renewed twice and the third renewal is currently being processed. International cooperation in high level radioactive waste management is highly beneficial to all concerned. Each nation involved in high level waste disposal has a single coordinated program for developing, testing, and evaluating approaches, hardware, and techniques for high level waste disposal. Thus there is limited opportunity for researchers in each country to exchange views regarding disposal technology with experienced researchers external to their own program, and to share research and development activities. The international arena, however, provides a host of organizations who have similar responsibilities and therefore similar interests and needs

  9. Atomic Energy Commission (Amendment) Law, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The Atomic Energy Commission (Amendment) Law, 1993 (P.N.D.C.L. 308) seeks to amend the Atomic Energy Commission Act of 1963 (Act 204) so as to provide for the establishment of a Radiation Protection Board and other institutes under the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. The Law further repeats the Atomic Energy Commission (Amendment) Law of 1982 (P.N.D.C.L. 37). (EAA)

  10. US Atomic Energy Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This is a new volume follows in the series supplementing the volumes 11 and 12 published in 1965 and 1966, updating the collection of Federal Acts and Executive Orders of the President of the United States of America relating to atomic energy legislation. Since the publication of volumes 11 and 12, the US Atomic Energy Act of 1954 alone has been amended 25 times, mainly as a consequence of by the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act, both of 1978. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954 is supplemented by a selection of the most important Federal Acts, Executive Orders of the President and Resolutions of the Congress. (orig./HSCH) [de

  11. Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board : annual report 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Operations of the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board during 1996-1997 were reviewed, summarizing activities in rights management, exploration, reservoir management, environmental affairs, operations and safety, Canada-Newfoundland benefits and financial matters. The Board manages the petroleum resources in the Newfoundland offshore area on behalf of the federal government of Canada and the provincial government of Newfoundland and Labrador. The Board ensures that resource development is conducted in accordance with good oilfield practices to optimize recovery and avoid waste, and that the operators' procurement decisions are consistent with their obligations and agreements with governments to provide economic and social benefits to Canada, and in particular to Newfoundland. The report summarizes energy resource activities, and presents a picture of revenues and expenditures. Current objectives and future plans under each heading are also reviewed. tabs., figs

  12. The Atomic energy basic law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The law aims to secure future energy resources, push forward progress of science and advancement of industry for welfare of the mankind and higher standard of national life by helping research, development and utilization of atomic power. Research, development and utilization of atomic power shall be limited to the peaceful purpose with emphasis laid on safety and carried on independently under democratic administration. Basic concepts and terms are defined, such as: atomic power; nuclear fuel material; nuclear raw material; reactor and radiation. The Atomic Energy Commission and the Atomic Energy Safety Commission shall be set up at the Prime Minister's Office deliberately to realize national policy of research, development and utilization of atomic power and manage democratic administration for atomic energy. The Atomic Energy Commission shall plan, consider and decide matters concerning research, development and utilization of atomic energy. The Atomic Energy Safety Commission shall plan, consider and decide issues particularly concerning safety securing among such matters. The Atomic Energy Research Institute shall be founded under the governmental supervision to perform research, experiment and other necessary affairs for development of atomic energy. The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation shall be established likewise to develop fast breeding reactor, advanced thermal reactor and nuclear fuel materials. Development of radioactive minerals, control of nuclear fuel materials and reactors and measures for patent and invention concerning atomic energy, etc. are stipulated respectively. (Okada, K.)

  13. Safety requirements laid down in the Atomic Energy Law and in the Law on Immission Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmann, K.

    1981-01-01

    The paper deals with safety requirements relating to installations, laid down in the Atomic Energy Law and in the Law on Immission Control. Actually it is a matter of how the safety requirements of sect. 7 of the Atomic Energy Law can be compared with those laid down in the sections 5 and 6 of the Federal Act for the Protection Against Nuisances. In the process, three comparative levels are examined: 1. The normative conditions concerning the licencability of hazardous installations, 2. those demands that go way beyond that in order to reduce residual risks, and 3. the licensing authorities' scope of discretion. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Judicial control authority and third-party action as laid down in the Atomic Energy Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degenhart, C.

    1981-01-01

    The author points out the fundamental complex of problems. From the 'undetermined' legal term of imperative prevention of damage as defined by Sect. 7 para. 2 (3) of the Atomic Energy Law follows the judicial claim for detailed analysis of facts in case of minor radioactive exposure under normal operation and in case of accident prevention. He discusses the relation of the Atomic Energy Law to the Basic Law and to the normative structure of the Atomic Energy Law. The re-orientation to be found in the judicial approach to control does recognize sanctuaries of the executive. Control density and the right of third parties to take action are closely interrelated. From the integration - according to subjective law and basic law - of the Atomic Energy Law into the realtionship existing between technological and cultural development, and the material relation of licences granted for nuclear installations follows a reduction of judicial control intensity, at least for the procedural constellation of third-party actions. (HSCH) [de

  15. A recommendation of the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection for the appointment of Nuclear Safety Control Officers for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, B.

    1990-01-01

    The Ordinance on the Implementation of Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection of the GDR requires that the managers of plants where nuclear facilities are operated appoint Control Officers for the fields of radiation protection, nuclear safety, physical protection, and accounting for and control of nuclear materials. The Control Officers are staff members of the operating organization but their appointment is subject to approval by the National Board and requires adequate qualification. The main task of the Control Officers as specialists is to give advice to the plant manager who retains responsibility for the safety of nuclear facilities, and to verify on his behalf that all requirements within their competence are met by the operating group. For this reason the Control Officer has to be absolutely independent of the head of the operating group. To enable the Control Officers to accomplish all necessary control activities and to guarantee independence from the head of the operating group, the plant manager has to establish adequate regulations of operation. As a pattern for such regulations the National Board has issued a Recommendation for the Appointment of Nuclear Safety Control Officers for Research Reactors, which provides a comprehensive survey of the requisite qualification features as well as the duties and rights of these Control Officers. This recommendation will be dealt with in the presentation

  16. Department of Energy Nuclear Material Protection, Control, and Accounting Program at the Mangyshlak Atomic Energy Complex, Aktau, Republic of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, R.; Berry, R.B.; Eras, A.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Nuclear Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) Program, the US Department of Energy and Mangyshlak Atomic Energy Complex (MAEC), Aktau, Republic of Kazakstan have cooperated to enhance existing MAEC MPC and A features at the BN-350 liquid-metal fast-breeder reactor. This paper describes the methodology of the enhancement activities and provides representative examples of the MPC and A augmentation implemented at the MAEC

  17. The control of radioisotopes in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    The Regulations applicable to the control of radioisotopes in Canada are reviewed. The administrative procedures are described, the definition of atomic radiation workers clarified and the means for inspections and compliance indicated. An outline is provided of the main revisions currently under consideration. (author) [fr

  18. Regulatory control of radioactivity and nuclear fuel cycle in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, P.E.; Jennekens, J.H.

    1977-05-01

    Legislation and regulations giving birth to the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) are outlined, as well as current licencing procedures. The AECB bases its health and safety criteria on ICRP recommendations. R and D is funded to aid regulatory activity. Licencing activities cover uranium resource management, uranium mining and milling, nuclear generating stations, heavy water plants, and radioactive waste management. Safeguards, physical security, and international controls are also concerns of the AECB. (E.C.B.)

  19. Atomic Energy Authority Bill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.N.; Stoddart, D.L.; Sinclair, R.M.; Ezra, D.

    1985-01-01

    The House, in Committee, discussed the following matters in relation to the Atomic Energy Authority Bill; financing; trading; personnel conditions of employment; public relations; organization; research programmes; fuels; energy sources; information dissemination. (U.K.)

  20. Atomic energy for progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The film discusses the functions and activities of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission. Shown are the applications of atomic energy in research, agriculture, engineering, industry and medicine, as well as the construction of the research reactor and its inauguration by President Marcos

  1. Advancing clean energy technology in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of clean energy technology in Canada. Energy is a major source of Canadian prosperity. Energy means more to Canada than any other industrialized country. It is the only OECD country with growing oil production. Canada is a stable and secure energy supplier and a major consumer. Promoting clean energy is a priority to make progress in multiple areas.

  2. Energy in Canada 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, P [ed.

    1987-01-01

    This publication provides a comprehensive annual reference source covering the Canadian energy industry. The information is of use to producers, consumers, distributors, regulators, analysts and writers throughout the energy sector, as well as researchers outside the energy field. Of the book's 10 chapters, eight concentrate on specific energy sectors (such as oil or coal), overviews the complete industry, and one contains useful reference material. The energy sectors covered are crude oil, natural gas, petroleum products, petrochemicals, coal, uranium, and electricity. Each sector-specific chapter examines the structure of the industry, its performance in 1986 (including events, pricing, regulation, finance and technology) and its potential future. Also included are four appendices: corporate profiles, regulatory agencies descriptions, energy associations and organizations (sector-specific), a glossary, and a compilation of abbreviations and conversions.

  3. Energy Literacy in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Turcotte

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Energy plays an important role in everyday activities, whether at a personal, institutional, corporate or social level. In this context, an informed or literate public is critical for the longterm conservation, management, pricing and use of increasingly scarce energy resources. A series of surveys were used to probe the literacy of Canadians with regard to energy issues ranging from relative ranking and importance of energy compared to other national issues, preference for various fuel types and willingness to pay for offsetting environmental impacts from energy generation. In addition, they were asked how Canada’s government should prioritize national energy independence over trade, even if ultimately reducing imports might impact national economic health. The survey revealed that Canadians have a good general knowledge of energy use and relative cost but lack detailed knowledge about sources of energy fuels, as well as sources and linkages with environmental impacts. However, an overwhelming majority of respondents indicated they were concerned about environmental issues; most seemed to direct that concern towards fuels such as coal and nuclear power where support was low compared to a relatively unconcerned view about the often substantial environmental effects of hydro dams or wind farms. Canadians say they have been willing to make adjustments to their own energy-consumption habits, to save money and conserve energy. Further, respondents generally expressed a willingness to pay a surcharge on monthly utility bills, if it would help mitigate the environmental impact of energy generation. There were limits to this view. Support for extra charges falls off rapidly as the costs go up; drivers showed themselves highly resistant to switching their commute to transit, even despite rising gas prices; and respondents were less enthusiastic to the idea of installing home solar panels or switching to electric cars, even when offered a subsidy to do

  4. Whole-body counters in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, C.

    1986-08-01

    A compilation of whole-body counting existing across Canada was prepared by AECB (Atomic Energy Control Board) staff. This work was initiated so that AECB staff and other concerned parties would have this information readily available, especially during urgent situations. This report is to be used for reference purposes only, as it makes no attempt to judge the present state of the art of whole-body counting

  5. The atomic energy basic law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The law establishes clearly the principles that Japan makes R and D, and utilizations of atomic energy only for the peaceful purposes. All the other laws and regulations concerning atomic energy are based on the law. The first chapter lays down the above mentioned objective of the law, and gives definitions of basic concepts and terms, such as atomic energy, nuclear fuel material, nuclear source material, nuclear reactor and radiation. The second chapter provides for the establishment of Atomic Energy Commission which conducts plannings and investigations, and also makes decisions concerning R and D, and utilizations of atomic energy. The third chapter stipulates for establishment of two government organizations which perform R and D of atomic energy developments including experiments and demonstrations of new types of reactors, namely, Atomic Energy Research Institute and Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Chapters from 4th through 8th provide for the regulations on development and acquisition of the minerals containing nuclear source materials, controls on nuclear fuel materials and nuclear reactors, administrations of the patents and inventions concerning atomic energy, and also prevention of injuries due to radiations. The last 9th chapter requires the government and its appointee to compensate the interested third party for damages in relation to the exploitation of nuclear source materials. (Matsushima, A.)

  6. Canada's energy future : 2008 workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The National Energy Board hosted this Energy Futures Workshop as a follow-up to its report entitled Canada's Energy Future: Reference Case and Scenarios to 2030, which focused on emerging trends in energy supply and demand. Various energy futures that may be available to Canadians up to the year 2030 were examined. This workshop addressed issues regarding the growing demand for energy, the adequacy of future energy supplies, and related issues of greenhouse gas emissions, emerging technologies, energy infrastructure and energy exports. The workshop was attended by 18 experts who presented their diverse views on long-term energy issues. The sessions of the workshop focused on external and key geopolitical issues that will influence Canadian energy markets; the adoption of alternative and emerging sources of energy; outlook for Canadian oil supply, including oil sands development, reservoir quality, and financial, environmental and technological issues; issues in electricity generation and transmission; gas market dynamics; and carbon dioxide capture and storage and the associated benefits and challenges. There was general consensus that global and Canadian energy markets will remain in a state of flux. Crude oil prices are likely to remain high and volatile. The combination of maturing energy resource basins and geopolitical tensions has created uncertainty about future availability and access to global energy resources. 2 figs., 3 appendices

  7. Opinions and decisions of the Atomic Energy Commission with selected orders. Progress report, July 1, 1972--December 31, 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    Issuances of the Atomic Energy Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and the Board of Contract Appeals during the period July through December 1972 are presented

  8. Fusion energy and Canada's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drolet, T.S.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is the process of releasing energy from matter which occurs in our sun. Canada is contributing to the development of technology which will permit this process to be harnessed and made available on earth. The international effort has increased from a modest beginning in the 1950s to a level of approximately two billion dollars annually in the 1980s. The purpose of this booklet is to introduce the concept of fusion energy as a technology which should make an important addition to the mix of energy sources for our future. Through a co-ordinated approach, Canada has established several projects which will contribute significantly to the development of technologies in specific areas leading to opportunities now for Canadian industry in the international effort

  9. Sor/88-114, 25 February 1988, Atomic Energy Control Regulations, amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The amendments to the Regulations mainly concern naturally-occurring radioactive prescribed substances (namely, uranium, thorium, radium, etc.). Any naturally-occurring radioactive material in a mineral or other material which has not been related to an activity associated with the development, application or use of atomic energy, is exempted from the scope of the Regulations. The Regulations will therefore not apply to radioactive substances such as uranium or thorium present in building materials or in minerals commonly used in industrial activities which are not associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. This exemption does not apply to such material in connection with import control and preparation for transport [fr

  10. Exclusion of objections in licensing procedures according to Atomic Energy Law or Pollution Control Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stober, R.

    1980-01-01

    The contribution shows that the exclusion of objections after expiration of the term provided for in licensing procedures under Atomic Energy Law and Pollution Control Law has to be understood extensively and that it is in accordance with German Basic Law. In detail, the treatise is limited to the discussion of the following issues: the effects of the expiration of the period on the right to raise objections, the importance of the exclusion of objections for lawsuits and the importance of the exclusion of objections for constitutional law. (orig./HSCH) [de

  11. An Energy Strategy for Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal C. Moore

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Canada is struggling to fully develop, sell and move its energy resources. This is a dramatic change from the recent past where the U.S. has provided stable growth in demand for energy supplied by the provinces, from hydrocarbons to electricity. Current circumstances now challenge this relationship, adding environmental, policy and economic hurdles that exacerbate the impact of fluctuations in world demand and pricing. In addition, competitive interaction between provinces, aboriginal land owners and special interest groups complicate and compound the issues of royalty returns, regulatory authority and direction, land-use management and long-term market opportunities for Canadian companies. There is no strategic document guiding the country’s energy future. As the steward of one of the largest, most diverse and valuable energy "banks" in the world, Canada has a unique opportunity to exploit a critical and valuable economic niche in the world economy. Given the lack of federal leadership and the tendency for each province to undercut each other in the same marketplace, there is also the distinct possibility the nation will squander the opportunity. This document offers the rationale for a comprehensive energy strategy, literally a vision where Canada can lead and not follow opportunities in energy markets. This strategic approach to energy systems by definition will include transportation, housing, employment and financial markets. It is not a plan, not a foil for tax or policy guidance in one or more sectors. This strategy is a fundamental rail on which plans, tactics and policies can be built. This vision identifies how the provinces can work together using all the tools available to them, maximizing long-term resource development while minimizing environmental damage. This document assumes there can be a broad commitment and effort by the federal government to help build those tools, providing guidance and assistance where needed without

  12. The House of Commons of Canada, Bill C-23 : An act to establish the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and to make consequential amendments to other acts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This enactment replaces the Atomic Energy Control Act with a modern statute to provide for more explicit and effective regulation of nuclear energy. While the existing Act encompasses both the regulatory and developmental aspects of nuclear activities, this enactment disconnects the two functions and provides a distinct identity to the regulatory agency. It replaces the Atomic Energy Control Board with the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, underlining its separate role from that of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., the federal research, development and marketing organization for nuclear energy

  13. FAO and atomic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-07-15

    During the past six years FAO has become more engaged in work concerned with atomic energy. In 1957 it established an Atomic Energy Branch. The new forces and new tools which have become available for use in the fight against poverty, disease and malnutrition can be of the greatest assistance in FAO's work in nearly all phases of the production, storage and distribution of food and other agricultural products. The Organization promotes their use to improve the standards of feeding, clothing and housing throughout the world. Another side of work related to atomic energy is concerned with combating contamination from the use of atomic energy for power production and other purposes. This raises considerable problems for food and agriculture, so that FAO also has a responsibility for assisting Governments in safeguarding their food and food-producing resources from contamination. FAO is essentially concerned with fostering wider knowledge of the many contributions that atomic science can make to agriculture, forestry, fisheries and nutrition. It is also concerned in assisting governments to establish sound programmes for applying atomic science in food and agriculture. One way of spreading such knowledge is through the publication of documents and reports

  14. FAO and atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    During the past six years FAO has become more engaged in work concerned with atomic energy. In 1957 it established an Atomic Energy Branch. The new forces and new tools which have become available for use in the fight against poverty, disease and malnutrition can be of the greatest assistance in FAO's work in nearly all phases of the production, storage and distribution of food and other agricultural products. The Organization promotes their use to improve the standards of feeding, clothing and housing throughout the world. Another side of work related to atomic energy is concerned with combating contamination from the use of atomic energy for power production and other purposes. This raises considerable problems for food and agriculture, so that FAO also has a responsibility for assisting Governments in safeguarding their food and food-producing resources from contamination. FAO is essentially concerned with fostering wider knowledge of the many contributions that atomic science can make to agriculture, forestry, fisheries and nutrition. It is also concerned in assisting governments to establish sound programmes for applying atomic science in food and agriculture. One way of spreading such knowledge is through the publication of documents and reports

  15. UNESCO and atomic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-01-15

    Atomic energy has been of particular concern to UNESCO virtually since the founding of this United Nations agency with the mission of promoting the advancement of science along with education and culture. UNESCO has been involved in the scientific aspects of nuclear physics - notably prior to the creation of the International Atomic Energy Agency - but it has also focussed its attention upon the educational and cultural problems of the atomic age. UNESCO's sphere of action was laid down by its 1954 General Conference which authorized its Director-General to extend full co-operation to the United Nations in atomic energy matters, with special reference to 'the urgent study of technical questions such as those involved in the effects of radioactivity on life in general, and to the dissemination of objective information concerning all aspects of the peaceful utilization of atomic energy; to study, and if necessary, to propose measures of international scope to facilitate the use of radioisotopes in research and industry'. UNESCO's first action under this resolution was to call a meeting of a committee of experts from twelve nations to study the establishment of a system of standards and regulations for the preparation, distribution, transport and utilization of radioactive isotopes and tracer molecules

  16. Accelerators for atomic energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Tokushi

    1999-01-01

    The research and educational activities accomplished using accelerators for atomic energy research were studied. The studied items are research subjects, facility operation, the number of master theses and doctor theses on atomic energy research using accelerators and the future role of accelerators in atomic energy research. The strategy for promotion of the accelerator facility for atomic energy research is discussed. (author)

  17. Sable Offshore Energy Inc.: Response to 'The Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board Benefits Plan Decision Report' Condition No. 3: Employment and Training Plan; Condition No. 4: Research and Development Plan; Condition No. 6: Disadvantaged Individual or Groups; Condition No. 7: Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Decisions of the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board, regarding the responses of Sable Offshore Energy Inc (SOEI) to conditions imposed by the Board in the Sable Offshore Energy Project Canada-Nova Scotia Benefit Plan Decision Report, have been announced. According to the press release (copy attached), the Board accepted the responses of SOEI regarding the establishment and staffing of an office in Nova Scotia for the implementation and project management and training of project personnel, the level of expenditures for research and development to be undertaken in Nova Scotia, proposed initiatives for employment and training opportunities for disadvantaged individuals and groups, and a technology transfer plan that will facilitate succession planning and create joint venturing opportunities for Nova Scotian and Canadian industry. tabs., figs

  18. Atomic energy and you

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The film discusses the peaceful applications of atomic energy in agriculture, engineering, industry and medicine. Shows exploration, prospecting and mining of uraninum ores at Larap, Camarines Norte and the study of geographical conditions of the site for the proposed Nuclear Power Plant in Bataan

  19. Energy flux of hot atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wotzak, G.P.; Kostin, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    The process in which hot atoms collide with thermal atoms of a gas, transfer kinetic energy to them, and produce additional hot atoms is investigated. A stochastic method is used to obtain numerical results for the spatial and time dependent energy flux of hot atoms in a gas. The results indicate that in hot atom systems a front followed by an intense energy flux of hot atoms may develop

  20. Meteorology and atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The science of meteorology is useful in providing information that will be of assistance in the choice of favorable plant locations and in the evaluation of significant relations between meteorology and the design, construction, and operation of plant and facilities, especially those from which radioactive or toxic products could be released to the atmosphere. Under a continuing contract with the Atomic Energy Commission, the Weather Bureau has carried out this study. Some of the meteorological techniques that are available are summarized, and their applications to the possible atmospheric pollution deriving from the use of atomic energy are described. Methods and suggestions for the collection, analysis, and use of meteorological data are presented. Separate abstracts are included of 12 chapters in this publication for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  1. Case-control study of prostatic cancer in employees of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooney, C.; Maconochie, N.; Fraser, P.; Davies, G.; Beral, V.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between risk of prostatic cancer and occupational exposures, especially to radionuclides, in employees of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. Risk of prostatic cancer was significantly increased in men who were internally contaminated with or who worked in environments potentially contaminated by tritium, chromium-51, iron-59, cobalt-60, or zinc-65. Internal contamination with at least one of the five radionuclides was detected in 14 men with prostatic cancer (10%) and 12 controls (3%) (relative risk 5.32 (95% confidence interval 1.87 to 17.24). Altogether 28 men with prostatic cancer (21%) and 46 controls (11%) worked in environments potentially contaminated by at least one of the five radionuclides (relative risk 2.36 (1.26 to 4.43)); about two thirds worked at heavy water reactors (19 men with prostatic cancer and 32 controls (relative risk 2.13 (1.00 to 4.52)). Relative risk of prostatic cancer increased with increasing duration of work in places potentially contaminated by these radionuclides and with increasing level of probable contamination. Prostatic cancer was not associated with exposure to plutonium, uranium, cadmium, boron, beryllium, or organic or inorganic chemicals. (Author)

  2. Critical energy infrastructure protection in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gendron, Angela [Canadian Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies, Carleton University (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    In Canada government acknowledged the need to protect energy assets against attacks. However, so far no strategy has been developed. The aim of this report is to present the characteristics of the energy sector in Canada, the threats, and how the government is responding to those threats. The energy sector in Canada is concentrated and diverse and is under not only terrorism or cyber attacks threats but also environmental threats. This report shows that the Government of Canada is focusing on the protection and assurance of important energy infrastructures but that they are facing several challenges resulting in long delays in the adoption of a formal strategy.

  3. Building the energy infrastructure in Atlantic Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, T. [Atlantica Centre for Energy, Saint John, New Brunswick (Canada)]. E-mail: tim.curry@atlanticaenergy.org

    2007-07-01

    This paper discusses the energy infrastructure in Atlantic Canada. The energy development is poised to help transform the economy of New Brunswick. Planning for energy projects and supporting infrastructure are under way and regional opportunities are emerging.

  4. Building the energy infrastructure in Atlantic Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curry, T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the energy infrastructure in Atlantic Canada. The energy development is poised to help transform the economy of New Brunswick. Planning for energy projects and supporting infrastructure are under way and regional opportunities are emerging

  5. Code of laws and regulations on atomic energy controls. Showa 53 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The code has collected above laws and regulations promulgated by 10th February, 1978 and they can be classified into following several categories. 1. Atomic Energy Basic Law and Atomic Energy Commission Establishment Law including their related government orders, regulations and rules. 2. The Law for Regulation of Nuclear Source Material, Nuclear Fuel Material and regulations, rules, instructions and guidelines. 3. The Law on Technical Criteria for the Prevention of Radiation Hazards and the Law Concerning the Prevention of Radiation Hazards due to Radioisotopes, etc. including their related government orders, regulations, rules and announcements. 4. The Law on Compensation for Nuclear Damage with its relating government order and the Law on Indemnity Agreement for Compensation of Nuclear Damage. 5. Laws for establishing those nuclear energy development organizations as Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency and Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. 6. Other laws relating to atomic energy and radiation utilization including their pertaining regulations, rules, standards, etc. such as: Electricity Business Law; Land Transportation and Cars Law; Ships and Vessels Safety Law; Aviation Law; Employees' Health and Safety Law; Electricity Resources Development Law; and others

  6. Administrative arrangement between the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada for co-operation and the exchange of information in nuclear regulatory matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    This Administrative Arrangement covers co-operation and exchange of technical information relating to the regulation of the health, safety, security, safeguards and environmental protection aspects of nuclear facilities and materials as well as of radioactive substances and waste. The Arrangement was concluded for five years and is renewable [fr

  7. The role and limitation of judicial control in the licensing procedure under the Atomic Energy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses the problems of the judiciary with decision-finding in proceedings where large and complicated technical installations are involved, presenting proposals aiming at more clearly defining and probably restricting judicial control. According to the author, a feasible step towards limiting the controlling competence of the judiciary is to more precisely define the factual characteristic 'state of the art in science and technology' which, in pursuance with sect. 7, sub-sect. 2 of the Atomic Energy Act is taken as a criterion to evaluate the efficiency of precautionary measures to prevent damage emanating from the erection and operation of nuclear installations. As the legislature explicitly wants the judiciary to use this characteristic, the judiciary has to have recourse to evaluation factors that do not belong to the science of jurisprudence. It is not the function of the judiciary to verify whether the 'state of the art' is based on appropriate principles. This adoption guarantees the 'best possible risk prevention and protection against hazards', as required by the Federal Constitutional Court. (orig./HSCH) [de

  8. Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board Annual report 1998-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board is responsible for ensuring safe working conditions for offshore petroleum activities, protecting the environment during offshore petroleum operations, and managing offshore petroleum resources. This annual report includes financial statements of the Board for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1999. The projects undertaken by the Board in 1998-1999 included a technical audit of the Sable Offshore Energy Project, a resource assessment of the area known as the 'Gully', and resolving a complication regarding publicly available resource data for calls for bids for NS98-1 and NS98-2. A list of exploration licences in place in the Nova Scotia Offshore area was presented. Their total work bid was just over $188 million. In 1998, the Board's exploration activity included the review and approval for nine seismic programs. The Board also continues to monitor the extended Cohasset Benefits Plan to cover the scope of PanCanadian's Exploratory Drilling Program. This report included statements of financial position, revenue and expenditure, changes in financial position, and notes to the financial statements including accounting policies, accounts receivable, deferred revenue and commitments. The report also admitted uncertainty due to the year 2000 issue. It stated that it is not possible to be certain that all aspects of the year 2000 issue affecting the Board will be fully resolved. tabs., figs

  9. Windows Calorimeter Control (WinCal) system configuration control board (SCCB) operating procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westsik, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    This document describes the operating procedure for the System Configuration Control Board (SCCB) performed in support of the Windows Calorimeter Control (WinCal) system. This board will consist of representatives from Babcock and Wilcox Hanford Company Babcock and Wilcox Protec, Inc.; and Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. In accordance with agreements for the joint use of the Babcock and Wilcox Hanford Company calorimeters located in the Hanford Site Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Nondestructive Assay Laboratory, concurrence regarding changes to the WinCal system will be obtained from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Further, changes to the WinCal software will be communicated to Los Alamos National Laboratory

  10. Activity of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan for compiling the consensus standard on nuclear criticality safety control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Tadakuni

    2003-01-01

    Activity of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan for compiling the consensus standard on nuclear criticality safety control is presented. The standard recommends an enhancement of nuclear criticality safety throughout a life cycle of facility in terms of a concept of 'barriers against criticality'. (author)

  11. Controlling electronics boards with PVSS

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobsson, Richard

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses several aspects of implementing a control system for electronics boards in order to perform remote Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) programming, hardware configuration, register control, and monitoring, as well as interfacing it to an expert system. The paper presents an implementation, using the Distributed Information Management (DIM) package and the industrial SCADA system PVSS II from ETM, in which the access mechanisms to the board resources are completely generic and in which the device prescription and the handling of mapping between functional parameters and physical registers follow a common structure independent of the board type. The control system also incorporates mechanisms by which it may be controlled from a finite state machine based expert system. Finally the paper suggests an improvement in which the mapping between logical parameters and physical registers is represented by descriptors in the device description such that the translation can be handled by a common m...

  12. Atomic Energy Commission Act, 1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    Promulgated in 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission Act (204) established and vested in the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission the sole responsibility for all matters relating to the peaceful uses of atomic energy in the country. Embodied in the Act are provisions relating to the powers, duties, rights and liabilities of the Commission. (EAA)

  13. WMO and atomic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-09-15

    The growing interest of WMO in atomic energy was reflected in the decision of the Executive Committee in 1956 to establish a panel of experts to study the meteorological aspects of the nuclear energy. One of the major achievements of the panel, which has held two meetings since its inception, has been the preparation of a technical note treating fully the various meteorological problems resulting from the applications of the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Over the past four years, steady progress has also been made both in adapting nuclear techniques to meteorological uses and in providing advice and assistance. Much time and thought are now being devoted to the study of large-scale air mass movements, turbulent diffusion and the other meteorological processes on which the transport and gradual fall-out of radioactive debris depend. The safe location of nuclear plants and the disposal of radioactive waste are related problems in which WMO has also taken a very active interest. Another aspect of the help which WMO as an organization can provide is to help for the collection and analysis of radioactive material in the biosphere. Advances in nuclear physics have also opened up great possibilities for the use of radioactive isotopes in making meteorological and hydrometeorological measurements

  14. Atomic energy and food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1969-07-01

    International activities aimed at improving, increasing and conserving food supplies are fostered in special ways by the Joint Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture established by the Agency and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. An examination of the processes by which food is produced and of the skills arising from nuclear techniques which are being applied is made here by Maurice Fried and Bjorn Sigurbjornsson. They are the Director and Deputy Director of the Joint Division, which is an integral part of both the Agriculture Department of FAO and of the Agency's Department of Research and Isotopes. (author)

  15. Agreement of 13 December 1991 between the Republic of Argentina, the Federative Republic of Brazil, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The text of the Agreement (and the Protocol thereto) between the Republic of Argentina, the Federative Republic of Brazil, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 7 December 1991 and signed in Vienna on 13 December 1991

  16. Integrating hydrogen into Canada's energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, P.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation outlines the steps in integrating of hydrogen into Canada's energy future. Canada's hydrogen and fuel cell investment is primarily driven by two government commitments - climate change commitments and innovation leadership commitments. Canada's leading hydrogen and fuel cell industry is viewed as a long-term player in meeting the above commitments. A hydrogen and fuel cell national strategy is being jointly developed to create 'Win-Wins' with industry

  17. Fusion energy. What Canada can do

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    As Canada's fusion programs have grown, Canadian capabilities in fusion science and technology have grown and matured with them. The fusion capabilities described in this booklet have come from a coordinated national effort. The Government of Canada is committed to continuing its fusion energy program, and to supporting global fusion efforts. These first pages provide an overview of Canada's fusion work and its underlying basis of science and technology

  18. Advanced technologies and atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The expert committee on the research 'Application of advanced technologies to nuclear power' started the activities in fiscal year 1994 as one of the expert research committees of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The objective of its foundation is to investigate the information on the advanced technologies related to atomic energy and to promote their practice. In this fiscal year, the advanced technologies in the fields of system and safety, materials and measurement were taken up. The second committee meeting was held in March, 1995. In this report, the contents of the lectures at the committee meeting and the symposium are compiled. The topics in the symposium were the meaning of advanced technologies, the advanced technologies and atomic energy, human factors and control and safety systems, robot technology and microtechnology, and functionally gradient materials. Lectures were given at two committee meetings on the development of atomic energy that has come to the turning point, the development of advanced technologies centering around ULSI, the present problems of structural fine ceramics and countermeasures of JFCC, the material analysis using laser plasma soft X-ray, and the fullerene research of advanced technology development in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. (K.I.)

  19. The National Energy Board's annual report 2002 to Parliament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In 2001 Canada's energy industry accounted for about 6 per cent of Canada's Gross Domestic product and employed 293,000 people. The National Energy Board informs Canadians about energy market trends. This annual report provides a summary of Canadian energy supply, consumption, production, prices and trade with an emphasis on developments in 2001. The National Energy Board dealt with applications for new pipeline facilities, new international power lines, tolls and tariff filings as well as approvals for exploration and development activity north of sixty. The year 2001 began with record high natural gas prices throughout North America, a crisis in the electricity market in California, and the highest oil prices since the 1991 Gulf war. Normal levels in oil and gas prices returned by the spring of 2001. In 2001, the Canadian pipeline infrastructure responded well to the market demands, delivering approximately $85 billion of natural gas, crude oil and petroleum products. The notable change was that the Alliance Pipeline and Vector Pipeline systems were in their first year of full operation, providing alternatives to TransCanada PipeLines system to deliver western Canadian natural gas to central Canadian markets. These new pipelines have created more competition between pipeline systems. There has also been significant consolidation within the industry. The events of September 11, 2001 emphasized the need to ensure security of Canada's natural gas and oil pipeline infrastructure. Most pipelines have been pro-active in protecting the overall security of the pipeline network in Canada. The Board also ensures that pipelines are operated in a manner that protects the environment, conducting audits of the environmental programs of regulated companies. There were no incidents in 2001 that resulted in severe degradation of the environment in which Canadian pipelines operate. tabs., figs

  20. CONTROL ENGINEERING ON BOARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serghei RADU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Control engineering embraces instrumentation, alarm systems, control of machinery and plant previously known under the misnomer of automation. Control engineering can be applied not only to propelling and auxiliary machinery but also to electrical installations, refrigeration, cargo handling (especially in tankers and deck machinery, e.g. Windlass control. Opinion still vary on such matters as the relative merits of pneumatic versus electronic system and whether the control center should be in the engine room or adjacent to the navigating bridge. Arguments against the exclusion of the engineer officer from close contact with the machinery are countered by the fact that electronic systems are based on changes other than those of human response. Automated ships (UMS operate closer to prescribed standards and therefore operate with greater efficiency. The closer control of machinery operating conditions, e.g. cooling water temperatures and pressures, permits machinery to be run at its optimum design conditions, making for fuel economy and reduced maintenance. Automation can carry out some tasks far more effectively than men. In other areas it is less effective. For example, the monitoring of machinery operating conditions such as the temperatures and pressures can be carried out by a solid state alarm scanning system at the rate of 400 channels/sec., giving a degree of surveillance which would be impossible by human observation. Conversely, the detection of noisy bearing, a leaky gland or cracked pipe is scarcely possible by automatic means. The balance between the possible and the necessary would be achieved in this case by combining automatic monitoring of all the likely fault conditions, with routine machinery space inspection say twice a day.

