WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic emission spectroscopy

  1. [Determination of potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, C; Wen, X; Jia, Y; Sun, S

    2001-06-01

    Sodium is used as a coolant in China experiment fast reactor (CEFR). Potassium in sodium has an influence on heat property of reactor. A analytical method has been developed to determinate potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy. Sodium sample is dissolved by ultrasonic humidifier. The working conditions of the instrument and inTerferences from matrix sodium, acid effect and concomitant elements have been studied. Standard addition experiments are carried out with potassium chloride. The percentage recoveries are 94.7%-109.8%. The relative standard deviation is 4.2%. The analytical range accords with sodium quality control standard of CFFR. The precision corresponds to the international analytical method in sodium coolant reactor. PMID:12947670

  2. Photon emission spectroscopy of ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystroem, B.

    1995-10-01

    Emission cross sections for the 1snp{sup 1}P{sub 1}-levels have been measured by photon emission spectroscopy for the collision systems He{sup +} + He at 10 keV and He{sup 2+} + He at 10-35 keV. Photon spectra of Krypton (Kr VIII) and Xenon (Xe V - IX) have also been obtained using 10q keV beams of Kr{sup q+} (q=7-9) and Xe{sup q+} (q=5-9) colliding with Helium and Argon. The Lifetimes of 3p{sup 2}P-levels in Na-like Nb are reported together with lifetime for the 3s3p{sup 3}P{sub 1}-level in Mg-like Ni, Kr, Y, Zr and Nb where this level has an intercombination transition to the ground state. 45 refs, 20 figs.

  3. Field-emission spectroscopy of beryllium atoms adsorbed on tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czyzewski, J.J.; Grzesiak, W.; Krajniak, J. (Politechnika Wroclawska (Poland))

    1981-01-01

    Field emission energy distributions (FEED) have been measured for the beryllium-tungsten (023) adsorption system over the 78-450 K temperature range. A temperature dependence of the normalized half-width, ..delta../d, of FEED peaks changed significantly due to beryllium adsorption; and the curve, ..delta../d vs p, for the Be/W adsorption system was identical in character to the calculated curve based on the free electron model in contrast to the curve for the clean tungsten surface. In the last part of this paper Gadzuk's theory of the resonance-tunneling effect is applied to the beryllium atom on tungsten. Experimental and theoretical curves of the enhancement factor as a function of energy have been discussed.

  4. Atomic Oscillator Strengths by Emission Spectroscopy and Lifetime Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, W. L.; Griesmann, U.; Kling, R.; Musielok, J.

    2002-11-01

    Over the last seven years, we have carried out numerous oscillator strength measurements for some light and medium heavy elements (Musielok et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000; Veres & Wiese 1996; Griesmann et al. 1997; Bridges & Wiese 1998; Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Gries- mann 2000; Bridges & Wiese to be published). Most recently we have determined numerous transitions of Mu II (Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Griesmann 2000) and are now working on Cl I (Bridges & Wiese to be published). See the summary statement at the end of the text. For the emission measurements, we have applied either a high-current wall-stabilized arc (described for example, in Musielok et al. (1999)), or a high-current hollow cathode, or a Penning discharge. The latter two sources were used for branching ratio measurements from common upper 1ev- els, while the wall-stabilized arc was operated at atmospheric pressure under the condition of partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, which allows the measurement of relative transition probabilities. Absolute data were obtained by combining the emission results with lifetime data measured by other research groups, especially the University of Hannover, with which we have closely collaborated. This group uses the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Our emission spectra were recorded for the light elements with a 2 m grating spectrometer, or, for Mu II, with an FT 700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. The radiometric calibration was carried out with a tungsten strip lamp for the visible part of the spectrum and with a deuterium lamp for the ultraviolet. All measurements were made under optically thin conditions, which was checked by doubling the path length with a focusing mirror setup. Typical uncertainties of the measured oscillator strengths are estimated to be in the range 15%-20% (one-standard deviation). However, discrepancies with advanced atomic structure theories are sometimes much larger. In Tables 1-3 and Fig. 1, we

  5. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy: The determination of trace impurities in uranium hexafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, M. A.; Morrow, R. W.; Farrar, R. B.

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace impurities in high-purity uranium hexafluoride using liquid-liquid extraction of the uranium from the trace impurities followed by analysis with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Detection limits, accuracy, and precision data are presented.

  6. Microwaves spark emission spectroscopy for the analysis of cations: A simple form of atomic emission spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahid Hussain; Khalid Mohammed Khan; Khadim Hussain; Sadam Hussain; Shahnaz Perveen

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for the cation analysis was investigated. The analysis is based on the sparking of the salts of metals in a microwave oven after placing in a graphite cell. The graphite cell absorbs microwaves and produces high temperature which converts the salt into light emitting species. The colour of light was found to dependent on the nature of cation, however, the intensity of the emitted light was found to be depending upon the form and shape of the graphite assembly in addition to the concentration of the salt. This communication presents explanation for all these observations and for the systematic and quantitative analysis using microwave spark emission technique.

  7. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fara, M.; Novak, F. [EGU Prague, PLC, Bichovice, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  8. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  9. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  10. Determination of total tin in canned food using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perring, Loic; Basic-Dvorzak, Marija [Department of Quality and Safety Assurance, Nestle Research Centre, P.O. Box 44, Vers chez-les-Blanc, 1000, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Tin is considered to be a priority contaminant by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Tin can enter foods either from natural sources, environmental pollution, packaging material or pesticides. Higher concentrations are found in processed food and canned foods. Dissolution of the tinplate depends on the of food matrix, acidity, presence of oxidising reagents (anthocyanin, nitrate, iron and copper) presence of air (oxygen) in the headspace, time and storage temperature. To reduce corrosion and dissolution of tin, nowadays cans are usually lacquered, which gives a marked reduction of tin migration into the food product. Due to the lack of modern validated published methods for food products, an ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) method has been developed and evaluated. This technique is available in many laboratories in the food industry and is more sensitive than atomic absorption. Conditions of sample preparation and spectroscopic parameters for tin measurement by axial ICP-AES were investigated for their ruggedness. Two methods of preparation involving high-pressure ashing or microwave digestion in volumetric flasks were evaluated. They gave complete recovery of tin with similar accuracy and precision. Recoveries of tin from spiked products with two levels of tin were in the range 99{+-}5%. Robust relative repeatabilities and intermediate reproducibilities were <5% for different food matrices containing >30 mg/kg of tin. Internal standard correction (indium or strontium) did not improve the method performance. Three emission lines for tin were tested (189.927, 283.998 and 235.485 nm) but only 189.927 nm was found to be robust enough with respect to interferences, especially at low tin concentrations. The LOQ (limit of quantification) was around 0.8 mg/kg at 189.927 nm. A survey of tin content in a range of canned foods is given. (orig.)

  11. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  12. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1995-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is promarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  13. Atomic spectroscopy and radiative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the basic physical principles of atomic spectroscopy and the absorption and emission of radiation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. It summarizes the basics of electromagnetism and thermodynamics and then describes in detail the theory of atomic spectra for complex atoms, with emphasis on astrophysical applications. Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas are considered. The interaction between radiation and matter is described, together with various types of radiation (e.g., cyclotron, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung, Compton). The basic theory of polarization is explained, as is the theory of radiative transfer for astrophysical applications. Atomic Spectroscopy and Radiative Processes bridges the gap between basic books on atomic spectroscopy and the very specialized publications for the advanced researcher: it will provide under- and postgraduates with a clear in-depth description of theoretical aspects, supported by practical examples of applications.

  14. Emission, optical--optical double resonance, and excited state absorption spectroscopy of matrix isolated chromium and molybdenum atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Making use of a combination of time-resolved emission, optical--optical double resonance, and excited state absorption spectroscopy, it has been possible to assign virtually all spectral features with energies below the z7P0 state of matrix isolated Cr atoms. The a5S state located at 7593 cm-1 in the free gaseous Cr atom has lifetimes of 6.32 and 5.1 s in Ar and Kr matrices, respectively. Matrix perturbations on Cr emission lines are small (-1). The dependence of nonradiative decay rates on the local density of states is elucidated. The magnitude of matrix shifts for a particular transition is correlated with the electronic configurations of ground and excited states and it is pointed out that states having only ''s'' electrons in addition to ''d'' electrons maintain their gas phase energy relationships in the matrix environment. Direct fluorescence is observed from the z7P0 level of Mo to the 7s ground state. The spin-orbit splitting of the ''relaxed'' z7P0 state is 690 cm-1, slightly lower than the 707 cm-1 splitting of the free gaseous Mo atom

  15. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  16. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. I. Identifying student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. This article (Paper I) describes how several serious conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. Paper II illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to significant improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  17. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. II. Addressing student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-02-01

    This is the second of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. Paper I describes how several conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among university students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. This second article (Paper II) illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  18. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of CR II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. the plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. the light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 sto 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0. 2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sn alloys. to avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000 K), electron densities (∼∼ 10''16 cm ''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained. (Author) 56 refs

  19. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. The plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. The light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 to 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0.2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sb alloys. To avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000K), electron densities (approx 10 ''16 cm''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained

  20. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  1. Atomic scale properties of magnetic Mn-based alloys probed by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mn-based alloys are characterized by a wealth of properties, which are of interest both from fundamental physics point of view and particularly attractive for different applications in modern technology: from magnetic storage to sensing and spin-based electronics. The possibility to tune their magnetic properties through post-growth thermal processes and/or stoichiometry engineering is highly important in order to target different applications (i.e. Mn$_{x}$Ga) or to increase their Curie temperature above room temperature (i.e. off-stoichiometric MnSi). In this project, the Mössbauer effect will be applied at $^{57}$Fe sites following implantation of radioactive $^{57}$Mn, to probe the micro-structure and magnetism of Mn-based alloys on the atomic-scale. The proposed experimental plan is devoted to establish a direct correlation between the local structure and bulk magnetism (and other physical properties) of Mn-based alloys.

  2. Fingerprinting of complex mixtures with the use of high performance liquid chromatography, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni Yongnian [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China)], E-mail: ynni@ncu.edu.cn; Peng Yunyan [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Kokot, Serge [Inorganic Materials Program, School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia)

    2008-05-26

    The molecular and metal profile fingerprints were obtained from a complex substance, Atractylis chinensis DC-a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), with the use of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) techniques. This substance was used in this work as an example of a complex biological material, which has found application as a TCM. Such TCM samples are traditionally processed by the Bran, Cut, Fried and Swill methods, and were collected from five provinces in China. The data matrices obtained from the two types of analysis produced two principal component biplots, which showed that the HPLC fingerprint data were discriminated on the basis of the methods for processing the raw TCM, while the metal analysis grouped according to the geographical origin. When the two data matrices were combined into a one two-way matrix, the resulting biplot showed a clear separation on the basis of the HPLC fingerprints. Importantly, within each different grouping the objects separated according to their geographical origin, and they ranked approximately in the same order in each group. This result suggested that by using such an approach, it is possible to derive improved characterisation of the complex TCM materials on the basis of the two kinds of analytical data. In addition, two supervised pattern recognition methods, K-nearest neighbors (KNNs) method, and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), were successfully applied to the individual data matrices-thus, supporting the PCA approach.

  3. Elemental Content in Brown Rice by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy Reveals the Evolution of Asian Cultivated Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yawen Zeng; Luxiang Wang; Juan Du; Jiafu Liu; Shuming Yang; Xiaoying Pu; Fenghui Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationship for classification traits and eight mineral elements in brown rice (Oryza sativa L.) from Yunnan Province in China was carried out using microwave assisted digestion followed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and the analytical procedures were carefully controlled and validated. In general, the results show that the mean levels of K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Cu in brown rice for 789 accessions of rice landraces was distinctly lower than that of improved cultivars. They further demonstrate that Ca plays an important role in the differentiation of subspecies indica-japonica, especially to enhance adaptation of cold stress, and that five mineral elements in brown rice enhance the eurytopicity from landrace to improved cultivar. Hierarchical cluster analysis, using average linkage from SPSS software based on eight mineral elements in brown rice, showed that Yunnan rice could be grouped into rice landrace and improved cultivar, with the rice landrace being further clustered into five subgroups, and that, interestingly, purple rice does not cluster with either of the groups. Our present data confirm that indica is the closest relative of late rice and white rice, and that they constitute rice landraces together, whereas japonica is the closest relatives of non-nuda, early-mid and glutinous rice. It is further shown that japonica, non-nuda, early-mid, glutinous, white and red rice might be more primitive than indica, nuda, late, non-glutinous and purple rice, respectively.

  4. Standard test method for determining elements in waste Streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of trace, minor, and major elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) following an acid digestion of the sample. Waste streams from manufacturing processes of nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be analyzed. This test method is applicable to the determination of total metals. Results from this test method can be used to characterize waste received by treatment facilities and to formulate appropriate treatment recipes. The results are also usable in process control within waste treatment facilities. 1.2 This test method is applicable only to waste streams that contain radioactivity levels that do not require special personnel or environmental protection. 1.3 A list of the elements determined in waste streams and the corresponding lower reporting limit is found in Table 1. 1.4 This test method has been used successfully for treatment of a large variety of waste solutions and industrial process liquids. The com...

  5. Time-resolved measurement of atomic emission enhancement by fs-ns dual-pulsed laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Li-Xin; Zhang Yong-Sheng; Zheng Guo-Xin; Liu Jing-Ru; Cheng Jian-Ping; Lü Min

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved measurement of atomic emission enhancement is performed by using a 500-fs KrF laser pulse incident upon a high density supersonic O2 gas jet, synchronized with an orthogonal ns frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser pulse. The ultra-short pulse serves as an igniter of the gas jet, and the subsequent ns-laser pulse significantly enhances the atomic emission. Analysis shows that the contributions to the enhancement effect are made mainly by the bremsstrahlung radiation and cascade ionization.

  6. Quantitation of motexafin lutetium in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Miles, Dale; Mody, Tarak D.; Hatcher, Lori I.; Fiene, John; Stiles, Mark; Patrick P. Lin; Lee, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) methods were developed and validated for the evaluation of motexafin lutetium (MLu, lutetium texaphyrin, PCI-0123) pharmacokinetics in human plasma. The LC-MS/MS method was specific for MLu, whereas the ICP-AES method measured total elemental lutetium. Both methods were fast, simple, precise, and accurate. For the LC-MS/MS method, a closely related analogue (PCI-0353...

  7. Measurement of Urinary Cadmium in Glazers Using Solid Phase Extraction Followed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jamaleddin Shahtaheri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Glazers are exposed to a variety of heavy metals in the ceramic industry, causing adverse effect on the body systems. Cadmium is one of the major raw materials for production of colored glazes. To evaluate occupational exposure to cadmium, spot urine samples were collected from 49 tile and pottery glazers in Yazd City in 2010 at the beginning and end of the work shift (98 samples. Totally, 55 office workers were also evaluated as control group. Samples were prepared using solid phase extraction followed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy. All the participants filled out a self administered questionnaire comprises questions about work shift, kind of job, use of mask, ventilation,work history, overtime work, age, weight, and height. The lung function tests were performed in a standing position according to the American Thoracic Society recommendation on both control andcadmium exposed individuals. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA was used to evaluate the data. The mean values of cadmium levels before and after shift in study group was 3.88 and 10.85 μg/gcreatinine,respectively. The mean values of cadmium levels at the end of the work shift in the glazers urine samples was almost 3.53 times higher than the control group and 2.17 times higher than the ACGIHbiological exposure indices (5 μg/g creatinine. In addition the lung functions of glazers was significantly lower than the office workers (p<0.001. Exposure to cadmium in ceramic industry can lead to the reduction of respiratory capacity. Hygienic behaviors such as using protective mask and working in efficient ventilated workplaces can decrease the rate of occupational exposure to cadmium.

  8. [Study of characteristics of excited O atom generated in multi-needle-to-plate corona discharge by emission spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hui; Yan, Ling; Mi, Dong; Zhu, Yi-min; Zhang, Lu

    2012-04-01

    The emission spectra of O(3p 5 P --> 3s 5 S2(0) 777.4 nm) produced by multi-needle-to-plate negative corona discharge and positive streamer discharge in air were successfully recorded at one atmosphere. The influences of discharge power, electrode gap, content of N2 and relative humidity on the excited O atom production were investigated in negative corona discharge. Meanwhile, the distribution of relative density of excited O atom in discharge space was also studied in positive streamer discharge. The results indicate that, for negative corona discharge, the amount of O active atom increases with the increase in power, decreases with increased discharge gap. And with the increase in relative humidity and N2 content, its amount firstly increases and then decreases; whereas for positive corona discharge, the relative density of O active atom from needlepoint to plate firstly increases and then decreases. PMID:22715745

  9. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented

  10. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented. (GHT)

  11. Observation of Atomic Emission Enhancement by fs-ns Dual-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Li-Xin; ZHANG Yong-Sheng; ZHANG Li-Rong; LIU Jing-Ru; CHENG Jian-Ping; L(U) Min

    2006-01-01

    An experiment of a 500-fs KrF laser pulse incident upon a high density supersonic O2 gas jet synchronously with an ns frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser pulse is performed in orthogonal configuration.Significant atomic emission enhancement of over forty-fold is observed with an optical multi-channel analyser.The enhancement effect is probably attributed to the different ionization mechanisms between fs and ns laser pulses.

  12. Determination of some inorganic metals in edible vegetable oils by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES)

    OpenAIRE

    Musa Özcan, M.; Altun, Turkan; Gode, Fethiye; Arslan, Gulsin; Pehlivan, Erol

    2008-01-01

    Seventeen edible vegetable oils were analyzed spectrometrically for their metal (Cu, Fe, Mn, Co, Cr, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Zn) contents. Toxic metals in edible vegetable oils were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). The highest metal concentrations were measured as 0.0850, 0.0352, 0.0220, 0.0040, 0.0010, 0.0074, 0.0045, 0.0254 and 0.2870 mg/kg for copper in almond oil, for iron in corn oil-(c), for manganese in soybean oil, for cobalt in sunflower oil-(b...

  13. Decoherence Spectroscopy for Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisa Trubko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Decoherence due to photon scattering in an atom interferometer was studied as a function of laser frequency near an atomic resonance. The resulting decoherence (contrast-loss spectra will be used to calibrate measurements of tune-out wavelengths that are made with the same apparatus. To support this goal, a theoretical model of decoherence spectroscopy is presented here along with experimental tests of this model.

  14. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser atomic spectroscopic study on actinium element has been performed in many areas of spectroscopy. The study on characteristic of atomic vapor has been proceeded for copper atom and the spatial density distribution of copper vapor is measured. This experimental data has been compared with the theoretically calculated data. In spectroscopic experiment, the first and second excited states for actinium element are identified and the most efficient ionization scheme for actinium element is identified. In addition, the corrosion problem for filament material due to the heating of the actinium element has been studied. (Author)

  15. Studies on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser atomic spectroscopy is studied both theoretically and experimentally. For Na-like ions, possible electric dipole, quadrupole and magnetic dipole transitions between atomic levels below 4f doublet F (J=7/2) state are investigated, using the recently developed computer programs - MCDF, MJE and MULTPOL. Line strength, oscillator strength and transition probability are calculated. A preliminary results for Hg-RIS experiment are also presented. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, high power dye laser, vacuum system, ionization cell and ion measuring system are constructed, and their characteristics are examined. (Author)

  16. Laser spectroscopy of sputtered atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of laser radiation to study the sputtering process is of relatively recent origin. Much has been learned from this work about the basic physics of the sputtering process itself through measurements of velocity and excited state distributions of sputtered atoms and the effects of adsorbates on substrate sputtering yields. Furthermore, the identification, characterization, and sensitive detection of sputtered atoms by laser spectroscopy has led to the development of in situ diagnostics for impurity fluxes in the plasma edge regions of tokamaks and of ultrasensitive methods (ppB Fe in Si) for surface analysis with ultralow (picocoulomb) ion fluences. The techniques involved in this work, laser fluorescence and multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy, will be described and illustrations given of results achieved up to now. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  17. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser-induced copper plasma by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Unnikrishnan; Kamlesh Alti; V B Kartha; C Santhosh; G P Gupta; B M Suri

    2010-06-01

    Plasma produced by a 355 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 6 ns focussed onto a copper solid sample in air at atmospheric pressure is studied spectroscopically. The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion line emissions in the time window of 300–2000 ns. An echelle spectrograph coupled with a gated intensified charge coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions. The temperature is obtained using the Boltzmann plot method and the electron density is determined using the Saha– Boltzmann equation method. Both parameters are studied as a function of delay time with respect to the onset of the laser pulse. The results are discussed. The time window where the plasma is optically thin and is also in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), necessary for the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of samples, is deduced from the temporal evolution of the intensity ratio of two Cu I lines. It is found to be 700–1000 ns.

  18. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A.; Parthey, Ch G.; Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Khabarova, K.; Pohl, R.; Peters, E.; Yost, D. C.; Matveev, A.; Predehl, K.; Droste, S.; Wilken, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.; Abgrall, M.; Rovera, D.; Salomon, Ch; Laurent, Ph; Udem, Th

    2013-12-01

    Precise determinations of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference [1]. A recent measurement of the 2S - 2P3/2 transition frequency in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct [2, 3]. We hope to contribute to this so-called "proton size puzzle" by providing additional experimental input from hydrogen spectroscopy.

  19. Pattern recognition of Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy of human scalp hair for discriminating between healthy and Hepatitis C patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, Gavin R. [Centre for Chemometrics, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantocks Close, Bristol BS2 8DF (United Kingdom); Ahmad, Sajjad [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Wasim, Mohammad [Chemistry Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Brereton, Richard G., E-mail: r.g.brereton@bris.ac.uk [Centre for Chemometrics, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantocks Close, Bristol BS2 8DF (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy measurements of six trace elements were performed on the scalp hair of 155 donors, 73 of which have been diagnosed with Hepatitis C and 82 Controls. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was employed to visualise the separation between groups and show the relationship between the elements and the diseased state. Pattern recognition methods for classification involving Quadratic Discriminant Analysis and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the data. The number of significant components for both PCA and PLS were determined using the bootstrap. The stability of training set models were determined by repeatedly splitting the data into training and test sets and employing visualisation for two components models: the percent classification ability (CC), predictive ability (PA) and model stability (MS) were computed for test and training sets.

  20. Determination of some inorganic metals in edible vegetable oils by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Özcan, M.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Seventeen edible vegetable oils were analyzed spectrometrically for their metal (Cu, Fe, Mn, Co, Cr, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Zn contents. Toxic metals in edible vegetable oils were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES. The highest metal concentrations were measured as 0.0850, 0.0352, 0.0220, 0.0040, 0.0010, 0.0074, 0.0045, 0.0254 and 0.2870 mg/kg for copper in almond oil, for iron in corn oil-(c, for manganese in soybean oil, for cobalt in sunflower oil-(b and almond oil, for chromium in almond oil, for lead in virgin olive oil, for cadmium in sunflower oil-(e, for nickel almond oil and for zinc in almond oil respectively. The method for determining toxic metals in edible vegetable oils by using ICP-AES is discussed. The metals were extracted from low quantities of oil (2-3 g with a 10% nitric acid solution. The extracted metal in acid solution can be injected into the ICPAES. The proposed method is simple and allows the metals to be determined in edible vegetable oils with a precision estimated below 10% relative standard deviation (RSD for Cu, 5% for Fe, 15% for Mn, 8% for Co, 10% for Cr, 20% for Pb, 5% for Cd, 16% for Ni and 11% for Zn.En este estudio se analizó espectrométricamente el contenido en metales (Cu, Fe, Mn, Co, Cr, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Zn de 17 aceites vegetales comestibles mediante ICP-AES. Las concentaciones más elevadas se encontraron para el cobre en el aceite de almendra (0.0850 mg/kg, para el hierro en el aceite de maiz(c,(0.0352 mg/kg, para el manganeso en el aceite de soja (0.0220 mg/kg, para el cobalto en el aceite de girasol (b (0.0040 mg/kg, para el cromo en el aceite de almendra (0.0010 mg/kg, para el plomo en el aceite de oliva virgen (0.0074 mg/kg, para el cadmio en el aceite de girasol (e (0.0045 mg/kg, para el niquel en el aceite de almendra (0.0254 mg/kg y para el zincen el aceite de almendra (0.2870 mg/kg. Los metales se extrajeron a partir de bajas cantidades de aceite (2-3 g, con

  1. Emissivity: A Program for Atomic Emissivity Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Sochi, Taha

    2009-01-01

    In this article we report the release of a new program for calculating the emissivity of atomic transitions. The program, which can be obtained with its documentation from our website www.scienceware.net, passed various rigorous tests and was used by the author to generate theoretical data and analyze observational data. It is particularly useful for investigating atomic transition lines in astronomical context as the program is capable of generating a huge amount of theoretical data and comp...