  1. Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    In Fiscal Year 1990, The Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel (Panel) handled 40 proceedings involving the construction, operation, and maintenance of commercial nuclear power reactors or other activities requiring a license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes, highlights, and analyzes how the judges and licensing boards of the Panel addressed the wide-ranging issues raised in these proceedings during the year

  2. Overlapping Nuclear Safety Control Provisions of the Atomic Energy Act and Electric Utility Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Gun-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Won; Koh, Jae-Dong; Ahn, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Chang-Bum

    2007-01-01

    Before May 17, 2005, Korea's nuclear power plant (hereinafter referred to as 'NNP') regulation system was two-pronged. Every NPP system consists of primary or secondary system, and each type was respectively regulated by the Atomic Energy Act(hereinafter referred to as 'AEA') and the Electric Utility Act(hereinafter referred to as 'EUA'). This unusual regulatory regime gave rise to a number of problems with respect to operation and safety. For this reason, the Enforcement Regulation of AEA and applicable Notice were revised on May 17, 2005 to the effect that all regulation on NPPs subject to EUA was brought under the purview of AEA, except regulation on business license for nuclear power generation under Article 7 of EUA and approval of plan of works for setting up electric installations (hereinafter referred to as 'construction plan') (including approval of any changes; the same shall apply hereinafter) under Article 61 thereof. From the point of view of the Ministry of Science and Technology, the regulation of NPPs by a single law has enhanced their safety. However, the Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Energy retains regulatory authority regarding NPPs. It reviews and approves construction plans for secondary system pursuant to Article 61 of EUA and Article 28 of the Enforcement Regulation thereof. This situation arose because Article 28 of the Enforcement Regulation of EUA continues to provide for matters related with nuclear power. Therefore, continued control of NPPs under EUA ignores the relationship and respective nature of AEA and EUA. There is also possibility of violation of a superseding law. Even if said provision is not in violation of a superseding law, Article 28 of the Enforcement Regulation of EUA poses the possibility of overlapping regulation, which may violate the principle of prohibiting excessive regulation, one of the principles of the Korean Constitution. Assessment of the dual regulatory system for review of secondary system requires (i

  3. Canada as the emerging energy superpower : testing the case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hester, A.

    2007-10-01

    The need for forward-thinking energy sector policies that promote Canada as a leader in the responsible and effective management of energy resources was discussed. This paper proposed a set of strategies and policy options designed to ensure that Canada becomes an energy superpower with the ability to control access to supplies and leverage energy resources in order to extend its sphere of political influence. The historical evolution of energy provision was examined in order to better define the criteria needed to attain energy superpower status. The paper also examined current global energy markets and provided a summary of Canada's current energy industry. The impact of the oil sands industry on the Canadian economy was also discussed. It was concluded that although Canada does not qualify as an energy super-power, the energy sector will play an important role in Canada's future. The implementation of forward-thinking policies may mean that Canada will emerge as a superpower in the future. 42 refs

  4. Study: control of atomic energy power plant; Etude de la regulation d'une installation atomique productrice d'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dautray, R; Leny, J C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    We are studying the control of a very flexible atomic power plant, able to supply an independent network. Two systems have been examined: in the first the moderator pre-heats the light water, in the second, this preheating is dispensed with, subsequent to a study of the dynamics of the plant. Very complete linear approximation study is being effected on the model of the second system, all effects being taken into account. The reactor is stable at all power levels, though slight reactivity or load variations cause undamped power oscillations around the equilibrium level. (author)Fren. [French] Nous etudions la regulation d'une installation atomique d'une grande souplesse, pouvant eventuellement fournir de l'energie a un reseau isole. Deux versions de l'installation sont etudiees: dans la premiere le moderateur sert a rechauffer l'eau industrielle, mais l'etude dynamique conduit a supprimer ce rechauffage, ce qui donne la deuxieme version. On effectue sur celle-ci une etude en approximation lineaire tres complete ou l'on tient compte de differents effets. L'installation se montre stable a tous les niveaux de puissance. Toutefois, de petites perturbations de reactivite ou de charge entrainent des oscillations de puissance mal amorties autour de la position d'equilibre. (auteur)

  5. Controlling the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazuzan, G.T.; Walker, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The authors trace the early history of nuclear power regulation in the US. Focusing on the Atomic Energy Commission, they describe the role of other groups that figured in the development of regulatory policies, including the Congressional Joint Committee on Atomic Energy, other federal agencies, state governments, the nuclear industry, and scientific organizations. They consider changes in public perceptions of and attitudes toward atomic energy and the dangers of radiation exposure. The basic purpose of the book is to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the general public with information on the historical antecedents and background of regulatory issues so that there will be continuity in policy decisions. The book concludes with an annotated bibliography of selected references. 19 figures

  6. Atomic energy laws in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukes, R.H.P.

    1980-01-01

    The regulations of German atomic energy laws are based in large on the fundamental law of the Federal Republic of Germany-the constitution. Atomgesetz of 1959, as amended on October 31, 1976, constitutes the core of atomic energy laws (Atomrecht), and is supplemented by orders (Verordnungen). The Federal Republic has the right to legislate Atomrecht, and the enforcement of such laws and orders is entrusted to each province. The peaceful uses of radioactive materials are stipulated by Atomgesetz and orders. Atomgesetz seeks two objects, first it is to enable the handling of radioactive substances for the acquisition of energy, medical treatment, food treatment and the harmless examination of things by radioactive materials, and secondly to ensure the protection from danger in the handling of such materials. The control of radioactive materials by the state including imports and exports, storage and possession, disposal and processing, etc., is established by the law to secure the protection from danger of atomic energy. The particular indemnification responsibility for the harm due to radiation is defined in Atomgesetz, and only the owners (Inhaber) of atomic energy facilities are liable for damage. The violation of the regulations on the transaction of radioactive materials is punished by fines up to 100,000 German marks of imprisonment of less than five years. Orders are established on roentgen ray, the protection from radiation, the treatment of foods by electron beam, gamma ray, roentgen ray or ultraviolet ray and the permission of medicines. The regulations of the EURATOM treaty have legality as Atomrecht. (Okada, K.)

  7. A shared vision for energy in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    Energy plays an important role in Canadian society. With vast and diverse energy resources, Canada is a major participant in international energy markets. This report discussed the challenges and opportunities of Canada's energy sector, such as meeting the demand for energy; conserving and using existing energy more efficiently; developing new and innovative energy technologies; moving to renewable, greener and cleaner energy sources; improving transmission and transportation capacity; improving regulatory approval processes; and meeting demand for a skilled and available workforce. The report also discussed formalization of the role of provinces and territories in international energy discussions. A seven point action plan was also presented in order to provide concrete solutions and actions if the full potential of Canada's energy sector was to be achieved. These steps included promoting energy efficiency and conservation; accelerating the development and deployment of energy research and technologies that advance more efficient production, transmission and use of clean and conventional energy sources; facilitating the development of renewable, green and/or cleaner energy sources to meet future demand while contributing to environmental goals; and, developing and enhancing a modern, reliable, environmentally safe, and efficient series of transmission and transportation networks for domestic and export/import sources of energy. Other actions were also presented, such as improving the timeliness and certainty of regulatory approval decision-making processes while maintaining rigorous protection of the environment and public interest; developing and implementing strategies to meet energy-sector human resource needs now and into the future; and, pursuing formalized participation of provinces and territories in international discussions and negotiations on energy. It was concluded that immediate action and sustained effort by all is needed in order to ensure that all

  8. Atomic energy review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    The ATOMIC ENERGY REVIEW (AER), a periodical started in 1963 in accordance with the recommendation made by the Scientific Advisory Committee, is now preparing for its tenth year of publication. The journal appears quarterly (ca 900 pages/year) and occasionally has special issues and supplements. From 1963 to 1971 AER developed into an important international high-standard scientific journal which keeps scientists in Member States informed on progress in various fields of nuclear energy. The Agency's specific role of helping 'developing countries to further their science and education' is reflected in the publication policy of the journal. The subject scope of AER, which was determined at the journal's inception, is very broad. It covers topics in experimental and theoretical physics, nuclear electronics and equipment, physics and technology of reactors and reactor materials and fuels, radio-chemistry, and industrial, medical and other uses of radioisotopes. In other words, almost any subject related to the peaceful application of nuclear energy can qualify for inclusion. Specifically, at any particular time the selection criteria for topics are influenced by the Agency's current programme and interests. AER carries comprehensive review articles, critical state-of-the-art and current awareness surveys, and reports on the important meetings organized or sponsored by the Agency. The following four subsections gradually became necessary to do justice to this variety of material: 'Reviews' proper, 'Current Research and Development', 'Special Item' and 'Conferences and Symposia'. Apart from the conference reports, one hundred and twenty-five reviews, almost all of which were published in English to make them accessible to a wide public, have so far been published

  9. Raw materials for energy generation in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, D S

    1976-03-01

    Canada is self-sufficient in energy. The energy demand in Canada up to the end of the century is predicted, and the present and future of the oil, gas, coal and uranium industries are considered. Since it is now Canadian policy to restrict export of energy sources, in the future Canada will probably make more domestic use of its coal reserves. An increase is forecast in the use of coal for electricity generation and as a feedstock for synthetic gas. A long lead time and large capital expenditure will be needed before coal can be transported from western Canada to markets in the east of the country. A relatively small amount of the coal reserves are extractable by surface mining, and new underground mining techniques will be needed to extract the extremely friable coal from the deformed seams in the mountains.

  10. Atomic safety and licensing board panel: Annual report, Fiscal Year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    This is the fiscal year 1988 annual report of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel. In response to further reduction in is authorized staffing level and with an eye toward the proposed full- text, electronic docket of the expected High-Level Waste Repository proceedings, the Panel stepped up efforts during fiscal year 1988 to extend the scope, depth and availability of its Computer Assistance Project (CAP) through INQUIRE. INQUIRE, and the Panel's ability to use the system to expeditiously manage and search the massive records that characterize our most complex cases, has generated great interest among legal practitioners and adjudicatory bodies throughout the United States and Canada

  11. Embedded controllers for local board-control

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, Niko; Mini, Giuseppe; Sannino, Mario; Guzik, Zbigniew; Jacobsson, Richard; Jost, Beat

    2005-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at CERN has a large number of custom electronic boards performing high-speed data-processing. Like in any large experiment the control and monitoring of these crate-mounted boards must be integrated into the overall control-system. Traditionally this has been done by using buses like VME on the back-plane of the crates. LHCb has chosen to equip every board with an embedded micro-controller and connecting them in a large Local Area Network. The intelligence of these devices allows complex (soft) real-time control and monitoring, required for modern powerful FPGA driven electronics. Moreover each board has its own, isolated control access path, which increases the robustness of the entire system. The system is now in pre-production at several sites and will go into full production during next year. The hardware and software will be discussed and experiences from the R&D and pre-production will be reviewed, with an emphasis on advantages and difficulties of this approach to board-control.

  12. ILO and atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    The work of the International Labour Organisation in the field of atomic energy has been concerned primarily with the protection of the worker against radiation; in this respect it developed the work carried out before the war on the occupational pathology of roentgen ray operators, radium and radioactive substances and uranium. In view of the extremely serious consequences to society and the individual that would result from a neglect of the essential precautions, the ILO has to adopt international standards setting out the essential precautions that should be observed in a work which may entail a radiation hazard. The 44th International Labour Conference, meeting in the summer of 1960, adopted a convention and recommendation on this subject. The Convention applies to all activities involving exposure of workers to ionizing radiations in the course of their work and provides that each Member of the ILO which ratifies it shall undertake to give effect to it by means of laws or regulations, codes of practice or other appropriate means. It further provides that the necessary steps taken at the national level to ensure effective protection should be progressively brought in line with the provisions of the Convention after its ratification

  13. Low energy atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Child, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    The semiclassical theory of atom-atom potential scattering and of low energy inelastic atom-atom scattering is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the origin and interpretation of rainbow structure, diffraction oscillations and exchange oscillations in the potential scattering differential cross-section, and to the glory structure and symmetry oscillations in the integral cross-section. Available methods for direct inversion of the cross-section data to recover the potential are reviewed in some detail. The theory of non-adiabatic transitions is introduced by a short discussion of interaction mechanisms and of diabetic and adiabatic representations. Analytical S matrix elements are presented for two state curve-crossing (Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg), Demkov and Nikitin models. The relation between Stuckelberg oscillations in the S matrix and in the differential cross-section is discussed in terms of interference between trajectories belonging to two different classical deflection functions. The energy dependences of the inelastic integral cross-section for curve-crossing and Demkov type transitions are also discussed. Finally the theory is reviewed in relation to a recent close-coupled study of fine structure transitions in F( 2 P) + Xe( 2 S) scattering

  14. Atomic Energy Authority Act 1954

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1954-01-01

    This Act provides for the setting up of an Atomic Energy Authority for the United Kingdom. It also makes provision for the Authority's composition, powers, duties, rights and liabilities, and may amend, as a consequence of the establishment of the Authority and in connection therewith, the Atomic Energy Act, 1946, the Radioactive Substances Act 1948 and other relevant enactments. (NEA) [fr

  15. Open road to control of constitutionality of section 7 of the Atomic Energy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rengeling, H.W.

    1978-01-01

    The Federal Constitutional Court (BVerfG), in answer to the court order of the Higher Administrative Court at Muenster, has affirmed in its interim decision of Jan. 31st, 1978 the permissibility of the concrete judicial review of the constitutionality of section 7 as being correct, and thus it has accepted at the same time the responsibility for the decision as being the responsibility of the Federal Constituional Court. For practical reasons the decision is to be welcomed because it is very likely that the question of the constitutionality of section 7 of the Atomic Energy Act as far as it permits the licensing of FRBs, which has come into the open now on account of the Muenster decision, would have been referred again in the near future to the BverfG, if the court had considered Muenster's order as not permissible. From the judicial point of view, the BVerfG's grounds are of interest; the permissibility of the judicial review of the constitutionality within the framework of the Kalkar case already having been very much in dispute before the verdict. The arguments of the BVerfG, which could be of great interest for similar proceedings in the future are briefly looked at in a critical manner, because the decision made in Karlsruhe will not remain without impacts on law concerning energy and environmental protection and on relevant policies. (orig.) [de

  16. Canada as a continental supplier of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winser, N.

    2002-01-01

    The US federal objectives for a national energy grid are presented. The objectives include an effective, large liquid market with a dramatic improvement in transmission capability and economics. Other objectives include market confidence and excellent reliability and safety. This Power Point presentation describes the management of super regional transmission organizations (RTOs), and large international transmission companies (ITCs) with reference to the benefits of fully functioning ITCs. A graph depicting UK congestion costs reveals that since April 1994, customers have saved at least $700 million and shareholders have gained at least $150 million. UK controllable operating costs have halved, with a 37 per cent real reduction in transmission costs to customers. Canada is a major exporter of electricity to the United States with most of the exports going to the Northeast USA. A graph depicting Canadian versus US electricity volumes indicates that net exports have declined since 2000. Total next export in 2001 was C$2.4 bn. In 2000 it was C$3.4 bn. The Canada-Northeast USA interface capability was also presented for New Brunswick, Ontario and Quebec with exports to Main, Vermont and New York. The constraints within US transmission is the fact that transmission networks limit power flows. The author also discusses regulatory developments in the United States, with reference to RTOs, standard market design, procedural standardization, and focus by the Northeast transmission owners on developing an ITC. 2 tabs., 4 figs

  17. Canada as a continental supplier of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winser, N. [Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The US federal objectives for a national energy grid are presented. The objectives include an effective, large liquid market with a dramatic improvement in transmission capability and economics. Other objectives include market confidence and excellent reliability and safety. This Power Point presentation describes the management of super regional transmission organizations (RTOs), and large international transmission companies (ITCs) with reference to the benefits of fully functioning ITCs. A graph depicting UK congestion costs reveals that since April 1994, customers have saved at least $700 million and shareholders have gained at least $150 million. UK controllable operating costs have halved, with a 37 per cent real reduction in transmission costs to customers. Canada is a major exporter of electricity to the United States with most of the exports going to the Northeast USA. A graph depicting Canadian versus US electricity volumes indicates that net exports have declined since 2000. Total next export in 2001 was C$2.4 bn. In 2000 it was C$3.4 bn. The Canada-Northeast USA interface capability was also presented for New Brunswick, Ontario and Quebec with exports to Main, Vermont and New York. The constraints within US transmission is the fact that transmission networks limit power flows. The author also discusses regulatory developments in the United States, with reference to RTOs, standard market design, procedural standardization, and focus by the Northeast transmission owners on developing an ITC. 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  18. Atomic Energy Act 1953-1966

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Act 1953-1966 establishes the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and lays down its powers, duties, rules of procedure and financing. The members of the Commission are appointed by the Governor-General. It is responsible, inter alia, for all activities covering uranium research, mining and trading as well as for atomic energy development and nuclear plant construction and operation. Its duties also include training of scientific research workers and collection and dissemination of information on atomic energy. For purposes of security, the Act further-more prescribes sanctions in relation to unauthorised acquisition or communication of information on this subject. Finally, the Act repeals the Atomic Energy (Control of Materials) Act 1946 and 1952. (NEA) [fr

  19. The Ontario Energy Board's proposed new mandate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughren, F.

    1998-01-01

    The Ontario Energy Board's proposed new mandate was reviewed. The role of the Board will be to regulate the monopoly delivery components of the electricity and natural gas industry and to smooth the transition to competition. The Board will monitor market performance and will encourage electricity and natural gas monopoly services to be compatible where possible. The Board will also assist local restructuring efforts when called upon do so and ensure that the marketplace operates efficiently and effectively. Gas marketers' licensing is scheduled to begin in early 1999. Licenses will also apply to the electric industry. The objectives of the proposed licensing, the regulatory requirements and the proposed regulatory approach are described

  20. Energy in Canada: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    Recent changes in the North American natural gas industry are discussed, with a focus on how these changes will affect the ability of Alberta and Canadian natural gas supply to meet market growth. These changes include a decline in the merchant role of many of the major interstate pipelines, resulting in a larger number of smaller-sized purchasers for natural gas marketers to deal with; a greater extent of direct purchasing by local distribution companies and large industrial users, combined with a preference for spot sales rather than long-term commitments; direct marketing of uncontracted gas by many producers and brokers; a bidding type of sales process rather than a negotiated process; and price deregulation. It is foreseen that long term security of supply will again become an important factor to North American buyers, and Canada can offer substantial supplies under secure long term contracts. Marketers will have to seek new market targets such as cogeneration plants and the transportation sector. Access to pipeline transport will be one of the major factors in obtaining new markets. The Canada-USA free trade agreement is viewed as a positive development which should help Canadian gas marketers to gain and retain U.S. customers

  1. Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board : annual report 1998/1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Financial information from the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board and a review of their operations was presented. The Board manages the petroleum resources in the Newfoundland Offshore area on behalf of the Canadian Government and the Newfoundland and Labrador Government. The Board ensures that resource development is conducted in accordance with good oilfield practice to optimize recovery and avoid waste. Energy resource activities were summarized. A total of nine offshore seismic surveys were completed during the summer of 1998, the largest acquisition of seismic data in any one year. The surveys recorded 76,000 km of 2-D and 3-D seismic data. The drilling and production activities of the Hibernia field were also reviewed. 24 million bbls of oil were produced from the platform during the 1998 calendar year. The Terra Nova project continues to progress for a first oil target date of late 2000. This report presented an operations review, exploration activity, and consolidated financial statements. Revenue and expenditure statements were summarized by source. tabs., figs

  2. The National Energy Board's annual report to Parliament 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The National Energy Board (NEB) informs Canadians about energy market trends. This annual report provides a summary of Canadian energy supply, consumption, production, prices and trade with an emphasis on developments in 2004, a year marked by high and volatile energy prices led by crude oil prices. Although exploration efforts increased, producers were led to develop non-traditional supply sources due to the declining supply of domestic conventional crude oil and flat domestic natural gas production. 2004 saw the expansion of crude oil production from the East coast offshore and from Alberta's oil sands. The year also saw the development of natural gas supply sources in Canada's North, the development of coalbed methane sources and the import of liquefied natural gas. Regulatory highlights for 2004 include applications for new pipeline facilities, new international power lines, tolls and tariff filings, and activities on frontier lands. In 2004 Canada's energy industry accounted for 6 per cent of Canada's Gross Domestic product and employed 300,000 people. Revenue from energy exports accounted for 15 per cent of all Canadian exports. Total energy production in Canada increased by about 2 per cent in 2004, compared with a decline of 0.2 per cent in 2003. Petroleum and natural gas accounted for more than 75 per cent of total energy production. Export revenues remained similar to 2003 levels due to high oil prices. Hydroelectric production declined for the second year in a row due to drought conditions. Renewable and other energy sources increased by nearly 4 per cent, while nuclear energy production increased over 20 per cent due to refurbished nuclear generators in Ontario. tabs., figs

  3. Atomic Energy Amendment Act 1978, No. 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This Act amends certain Sections of the Atomic Energy Act 1953. The principal modifications concern the definitions of atomic energy, prescribed substances, the provision and supply of uranium in relation to the functions of the Atomic Energy Commission, compliance with the agreement with the IAEA on the application of safeguards under the Non-Proliferation Treaty as well as with any agreement with any other international organization or another country. The Act also amends the 1953 Act in respect of the control of prescribed substances and repeals the section concerning jurisdiction of courts. (NEA) [fr

  4. 75 FR 9196 - Letter From Secretary of Energy Accepting Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Letter From Secretary of Energy Accepting Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) Recommendation 2009-2 AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...: The Department of Energy (DOE) acknowledges receipt of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board...

  5. Licensing and regulatory control of nuclear power plants in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the safety philosophy adopted in Canada, the safety criteria and regulatory requirements necessary for the application of this philosophy to reactor design and operation, and finally the means by which compliance with Board requirements is effected. It is emphasized that the effectiveness of regulatory control depends not only on the underlying philosophy but also on the detailed way in which it is applied. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Opportunities in Canada's growing wind energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovshin Moss, S.; Bailey, M.

    2006-01-01

    Investment in Canada's wind sector is projected to reach $8 billion by 2012, and growth of the sector is expected to create over 16,000 jobs. Canada's wind energy capacity grew by 54 per cent in 2005 alone, aided in part by supportive national policies and programs such as the Wind Power Production Incentive (WPPI); the Canadian Renewable Conservation Expense (CRCE) and Class 43.1 Capital Cost Allowance; and support for research and development. Major long-term commitments for clean power purchases, standard offer contracts and renewable portfolio standards in several provinces are encouraging further development of the wind energy sector. This paper argued that the development of a robust Canadian wind turbine manufacturing industry will enhance economic development, create opportunities for export; and mitigate the effects of international wind turbine supply shortages. However, it is not known whether Canadian wind turbine firms are positioned to capitalize on the sector's recent growth. While Canada imports nearly all its large wind turbine generators and components, the country has technology and manufacturing strengths in advanced power electronics and small wind systems, as well as in wind resource mapping. Wind-diesel and wind-hydrogen systems are being developed in Canada, and many of the hybrid systems will offer significant opportunities for remote communities and off-grid applications. Company partnerships for technology transfer, licensing and joint ventures will accelerate Canada's progress. A recent survey conducted by Industry Canada and the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) indicated that the total impact of wind energy related expenditures on economic output is nearly $1.38 billion for the entire sector. Annual payroll for jobs in Canada was estimated at $50 million, and substantial employment growth in the next 5 years is expected. Canada offers a strong industrial supply base capable of manufacturing wind turbine generators and

  7. High-energy atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drukarev, Evgeny G

    2016-01-01

    This self-contained text introduces readers to the field of high-energy atomic physics - a new regime of photon-atom interactions in which the photon energies significantly exceed the atomic or molecular binding energies, and which opened up with the recent advent of new synchrotron sources. From a theoretical point of view, a small-parameter characteristic of the bound system emerged, making it possible to perform analytic perturbative calculations that can in turn serve as benchmarks for more powerful numerical computations. The first part of the book introduces readers to the foundations of this new regime and its theoretical treatment. In particular, the validity of the small-parameter perturbation expansion and of the lowest-order approximation is critically reviewed. The following chapters then apply these insights to various atomic processes, such as photoionization as a many-body problem, dominant mechanisms for the production of ions at higher energies, Compton scattering and ionization accompanied b...

  8. Climate saver atomic energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    According to the Schleswig-Holstein Land government nuclear power phaseout is compatible with measures designed to protect world climate. Only efforts aimed at quickly reducing energy demand by means of thermal insulation, energy conservation techniques, cogeneration systems and application of renewable energies are necessary. The Schleswig-Holstein energy concept is given as an example of making possible a worldwide carbon dioxide reduction. (DG) [de

  9. Energy supply and demand in Canada and export demand for Canadian energy, 1966--1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1969-01-01

    This report presents the results of a National Energy Board staff study of energy supply and demand in Canada to 1990. The study covers all forms of energy in Canada, and probable sources of supply for serving both indigenous and export demand for Canadian energy. Energy demand by market sector (residential and commercial, industrial, and transportation) is discussed in Chapters III, IV and V, respectively. Chapters VI, VII, VIII, and IX deal with supply prospects for Canadian petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity serving indigenous and export markets. A summary of the report is contained in Chapter II. Appendix A reviews general assumptions including those relating to population and household growth. Appendix B summarizes the methodology used for estimating residential energy demand, automobile transportation energy demand, and electricity supply. Appendix C includes a number of tables which provide detailed information. A list of definitions and abbreviations follows the Table of Contents.

  10. The Canadian public's awareness and perception of the Atomic Energy Control Board. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents the findings from personal interviews with a nationwide sample of 1 928 Canadians 18 years of age and over. The report also incorporates the key findings from the exploratory phase report 'Focus Groups Findings on Attitudes Toward the AECB and Its Activities', CRC, October 1988

  11. Atomic Energy Control Board 1991-92 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. 22 figs

  12. Atomic Energy Control Board 1991-92 estimates part III expenditure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program`s financial performance over the past year. 22 figs.

  13. Atomic Energy Control Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. 7 refs., 21 figs

  14. Atomic Energy Control Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program`s financial performance over the past year. 7 refs., 21 figs.

  15. Energy and the future : Canada's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymont, M.

    2005-01-01

    The rise in global energy consumption is driven by economic growth, particularly in developing countries. It is expected that by 2030, the world population will consume 50 per cent more energy than today. This increase in global energy demand can no longer be met through the business as usual approach. Graphs depicting emerging energy demand in Asia were presented for nuclear energy, coal, natural gas, oil and renewables. The issue of how China can meet it's growing energy demand was discussed with reference to energy consumed by its industrial, agricultural, commercial, residential and transportation sectors. The author emphasized the uneven distribution of resources, where consuming areas do not coincide with producing areas. It is expected that traditional energy sources will still supply most of the world's energy need for the foreseeable future, but they will leave less of an environmental impact. The author suggested that renewable energy sources will also increase but will comprise less than 20 per cent of the world supply in 2050. The author also discussed the issue of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, Kyoto obligations and projections of what will happen with Kyoto post 2012. Canada's GHG record and recent environmental findings were also discussed with reference to Arctic ice coverage and the decline in average winter temperature. It was suggested that technology is the key to the energy shortage the environment and security. With declining conventional oil reserves, old nuclear technology and aging electric power technology, new technology must be used to address supply issues, distribution, interconversion, environmental impacts and risks. It was emphasized that since the energy sector is Canada's greatest economic driver, Canada should focus on energy technologies to build a more competitive energy sector. Huge export opportunities also exist for energy technologies. The role of industry and governments in achieving this goal was also discussed. figs

  16. SOR 90-165, 8 March 1990, Atomic Energy Control Regulations, amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Subsections 7(4) and (5) of the Regulations were revoked by this amendment. Those subsections required the AECB, when deciding whether or not to authorise export of a prescribed substance, to be satisfied about the price and quantity of that substance. The two subsections were replaced by new provisions simply authorising the Board to issue an export licence and to impose conditions on the licence in the interests of health, safety and security. (NEA) [fr

  17. Electricity market readiness plan : Ontario Energy Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    This document informs electric power market participants of the Ontario Energy Board's newly developed market readiness plan and target timelines that local distribution companies (LDCs) must meet for retail marketing. The Ontario Energy Board's plan incorporates relevant independent market operator (IMO)-administered market milestones with retail market readiness targeted for September 2001. The market readiness framework involves a self-certification process for LDCs by August 10, 2001, through which the Board will be able to monitor progress and assess the feasibility of meeting the target timelines. For retail market readiness, all LDCs will have to calculate settlement costs, produce unbundled bills, provide standard supply service, change suppliers and accommodate retail transactions. LDCs must be either authorized participants in the IMO-administered market or become retail customers of their host LDC. Unbundled bills will include itemized charges for energy price, transmission, distribution and debt retirement charge. 1 tab., 1 fig

  18. Institute for Atomic Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Institute has in 1980 changed its name to 'Institutt for Energiteknikk' and this reflects a de facto change in programme emphasis in which a large part of the activity in 1979 was in energy systems analysis, energy technology and conservation, petroleum technology,etc. However previous projects in environmental and safety aspects of nuclear power, risk analysis and fundamental physics using neutron beams, have continued. Nuclear technology is now concentrated in the Halden Reactor Project, whose work is outlined. Isotope production based on the JEEP II reactor and irradiation there and in the Co-60 plant, and isotope applications in environmental and resource investigations continue as previously. Waste processing and safeguards are also carried out as national responsibilities. (JIW)

  19. 76 FR 51065 - Florida Power & Light Company; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... & Light Company; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Pursuant to delegation by the... hereby given that an Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (Board) is being established to preside over the following proceeding: Florida Power & Light Company (St. Lucie Plant, Unit 1) This proceeding involves a...

  20. 75 FR 54400 - Florida Power and Light Company; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ...] Florida Power and Light Company; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Pursuant to delegation..., notice is hereby given that an Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (Board) is being established to preside over the following proceeding: Florida Power & Light Company (Turkey Point Units 6 and 7) This...

  1. New trends in designing NPP control boards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrat'ev, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    A short analytical summary of the latest developments and future trends in designing NPP control boards is given. The designs of the Westinghause and the Hynkley-Point NPP control boards are described in detail. The essence of the advanced control board concept consists , firstly, in expanded use of computer-controlled displays for the sake of reducing the content of unimportant information presented to an operator, and, secondary, in better account of human possibilities to convert the NPP operation information into a more suitable form. An enlarged use of the direct digital reactor control utilizing microprocessors is expected. Besides, the employment of full-scale control board mock-ups and information desks as well as testing newly-developed control boards at computer reactor simulators are concluded to be used at all-growing rate [ru

  2. The National Film Board of Canada and Its Task of Communication. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, C. Rodney

    The National Film Board of Canada has, through its films, achieved a world-wide influence, and its uniqueness lies in its administrative structure and its place in the Canadian Government which has enabled it to survive while similar organizations in other countries have succumbed to political and film industry pressures. This study offers a…

  3. Nuclear energy in Canada: the CANDU system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.L.

    1979-10-01

    Nuclear electricity in Canada is generated by CANDU nuclear power stations. The CANDU reactor - a unique Canadian design - is fuelled by natural uranium and moderated by heavy water. The system has consistently outperformed other comparable nuclear power systems in the western world, and has an outstanding record of reliability, safety and economy. As a source of energy it provides the opportunity for decreasing our dependence on dwindling supplies of conventional fossil fuels. (auth)

  4. Canada's conventional natural gas resources : a status report : an energy market assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-04-01

    The National Energy Board monitors the supply of all energy commodities in Canada as well as the demand for Canadian energy commodities in domestic and export markets. Energy market assessment reports examine different facets of the Canadian energy market and include long term-assessments of Canada's supply and demand as well as near-term energy market issues. This report examines the geological potential for conventional natural gas resources. An estimate of those resources for Canada was also presented. The main objective of the report is to set the groundwork for future partnerships between provincial, territorial and federal agencies. The size of Alberta's conventional natural gas resources is being examined in partnership with the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB). The ultimate potential for conventional natural gas in British Columbia is being assessed by the British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines. The Board's internal assessment for 2004 has revealed an estimate of 207 trillion cubic feet for the ultimate of conventional natural gas in Alberta. This estimate is higher than the estimate provided by the Canadian Gas Potential Committee in 2001 and higher than the 1992 assessment of the EUB. It was noted that most undiscovered resources in Alberta will be found in the shallow Cretaceous zones, not in deep Devonian zones. The Board also revised its estimate for the Mackenzie Delta-Beaufort Sea region and the East Newfoundland Basin. The current estimate for ultimate potential of conventional natural gas in Canada is 501 trillion cubic feet, with the following distribution of the resources by basin: Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (54.5 per cent), Northern Canada (23.1 per cent), East Coast (18.3 per cent), West Coast (3.4 per cent), Ontario (0.5 per cent), and Gulf of St. Lawrence (0.3 per cent). 39 refs., 7 tabs., 13 figs

  5. Reasons for decision in the matter of review of the applications for gas export licences from Brooklyn Navy Yard Cogeneration Partners, L.P., Husky Oil Operations Ltd., ProGas Limited, Shell Canada Ltd., Western Gas Marketing Limited application dated 7 March 1994 from Rocky Mountain Ecosystem Coalition for a review of GH-5-93 decision made by the National Energy Board in February 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    In February 1994, the National Energy Board of Canada granted 16 licenses to five companies for the export of natural gas to various power plants and gas distribution companies in the United States. In response to a submission from the Rocky Mountain Ecosystem Coalition, the Board requested submissions from those companies as part of a review of its Feburary 1994 decision. The Coalition claimed that the Board should have considered upstream environmental effects of the gas exports in its decisions; this claim was based on a Canadian Supreme Court decision of 24 February 1994 which required Hydro-Quebec to conduct environmental impact assessments related to electricity exports. The Board accordingly asked the five exporting companies to address the following questions in their submissions: the correctness of Board decisions considering environmental and directly-related social effects of the proposals in respect of the scope of its obligations under federal guidelines; whether evidence submitted by the applicants would allow the Board to meet its obligations under those guidelines; and whether there is any other evidence necessary to allow the Board to meet its obligations. A summary of the submissions and the views of the Board are presented. The applicability of the Supreme Court Hydro-Quebec decision to gas exports is discussed. The Board found that the decision was only applicable if there is a necessary connection between the upstream facilities and the proposal to export gas. The Board found that only the application from Shell Canada had this connection, and thus will require Shell to provide sufficient information concerning environmental and directly-related social effects relating to its proposal

  6. The RPA Atomization Energy Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Perdew, John P; Csonka, Gábor I

    2010-01-12

    There is current interest in the random phase approximation (RPA), a "fifth-rung" density functional for the exchange-correlation energy. RPA has full exact exchange and constructs the correlation with the help of the unoccupied Kohn-Sham orbitals. In many cases (uniform electron gas, jellium surface, and free atom), the correction to RPA is a short-ranged effect that is captured by a local spin density approximation (LSDA) or a generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Nonempirical density functionals for the correction to RPA were constructed earlier at the LSDA and GGA levels (RPA+), but they are constructed here at the fully nonlocal level (RPA++), using the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) of Langreth, Lundqvist, and collaborators. While they make important and helpful corrections to RPA total and ionization energies of free atoms, they correct the RPA atomization energies of molecules by only about 1 kcal/mol. Thus, it is puzzling that RPA atomization energies are, on average, about 10 kcal/mol lower than those of accurate values from experiment. We find here that a hybrid of 50% Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof GGA with 50% RPA+ yields atomization energies much more accurate than either one does alone. This suggests a solution to the puzzle: While the proper correction to RPA is short-ranged in some systems, its contribution to the correlation hole can spread out in a molecule with multiple atomic centers, canceling part of the spread of the exact exchange hole (more so than in RPA or RPA+), making the true exchange-correlation hole more localized than in RPA or RPA+. This effect is not captured even by the vdW-DF nonlocality, but it requires the different kind of full nonlocality present in a hybrid functional.

  7. Energy storage on board of railway vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, M.; Scholten, J. [Bombardier Transportation, Mannheim (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The proposed energy storage on board of a Railway vehicle leads to a big step in the reduction of consumed energy. Up to 30% energy saving are expected in a light rail vehicle, at the same time reducing the peak power demand drastically. In addition, with the energy storage an operation without catenary could become reality, which was successfully demonstrated with the prototype light rail vehicle driving with switched off pantograph. This prototype vehicle is in passenger operation since September 2003, the implemented software is optimised on energy savings and first experience is very promising. (authors)

  8. Ontario Energy Board 2005 survey of stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    A survey was conducted among members of the Ontario Energy Board's (OEB) various stakeholder groups in order to measure the Board's performance and to help the Board identify areas for improvement in the way it operates. The survey included telephone interviews with consumer groups, advocacy groups, the energy sector, electricity and gas distributors, financial organizations as well as other stakeholders. The topics addressed in the survey were key energy issues and priority issues; the perceived role of the OEB; the OEB strengths and weaknesses; the importance of various OEB functions; the overall performance of the OEB; an evaluation of OEB communication with industry and consumers; an evaluation of service quality; and, awareness and participation in regulatory policy initiatives. Respondents used a 10-point scale in their evaluation. This report presented the main findings and their interpretations. Major stakeholders identified electricity supply issues and the price of electricity as being the most important energy issues facing Ontario. This report also presented the detailed findings for questions regarding the lack of generator capacity, policy stability, the coal phase out program, electricity blackouts, conservation, electricity restructuring and investment. The major finding of the survey was an overall increase in satisfaction with the OEB's performance. It was suggested that the OEB can improve in timeliness and providing consumer information. The major areas of strength were found to be its professionalism in conducting hearings and the fairness of the Board's decisions and regulations. tabs

  9. Energy storage in Canada - Embassy report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quennehen, Sylvain

    2014-09-01

    After having outlined what is at stake in energy storage in the world (brief presentation of storage methods, overview of world electricity production and its storage challenges), and given an overview of the Canadian energy sector, this report gives an overview of the Canadian key and particularly innovating actors: main organisations, scientific research (in the fields of advanced batteries, of fuel cells, and of thermal storage), industrial sector (leaders in electricity production, in the electric or hybrid automotive sector and in the field of portable electronic devices, in the Li-ion battery sector, and in the hydrogen fuel cell sector, innovating actors in other energy storage methods). The author then discusses the innovation momentum in Canada: examples of energy storage projects by public organisations (CNRC, RNC), industrial projects in energy projects, investment dynamics

  10. Building on strengths: Canada's energy policy framework. Insights from the Canadian Energy Forums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses Canada's energy policy and insights from the Canadian Energy Forums. The Energy Council of Canada held a series of Canadian Energy Forums leading up to Canada hosting the World Energy Congress Montreal 2010 in September. The Cross-Canada Forums focused upon specific regions of Canada and obtained from governments, industry and other stake holders, perspectives and planned policy actions to address present and future energy challenges.

  11. Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board annual report, 1992-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board was established as the agency responsible for the regulation of the hydrocarbon resources in the Nova Scotia offshore. The Board evaluates resource potential, administers petroleum exploration and production rights, approves offshore activities, and approves benefits and development plans. The main activities of the Board in 1992-1993 are summarized and financial statements are presented. Highlights include production of 572,300 m 3 of oil during the first production season of LASMO Nova Scotia Ltd.'s Cohasset development, the first commercial offshore oil production for Canada; four major resource evaluation projects in the Glenelg Field, the Laurentian sub-basin, the Fundy Rift Basin, and the Panuke Field; holding of discussions between Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and Canada on the maritime boundary lines between respective offshore petroleum board jurisdictions, in the wake of a June 1992 determination of the disputed maritime boundary around St. Pierre et Miquelon; and amendments of certain safety-related legislation applicable to offshore operations. Employment benefits of the Cohasset project during 1992 totalled ca 470 Nova Scotians and 120 other Canadians. 3 tabs

  12. Atomic energy in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1967-06-15

    Most countries in Latin America, including all those on the mainland, are Members of the Agency. Interest in the possibilities of nuclear energy has led to considerable activity, much of it in direct collaboration with the IAEA. Member States in the region are: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela. Of these, Argentina, Brazil, Colombia and Venezuela are operating, and Mexico and Uruguay are constructing, research reactors, while Chile and Peru are studying proposals. Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Uruguay have all agreed to accept Agency safeguards for reactors. The possibility of future needs for nuclear power is under examination by several countries, in some cases being related to desalination of water. All atomic work in Latin America is devoted to peaceful uses, and note-worthy progress has been made with proposals for a treaty which would make the whole region a militarily de-nuclearized zone. It is proposed that when this comes into effect the Agency will be asked to apply the controls developed in its safeguards system, and to carry out the inspections necessary to establish that work in progress is solely for peaceful purposes

  13. Atomic energy in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    Most countries in Latin America, including all those on the mainland, are Members of the Agency. Interest in the possibilities of nuclear energy has led to considerable activity, much of it in direct collaboration with the IAEA. Member States in the region are: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela. Of these, Argentina, Brazil, Colombia and Venezuela are operating, and Mexico and Uruguay are constructing, research reactors, while Chile and Peru are studying proposals. Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Uruguay have all agreed to accept Agency safeguards for reactors. The possibility of future needs for nuclear power is under examination by several countries, in some cases being related to desalination of water. All atomic work in Latin America is devoted to peaceful uses, and note-worthy progress has been made with proposals for a treaty which would make the whole region a militarily de-nuclearized zone. It is proposed that when this comes into effect the Agency will be asked to apply the controls developed in its safeguards system, and to carry out the inspections necessary to establish that work in progress is solely for peaceful purposes

  14. Nuclear energy. Unmasking the mystery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    The Standing Committee on Energy, Mines and Resources of the House of Commons of Canada undertook a study of the economics of nuclear power in Canada. This is its report on the evidence it heard. It found that maintaining the nuclear power option is vital to Canada's interests. The Committee recommended that: the schedule for establishing a commercial high-level radioactive waste repository be advanced; the basic insurance coverage on nuclear facilities be raised; the federal government increase its financial support of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL); AECL expand its research and development activities, including non-nuclear R and D; AECL be allowed to hold a minority interest in any component of AECL that is privatized; any new entity created by privatization from AECL be required to remain under Canadian control; the Atomic Energy Control Act be altered to allow the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) to recover costs through licensing fees and user charges, while the AECB's parliamentary appropriation is increased to offset remaining costs of operations; membership on the AECB be increased from one to five full-time members, retaining the present four part-time members; the AECB hold its hearings in public; the name of the AECB be changed so it is more readily distinguishable from AECL; the AECB establish an office of public information; and that federal and provincial governments cooperate more closely to identify opportunities where more efficient use of electricity could be achieved and to promote those measures that can attain the greatest economic efficiency

  15. Atomic Energy Board, twentieth annual report, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following: nuclear materials, nuclear power, application of radioisotopes and radiation, health and safety, and fundamental studies undertaken in the fields of physics, chemistry, metallurgy, medicine and geology during 1976. The supporting activities of the computer services, engineering services, waste disposal plant, instrumentation section, research reactor and analytical services are given for 1976. The report contains a bibliography of publications published by staff members and bursars during 1976

  16. Canada's energy outlook : the reference case 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labib, H.; Casaubon, R.; Peluso, T.

    2006-10-01

    This long-term projection of energy supply, demand, consumption, production and greenhouse gas emissions from now until 2020 identified pressure points and emerging issues in Canadian energy markets. It contributed to public discussions on energy and related economic and environmental issues in Canada and provided a reference scenario from which new energy and climate change policies can be evaluated. Energy projections were developed based on the relationships between energy production, consumption and prices, as well as economic, technological and policy factors. The report included government implemented initiatives that promote energy efficiency or increase the use of alternative energy. This Outlook to 2020 is sensitive to key assumptions about economic growth, oil sands development and the electricity generation mix. It is based on a specific set of assumptions regarding oil price and economic growth. This outlook assumes crude oil prices to be nearly twice that of the last outlook in 1999 and natural gas prices are assumed to be three times higher. The outlook also assumes that the Mackenzie Delta gas pipeline will be in service by 2011. Other principal assumptions used to develop this outlook were that population will grow by 0.7 percent annually and that all but two of Canada's nuclear power plants will stay in service for at least eight more years. The outlook revealed that total energy demand is projected to grow by 1.3 percent per year. The fuel mix will not change much over this period because the prices of different energy sources will remain the same. Energy intensity is expected to improve by about 0.25 per cent annually in the residential and commercial sectors due to stock turn over and appliance regulations. Total energy demand will increase by 1 per cent per year for the residential sector, and at 2.4 percent per year for the commercial sector. Transportation demand is expected to grow by 1.6 per cent per year, while industrial energy intensity

  17. The French Atomic Energy Commission program in the field of reactor instrumentation and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golinelli, C.; Bernard, P.; Thomas, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    The worldwide slowing-down of the nuclear reactor construction must not lead to decrease the Research and Development effort. Particularly, in the field of the Nuclear Instrumentation and Control, new technologies are quickly changing: sensors, electronics, optronics, computer science... The nuclear industry is reluctant to the introduction of new concepts and of sophisticated technologies. Safety requires highly qualified systems. The development process must respect each step: - interest evaluation of the new idea, - designing and manufacturing of a prototype equipment, - qualification using an experimental facility or with a simulator, - qualification in operational condition (reliability, ageing, accidental standards...). We present an overview of the French CEA program covering the IC domain from the sensors to the operator screen

  18. Participation of the public in licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Act and the Federal Emission Control Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hett, F.T.

    1994-01-01

    Section 7 of the Atomic Energy Act (AtG), section 4 of the Federal Emission Control Act (BImSchG), the Nuclear Installations Licensing Ordinance (AtVfV), and the Ninth Ordinance on the Implementation of the BImSchG (Principles of the licensing procedure) require participation of the public in the procedure before administrative provisions or decisions are issued. The book presents the legally prescribed steps at which participation of the public is mandatory, for the simple case (only one license on the agenda), and for the multi-stage licensing procedure: preliminary negotiations / filling of applications for a license and filing of documents / public announcement of projects / access to files / objections / preclusion of delayed objections / public hearing and other expert discussions / termination of procedure, decision-making by the authorities / decisions on subdivision of procedure into defined stages / modification of the procedure. The analysis of the functions of participation of the public examines the following goals: information / representation of interests / reconciliation of interests / legitimation / control / protection of rights / support. Finally, the book explains the principles of the Constitution demanding participation of the public: human dignity / democracy / rule of law / anticipated effects of the right to have recourse to the courts / civil rights. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Communication from the Permanent Mission of Israel to the International Atomic Energy Agency regarding nuclear export controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a letter dated 13 July 2004 from the Permanent Mission of Israel providing information on Israel's nuclear export policies and practices. As requested by the Permanent Mission, the letter and document attached to it are reproduced herein for the information of Member States

  20. Atomic Energy (factories) rules: 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These rules are made by the Central Government under the Factories Act, 1948 and extend to all factories engaged in carrying out the purposes of the Atomic Energy Act, 1962. The rules cover the requirements of inspecting staff, health aspects, personnel safety, personnel welfare, working hours, employment of young persons, special provisions in case of dangerous manufacturing processes or operations, supplemental rules for administrative aspects and special powers of competent authority. (M.G.B.)

  1. The law for the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The law establishes the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in accordance with the Basic Act on Atomic Energy as a government corporation for the purpose of promoting R and D and utilizations of atomic energy (first chapter). The second chapter concerns the directors, advisers and personnel of the institute, namely a chairman of the board of directors, a vice-chairman, directors not more than seven persons, and auditors not more than two persons. The chairman represents and supervises the intitute, whom the prime minister appoints with the agreement of Atomic Energy Commission. The vice-chairman and other directors are nominated by the chairman with the approval of the prime minister, while the auditors are appointed by the prime minister with the advice of the Atomic Energy Commission. Their terms of office are 4 years for directors and 2 years for auditors. The third chapter defines the scope of activities of the institute as follows: basic and applied researches on atomic energy; design, construction and operation of nuclear reactors; training of researchers and technicians; and import, production and distribution of radioisotopes. Those activities should be done in accordance with the basic development and utilization plans of atomic energy established by the prime minister with the determination of Atomic Energy Commission. The fourth chapter provides for the finance and accounting of the institute, and the fifth chapter requires the supervision of the institute by the prime minister. (Matsushima, A.)

  2. 1995 annual report. Ghana Atomic Energy Commission : using nuclear energy and techniques to alleviate hunger, diseases and control of environmental pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The 1995 annual report reflects the activities of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) on an institutional basis. It provides an overview of the outcomes achieved and the current activities of the GAEC grouped under its core nuclear science areas

  3. Proceedings of Synergy 1998 : Canada's energy congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this conference was to help energy companies understand what deregulation of the electricity industry means and to meet the challenges of the increasingly competitive and volatile market environment that will inevitably follow deregulation. Accordingly, individual speakers and panels addressed the likely impacts of deregulation on energy markets, strategies to capitalize on restructuring, world market developments in the post monopoly era, strategies for gas buyers, and new opportunities for small co-generation companies and independent power producers using natural gas. Other topics dealt with included predictions about the role of the regulator in the new electricity market, the allocation of stranded costs, and the effects of FERC ruling in the USA on competition in Canada. Consumer concerns were also addressed by presentations about the bottom line for consumers, the operation of the Independent Market Operator, the influence of major power consumers on restructuring, the question of reliability in the new regime, and the effects of convergence. Experiences gained with industry restructuring in California, in the United Kingdom, in the New England States, in Scandinavian countries and in New Zealand were also reviewed as background for understanding the restructuring about to go into effect in various provinces of Canada. tabs., figs

  4. Government, utilities, industry and universities: partners for nuclear development in Canada and abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, D.G.; Woolston, J.E.

    1971-09-01

    In Canada, eleven power reactors installed or committed at four sites will provide 5 520 MW(e) for an investment of $1 800 million. Uranium production during the decade 1958-1967 totalled 79 700 tonnes U 3 O 8 worth $1 621 million. For nuclear research, development and control, the federal government employs about 6 000 people and spends about $80 million/year which includes the cost of operating three major research reactors (> 30 MW each). Aggregate commercial isotope production has reached 14 megacuries, and Canada has about 3 000 licensed users. Three power and two research reactors of Canadian design are or will be installed in developing countries overseas. Legislation in 1946 made atomic energy a federal responsibility and established an Atomic Energy Control Board. The Board's regulations, which deal primarily with health, safety and security, are administered with the co-operation of appropriate departments of the federal and provincial governments. Large-scale nuclear research began in 1941 and continued under the National Research Council until 1952 when the federal government created a public corporation, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, to take over both research and the exploitation of atomic energy. Another public corporation, Eldorado Nuclear Limited, conducts research and development on the processing of uranium and operates Canada's only uranium refinery, but prospecting and mining is undertaken largely by private companies. The publicly owned electrical utilities of Ontario and Quebec operate nuclear power stations and participate, with governments, in their financing. Private industry undertakes extensive development and manufacturing, mainly under contract to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and the utilities, and industry has formed its own Canadian Nuclear Association. Canadian universities undertake nuclear research, and receive significant government support; one has operated a research reactor since 1959. Canada's nuclear program is

  5. Public acceptance of nuclear energy in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper starts from the premise that there is no future for nuclear energy without public support. It traces the history of Canadian public attitudes toward this technology from the early years of opinion polling in the 1940s to the present day. It briefly discusses why nuclear energy is mistrusted by many and the nature of the challenge to the industry in this regard. It describes in some detail current public attitudes in Canada, concentrating on opinion polls, surveys, reports and focus group studies on attitudes towards the nuclear industry, the environment, waste disposal and nuclear safety. In conclusion, it suggests some new directions the industry might consider to stop the decline in public opinion and turn it around. (author)

  6. Controlling Electronics Boards with PVS

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    - Introduction - Control System Architecture - Device Description - FPGA Programming - Register Control - Data Subscription - Examples of Graphics User Interfaces - Parameter - Register Translation - Application on the LHCb Timing Fast Control System

  7. Atomic Energy Commission Act, 2000 (Act 588)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Act 588 of the Republic of Ghana entitled, Atomic Energy Commission Act, 2000, amends and consolidates the Atomic Energy Commission Act, 204 of 1963 relating to the establishment of the Atomic Energy Commission. Act 588 makes provision for the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission to establish more institutes for the purpose of research in furtherance of its functions and also promote the commercialization of its research and development results. (E.A.A.)

  8. Energy Literacy in Canada: A summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Eisler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surveys among the general population, business and policy leaders, and aboriginal Canadians reveal that, among all three groups, there is ample general knowledge about the way Canadians use energy and the costs related to it. But when they think about economic and social policy issues of importance, Canadians tend to consider energy a low priority. While this may be the consequence of living in an energysecure country, given that the economy’s strength, growth and resilience are so intimately linked to secure and sustainable sources of energy, that lack of engagement can only be problematic for policymakers dealing with energy-related issues. It can lead to important choices being made without widespread public awareness, input and agreement. But, even more worrisome is that these surveys found that all three Canadian cohorts surveyed severely lack trust in the key voices that speak on energy issues. They hold negative views of energy company executives, mistrust information from industry associations, and lack trust in their provincial and federal governments. Aboriginal Canadians were the least likely to trust all these sources. The importance of trust cannot be overstated. The absence of trust can lead to negative consequences for investment in the energy system, and can undermine public confidence in leadership, making the challenge of improving energy literacy that much more difficult. An early step towards remedying that credibility gap could include creating independent, credible, centralized institutions that serve as clearing houses for non-politicized energy information, such as the Energy Information Administration in the United States. In addition, it is clear that Canada can only benefit from measures that nurture robust yet sober debate about energy issues, that will help stimulate public engagement. To that end, the creation of a national advisory coalition, comprised of aboriginal Canadians, academics, opinion leaders and

  9. Atomic Energy Authority Bill (Lords)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eadie, A.; Goodlad, A.; Fisher, M.; Griffiths, P.; Coombs, S.

    1986-01-30

    The discussions of one of the standing committees of the House of Lords on the Atomic Energy Authority Bill are reported verbatim. Clauses 6, 9 and new clauses 3, 2 and 4 were discussed. The amendments to the clauses were put and debated. The safety requirements of the nuclear industry and the money necessary for these are discussed. At the end of the debate on each clause (and amendments if any), the decision of the House as to its agreement or otherwise is recorded. It was agreed that the Bill, as amended by the committee, should be reported to the (full) House of Lords. The debate lasted 1 3/4 hours.

  10. Atomic Energy Research benchmark activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makai, M.

    1998-01-01

    The test problems utilized in the validation and verification process of computer programs in Atomic Energie Research are collected into one bunch. This is the first step towards issuing a volume in which tests for VVER are collected, along with reference solutions and a number of solutions. The benchmarks do not include the ZR-6 experiments because they have been published along with a number of comparisons in the Final reports of TIC. The present collection focuses on operational and mathematical benchmarks which cover almost the entire range of reaktor calculation. (Author)

  11. Atomic Energy Authority Act 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    This Act provides for the transfer of property, rights, liabilities and obligations of parts of the undertaking of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Autority, to two new Compagnies set up for this purpose: the Bristish Nuclear Fuels Limited, and the Radiochemical Centre Limited. Patents licences and registered designs owned by the Autority at the time of the transfer are not included therein. The Act also includes amendments to the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, notably as regards permits to operate granted to a body corporate. Finally, the Schedule to this Act lays down a certain number of provisions relating to security and the preservation of secrets. (NEA) [fr

  12. What nuclear energy means to Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The Canadian nuclear industry employs more than 30,000 people directly, and indirectly supports nearly 100,000 jobs. It contributed more than C$4 billion to the economy in 1989. In 1989, Ontario had already saved C$15.9 billion in foreign exchange by using uranium rather than coal. Canada is the world's leading exporter of uranium. Canadian nuclear research was the most effective in the western world in terms of electricity produced per research dollar spent to the end of 1988 (twelve times as effective as Italy's, which had spent 1.5 times as much). One half of Ontario's electricity now comes from CANDUs, and this helps to keep Ontario's rates among the cheapest in the world. Nuclear energy has helped to prevent environmental damage from acid gases and ash. CANDUs currently hold 5% of the world reactor market, a proportion which is expected to grow

  13. The Canada-U.S. trade, energy, and emissions relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, David

    2010-01-01

    A significant level of trade integration exists between Canada and the United States. For this reason, climate and energy policies in one country have economic and environmental impacts in the other. The two nations have embarked on a clean energy dialogue for the development of a clean energy strategy for Canada and this document aims at providing information and context. This paper showed that the trade relationship with the United States is important to maintaining Canada's level of prosperity. Although climate and energy policies in one country have impacts on the other, significant differences exist between their respective energy sources and emissions and a common policy would affect Canada's competitiveness. This paper showed that Canada and the United States need to discuss their clean energy and climate policies with each other but that it is not possible to implement a common policy.

  14. Program Baseline Change Control Board charter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this Charter is to establish the Program Baseline Change Control Board (PBCCB) for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program, and to describe its organization, responsibilities, and basic methods of operation. Guidance for implementing this Charter is provided by the OCRWM Baseline Management Plan (BMP) and OCRWM Program Baseline Change Control Procedure

  15. BP Canada Energy Company energy efficiency and GHG reduction opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, B. [BP Canada Energy Company, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presented an outline of the BP Canada Energy Company's energy efficiency program, which uses an innovative approach that relies on front line operations staff to generate, evaluate and implement ideas for energy reduction projects. An outline of the organization team was presented, with details of the small central Calgary group responsible for coordination, technical support and tracking of data. Key objectives of the team were identified as: the promotion of energy efficiency; sharing of best practices; and coordination of efforts at operations at both the development and corporate level. An outline of BP upstream operations and emissions reduction strategies was provided along with a timeline of BP Canada greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and sustainable reductions projects. A chart representing energy savings through conversion to natural gas was also presented, sorted by project type. Results included over 400 GHG or energy reduction projects completed, with an average pay out of 30 months as well as 300,000 tonnes equivalent of GHGs reduced at an estimated value of of $13,000,000. Areas of focus for future projects include: compression; fired equipment; flaring; venting; and fugitive emissions. Strategies to reduce emissions in all areas of future research were also provided. tabs, figs.

  16. Community energy planning in Canada. The role of renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Denis, Genevieve; Parker, Paul

    2009-01-01

    An emerging trend in Canada is the creation of community energy plans, where decisions that used to be left to regional level energy agencies or private individuals are now being considered at the community level. A desire to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to become more energy self-sufficient is driving this change. Theoretically, local level management is desirable because it achieves these goals through improvements in the three areas of energy efficiency, energy conservation and switching to renewable energy sources. The analysis of 10 of the first community energy plans in Canadian communities, ranging in population size from 500 to one million, finds that communities are choosing policies and programs centred on increasing energy efficiency and conservation while renewable energy receives much less attention. Municipal operations were called upon to set higher targets than the general community. Communities that recognized the substantial potential of renewable energy often focused on technologies that the municipal sector could implement, such as bio-fuels for their transportation fleet. Wind, passive solar design, solar photovoltaics and solar thermal options were only recommended in a few cases. Overall, only one of the five larger communities (Calgary) recommended implementing multiple renewable energy technologies while three of the five smaller communities proposed multiple renewable energy sources. The implication is that smaller and more remote communities may be the most willing to lead in the planned introduction of renewable energy systems. (author)

  17. 78 FR 16493 - ExxonMobil Canada Energy, Flint Hills Resources Canada, LP, Imperial Oil, NOVA Chemical (Canada...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    .... Paul Park Refining Co. LLC, Suncor Energy Marketing, Inc., United Refining Company v. Enbridge Energy..., Inc., Phillips 66 Canada ULC, St. Paul Park Refining Co. LLC, Suncor Energy Marketing, Inc., and... assistance with any FERC Online service, please email [email protected] , or call (866) 208-3676...

  18. The State and atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungk, R.

    1991-01-01

    Illustrous, eloquent, and yet easy to read for the interested layman, the book begins with alleged deplorable conditions at the reprocessing centra La Hague, portrays, amongst other things, the spying on and supervision of persons in the nuclear field and in research, the misuse of fissile material, and threats and blackmail as a consequence thereof, human error as a cause of accidents, and it concludes with a nonviolent new International against the state and atomic energy, against technological tyranny. Titles of chapters: The hard road; radiation feed; the gamblers; homo atomicus; the intimidated; the ''proliferators''; nuclear terrorists; those supervised; the smooth road. It remains an open question whether the book contributes to defusing the nuclear controversy - in the book almost an ideology - and to bringing the two sides closer together. (HP) [de

  19. Atoms for pest control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindquist, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Insects cause losses estimated at between 8% and 20% of total production of crops and livestock throughout the world. With the aim of developing technologies which can reduce such losses, the Insect and Pest Control Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division actively sponsors projects and conducts research through the Entomology Section of the Agricultural Biotechnology Laboratory at Seibersdorf. In its work, the Section has placed considerable emphasis on the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). This technique involves the sterilization and release of large numbers of insects of the target species into the area where control is to be achieved. There, the sterile insects mate with the fertile wild insects, which produce no progeny: the technique is thus a highly specific form of ''birth control''. It is being used against a number of pest species in several countries

  20. Concept of electric power output control system for atomic power generation plant utilizing cool energy of stored snow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, Seiji; Toita, Takayuki

    2003-01-01

    A concept of the SEAGUL system (Snow Enhancing Atomic-power Generation UtiLity) is proposed in this paper. Lowering the temperature of sea water for cooling of atomic-power plant will make a efficiency of power generation better and bring several ten MW additional electric power for 1356 MW class plant. The system concept stands an idea to use huge amount of seasonal storage snow for cooling water temperature control. In a case study for the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, it is estimated to cool down the sea water of 29degC to 20degC by 80 kt snow for 3 hours in a day would brought 60 MWh electric power per a day. Annually 38.4 Mt of stored snow will bring 1800 MWh electric power. (author)

  1. Sports injuries, drowning and exposure to radiation concern Canada Safety Council meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Caroline.

    1979-01-01

    Hazards associated with surface sports, aquatic sports and exposure to radiation were considered at a meeting of the Canada Safety Council in late 1979. The session on radiation noted that 6 of 20000 radiation workers wearing dosimeters were exposed to a dose in excess of 5 rem, the annual limit set by the Atomic Energy Control Board. Radiographers were in the job classification receiving the highest doses of ionizing radiation. Concern was expressed for the emission of damaging radiation from broken mercury vapour lamps. Increased regulation rather than training was seen as the most effective solution. (T.I.)

  2. Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. 1996 annual report : using nuclear energy and techniques to alleviate hunger, diseases and control of environmental pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The 1996 annual report reflects the activities of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) on an institutional basis. It provides an overview and indicates the many ways in which the GAEC contributes to the development of nuclear science in the fields of agriculture, industry and medicine

  3. The Satisfaction and Use of Research Ethics Board Information Systems in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detlor, Brian; Wilson, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    This article reports findings from a national survey of Research Ethics Board (REB) personnel across Canada on the satisfaction and use of information systems that support the review and administration of research ethics protocols. Findings indicate that though a wide variety of REB systems are utilized, the majority fall short of desired characteristics. Despite these shortcomings, most respondents are satisfied with their current REB systems. Satisfaction is dependent on the volume of protocols processed in relation to the robustness of the system. Boards with higher volumes are more satisfied with full-fledged systems; however, the satisfaction of REBs with lower volumes is not affected by the robustness of the REB system used. Recommendations are provided. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. TransCanada PipeLines Limited 1998 annual report : TransCanada energy solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Financial information from TransCanada PipeLines Limited and a review of the company's 1998 operations was made available for the benefit of shareholders. TransCanada's pipeline system transports natural gas and crude oil from Western Canada Sedimentary Basin to North America's major energy markets. Net earnings from continuing operations for 1998, before unusual charges, were $575 million ($ 355 million after unusual charges) compared to $522 million for 1997. Solid performances from the energy transmission and international business, when compared to 1997, were more than offset by a decreased contribution from energy processing. TransCanada recorded integration costs of $166 million, after tax, related to the merger with NOVA in 1998, which was the major operational accomplishment during the year, creating a seamless economic energy delivery, processing and marketing system from the wellhead to the market. tabs., figs

  5. National Atomic Energy Commission. Decree No. 1540, August 30 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    One of the objectives of the reorganization process of Argentina's public sector was to transfer to the private sector some of the Nation's productive activities, including those concerning the nuclear field. As a consequence, by Decree No. 1540 of August 30, 1994, (B.O. 2-Dec-94), CNEA's functions were partially reorganized. According to Decree No. 1540, the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) maintained the missions and functions established by Decree-Law No. 22.498/56, with the exception of the regulation and surveillance of nuclear activities and the nuclear power generation activities. For the fulfillment of these activities, both the National Board of Nuclear Regulation (Ente Nacional Regulador Nuclear - ENREN) and Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (NASA), were created. The National Board of Nuclear Regulation (ENREN), as an autarchical entity reporting to the Presidency of the Nation, shall be administered by a Board of Directors and shall be responsible for surveying and controlling all nuclear activities, shall suggest regulations and standards to ensure radiological and nuclear safety, personal protection, a controlled use of nuclear materials, licensing and surveillance of nuclear installations, and compliance with international safeguards. Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (NASA) shall be organised as a corporation, reporting to the Ministry of Economy and Public Works and Services (Ministerio de Economia y Obras y Servicios Publicos) who will approve its statures. NASA shall take care of nuclear power generation at the Atucha I and Embalse nuclear power plants, as well as the construction, start-up and operation of the Atucha II nuclear power plant. As far as royalties are concerned, the Decree obliges Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. to pay CNEA for the performance of research and development activities, and to the ENREN an yearly regulatory tax per megawatt of installed nuclear power generation capacity. Also, Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. is declared

  6. Design of atomic energy information network system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. T.; Lee, E. J.; Han, K. W.; Lee, H. C.; Chang, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    As the 21 st century is expected to induce a Knowledge based society, responding to this kind of change on our own initiative could be achieved by establishing networks among atomic energy agencies with the Atomic Energy Portal Site in a pivotal role. Thus, enabling the knowledge information from each agency to be easily shared and utilized. Furthermore, it can contribute to further researches by providing accumulated knowledge in the atomic energy, such as research output and past achievements, and by avoiding the repetition of researches on the same subjects. It could also provide remote educational data to researchers and industrial experts in atomic energy, as well as atomic energy information for general public consistently, so that we can promote our confidence in atomic energy

  7. International Atomic Energy Agency specialists meeting on experience in ageing, maintenance, and modernization of instrumentation and control systems for improving nuclear power plant availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the Specialist's Meeting on Experience in Aging, Maintenance and Modernization of Instrumentation and Control Systems for Improving Nuclear Power Plant Availability that was held at the Ramada Inn in Rockville, Maryland on May 5--7, 1993. The Meeting was presented in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the International Atomic Energy Agency. There were approximately 65 participants from 13 countries at the Meeting. Individual reports have been cataloged separately

  8. Atomic Energy (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This Act extends the power of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority to dispose of shares held by it in any company, and the power of the Secretary of State for Energy to dispose of shares held by him in companies engaged in activities in the field of atomic energy or radioactive substances. (NEA) [fr

  9. 77 FR 71454 - Notice of Atomic Safety And Licensing Board Reconstitution, Tennessee Valley Authority (Watts Bar...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule. See 10 CFR 2.302 et seq. Issued at Rockville, Maryland this 16th day of November 2012. E. Roy Hawkens, Chief Administrative Judge, Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel...

  10. A review of renewable energy in Canada, 1990-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyboer, J.; Rivers, N.; Muncaster, K.; Bennett, M.; Bennett, S.

    2004-10-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive database of renewable energy facilities in Canada by province and by resource type. It considers technologies used for power generation or cogeneration, renewable energy heating systems, hydrogen generation and transportation fuels. Renewable energy technologies convert naturally regenerating resources into useful energy such as electricity, thermal energy, hydrogen or bio-fuels. The database contains information on renewable power operations in Canada over a scale of 100 kilowatts of rated capacity. Smaller applications have been included for run-of-river, hydro, earth, wind and solar power. There are 753 records for renewable energy facilities in Canada, including wind, hydroelectricity, wood residue biomass, landfill/sewage gas, solar photovoltaic, municipal solid waste, and tidal energy. The data in this report was acquired from Statistics Canada and other public information sources. For each of the 753 renewable energy power plants, this report states its type of renewable energy, the province, the name of the project, its location, its operator, electrical generating capacity, number of generating units, average annual electricity production, and the year it began operation. Canada currently has an installed electrical capacity of 115 GW, of which renewable energy sources constitute 76 per cent with the dominant source being hydroelectricity. Manitoba has the highest portion of renewable energy in its installed electrical capacity. Approximately 40 per cent Canada's renewable power capacity is in Quebec, followed by 15 per cent in British Columbia. Nova Scotia has Canada's only tidal power plant. Most of the installed renewable energy power capacity in Canada is owned by integrated electric utilities and a small percentage is owned by renewable electricity generating companies, aluminium companies, pulp and paper companies or diversified electricity generators. It is expected that interest in renewable energy will grow with

  11. Amendment of Atomic Energy Basic Law and the development of Atomic Energy Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochi, Kenji

    1978-01-01

    This article explains the key points of the major development of Atomic Energy Administration recently made by amendments of Atomic Energy Basic Law and other two relating laws. These amendments passed through the Diet and were enacted on 7th, June, 1978. The aim of them is focussed on reinforcement and rearrangement of safety controls on nuclear reactors. Previously, although the approval of the installation plan with basic designs of a nuclear reactor has been done by Prime Minister, further approvals of detailed designs and process of construction works, as well as inspections before and after operation have been conducted by each responsible minister, respectively. That is, those controls for power reactors have been within jurisdiction of minister of Trade and Industry, and for nuclear ships' reactors minister of Transportation has been responsible. Under the new system, above mentioned ministers continue to exercise almost same controls over reactors within their jurisdiction respectively, however the new laws have established so-called ''double check'' principle in that: when each responsible minister approves the installation, detailed designs and further stages of construction and operation of the reactor, he should hear and pay a great regard for opinions of Atomic Energy Commission and Atomic Energy Safety Commission. The latter is newly established organization which has similar status and authority to the former. (J.P.N.)

  12. 75 FR 16869 - Areva Enrichment Services, LLC; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... Enrichment Services, LLC; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Pursuant to delegation by the... following proceeding: Areva Enrichment Services, LLC (Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility) This Board is being established pursuant to a Notice of Hearing and Commission Order regarding the application of Areva Enrichment...