  2. Design of a WWW database server for Atomic Spectroscopy Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contis, A.

    1995-12-01

    The department of Atomic Spectroscopy at Lund Univ produces large amounts of experimental data on energy levels and emissions for atomic systems. In order to make this data easily available to users outside the institution, a database has been produced and made available on the Internet. This report describes the organization of the data and the Internet interface of the data base. 4 refs.

  3. Determination of Serum Lithium by Flame Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nafissy

    1976-07-01

    Full Text Available Lithum can be de termined both by atomic absorption spectroscopy andflame emission spectroscopy. We have used the later method with a Zeiss Model pMQlI spectro photometer fitt ed with ante-chamber atomizer and a potensiome rric line recorder. Accurate ana lysis for the clement was acco mplished due to a sophisracared measuring instrument.

  4. Determination of trace levels of dissolved vanadium in seawater by use of synthetic complexing agents and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasse, G.; Ouddane, B.; Fischer, J.C. [Univ. des Sciences et Technologies et Lille, Lab. de Chimie Analytique et Marine (ELICO), UPRESA CNRS 8013, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2002-11-01

    In the determination of traces of dissolved vanadium in complex matrices such as seawater, separation and enrichment from the matrix is of special importance. A wide variety of methods has been proposed for preconcentration, depending to the nature of samples and the methods to be used for measurement. Among these methods separation techniques based on sorption on to chelating resins seem convenient, rapid, and capable of achieving a high concentration factor. The methods proposed in this paper are based on the transformation of all dissolved vanadium species in seawater into organic complexes by use of synthetic complexing agents such as dithizone, luminol, or 8-hydroxyquinoline; the resulting vanadium-organic complexes were sorbed on to a C{sub 18} column at a flow rate of 5 mL min{sup -1}. The vanadium sorbed on the C{sub 18} columns was then stripped by use of nitric acid (2 mol L{sup -1}) and analysed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, ICP-AES. This method was optimised and use of other chelating resins, such as chelamine, chelex-100, and immobilised 8-hydroxyquinoline and was compared by passing seawater samples directly over the resins. The experimental conditions (pH, acid used for elution, and contact time between the liquid sample and the resin) were optimised. The results were compared for all the resins used and were indicative of excellent and coherent reproducibility. (orig.)

  5. Combination of the ionic-to-atomic line intensity ratios from two test elements for the diagnostic of plasma temperature and electron number density in Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tognoni, E. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Area della Ricerca del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: tognoni@ipcf.cnr.it; Hidalgo, M.; Canals, A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia. Universidad de Alicante. Apdo. 99, 03080, Alicante (Spain); Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Salvetti, A.; Palleschi, V. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Area della Ricerca del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    In Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) spectrochemical analysis, the MgII(280.270 nm)/MgI(285.213 nm) ionic to atomic line intensity ratio is commonly used as a monitor of the robustness of operating conditions. This approach is based on the univocal relationship existing between intensity ratio and plasma temperature, for a pure argon atmospheric ICP in thermodynamic equilibrium. In a multi-elemental plasma in the lower temperature range, the measurement of the intensity ratio may not be sufficient to characterize temperature and electron density. In such a range, the correct relationship between intensity ratio and plasma temperature can be calculated only when the complete plasma composition is known. We propose the combination of the line intensity ratios of two test elements (double ratio) as an effective diagnostic tool for a multi-elemental low temperature LTE plasma of unknown composition. In particular, the variation of the double ratio allows us discriminating changes in the plasma temperature from changes in the electron density. Thus, the effects on plasma excitation and ionization possibly caused by introduction of different samples and matrices in non-robust conditions can be more accurately interpreted. The method is illustrated by the measurement of plasma temperature and electron density in a specific analytic case.

  6. Atomic processes relevant to polarization plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When atoms (ions) are excited anisotropically, polarized excited atoms are produced and the radiation emitted by these atoms is polarized. From the standpoint of plasma spectroscopy research, we review the existing data for various atomic processes that are related to the polarization phenomena. These processes are: electron impact excitation, excitation by atomic and ionic collisions, photoexcitation, radiative recombination and bremsstrahlung. Collisional and radiative relaxation processes of atomic polarization follow. Other topics included are: electric-field measurement, self alignment, Lyman doublet intensity ratio, and magnetic-field measurement of the solar prominence. (author)

  7. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric discharge type atomic vaporizer is developed for the spectroscopic study on actinide elements. Laser induced fluorescence study on actinide elements is performed by using this high temperature type atomizer. For the effective photoionization of elements, copper vapor laser pumped dye laser and electron beam heating type atomic vaporizer are built and their characteristics are measured. In addition, resonance ionization mass spectroscopic analysis for lead sample as well as laser induced fluorescence study on uranium sample in solution phase is made. (Author)

  8. Precision spectroscopy of the helium atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui-ming HU; Zheng-Tian LU; Zong-Chao YAN

    2009-01-01

    Persistent efforts in both theory and experiment have yielded increasingly precise understanding of the helium atom. Because of its simplicity, the helium atom has long been a testing ground for relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects in few-body atomic systems theoretically and experimentally.Comparison between theory and experiment of the helium spectroscopy in ls2p3pJ can potentially extract a very precise value of the fine structure constant a. The helium atom can also be used to explore exotic nuclear structures. In this paper, we provide a brief review of the recent advances in precision calculations and measurements of the helium atom.

  9. Solving a Mock Arsenic-Poisoning Case Using Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarr, Matthew A.

    2001-01-01

    A new upper-level undergraduate atomic spectroscopy laboratory procedure has been developed that presents a realistic problem to students and asks them to assist in solving it. Students are given arsenic-laced soda samples from a mock crime scene. From these samples, they are to gather evidence to help prosecute a murder suspect. The samples are analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy or by atomic absorbance spectroscopy to determine the content of specific metal impurities. By statistical comparison of the samples' composition, the students determine if the soda samples can be linked to arsenic found in the suspect's home. As much as possible, the procedures and interpretations are developed by the students. Particular emphasis is placed on evaluating the limitations and capabilities of the analytical method with respect to the demands of the problem.

  10. Investigations of superconducting and non-superconducting YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/0/sub 7-x/ by field ion microscopy, atom-probe mass spectroscopy and field electron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellogg, G.L.; Brenner, S.S.

    1988-11-01

    The structure and composition of superconducting and non-superconducting samples of YBa Cu 0 were examined by field ion microscopy, atom-probe mass spectroscopy and field-electron emission techniques. Field ion microscope images from both types of material exhibited ring structures associated with atomic or multiatomic layers and uniform, layer-by-layer field evaporation was possible. Atom-probe mass spectra contained signals corresponding to atomic and molecular oxygen, all three metals, and oxides of Cu and Y. Atom-probe mass spectra from the superconducting sample (x /similar to/ 0.35) contained a much larger molecular oxygen signal than mass spectra from the non-superconducting samples (x/similar to/O.8) indicating that oxygen in the Cu0 chains is field desorbed preferentially as molecular oxygen ions. Field electron emission from the superconducting samples exhibited normal Fowler-Nordheim characteristics above and below the superconducting transition temperature. Surface contaminates were found to decrease the work function of the material by as much as 39%.

  11. Precision spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthey, Christian Godehard

    2011-12-15

    This Thesis reports on three measurements involving the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and deuterium conducted on a 5.8 K atomic beam. The transition is excited Doppler-free via two counter-propagating photons near 243 nm. The H/D isotope shift has been determined as {delta}{integral}{sub exp}=670 994 334 606(15) Hz. Comparing with the theoretical value for the isotope shift, excluding the leading nuclear size effect, {delta}{integral}{sub th}=670 999 566.90(66)(60) kHz we confirm, twice more accurate, the rms charge radius difference of the deuteron and the proton as left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub d}- left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub p}=3.82007(65) fm{sup 2} and the deuteron structure radius r{sub str}=1.97507(78) fm. The frequency ratio of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen to the cesium ground state hyperfine transition provided by the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM is measured to be {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 035 (10) Hz which presents a fractional frequency uncertainty of 4.2 x 10{sup -15}. The second absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen presents the first application of a 900 km fiber link between MPQ and Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig which we have used to calibrate the MPQ hydrogen maser with the stationary cesium fountain clock CSF1 at PTB. With the result of {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 017 (11) Hz we can put a constraint on the electron Lorentz boost violating coefficients 0.95c{sub (TX)}-0.29c{sub (TY)}-0.08 c{sub (TZ)}=(2.2{+-}1.8) x 10{sup -11} within the framework of minimal standard model extensions. We limit a possible drift of the strong coupling constant through the ratio of magnetic moments at a competitive level ({partial_derivative})/({partial_derivative}t)ln ({mu}{sub Cs})/({mu}{sub B})=-(3.0{+-}1.2) x 10{sup -15} yr{sup -1}.

  12. Precision spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Thesis reports on three measurements involving the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and deuterium conducted on a 5.8 K atomic beam. The transition is excited Doppler-free via two counter-propagating photons near 243 nm. The H/D isotope shift has been determined as Δ∫exp=670 994 334 606(15) Hz. Comparing with the theoretical value for the isotope shift, excluding the leading nuclear size effect, Δ∫th=670 999 566.90(66)(60) kHz we confirm, twice more accurate, the rms charge radius difference of the deuteron and the proton as left angle r2 right angle d- left angle r2 right angle p=3.82007(65) fm2 and the deuteron structure radius rstr=1.97507(78) fm. The frequency ratio of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen to the cesium ground state hyperfine transition provided by the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM is measured to be ∫1S-2S=2 466 061 413 187 035 (10) Hz which presents a fractional frequency uncertainty of 4.2 x 10-15. The second absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen presents the first application of a 900 km fiber link between MPQ and Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig which we have used to calibrate the MPQ hydrogen maser with the stationary cesium fountain clock CSF1 at PTB. With the result of ∫1S-2S=2 466 061 413 187 017 (11) Hz we can put a constraint on the electron Lorentz boost violating coefficients 0.95c(TX)-0.29c(TY)-0.08 c(TZ)=(2.2±1.8) x 10-11 within the framework of minimal standard model extensions. We limit a possible drift of the strong coupling constant through the ratio of magnetic moments at a competitive level (∂)/(∂t)ln (μCs)/(μB)=-(3.0±1.2) x 10-15 yr-1.