  13. Energy Policies of IEA Countries - Canada -- 2009 Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-04-12

    Canada, with its diverse and balanced portfolio of energy resources, is one of the largest producers and exporters of energy among IEA member countries. The energy sector plays an increasingly important role for the Canadian economy and for global energy security, as its abundant resource base has the potential to deliver even greater volumes of energy. The federal, provincial and territorial governments of Canada are all strongly committed to the sustainable development of the country's natural resources and have a long-standing and informed awareness of the need for each to contribute to the development of the energy sector. Furthermore, the government of Canada seeks to achieve a balance between the environmentally responsible production and use of energy, the growth and competitiveness of the economy, and secure and competitively priced energy and infrastructure. Nonetheless, the long-term sustainability of the sector remains a challenge. Due to climatic, geographic and other factors, Canada is one of the highest per-capita CO2 emitters in the OECD and has higher energy intensity than any IEA member country. A comprehensive national energy efficiency strategy, coupled with a coordinated climate change policy targeted at the key emitting sectors, is needed. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a priority for the federal government and presents Canada with an opportunity to develop a new technology that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions on a large scale. The IEA recommends that Canada provide international leadership in the development of CCS technology. This review analyses the energy challenges facing Canada and provides sectoral critiques and recommendations for further policy improvements. It is intended to help guide Canada towards a more sustainable energy future.

  14. Energy Policies of IEA Countries - Canada -- 2009 Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-04-12

    Canada, with its diverse and balanced portfolio of energy resources, is one of the largest producers and exporters of energy among IEA member countries. The energy sector plays an increasingly important role for the Canadian economy and for global energy security, as its abundant resource base has the potential to deliver even greater volumes of energy. The federal, provincial and territorial governments of Canada are all strongly committed to the sustainable development of the country's natural resources and have a long-standing and informed awareness of the need for each to contribute to the development of the energy sector. Furthermore, the government of Canada seeks to achieve a balance between the environmentally responsible production and use of energy, the growth and competitiveness of the economy, and secure and competitively priced energy and infrastructure. Nonetheless, the long-term sustainability of the sector remains a challenge. Due to climatic, geographic and other factors, Canada is one of the highest per-capita CO2 emitters in the OECD and has higher energy intensity than any IEA member country. A comprehensive national energy efficiency strategy, coupled with a coordinated climate change policy targeted at the key emitting sectors, is needed. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a priority for the federal government and presents Canada with an opportunity to develop a new technology that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions on a large scale. The IEA recommends that Canada provide international leadership in the development of CCS technology. This review analyses the energy challenges facing Canada and provides sectoral critiques and recommendations for further policy improvements. It is intended to help guide Canada towards a more sustainable energy future.

  15. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd

    2009-04-06

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America . This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Canada, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial and residential buildings in Canada.

  16. A review of existing renewable energy facilities in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyboer, J.; Pape-Salmon, A.

    2003-05-01

    This first annual report on renewable energy in the Canadian electricity sector includes records from 629 power plants across Canada. Renewable energy sources include wind, hydroelectricity, wood residue biomass, landfill/sewage gas, solar photovoltaic, municipal solid waste, and tidal energy. The data in this report was acquired from Statistics Canada and other public information sources. For each of the 629 renewable energy power plants, this report states its type of renewable energy, the province, the name of the project, its location, its operator, electrical generating capacity, number of generating units, average annual electricity production, and the year it began operation. The majority (64 per cent) of Canada's total installed power capacity comes from renewable energy sources, with the dominant source being hydroelectricity. Manitoba has the highest portion of renewable energy at almost 98 per cent of its installed electrical capacity. Nearly half of Canada's renewable power capacity is in Quebec, followed by 18 per cent in British Columbia. Nova Scotia has Canada's only tidal power plant. Approximately 80 per cent of the total installed renewable energy power capacity in Canada is owned by integrated electric utilities. Eleven per cent is owned by renewable electricity generating companies, 5 per cent is owned by aluminium companies, and 3 per cent is owned by pulp and paper companies. The rest is owned by diversified electricity generators. It is expected that with the ratification of the Kyoto Protocol interest in renewable energy will grow. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs., 1 appendix

  17. Energy levels of muonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borie, E.; Rinker, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of muonic atoms is a complex and highly developed combination of nuclear physics, atomic physics, and quantum electrodynamics. Perhaps nowhere else in microscopic physics are such diverse branches so intimately intertwined and yet readily available for precise experimental verification or rejection. In the present review we summarize and discuss all of the most important components of muonic atom theory, and show in selected cases how this theory meets experimental measurements

  18. Atomic energy indemnification system in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Eiichi

    1980-01-01

    The Japanese legislation on the indemnification by atomic energy enterprisers for atomic energy damages, published in 1961 and enforced in 1962, includes the law concerning indemnification for atomic energy damages and the law concerning atomic energy damage indemnification contracts (hereafter referred to as ''the law concerning indemnification contracts''). While the Japanese laws are same as the foreign legislation in the provisions of the responsibility of atomic energy damages without the error of atomic energy enterprisers, exemption reasons are more important in this respect. When damages are due to exceptionally grave natural disasters or social disturbances, atomic energy enterprisers are exempted from the responsibility. Indemnification amounts are determined, but the Japanese laws do not limit then, different from the foreign regulations. The periods for demanding indemnification are not defined particularly in the law concerning indemnification contracts, and the general basic rules of the civil law are applied. As a result, the demand right terminates in 3 years after the injured persons find damage and offenders, and in 20 years since the unlawful act (Article 724, Civil law). The indemnification liability for atomic energy damages is focused on atomic energy enterprisers concerned in the same way as the foreign laws. The measures for assuring the execution of indemnification responsibility consist in principle of the firm conbination of the liability insurance contracts with private insurance companies and the indemnification contracts for atomic energy damages with the state. The damages of employes suffered in works are excluded from indemnification, which has been the main issue of discussion since the enactment of atomic energy laws. (Okada, K.)

  19. International Atomic Energy Agency and Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Rahim Mohd Nor

    1985-01-01

    A review on IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and its relation with Malaysia is given. This article also discusses the background history of IAEA, its organization and functions in the field of nuclear energy

  20. Atomic Energy Authority (Weapons Group) Act 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    This Act, which came into force on 6th March 1973 and modified Section 2 of the Atomic Energy Authority Act 1954 in respect of the Authority's power to do work on explosive nuclear devices, made provision for the transfer to the Secretary of State for Defence of the Weapons Group of the Atomic Energy Authority. (NEA) [fr

  1. Atomic Energy Law with ordinances. 9. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The revised edition of the text is due to a variety of major changes in, and amendments to, the German Atomic Energy Law. This book includes the current version of the Atomic Energy Law which has been changed several times, the 1982-version of the ordinace concerning procedures laid down in the Atomic Energy Law, the 1976 radiation protection ordinance together with recent amendments, the 1973 X-ray ordinance, the 1977 financial security ordinance laid down in the Atomic Energy Law, the 1981 ordinance concerning costs, the ordinance concerning performance in anticipation of ultimate disposal. The book is a compilation of the basic Atomic Energy Law which is needed mostly for imminent practical requirements. (orig./HSCH) [de

  2. Atomic energy for the peace and progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, L.

    2000-06-01

    This document is a poster of the Commission of Atomic Energy of Costa Rica. In it some uses of atomic energy in Costa Rica, are mentioned. Some of them are: the technical cooperation, which has permitted to develop and to fortify the production and control of radio pharmaceuticals in the nuclear services of medicine. The diagnoses and medical processing, to acquire new equipment and to consolidate the maintenance and service of nuclear instrumentation. By means of technical of induced mutations, they have developed agricultural resistant varieties to the environmental conditions. Control of ripeness, genetic improvement of seeds, resistance to the illnesses and efficiency of the agronomic performance. The isotopic techniques of traces have great importance to evaluate the hydric resources, and their risk of contamination with toxic metals and pesticides. Nuclear techniques have been used to obtain information and to deepen in their knowledge. A laboratory of radiology control was established in the Technological Institute of Costa Rica, to give service to the industrial installations. To access the information of this field, the Nuclear Center of Information can be consulted, in the University of Costa Rica. (author) [es

  3. Atomic data for controlled fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, C.F.; Ray, J.A.; Ricci, E.; Wilker, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Thomas, E.W.; Gilbody, H.B.

    1977-02-01

    Presented is an evaluated graphical and tabular compilation of atomic and molecular cross sections of interest to controlled thermonuclear research. The cross sections are tabulated and graphed as a function of energy for collision processes involving heavy particles, electrons, and photons with atoms and ions. Also included are sections on data for particle penetration through macroscopic matter, particle transport properties, particle interactions with surfaces, and pertinent charged particle nuclear cross sections and reaction rates. In most cases estimates have been made of the data accuracy

  4. The ORNL Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, D.R.; Krstic, P.S.; Ownby, F.M.; Meyer, F.W.; Havener, C.C.; Bannister, M.E.; Liu, W.; Jeffery, D.J.; Stancil, P.C.

    1997-01-01

    The principal mission of the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center is the collection evaluation, and dissemination of atomic collision data relevant to fusion energy development. With the advent of the widespread use of the World Wide Web, the data center's resources are being placed on-line to facilitate their use by end-users (cf. http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/). As this development continues, initially disparate, individually compiled resources will be transformed into integrated tools for retrieving recommended data, or displaying and manipulating the information available. The data center's present capabilities, recent data production/evaluation efforts, and goals for future development are highlighted here

  5. Canada's oil sands, opportunities and challenges to 2015 : an energy market assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    The National Energy Board monitors the supply of all energy commodities in Canada along with the demand for Canadian energy commodities in domestic and export markets. This report provides an assessment of the current state of the oil sands industry and the potential for growth. It also identifies the major issues and challenges associated with the development of Canada's oil sands, one of the world's largest hydrocarbon resources. Initial production of Canada's oil sands began in 1967. The resource has become more economic to develop in recent years due to higher energy prices and new technologies. The economic potential of Canada's oil sands has been recognized internationally. Canadian oil sands production in 2004 will surpass 160,000 cubic metres per day. By 2015, production is expected to more than double to meet market demands. The challenges facing the industry include higher natural gas prices, capital cost overruns and environmental impacts. The major factors that affect the rate of oil sands development include natural gas supply, energy demand, oil and gas pricing, markets and pipelines, environmental considerations, emerging technologies, geopolitical issues, and labour. This report includes key findings for the following four key components: economic potential and development of the resource base; markets and pipelines; environmental and socio-economic impacts; and, potential spin-off developments in the electricity and petrochemical industries. 26 tabs., 53 figs

  6. Atomic energy levels and Grotrian diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Bashkin, Stanley

    1975-01-01

    Atomic Energy Levels and Grotrian Diagrams, Volume I: Hydrogen I - Phosphorus XV presents diagrams of various elements that show their energy level and electronic transitions. The book covers the first 15 elements according to their atomic number. The text will be of great use to researchers and practitioners of fields such as astrophysics that requires pictorial representation of the energy levels and electronic transitions of elements.

  7. Intergovernmental organisation activities: European Atomic Energy Community, International Atomic Energy Agency, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    European Atomic Energy Community: Proposed legislative instruments, Adopted legislative instruments, Non-legislative instruments, Other activities (meetings). International Atomic Energy Agency: IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency: The Russian Federation to join the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency; Participation by the regulatory authorities of India and the United Arab Emirates in the Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP); NEA International Workshop on Crisis Communication, 9-10 May 2012; International School of Nuclear Law: 2013; Next NEA International Nuclear Law Essentials Course

  8. Mineral supplies for atomic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, C S

    1950-03-31

    In a preliminary discussion the author describes the process of fission and discusses the materials required. Geological considerations are presented along with information regarding the occurrences of thorium and uranium deposits. The chief sources of uranium ore are the Belgian Congo, the Great Bear Lake in Canada, the Erzgebirge in Bohemia, and the low grade carnotite ore in Colorado, and possibly a deposit in Siberia. The monazite sands of Travancore are the most useful source of thoria today. The world's supply of uranium is somewhat under 10,000 tons of ore annually and thorium approximately 5,000 tons of suitable monazite sand.

  9. 77 FR 23238 - Application To Export Electric Energy; Citigroup Energy Canada ULC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY [OE Docket No. EA-326-A] Application To Export Electric Energy; Citigroup... electric energy from the United States to Canada pursuant to section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA... electric energy from the United States to Canada as a power marketer for a five-year term. The current...

  10. Control of an atom laser using feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haine, S.A.; Ferris, A.J.; Close, J.D.; Hope, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    A generalized method of using feedback to control multimode behavior in Bose-Einstein condensates is introduced. We show that for any available control, there is an associated moment of the atomic density and a feedback scheme that will remove energy from the system while there are oscillations in that moment. We demonstrate these schemes by considering a condensate trapped in a harmonic potential that can be modulated in strength and position. The formalism of our feedback scheme also allows the inclusion of certain types of nonlinear controls. If the nonlinear interaction between the atoms can be controlled via a Feshbach resonance, we show that the feedback process can operate with a much higher efficiency

  11. A History of the Atomic Energy Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Alice L.

    1983-07-01

    This pamphlet traces the history of the US Atomic Energy Commission's twenty-eight year stewardship of the Nation's nuclear energy program, from the signing of the Atomic Energy Act on August 1, 1946 to the signing of the Energy Reorganization Act on October 11, 1974. The Commission's early concentration on the military atom produced sophisticated nuclear weapons for the Nation's defense and made possible the creation of a fleet of nuclear submarines and surface ships. Extensive research in the nuclear sciences resulted in the widespread application of nuclear technology for scientific, medical and industrial purposes, while the passage of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 made possible the development of a nuclear industry, and enabled the United States to share the new technology with other nations.

  12. History of the Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, A.L.

    1983-07-01

    This pamphlet traces the history of the US Atomic Energy Commission's twenty-eight year stewardship of the Nation's nuclear energy program, from the signing of the Atomic Energy Act on August 1, 1946 to the signing of the Energy Reorganization Act on October 11, 1974. The Commission's early concentration on the military atom produced sophisticated nuclear weapons for the Nation's defense and made possible the creation of a fleet of nuclear submarines and surface ships. Extensive research in the nuclear sciences resulted in the widespread application of nuclear technology for scientific, medical and industrial purposes, while the passage of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 made possible the development of a nuclear industry, and enabled the United States to share the new technology with other nations

  13. History of the Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, A.L.

    1982-08-01

    This pamphlet traces the history of the Atomic Energy Commission's twenty-eight year stewardship of the Nation's nuclear energy program, from the signing of the Atomic Energy Act on August 1, 1946, to the signing of the Energy Reorganization Act on October 11, 1974. The Commission's early concentration on the military atom produced sophisticated nuclear weapons for the Nation's defense and made possible the creation of a fleet of nuclear submarines and surface ships. Extensive research in the nuclear sciences resulted in the widespread application of nuclear technology for scientific, medical and industrial purposes, while the passage of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 made possible the development of a nuclear industry, and enabled the United States to share the new technology with other nations

  14. International Atomic Energy Agency specialists meeting on experience in ageing, maintenance, and modernization of instrumentation and control systems for improving nuclear power plant availability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the Specialist`s Meeting on Experience in Aging, Maintenance and Modernization of Instrumentation and Control Systems for Improving Nuclear Power Plant Availability that was held at the Ramada Inn in Rockville, Maryland on May 5--7, 1993. The Meeting was presented in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the International Atomic Energy Agency. There were approximately 65 participants from 13 countries at the Meeting. Individual reports have been cataloged separately.

  15. Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, J.

    1991-01-01

    Canada, while professing a non-nuclear policy for its own armed forces, is, none the less, a member of a nuclear alliance. The security gained through participation in such arrangements does not come cost-free, despite the common view that countries such as Canada enjoy a free ride. Being under the nuclear umbrella, as this paper seeks to illustrate, does generate its own problems and costs. For example, does influence stem from the actual possession of nuclear weapons (albeit under US control), from support of the concept of nuclear deterrence and its infrastructure, or from possessing territory that is of strategic importance to a more powerful ally? Does the Canadian experience serve as a model for countries that are in close proximity to an existing or threshold nuclear power? Much depends on the willingness of a country to participate in the nuclear infrastructure associated with the acquisition of nuclear weapons for security purposes. It must accept the underlying rationale or logic of nuclear deterrence and the constraints on alternative security options that this imposes and it must also recognize that reliance on nuclear deterrence for military security seven if one seeks to emulate Canada and become a non-nuclear weapon state in a nuclear alliance can produce strains in its own right. The case of Canada shows that a country seeking security through such means should be aware of, and reflect upon, the fact that what appears to be a free ride does not come free of charge. However, a country may have other options in it, military security that have neither historically or geostrategically been available to Canada

  16. Co-operation agreement. The text of the agreement of 25 May 1998 between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for accounting and control of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-25

    The document reproduces the text of the Co-operation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials which entered into force on 25 May 1998

  17. Co-operation agreement. The text of the agreement of 25 May 1998 between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for accounting and control of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Co-operation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials which entered into force on 25 May 1998

  18. International Atomic Energy Agency activities in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisenweaver, D W.; )

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been addressing the safety and technical issues of decommissioning for over 20 years, but their focus has been primarily on planning. Up to know, the activities have been on an ad hoc basis and sometimes, important issues have been missed. A new Action Plan on the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities has recently been approved by the Agency's board of Governors which will focus the Agency's efforts and ensure that our Member States' concerns are addressed. The new initiatives associated with this Action Plan will help ensure that decommissioning activities in the future are performed in a safe and coherent manner. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been preparing safety and technical documents concerning decommissioning since the mid-1980's. There have been over 30 documents prepared that provide safety requirements, guidance and supporting technical information. Many of these documents are over 10 years old and need updating. The main focus in the past has been on planning for decommissioning. During the past five years, a set of Safety Standards have been prepared and issued to provide safety requirements and guidance to Member States. However, decommissioning was never a real priority with the Agency, but was something that had to be addressed. To illustrate this point, the first requirements documents on decommissioning were issued as part of a Safety Requirements [1] on pre-disposal management of radioactive waste. It was felt that decommissioning did not deserve its own document because it was just part of the normal waste management process. The focus was mostly on waste management. The Agency has assisted Member States with the planning process for decommissioning. Most of these activities have been focused on nuclear power plants and research reactors. Now, support for the decommissioning of other types of facilities is being requested. The Agency is currently providing technical

  19. Nuclear energy's continuing benefits to Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.L.

    1981-06-01

    The goal of the Canadian nuclear power program when it began twenty years ago was to reduce Canadian dependence on imported coal. This goal has been met, with 35 percent of Ontario's electricity being produced by CANDU reactors. These reactors have been proven reliable and safe, and provide a considerable cost advantage over coal. The CANDU reactor was developed with the strengths and limitations of Canadian industry in mind, the newest stations have over 85 percent Canadian-manufactured components. A similar benefit should be found in many countries with manufacturing capabilities comparable to Canada's. The use of natural uranium as a fuel has been a wise choice both technically and economically. A new industry was created in Canada in order to gain an assured supply of heavy water. The personnel brought to or trained in Canada to work in all parts of the nuclear industry represent a valuable asset in themselves. Radioisotope exports are making a significant contribution. Nuclear power is likely to make its greatest impact in the next century, when it will be a necessity

  20. Basic principles of radiation protection in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The major goal of radiation protection in Canada is to ensure that individuals are adequately protected against the harm that might arise from unwarranted exposure to ionizing radiation. This report deals with the basic principles and organizations involved in protection against ionizing radiation. Three basic principles of radiation protection are: 1) that no practice shall be adopted unless its introduction produces a positive net benefit for society, 2) that all exposures shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable, relevant economic and social factors being taken into account, and 3) that doses to individuals should not exceed specified annual limits. The limit for radiation workers is currently 50 mSv per year, and exposures of the general public should not exceed a small fraction of that of radiation workers. Other specific areas in radiation protection which have received considerable attention in Canada include limitations on collective dose (the sum of the individual doses for all exposed individuals), exemption rules for extremely small radiation doses or amounts of radioactive materials, occupational hazards in uranium mining, and special rules for protection of the foetus in pregnant female radiation workers. Implementation of radiation protection principles in Canada devolves upon the Atomic Energy Control Board, the Department of National Health and Welfare, provincial authorities, licensees and radiation workers. A brief description is given of the roles of each of these groups

  1. Transfer of energy in an atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemin, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    In most cases the nucleus does not interact with the electron cloud because its energy range is far higher, but in some rare cases electrons from the electron cloud and the nucleus may exchange energy: an electron may de-excite by transferring a part of its energy to the nucleus that becomes itself excited (nuclear excitation by electronic transfer or NEET), conversely electrons can receive energy from the nucleus (bound internal conversion or BIC). For the first time both energy transfers have been observed: a BIC process on a tellurium-125 atom by a French team and a NEET process on a gold-197 atom by a Japanese team. (A.C.)

  2. Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    A goal of the 21. century is for society to pursue 'sustainable economic development and prosperous life by recycling resources', thus rejecting 'development based on the waste of resources'. For Japan, which has limited energy resources, it is important to secure safe, inexpensive, environmentally friendly energy resources having long-term availability. To contribute to long-term energy security and solve global environmental issues, and to create advanced competitive science and technology, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was established by integrating the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) in October 2005. JAEA is endeavoring to establish nuclear fuel cycles, to contribute to social improvement through hydrogen production initiated by atomic energy, and to pursue research and development of thermonuclear fusion and quantum beam technology. This paper reviews the main R and D activities of JAEA. The structure of the paper is the following: 1. Introduction; 2. Japan Atomic Energy Agency; 3. Efforts to Commercialize the Fast Reactor Cycle; 4. Monju Progress; 5. Geological Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste R and D; 6. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor System R and D; 7. Fusion Research and Development; 8. LWR Spent Fuel Reprocessing Technology; 9. Quantum Beam Technologies; 10. Nuclear Safety Research and Regulatory Applications; 11. Basic Science and Engineering Research; 12. Contribution to the Enhanced International Nonproliferation Regimes; 13. Conclusions. To summarize, JAEA will promote the above R and D activities, addressing the following commitments: - On problems that atomic energy faces, we shall extend technical assistance in response to the government and the industrial sectors. - We shall produce technical options to attain political goals to secure medium to long-term stable energy supplies and to solve global environmental issues. - With the high potentials of atomic

  3. Why? The nuclear and atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwangwoong

    2009-01-01

    This book is a science comic book for students in elementary school, which contains energy and life such as our body and energy, animal and energy, plant and energy, kinetic energy, potential energy and the principle of the conservation of energy in the first part. The second part explains fossil fuel like coal, petroleum and natural gas. Next it deals with electric power, nuclear energy such as atom and molecule, nuclear fusion and energy for future like solar cell and black hole power plant.

  4. Why? The nuclear and atomic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwangwoong

    2009-01-15

    This book is a science comic book for students in elementary school, which contains energy and life such as our body and energy, animal and energy, plant and energy, kinetic energy, potential energy and the principle of the conservation of energy in the first part. The second part explains fossil fuel like coal, petroleum and natural gas. Next it deals with electric power, nuclear energy such as atom and molecule, nuclear fusion and energy for future like solar cell and black hole power plant.

  5. Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel annual report, fiscal year 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotter, B.P. Jr.

    1990-07-01

    In Fiscal Year 1989, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel (ASLBP) handled 40 proceedings involving the construction, operation and maintenance of commercial nuclear power reactors or other activities requiring a license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes, highlights and analyzes how the wide-ranging issues raised in these proceedings were addressed by the Judges and Licensing Boards of the ASLBP during the year. 5 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel annual report, Fiscal year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    In Fiscal Year 1992, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel (''the Panel'') handled 38 proceedings. The cases addressed issues in the construction, operation, and maintenance of commercial nuclear power reactors and other activities requiring a license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This reports sets out the Panel's caseload during the year and summarizes, highlights, and analyzes how the wide-ranging issues raised in those proceedings were addressed by the Panel's judges and licensing boards

  7. Manhattan Project redux: Canada and the first atomic weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, J.E

    2008-09-15

    Only three nuclear weapons produced by the Manhattan Project (MP) were used during World War II: Trinity Test, New Mexico on 16 July 1945, Hiroshima, Japan, on 6 August 1945, and Nagasaki, Japan, on 9 August 1945. Several sources and authors, including EM and RL (1967), Stacey (1970), Sanger (1981), and Buckley (2000), have written that it is unlikely that any Canadian uranium was used in the atomic weapons that ended WW II. These sources offer no detailed justification for their conclusion, nevertheless, after analysis of data contained in numerous sources, this article reaches a similar conclusion. (author)

  8. Manhattan Project redux: Canada and the first atomic weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenault, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Only three nuclear weapons produced by the Manhattan Project (MP) were used during World War II: Trinity Test, New Mexico on 16 July 1945, Hiroshima, Japan, on 6 August 1945, and Nagasaki, Japan, on 9 August 1945. Several sources and authors, including EM and RL (1967), Stacey (1970), Sanger (1981), and Buckley (2000), have written that it is unlikely that any Canadian uranium was used in the atomic weapons that ended WW II. These sources offer no detailed justification for their conclusion, nevertheless, after analysis of data contained in numerous sources, this article reaches a similar conclusion. (author)

  9. White paper on atomic energy in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    Since the publication of its last White Paper on Atomic Energy in 2004, the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan (AEC) summarized trends covering all aspects of nuclear energy over the period up to December 2005. This paper is comprised of a main document and supplementary materials. In the first chapter of the main document, the first section summarized the changes on research, development and utilization of nuclear energy in 50 years from establishment of the Atomic Energy Basic Law. The second section summarized that nuclear energy utilization (energy utilization and radiation utilization) for contributing to the welfare of humanity and the improvement of the standard of living of the people, and the appropriate direction in the future and the recognitions to become its background of nuclear policies that indicated in 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' (AEC decided at October 2005), concerning fundamental activities, R and D activities and international activities that essential for the realization of nuclear energy utilization. The second chapter summarized recent trends of national and private activities on research, development and utilization of nuclear energy, covering the topics 'Nuclear Energy Policy in Japan', 'Strengthening Fundamental Activities on Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy', 'Steady Promotion of Nuclear Energy Utilization', Promotion of Nuclear Energy Research and Development', Promotion of International Activity', 'Various Evaluation on Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy'. The supplementary materials include lists of AEC decisions, nuclear energy budgets, year-by-year data tables, and other such similar materials. (J.P.N.)

  10. Protocol Additional to the agreement between France, the European Atomic Energy Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The text of the Protocol Additional to the Agreement between France, the European Atomic Energy Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in France is reproduced in the Annex to this document for the information of all Members. The Additional Protocol was approved by the Board of Governors on 11 June 1998. It was signed in Vienna on 22 September 1998. Pursuant to Article 16 of the Additional Protocol, the Protocol entered into force on 30 April 2004, the date on which the Agency received written notification that the European Atomic Energy Community and France had met their respective internal requirements for entry into force

  11. Atomic energy today: An urgent dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronado, G.

    1997-01-01

    This article compiles the trajectory of the nuclear energy, in different countries of the world, since 1939. It also makes reference to the nuclear accidents that have happened in the past. It contains information of other applications of the nuclear energy, such as: the atomic industry of energetic production and alternatives to the nuclear energy [es

  12. Canada's energy perspectives and policies for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Karen; Li Xianguo

    2009-01-01

    A regression analysis is performed to make projections for the Canadian energy production and consumption. These have been increasing and are projected to increase even further in the near future. The primary energy production and consumption are projected to increase by 52% and 34%, respectively, by 2025 over 2004 if business as usual. The amount of fossil energy resources is finite and the extraction, transportation and combustion of fossil fuels cause environmental pollution and climate change. On the other hand, energy plays an important role in the economic and social development of Canada. Canada can develop further from an energy balance point of view, but this alone cannot be sustainable, because of the negative consequences of the major energy use on the environment. Application of energy localization and diversification is a promising solution, but in order to reach that, better energy efficiency and more use of renewable energy are necessary. Instead of non-compulsory policies Canada's policy approach should have more compulsory policies. Only then Canada can be made to develop further in a sustainable manner

  13. Electricity supply without atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnbaum, U.; Duering, K.; Moenig, W.; Mueller, M.; Pohlmann, M.; Wagner, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    Alongside their bill for the immediate closure of all atomic power stations in the F.R.G. (Drs. 10/1913 of the German Bundestag), the parliamentary Greens handed over a study, presented in October 1984, to the F- and T-Committee of the Bundestag for debate. This paper analyses the hypotheses and statements of these discussions. A summary is attached in the appendix. (orig.) [de

  14. The Future of Atomic Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermi, E.

    1946-05-27

    There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

  15. On the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eklund, S [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1963-07-15

    The main concepts motivating the decision to establish an international agency for peaceful uses of atomic energy are presented in the paper. They consists of: 1) co-ordination in the fields of safety field, legal liability and safeguards; 2) ensuring that scientific and technical data are made freely accessible on a worldwide scale and 3) assisting the developing countries in benefiting from this new science and technology and use the atomic energy for economic and social development

  16. Simulating evolution of technology: An aid to energy policy analysis. A case study of strategies to control greenhouse gases in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyboer, John

    Issues related to the reduction of greenhouse gases are encumbered with uncertainties for decision makers. Unfortunately, conventional analytical tools generate widely divergent forecasts of the effects of actions designed to mitigate these emissions. "Bottom-up" models show the costs of reducing emissions attained through the penetration of efficient technologies to be low or negative. In contrast, more aggregate "top-down" models show costs of reduction to be high. The methodological approaches of the different models used to simulate energy consumption generate, in part, the divergence found in model outputs. To address this uncertainty and bring convergence, I use a technology-explicit model that simulates turnover of equipment stock as a function of detailed data on equipment costs and stock characteristics and of verified behavioural data related to equipment acquisition and retrofitting. Such detail can inform the decision maker of the effects of actions to reduce greenhouse gases due to changes in (1) technology stocks, (2) products or services, or (3) the mix of fuels used. This thesis involves two main components: (1) the development of a quantitative model to analyse energy demand and (2) the application of this tool to a policy issue, abatement of COsb2 emissions. The analysis covers all of Canada by sector (8 industrial subsectors, residential commercial) and region. An electricity supply model to provide local electricity prices supplemented the quantitative model. Forecasts of growth and structural change were provided by national macroeconomic models. Seven different simulations were applied to each sector in each region including a base case run and three runs simulating emissions charges of 75/tonne, 150/tonne and 225/tonne CO sb2. The analysis reveals that there is significant variation in the costs and quantity of emissions reduction by sector and region. Aggregated results show that Canada can meet both stabilisation targets (1990 levels of

  17. Development of FPGA-Based Control Board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yoon Hee; Jeong, See Chae; Choi, Woong Seock; Lee, Chang Jae; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Ha, Jae Hong [Korea Power Engineering Company Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    It is well known that existing nuclear power plant (NPP) control systems contain many components which are becoming obsolete at an increasing rate. Various studies have been conducted to address control system hardware obsolescence. Obsolete analog and digital control systems in non-nuclear power plants are commonly replaced with modern digital control systems, programmable logic controllers (PLC) and distributed control systems (DCS). Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are highlighted as an alternative means for obsolete control systems. FPGAs are advanced digital integrated circuits (ICs) that contain configurable (programmable) blocks of logic along with configurable interconnects between these blocks. Designers can configure (program) such devices to perform a tremendous variety of tasks. FPGAs have been evolved from the technology of Programmable Logic Device (PLD). Nowadays they can contain millions of logic gates by nanotechnology and so be used to implement extremely large and complex functions that previously could be realized only using Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). This paper is to present the development of a FPGAbased control board performing user-defined control functions. An Actel ProASIC{sup plus} FPGA platform is implemented as the comparator of Plant Protection System (PPS). Functional simulation is implemented for the comparator.

  18. Identifying barriers to aboriginal renewable energy deployment in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, Joel

    2012-01-01

    As one of the largest and wealthiest countries in the world, Canada stands well-positioned to take advantage of ongoing growth in North American demand for primary energy supply by expanding domestic delivery of renewable energy generation to internationally interconnected electric grids across the country. There are myriad benefits of adopting the renewable energy approach to development—as the province of Ontario has acknowledged through the implementation of their 2009 Green Energy Act—including drastic reductions in carbon emissions, the decommissioning of existing fossil fuel power generation that cause serious public health problems, and opportunities for sustainable development at the community level. One group in particular stands poised to shape these debates. In Canada, historically marginalized Aboriginal peoples remain one of the groups with the greatest potential for meeting these enormous renewable energy deployment needs. Aboriginal involvement in renewable energy generation in Canada has been as diverse as Canada's Aboriginal peoples and groups have already adopted a range of different solutions to meet energy supply needs. However, many significant barriers exist that prevent this diverse cultural group from reaching its full potential. The article identifies some of these shortcomings and analyzes their roots. - Highlights: ► Renewable energy is one of the most important sustainable development opportunities today. ► Aboriginal-led renewable development could dramatically increase Canadian supply. ► Surmountable barriers are identified.

  19. Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) staff assessment and views of current maintenance practices of a four unit CANDU plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, I.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the AECB practices in assessing maintenance activities at one four unit CANDU nuclear plant.-it outlines the authority of the AECB in enforcing the licence condition concerned with maintenance, and how this is interpreted by AECB site staff to measure and report maintenance activities. The AECB staff attaches great importance to proper maintenance as it affects safe operation. Programs used by the licensee staff to identify safety important components, or to predict degradations and failures are of particular interest. In our experience, the application of such programs has been generally good. However, their integration into an overall maintenance scheme can be improved, and the possibilities of integration are not well understood. This paper includes examples of such integration to illustrate our views and to highlight the resultant benefits that AECB staff believes are possible. (author)

  20. HiEnergy Technologies announces scientific advisory board

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    HiEnergy has named the physicists on their independent scientific advisory board. They include Nobel laureate Dr. Melvin Schwartz and Dr. Giovanni Fazio, Senior Physicist at the Harvard Smithsonian Centre (1/2 page).

  1. 78 FR 52171 - State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... EERE with the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative and other proposed programs, provide an update to...; reasonable provision will be made to include requested topic(s) on the agenda. The Chair of the Board is...

  2. 78 FR 44943 - State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ... to assist EERE with the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative and other proposed programs, provide an... be made to include requested topic(s) on the agenda. The Chair of the Board is empowered to conduct...

  3. The state of energy efficiency in Canada 2006 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This report reviewed energy efficiency strategies in Canada's economic sector, and provided information on the contributions made by various energy efficiency initiatives administered by Natural Resources Canada through its Office of Energy Efficiency. Energy use in Canada increased by 22 per cent between 1990 and 2003, in contrast to the 32 per cent anticipated without energy efficiency increases. Energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions were 52 megatonnes lower than they would have been without energy efficiency programs, indicating that strong and measurable progress has been made. In the residential sector, the combined effects of a 26 per cent increase in activity, an increase in energy demand due to weather, and an increase in the average number of appliances per household were partly offset by a 19 per cent improvement in energy efficiency. A 45 per cent increase in industrial activity along with a 13 per cent improvement in energy efficiency between 1990-2003 was noted. A 15 per cent increase in passenger transportation and a 40 per cent increase in freight transportation were offset by a 16 per cent improvement in energy efficiency. Basic policy instruments were reviewed, as well as information and voluntary programs, direct financial incentives, and various regulations to eliminate less efficient products from the market. It was noted that the Green Municipal Fund has recently provided over $248 million to support 419 feasibility studies and energy efficiency projects. The federal budget has provided an additional $300 million towards the fund. 22 figs.

  4. Externalities of energy and atomic power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-09-01

    Energy technology ensures not only energy supply but also has great impacts on society and environments. Economical value and effect evaluation alone doesn't mean appropriate so the evaluation of 'externalities' should be appreciated. In order to assess atomic power in this context, the Atomic Energy Society of Japan set up a research committee on 'externalities of energy and atomic power' from April 2002 to March 2006, whose activities were described in this report. In addition to environmental effects and environmental externalities, four areas were newly studied as follows: (1) biological effects of low dose rate exposure and externalities, (2) externalities as social/economical effects including stable supply and security, (3) energy technologies evaluation and (4) social choice and decision-making. (T. Tanaka)

  5. Report of Atomic Energy Group of Advisory Committee for Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The report consists of two chapters. Chapter 1 addresses the present status and future trends in the field of atomic energy. The present conditions of atomic energy development and social background behind them are described first. Features of atomic energy is discussed in relation to its technique-intensive aspect, stability of supply, stability of price, environmental load, and handling of radioactive materials. The relations of these features with energy policies are then discussed, focusing on basic political principles, optimum combination of various energy sources, and the role to be played by atomic energy. This chapter then deals with future trends in atomic energy development efforts and major problems remaining to be solved. Future supply and demand of energy and electric power are discussed. Problems related with atomic energy development are described focusing on some severe conditions depressing the development activities, and measures to be taken immediately. Chapter 2 describes important issues and measures to be taken in the future towards atomic energy development. Discussion is made on safety measures, back-end measures, promotion of location activities, and publicity. (N.K.)

  6. Energy [R]Evolution: Opportunities for Decarbonizing Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The future of conventional energy in Canada is uncertain. World oil prices have suffered steep declines recently and there are no strong arguments for recovery in the foreseeable future. The country is now engaged in serious debates and discussions over the value of GHG emissions, pipelines, oil and gas operations, and renewable energy. Oilsands deposits in northern Alberta require long-term investment and decades of consistent sales to repay those investments. The election of more progressive governments in Alberta and Canada may provide the national and global credibility and opportunity to address the environmental problems caused by Oilsands and other fossil fuel developments. The discussion will focus on the possible ways forward for Canada to diversify the regional and national economy with renewable energy networks, thereby meeting our Paris GHG emission reduction commitments. The end goal of this work is to see the Canadian economy decarbonized within two decades.

  7. The Ontario Energy Board`s draft standard supply service code: effects on air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, J.; Bjorkquist, S. [Ontario Clean Air Alliance, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1999-06-29

    The Ontario Clean Air Alliance (OCAA), a coalition of 67 organizations, takes issue with the Ontario Energy Board`s draft document `Standard Supply Service Code`, particularly sections 2.2.2. and 2.5.2 which they claim are not in the public interest unless the Ontario government implements the OCAA`s recommended emission caps. The alliance is of the view that without strict new environmental regulations the proposed Code would encourage the use of coal for electricity generation. Public health, the environment, consumer interests, job creation and promotion of a competitive electricity market would all be jeopardized by this development, the alliance states. The argument is supported by extensive reference to the Final Report of the Ontario Market Design Committee (MDC) which also emphasized the importance of combining the introduction of competition with appropriate environmental regulations, singling out the emission cap and trade program, and recommending that it be launched concurrently with the electricity market opening for competition. The view of the MDC was that public support for restructuring would not be forthcoming in the absence of regulatory measures to control power plant emissions. 25 refs.

  8. The new Board of Governors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    Full text: Miss Blanche Margaret Meagher was elected chairman of the IAEA Board of Governors for 1964-65, after the new Board had been constituted at the Eighth Session of the General Conference in September. Since 1962 Miss Meagher has been Canadian Ambassador to Austria, and Canadian Governor of the Agency. Miss Meagher joined the Canadian Department of External Affairs in 1942, and has held a number of foreign diplomatic appointments; she has also served on Canadian delegations to the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the International Telecommunication Union, the Economic and Social Council of UN and the UN Disarmament Sub-Committee. The Vice-Chairmen of the Board are Mr. Wilhelm Billig (Poland) and Mr. Hassan M. Tohamy (UAR). Mr. Billig is Chairman of the State Council for Atomic Energy, and High Commissioner for Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. Mr. Tohamy is Ambassador to Austria, and Resident Representative to the Agency. Of the twelve elected members of the Board, five were chosen by the General Conference in 1964 for two years, viz. Argentina, Chile, Netherlands, Thailand and the United Arab Republic. Seven were elected in 1963: Afghanistan, China, Congo (Leopoldville), Morocco, Romania, Switzerland and Uruguay. The remaining thirteen members have been designated by the Board: Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Finland, France, India, Japan, Poland, South Africa, USSR, United Kingdom and United States. (author)

  9. The Mean Excitation Energy of Atomic Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Stephan; Oddershede, Jens; Sabin, John R.

    2015-01-01

    A method for calculation of the mean excitation energies of atomic ions is presented, making the calculation of the energy deposition of fast ions to plasmas, warm, dense matter, and complex biological systems possible. Results are reported to all ions of helium, lithium, carbon, neon, aluminum...

  10. The Harnessed Atom: Nuclear Energy & Electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    This document is part of a nuclear energy curriculum designed for grades six through eight. The complete kit includes a written text, review exercises, activities for the students, and a teachers guide. The 19 lessons in the curriculum are divided into four units including: (1) "Energy and Electricity"; (2) "Understanding Atoms and Radiation"; (3)…

  11. Low cost energy in Canada: The view from downstream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irving, K.

    1993-01-01

    The key cost determinants of energy in Canada are analyzed and recommendations are made to ensure the competitiveness of Canadian energy costs and energy-consuming industries in the North American and world markets. Oil supplies 45% of world energy and has a key role in determining prices of all other energy forms since it serves as an incremental source of energy: its consumption changes according to economic growth, changes in weather patterns, and other factors. North America currently accounts for about a third of world oil consumption. North American oil demand is expected to remain flat over the next few decades. As Canada only produces ca 3% of world oil supply, it cannot determine oil prices. However, with an efficient downstream industry, Canada can influence the end-user price of energy. The cost structure of refined products in Canada is analyzed. The cost of raw materials is the single biggest determinant of the final product cost, followed by taxes, operating costs, and profit margin. For gasoline in Ontario, taxes account for half the retail cost, crude oil prices ca 30%, and refining costs ca 4%. Refining costs comprise about two thirds labor costs and one third energy costs. Refiner margins have not exceeded 2 cents/l since 1981, creating reluctance to invest in the refining sector. By 1994, some 200,000 bbl/d of refining capacity is expected to be shut down in Canada. Compared to refineries in the USA, Canadian refineries are smaller and have a much lower capacity to upgrade residual fuel oil to light products. Future challenges to the industry include a projected need for $5 billion in investment, largely to fund new environmental initiatives. Such an investment cannot be met through current industry profits. 12 figs., 3 tabs

  12. 76 FR 58049 - Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; Honeywell International, Inc.; Metropolis Works Uranium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 40-3392-MLA; ASLBP No. 11-910-01-MLA-BD01] Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; Honeywell International, Inc.; Metropolis Works Uranium Conversion Facility... assurance for its Metropolis Works uranium conversion facility in Metropolis, Illinois. \\1\\ LBP-11-19, 74...

  13. Functions of the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection of the German Democratic Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Functions of the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection of the GDR are described considering the following aspects: Nuclear plant safety, nuclear safeguards, physical protection, safety in working areas, environmental protection including radioactive waste management, protection of man by medical supervision and dosimetry, further training, international co-operation and information. (author)

  14. Circuit Board Analysis for Lead by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in a Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhammer, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    A circuit board analysis of the atomic absorption spectroscopy, which is used to measure lead content in a course for nonscience majors, is being presented. The experiment can also be used to explain the potential environmental hazards of unsafe disposal of various used electronic equipments.

  15. Independent directors’ board networks and controlling shareholders’ tunneling behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yunsen; Wang, Yutao; Lin, Le

    2014-01-01

    As one of the channels by which board directors build important relationships, board networks can affect the governance role of independent directors. Defining director board networks as their connections based on direct ties they establish when serving on at least one common board, this paper explores the role of the network centrality of independent directors in restraining tunneling behavior by controlling shareholders in the Chinese capital market. Our empirical evidence shows that tunnel...

  16. Renewable energy research and development in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappell, M S

    1979-12-01

    Canadian research and development (R and D) in renewable energy began as a result of the oil crisis in 1974, and in keeping with government policy, is predominantly carried out in the private sector under contract to the federal government. The variety in technical maturity of the renewable energy technologies is reflected in the non-uniform funding levels among the five constituent programs. The greatest support is allotted to solar energy in recognition of its enormous potential, both in low to mid-temperature thermal and in photovoltaic applications. This report describes the technical content of these five renewable energy and R and D programs, and outlines the organization and management structures used to direct the effort. Biomass energy R and D concentrates on the harvesting, processing and conversion of wood wastes into convenient fuel forms. Near-term applications will continue to be in the forest products industries. Wind energy R and D in geothermal energy are focussed on identification and quantification of the resource. A five-megawatt experimental geothermal heating system is being established at the University of Regina. The hydraulic energy R and D program does not consider conventional hydro-electric systems which are well developed; rather, it primarily covers laboratory-scale tests on conversion devices for wave, tidal, and river flow energy systems. A substantial effort is also underway in analytic and modelling techniques for hydraulic energy systems of all types. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Canada's energy future : reference case and scenarios to 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Energy is essential to the comfort and economic prosperity of Canadians. This report highlighted some of the issues that Canada faces with respect to its energy future. The report focused on emerging trends in energy supply and demand, and examined various energy futures that may be available to Canadians up to the year 2030. Three different scenarios were presented: (1) a continuing trends scenario; (2) a triple E scenario in which economic, environmental and energy objectives are balanced; and (3) a fortified islands scenario in which security concerns were coupled with international unrest and protectionist governments. The report determined that energy demand will remain a function of population and economic growth. Automobiles will continue to rely on fossil fuels. Energy efficiency will improve in relation to the effectiveness of government policies, and a move towards natural gas alternatives will occur. However, fossil fuels will remain a dominant source of energy supply. Oil sands production grew in all 3 of the evaluated scenarios. It is expected that total natural gas production will decline and imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) will increase. In all 3 scenarios greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions increased or only slightly declined. A full spectrum of GHG mitigation strategies will need to be implemented so that Canada can meet its target of a 20 per cent reduction in GHGs by 2020. It was concluded that effective policies are needed to optimize Canada's multiple objectives of economic growth, environment sustainability, and development of energy resources. 6 tabs., 118 figs

  18. Canada's voluntary industrial energy conservation programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Jr., C. A.

    1979-07-01

    The organization of the voluntary industrial energy conservation program is described. There are 15 industrial sectors in the program and the plan implemented by the sectors including individual companies, trade associations, industry task forces, task force coordinating committee, and government is described. Targets for attack are mainly housekeeping projects, energy efficiency in retrofitting, and new processes. Problems are identified. It is concluded that compiled total performance has essentially achieved its target of 12% improved energy efficiency two years ahead of schedule. (MCW)

  19. Zero energy growth for Canada: necessity and opportunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, D B

    1976-05-01

    In resolving questions about the energy growth rate in Canada, two basic routes are possible: to allow costs and prices to adjust sufficiently to bring supply and demand into balance, presumably at a lower energy growth rate, or to adopt the normative propostion that some explicit choice should be made about target rates of energy consumption. This essay suggests that Canada should follow the latter route and that policies should be adopted to move Canada to a position close to zero energy growth by the year 2000. The thesis is that such a target is both feasible and desirable, with emphasis on the latter. Desirability is defined very broadly to include economic, social and environmental aspects. This essay attempts to answer basic questions about the nature of a low-energy alternative for Canada. In particular, energy conservation is associated with a larger construct called the conserver society, involving goals such as moderation in scale and in rates of change, emphasis on personal contact and community, and maintenance of a wide diversity of people and activities, as well as with the more obvious connotations of reduced material throughput and an improved environment. In this construct, zero energy growth is quite compatible with Canadian conditions that require major attention to space heating and a large transportation sector. Combined with the fact that the energy intended to be conserved includes all non-renewable energy and any other energy produced under capital-intensive, centralized conditions, but not small solar, biomass or wind plants, which can be accepted without destroying the conserver society values, it is felt that there is abundant energy for Canadians to live very well. 41 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Atomic Energy Authority Act 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Under this Act the UKAEA is given power to borrow so that it can finance its capital expenditure programme, and will undertake a debt to the Secretary of State for Energy representing its assets. Power is given for the Government to guarantee such borrowing. The UKAEA has been organised financially on the basis of a trading fund. The Act came into force on 1 April 1986. (NEA) [fr

  1. 77 FR 1748 - Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; Calvert Cliffs 3 Nuclear Project, LLC, and UniStar Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... under represents potential contributions of wind and solar power, the combination alternative depends... Judge Ronald M. Spritzer, Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel, Mail Stop T-3F23, U.S. Nuclear..., Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel, Mail Stop T-3F23, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Fax: (301...

  2. Ozone depletion, greenhouse effect and atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adzersen, K.H.

    1991-01-01

    After describing the causes and effects of ozone depletion and the greenhouse effect, the author discusses the alternative offered by the nuclear industry. In his opinion, a worldwide energy strategy of risk minimisation will not be possible unless efficient energy use is introduced immediately, efficiently and on a reliable basis. Atomic energy is not viewed as an acceptable means of preventing the threatening climate change. (DG) [de

  3. Atomic Energy Authority Bill (Lords) - second reading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In the debate in the House of Commons on the second reading of the Atomic Energy Bill, the objective of which is to put the finances of the Authority on to a trading fund basis, the discussion included the following: proposed changes in method of financing the Authority; safety; underlying research; customer relations; accountability; personnel; public relations; radioactive waste management; energy research; parliamentary scrutiny; energy policy; nuclear power; fast reactors; fusion research; government policy. (U.K.)

  4. Falling behind - Canada's lost clean energy jobs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-05-15

    With the depletion of conventional resources and the increasing concerns about the environment, emphasis has been put on developing clean energy. Clean energy is expected to become one of the main industrial sectors within the next decade, thus creating numerous jobs. While significant investments have been made by several countries to shift to clean energy, Canada is investing in highly polluting resources such as the tar sands. It is shown that if Canada were to match U.S. efforts in terms of clean energy on a per person basis, they would need to invest 11 billion additional dollars and this would result in the creation of 66,000 clean energy jobs. This paper showed that Canada is falling behind in terms of clean energy and the authors recommend that the Canadian government match U.S. investments and design policies in support of clean energy and put a price on carbon so as to favor the development of the clean energy sector and its consequent job creation.

  5. Administrative Arrangement between the Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada and le Service central de surete des installations nucleaires du Ministere de l'industrie et de l'amenagement du territoire de la Republique francaise for the exchange of technical information and cooperation in the regulation of nuclear safety (10 May 1990)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Arrangement which entered into force on the date of its signature and remains in effect for five years, provides for exchange of information between both agencies on the regulation of nuclear facilities and intervention measures in cases of emergency. This includes information on regulatory procedures for the safety of designated nuclear facilities, notification of important events, such as serious operating incidents, reactor shutdowns ordered by the regulatory authorities, etc. (NEA) [fr

  6. Toward an energy security strategy for Canada : a discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-12-01

    Energy security strategies for Canada were presented in this paper. Article 6.05 of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) prohibits Canada from reducing the proportion of energy exported to the United States or Mexico. Between 1982 and 2002, natural gas consumption in Canada rose by 96 per cent while exports increased by 396 per cent. Crude oil consumption increased by 29 per cent, while exports rose by 595 per cent. Government practices have tended towards extracting and exporting resources as quickly as possible with no consideration to resource availability for future generations. In addition, much of the value of Canadian resources has been given to private corporations. The environment has been damaged in order to enable faster extraction, and First Nations, employees, and communities have been placed at the mercy of corporations and international markets. Canada's unique cultural and societal arrangements have not been protected. Four principles to address these concerns were presented: (1) managing non-renewable resources as responsible stewards and conserving their economic availability for future generations; (2) ensuring that the benefits from fossil fuels are invested in other forms of capital that will ensure the future prosperity and energy security of Canada; (3) ensuring that the extraction and use of resources has minimal impacts on the planet and (4) a re-direction of the proceeds from resource exploitation towards education, social and health services, land claims and land use settlements, and the elimination of poverty among First Nations people. It was suggested that energy-related jobs and workers should be protected through the development of an industrial strategy which includes investment in renewable energy development and re-training programs for workers. Consistent depoliticized policies are needed to reduce the impact on low-income Canadians of free-market price swings and the unavoidable costs of environmental protection. It was

  7. Safety aspects of nuclear plant licensing in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennekens, J.H.F.

    1975-01-01

    The legislative authority is laid down in the Atomic Energy Control Act, 1946, declaring atomic energy a matter of national interest and establishing the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) as the competent body for regulating all aspects of atomic energy. The Act also vests a Minister designated by the Government with research and exploitation functions; thus, by Ministerial order, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited was established in 1952 as a State-owned company. The Nuclear Liability Act, 1970, channels all liability for nuclear damage to the operator of a nuclear installation and requires him to obtain insurance in the amount of $75 million, part of which may be re-insured by the Government. The licensing requirements comprise the issuance of a site approval, a construction licence and an operating licence. The AECB is assisted in its licensing functions by its Nuclear Plant Licensing Directorate and by the Reactor Safety Advisory Committee co-operating with each other in making extensive safety assessments of a licence application. A site evaluation report, a preliminary safety report and a final safety report are required in relation to the siting, construction and operation of a nuclear power plant. The Canadian reactor safety philosophy is based on the concept of defence in depth, implemented through a multi-step approach, which includes avoidance of malfunctions, provision of special safety systems, periodic inspection and testing, and avoidance of human errors. Specific criteria and principles have evolved in applying this basic safety philosophy and radiation protection standards are derived from international recommendations. Stringent control is exercised over the management of radioactive waste and management facilities must meet the engineering and procedural requirements of AECB before they can be placed in operation. (author)

  8. Intervention of the Canadian Nuclear Association to the National Energy Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This submission from the Canadian Nuclear Association to the National Energy Board of Canada was made in support of the application by the New Brunswick Electric Power Commission to increase its electricity exports from the Point Lepreau nuclear station to the New England states from 205 MW to 335 MW. The Canadian Nuclear Association felt that their support was justified in view of the fact that the CANDU nuclear reactor had proven itself to be a safe, reliable and economic source of electric generation. They felt the 630 MW CANDU station at Point Lepreau, New Brunswick would have sufficient generating capacity to export 335 MW for a ten-year period

  9. Critical Energy Infrastructure Protection in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    department for the Energy sector, has been pro- active and innovative in enhancing protection for national critical energy infrastructure (NCI). While...prospérité (PSP), mais des relations transfrontalières plus informelles entre les propriétaires/opérateurs et leurs associations industrielles ...create innovative solutions for CIP. 9. International Cooperation: participate in international CIP initiatives and to strengthen information-sharing

  10. Review and prospects of Atomic Energy Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartkopf, G.

    1983-01-01

    At the 7th German Symposium on Atomic Energy Law which took place on March 16th, 1983 in Goettingen the Undersecretary of State of the Federal Ministery of the Interior, Dr. Guenter Hartkopf, delivered the opening speech. The speech deals with the conditions set by constitutional law and ethics, improvement of nuclear liability, guide line for incident response, participation of the public in licensing procedures under atomic energy law, necessary measures to prevent damage, the concept of waste management. Also in future the safety of the citizens has absolute priority. (orig./HSCH) [de

  11. White paper on atomic energy in 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In Japan, there are currently 21 nuclear power plants in operation with a total capacity of 15,000MW. Under the present situation of the so-called second energy crisis, the role of nuclear power is assuming increasingly more importance. The white paper is presented covering the one year period from October 1978; statistics, however, are for fiscal 1978. Contents are the following: part I general ''world nuclear power situation, advances in nuclear energy, the outlook for 1980s''; part II the status of nuclear power ''nuclear power generation, nuclear power safety, nuclear fuel cycle, international activities, safeguards, development of power reactors, nuclear fusion/nuclear powered ship/high-temperature gas cooled reactor, radiation utilization, basic research, nuclear power industry''; part III references (organization/plans of Atomic Energy Commission etc., atomic energy budgets, nuclear energy statistics, etc.). (J.P.N.)

  12. Nuclear Energy Board Final Report 1973-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    The Nuclear Energy Board (NEB) will shortly cease to exist with its responsibilities being transferred to a new organisation the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII), to be established under the Radiological Protection Act which became law in May 1991. This concluding statement issued by the Board on its dissolution, focuses attention on the important resource which the RPII will have at its disposal in the light of the experience of the NEB over the past 18 years

  13. Regulatory control of radioactivity and nuclear fuel cycle in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, P.E.; Jennekens, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    The mining of pitchblende for the extraction of radium some four decades ago resulted in a largely unwanted by-product, uranium, which set the stage for Canada to be one of the first countires in the world to embark upon a nuclear energy program. From this somewhat unusual beginning, the Canadian program expanded beyond mining of uranium-bearing ores to include extensive research and development in the field of radio-isotope applications, research and power reactors, nuclear-fuel conversion and fabrication facilities, heavy-water production plants and facilities for the management of radioactive wastes. As in the case of any major technological development, nuclear energy poses certain risks on the part of those directly engaged in the industry and on the part of the general public. What characterizes these risks is not so much their physical nature as the absence of long-term experience and the confidence resulting from it. The early development of regulatory controls in the nuclear field in Canada was very much influenced by security considerations but subsequently evolved to include radiological protection and safety requirements commensurate with the expanding application of nuclear energy to a wide spectrum of peaceful uses. A review of Canadian nuclear regulatory experience will reveal that the risks posed by the peaceful uses of nuclear energy can be controlled in such a manner as to ensure a high level of safety. Recent events and development have shown however that emphasis on the risks associated with low-probability, high-consequence events must not be allowed to mask the importance of health and safety measures covering the entire fuel cycle

  14. Laser Control of Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Letkhov, V S

    2007-01-01

    This text treats laser light as a universal tool to control matter at the atomic and molecular level, one of the most exciting applications of lasers. Lasers can heat matter, cool atoms to ultra-low temperatures where they show quantum collective behaviour, and can act selectively on specific atoms and molecules for their detection and separation.

  15. The energy crisis and Bonn's atomic energy programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhaus, K.; Heimbrecht, J.

    1979-01-01

    What are the background and causes of the energy crisis. In whose interest and on whose back is energy policy made in our country. Will the lights go out without nuclear power. Which are the real goals and dangers of Bonn's atomic energy programme. Is coal a real alternative to nuclear power in the Federal Republic of Germany. What possibilities and requirements are there for a national and democratic energy policy in the Federal Republic of Germany. Which are the central problems of the protest movement against the government's atomic energy programme. These questions, which are still in the centre of political discussion, are investigated by the authors. (orig.) [de

  16. Israel Atomic Energy Commission 1997 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    radioisotope diagnostics and therapy by individually calibrated, rapidly dissolving capsules, resulted in better dose control and reduced patient and personnel exposures. The non-nuclear aspect of our work is represented this year by the fourth paper, which deals with the utilization of our plasma physics expertise in the development and parametric studies of advanced Hall thrusters for space applications. An interesting outcome of this work was the disco Query of the dependence of the electrical characteristics and performance of the thruster on the material its chamber is made of. Finally, I would like to commend once again the authors of the selected presentations as well as the entire staff of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission for their continued efforts, contributions and achievements and to wish them all many more years of fruitful endeavors

  17. Israel Atomic Energy Commission 1997 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    radioisotope diagnostics and therapy by individually calibrated, rapidly dissolving capsules, resulted in better dose control and reduced patient and personnel exposures. The non-nuclear aspect of our work is represented this year by the fourth paper, which deals with the utilization of our plasma physics expertise in the development and parametric studies of advanced Hall thrusters for space applications. An interesting outcome of this work was the disco Query of the dependence of the electrical characteristics and performance of the thruster on the material its chamber is made of. Finally, I would like to commend once again the authors of the selected presentations as well as the entire staff of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission for their continued efforts, contributions and achievements and to wish them all many more years of fruitful endeavors.

  18. Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, regulatory highlights for 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    This new publication informs readers about what the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) did in the past year, including important regulatory issues, trends and initiatives. The EUB is an agency of the provincial government, established to regulate Alberta`s energy resource and utility sectors. It is part of the Alberta Ministry of Energy. The four main functions of the Board are regulatory initiatives, license applications, enforcement and information. This publication summarized the EUB`s position regarding flaring (both solution gas flaring and well test flaring), and Board activities in the areas of animal health concerns, the gas over bitumen controversy, the deregulation of the electric industry and what it means to the EUB, improvements in data quality as a result of improved industry compliance in reporting, and a variety of issues related to the oil sands and the negotiated settlement process. Also, the Board has been proactive in the area of oilfield waste management guidelines, proliferation policies for gas processing facilities, sulphur recovery guidelines, and the expansion of the orphan well program to include facilities and pipelines. As a measure of the success of the EUB, a recent survey of 19 randomly selected focus groups praised EUB for its impartiality, fair and equitable enforcement and independence. It was also praised for its technically competent and experienced staff, its access to quality information and the clarity of its mandate, regulatory requirements and processes. The Board`s efforts in the area of timely stakeholder consultation was highlighted. tabs., figs.

  19. 78 FR 11167 - Meetings: State Energy Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463; 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of these meetings be... carry out the Board's responsibilities as designated in the State Energy Efficiency Programs Improvement... and Renewable Energy (EERE), discuss new initiatives and technologies generated by the EERE program...

  20. Not Just the Facts: Adjudicator Bias and Decisions of the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (2006-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Innessa Colaiacovo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB is Canada’s largest administrative tribunal. The Refugee Protection Division (RPD of the IRB is responsible for the adjudication of refugee claims made from within Canada.  In accordance with its obligations under international law, Canada grants protection to persons who have a well-founded fear of persecution because of race, nationality, religion, political opinion, or membership in a particular social group. In addition, a person may request protection in Canada on the basis of his or her fear of torture, risk to life or risk of cruel and unusual treatment or punishment. Acceptance (approval rates of claims vary widely across members of the IRB, with some granting asylum in less than 10 percent of cases, and others granting asylum in more than 90 percent of cases. Despite this fact, there is a lack of analysis exploring whether grant rates vary systematically in relationship to observed characteristics of adjudicators. This paper presents statistical analysis of over 68,000 refugee claims adjudicated by 264 members of the board from 2006 to 2011. It finds that the probability of acceptance is associated with individual members’ characteristics including education, gender, and professional experience, when holding constant the claimant’s country of origin, gender, and the year and regional office of adjudication. The findings suggest that the identity of the adjudicator affects whether or not an individual receives asylum. 

  1. Golden mean energy equals highest atomic electron orbital energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, Leonard J. [Interdisciplinary Research Club, P.O. Box 371, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States)], E-mail: LJMalinowski@gmail.com

    2009-12-15

    The golden mean numerical value {phi} = 0.5({radical}5 - 1) has been given a physical manifestation through E infinity theory. This short paper relates the golden mean energy 0.618034 MeV to atomic electron orbitals.

  2. Golden mean energy equals highest atomic electron orbital energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, Leonard J.

    2009-01-01

    The golden mean numerical value φ = 0.5(√5 - 1) has been given a physical manifestation through E infinity theory. This short paper relates the golden mean energy 0.618034 MeV to atomic electron orbitals.

  3. Temperature distribution of the energy consumed as heat in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puttagunta, V.R.

    1974-10-01

    The amount of energy consumed as heat (excluding thermal generation of electricity) in Canada is estimated from statistical data available on the total consumption of energy for the years 1958 to 2000. Based on some actual plant data and other statistical information this energy consumption is sub-divided into four temperature categories: high (>260 degrees C), intermediate (140-260 degrees C), low (100-140 degrees C), and space heating (<100 degrees C). The results of this analysis show that approximately half of all the energy consumed in Canada has an end use as heat. Less than 10 percent of the energy consumed as heat is in the high temperature category, 12 to 14 percent is in the intermediate temperature range, 21 to 27 percent is in the low temperature range, and 50 to 58 percent is used for space heating. Over 90 percent of the energy consumed as heat in Canada is within the temperature capability of the CANDU-PHW reactor. (author)

  4. Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel Biennial Report, Fiscal Years 1993--1994. Volume 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    In Fiscal Year 1993, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel (''the Panel'') handled 30 proceedings. In Fiscal Year 1994, the Panel handled 36 proceedings. The cases addressed issues in the construction, operation, and maintenance of commercial nuclear power reactors and other activities requiring a license form the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report sets out the Panel's caseload during the year and summarizes, highlight, and analyzes how the wide- ranging issues raised in those proceedings were addressed by the Panel's judges and licensing boards

  5. Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel Biennial Report, Fiscal Years 1993--1994. Volume 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    In Fiscal Year 1993, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel (``the Panel``) handled 30 proceedings. In Fiscal Year 1994, the Panel handled 36 proceedings. The cases addressed issues in the construction, operation, and maintenance of commercial nuclear power reactors and other activities requiring a license form the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report sets out the Panel`s caseload during the year and summarizes, highlight, and analyzes how the wide- ranging issues raised in those proceedings were addressed by the Panel`s judges and licensing boards.

  6. Atomic Energy Act and ordinances. 8. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The new issue of the text contains the Atomic Energy Act (AtG) in its new wording of the announcement of 31 Oct 76, the new wording of the ordinances put in effect in 1977: Atomic procedure ordinance (AtVfV), radiation protection ordinance (SSU), and atomic financial security ordinance (AtDeckV); furthermore the x-ray ordinance (RoeV) of 1978 in its wording which has been changed by the radiation protection ordinance. Also printed are the cost ordinance (AtKostV) of 1971, the food irradiation ordinance (LebensmBestrV) in the wording of 1975 and the medicine ordinance (ArzneimV) in the wording of 1971. An addition was made by adding to the liability laws the Paris agreement (PUE) on the liability towards third persons in the field of nuclear energy in the wording of the announcement of 5 Feb 76. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Danish Atomic Energy Commission 1974/75

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    Activities of the Danish Atomic Energy Commission and the Risoe eesearch Establishment for the period April1, 1974 to March 31, 1975 are summarized. The operations of the various facilities at the Research Establishment are revised. Operating staff levels and financial data are tabulated, a selected list of staff publications is given, and the design data on research facilities are presented. (B.P.)

  8. Philippine Atomic Energy Commission: Annual report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This publication gives the highlights of the research and development projects of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission in agriculture and food, nuclear fuels and power system technology, medicine, public health and nutrition, environmental surveillance, supportive basic research, social response to nuclear technology, nuclear licensing and safeguards, supportive technology and international and local linkages including manpower development. (ELC)

  9. The International Atomic Energy Agency's safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.

    2000-01-01

    A system of international safeguards has been established to provide assurance that nuclear materials in civilian use are not diverted from their peaceful purpose. The safeguards system is administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency/Department of Safeguards and devolves from treaties and other international agreements. Inspectors from the Agency verify reports from States about nuclear facilities by audits, observation, and measurements. (author)

  10. Ghana Atomic Energy Commission: Annual Report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This report covers the activities and research progams of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 2001. The research programs and associated publications have been grouped under the three main institutes of the Commission namely National Nuclear Research Institute, Radiation Protection Institute and Biotechnology and Nuclear Agricultre Research Institute.

  11. Ghana Atomic Energy Commission: Annual Report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This report covers the activities and research progams of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 2001. The research programs and associated publications have been grouped under the three main institutes of the Commission namely National Nuclear Research Institute, Radiation Protection Institute and Biotechnology and Nuclear Agricultre Research Institute

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency. Highlights of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, V.A.

    1991-09-01

    This document provides a brief, well-illustrated summary of the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the months up to September 1991. Especially mentioned are the programmes to enhance the safety of nuclear power, from the study of nuclear reactors to assessing the radiological consequences of reactor accidents, and the areas of non-proliferation and safeguards

  13. International Atomic Energy Agency: Highlights of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, A.

    1992-09-01

    This document provides a brief, well-illustrated summary of the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the months up to September 1992. Especially mentioned are the programmes to enhance the safety of nuclear power, from the study of nuclear reactors to assessing the radiological consequences of reactor accidents, and the areas of non-proliferation and safeguards

  14. Institute of Atomic Energy - Annual Report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiboda, G.

    2000-01-01

    This Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research works carried out at the Institute at 1999. As in the preceding years the authors of the individual scientific reports published in this Annual Report are fully responsible for their content and layout. The Report contains the information on other activities of the Institute as well

  15. Institute of Atomic Energy - Annual Report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiboda, G.

    1999-01-01

    This Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research works carried out at the Institute in 1998. As in the preceding years the authors of the individual scientific reports published in this Annual Report are fully responsible for their content and layout. The Report contains the information on other activities of the Institute as well

  16. Atomic Energy Act with ordinances. 16. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, E.

    1992-01-01

    The convenient edition contains the entire body of German atomic energy and radiation protection laws in their updated version as of June 1992. Thus it also takes the amendments of the Atomic Energy Act (Article 22 Paragraph 1 Sentence 1 and Paragraph 3 as well as Article 46 Paragraph 3 Atomic Energy Act) into account on the basis of the Law on the Establishment of a Federal Export Office from February 28, 1992 (Code of Federal Laws I, pp. 376 ff). As a result of this law, which became effective as of April 1, 1992, within the scope of business of the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs, a federal export office was established which was endowed with the status of a federal agency. This office is in charge of administrative and supervisory tasks on the federal level. Within the framework of the atomic energy law this agency is in charge of export and import permits as well as the supervision of the export and import of nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Energy dissipation in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Pukhova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The instantaneous displacement, velocity and acceleration of a cantilever tip impacting onto a graphite surface are reconstructed. The total dissipated energy and the dissipated energy per cycle of each excited flexural mode during the tip interaction is retrieved. The tip dynamics evolution is studied by wavelet analysis techniques that have general relevance for multi-mode atomic force microscopy, in a regime where few cantilever oscillation cycles characterize the tip–sample interaction.

  18. Viet Nam National Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Vietnam National Atomic Energy Commission (VINATOM) is a governmental body in charge of organizing and coordinating activities related to use of nuclear energy for peaceful purpose. VINATOM in structure consists of the Nuclear Research Institute (Dalat), the Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (Hanoi), the Institute for Technology of Radioactive and Rare Elements (Hanoi), and the Centre for Nuclear Technique Application (Ho Chi Minh City). This catalogue introduces profiles of nuclear R and D activities under management by VINATOM. (N.H.A)

  19. Philippine Atomic Energy Commission: Annual report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    This publication enumerates the research and development activities of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission with priorities geared towards achieving the economic and social upliftment of the Filipinos in the field of agriculture, energy, industry, health and environment. Highlights are summaries of investigations and studies of great importance in crop improvement, animal production, nuclear fuels, nutrition research, not to mention its supportive technology, technical services, nuclear information and public acceptance, and nuclear manpower development. (RTD)

  20. Task analysis methods applicable to control room design review (CDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moray, N.P.; Senders, J.W.; Rhodes, W.