  13. Photoelectron spectroscopy of heavy atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of relativistic interactions in the photoionization of heavy atoms and molecules has been investigated by the technique of photoelectron spectroscopy. In particular, experiments are reported which illustrate the effects of the spin-orbit interaction in the neutral ground state, final ionic states and continuum states of the photoionization target

  14. Building and analyzing models from data by stirred tank experiments for investigation of matrix effects caused by inorganic matrices and selection of internal standards in Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotti, Marco [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genova (Italy)], E-mail: grotti@chimica.unige.it; Paredes, Eduardo; Maestre, Salvador; Todoli, Jose Luis [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Universidad de Alicante, 03080, Alicante (Spain)

    2008-05-15

    Interfering effects caused by inorganic matrices (inorganic acids as well as easily ionized elements) in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy have been modeled by regression analysis of experimental data obtained using the 'stirred tank method'. The main components of the experimental set-up were a magnetically-stirred container and two peristaltic pumps. In this way the matrix composition was gradually and automatically varied, while the analyte concentration remained unchanged throughout the experiment. An inductively coupled plasma spectrometer with multichannel detection based on coupled charge device was used to simultaneously measure the emission signal at several wavelengths when the matrix concentration was modified. Up to 50 different concentrations were evaluated in a period of time of 10 min. Both single interfering species (nitric, hydrochloric and sulphuric acids, sodium and calcium) and different mixtures (aqua regia, sulfonitric mixture, sodium-calcium mixture and sodium-nitric acid mixture) were investigated. The dependence of the emission signal on acid concentration was well-fitted by logarithmic models. Conversely, for the easily ionized elements, 3-order polynomial models were more suitable to describe the trends. Then, the coefficients of these models were used as 'signatures' of the matrix-related signal variations and analyzed by principal component analysis. Similarities and differences among the emission lines were highlighted and discussed, providing a new insight into the interference phenomena, mainly with regards to the combined effect of concomitants. The combination of the huge amount of data obtained by the stirred tank method in a short period of time and the speed of analysis of principal component analysis provided a judicious means for the selection of the optimal internal standard in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

  15. Mid infrared emission spectroscopy of carbon plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Laszlo; Brown, Ei Ei; S-C Yang, Clayton; Hommerich, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Mid infrared time-resolved emission spectra were recorded from laser-induced carbon plasma. These spectra constitute the first study of carbon materials LIB spectroscopy in the mid infrared range. The carbon plasma was induced using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. The laser beam was focused to high purity graphite pellets mounted on a translation stage. Mid infrared emission from the plasma in an atmospheric pressure background gas was detected by a cooled HgCdTe detector in the range 4.4-11.6μm, using long-pass filters. LIB spectra were taken in argon, helium and also in air. Despite a gate delay of 10μs was used there were strong backgrounds in the spectra. Superimposed on this background broad and noisy emission bands were observed, the form and position of which depended somewhat on the ambient gas. The spectra were digitally smoothed and background corrected. In argon, for instance, strong bands were observed around 4.8, 6.0 and 7.5μm. Using atomic spectral data by NIST it could be concluded that carbon, argon, helium and nitrogen lines from neutral and ionized atoms are very weak in this spectral region. The width of the infrared bands supports molecular origin. The infrared emission bands were thus compared to vibrational features of carbon molecules (excluding C2) of various sizes on the basis of previous carbon cluster infrared absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses in the literature and quantum chemical calculations. Some general considerations are given about the present results. PMID:27428600

  16. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Todoli, J.L. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Hidalgo, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Iglesias, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain)], E-mail: monica.iglesias@udg.es

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S{sup 2-}) at low levels ({mu}g L{sup -1}) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H{sub 2}S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669 nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H{sub 2}S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H{sub 2}S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} to 25 mg L{sup -1} of sulfide. Detection limits of 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 6 {mu}g L{sup -1} were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters.

  17. A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

  18. Imaging spectroscopy with the atomic force microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Baselt, David R.; Baldeschwieler, John D.

    1994-01-01

    Force curve imaging spectroscopy involves acquiring a force-distance curve at each pixel of an atomic force microscope image. Processing of the resulting data yields images of sample hardness and tip-sample adhesion. These images resemble Z modulation images and the sum of forward and reverse friction images, respectively, and like them exhibit a number of potentially misleading contrast mechanisms. In particular, XY tip motion has a pronounced effect on hardness images and the meniscus force...

  19. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  20. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  1. Laser Spectroscopy of Muonic Atoms and Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Fernandes, Luis M P; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Amaro, Fernando D; Amaro, Pedro; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Franke, Beatrice; Galtier, Sandrine; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L; Götzfried, Johannes; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hildebrandt, Malte; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kirch, Klaus; Knecht, Andreas; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Bigot, Eric-Olivier Le; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Machado, Jorge; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; Santos, Joaquim M F dos; Santos, José Paulo; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Szabo, Csilla I; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Voss, Andreas; Weichelt, Birgit; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy of the Lamb shift (2S-2P energy difference) in light muonic atoms or ions, in which one negative muon $\\mu^-$ is bound to a nucleus, has been performed. The measurements yield significantly improved values of the root-mean-square charge radii of the nuclei, owing to the large muon mass, which results in a vastly increased muon wave function overlap with the nucleus. The values of the proton and deuteron radii are 10 and 3 times more accurate than the respective CODATA values, but 7 standard deviations smaller. Data on muonic helium-3 and -4 ions is being analyzed and will give new insights. In future, the (magnetic) Zemach radii of the proton and the helium-3 nuclei will be determined from laser spectroscopy of the 1S hyperfine splittings, and the Lamb shifts of muonic Li, Be and B can be used to improve the respective charge radii.

  2. Collinear laser spectroscopy of atomic cadmium

    OpenAIRE

    Frömmgen, Nadja; Balabanski, Dimiter L.; Bissell, Mark L.; Bieroń, Jacek; Blaum, Klaus; Cheal, Bradley; Flanagan, Kieran; Fritzsche, Stephan; Geppert, Christopher; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Kreim, Kim; Krieger, Andreas; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine structure $A$ and $B$ factors of the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\rm{P}_2 \\rightarrow 5s\\,6s\\,\\; ^3\\rm{S}_1$ transition are determined from collinear laser spectroscopy data of $^{107-123}$Cd and $^{111m-123m}$Cd. Nuclear magnetic moments and electric quadrupole moments are extracted using reference dipole moments and calculated electric field gradients, respectively. The hyperfine structure anomaly for isotopes with $s_{1/2}$ and $d_{5/2}$ nuclear ground states and isomeric $h_{11/2}$ sta...

  3. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy; Probabilidades de transicion de algunos niveles de Cr II, Na II y Sb I medediante espectroscopia de plasma producidos por laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A. M.; Ortiz, M.; Campos, J.

    1995-07-01

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of CR II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. the plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. the light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 sto 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0. 2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sn alloys. to avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000 K), electron densities ({approx}{approx} 10''16 cm ''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained. (Author) 56 refs.

  4. Atomic spectroscopy sympsoium, Gaithersburg, Maryland, September 23--26, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of one hundred papers given at the conference are presented along with the conference program and an author index. Session topics include: highly ionized atoms; laser spectroscopy and hyperfine structure; complex spectra; laser spectroscopy, radiation theory; theory of highly ionized atoms and analysis of plasmas; plasma spectroscopy, line strengths; spectral analysis, instrumentation, reference wavelengths; beam foil spectroscopy, line strengths, energy levels; absorption spectroscopy, autoionization, and related theory; and spectral analysis, instrumentation, and VUV physics

  5. Collinear laser spectroscopy of atomic cadmium

    CERN Document Server

    Frömmgen, Nadja; Bissell, Mark L; Bieroń, Jacek; Blaum, Klaus; Cheal, Bradley; Flanagan, Kieran; Fritzsche, Stephan; Geppert, Christopher; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Kreim, Kim; Krieger, Andreas; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Rajabali, Mustafa M; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Papuga, Jasna; Yordanov, Deyan T

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine structure $A$ and $B$ factors of the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\rm{P}_2 \\rightarrow 5s\\,6s\\,\\; ^3\\rm{S}_1$ transition are determined from collinear laser spectroscopy data of $^{107-123}$Cd and $^{111m-123m}$Cd. Nuclear magnetic moments and electric quadrupole moments are extracted using reference dipole moments and calculated electric field gradients, respectively. The hyperfine structure anomaly for isotopes with $s_{1/2}$ and $d_{5/2}$ nuclear ground states and isomeric $h_{11/2}$ states is evaluated and a linear relationship is observed for all nuclear states except $s_{1/2}$. This corresponds to the Moskowitz-Lombardi rule that was established in the mercury region of the nuclear chart but in the case of cadmium the slope is distinctively smaller than for mercury. In total four atomic and ionic levels were analyzed and all of them exhibit a similar behaviour. The electric field gradient for the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\mathrm{P}_2$ level is derived from multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculatio...

  6. Electron spectroscopy of collisional excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis measurements are described in which coincidences are detected between scattered projectiles and emitted electrons. This yields information on two-electron excitation processes. In order to show what can be learnt from coincidence experiments a detailed theoretical analysis is given. The transition amplitudes, which contain all the information, are introduced (ch.2). In ch.3 the experimental set-up is shown. The results for the Li+-He system are shown in ch. 7 and are compared with predictions based on the Molecular-Orbitalmodel which however does not account for two-excitation mechanisms. With the transition amplitudes also the wave function of the excited atom has been completely determined. In ch.8 the shape of the electron cloud, induced by the collision, is derived from the amplitudes. The relation between the oscillatory motion of this cloud after the collision and the correlation between the two electrons of the excited atom is discussed. In ch. 6 it is shown that the broad structures in the non-coincident energy spectra of the Li+-He system are erroneously interpretated as a result of electron emission from the (Li-He)+-quasimolecule. A model is presented which explains, based on the results obtained from the coincidence measurements, these broad structures. In ch. 4 the Post-Collision Interaction process is treated. It is shown that for high-energy collisions, in contrast with general assumptions, PCI is important. In ch. 5 the importance of PCI-processes in photoionization of atoms, followed by Auger decay, are studied. From the formulas derived in ch. 4 simple analytical results are obtained. These are applied to recent experiments and good agreement is achieved. 140 refs.; 55 figs.; 9 tabs

  7. 原子发射光谱双谱线法测量半导体桥(SCB)等离子体温度%Measurement of the Semiconductor Bridge (SCB) Plasma Temperature by the Double Line of Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯红艳; 李艳; 张琳; 吴蓉; 王俊德; 朱顺官

    2007-01-01

    A system consisting of two interference filters of different wavelength and two photo-multiplier detectors was used to measure the time evolution of the SCB plasma temperature based on the double line of atomic emission spectroscopy. The highest temporal resolution of the apparatus was 0.1 μs. The results show that when the voltage is 24 - 32 V and all capacitances are 68 μF, the highest temperature and duration of the SCB plasma increases from 2710 K to 3880 K and from 170.7 μs to 283.4 μs, respectively.%在原子发射光谱双谱线法的基础上,设计了含有两个干涉滤光片和光电倍增管双谱线测温系统.仪器的最高的时间分辨率为0.1μs.讨论了不同能量输入条件下SCB等离子体的温度和等离子体的存在时间.实验结果表明在电压24~32 V,电容68μF不变的情况下,等离子体的温度从2710 K升高到3880 K,等离子体存在时间从170.7μs上升到283.4μs.

  8. Theory of atomic spectral emission intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theoretical derivation of a new spectral line intensity formula for atomic radiative emission is presented. The theory is based on first principles of quantum physics and statistical physics. It is argued that the formulation of the theory provides a very good example of the manner in which quantum logic transforms into common sense logic. The theory is strongly supported by experimental evidence. (author) (16 refs.)

  9. PETOS-BASIC programs for treating data and reporting results in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A PETOS-BASIC program was written which provides the off-line treatment of data in optical emission spectroscopy, flame photometry and, atomic absorption spectroscopy. Polynomial calibration functions are fitted in overlapped steps by the least squares method. The calculated concentrations in unknown samples are stored in sequential files (one per element, up to four), from which they can be read to be reported in a second program. (Author) 7 refs

  10. Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Rare Earth Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Palm, Christopher; Joshi, Trinity; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We discuss progress in our experimental program to employ optical-frequency-comb-based spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms. We plan to carry out systematic measurements of atomic transitions in rare-earth atoms to elucidate the energy level structure and term assignment and determine presently unknown atomic state parameters. This spectroscopic information is important in view of the increasing interest in rare-earth atoms for atomic frequency standards, in astrophysical investigations of chemically peculiar stars, and in tests of fundamental physics (tests of parity and time-reversal invariance, searches for time variation of fundamental constants, etc.). We are presently studying the use of hollow cathode lamps as atomic sources for two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0958749.