    1985-06-01

    This report presents the results of a research study conducted in support of the human factors engineering program of the Atomic Energy Control Board in Canada. It contains five products which may be used by the Atomic Enegy Control Board in relation to Task Analysis of jobs in CANDU nuclear power plants: 1. a detailed method for preparing for a task analysis; 2. a Task Data Form for recording task analysis data; 3. a detailed method for carrying out task analyses; 4. a guide to assessing alternative methods for performing task analyses, if such are proposed by utilities or consultants; and 5. an annotated bibliography on task analysis. In addition, a short explanation of the origins, nature and uses of task analysis is provided, with some examples of its cost effectiveness. 35 refs

  1. Assessment of tidal and wave energy conversion technologies in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This paper presented an attractive option to help meet Canada's future energy needs, notably the vast and energetic Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic coastal waters which make ocean renewable energy, particularly tidal in-stream energy conversion (TISEC) and wave energy conversion (WEC). There is much uncertainty regarding the possible environmental impacts associated with their deployment and operation. In support of commercial development of the industry, a review of scientific knowledge was needed for the development of policy and regulations consistent with Canada's conservation and sustainability priorities. In April 2009, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) hosted a two-day national science advisory process meeting in order to determine the current state of knowledge on the environmental impacts of tidal and wave energy conversion technologies and their application in the Canadian context based on published reports. Potential mitigation measures were identified and the feasibility of developing a relevant Canadian statement of practice was determined. This report presented an assessment and analysis of wave power, including the impacts on physical processes; impacts on habitat characteristics; impacts on water quality; impacts of noise and vibrations; impacts of electromagnetic fields; impacts of physical encounters; cumulative impacts; and mitigation measures. It was concluded that there is a recognized need to develop and maintain national and regional georeferenced, interoperable, standards-based databases that enable access by governments, developers, academics, non-governmental organizations and the general public. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  2. Controlling front-end electronics boards using commercial solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Beneyton, R; Jost, B; Schmeling, S

    2002-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated B-physics experiment under construction at CERN's large hadron collider (LHC) accelerator. This paper will describe the novel approach LHCb is taking toward controlling and monitoring of electronics boards. Instead of using the bus in a crate to exercise control over the boards, we use credit-card sized personal computers (CCPCs) connected via Ethernet to cheap control PCs. The CCPCs will provide a simple parallel, I2C, and JTAG buses toward the electronics board. Each board will be equipped with a CCPC and, hence, will be completely independently controlled. The advantages of this scheme versus the traditional bus-based scheme will be described. Also, the integration of the controls of the electronics boards into a commercial supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system will be shown. (5 refs).

  3. Department of Atomic Energy: Annual report, 1983-84

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The annual report of the Department of Atomic Energy for the financial year 1983-84 describes its activities under the headings: Nuclear Power, Research and Development, Public Sector Undertakings, and Other Activities. The report surveys: (1) the performance of nuclear power plants at Tarapur, Kota and Kalpakkam, heavy water plants, fuel fabrication and reprocessing plants, and waste management facilities, (2) the research and development activities of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre at Bombay and its constituent units at various locations in the country, Reactor Research Centre at Kalpakkam, the aided institutes, namely, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research and Tata Memorial Centre, both at Bombay, and Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics at Calcutta, (3) performance of public sector undertakings: Indian Rare Earths Ltd., Uranium Corporation of India Ltd., and Electronics Corporation of India Ltd., (4) progress of nuclear power projects at Narora and Kakrapar, Orissa Sand Complex Project, MHD project at Tiruchirapalli, DHRUVA (formerly known as R-5) project at Bombay, Fast Breeder Test Reactor and 500 MW Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor projects at Kalpakkam, and heavy water projects at Thal-Vaishet and Manuguru, and (5) other activities including technology transfer; training; service to industry, agriculture and medicine in use of radioisotopes and radiation, export of radioisotopes, allied products and nuclear instruments; international relations; countrywide radiation safety programme, exploration of atomic minerals; information and publicity etc. An Atomic Energy Regulatory Board was established during the report year for the special purpose of carrying out regulatory and safety functions specified in the Atomic Energy Act of the Government of India. (M.G.B.)

  4. Report of an International Atomic Energy Agency's Advisory Group meeting on ''Quality control of cyclotron-produced radiopharmaceuticals''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera-Ruiz, H.; Marcus, C.S.; Pike, V.W.

    1990-01-01

    The special requirements for the preparation and quality control of cyclotron-produced tracers have been described with particular reference to the production of short-lived positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The regulatory philosophy and training aspects of implementation are considered followed by various aspects of quality of control including good production practice, chemical purity, radionuclide purity, radiochemical purity, specific activity, shelf-life and sterility and apyrogenicity. Finally some organizational aspects such as legal and regulatory aspects, supply of radiopharmaceuticals and professional liability are considered. (UK)

  5. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.; Hinds, E.A.

    2015-01-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry

  6. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Hinds, E.A., E-mail: Clare.Burrage@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: Edmund.Copeland@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: Ed.Hinds@imperial.ac.uk [Centre for Cold Matter, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry.

  7. Report on energy supply and demand in Canada : 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dion, M.; Lacroix, J.; Smalldridge, G.; Svab, J.; Cromey, N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of energy use in Canada. The year 1990 was used as a starting point because that is the base year for energy inventories for the Kyoto Protocol. Data was derived from monthly and quarterly surveys. The report describes data quality and methodology as well as energy conversion factors. It includes individual tables on primary and secondary energy for: coal, crude oil, natural gas, natural gas liquids, primary electricity, steam, coke, secondary electricity, refined petroleum products, non-energy refined petroleum products, solid wood waste, and spent liquor. The most recent data on energy demand and supply indicates that Canadians consumed energy for transportation twice as fast as the nation's industries did in the past 12 years. From 1990 to 2002, energy consumption in the transportation sector increased 22.7 per cent while demand in the industrial sector rose by 11.7 per cent. Canada's energy consumption increased 17.6 per cent from 1990 to 2002. In 2002, the transportation and industrial sectors each accounted for 30 per cent of total energy consumption. Consumption of natural gas, refined petroleum and coal increased 18.1 per cent, with the greatest increased being in natural gas. In 2002, electricity produced by water, nuclear power, wind and tidal action accounted for 25 per cent of energy consumption. Secondary electricity generation from fossil fuels increased steadily. The general increase in domestic demand for energy in 2002 was due to an increase in energy consumption by the industrial sector and by growing residential sales. In 2002, the rate of increase in energy consumption in Alberta was higher than in any other province due to a booming economy and rising population. Ontario consumed the most energy in 2002, accounting for 34 per cent of the country's energy demand

  8. Regulation of the complete fuel cycle current and proposed nuclear legislation in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, F.C.

    1978-01-01

    The increasing complexity of the Canadian nuclear programme, the problems of contamination and uranium mine safety and the national and international concern about proliferation have emphasized the need for a systematic and strong control over nuclear activities. Although the 1946 Atomic Energy Control Act provides the Atomic Energy Control Board with most of the powers necessary to achieve this, the new Act has been introduced to clarify jurisdiction and to strengthen the Board, which would then be renamed the Nuclear Control Board. Its duty would be to control health, safety and the environmental and other security aspects of the complete fuel cycle. (NEA) [fr

  9. Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, regulatory highlights for 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This new publication informs readers about what the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) did in the past year, including important regulatory issues, trends and initiatives. The EUB is an agency of the provincial government, established to regulate Alberta's energy resource and utility sectors. It is part of the Alberta Ministry of Energy. The four main functions of the Board are regulatory initiatives, license applications, enforcement and information. This publication summarized the EUB's position regarding flaring (both solution gas flaring and well test flaring), and Board activities in the areas of animal health concerns, the gas over bitumen controversy, the deregulation of the electric industry and what it means to the EUB, improvements in data quality as a result of improved industry compliance in reporting, and a variety of issues related to the oil sands and the negotiated settlement process. Also, the Board has been proactive in the area of oilfield waste management guidelines, proliferation policies for gas processing facilities, sulphur recovery guidelines, and the expansion of the orphan well program to include facilities and pipelines. As a measure of the success of the EUB, a recent survey of 19 randomly selected focus groups praised EUB for its impartiality, fair and equitable enforcement and independence. It was also praised for its technically competent and experienced staff, its access to quality information and the clarity of its mandate, regulatory requirements and processes. The Board's efforts in the area of timely stakeholder consultation was highlighted. tabs., figs

  10. Canada refutes Gardner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    An epidemiological study of childhood leukaemia in relation to the preconception occupational exposure of fathers to ionizing radiation has been carried out by an academic team for the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board. The study had twice as many cases of childhood leukaemia as the study around Sellafield by Gardner et al and had ample statistical power to check the Gardner result. However, the Canadian study found no evidence of any significant effect of parental radiation exposure on childhood leukaemia. (Author)

  11. German Atomic Energy Act turns fifty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The German Atomic Energy Act entered into force on January 1, 1960. It turns fifty at the beginning of 2010. Is this a reason to celebrate or rather the opposite? Lawyers, in principle, can view old pieces of legislation from 2 perspectives: On the one hand, aged laws are treated in a spirit of veneration and are celebrated as proven. On the other hand, an anniversary of this kind can be a welcome reason for demands to abolish or, at least, fundamentally renew that law. Over the past half century, the German Atomic Energy Act went through stormy and varied phases both of a legal and a political character. Its 50 th anniversary is likely to spark off very conflicting evaluations as well. A review of legal history shows that the German or, rather, the Federal German Atomic Energy Act (AtG) was not a first-of-its-kind piece of legislation but stemmed from the 1957 EURATOM Treaty, in a way representing a latecomer of that treaty. The Atomic Energy Act experienced a number of important developments throughout its history: - In 1975, compulsory licensing of fuel element factories was introduced. - The back end of the fuel cycle, especially final storage, were incorporated in the Atomic Energy Act comprehensively first in 1976. - In 1985, legislators decided in favor of unlimited nuclear liability. - In 1994 and 1998, only some innovations in special items were introduced under the headings of environmental impact assessment and suitability for repository storage because the controversy about nuclear power did not permit a fundamental alignment towards a more comprehensive modern safety law. - The decision to opt out of the peaceful uses of nuclear power in 2002 drew the final line so far of decisions about directions of nuclear law in a major amendment. In parallel, the decisions by the Federal Constitutional Court and the Federal Administrative Court in the late 1970s and, above all, the 1980s provided important assistance which has remained valid to this day. What is

  12. 76 FR 54747 - State Energy Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463; 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of these meetings be announced in... Energy Efficiency Programs Improvement Act of 1990 (Pub. L. 101-440). Tentative Agenda: Receive updates... National Laboratory (ORNL) to discuss new initiatives and technologies and explore possible technology...

  13. The cost - effective solar energy applications in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pape, A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper outlines several cost-effective solar energy application in Canada, and estimates the GHG emission reduction potential for each. The applications include: (1) passive solar building design; (2) solar water heating applications; (3) solar photovoltaics for remote power; and (4) solar assisted space heating and cooling in industrial buildings. Each technology is briefly profiled in terms of functionality, cost characteristics, energy production characteristics and potential emission reduction benefits. Real-life examples of each application are also included. Finally, the paper concludes on the potential role of solar energy in the reduction of Canadian GHG emissions. (author)

  14. Energy policies of IEA countries. Canada 1996 review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This IEA report provides a comprehensive, in-depth assessment of the energy policies of Canada, including recommendations on future policy developments. The report acknowledges the marked shift of federal energy policy in the last decade away from heavy intervention to a more market-based approach. This has increased the strength and competitive position of Canada's energy producers, especially in oil and gas, and has provided more choice for consumers. Electricity, however, is an area that could benefit from a more market-based policy orientation. Federal provincial co-ordination is of fundamental importance. Other key issues highlighted in the review include the opportunities and challenges of international agreements on the environment, which increasingly drive energy policy decision-making; the adequacy and effectiveness of programmes to promote energy efficiency; and the balance and direction of energy research and development efforts. This report forms part of a series of periodic in-depth reviews conducted and discussed by the IEA Member countries on a four-year cycle. Short reviews of energy policy developments in all twenty-three Member countries are published annually in Energy Policies of IEA Countries. (author)

  15. Nuclear fuel waste disposal in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormuth, K.W.; Gillespie, P.A.

    1990-05-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed a concept for disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel waste and is submitting it for review under Federal Environmental Assessment and Review Process. During this review, AECL intends to show that careful, controlled burial 500 to 1000 metres deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Precambrian Shield is a safe and feasible way to dispose of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The concept has been assessed without identifying or evaluating any particular site for disposal. AECL is now preparing a comprehensive report based on more than 10 years of research and development

  16. Nuclear fuel waste disposal in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormuth, K.W.; Gillespie, P.A.

    1990-05-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed a concept for disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel waste and is submitting it for review under the Federal Environmental Assessment and Review Process. During this review, AECL intends to show that careful, controlled burial 500 to 1000 metres deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Precambrian Shield is a safe and feasible way to dispose of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The concept has been assessed without identifying or evaluating any particular site for disposal. AECL is now preparing a comprehensive report based on more than 10 years of research and development

  17. National Transportation Safety Board : weak internal control impaired financial accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-28

    The U. S. General Accounting Office (GAO) was asked to review the National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) internal controls over selected types of fiscal year expenditures. They were asked to determine whether internal control weaknesses were a...

  18. The tenth Arab conference on peaceful uses of atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This conference includes the paper presented at the tenth Arab conference of the peaceful uses of Nuclear Atomic Energy that is organized by AAEA (Arab Atomic Energy Agency) in cooperation with Iraqi Ministry of Science and Technology and Kurdistan government , held in Erbil (Iraq) from 12-16 December 2010. This conference consists of three volumes covering the following concepts: Analysis and Material Improvement, Soil fertility, Water Recourse Management, Nuclear Medicine and Biological Irradiation, Isotopes Production, Improvement of Plant and Animal Production, Decommissioning and Dismantling of Nuclear Facilities, Radioactive Waste Management, Nuclear Safety and Security of Radiation Protection, Pest Control and Food Irradiation Processing

  19. QED effects on individual atomic orbital energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozioł, Karol; Aucar, Gustavo A.

    2018-04-01

    Several issues, concerning QED corrections, that are important in precise atomic calculations are presented. The leading QED corrections, self-energy and vacuum polarization, to the orbital energy for selected atoms with 30 ≤ Z ≤ 118 have been calculated. The sum of QED and Breit contributions to the orbital energy is analyzed. It has been found that for ns subshells the Breit and QED contributions are of comparative size, but for np and nd subshells the Breit contribution takes a major part of the QED+Breit sum. It has also, been found that the Breit to leading QED contributions ratio for ns subshells is almost independent of Z. The Z-dependence of QED and Breit+QED contributions per subshell is shown. The fitting coefficients may be used to estimate QED effects on inner molecular orbitals. We present results of our calculations for QED contributions to orbital energy of valence ns-subshell for group 1 and 11 atoms and discuss about the reliability of these numbers by comparing them with experimental first ionization potential data.

  20. White paper on atomic energy in 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear power generation in Japan attained the scale of 21 plants with 15 million kW capacity, and its proportion in electric power supply exceeded 13%. Now it is indispensable for various economic activities and national life, and it is expected that its role as the substitute energy for petroleum will grow more and more in future. The Atomic Energy Commission took up preponderantly the promotion of nuclear power generation and the related measures in view of such situation when the trend in the development and utilization of atomic energy in Japan is reviewed in this white paper. When nuclear power generation is promoted, efforts are exerted on the improvement of safety, and it is necessary to tackle with all might the subjects such as the settlement of LWRs more firmly, the development of new reactors, the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle, and the countermove to complex international situation, while giving consideration to the development of independent technologies. It is most important to obtain national consensus when atomic energy is developed and utilized, as seen in the difficulty of locating nuclear power stations. In this annual report, the events for about one year from October, 1979, are described. Also the related data and documents are shown. (Kako, I.)

  1. A survey of research programs in radiation protection in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    A survey of research programs in Canada concerned with radiation protection was conducted in 1991-92 by the Joint Subcommittee on Regulatory Research (JSCRR) of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) Advisory Committees on Radiological Protection and on Nuclear Safety. The purpose of this survey was to determine the current state of funding for this type of research in Canada. Funding for health-related radiation research in Canada is critical to establishing and maintaining a supply of trained professionals who can provide competent advice on health-related problems in radiation protection. The present report is an analysis of the information received in this survey. This survey concludes with the recommendation that the organization and definition of subprograms for the AECB Regulatory Research and Support Program should be completed as soon as possible. In this report the JSCRR should assist AECB staff in preparing a report in which priorities for research related to radiation protection are indicated. The sources of information noted at the end of the Discussion section of this report should be considered for this purpose. (author). 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. A survey of research programs in radiation protection in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    A survey of research programs in Canada concerned with radiation protection was conducted in 1991-92 by the Joint Subcommittee on Regulatory Research (JSCRR) of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) Advisory Committees on Radiological Protection and on Nuclear Safety. The purpose of this survey was to determine the current state of funding for this type of research in Canada. Funding for health-related radiation research in Canada is critical to establishing and maintaining a supply of trained professionals who can provide competent advice on health-related problems in radiation protection. The present report is an analysis of the information received in this survey. This survey concludes with the recommendation that the organization and definition of subprograms for the AECB Regulatory Research and Support Program should be completed as soon as possible. In this report the JSCRR should assist AECB staff in preparing a report in which priorities for research related to radiation protection are indicated. The sources of information noted at the end of the Discussion section of this report should be considered for this purpose. (author). 15 refs., 3 tabs

  3. 77 FR 20015 - State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... (STEAB). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463; 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice... carry out the Board's responsibilities as designated in the State Energy Efficiency Programs Improvement... discuss new initiatives and technologies, and explore possible technology transfer programs, meet with...

  4. 78 FR 65980 - State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... Federal Register. DATES: Thursday, November 21, 2013, from 3:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time). To... Energy Efficiency Programs Improvement Act of 1990 (Pub. L. 101-440). Tentative Agenda: Receive an update... the Board on routine business matters and EERE areas of interest, and work on agenda items and details...

  5. 75 FR 346 - State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... advancement, find ways to encourage energy efficiency market transformation, and update members on routine business matters affecting the Board. Public Participation: The meeting is open to the public. Written... empowered to conduct the meeting in a fashion that will facilitate the orderly conduct of business. Minutes...

  6. Radiation Protection Institute,Ghana Atomic Energy Commission: Annual Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission was established to provide scientific and technical support for executing the operational functions of the Radiation Protection Board. The 2014 Annual Report highlights the operational activities of Institutes. Also presented is a list of research projects, publications and abstracts of technical reports.

  7. The law for the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Act for Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been promulgated anew. Contents are the following : general rules, officials, advisors and personnel, duties, financial affairs and accounts, supervision, miscellaneous rules, penal provisions, and additional rules. (In the additional rules, the merger into JAERI of Japan Nuclear Ship Research and Development Agency is treated.) Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute conducts research etc. for the development of atomic energy comprehensively and efficiently, thereby contributing to the promotion of atomic energy research, development and utilization, according to the Atomic Energy Fundamental Act. Duties are atomic energy basic and application research, reactor relation, training of the personnel, RIs relation, etc. (Mori, K.)

  8. Sampling and Control Circuit Board for an Inertial Measurement Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmins, David T (Inventor); Powis, Richard T., Jr. (Inventor); Sands, Obed (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A circuit board that serves as a control and sampling interface to an inertial measurement unit ("IMU") is provided. The circuit board is also configured to interface with a local oscillator and an external trigger pulse. The circuit board is further configured to receive the external trigger pulse from an external source that time aligns the local oscillator and initiates sampling of the inertial measurement device for data at precise time intervals based on pulses from the local oscillator. The sampled data may be synchronized by the circuit board with other sensors of a navigation system via the trigger pulse.

  9. Responsibility for atomic energy damages and indemnification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelzer, N.M.

    1980-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany, the overall regulations on civil responsibility for the damages by nuclear fission or the effect of radiation of radioactive materials were established for the first time in the law concerning peaceful use and protection from danger of atomic energy (hereafter referred to as Atomgesetz) in 1959. Responsibility without error was adopted by German legislators. The liability of the owners of atomic energy facilities (Article 25) was distinguished from that of the possessors of radioactive materials (Article 26) under the law. Facility responsibility (Anlagenhaftung) was limited to 500 million German marks at the maximum. Facility owners had the obligation to offer monetary security of 80 million German marks at the maximum by insurances, etc. When disasters exceeded the amount, the owners were exempted by the state up to the maximum 500 million German marks. The Federal Republic adopted the Paris Agreement in 1975 by a law, and the domestic adjustment of Atomgesetz to the European treaty on atomic energy responsibility was made through the third revision of the Gesetz. According to Article 25-1 of Atomgesetz, the regulations of Paris Agreement are first applied to the owners of atomic energy facilities (operators), and as supplement, Articles 25 to 40 of Atomgesetz are applied. The maximum liability amount is 1,000 million German marks. The demand right of indemnification expires in 3 years after demanders find or are bound to find damages and offenders, and terminates in 30 years regardless of whether the former finds the latter or not. Brussels nuclear ship agreement is applied to nuclear ship owners in Germany (Article 25a, Atomgesetz). (Okada, K.)

  10. Small wind in Canada's energy future : fostering domestic manufacturers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoads-Weaver, H.; Gluckman, M.; Weis, T.; Moorhouse, J.; Taylor, A.; Maissan, J.; Sherwood, L.; Whittaker, S.

    2008-01-01

    While large-scale wind power projects are sustaining a 30 per cent annual growth rate, residential-scale wind power is increasingly being adopted in Germany, Japan, and the United States. This presentation discussed the benefits associated with fostering strong domestic wind turbine markets in Canada. Small wind turbine markets typically consist of grid-connected, net-metered turbines of less than 1 kW, off-grid micro-turbines used for battery charging, and net-metered, grid-connected, mid-sized turbines larger than 10 kW used in farming and small business applications. Continued energy price hikes are expected to cause the rapid growth of distributed generation, and nearly half of the world's 10 to 300 kW wind turbine generator manufacturers are located in Canada. However, federal support for small-scale distributed wind systems is lacking, and financial incentives are needed to mature the technology in Canada and leverage private investment. The use of decentralized energy will help to prevent line losses and reduce peak demands on the electricity grid. Use of the technology offers farms and small businesses a revenue stream and can reduce energy costs and demands. It is also expected that small wind jobs in Canada will grow from 50 to 640 by 2025. It was concluded that in order to ensure small wind development, capital cost incentive levels must be coupled with good interconnection and permitting policies. In addition, minimum safety and performance standards must be developed, along with rebate policies and siting analysis methods. tabs., figs

  11. Atlantic Canada's energy research and development website and database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Petroleum Research Atlantic Canada maintains a website devoted to energy research and development in Atlantic Canada. The site can be viewed on the world wide web at www.energyresearch.ca. It includes a searchable database with information about researchers in Nova Scotia, their projects and published materials on issues related to hydrocarbons, alternative energy technologies, energy efficiency, climate change, environmental impacts and policy. The website also includes links to research funding agencies, external related databases and related energy organizations around the world. Nova Scotia-based users are invited to submit their academic, private or public research to the site. Before being uploaded into the database, a site administrator reviews and processes all new information. Users are asked to identify their areas of interest according to the following research categories: alternative or renewable energy technologies; climate change; coal; computer applications; economics; energy efficiency; environmental impacts; geology; geomatics; geophysics; health and safety; human factors; hydrocarbons; meteorology and oceanology (metocean) activities; petroleum operations in deep and shallow waters; policy; and power generation and supply. The database can be searched 5 ways according to topic, researchers, publication, projects or funding agency. refs., tabs., figs

  12. Report by the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency on behalf of the Board of Governors to all members of the Agency on the Non-Compliance of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea with the agreement between the IAEA and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea for the application of safeguards in connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons (INFCIRC/403) and on the Agency's inability to verify the non-diversion of material required to be safeguarded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The document contains the following items: Report by the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency on behalf of the Board of Governors to all members of the Agency on the non-compliance of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea with the agreement between the IAEA and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea for the application of Safeguards in connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and on the Agency's inability to verify the non-diversion of material required to be safeguarded; resolution adopted by the Board on 1 April 1993 (Annex 1); Agreement of 30 January 1992 between the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons (Annex 2); resolution adopted by the Board of Governors on 25 February 1993 (Annex 3); Communications from the Director General of the IAEA to the Minister for Atomic Energy of DPRK or from the Minister for Atomic Energy of the DPRK of the Director General of the IAEA (Annexes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12); statement of the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Pyongyang, 12 March 1993 (Annex 7); resolution adopted by the Board on 18 March 1993 (Annex 10)

  13. Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thexton, H.E.

    1987-01-01

    The development of CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) type reactors in Canada is traced. What is CANDU? and how does it differ from a pressurized water reactor? Whey did Canada adopt this design? What factors have led to its success? These questions are asked and answered. First the design itself is explained. Technical problems are considered and figures on operating reliability presented. The economic advantages of CANDU are shown by comparing electricity generating costs at CANDU stations with those at coal-fired stations. Future CANDU options are discussed and prospects for CANDU considered. (U.K.)

  14. Ionization of atoms by high energy photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Y.; Ioffe, A.F.

    1994-01-01

    Photoionization of atoms by high energy photons is considered. It is emphasized that in this frequency region the cross section and other characteristics of the process are strongly effected by electron shell polarization and rearrangement effects, including that due to inner vacancy Auger decay. In the effects of nuclear structure could be important and noticeable, i.e. of virtual or real excitation of the nucleus degrees of freedom and of the Quantum Electrodynamics vacuum. Ionization accompanied by secondary photon emission (Compton ionization) is analyzed in the considered domain of energies

  15. Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciej, H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the Canadian oil and natural gas sector is in for another grim year in 1992. Further streamlining to enhance operating efficiencies and control costs is the first order of the day. About $4 billion worth of producing properties remains on the market, as corporate focus continues to shift to core properties. New management structures put in place in the last two years will be severely tested to improve the sector's financial performance. Massive write-downs in 1990 and 1991 have put balance sheets in much better shape for improved financial performance in the future. Although new long-term debt exceeded redemptions in 1991, largely because of debt- financing of major capital projects, individually most companies are in better shape through significant debt repayment or restructuring. The substantial reductions in interest rates will also help to enhance discretionary cash flow. At this stage, everything appears to be in place to expect that 1992 will represent the bottom of the down-cycle for Canada

  16. White paper on atomic energy in 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    Since the publication of its last White Paper on Nuclear Energy in 2003, the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan (AEC) summarized trends covering all aspects of nuclear energy over the period up to December 2004. This paper is comprised of a main document and supplementary materials. The first chapter of the main document summarizes the current activities toward national and international understanding and trust promotion of nuclear energy divided along the topics of 'Restoring trust', 'Structuring trust toward new enterprise implementation', 'Establishment of understanding and trust of international society', 'AEC's activities toward creation of new Long-Term Program', and 'Establishment of future understanding and trust. 'The second chapter summarized recent trends of national and private activities based on the Long-Term Program created in November 2000, covering the topics 'Nuclear Energy Policy in Japan', 'Harmony between People, Society and Nuclear Energy', 'Nuclear Power Generation and the Nuclear Fuel Cycle', 'Diversified Development of Nuclear Science and Technology', 'Utilization of Radiation Contributing to People's Lives', 'Harmony between International Society and Nuclear Energy', and 'Foundation to Promote Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy'. The supplementary materials include lists of AEC decisions, nuclear energy budgets, year-by-year data tables, and other such similar materials. (T. Tanaka)

  17. Canada's renewable energy resources. An assessment of potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, P; Argue, R; Burrell, T; Hathaway, G

    1976-04-01

    Rising costs of conventional, frontier and nuclear energy production and the prospect of future shortages have prompted a resurgence of interest in alternative, renewable energy technologies. This study constituted a preliminary step in determining which sources, technologies and applications may be appropriate in Canada, and when and under what conditions they might be technically and economically viable. Principal sources of renewable energy (solar radiation, wind and biomass), as well as waves, thermal gradients and sensible heat sources are reviewed to establish, in general terms, their significance in the Canadian context. Next, the technical characteristics, efficiency, costs, impacts and state-of-the-art of sixteen harnessing or conversion technologies are presented as an information base upon which to build an assessment of potential. A method of comparing the life cost of a renewable energy system to that of the likely conventional alternative is proposed and applied in cases where adequate technical and economic data are available. A variety of different economic assumptions are also outlined under which the renewable systems would be cost competitive. This costing methodology is applied in detail to four case studies: residential solar space and water heating, photovoltaics, residential, a 200 kW wind generator, and anaerobic digestion of livestock wastes. Finally, the potential for renewable energy approaches in Canada is explored and evaluated from three perspectives: technical viability, economic viability and implementation. 319 refs., 18 figs., 94 tabs.

  18. Canada's renewable energy resources: an assessment of potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, P; Argue, R; Argue, R; Burrell, T; Hathaway, G

    1976-04-01

    Rising costs of conventional, frontier, and nuclear energy production and the prospect of future shortages have prompted a resurgence of interest in alternative, renewable energy technologies. This study constitutes a preliminary step in determining which sources, technologies, and applications may be appropriate in Canada and when and under what conditions they might be technically and economically viable. Principal sources of renewable energy (solar radiation, wind, and biomass), as well as waves, thermal gradients and, sensible heat sources are reviewed to establish, in general terms, their significance in the Canadian context. Next, the technical characteristics, efficiency, costs, impacts, and state of the art of sixteen harnessing or conversion technologies are presented as an information base upon which to build an assessment of potential. A method of comparing the life cost of a renewable energy system to that of the likely conventional alternative is proposed and applied in cases where adequate technical and economic data are available. A variety of different economic assumptions are also outlined under which the renewable systems would be cost competitive. This costing methodology is applied in detail to four Case Studies: solar space and water heating--residential; photovoltaics--residential; wind generator--200 kW; and anaerobic digestion of livestock wastes. Finally, the potential for renewable energy approaches in Canada is explored and evaluated from three perspectives: technical viability, economic viability, and implementation.

  19. Network on chip master control board for neutron acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz-Martinez, E.; Mary, T.; Mutti, P.; Ratel, J.; Rey, F.

    2012-01-01

    The acquisition master control board is designed to assemble the various acquisition modes in use at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL). The main goal is to make the card common for all the ILL's instruments in a simple, modular and open way, giving the possibility to add new functionalities in order to follow the evolving demand. It has been necessary to define a central element to provide synchronization to the rest of the units. The backbone of the proposed acquisition control system is the denominated master acquisition board. The master board consists on a VME64X configurable high density I/O connection carrier board based on the latest Xilinx Virtex-6T FPGA. The internal architecture of the FPGA is designed as a Network on Chip (NoC) approach. The complete system also includes a display board and n histogram modules for live display of the data from the detectors. (authors)

  20. The No.I. Law (1980) on atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Law regulates all aspects of the use and application of nuclear energy. The four basic principles of the law are as follows: 1. Nuclear energy can be applied only for peaceful purposes, and this must be promoted by effective international cooperation. 2. The materials, equipment and establishments serving the application of nuclear energy are generally in social ownership. 3. Nuclear energy can be applied only with satisfactory safety precautions, and its uses are determined and regularly controlled by the state. 4. The compensation of the damages caused by nuclear energy applications is regulated by special rules. The enforcement of the law and the direction, control and development of the application of nuclear energy is the responsibility of the Council of Ministers. (R.J.)

  1. Co-operation Agreement. The Text of the Agreement of 25 May 1998 between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The text of the Co-operation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 25 May 1998, pursuant to Article 8 [fr

  2. Co-operation Agreement. The Text of the Agreement of 25 May 1998 between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The text of the Co-operation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 25 May 1998, pursuant to Article 8 [es

  3. Atomic energy law in Indonesia Perundang-undangan tenaga atom di Indonesia/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poernomo, Moendi.

    1980-01-01

    Levels of the development of the National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia covering the reorganization and the president's decree concerning the agency since 1958 are presented. The National Atomic Energy Agency BATAN is responsible for application of radioactive materials over the country and the protection of the general public against radioactive hazards. BATAN's missions are embodied with the atomic energy law. (SMN)

  4. Basic law of atomic energy for pacific uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    This law comprehend information about the pacific uses of atomic energy. Likewise it creates the Commission of Atomic Energy and stipulates: it s organization and functions, regulations and licensures, responsibilities, income and patrimony. (SGB)

  5. FPGA based VME boards for Indus-2 timing control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lulani, Nitin; Barpande, K.; Fatnani, P.; Sheth, Y.

    2009-01-01

    FPGA based two VME boards are developed and deployed recently for Indus-2 timing control system at RRCAT Indore. New FPGA based 5-channel programmable (Coarse-Fine) delay generator board has replaced three 2-channel coarse and one 4-channel fine existing delay generator boards. Introduction of this board has improved the fine delay resolution (to 0.5ns) as well as channel to channel jitter (to 0.8ns) of the system. It has also improved the coarse delay resolution from previous 33ns to 8ns with the possibility to work at divided Indus-2 RF clock. These improved parameters have resulted in better injection rate of beam. Old coincidence generator board is also replaced with FPGA based newly developed Coincidence clock generator VME board, which has resulted in successful controlled filling of beam (single, multi and 3-symmetrical bucket filling) in Indus-2. Three more existing boards will be replaced by single FPGA based delay generator card in near future. This paper presents the design, test results and features of new boards. (author)

  6. Towards a renewable energy training strategy in Canada : NRCan's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omboli, E.

    2004-01-01

    This abstract outlines the importance of education and training as a marketing tool for the solar industry, as well as the importance of developing strategic alliances with educational institutions. The constructive collaboration between the Renewable Energy Deployment Initiative (REDI) and the Association of Canadian Community Colleges (ACCC) is discussed as a leading example in promoting renewable energy systems in community colleges as well as supporting the development of a national renewable energy training strategy. Future goals of NRCan (Natural Resources Canada) are outlined, with 4 pilot projects emerging as a result of a Request for Proposals initiative. A Train-the-trainer seminar has helped to create a foundation for a national renewable energy training strategy. Future goals include new training partners and more funding

  7. Evaluation of American Board of Orthodontics certification protocols in postgraduate orthodontic programs in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyun; Putrus, Raphael R; Pruzansky, Dawn P; Grubb, John

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the board certification protocols that hospital and university-based postgraduate orthodontic programs have in place to prepare residents for the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO) certification examination. An electronic survey was sent to the program directors of each of the 72 postgraduate orthodontic programs in the United States and Canada. The survey consisted of 49 questions about demographics, resident case assignment protocols, and ABO examination preparation methods. The response rate was 81%. Most programs were 30 to 36 months in length (72.7%). Many residents had a case load of 51 to 75 during their first year (50.9%), with an average maximum case load of 70 to 109. There was a positive correlation with both the number of cases that first-year residents start and the length of the program (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.379; P <0.01) when compared with maximum case load. Approximately 72% of the programs do not offer a written mock board examination; however, 72% reported offering a clinical mock board examination. ABO cases are identified within the first 6 months of most programs. About 88% of respondents believe that residents take advantage of the banking system, and that over the past 5 years ABO Initial Certification Examination applications have increased. Most program directors (89.1%) believe that their program length is sufficient for board preparation. Subjects tested in the written examination are integrated into the didactic curriculum and strengthened with ongoing literature reviews, with a passing rate over 90%. Clinical examination preparation varies, with most programs requiring a mock board examination for graduation. Total participation in both the Initial Certification Examination and banking has increased since 2010; better follow-up protocols are needed to track residents after graduation. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc

  8. Renewable energy for Canada's northern communities - quantifying potential fuel savings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brothers, C.

    1998-01-01

    The probable impact of renewable energy technologies on fuel consumption in Canada's remote northern communities was discussed. These communities currently meet their electricity requirements using expensive diesel powered generators. It was noted that change to renewable energy in Canada's remote communities will only be made if the economic benefits can be clearly demonstrated. A study was conducted in Cambridge Bay, Northwest Territories, in which electrical load requirements and wind and solar resource data from the community was acquired to estimate savings in diesel fuel consumption for various renewable energy technologies. Wind was found to provide the most fuel displacement and was considered to be the most appropriate technology for these communities. A photovoltaic (PV) system of equivalent size would have significantly less impact on fuel savings in a community like Cambridge Bay, in part because a PV system would be poorly correlated on a seasonal basis with the energy requirements of the community. A wind-diesel system would be the most advantageous in terms of fuel savings due to its relatively high capacity factor, and due to the fact that is it is available year around. 4 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  9. Transport of radioactive material in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    In this report, the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety (ACNS) presents the results of its study on how the system of the transport of radioactive material (TRM) in Canada is regulated, how it operates, and how it performs. The report deals with the transport of packages, including Type B packages which are used to carry large quantities of radioactive material, but not with the transport of spent nuclear fuel or with the transport of low-level historical waste. The ACNS has examined the Canadian experience in the TRM area, the regulatory framework in Canada with respect to the TRM some relevant aspects of training workers and monitoring compliance with regulatory requirements, the state of the emergency preparedness of organizations involved in the TRM and the process of updating present regulations by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). As a result of this study, the ACNS concludes that the current Canadian regulatory system in the TRM is sound and that the TRM is, for the most part, conducted safely. However, improvements can be made in a number of areas, such as: determining the exposures of workers who transport radioactive material; rewording the proposed Transport Regulations in plain language; training all appropriate personnel regarding the AECB and Transport Canada (TC) Regulations; enforcing compliance with the regulations; and increasing the level of cooperation between the federal agencies and provincial authorities involved in the inspection and emergency preparedness aspects of the TRM. It is also noted that Bill C-23, the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, imposes a new requirement, subject to the Regulations, for a licence for a carrier to transport some types of radioactive material

  10. Transport of radioactive material in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    In this report, the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety (ACNS) presents the results of its study on how the system of the transport of radioactive material (TRM) in Canada is regulated, how it operates, and how it performs. The report deals with the transport of packages, including Type B packages which are used to carry large quantities of radioactive material, but not with the transport of spent nuclear fuel or with the transport of low-level historical waste. The ACNS has examined the Canadian experience in the TRM area, the regulatory framework in Canada with respect to the TRM some relevant aspects of training workers and monitoring compliance with regulatory requirements, the state of the emergency preparedness of organizations involved in the TRM and the process of updating present regulations by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). As a result of this study, the ACNS concludes that the current Canadian regulatory system in the TRM is sound and that the TRM is, for the most part, conducted safely. However, improvements can be made in a number of areas, such as: determining the exposures of workers who transport radioactive material; rewording the proposed Transport Regulations in plain language; training all appropriate personnel regarding the AECB and Transport Canada (TC) Regulations; enforcing compliance with the regulations; and increasing the level of cooperation between the federal agencies and provincial authorities involved in the inspection and emergency preparedness aspects of the TRM. It is also noted that Bill C-23, the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, imposes a new requirement, subject to the Regulations, for a licence for a carrier to transport some types of radioactive material.

  11. Atomic resonances above the total ionization energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolen, G.

    1975-01-01

    A rigorous result obtained using the theory associated with dilatation analytic potentials is that by performing a complex coordinate rotation, r/subj/ → r/subj/e/subi//sup theta/, on a Hamiltonian whose potential involves only pairwise Coulombic interactions, one can show that when theta = π/2, no complex eigenvalues (resonances) appear whose energies have a real part greater than the total ionization energy of the atomic system. This appears to conflict with experimental results of Walton, Peart, and Dolder, who find resonance behavior above the total ionization energy of the H -- system and also the theoretical stabilization results of Taylor and Thomas for the same system. A possible resolution of this apparent conflict is discussed and a calculation to check its validity is proposed

  12. Right of action and participation in administrative procedure of foreign neighbours as exemplified by Atomic Energy Law and the Law on Immission Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukes, R.; Dehmer, R.; Wendling, K.

    1986-01-01

    The article deals with the question whether the exclusion of foreigners from participation in a licensing procedure pursuant to Atomic Energy Law (Administrative Court Oldenburg, February 6, 1985) may be transferred to the licensing procedure pursuant to the Federal Art on Protection Against Harmful Effects on the Environment. A further problem concerns the consideration of foreign neighbours' interests by the licensing authority. While the authors accept the latter, they refuse the right of action of foreigners. (CW) [de

  13. Annual report 2001[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2001. The report outlines the IAEA activities in the following fields: nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management technology, comparative assessment for sustainable energy development; food and agriculture, human health, marine environment and water resources, applications of physical and chemical sciences, nuclear safety, radiation safety, radioactive waste safety, co-ordination of safety activities, safeguards, security of material, verification in Iraq pursuant to UNSC resolutions, management of technical co-operation for development, policy-making, management and support.

  14. Report to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicka, U.

    1986-07-01

    The results of research done under the International Atomic Energy Agency Contract no 4121/RB: 'Measurement of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section on small samples' at the Institut of Nuclear Physics during the period from July 1, 1985 to June 30, 1986 are presented. The research was based on the Plexiglass thermal neutron diffusion parameters and on the method of preparation of the rock samples for the measurements according to the INP method. Three rock samples delivered by the IAEA: Ottawa Sand, Royer Dolomite and Dunite Sand have been measured. (author)

  15. 1992 developments in Atomic Energy Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manger, R.

    1993-01-01

    The draft legislation amending the German Atomic Energy Act existing since the autumn of 1992 clearly focuses of the back end of the fuel cycle. Spent fuel and waste management is to be opened up, privatized, and paid for. Opening spent fuel and waste management supplement the former priority given to the utilization of radioactive residues by an equivalent option, i.e. the orderly disposal of such waste which, at present, is permitted only under very limited conditions. The draft still needs to be harmonized with other ministries. (orig.) [de

  16. Early years of nuclear energy research in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurence, G.C.

    1980-01-01

    The first experimental attempts in Canada to obtain energy from uranium fission were carried out by the author in the Ottawa laboratories of the National Research Council from 1940 to 42. This program grew into a joint British-Canadian laboratory in Montreal. Work done at this laboratory, which moved to Chalk River in 1946, led to the construction of ZEEP (the first nuclear reactor to operate outside of the United States) NRX, and ultimately to the development of the CANDU power reactors. People involved in the work and events along the way are covered in detail. (LL)

  17. Atomic energy wants new personality. An essay of education and personality in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takuma, Masao

    2004-01-01

    New personality in atomic energy consists of personification of independence, democracy and publication. They are able to create new technologies and new plants with safety and maintenance. The technical experts and all the parties concerned have to explain the situation and the conditions of atomic energy in order to justify the people's trust in them. Only good personality with morals can obtain the confidence of the nation. It is important for new technical experts and all the parties concerned to receive an education related to sociality. (S.Y.)

  18. The industrial development of atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    Countries with large stock of fissile material and producing large quantity of nuclear pure 235 U and 239 Pu are able to allocate part of the stock to non military research. For countries with low stock of fissile material, all the stock is allocated to military research. An economical and technical solution has to be find to dedicate a part of fissile material to non military research and develop the atomic energy industry. It stated the industrial and economical problems and in particular the choice between the use of enriched fuel with high refining cost or depleted fuel with low production cost. It discusses of four possible utilizations of the natural resources: reactors functioning with pure fissile material ( 235 U or 239 Pu) or concentrated material ( 235 U mixed with small quantities of 238 U after an incomplete isotopic separation), breeder reactors functioning with enriched material mixed with 238 U or Thorium placed in an appropriate spatial distribution to allow neutrons beam to activate 238 U or Thorium with the regeneration of fissile material in 239 Pu, reactors using natural uranium or low enriched uranium can also produce Plutonium with less efficiency than breeder reactors and the last solution being the use of natural uranium with the only scope of energy production and no production of secondary fissile material. The first class using pure fissile material has a low energy efficiency and is used only by large fissile material stock countries to accumulate energy in small size fuel for nuclear engines researches for submarines and warships. The advantage of the second class of reactors, breeder reactors, is that they produce energy and plutonium. Two type of breeder reactor are considered: breeder reactor using pure fissile material and 238 U or breeder reactor using the promising mixture of pure fissile material and Thorium. Different projects are in phase of development in United States, England and Scotland. The third class of reactor using

  19. Disposal of radioactive wastes arising in the United Kingdom from the peaceful uses of atomic energy

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, P M

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes United Kingdom policy in relation to radioactive waste and summarises the relevant legislation ad methods of control. Data are given on the amounts of radioactivity discharged as waste from establishments of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, the nuclear power stations operated by the Electricity Generating Boards and other users of radioactive materials. Studies of the behaviour of radioactivity in the environment are reported with particular reference to food chains and other potential sources of irradiation of the public. The results of environmental monitoring are presented and estimates are made of radiation doses received by individual members of the public and larger population groups as a result of waste disposal. It is concluded that the doses received are all within the appropriate limits recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, and in most cases are trivial.

  20. Safety objectives for nuclear activities in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    This report by the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety presents a concise statement of the basic safety objectives which the Committee considers underlie, or should underlie, the regulations and the licensing and compliance practices of the Atomic Energy Control Board. The report also includes a number of general criteria for achieving these objectives

  1. Climate change mitigation through energy efficiency : opportunities in Atlantic Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cote, R.; Archibald, G.

    2008-01-01

    Canada's total energy use is expected to increase by 20 per cent between 2005 and 2020. Studies have suggested that successful energy efficiency initiatives could reduce growth in demand by up to 50 per cent, while reducing greenhouse gases (GHGs) by an estimated 40 per cent. Energy use comprises approximately 65.4 per cent of total expenditures for most businesses. Atlantic region industries contribute nearly 7 per cent of Canadian industrial energy consumption while contributing 5 per cent to the Canadian industrial gross domestic product (GDP). Energy efficiency practices adopted by industry operators in the Maritimes included modifications to boilers, process cooling equipment, motors, compressed air equipment, lighting and HVAC systems. Energy efficiency performance values in the Maritimes range from 11 to 100 per cent, with an average of 65 per cent. Opportunities for improving energy efficiency include inefficient lighting, leaking faucets, poor heat distribution, and inappropriate solid waste segregation. Cost savings for various energy efficiency measures were presented. Case studies of various eco-efficiency programs conducted at plants and businesses in the Maritimes were also included. tabs., figs.

  2. Ontario Energy Board : 2000-2001 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-10-01

    Fiscal 2000-2001 was a busy period for the Ontario Energy Board (OEB) as it was preparing for Ontario's new, competitive electricity market. The OEB's roles and responsibilities have been changing in recent years in preparation for more administrative responsibilities in the deregulated electricity market. In 2000, the OEB distributed a proposed gas distribution access rule for comment by industry and other stakeholders. Another major highlight of the year's work was the development of the 2000 Model Gas Franchise Agreement. The OEB also assumed a leadership role in the electricity sector to ensure the readiness of retail participants in Ontario's competitive electricity market. The Market Readiness Task Force was instrumental in this activity. This Task Force was led by the Independent Electricity Market Operator. Various rules, codes, handbooks and guidelines were also developed, based on the advise of various stakeholders. The Board also continued its work to improve the efficiency of its regulatory procedures and processes by encouraging electronic business transactions and paperless hearings. These efficient ways of doing business should contribute to the cost-effectiveness of the Board. In 2000 the Board began its review of the first unbundled rate applications from electricity distributors and approved 69 out of 114 applications for mergers and acquisition in the electricity sector. The customary consolidated financial statement including balance sheets, assets, liabilities and capital were also included in this report. tabs., figs.

  3. 75 FR 80482 - Application To Export Electric Energy; TransCanada Power Marketing Ltd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY [OE Docket No. EA-262-C] Application To Export Electric Energy; TransCanada... to transmit electric energy from the United States to Canada pursuant to section 202(e) of the... the Department of Energy (DOE) issued Order No. EA- 262, which authorized TCPM to transmit electric...

  4. 76 FR 11437 - Application To Export Electric Energy; SESCO Enterprises Canada, LTD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY [OE Docket No. EA-297-B] Application To Export Electric Energy; SESCO... transmit electric energy from the United States to Canada pursuant to section 202(e) of the Federal Power... electric energy from the United States to Canada as a power marketer for a two-year term using existing...

  5. The origins of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, International Relations (France)

    1977-08-15

    On 23 October 1956 in New York, 81 member countries of the United Nations Organization or of its specialized agencies adopted the Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which was to go into formal operation before the end of 1957. A major step towards world-wide control of nuclear energy thus came to be taken more than ten years after the idea of establishing such control had been launched - the first tentative efforts, from 1946 to 1948, having ended in failure. The account follows in an attempt to retrace this 'prehistory' of the IAEA.

  6. The origins of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1977-01-01

    On 23 October 1956 in New York, 81 member countries of the United Nations Organization or of its specialized agencies adopted the Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which was to go into formal operation before the end of 1957. A major step towards world-wide control of nuclear energy thus came to be taken more than ten years after the idea of establishing such control had been launched - the first tentative efforts, from 1946 to 1948, having ended in failure. The account follows in an attempt to retrace this 'prehistory' of the IAEA

  7. Constitutional relevance of atomic energy law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettow, S.

    1980-01-01

    In a decision publicized on December 20, 1979 the German Federal Constitutional Court rejected a claim of unconstitutionality in connection with the licensing procedure of the Muelheim-Kaerlich Nuclear Power Station currently under construction. This constitutes confirmation, by the 1st Department of the Court, of a decision in 1978 by the 2nd Department about the Kalkar fast breeder power plant, in which the peaceful utilization of nuclear energy had been found to be constitutional. However, the new decision by the Federal Constitutional Court particularly emphasizes the constitutional relevance of the rules of procedure under the Atomic Energy Act and their function with respect to the protection of civil rights. (orig.) [de

  8. Ninth German symposium on atomic energy law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukes, R.; Birkhofer, A.

    1991-01-01

    The symposium dealt with the forthcoming amendment to the Atomic Energy Law. There was an introductory presentation of the plans of the Federal Government for the amendment the aims attached to the amendment as seen by the Social Democratic Party and the revival of the nuclear option. The topics of the five work sessions were: questions concerning constitutional law - Laender administration on behalf of the Federal Government - subordinate legislation in the system of energy law; legislation on liability; financial security financing of decommissioning; licensing, supervision, retrofitting; waste disposal, ultimate waste disposal, fuel cycle. All lectures held in the work sessions and the reports on the discussions following them are included. Finally the amendment project was considered from the technological point of view and a resume was drawn. All 22 lectures have been seperately prepared for retrieval from the database. (HSCH) [de

  9. Nuclear energy: salvaging the atomic age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    The history of atomic power is reviewed from the first chain reaction in Chicago in 1942 to the worst-to-date accident at the Three Mile Island power plant in March, 1979. While media coverage during the Three Mile Island incident made the public aware of some reactor hardware and radiation hazards, Weinberg suggests that an acceptable nuclear future should have six characteristics: increased physical isolation of reactors, further technical improvements, separation of generation and distribution, professionalization of the nuclear cadre, heightened security, and public education about the hazards of radiation. Weinberg feels the question of low-level radiation effects to be critical to public acceptance of nuclear energy. Since the effects (if any) are so rarely seen because exposures are so small, the issue may be beyond the ability of science to decipher. Weinberg again explains his reference to nuclear energy as a Faustian Bargain: ''...nuclear energy, that miraculous and quite unsuspected source of energy, demands an unprecedented degree of expertise, attention to detail, and social stability. In return, man has, in the breeder reactor, an inexhaustible energy source.''

  10. India's atomic energy programme - Past and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethna, H.N.

    1979-01-01

    A review is given of the development of the atomic energy program in India, beginning with the work of individual scientists in the period before Indian independence in 1948 and continuing through the establishment in 1954 of the Department of Atomic Energy on up to the present. It was recognized at an early stage of development that the most important task for the introduction of nuclear technology in India was to establish a cadre of scientists and engineers and to generate interactions among various scientific disciplines and, at an appropriate stage, to translate the interaction into concrete projects. Effort is made to rely on indigenous resources with the goal of making the country as self-sufficient as possible in the nuclear field. The technology developed in the nuclear program is shown to be transferable to numerous fields. The availability of adequate investment capital, as a consequence of competition from the other developing programs, is recognized as a possible constraint on the nuclear program

  11. Project of Atomic Energy Technology Record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K. C.; Ko, Y. C.; Kwon, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    Project of the Atomic Energy Technology Record is the project that summarizes and records whole process, from the background to the performance, of each category in all fields of nuclear science technology which have been researched and developed at KAERI. This project includes development of Data And Documents Advanced at KAERI. This project includes development of Data And Documents Advanced Management System(DADAMS) to collect, organize and preserve various records occurred in each research and development process. In addition, it means the whole records related to nuclear science technology for the past, present and future. This report summarizes research contents and results of 'Project of Atomic Energy Technology Record'. Section 2 summarizes the theoretical background, the current status of records management in KAERI and the overview of this project. And Section 3 to 6 summarize contents and results performed in this project. Section 3 is about the process of sectoral technology record, Section 4 summarizes the process of Information Strategy Master Plan(ISMP), Section 5 summarizes the development of Data And Documents Advanced Management System(DADAMS) and Section 6 summarizes the process of collecting, organizing and digitalizing of records

  12. Seabed characterization for the development of marine renewable energy on the Pacific margin of Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, J. Vaughn; Conway, Kim W.

    2014-07-01

    An inventory of Canada's marine renewable energy resources based on numerical modeling of the potential tidal, wave and wind energy has been published that identifies areas with maximum resource potential. However, the inventory does not consider the seabed geological conditions that will control the safe development of seabed installations and cable corridors. The Geological Survey of Canada (Natural Resources Canada) has therefore undertaken an assessment of seafloor geological characteristics and physical environmental parameters that will be encountered during any extensive deployment of marine renewable energy systems for the Pacific offshore of Canada. Here we present an overview of seabed characterization for key sites for each of the three energy types. Narrow passages exiting the Salish Sea near the Canadian boundary with the United States and northwards out of the Strait of Georgia provide very promising sites for tidal generation. Here, elliptical fields of very large subaqueous dunes, from 12 to 28 m in height, present a significant challenge to site development. Along the exposed continental shelf of Vancouver Island focused wave-energy close to shore (40-60 m water depth) offers significant energy potential, but any engineering systems would have to be founded on a seafloor made up of a mobile gravel lag and an extensive boulder pavement. A large wind farm proposed for the Pacific North Coast would be built on an extensive shallow bank that has active sediment transport and a large field of sand ridges that have developed within a macrotidal environment. A significant challenge is providing for a safe seafloor cable corridor of over 100 km that crosses a large subaqueous dune field to connect to the electrical grid on the mainland. These examples show how geoscience has and will provide critical information to project proponents and regulators for the safe development of marine renewable energy.

  13. Atomic and molecular physics of controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joachain, C.J.; Post, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    This book attempts to provide a comprehensive introduction to the atomic and molecular physics of controlled thermonuclear fusion, and also a self-contained source from which to start a systematic study of the field. Presents an overview of fusion energy research, general principles of magnetic confinement, and general principles of inertial confinement. Discusses the calculation and measurement of atomic and molecular processes relevant to fusion, and the atomic and molecular physics of controlled thermonuclear research devices. Topics include recent progress in theoretical methods for atomic collisions; current theoretical techniques for electron-atom and electronion scattering; experimental aspects of electron impact ionization and excitation of positive ions; the theory of charge exchange and ionization by heavy particles; experiments on electron capture and ionization by multiply charged ions; Rydberg states; atomic and molecular processes in high temperature, low-density magnetically confined plasmas; atomic processes in high-density plasmas; the plasma boundary region and the role of atomic and molecular processes; neutral particle beam production and injection; spectroscopic plasma diagnostics; and particle diagnostics for magnetic fusion experiments

  14. Feedback Control of MEMS to Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Feedback Control of MEMS to Atoms illustrates the use of control and control systems as an essential part of functioning integrated miniaturized systems. The book is organized according to the dimensional scale of the problem, starting with microscale systems and ending with atomic-scale systems. Similar to macroscale machines and processes, control systems can play a major role in improving the performance of micro- and nanoscale systems and in enabling new capabilities that would otherwise not be possible. The majority of problems at these scales present many new challenges that go beyond the current state-of-the-art in control theory and engineering. This is a result of the multidisciplinary nature of micro/nanotechnology, which requires the merging of control engineering with physics, biology and chemistry. This book: Shows how the utilization of feedback control in nanotechnology instrumentation can yield results far better than passive systems can Discusses the application of control systems to problems...

  15. Association of total energy intake and macronutrient consumption with colorectal cancer risk: results from a large population-based case-control study in Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhuoyu; Liu, Lin; Wang, Peizhong Peter; Roebothan, Barbara; Zhao, Jin; Dicks, Elizabeth; Cotterchio, Michelle; Buehler, Sharon; Campbell, Peter T; McLaughlin, John R; Parfrey, Patrick S

    2012-03-26

    Diet is regarded as one of the most important environmental factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. A recent report comprehensively concluded that total energy intake does not have a simple relationship with CRC risk, and that the data were inconsistent for carbohydrate, cholesterol and protein. The objective of this study was to identify the associations of CRC risk with dietary intakes of total energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, fiber, and alcohol using data from a large case-control study conducted in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) and Ontario (ON), Canada. Incident colorectal cancer cases (n = 1760) were identified from population-based cancer registries in the provinces of ON (1997-2000) and NL (1999-2003). Controls (n = 2481) were a random sample of residents in each province, aged 20-74 years. Family history questionnaire (FHQ), personal history questionnaire (PHQ), and food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) were used to collect study data. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of intakes of total energy, macronutrients and alcohol with CRC risk. Total energy intake was associated with higher risk of CRC (OR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.21-2.01, p-trend = 0.02, 5th versus 1st quintile), whereas inverse associations emerged for intakes of protein (OR: 0.85, 95%CI: 0.69-1.00, p-trend = 0.06, 5th versus 1st quintile), carbohydrate (OR: 0.81, 95%CI: 0.63-1.00, p-trend = 0.05, 5th versus 1st quintile) and total dietary fiber (OR: 0.84, 95% CI:0.67-0.99, p-trend = 0.04, 5th versus 1st quintile). Total fat, alcohol, saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and cholesterol were not associated with CRC risk. This study provides further evidence that high energy intake may increase risk of incident CRC, whereas diets high in protein, fiber, and carbohydrate may reduce the risk of the disease.

  16. Association of total energy intake and macronutrient consumption with colorectal cancer risk: results from a large population-based case-control study in Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhuoyu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diet is regarded as one of the most important environmental factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC risk. A recent report comprehensively concluded that total energy intake does not have a simple relationship with CRC risk, and that the data were inconsistent for carbohydrate, cholesterol and protein. The objective of this study was to identify the associations of CRC risk with dietary intakes of total energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, fiber, and alcohol using data from a large case-control study conducted in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL and Ontario (ON, Canada. Methods Incident colorectal cancer cases (n = 1760 were identified from population-based cancer registries in the provinces of ON (1997-2000 and NL (1999-2003. Controls (n = 2481 were a random sample of residents in each province, aged 20-74 years. Family history questionnaire (FHQ, personal history questionnaire (PHQ, and food frequency questionnaire (FFQ were used to collect study data. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of intakes of total energy, macronutrients and alcohol with CRC risk. Results Total energy intake was associated with higher risk of CRC (OR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.21-2.01, p-trend = 0.02, 5th versus 1st quintile, whereas inverse associations emerged for intakes of protein (OR: 0.85, 95%CI: 0.69-1.00, p-trend = 0.06, 5th versus 1st quintile, carbohydrate (OR: 0.81, 95%CI: 0.63-1.00, p-trend = 0.05, 5th versus 1st quintile and total dietary fiber (OR: 0.84, 95% CI:0.67-0.99, p-trend = 0.04, 5th versus 1st quintile. Total fat, alcohol, saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and cholesterol were not associated with CRC risk. Conclusion This study provides further evidence that high energy intake may increase risk of incident CRC, whereas diets high in protein, fiber, and carbohydrate may reduce the risk of the disease.

  17. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited applications of accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormrod, J.H.; Ungrin, J.

    1988-01-01

    Accelerators have been tools in the physicist's arsenal since the early 1930's, and the requirements of the research laboratory have spawned most of the significant advances in the technology. The characteristics needed in medical and industrial applications frequently differ from those needed by researchers. The authors review a variety of applications in medical therapy; medical isotope production; sterilization of medical supplies, food and water; the production of synthetic materials; industrial radiography; borehole logging; gemstone colour changes; the production of micropore filters; material modifications; long-wavelength radiation generation; sewage treatment; stack gas cleaning; electronuclear breeding; laser weaponry; and rock spalling and tunneling

  18. Canada as an energy superpower : how clean, how powerful, how super?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, M.

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, Canada's Prime Minister declared Canada to be an emerging energy superpower due to its vast reserves of oil, gas, and uranium. This article clarified the attributes of a superpower and explained how they can be used to evaluate Canada's situation. The attributes of a superpower include a capability to potentially influence the behaviour of other countries and the course of world events; the capacity to deploy that capability when it can be effective; a clear understanding of one's national interests and policies; and, a will to use the energy capacity when called upon. This framework was used to test the hypothesis of Canada as a power in energy. It was agreed that in terms of reserves, production and exports, Canada is a significant player by world standards. Canada has technological leadership in some parts of the fuel cell industry, possibly nuclear energy and the deployment of advanced technology in resource extraction. However, it was argued that deployment capacity must be maintained and enhanced. The author claimed that Canada's ability to exercise power through unilateral deployment of energy resources is modest, although Canada does have an implicit policy expressed through international treaties such as its membership in the World Trade Organization (WTO), International Energy Agency (IEA), and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Canada also benefits from pipeline and powerline regulations for shared regulation of electricity reliability. It was suggested that Canada has the capability to be a voice in support of market-based approaches to energy and an open international trade and investment regime. It was determined that Canada is committed to market-based energy policies and to North American partnership in a broader international context. The author suggested that although Canada has many capabilities regarding energy resources and the capacity to deliver them to markets, it lacks energy policy at the national level, and requires

  19. Canada: Darlington NPP. Project Control. Annex 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieckowski, G.

    1999-01-01

    This annex deals with project control. The just slowed down and delayed. Senior engineering, construction and procurement staff stayed with the project. Documentation was preserved though normal functioning of the records department project was completed and put into service with a few years' delay. (author)

  20. The way that Ibaraki Prefecture has tackled atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Hirokatsu; Hirai, Yasuo; Tsuji, Tadashi.

    1996-01-01

    First, the development of the district centering around Tokai Village is mentioned, where at present Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, Japan Atomic Power Co. and others are located. Ibaraki Prefecture investigated the effects that atomic energy facilities exerted economically and socially to the district. As to the social environment investigation related to atomic energy facilities, its purpose, the objects of investigation, the contents and the method of investigation are reported. As to the progress of the development and utilization of atomic energy in Ibaraki Prefecture, 23 establishments are located in the district. Also there are 16 power reactors and research reactors, one fuel reprocessing plant, 4 nuclear fuel fabrication facilities, 86 nuclear fuel using facilities and 28 radioisotope using facilities. Their situations are reported. As to the atomic energy administration of Ibaraki Prefecture, the safety administration and the countermeasures for surrounding areas are explained. The effects exerted to the society and the economy of the district are reported. The results of the investigation of the conscience concerning atomic energy of residents are shown about energy and atomic energy, atomic energy administration, and the relation of atomic energy facilities with the district. (K.I.)

  1. National energy policy provides scant power direction. [Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-05-07

    More federal direction on electric power developments was expected than actually materialized in the national energy policy released recently by Energy, Mines, and Resources. None of the primary objectives was specifically geared to improving the sagging power outlook. The five targets mentioned would have varying positive influences on Canadian power security if achieved, but oil and gas problems stole the spotlight. Failure of a national energy grid to make the top priority list was a disappointment. Observers had been expecting more prominent treatment for grid schemes in light of comments made by energy minister Alastair Gillespie at the recent energy conservation conference in Ottawa. But the strategy paper merely endorses the strengthening of regional interconnections, particularly in eastern Canada, and urges closer coordination among provincial utilities in planning and development. It reveals no new move to spur grid action and only reiterates the federal offer to back 50 percent of interconnection studies and capital costs. The paper does recognize that strengthened regional ties would lead to a form of integrated national system permitting more efficient systems growth, mutual assistance in the event of power failures, and some averaging out of peak and off-peak loads. They would economize on the need for stand-by power and enhance more rational expansion.

  2. Why atomic energy affects Civil Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knieper, R.

    1980-01-01

    Based on the decision of July 20, 1979 by the Amtsgericht Stuttgart, which dismissed the complaint filed by the Technische Werke der Stadt Stuttgart (public utility) against electricity boycotters as being unfounded for the time being, the author states that a political function is due to Civil Law. The concrete question is whether political considerations have surpassed the limits of laws and interpretations bound by the basic rights. The relationship between a customer depending on power supply and the supply monopolist exceeds contractual relationship by far since it is a social relationship: it is inescapably embraced by the customer's dependence on power supply and by the customer being subject to research work. Atomic energy is being introduced into law of contract by means of dogmatic crutches - breach of additional obligation under a contract. However, in Civil Law, there are a great number of such means enabling solutions to be corrected which seem to be inadequate. (HSCH) [de

  3. Admissibility of appeals in atomic energy law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rengeling, H.W.

    1981-01-01

    Using two decisions made by the Federal Court of Administration on the Whyl reactor on July 17, 1980, and on the Stade reactor on December 22, 1980, which he considers as having at least an orientation effect, the author examines the admissibility of appeals filed according to the Atomic Energy Law. For substantiating the appeal, he discusses rules of law that protect third parties and the complainant's obligation to substantiate the appeal. In view of the preclusion of objectives, he differentiates between 'forfeiture' preclusion and 'validity' preclusion. In his view, the above-mentioned decisions produce effects that are to the benefit of the constitutional state and the necessary further development of economy and technology. (HSCH) [de

  4. The China Institute of Atomic Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Mingwu

    2001-01-01

    The China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), established in 1950, carries out multidisciplinary research in nuclear science, technology and engineering. It has three research reactors and ten low energy accelerators. The focus of its nuclear energy related R and D is on reactor engineering and technology. In the area of nuclear techniques for applications, R and D is carried out on accelerators, isotope production, nuclear electronics and utilization of radioisotopes and radiation. There is also a strong programme in basic nuclear physics and radiochemistry. New major facilities under construction in CIAE include China Advanced Research Reactor (flux 8x10 14 n/cm 2 /sec) and China Experimental Fast Reactor. China has been successfully using the products of its R and D for a variety of applications in medicine, industry, materials science etc. A dynamic research programme is tuned to attract young talent to CIEA and there is good collaboration with the Beijing University. CIEA has been an active participant of RCA programmes of the IAEA and has been a resource for many developing countries. The management expects the Institute to be a leading multidisciplinary institute in the field of nuclear science, technology and engineering. (author)

  5. The new protection level of the atomic energy law; Das neue Schutzniveau des Atomgesetzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziehm, Cornelia [Deutsche Umwelthilfe e.V. (DUH), Berlin (Germany). Klimaschutz und Energiewende

    2011-07-01

    The atomic energy law is determining the normative basis for best possible danger prevention and hazard control in accordance with the actual state-of-the art of science and technology. This is not only essential for the legal licensing procedures but also for atomic energy authorities. With the introduction of paragraph 7d into the German atomic energy law in the frame of revision 12 essential protection requirements and retrofitting measures will be withdrawn from the danger prevention in the sense of the atomic energy law and thus the third party protection.

  6. Control board and utility system for cell complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, G.L. de; Silva, A.C.; Souza, A.S.F. de; Souza, M.L.M. de; Rautenberg, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    To attend necessities of hot cells operation and process control for isotope production in IEN cyclotron (Brazilian-CNEN) a utility system, such as, electricity, water, vacuum, air, and gas, and control board was constructed, which advantages are presented. (M.C.K.)

  7. Energy transition. Who will board the energy Airbus?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moragues, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    As the French President called for the creation of a French-German company dedicated to energy transition, inspired by the Airbus project which emerged to share the design and development costs of a specific product (a large capacity aircraft), this article comments the possibility of applying such a strategy between the main French and German actors like Siemens, RWE, Alstom, EDF. Such an idea has already its reality as some French and German are cooperating in different projects: offshore wind energy consortium, research and development in photovoltaic, smart grids, energy storage, and so on. Some of these projects are evoked and commented, for example one which has emerged just after the President's speech: the project of a giant factory of solar arrays proposed by the CEA and the Fraunhofer Institute. One major need is also evoked, the harmonization at the regulation stage

  8. Development of an ATCA IPMI Controller Mezzanine Board and its usage on an ATCA ROD Evaluator board for the ATLAS LAr upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    "DUMONT DAYOT, N; The ATLAS collaboration; "CAP, S; "DUMONT DAYOT, N; "FOURNIER, L; "LETENDRE, N; "PERROT, G; "Wingerter, I

    2011-01-01

    In the context of the LHC upgrades, a new Read-Out Driver (ROD) board for the ATLAS LAr calorimeter is being developed. xTCA (Advanced/Micro Telecom Computing Architecture) is becoming a standard in high energy physics and is a serious candidate for future readout systems. We will present our current developments to master ATCA and to integrate a large number of very high speed links (96 links/8.5 Gbps) on a ROD Evaluator ATCA board. To manage our ROD Evaluator, we have developed a versatile ATCA IPMI controller for ATCA boards which is FPGA Mezzanine Card (FMC) compliant.

  9. Annual report and accounts of the Nuclear Energy Board 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In a year which saw the passing into law of the Radiological Protection Act 1991, and on the international scene the publication of new Recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the Nuclear Energy Board deepened the emphasis of its work on the protection of the public and the environment against the risks associated with ionising radiation. This it did particularly through its programme of monitoring of both artificial and natural radioactivity in the environment, regulation of uses of ionising radiation in medicine and industry, development of emergency response capability and participation in international research activities

  10. Three Essays on Energy Efficiency and Environmental Policies in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamtessa, Samuel

    2011-09-01

    This thesis is organized into five Chapters. In Chapter 1, we provide an introduction. In Chapter 2, we present a study on residential energy-efficiency retrofits in Canada. We describe the EnerGuide for Houses data and model household decisions to invest in energy-efficiency retrofits. Our results show that government financial incentives have important positive effects. The decision to invest in energy-efficiency retrofits is positively related to potential energy cost savings and negatively related to the costs of the retrofits. We find that household characteristics such as the age composition of household members are important factors. All else remaining constant, low income households are more likely to undertake energy-efficiency retrofits. In the third Chapter, we present our study on price-induced energy efficiency improvements in Canadian manufacturing. Our study employs a new approach to the estimation of price-induced energy efficiency improvements and the results have important empirical and policy implications. In the fourth chapter, we present our study on the implications of the "shale gas revolution" on Alberta greenhouse gas emission abatement strategy. Given that the strategy is centered on deployment of CCS technologies, we analyze the effects of the declines in natural gas price on CCS deployment in the electricity sector. We use the CIMS simulation model to simulate various policy scenarios under high and low natural gas price assumptions. Comparison of the results shows that CCS market penetration in the electricity sector is very minimal in the low natural gas price scenario even when a 50% cost subsidy is applied. Accordingly, there is little gain from subsidizing CCS given the "shale gas revolution." We provide a few concluding remarks in Chapter 5.

  11. Atomic energy policy in fiscal year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Michio

    1985-01-01

    The international demand and supply of petroleum advance in relaxed condition at present, but tend to get stringent in long term. Nuclear power is the most promising substitute energy for petroleum, and in Japan, 28 nuclear power plants with 20.56 million kW output are in operation, generating 20.4% of the total generated power in 1983. According to the perspective of long term power supply, the installed capacity of nuclear power plants will reach 62 million kW and 27% of the total installed capacity by 2000. It is important to positively deal with the industrialization of nuclear fuel cycle, the upgrading of nuclear power generation, the development of the reactors of new types and so on, preparing for the age that nuclear power generation will become the center of power supply. The atomic energy policy of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in fiscal year 1985 is reflected to the budget, financial investment and funding and other measures based on the above viewpoint. The outline of the budget and financial investment and funding for fiscal year 1985 is explained. The points are the promotion of industrialization of nuclear fuel cycle, the promotion of nuclear power generation and the promotion of understanding and cooperation of nation on the location of electric power sources. (Kako, I.)