  11. Spontaneous emission of two interacting atoms near an interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dehua Wang

    2009-01-01

    The spontaneous emission rate of two interacting excited atoms near a dielectric interface is studied using the photon closed-orbit theory and the dipole image method.The total emission rate of one atom during the emission process is calculated as a function of the distance between the atom and the interface.The results suggest that the spontaneous emission rate depends not only on the atomic-interface distances,but also on the orientation of the two atomic dipoles and the initial distance between the two atoms.The oscillation in the spontaneous emission rate is caused by the interference between the outgoing electromagnetic wave emitted from one atom and other waves arriving at this atom after traveling along various classical orbits.Each peak in the Fourier transformed spontaneous emission rate corresponds with one action of photon classical orbit.

  12. Emission Probability of the Cascade Three-Level-Atom Mazer with Injected Atomic Coherence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊锦; 张智明

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the injected atomic coherence on the atomic emission probability of the micromaser injected with ultracold cascade three-level atoms by considering that the atoms are initially in the coherent superposition states of the two upper levels. We show that there is no interference between the transitions from the two upper levels to the lowest level. In the large atom-field-detuning case, the atomic emission probability decreases as the coherent parameter increases. In the zero atom-field-detuning case, the atomic emission probability has three sets of resonance peaks. The reason for these results has been explained.

  13. THE SPECTROSCOPY OF URANIUM ATOM WITHIN THE "SILVA" PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    Avril, R.; Ebrardt, J.; Petit, A.; Viala, F.; Vors, E.

    1987-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (SILVA) has been recognized as beeing an attractive powerful technique for the enrichment of uranium for light water reactor fuel. Since the heart of the AVLIS process is based on selective multistep photoionization of an uranium atomic vapor stream, the development of this process in France, has stimulated intensive studies in the field of uranium spectroscopy.

  14. X-ray Emission of Hollow Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhaoYongtao; XiaoGuoqing; ZhangXiaoan; YangZhihu; ChenXimeng; ZhangYanping

    2003-01-01

    We have systematically investigated the X-rays emission of hollow atoms (HA) which formed in the interaction of highly charged ions with a variety of solid surfaces at the atomic physics experimental setup of IMP. The X-ray spectra were measured by Si(Li) detectors with effective energy ranging from 1 keV to 60 keV. The results show that, the X-ray emission from the formed HA is closely correlated with the charge state of the projectile ions, and weakly correlated with the velocity of the projectile ions. For example, it was found that when Ar18+ ions interact with Be-target, the yield of K X-ray with character energy of 3.0 keV is 7.2×10-3 per ion, which is two times and 5 order of magnitude higher than those in the interactions of Ar17+ and Ar16+ ions respectively. When Ar15+ ions interact with the same targets, the Argon K X-ray would be too feeble to be detected. The X-ray yield with single ion in this experiment can be represented by the following equation,

  15. Chemical interactions by low-energy electron-induced x-ray emission spectroscopy, LEXES

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnelle, C

    2002-01-01

    The possibilities presented by low-energy electron-induced x-ray emission spectroscopy to study chemical interactions in solids are discussed. Examples of change observed for the emissions between core levels as a function of the chemical environment of the emitting atoms are given. By comparing the partial densities of the valence states associated to each type of atoms in the compound, it is shown that the strength of the metal-ligand interactions can be obtained. Information on the charge densities around each type of atoms can be deduced. Application to the study of the interactions at the atomic scale to solid-solid interfaces is presented. (author)

  16. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: Counting noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe new work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions). When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. We show that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective. (orig./FKS)

  17. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the technique of resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS), a laser is tuned to a wavelength that will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or non-resonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms: and because detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples of one-atom detection are given, including that of the noble gases, to show complementarity with accelerator mass spectrometry AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81Kr by using RIS has interesting applications for solar-neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. (author)

  18. Modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in hollow cathode lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the experimental study of modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp. The dependences of its linewidth, slope and magnitude on the various experimental parameters are measured and fitted by the well-known theoretical expressions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We have observed the Dicke narrowing effect by increasing the current of the hollow cathode lamp. It is also found that there are the optimal current and laser power to generate the better modulation transfer spectroscopy signal, which can be employed for locking the laser frequency to the atomic transition. (authors)

  19. Deuteron charge radius from spectroscopy data in atomic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Antognini, Aldo; Beyer, Axel; Fleurbaey, Hélène; Grinin, Alexey; Hänsch, Theodor W; Julien, Lucile; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Matveev, Arthur; Biraben, François

    2016-01-01

    We give a pedagogical description of the method to extract the charge radii and Rydberg constant from laser spectroscopy in regular hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms, that is part of the CODATA least-squares adjustment of the fundamental physical constants. We give a deuteron charge radius from D spectroscopy alone of 2.1415(45) fm. This value is independent of the proton charge radius, and five times more accurate than the value found in the CODATA Adjustment 10.

  20. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π− beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π− occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN

  1. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M., E-mail: Masaki.Hori@mpq.mpg.de; Sótér, A.; Aghai-Khozani, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik (Germany); Barna, D. [CERN (Switzerland); Dax, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland); Hayano, R. S.; Murakami, Y.; Yamada, H. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π{sup −} beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π{sup −} occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN.

  2. Application of dynamic impedance spectroscopy to atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Darowicki, Artur Zieliński and Krzysztof J Kurzydłowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM is a universal imaging technique, while impedance spectroscopy is a fundamental method of determining the electrical properties of materials. It is useful to combine those techniques to obtain the spatial distribution of an impedance vector. This paper proposes a new combining approach utilizing multifrequency scanning and simultaneous AFM scanning of an investigated surface.

  3. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  4. SPECTRW: A software package for nuclear and atomic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfas, C. A.; Axiotis, M.; Tsabaris, C.

    2016-09-01

    A software package to be used in nuclear and atomic spectroscopy is presented. Apart from analyzing γ and X-ray spectra, it offers many additional features such as de-convolution of multiple photopeaks, sample analysis and activity determination, detection system evaluation and an embedded code for spectra simulation.

  5. Current Status of Atomic Spectroscopy Databases at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramida, Alexander; Ralchenko, Yuri; Reader, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    NIST's Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center maintains several online databases on atomic spectroscopy. These databases can be accessed via the http://physics.nist.gov/PhysRefData web page. Our main database, Atomic Spectra Database (ASD), recently upgraded to v. 5.3, now contains critically evaluated data for about 250,000 spectral lines and 109,000 energy levels of almost all elements in the periodic table. This new version has added several thousand spectral lines and energy levels of Sn II, Mo V, W VIII, and Th I-III. Most of these additions contain critically evaluated transition probabilities important for astrophysics, technology, and fusion research. A new feature of ASD is providing line-ratio data for diagnostics of electron temperature and density in plasmas. Saha-Boltzmann plots have been modified by adding an experimental feature allowing the user to specify a multi-element mixture. We continue regularly updating our bibliography databases, ensuring comprehensive coverage of current literature on atomic spectra for energy levels, spectral lines, transition rates, hyperfine structure, isotope shifts, Zeeman and Stark effects. Our other popular databases, such as the Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopy Data, searchable atlases of spectra of Pt-Ne and Th-Ne lamps, and non-LTE plasma-kinetics code comparisons, continue to be maintained.

  6. The emission properties of an atom inside a cavity when manipulating the atoms outside the cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen; YE Liu; XIONG Kuang-wei; ZHANG Jin

    2003-01-01

    Considering three two-level atoms initially in the GHZ state, then one atom of them is put into an initially empty cavity and made resonant interaction. It is shown that the emission properties of the atom inside the cavity can be affected only when both of the atoms outside the cavity have been manipulated. This conclusion can also be generalized to n two-level atoms.

  7. Atomic spectroscopy introduction to the theory of hyperfine structure

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Anatoli V

    2006-01-01

    Atomic Spectroscopy provides a comprehensive discussion on the general approach to the theory of atomic spectra, based on the use of the Lagrangian canonical formalism. This approach is developed and applied to explain the hydrogenic hyperfine structure associated with the nucleus motion, its finite mass, and spin. The non-relativistic or relativistic, spin or spin-free particle approximations can be used as a starting point of general approach. The special attention is paid to the theory of Lamb shift formation. The formulae for hydrogenic spectrum including the account of Lamb shift are written in simple analytical form. The book is of interest to specialists, graduate and postgraduate students, who are involved into the experimental and theoretical research in the field of modern atomic spectroscopy.

  8. 2p3d Resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy of cobalt compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooneveld, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript demonstrates that 2p3d resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) yields unique information on the chemically relevant valence electrons of transition metal atoms or ions. Experimental data on cobalt compounds and several theories were used hand-in-hand. In chapter 1 2p3d RXES was s

  9. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy of an HPPMS coating process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the time resolved optical emission spectroscopy of a high power pulse magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) physical vapour deposition coating process. With an industrial coating unit CC800/9 HPPMS (CemeCon AG, Wuerselen) a (Cr,Al,Si)N coating was deposited. During the coating process, an absolute calibrated Echelle spectrometer (ESA-3000) measured the intensities of the spectral lines of chromium (Cr), aluminium (Al) and molecular bands of nitrogen (N2). Time resolved measurements enable us to calculate different parameters such as the average velocity of sputtered Al and Cr atoms or the internal plasma parameters electron density ne and electron temperature kTe with a time resolution of 20 μs. With these parameters, we determine the ionization rates of Al, Cr, Ar and Kr atoms and the deposition densities of Al and Cr atoms. Thus simulated deposition densities of 1.75 x 1020 m-2 s-1 for chromium and 1.7 x 1022 m-2 s-1 for aluminium are reached.

  10. Photoionization of Endohedral Atoms: Collective, Reflective and Collateral Emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photoionization properties of a fullerene-confined atom differ dramatically from that of an isolated atom. In the low energy region, where the fullerene plasmons are active, the electrons of the confined atom emerge through a collective channel carrying a significant chunk of plasmon with it. The photoelectron angular distribution of the confined atom however shows far lesser impact of the effect. At higher energies, the interference between two single-electron ionization channels, one directly from the atom and another reflected off the fullerene cage, producuces oscillatory cross sections. But for the outermost atomic level, which transfers some electrons to the cage, oscillations are further modulated by the collateral emission from the part of the atomic charge density transferred to the cage. These various modes of emissions are studied for the photoionization of Ar endohedrally confined in C60.

  11. Updated Atomic Data and Calculations for X-ray Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, A R; Smith, R K; Brickhouse, N S

    2012-01-01

    We describe the latest release of AtomDB, version 2.0.2, a database of atomic data and a plasma modeling code with a focus on X-ray astronomy. This release includes several major updates to the fundamental atomic structure and process data held within AtomDB, incorporating new ionization balance data, state-selective recombination data, and updated collisional excitation data for many ions, including the iron L-shell ions from Fe$^{+16}$ to Fe$^{+23}$ and all of the hydrogen- and helium-like sequences. We also describe some of the effects that these changes have on calculated emission and diagnostic line ratios, such as changes in the temperature implied by the He-like G-ratios of up to a factor of 2.

  12. Laser spectroscopy of atomic beams of short-lived nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possibility of performing laser-nuclear-spectroscopic experiments at qualitatively new level aimed to solve the second-glass current problem and to search T-non invariant effects in the beta-decay of atomic nuclei is discussed. The question of the increase in efficiency of the experiments, aimed to study the main characteristics of nuclei, far from the beta-stability, by means of the laser spectroscopy methods is considered. 147 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  13. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun [Department of Physics, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible} 6s7s {sup 1}S{sub 0}) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm{sup 3} and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s{sup 1}S{sub 0} state via the intercombination 6s6p{sup 3}P{sub 1} state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 Degree-Sign C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle.