  12. Israel Atomic Energy Commission 1996 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Selecting the research efforts to be highlighted in the Israel Atomic Energy Commission's Annual Report from the large body and broad spectrum of ongoing work is not an easy task. The extensive bibliography of published results attached to the report attests to the scope of this difficulty. Of the many worthwhile projects, four were chosen to represent best the current trends in the continuing R and D program at the research centers of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission. One of these trends is the growing cooperation with private industry, in an attempt to gear our R and D programs to respond to market demands. Another feature, noted already several years ago, is the extensive collaboration of our scientists and engineers with colleagues at other institutions, in Israel and abroad. some of the work reported is part of evolving international industrial cooperation projects, illustrating both these trends. Following a trend common to many nuclear research centers around the world, a substantial part of our research effort is non-nuclear in nature. This is illustrated in the first article, which deals with advances in the application of non-linear optics in diverse fields of science and technology. These include state-of-the-art solid-state lasers, rapid modulation of light signals, development and generation of tunable sources of coherent light, optical data storage and the microscopic probing of biological and inorganic samples. The present work reports on a range of R and D, from the fundamentals of non-linear optical materials to proof-of-principle demonstrations of non-linear subwavelength resolution microscopy, to fabrication of prototype commercial tunable laser systems The second report considers the microstrain characteristics in some alloys using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The research utilizes XRD line broadening effects to study the characteristics of alloys from especially prepared surfaces. These characteristics include the homogeneity of alloying

  13. Israel Atomic Energy Commission 1996 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Selecting the research efforts to be highlighted in the Israel Atomic Energy Commission`s Annual Report from the large body and broad spectrum of ongoing work is not an easy task. The extensive bibliography of published results attached to the report attests to the scope of this difficulty. Of the many worthwhile projects, four were chosen to represent best the current trends in the continuing R and D program at the research centers of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission. One of these trends is the growing cooperation with private industry, in an attempt to gear our R and D programs to respond to market demands. Another feature, noted already several years ago, is the extensive collaboration of our scientists and engineers with colleagues at other institutions, in Israel and abroad. some of the work reported is part of evolving international industrial cooperation projects, illustrating both these trends. Following a trend common to many nuclear research centers around the world, a substantial part of our research effort is non-nuclear in nature. This is illustrated in the first article, which deals with advances in the application of non-linear optics in diverse fields of science and technology. These include state-of-the-art solid-state lasers, rapid modulation of light signals, development and generation of tunable sources of coherent light, optical data storage and the microscopic probing of biological and inorganic samples. The present work reports on a range of R and D, from the fundamentals of non-linear optical materials to proof-of-principle demonstrations of non-linear subwavelength resolution microscopy, to fabrication of prototype commercial tunable laser systems The second report considers the microstrain characteristics in some alloys using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The research utilizes XRD line broadening effects to study the characteristics of alloys from especially prepared surfaces. These characteristics include the homogeneity of alloying

  14. 78 FR 30295 - Constellation Energy Commoditiesgroup, Inc., ENI USA Gas Marketing LLC, Sequent Energy Canada...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ..., 13-37-NG, 13-24-NG, 13-28-LNG, and 13-32-LNG] Constellation Energy Commoditiesgroup, Inc., ENI USA... natural gas from/to Canada. Group, Inc. 3247 03/05/13 12-161-LNG...... ENI USA Gas Order granting blanket...

  15. Does nuclear energy have a role in the development of Canada's oil sands?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunbar, R.B.; Sloan, T.W.

    2004-01-01

    The Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI) completed a study for Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) that compares the economics of a modified ACR-700 Advanced CANDU Reactor with the economics of a natural gas-fired facility to supply steam to a hypothetical Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) project located in northeastern Alberta. The results were initially presented at the Petroleum Society's Canadian International Petroleum Conference 2003, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, June 10-12, 2003. The comparison was made by using discounted cash-flow methodology to estimate the levelized unit cost of steam that could be supplied to the SAGD project from either a nuclear or a gas-fired facility. The unit cost of steam was determined by treating the steam supply facility as a standalone business; it would ensure that all costs are recovered including capital costs, operating costs, fuel costs, and a return on investment. The study indicated that steam supply form an ACR-700 nuclear facility is economically competitive with stea supply from a gas-fired facility. An examination of key variables indicated that the cost of steam form the nuclear facility is very sensitive to the capital cost of the facility, while the cost of steam from the gas-fired facility is very sensitive to the price of natural gas and possible Kyoto Protocol compliance costs. (author)

  16. 50 CFR 21.52 - Public health control order for resident Canada geese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public health control order for resident... and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.52 Public health control order for resident Canada geese. (a) Which... Canada geese, as defined in § 21.3. (b) What is the public health control order for resident Canada geese...

  17. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    The text of the Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, as approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959, is re produced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. As required by section 38 of the Agreement, the Director General will transmit certified copies, in the Agency's four working languages, to the Government of each Member State

  18. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter

  19. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-08-17

    The text of the Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, as approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959, is re produced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. As required by section 38 of the Agreement, the Director General will transmit certified copies, in the Agency's four working languages, to the Government of each Member State.

  20. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter [ru

  1. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter [fr

  2. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter [es

  3. Young students's opinion about atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso, Belen; Martin, Hugo R.

    2006-01-01

    The present research work was performed in answer to a requirement that the CNEA-RC made to students of the Public and Institutional Relations Degree of the UES21, as a part of activities carried out in the framework of the Academic Cooperation Agreement between both institutions. In this case the students had to attend the Professional Practical course during the first semester of 2006, which included a short period in some company or organization. The Degree of Knowledge and the Opinion of the students from the Cycle of Specialization of the Province of Cordoba Educational System (ages between 15 and 17 years old), on the activities that are made in the site of CNEA-RC and DIOXITEK SA at Alta Cordoba neighborhood in Cordoba city has been analyzed. The same aspects were analyzed for Dioxitek's activities (equipment, raw materials, risk performance, etc.). Although the activities made at CNEA-RC involved during 2005/6 about 4000 students, due to the short time available for the practical part only the data of two schools located near the facilities were processed. Three aspects of the space conformed between the public and the general opinion were analyzed: the customs, the stereotypes and the attitudes of the people. These aspects were taken as the characteristics to describe to the opinions, their direction and intensity. The analysis was based on an exploratory investigation of type, characterized by its flexibility. The field work was of quantitative character. The surveys were structured with closed questions (categories of answers delimited previously on which the students must answer). For its design we used diverse sources of intelligence, such as pages of Internet, pamphlets, magazines, annual balances of the organizations, etc. The main results were the following: 1) The greater percentage of students declared to have little information on Atomic Energy. Only 4% declared to have abundant knowledge on the subject. 2) A 38% of the students indicated that

  4. Determination of Atomic Data Pertinent to the Fusion Energy Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reader, J.

    2013-01-01

    We summarize progress that has been made on the determination of atomic data pertinent to the fusion energy program. Work is reported on the identification of spectral lines of impurity ions, spectroscopic data assessment and compilations, expansion and upgrade of the NIST atomic databases, collision and spectroscopy experiments with highly charged ions on EBIT, and atomic structure calculations and modeling of plasma spectra

  5. Proceedings of Canada Forum 4. annual conference : powering up Aboriginal energy : clean energy driving Aboriginal economic development across Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, C. [Lumos Energy, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Aboriginal Clean Energy Network, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Buckell, J. [Michipicoten First Nation, Wawa, ON (Canada)] (comps.)

    2010-07-01

    This conference provided a form to discuss issues related to renewable energy and methods of creating successful and sustainable business models and plans in Aboriginal communities. The Government of Canada's new Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development promotes partnerships supporting Aboriginal businesses in order to maximize access to capital. More than $350 billion in major resource and energy developments have been identified in or near Aboriginal communities. The tools available for small, medium and large-sized Aboriginal businesses were discussed along with financing sources and mechanisms for creating equity in renewable energy projects. Speakers also addressed the need for new transmission to serve renewable generation; recognition of rights in sharing the land; and Ontario's Aboriginal Energy Partnerships Program which provides an opportunity for First Nations and Metis to work with the government and private sector to build, own and operate new electricity transmission. Other topics presented at the conference included biomass district heating; bioenergy projects; wind partnerships with Aboriginal communities; hydroelectric development; and northern and remote communities. The conference featured 11 presentations, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  6. Proceedings of Canada Forum 4. annual conference : powering up Aboriginal energy : clean energy driving Aboriginal economic development across Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, C.; Buckell, J.

    2010-01-01

    This conference provided a form to discuss issues related to renewable energy and methods of creating successful and sustainable business models and plans in Aboriginal communities. The Government of Canada's new Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development promotes partnerships supporting Aboriginal businesses in order to maximize access to capital. More than $350 billion in major resource and energy developments have been identified in or near Aboriginal communities. The tools available for small, medium and large-sized Aboriginal businesses were discussed along with financing sources and mechanisms for creating equity in renewable energy projects. Speakers also addressed the need for new transmission to serve renewable generation; recognition of rights in sharing the land; and Ontario's Aboriginal Energy Partnerships Program which provides an opportunity for First Nations and Metis to work with the government and private sector to build, own and operate new electricity transmission. Other topics presented at the conference included biomass district heating; bioenergy projects; wind partnerships with Aboriginal communities; hydroelectric development; and northern and remote communities. The conference featured 11 presentations, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database.

  7. 33 CFR 223.1 - Mississippi River Water Control Management Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., responsibilities and authority of the Mississippi River Water Control Management Board. (b) Applicability. This... control management within the Mississippi River Basin. (c) Objectives. The objectives of the Board are: (1...) Composition. The Mississippi River Water Control Management Board is a continuing board consisting of the...

  8. The impact of Canada's environmental review process on new uranium mine developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1997-01-01

    Canada introduced and environmental assessment process in the mid 1970s. It was designed to ensure that the environmental consequences of all project proposals with federal government involvement were assessed for potential adverse effects early in the planning stage. In 1984, a Guidelines Order was approved to clarify the rules, responsibilities and procedures of the environmental Assessment and Review Process (EARP) that had evolved informally under earlier Cabinet directives. In 1989/1990, the Federal Court of Appeal effectively converted the Guidelines Order into a legal requirement for rigorous application. The Supreme Court of Canada upheld the constitutionally of the EARP Guidelines Order in 1992. Canada became the world's leading producer and exporter of uranium during the late 1980s. Since then, the Canadian public has become sensitized to numerous issues concerning environmental degradation, from the Chernobyl accident to ozone depletion. In 1991, during this period of increasing awareness, the Atomic Energy Control Board, the federal nuclear regulator, referred six new Saskatchewan uranium mining projects for environmental review, pursuant to the EARP Guidelines Order. The public review process provided an extremely valuable focus on aspects of these developments that needed to be addressed by proponents and regulators. It has helped to demonstrate that new uranium mining projects are being developed in a responsible manner, after full consideration has been given to the potential impacts and public concerns associated with these facilities. 4 figs, 1 tab

  9. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Frank, S; Bonneau, M; Schmiedmayer, J; Hild, S; Gross, C; Cheneau, M; Bloch, I; Pichler, T; Negretti, A; Calarco, T; Montangero, S

    2016-10-11

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit - the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations.

  10. Evaluating transit preferential measures : Priority lanes, boarding and control strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    West, J.; Cats, O.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of bus service improvements such as bus lanes, allowing boarding through all doors and headway-based holding control ideally requires a simulation model that combines features of both classical analytical models and microscopic simulation. However, as the usage of such models has been

  11. ENERGY RELAXATION OF HELIUM ATOMS IN ASTROPHYSICAL GASES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewkow, N. R.; Kharchenko, V.; Zhang, P.

    2012-01-01

    We report accurate parameters describing energy relaxation of He atoms in atomic gases, important for astrophysics and atmospheric science. Collisional energy exchange between helium atoms and atomic constituents of the interstellar gas, heliosphere, and upper planetary atmosphere has been investigated. Energy transfer rates, number of collisions required for thermalization, energy distributions of recoil atoms, and other major parameters of energy relaxation for fast He atoms in thermal H, He, and O gases have been computed in a broad interval of energies from 10 meV to 10 keV. This energy interval is important for astrophysical applications involving the energy deposition of energetic atoms and ions into atmospheres of planets and exoplanets, atmospheric evolution, and analysis of non-equilibrium processes in the interstellar gas and heliosphere. Angular- and energy-dependent cross sections, required for an accurate description of the momentum-energy transfer, are obtained using ab initio interaction potentials and quantum mechanical calculations for scattering processes. Calculation methods used include partial wave analysis for collisional energies below 2 keV and the eikonal approximation at energies higher than 100 eV, keeping a significant energy region of overlap, 0.1-2 keV, between these two methods for their mutual verification. The partial wave method and the eikonal approximation excellently match results obtained with each other as well as experimental data, providing reliable cross sections in the astrophysically important interval of energies from 10 meV to 10 keV. Analytical formulae, interpolating obtained energy- and angular-dependent cross sections, are presented to simplify potential applications of the reported database. Thermalization of fast He atoms in the interstellar gas and energy relaxation of hot He and O atoms in the upper atmosphere of Mars are considered as illustrative examples of potential applications of the new database.

  12. 76 FR 67158 - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Cancellation of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces the cancellation of the November 1, 2011, meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas...

  13. Pilot project of atomic energy technology record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K. C.; Kim, Y. I.; Kim, Y. G.

    2011-12-01

    Project of the Atomic Energy Technology Record is the project that summarizes and records in each category as a whole summary from the background to the performance at all fields of nuclear science technology which researched and developed at KAERI. This project includes Data and Document Management System(DDMS) that will be the system to collect, organize and preserve various records occurred in each research and development process. To achieve these goals, many problems should be solved to establish technology records process, such as issues about investigation status of technology records in KAERI, understanding and collection records, set-up project system and selection target field, definition standards and range of target records. This is a research report on the arrangement of research contents and results about pilot project which records whole nuclear technology researched and developed at KAERI in each category. Section 2 summarizes the overview of this pilot project and the current status of technology records in domestic and overseas, and from Section 3 to Section 6 summarize contents and results which performed in this project. Section 3 summarizes making TOC(Table of Content) and technology records, Section 4 summarizes sectoral templates, Section 5 summarizes writing detailed plan of technology records, and Section 6 summarizes Standard Document Numbering System(SDNS). Conclusions of this report are described in Section 7

  14. Safety precautions in atomic pile control (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furet, J.

    1962-01-01

    We have been led to study the problem of safety in atomic pile control as a result of our participation on the one hand in the planning of C.E.A. atomic piles, and on the other hand in the pile safety sub omission considering atomic pile safety of operational or planned C.E.A. piles. We have thus had to consider the wishes occurring in piles during their operation and also their behaviour in the dynamic state The present work deals mainly with the importance of intrinsic safety devices, with the influence of reactivity variations on the power fluctuations during accidental operation, and with the development of robust and reliable safety appliances. The starting p accident has been especially studied both for low-flux piles where a compromise is necessary between the response time of the safety appliances and the statistical fluctuations and for high lux piles where xenon poisoning has an effect on the lower limit of the velocity of reactivity liberation. The desirability has been stressed of automation as a safety factor in atomic pile control. The details required for an understanding of the diagrams of the apparatus are given. (author) [fr

  15. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  16. Control system for ATLAS TileCal HVRemote boards

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)739751; The ATLAS collaboration; Gurriana, Luis; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Evans, Guiomar; Gomes, Agostinho; Maio, Amelia; Pinto Silva Rato, Catia Sofia; Almendra Sabino, Joao Maria; Soares Augusto, Jose

    2018-01-01

    One of the proposed solutions for upgrading the high voltage (HV) system of Tilecal, the ATLAS hadron calorimeter, consists in removing the HV regulation boards from the detector and deploying them in a low-radiation room where there is permanent access for maintenance. This option requires many ~100 m long HV cables but removes the requirement of radiation hard boards. That solution simplifies the control system of the HV regulation cards (called HVRemote). It consists of a Detector Control System (DCS) node linked to 256 HVRemote boards through a tree of Ethernet connections. Each HVRemote includes a smart Ethernet transceiver for converting data and commands from the DCS into serial peripheral interface (SPI) signals routed to SPI-capable devices in the HVRemote. The DCS connection to the transceiver and the control of some SPI-capable devices via Ethernet has been tested successfully. A test board (HVRemote-ctrl) with the interfacing sub-system of the HVRemote was fabricated. It is being tested through SP...

  17. Control System for ATLAS TileCal HVRemote boards

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)739751; The ATLAS collaboration; Gurriana, Luis; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Evans, Guiomar; Gomes, Agostinho; Maio, Amelia; Pinto Silva Rato, Catia Sofia; Almendra Sabino, Joao Maria; Augusto, Jose

    2017-01-01

    One of the proposed solutions for upgrading the high voltage (HV) system of TileCal, the ATLAS central hadron calorimeter, consists in removing the HV regulation boards from the detector and deploying them in a low-radiation room where there is permanent access for maintenance. This option requires many ∼100 m long HV cables but removes the requirement of radiation hard boards. This solution simplifies the control system of the HV regulation cards (called HVRemote). It consists of a Detector Control System (DCS) node linked to 256 HVRemote boards through a tree of Ethernet connections. Each HVRemote includes a smart Ethernet transceiver for converting data and commands from the DCS into serial peripheral interface (SPI) signals routed to SPI-capable devices in the HVRemote. The DCS connection to the transceiver and the control of some SPI-capable devices via Ethernet has been tested successfully. A test board (HVRemote-Ctrl) with the interfacing sub-system of the HVRemote was fabricated. It is being tested ...

  18. Possibilities of reduction of the on-board energy for an innovative subway

    OpenAIRE

    Allègre, A-L.; Barrade, P.; Delarue, P.; Bouscayrol, A.; Chattot, E.; El-Fassi, S.

    2009-01-01

    An innovative subway has been proposed using supercapacitors as energy source. In this paper, are presented different possibilities to reduce on-board stored energy in order to downsize the on-board energy storage subsystem. Special attention is paid to the influence of a feeding rail extension or a downward slope at the beginning of the interstation on the on-board stored energy. A map is built to facilitate the selection of the solution which leads to reduce the on-board energy.

  19. Solar and Geothermal Energy: New Competition for the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Luther J.

    1974-01-01

    Describes new emphasis on research into solar and geothermal energy resources by governmental action and recent legislation and the decreased emphasis on atomic power in supplementing current energy shortages. (BR)

  20. Radioactive waste management in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, N.J.

    1986-09-01

    This bibliography is an up-date to AECL-6186(Rev 3), 1952-1982, 'Radioactive Waste Management in Canada AECL Publications and Other Literature' compiled by Dianne Wallace. Canadian publications from outside contractors concerning the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program are included in addition to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited reports and papers. 252 refs

  1. Books on Atomic Energy for Adults and Children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1969-01-01

    This booklet contains two lists of atomic energy books, one for students and one for adults. The student list has grade annotations. The lists are not all-inclusive but comprise selected basic books on atomic energy and closely related subjects.

  2. On promotion of base technologies of atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In the long term plan of atomic energy development and utilization decided in June, 1987 by the Atomic Energy Commission, it was recognized that hereafter, the opening-up of the new potential that atomic energy possesses should be aimed at, and the policy was shown so that the research and development hereafter place emphasis on the creative and innovative region which causes large technical innovation, by which the spreading effect to general science and technology can be expected, and the development of the base technologies that connect the basic research and project development is promoted. The trend of atomic energy development so far, the change of the situation surrounding atomic energy, the direction of technical development of atomic energy hereafter and the base technologies are discussed. The concept of the technical development of materilas, artificial intelligence, lasers, and the evaluation and reduction of radiation risks used for atomic energy is described. As the development plan of atomic energy base technologies, the subjects of technical development, the future image of technical development, the efficient promotion of the development and so on are shown. (Kato, I.)

  3. The regulation of uranium refineries and conversion facilities in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didyk, J.P.

    1986-04-01

    The nuclear regulatory process as it applies to uranium refineries and conversion facilities in Canada is reviewed. In the early 1980s, Eldorado Resources Limited proposed to construct and operate new facilities for refining yellowcake and for the production of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ). These projects were subject to regulation by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). A description of the AECB's comprehensive licensing process covering all stages of siting, construction, operation and eventual decommissioning of nuclear facilities is traced as it was applied to the Eldorado projects. The AECB's concern with occupational health and safety, with public health and safety and with the protection of the environment in so far as it affects public health and safety is emphasized. Some regulatory difficulties encountered during the project's development which led to opening up the licensing process to public input and closer coordination of regulatory activities with other provincial and federal regulatory agencies are described. The Board's regulatory operational compliance program for uranium refineries and conversion facilities is summarized

  4. The oil sands: A new energy vision for Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Canada`s oil sands deposits were considered to offer huge potential for wealth generation and enduring social benefits. This report showed that putting in action the plan developed by the National Task Force on Oil Sands Strategies would help unlock this potential and realize the benefits; the forecast called for a doubling or tripling of oil sands production over the next 25 years. The plan should also predicted an increase in investments in oil sands since the fiscal regime would be stable and the product would be in increasing demand. New capital investment should generate significant environmental, social and economic benefits. The real outcome would be increased national prosperity, since further growth in investment would translate into thousands of skilled jobs across Canada, expansion of government revenues, and improvements to Canada`s trade balance. 1 ill.

  5. Eleventh Arab Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasr, N.

    2012-01-01

    The Arab conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy is an important station where Arab researchers and scientists meet to present the results of their scientific and applied research activities, to exchange views, experiences and knowledge and to strengthen the bonds of cooperation among them. Under this framework, the Arab Atomic Energy Agency organized the eleventh Arab conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy in cooperation with the Ministry of Science and Communications of the Republic of Sudan and the Sudan Atomic Energy Commission in Khartoum city during the period of 23-27 December 2012. The sessions of the conference included scientific papers, in addition to specialized lectures on topics of particular importance in the field of peaceful applications of atomic energy followed by panel discussions.

  6. Canada's Fusion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D. P.

    1990-01-01

    Canada's fusion strategy is based on developing specialized technologies in well-defined areas and supplying these technologies to international fusion projects. Two areas are specially emphasized in Canada: engineered fusion system technologies, and specific magnetic confinement and materials studies. The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project focuses on the first of these areas. It tritium and fusion reactor fuel systems, remote maintenance and related safety studies. In the second area, the Centre Canadian de fusion magnetique operates the Tokamak de Varennes, the main magnetic fusion device in Canada. Both projects are partnerships linking the Government of Canada, represented by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and provincial governments, electrical utilities, universities and industry. Canada's program has extensive international links, through which it collaborates with the major world fusion programs, including participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project

  7. Reasons for decision in the matter of Coral Energy Canada Inc. : application for approval of modifications to the Firm Transportation Risk Alleviation Mechanism (FT-RAM) pilot for the TransCanada PipeLines Limited Mainline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Coral Energy Canada Inc. (Coral) is one of the largest wholesale energy marketers and traders in North America whose customers include utilities, gas distribution companies, municipalities, rural electrical cooperatives, independent power producers, industrial customers and commercial customers. As such, it is one of the largest shippers on the TransCanada Mainline Natural Gas Transmission System operated by TransCanada PipeLines Limited. As part of its 2001 and 2002 tolls and tariff applications, TransCanada proposed a new service enhancement called the Firm Transportation (FT) Make-up credits, which has proven to be flawed. A modified service enhancement known as the Firm Transportation Risk Alleviation Mechanism (FT-RAM) was subsequently proposed so that credits could be applied against a shipper's monthly interruptible transportation (IT) service account, based on any unused demand charges from the shippers FT contracts. In order to promote long haul service, the credits are only given for long-haul contracts, primarily for points originating in Alberta and Saskatchewan. On September 30, 2005, Coral applied to the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board for approval of modifications to the (FT-RAM) pilot to be effective on November 1, 2005. Coral proposed that the existing pilot be expanded to include short-haul FT contracts in limited circumstances where the same shipper holds a long-haul contract that delivers to the same location as the receipt point of the short-haul FT contract. The Board sought views from interested party of the appropriate process and associated timelines that should be used to deal with the application. Certain parties suggested that it would be inappropriate for the Board to approve any modifications to the existing FT-RAM pilot until the terms and conditions underlying certain Toll Task Force Resolutions were fulfilled. This document presented the positions of the interested parties, Coral's response to the positions of parties, views of

  8. Positronium-alkali atom scattering at medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Ajoy; Basu, Arindam; Sarkar, Nirmal K; Sinha, Prabal K

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the scattering of orthopositronium (o-Ps) atom off different atomic alkali targets (Na to Cs) at low and medium energies (up to 120 eV). Projectile-elastic and target-elastic close-coupling models have been employed to investigate the systems in addition to the static-exchange model. Elastic, excitation and total cross sections have been reported for all four systems. The magnitude of the alkali excitation cross section increases with increasing atomic number of the target atom while the position of the peak value shifts towards lower incident energies. The magnitudes of the Ps excitation and ionization cross sections increase steadily with atomic number with no change in the peak position. The reported results show regular behaviour with increasing atomic number of the target atom. Scattering parameters for the Ps-Rb and Ps-Cs systems are being reported for the first time

  9. New drive and control concept of the paper-board machine at the board factory "Umka"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeftenić Borislav

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the reconstruction of the drives of a paper machine for the press and drying part of the machine during June, 2001, as well as the expansion of the paper machine with a "third coating" during July, 2002 at the board factory "Umka". The existing old drive of the press and the drying groups was realized as a 76 meter long line shaft drive. The coating section of the machine was realized with sectional drives with DC motors fed from thyristor converters. The concept of the new drive is based on standard squirrel cage induction motors, fed from frequency converters. The system is controlled by a programmable logic controller. The communication between the controller, frequency converters and control panels is realized with a profibus protocol. The Laboratory for Electric Drives, of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Belgrade, was contracted for the drive part of the reconstruction of the paper-board machine. The complete project, supervision of the work of the investor's own technical services and final commissioning of the drives were organized in such a way that the drives were changed during the planned periods for the repair of the machine.

  10. Atomic energy and science disclosure in Cordoba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Hugo R.

    2011-01-01

    In September 2009, considering the existing interest in public communication of scientific activities that are developed locally, a group of researchers and communicators from Córdoba, decided to form the Network of Outreach of Córdoba. Its stated objectives of the Constitutive Act are presented in this paper along with the main activities undertaken to date and plans for the future. Since that time, the Management of Institutional Relations of the CNEA in Córdoba became involved in public circulation of scientific knowledge, in what has proven to be a framework that ensures an adequate level of debate to present nuclear national activities. This will involve collaborative efforts with professional institutions involved in research, teaching and communicating science. The main objective was to encourage the transfer of knowledge to optimize available resources, improving the methodological approaches and generating creative products tailored to regional needs, in order to promote the democratization of science and nuclear technology. This paper consists of two parts. On the one hand describes the activities of the Network during the year 2011 shows results with particular emphasis on topics related to atomic energy, and secondly, shows the desirability of promoting such activities in the CNEA. Among the main actions considered, highlighting the institutional participation in the official Ministry of Science and Technology Fair participation in Science and Technology Provincial Cordoba 2011, issue of the radio program 'Green Light: Science and technology everyday life' by National Technological University Radio and a network of forty provincial stations, and active participation in the Course of Specialization in Public Communication of Science and Scientific Journalism, organized by the School of Information Sciences and the Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Astronomy, National University of Cordoba, among others. (author) [es

  11. Annual report 2003[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The Annual Report reviews the results of the Agency's programme according to the three 'pillars' of technology, safety and verification. The main part of the report, starting on page 9, generally follows the programme structure as it applied in 2003. The introductory chapter, seeks to provide a thematic analysis, based on the three pillars, of the Agency's activities within the overall context of notable developments during the year. Additional information on specific issues can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review and Technical Co-operation Report. This material is also available on the Agency's WorldAtom web site (http://www.iaea.org/Worldatom/Documents/Anrep/Anrep2003/). All sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The topics covered in the chapter related to Technology are: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Material Technologies; Analysis for Sustainable Energy Development; Nuclear Science; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Water Resources; Protection of the Marine and Terrestrial Environments; Physical and Chemical Applications. Topics related to safety discussed in this report are: Safety of Nuclear Installations; Radiation Safety; Management of Radioactive Waste; Security of Material. Topics related to Verification are Safeguards and Verification in Iraq Pursuant to UNSC Resolutions. A separate chapter is devoted to Management of Technical Cooperation for Development.

  12. Effect of inelastic energy losses on development of atom-atom collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinyuk, V.V.; Remizovich, V.S.

    2001-01-01

    The problem of influence of inelastic energy losses (ionization braking) of particles on the development of atom-atom collision cascades in infinite medium was studied theoretically. Main attention was paid to study of angular and energy distributions of primary ions and cascade atoms in the presence of braking. Analytical calculations were made in the assumption that single scattering of particles occurs by solid balls law, while the value of electron braking ability of a medium is determined by the Lindhard formula. It is shown that account of braking (directly when solving the Boltzmann transport equation) changes in principle the previously obtained angular and energy spectra of ions and cascade atoms. Moreover, it is the braking that is the determining factor responsible for anisotropy of angular distributions of low-energy primary ions and cascade atoms [ru

  13. Annual report 2000[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2000.

  14. The International Atomic Energy Agency Flag Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the IAEA Flag Code which was promulgated by the Director General on 15 September 1999, pursuant to the decision of the Board of Governors on 10 June 1999 to adopt an Agency flag as described in document GOV/1999/41 and its use in accordance with a flag code to be promulgated by the Director General

  15. The International Atomic Energy Agency Flag Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-17

    The document reproduces the text of the IAEA Flag Code which was promulgated by the Director General on 15 September 1999, pursuant to the decision of the Board of Governors on 10 June 1999 to adopt an Agency flag as described in document GOV/1999/41 and its use in accordance with a flag code to be promulgated by the Director General.

  16. Summary of the law relating to atomic energy and radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, D.F.; Ritchie, K.J.S.

    1982-04-01

    The law relating to atomic energy and radioactive substances in the United Kingdom is summarized under the following headings: the Common Law; legislation (Atomic Energy Act 1946; Radioactive Substances Acts 1948 and 1960; Electricity (Amendment) Act 1961; Nuclear Installations Act 1965 and 1969 (and subordinate legislation); Secretary of State for Trade and Industry Order 1970; Radiological Protection Act 1970 (as amended); Air Navigation (Restriction of Flying)(Atomic Energy Establishments) Regulations 1981; Nuclear Safeguards and Electricity (Finance) Act 1978; legislation relating to the UK Atomic Energy Authority); Regulations under the Factories Act 1961; Regulations relating to educational establishments; Regulations and Orders relating to food and medicines; Regulations, etc., affecting the transport of radioactive materials; Regulations under the Social Security Act 1975; control of import and export; the Euratom Treaty; important non-statutory Codes of Practice, etc.; international conventions, etc., relating to the peaceful use of atomic energy and radioactive substances, in which the United Kingdom is interested; foreign legislation. (U.K.)

  17. Regulatory challenges of historic uranium mines in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, C.H.; Stenson, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    The radium and uranium mining industry began in Canada in 1930 with the discovery of the Port Radium deposit in the Northwest Territories. During the 1950s more uranium mines opened across Canada. Most of these mines ceased operation by the end of the 1960s. Some were remediated by their owners, while others were abandoned. The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), predecessor to the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), was created in 1946. However, it was not until the mid-1970s that the AECB took an active role in regulating health, safety and environmental aspects of uranium mining; so many of the older mines have never been licensed. With the coming into force of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) in May 2000, this situation has been reviewed. The NSCA requires a licence for the possession of nuclear substances (including uranium mine tailings), or the decommissioning of nuclear facilities (including uranium mines and mills). Furthermore, governments (federal and provincial) are also subject to the NSCA, a change from the previous legislation. The CNSC has an obligation to assess these sites, regardless of ownership, and to proceed with licensing or other appropriate regulatory action. The CNSC has reviewed the status of the twenty sites in Canada where uranium milling took place historically. Eight are already licensed. Licensing actions are being pursued at the other sites. A review of nearly 100 small uranium mining or exploration sites is also underway to determine the most appropriate regulatory approach. This paper focuses on regulatory issues surrounding the historic mining and milling sites, and the regulatory approach being taken, including licensing provincial and federal government bodies who own some of the sites, and ensuring the safe management of sites that were abandoned. (author)

  18. On promotion of base technologies of atomic energy. Aiming at breakthrough in atomic energy technologies in 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-01

    In the long term plan of atomic energy development and utilization decided in June, 1987 by the Atomic Energy Commission, it was recognized that hereafter, the opening-up of the new potential that atomic energy possesses should be aimed at, and the policy was shown so that the research and development hereafter place emphasis on the creative and innovative region which causes large technical innovation, by which the spreading effect to general science and technology can be expected, and the development of the base technologies that connect the basic research and project development is promoted. The trend of atomic energy development so far, the change of the situation surrounding atomic energy, the direction of technical development of atomic energy hereafter and the base technologies are discussed. The concept of the technical development of materilas, artificial intelligence, lasers, and the evaluation and reduction of radiation risks used for atomic energy is described. As the development plan of atomic energy base technologies, the subjects of technical development, the future image of technical development, the efficient promotion of the development and so on are shown. (Kato, I.).

  19. The 59. conference of Canada's energy and mines ministers : A submission by the Coal Association of Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The most abundant fossil fuel in Canada is coal, and almost 20 per cent of all electricity generated in Canada uses coal as its energy source. About 75 per cent of all electricity generated in Alberta and 67 per cent of that generated in Saskatchewan is derived from domestic coal resources. Coal plays an important role in regional economies. This paper was prepared with the intent of providing a status report on the coal industry to the Energy and Mines Ministers while also identifying the challenges facing the industry. Productivity has been increased and emissions have been reduced, but the industry is facing risks. Cooperation between industry players and governments is required to ensure the long-term viability of the coal industry in Canada. Some recommendations were made by the Coal Association of Canada (CAC) as follows: (1) that the 21 per cent tax-rate to the mining sector be extended by the federal government, while continuing deductibility of the existing resource allowance, (2) that the Corporate Capital Tax be eliminated entirely by the federal government, or that at least for all assets located in rural areas, and (3) the CAC believes better solutions than the Kyoto Protocol exist (CAC does not support Kyoto). The CAC is of the opinion that continental approach should be favored for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The CAC also believes that financial and technical resources should be allocated for the improvement of existing infrastructure and the development of new technologies in terms of reductions of emissions. refs

  20. Oil and natural gas energy plan for Canada, 1977--1985: Appendix D to Canada's resources and the national interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-12-01

    Governments in Canada have made a number of changes in oil and gas policies and fiscal treatments recently. There remains a considerable question, however, whether Canada will have sufficient volumes of these two energy fuels available securely and economically in the years ahead. This report examines the position that oil and gas will occupy in Canada's energy future, and assesses the contribution that domestic supplies could provide. It was concluded that, under current and proposed royalty, taxation, and regulatory systems, the flow of investments into exploration and development will be insufficient to increase the domestic supply base to provide an acceptable level of future self-reliance. Additionally, because of jurisdictional factors, reinvestments from current production are not being directed to the areas of greatest resource potential in Canada. In order to illustrate the types and degrees of further policy and fiscal changes that are required, an investment program that could lead to a minimum acceptable level of production from Canadian sources was formulated. Recommendations for changes in fiscal regimes lead to a ''formula'' that directs 35 percent of net production revenue from current production to the exploration and development of new supplies; mobilizes new investment; and directs a greater portion of both these sources of funds to the development of potential supplies from remote and technologically difficult, high-risk areas. The implementation of this formula will require concessions by both the producing provinces and the Federal government together with commitments from producers.