  14. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2013-02-01

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s(2)(1)S0↔ 6s7s (1)S0) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm(3) and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s(1)S0 state via the intercombination 6s6p(3)P1 state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 °C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle. PMID:23464193

  15. Emission Spectra of a Moving Atom in an Electromagnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-Tao; FENG Xun-Li; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2000-01-01

    The emission spectra of a two-level atom moving in an electromafneric fiekd are studied We find that there that there is a shift in the peak position and that each peak splits into double peaks The shit is duble peaks The shift is duc to the detuning indced by the atomic mition and the splitting is casused by the atomic energy change due of photons

  16. Introducing many-body physics using atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Krebs, Dietrich; Santra, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Atoms constitute relatively simple many-body systems, making them suitable objects for developing an understanding of basic aspects of many-body physics. Photoabsorption spectroscopy is a prominent method to study the electronic structure of atoms and the inherent many-body interactions. In this article the impact of many-body effects on well-known spectroscopic features such as Rydberg series, Fano resonances, Cooper minima, and giant resonances is studied, and related many-body phenomena in other fields are outlined. To calculate photoabsorption cross sections the time-dependent configuration interaction singles (TDCIS) model is employed. The conceptual clearness of TDCIS in combination with the compactness of atomic systems allows for a pedagogical introduction to many-body phenomena.

  17. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Poli, N.; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M.; Sorrentino, F.; Drullinger, R. E.; Tino, G. M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable View the MathML source state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trap...

  18. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  19. Atomic jet with ionization detection for laser spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms under collisions and fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, G.

    2008-03-01

    An efficient atomic jet setup offering many unprecedented advantages over a conventional heat pipe setup used in multi-photon spectroscopy, mainly of alkaline-earth metals, has been constructed by a scheme in which the sample material is encapsulated in a disposable cartridge oven located inside a thermally stabilised heat-pipe and is made to effuse in to a row of atomic beams merging to form a jet target. This novel scheme combines the advantages of both high density atomic beam with convenient geometry for orthogonal excitation and high sensitive ionisation detection capabilities of thermionic diodes, besides eliminating several problems inherent in the usual heat-pipe operation. Out of various designs, typical results are presented for a linear heat-pipe with vertical atomic jet used in two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of Sr I. Controlled excitations of both Rydberg and non-Rydberg states, which cannot otherwise be accessed from the ground state due to parity and spectroscopic selection rules, have been achieved by employing a weak electric field complimented by collisions. The atomic jet setup is also found very useful for the study of collisional broadening and shift of excited states and time evolution of Rydberg atoms.

  20. Laser cooling, trapping, and Rydberg spectroscopy of neutral holmium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetter, James Allen

    This thesis focuses on progress towards using ensembles of neutral holmium for use in quantum computing operations. We are particularly interested in using a switchable interaction between neutral atoms, the Rydberg blockade, to implement a universal set of quantum gates in a collective encoding scheme that presents many benefits over quantum computing schemes which rely on physically distinct qubits. We show that holmium is uniquely suited for operations in a collective encoding basis because it has 128 ground hyperfine states, the largest number of any stable, neutral atom. Holmium is a rare earth atom that is very poorly described for our purposes as it has never been cooled and trapped, its spectrum is largely unknown, and it presents several unique experimental challenges related to its complicated atomic structure and short wavelength transitions. We demonstrate important progress towards overcoming these challenges. We produce the first laser cooling and trapping of holmium into a MOT. Because we use a broad cooling transition, our cooling technique does not require the use of a Zeeman slower. Using MOT depletion spectroscopy, we provide precise measurements of holmium's Rydberg states and its ionization potential. Our work continues towards cooling holmium into a dipole trap by calculating holmium's AC polarizability and demonstrating the results of early attempts at an optical dipole trap. We provide details of future upgrades to the experimental apparatus and discuss interesting potential for using holmium in quantum computing using single atoms in a magnetically trapped lattice. This thesis shows several promising indicators for continued work in this field.

  1. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10-5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 104 atoms cm-3. The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  2. Some applications of ballistic electron emission microscopy/spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of ballistic electron emission microscopy and spectroscopy applications is presented. Results of our ballistic electron emission spectroscopy measurements on cleaved n-GaAs are given. The threshold in ballistic current-voltage characteristic is observed at bias 1.93 V which is high above the expected threshold. Explanation of this effect is given in the frame of present theoretical results. (author)

  3. Angular distribution and atomic effects in condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general concept of condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy is that angular distribution and atomic effects in the photoemission intensity are determined by different mechanisms, the former being determined largely by ordering phenomena such as crystal momentum conservation and photoelectron diffraction while the latter are manifested in the total (angle-integrated) cross section. In this work, the physics of the photoemission process is investigated in several very different experiments to elucidate the mechanisms of, and correlation between, atomic and angular distribution effects. Theoretical models are discussed and the connection betweeen the two effects is clearly established. The remainder of this thesis, which describes experiments utilizing both angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission in conjunction with synchrotron radiation in the energy range 6 eV less than or equal to h ν less than or equal to 360 eV and laboratory sources, is divided into three parts

  4. Atomic and Molecular Data for Optical Stellar Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Heiter, U; Asplund, M; Barklem, P S; Bergemann, M; Magrini, L; Masseron, T; Mikolaitis, Š; Pickering, J C; Ruffoni, M P

    2015-01-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2- to 10-m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available ...

  5. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, G; T.M. Brzozowski; R. DRULLINGER; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Toninelli, C.; Tino, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    Laser Optics 2003: Solid State Lasers and Nonlinear Frequency Conversion, edited by Vladimir I. Ustugov abstract: We present a new laser setup suited for high precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium. The source is used for an absolute frequency measurement of the visible 5s21S0-5s5p3P1 intercombination line of strontium which is considered a possible candidate for a future optical frequency standard. The optical frequency is measured with an optical comb generator referenced to the SI t...

  6. Resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering spectroscopy of an atomic transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xudong; Qiao, Cuifang; Li, Chuanliang; Chen, Fenghua

    2016-07-01

    A novel resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering (REBS) spectroscopy from a population difference grating (PDG) is reported. The PDG is formed by a standing-wave (SW) pump field, which periodically modulates the space population distributions of two levels in the 87Rb D1 line. Then, a probe beam, having identical frequency and orthogonal polarization with the SW pump field, is Bragg-scattered by the PDG. The research achievement shows that the Bragg-scattered light is strongest at an atomic transition, and forms an REBS spectrum with a high signal-to-noise ratio and sub-natural linewidth. The observed REBS can be applied in precise frequency measurements.

  7. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Breuker, H; Nagata, Y; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Hayano, R; Knudsen, H; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Leali, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

  8. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium. PMID:16527534

  9. Rotational spectra of N$_2^+$: An advanced undergraduate laboratory in atomic and molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bayram, S B; Arndt, P T

    2015-01-01

    We describe an inexpensive instructional experiment that demonstrates the rotational energy levels of diatomic nitrogen, using the emission band spectrum of molecular nitrogen ionized by various processes in a commercial AC capillary discharge tube. The simple setup and analytical procedure is introduced as part of a sequence of educational experiments employed by a course of advanced atomic and molecular spectroscopy, where the study of rotational spectra is combined with the analysis of vibrational characteristics for a multifaceted picture of the quantum states of diatomic molecules.

  10. Emissivity measurements with an Atomic Force Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    van Zwol, Pieter Jan; Ranno, Laurent; Chevrier, Joel

    2011-01-01

    We show that functionalized micromechanical bilayer levers can be used as sensitive probes to accurately measure radiative heat flux in vacuum between two materials at the micro scale. By means of calibration to one material these measurements can be made quantitative for radiative heat flux or for either temperature or material emissivity. We discuss issues and opportunities for our method and provide ample technical details regarding its implementation and demonstrate good correspondence wi...

  11. Production of ultra slow antiprotons, its application to atomic collisions and atomic spectroscopy - ASACUSA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) project aims at studying collision dynamics with slow antiprotons and high precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms. To realize these purposes, the production of high quality ultra slow antiproton beams is essential, which is achieved by the combination of antiproton decelerator (AD) from 3 GeV to 5 MeV, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) decelerator from 5 MeV to 50 keV, and finally an electromagnetic trap from 50 keV to 10 eV. From the atomic physics point of view, an antiproton is an extremely heavy electron and/or a negatively charged proton, i.e., the antiproton is a unique tool to shed light on collision dynamics from the other side of the world. In addition to this fundamentally important feature, the antiproton has also a big practical advantage, i.e., it annihilates with the target nuclei emitting several energetic pions, which provides high detection efficiency with very good time resolution. Many-body effects which are of great importance to several branches of science will be studied through ionization and antiprotonic atom formation processes under single collision conditions. Various antiprotonic atoms including protonium (p anti-p) are expected to be meta-stable in vacuum, which is never true for those in dense media except for antiprotonic helium. High precision spectroscopy of protonium will for the first time become feasible benefited by this meta-stability. The present review reports briefly the production scheme of ultra slow antiproton beams and several topics proposed in the ASACUSA project

  12. Atomic spectroscopy sympsoium, Gaithersburg, Maryland, September 23--26, 1975. [Program, abstracts, and author index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Abstracts of one hundred papers given at the conference are presented along with the conference program and an author index. Session topics include: highly ionized atoms; laser spectroscopy and hyperfine structure; complex spectra; laser spectroscopy, radiation theory; theory of highly ionized atoms and analysis of plasmas; plasma spectroscopy, line strengths; spectral analysis, instrumentation, reference wavelengths; beam foil spectroscopy, line strengths, energy levels; absorption spectroscopy, autoionization, and related theory; and spectral analysis, instrumentation, and VUV physics. (GHT)

  13. Vibrational emission analysis of the CN molecules in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of organic materials is based on the analysis of atomic and ionic emission lines and on a few molecular bands, the most important being the CN violet system and the C2 Swan system. This paper is focused in molecular emission of LIBS plasmas based on the CN (B2Σ–X2Σ) band, one of the strongest emissions appearing in all carbon materials when analyzed in air atmosphere. An analysis of this band with sufficient spectral resolution provides a great deal of information on the molecule, which has revealed that valuable information can be obtained from the plume chemistry and dynamics affecting the excitation mechanisms of the molecules. The vibrational emission of this molecular band has been investigated to establish the dependence of this emission on the molecular structure of the materials. The paper shows that excitation/emission phenomena of molecular species observed in the plume depend strongly on the time interval selected and on the irradiance deposited on the sample surface. Precise time resolved LIBS measurements are needed for the observation of distinctive CN emission. For the organic compounds studied, larger differences in the behavior of the vibrational emission occur at early stages after plasma ignition. Since molecular emission is generally more complex than that involving atomic emission, local plasma conditions as well as plume chemistry may induce changes in vibrational emission of molecules. As a consequence, alterations in the distribution of the emissions occur in terms of relative intensities, being sensitive to the molecular structure of every single material. - Highlights: • Vibrational emission of CN species in laser-induced plasmas has been investigated. • Distribution of vibrational emission of CN has been found to be time dependent. • Laser irradiance affects the vibrational distribution of the CN molecules. • Plume chemistry controls the excitation mechanisms of CN molecules in the

  14. Electrochemical frequency modulation and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy methods for monitoring corrosion rates and inhibition of low alloy steel corrosion in HCl solutions and a test for validity of the Tafel extrapolation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inhibition effect of glycine (Gly) towards the corrosion of low alloy steel ASTM A213 grade T22 boiler steel was studied in aerated stagnant 0.50 M HCl solutions in the temperature range 20-60 deg. C using potentiodynamic polarization (Tafel polarization and linear polarization) and impedance techniques, complemented with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). Electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM), a non-destructive corrosion measurement technique that can directly give values of corrosion current without prior knowledge of Tafel constants, is also presented here. Experimental corrosion rates determined by the Tafel extrapolation method are compared with corrosion rates obtained by electrochemical, namely EFM technique, and chemical (i.e., non-electrochemical) method for steel in HCl. The chemical method of confirmation of the corrosion rates involved determination of the dissolved cation, using ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry) method of analysis. Corrosion rates (in mm y-1) obtained from the electrochemical (Tafel extrapolation and EFM) and the chemical method, ICP, are in a good agreement. Polarization studies have shown that Gly is a good 'green', mixed-type inhibitor with cathodic predominance. The inhibition process was attributed to the formation of an adsorbed film on the metal surface that protects the metal against corrosive agents. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersion X-ray (EDX) examinations of the electrode surface confirmed the existence of such an adsorbed film. The inhibition efficiency increases with increase in Gly concentration, while it decreases with solution temperature. Temkin isotherm is successfully applied to describe the adsorption process. Thermodynamic functions for the adsorption process were determined.

  15. Search for ultralight scalar dark matter with atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Van Tilburg, Ken; Bougas, Lykourgos; Budker, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    We report new limits on ultralight scalar dark matter (DM) with dilaton-like couplings to photons that can induce oscillations in the fine-structure constant alpha. Atomic dysprosium exhibits an electronic structure with two nearly degenerate levels whose energy splitting is sensitive to changes in alpha. Spectroscopy data for two isotopes of dysprosium over a two-year span is analyzed for coherent oscillations with angular frequencies below 1 rad/s. No signal consistent with a DM coupling is identified, leading to new constraints on dilaton-like photon couplings over a wide mass range. Under the assumption that the scalar field comprises all of the DM, our limits on the coupling exceed those from equivalence-principle tests by up to 4 orders of magnitude for masses below 3 * 10^-18 eV. Excess oscillatory power, inconsistent with fine-structure variation, is detected in a control data set, and is likely due to a systematic effect. Our atomic spectroscopy limits on DM are the first of their kind, and leave sub...

  16. Laser-excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in a helium microwave-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Timothy S.

    The focus of this dissertation is to report the first documented coupling of helium microwave induced plasmas (MIPs) to laser excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability to effectively produce intense atomic emission from both metal and nonmetal analytes gives helium microwave induced plasmas a greater flexibility than the more commonly utilized argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Originally designed as an element selective detector for non-aqueous chromatography applications at low applied powers (plasma has been applied to aqueous sample determinations at higher applied powers (>500 W). The helium MIP has been shown to be a very powerful analytical atomic spectroscopy tool. The development of the pulsed dye laser offered an improved method of excitation in the field of atomic fluorescence. The use of laser excitation for atomic fluorescence was a logical successor to the conventional excitation methods involving hollow cathode lamps and continuum sources. The highly intense, directional, and monochromatic nature of laser radiation results in an increased population of atomic species in excited electronic states where atomic fluorescence can occur. The application of laser excitation atomic fluorescence to the analysis of metals in a helium microwave induced plasma with ultrasonic sample nebulization was the initial focus of this work. Experimental conditions and results are included for the aqueous characterization of manganese, lead, thallium, and iron in the helium MIP- LEAFS system. These results are compared to previous laser excitation atomic fluorescence experimentation. The effect of matrix interferences on the analytical fluorescence signal was also investigated for each element. The advantage of helium MIPs over argon ICPs in the determination of nonmetals in solution indicates that the helium MIP is an excellent candidate for laser excitation atomic fluorescence experiments involving nonmetals such as chlorine, bromine, iodine, and

  17. Demonstration of Weak Measurement Based on Atomic Spontaneous Emission

    OpenAIRE

    Shomroni, Itay; Bechler, Orel; Rosenblum, Serge; Dayan, Barak

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new type of weak measurement based on the dynamics of spontaneous emission. The pointer in our scheme is given by the Lorentzian distribution characterizing atomic exponential decay via emission of a single photon. We thus introduce weak measurement, so far demonstrated nearly exclusively with laser beams and Gaussian statistics, into the quantum regime of single emitters and single quanta, enabling the exploitation of a wide class of sources that are abundant in nature. We d...

  18. Emission spectrum of the atomic chain excited by channeled particle

    CERN Document Server

    Epp, V

    2014-01-01

    Basic properties of radiation of the atomic chains excited by a channeled particle are considered. Using a very simple two-dimensional model of a crystal lattice we have shown that the main part of this radiation is generated on the frequency of oscillations of a channeled particle between the crystal planes, shifted by the Doppler effect. Spectral and angular distribution and spectral distribution of the radiation of the atomic chain excited by channeled particle were calculated. Emission spectrum of the atomic chain excited by channeled particle was plotted.

  19. Atomic spectroscopy and highly accurate measurement: determination of fundamental constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author concerning highly accurate atomic spectroscopy applied for the determination of fundamental constants. A pure optical frequency measurement of the 2S-12D 2-photon transitions in atomic hydrogen and deuterium has been performed. The experimental setting-up is described as well as the data analysis. Optimized values for the Rydberg constant and Lamb shifts have been deduced (R = 109737.31568516 (84) cm-1). An experiment devoted to the determination of the fine structure constant with an aimed relative uncertainty of 10-9 began in 1999. This experiment is based on the fact that Bloch oscillations in a frequency chirped optical lattice are a powerful tool to transfer coherently many photon momenta to the atoms. We have used this method to measure accurately the ratio h/m(Rb). The measured value of the fine structure constant is α-1 = 137.03599884 (91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.7*10-9. The future and perspectives of this experiment are presented. This document presented before an academic board will allow his author to manage research work and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  20. Atomic Coherence in the Micromaser Injected with Slow V-type Three-State Atoms: Emission Probability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-Ming; LIANG Wen-Qing; XIE Sheng-Wu

    2001-01-01

    The effects of atomic coherence on the single-mode two-photon rnicromaser injected with slow V-type three-state atoms are studied for the first time. It is shown that the atomic coherence can modify the atomic emission probability. The effects of the atomic centre-of-mass momentum, the cavity length and other parameters are also studied.

  1. Optimization and control of a plasma carburizing process by means of optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rie, K.-T.; Menthe, E.; Woehle, J. [TU Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Oberflaechentechnik und Plasmatechnische Werkstoffentwicklung

    1998-01-01

    In this work optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is used to characterize the dissociation process of methane in an argon/hydrogen/methane discharge for plasma carburizing. The optical emission spectra of the discharge have been measured as a function of process parameters: discharge voltage, pulse duration and pulse pause time. A correlation between the intensities of hydrocarbon molecules, carbon atoms and ions, and the carbon mass flow model of the carburizing process has been confirmed. The dominant species identified in the spectra used for correlation are excited and ionized carbon atoms, as well as excited carbon and hydrocarbon molecules such as excited CH with a molecular band at 431.42 nm and 314.41 nm, and excited C{sub 2} with molecular band at 501.50 nm. Excited carbon atoms at 493.21 nm and excited carbon ions at 387.17 nm and 426.70 nm are also detected. (orig.) 10 refs.

  2. CANAS '01 - Colloquium analytical atomic spectroscopy; CANAS '01 - Colloquium Analytische Atomspektroskopie. Programm. Kurzfassungen der Vortraege und Poster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The main topics of the meeting on analytical atom spectroscopy were: optical atom spectrometry, x-ray fluorescence analysis, absorption spectroscopy, icp mass spectroscopy, trace analysis, sampling, sample preparation and quality assurance.

  3. Modulation transfer spectroscopy in a lithium atomic vapor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dali; Zhou, Chao; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-05-16

    We have investigated modulation transfer spectroscopy of D2 transitions of 7Li atoms in a vapor cell. The role of the intensity of the probe beam in the spectrum is important, we have seen unique characteristics of the signal in the crossover peak. In order to find the best signal for laser locking, the slope and frequency offset of the zero-crossing signal are determined. The dependence of the modulation transfer spectra on polarizations of pump and probe beam is demonstrated. The residual amplitude modulation in the system is also considered, and the distortion of the spectra due to the modulation is analyzed. It was found that the crossover peak is more suitable for frequency stabilization due to its better residual amplitude modulation compensation. PMID:27409886

  4. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  5. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena-Diaz, M; Ponce, L; Arronte, M; Flores, T [Laboratorio TecnologIa Laser, CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Ind. Altamira, 89600, TAMPS (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  6. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained

  7. Non-coincident multi-wavelength emission absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of noncoincident sampling on the measurement of atomic number density and temperature by multiwavelength emission absorption. The assumption is made that the two signals, emission and transmitted lamp, are time resolved but not coincident. The analysis demonstrates the validity of averages of such measurements despite fluctuations in temperature and optical depth. At potassium-seeded MHD conditions, the fluctuations introduce additional uncertainty into measurements of potassium atom number density and temperature but do not significantly bias the average results. Experimental measurements in the CFFF aerodynamic duct with coincident and noncoincident sampling support the analysis.

  8. Probing Local Environments by Time-Resolved Stimulated Emission Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Rei; Graham Hungerford; Michael Belsley; Ferreira, M. Isabel C.; Peter Schellenberg

    2012-01-01

    Time-resolved stimulated emission spectroscopy was employed to probe the local environment of DASPMI (4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methyl-pyridinium iodide) in binary solvents of different viscosity and in a sol-gel matrix. DASPMI is one of the molecules of choice to probe local environments, and the dependence of its fluorescence emission decay on viscosity has been previously used for this purpose in biological samples, solid matrices as well as in solution. The results presented in this p...

  9. Pre-concentration of Cr, Mn, Fe and Co of water sea and analysis by plasma emission spectroscopy - DCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of separation and pre-concentration methods of chromium, manganese, iron and cobalt from seawater, that allow use control methods of 51 Cr, 54 Mn, 55,59 Fe, 58,59 Co with a better sensibility and the determination of this elements by atomic absorption spectroscopy or plasma emission spectroscopy are described. This methods of seawater analysis will use near the region of Angra I reactor. (author)

  10. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atomic physics and foundations of spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unique, unified presentation of these partial fields and by this exclusive. With the highly reputed co-author Prof. Dr. Ingolf Volker Hertel. Eminent presentation makes it possible, together also over set connections. For bachelor/master and diploma curricula. The book applies primarily to graduate students of physics and physical chemistry until promotion. It offers a detailed introduction to the most important theme complexes of atomic and molecular physics and the methods of modern optical physics connected with this. In many selected partial fields it leads until the actual status of research. Simultaneously it also appeals to the active scientist and wants to be a standard work of the field. By the clearly stuctured chapters the reader is - starting from the foundations of quantum physics - step-wise made familiar with the most important phenomena and models of atomic and molecular physics and led wherever it is offered, to their actual developments in modern research. In the first part here present the to a certain degree canonical knowledge with the main topic structure of atoms and molecules and the competent spectroscopy is summarized. In the second part still being in work deepening knowledge for this is mediated, and selected chapters of modern optics, lase physics, cluster research, and scattering physics is treated, as well a short excursus in the world of cold atoms and molecules is given. At the whole both volumes of this textbook want to show to the interested reader that atomic, molecular, and optical physics, are still as usual an alive field of modern physical research

  11. Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy of a Lasing Material: Ruby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposti, C. Degli; Bizzocchi, L.

    2007-01-01

    Ruby is a crystalline material, which comes very expensive and is of great significance, as it helped in the creation of first laser. An experiment to determine the absorption and emission spectroscopy, in addition to the determination of the room-temperature lifetime of the substance is being described.

  12. Diamond Analyzed by Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainsky, Isay L.

    1998-01-01

    Diamond is a promising semiconductor material for novel electronic applications because of its chemical stability and inertness, heat conduction properties, and so-called negative electron affinity (NEA). When a surface has NEA, electrons generated inside the bulk of the material are able to come out into the vacuum without any potential barrier (work function). Such a material would have an extremely high secondary electron emission coefficient o, very high photoelectron (quantum) yield, and would probably be an efficient field emitter. Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films have even more advantages than diamond single crystals. Their fabrication is relatively easy and inexpensive, and they can be grown with high levels of doping--consequently, they can have relatively high conductivity. Because of these properties, diamond can be used for cold cathodes and photocathodes in high-power electronics and in high-frequency and high-temperature semiconductor devices.

  13. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'Skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0-3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time.

  14. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Okaba, Shoichi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturisation. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kKagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF) are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the $^1 S_0-{}^3P_1$ (m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibresHC-PCFs improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time.

  15. Emission spectrum of a harmonically trapped A-type three-level atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Hong; Tang Pei

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the emission spectrum for a ∧-type three-level atom trapped in the node of a standing wave.We show that the atomic center-of-mass motion not only directly affects the peak number,peak position,and peak height in the atomic emission spectrum,but also influences the effects of the cavity field and the atomic initial state on atomic emission spectrum.

  16. Combined field ion and field electron emission microscopy and energy - resolved atom-probe spectroscopy of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, N.; Bozdech, G.; Melmed, A.J.

    1988-11-01

    Field electron emission patterns obtained under UHV conditions between 78 K and 200 K are spatially correlated with features observed by argon-FIM at surfaces prepared by field evaporation. Fowler-Nordheim plots of local and total i-V data taken at 78 K, i.e. 14 K below T/sub c/ display a straight-line behavior, at least up to total electron currents of 10 nA. Increasing the tip-temperature from 78 K to 150 K has no measurable effect on the local field electron emission current, which originates from the vicinity of a prominent facet identified as a region of enhanced emission. Above 150 K, an increase of the field electron emission current is measured, involving a hysteresis-like behavior as the temperature is decreased. Retarding-potential analysis of /sup 40/Ar/sup +/ reveals a shift to larger energy deficits with increasing argon pressure, ranging between 5 eV and 10 eV above the energy deficit measured for W. This result possibly indicates a considerable penetration of the applied electric field into the near surface layers under Ar-FIM conditions at 78 K.

  17. Probing Local Environments by Time-Resolved Stimulated Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved stimulated emission spectroscopy was employed to probe the local environment of DASPMI (4-(4-(dimethylaminostyryl-N-methyl-pyridinium iodide in binary solvents of different viscosity and in a sol-gel matrix. DASPMI is one of the molecules of choice to probe local environments, and the dependence of its fluorescence emission decay on viscosity has been previously used for this purpose in biological samples, solid matrices as well as in solution. The results presented in this paper show that time-resolved stimulated emission of DASPMI is a suitable means to probe the viscosity of local environments. Having the advantage of a higher time resolution, stimulated emission can provide information that is complementary to that obtained from fluorescence decay measurements, making it feasible to probe systems with lower viscosity.

  18. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T., E-mail: tomomi.fujita@riken.jp [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Shimoda, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan); Collaboration: OROCHI Collaboration

    2015-11-15

    A new laser spectroscopic method named “OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)” has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with {sup 84−87}Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  19. Studies in atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy-V The fluorescence characteristics and determination of antimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnall, R M; Thompson, K C; West, T S

    1967-10-01

    Atomic-fluorescence of antimony may be generated in an air-propane flame by nebulizing aqueous solutions of antimony salts whilst irradiating the flame by means of a microwave-excited electrode-less discharge tube operating at 30 W. The strongest fluorescence is exhibited by the (4)S(11 2 ) --> (4)P(1 3 ) 2311 A resonance line and weaker signals are observed at the 2068 and 2176 A resonance lines and at four intercombination lines, at 2598, 2671, 2770 and 2878 A. A process of thermally assisted direct-line fluorescence is postulated to account for the otherwise inexplicable intensity of the 2598 A line emission. Atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy at 2176 A permits the determination of antimony in the range 0.1-120 ppm with a detection limit of 0.05 ppm. With the same equipment and source, the range of measurement for atomic-absorption was 6-120 ppm and the detection limit was 1 ppm. No interferences were observed from 100-fold molar amounts of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, NH(4), Pb and Zn or from arsenate, chloride, nitrate, phosphate and sulphate. PMID:18960212

  20. One-atom detection using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new measuring technique which can detect a single atom of a given kind, even in the presence of 1019 or more atoms of another kind, with good space and time resolution, was utilized to study the density fluctuation of less than 100 cesium atoms in a small volume of space filled with inert gases. Repeated measurements of the absolute number of atoms in a defined volume at an arbitrary time were recorded for the first time in order to obtain a statistical distribution giving the fluctuation of the number of atoms around the mean value. Numerous other physics applications of the one-atom detector are briefly described

  1. Supplemental Report: Application of Emission Spectroscopy to Monitoring Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides supplemental information to an earlier report BNF-98-003-0199, ''Evaluation of Emission Spectroscopy for the On-Line Analysis of Technetium''. In this report data is included from real Hanford samples as well as for solutions spiked with technetium. This supplemental work confirms the ability of ICP-ES to monitor technetium as it breaks through an ion exchange process

  2. An Analysis of Noise on Optical Emission Spectroscopy Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Beibei; McLoone, Sean; RINGWOOD, John; MacGearailt, Niall

    2010-01-01

    Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) is a non-intrusive plasma diagnostic technique that can be used to measure the chemical changes in a plasma that is in- creasingly being considered for monitoring and control of plasma etch processes. In the practice of collecting OES data for plasma etching, it is inevitable that noise is included in the measurements. The existence of noise can destroy signals or at least make the identi¯cation and interpretation of signal patterns unreliabl...

  3. Infrared [Fe II] Emission Lines from Radiative Atomic Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Kim, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    [Fe II] emission lines are prominent in the infrared (IR), and they are important diagnostic tools for radiative atomic shocks. We investigate the emission characteristics of [Fe II] lines using a shock code developed by Raymond (1979) with updated atomic parameters. We first review general characteristics of IR [Fe II] emission lines from shocked gas, and derive [Fe II] line fluxes as a function of shock speed and ambient density. We have compiled the available IR [Fe II] line observations of interstellar shocks and compare them to the ratios predicted from our model. The sample includes both young and old supernova remnants in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud and several Herbig-Haro objects. We find that the observed ratios of IR [Fe II] lines generally fall on our grid of shock models, but the ratios of some mid-infrared lines, e.g., [Fe II] 35.35 um/[Fe II] 25.99 um, [Fe II] 5.340 um/[Fe II] 25.99 um, and [Fe II] 5.340 um/[Fe II] 17.94 um, are significantly offset from our model grid. We discuss ...

  4. Spatial Resolution of Combined Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy for Atomic Oxygen Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Makoto; Nakajima, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    For developments of thermal protection system, atomic oxygen plays important role. However, its measurement method has not been established because the pressure in front of TPS test materials is as high as a few kPa. Our group proposed combined wavelength modulation and integrated output spectroscopies based on the forbidden transition at OI 636 nm to measure the ground-state number densities. In this study, WM-ICOS system is developed and applied to a microwave oxygen plasma to evaluate measurable region. As a result, the estimated number density by ICOS could be measured as low as 1021 m21. For the condition, WM-ICOS was applied. The signal to noise ratio of the 2f signal was 40.4. Then, the sensitivity was improved about 26. This result corresponding to the measurement limit of the partial atomic oxygen pressure of 250 Pa. The sensitivity of WM-ICOS was found to enough to diagnose the shock layer in high enthalpy flows. However, the spatial resolution was as large as 8 mm. The size of the beam pattern depends on the cavity length, robust ness of the cavity and accuracy of the cavity alignment. In this presentation, the relationship among these parameters will be discussed.

  5. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy. (GHT)

  6. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy

  7. High-voltage spark atomic emission detector for gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkin, C. L.; Koeplin, S. M.; Crouch, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A dc-powered, double-gap, miniature nanosecond spark source for emission spectrochemical analysis of gas chromatographic effluents is described. The spark is formed between two thoriated tungsten electrodes by the discharge of a coaxial capacitor. The spark detector is coupled to the gas chromatograph by a heated transfer line. The gas chromatographic effluent is introduced into the heated spark chamber where atomization and excitation of the effluent occurs upon breakdown of the analytical gap. A microcomputer-controlled data acquisition system allows the implementation of time-resolution techniques to distinguish between the analyte emission and the background continuum produced by the spark discharge. Multiple sparks are computer averaged to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The application of the spark detector for element-selective detection of metals and nonmetals is reported.

  8. Electron emission from a two-dimensional crystal with atomic thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Xianlong Wei; Qing Chen; Lianmao Peng

    2013-01-01

    Electron emission from a two-dimensional (2D) crystal with atomic thickness is theoretically studied with all the features associated with the low dimensionality and the atomic thickness being well considered. It is shown that, the atomic thickness results in quantum confinement of electrons in the crystal along thickness direction, and consequently two different ways of electron emission from it without and with quantum confinement of electrons normal to emission boundary: edge emission and ...

  9. Advances with tungsten coil atomizers: Continuum source atomic absorption and emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two new tungsten coil spectrometers are described: a continuum source tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometer and a tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometer. Both devices use a 150 W tungsten coil extracted from a slide projector bulb. The power is provided by a computer-controlled, solid state, constant current 0-10 A supply. The heart of the optical system is a high-resolution spectrometer with a multi-channel detector. The continuum source system employs xenon or deuterium lamps, and is capable of multi-element analyses of complex samples like engine oil, urine, and polluted water. Spiked engine oil samples give mean percent recoveries of 98 ± 9, 104 ± 9, and 93 ± 0.8 for Al, V, and Ni, respectively. Copper, Zn, and Cd are determined in urine samples; while Cd, Co, Yb, and Sr are determined in water samples. Detection limits for Cd, Zn, Cu, Yb, Sr, and Co are: 8, 40, 1, 4, 1, and 4 μg l-1. The technique of tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry using a 150 W commercial projector bulb is reported for the first time. Calcium, Ba, and Sr are determined with detection limits of 0.01, 0.5, and 0.1 μg l-1. Relative standard deviations are lower than 10% in each case, and Sr is determined in two water standard reference materials

  10. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the RIS technique, a laser is tuned to a wavelength which will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or nonresonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms; and since detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples are given of one-atom detection, including that of the noble gases, in order to show complementarity with AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81Kr using RIS has interesting applications for solar neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective

  12. Eye-safe infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions from energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ei E.; Hömmerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton C.; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Samuels, Alan C.

    2016-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. Besides elemental emissions from conventional UV-Vis LIBS, molecular LIBS emission signatures of the target compounds were observed in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region in recent studies. Most current LIBS studies employ the fundamental Nd:YAG laser output at 1.064 μm, which has extremely low eye-damage threshold. In this work, comparative LWIR-LIBS emissions studies using traditional 1.064 μm pumping and eye-safe laser wavelength at 1.574 μm were performed on several energetic materials for applications in chemical, biological, and explosive (CBE) sensing. A Q-switched Nd: YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm and the 1.574 μm output of a pulsed Nd:YAG pumped Optical Parametric Oscillator were employed as the excitation sources. The investigated energetic materials were studied for the appearance of LWIR-LIBS emissions (4-12 μm) that are directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as partially dissociated and recombination molecular species. The observed molecular IR LIBS emission bands showed strong correlation with FTIR absorption spectra of the studied materials for 1.064 μm and 1.574 μm pump wavelengths.

  13. Atomic carbon in comet atmospheres. Origin and emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed study of neutral carbon emissions is made, to precise the excitation mechanism nature, to determine the production mechanisms and examine wether information on CO and CO2 molecule abundance could be deduced, or wether another source must be looked for. After an exhaustive study of excitation rates necessary for theoretical intensity calculation, a new effect has been discovered, and which acts on the atom excitation rates, via their distribution on the fundamental hyperfine levels. On the other hand, the strong dependency of the excitation rate ratio with heliocentric velocity and with the hypothesis which is made on the atom population initial distribution has been revealed. The carbon abundance in all the comets of the initial sample has been calculated, then compared to the water one revealing two groups of comets. Then an abundance criterium to remove the CO and CO2 molecules from the carbon potential-parents in the Bradfield comet has been used while CO is the best candicate for C(3P) and C(1D) atom production in the West, Kohoutek and Bennet comets (but to certain conditions). The important conclusion is that, while the relative abundance (C2/OH, CN/OH,...) of the minor carbon compounds were constant, the CO relative abundance varies from an object to the other, probably an effect due to repeated passage of some comets near the sun

  14. Atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy of individual electron trap states using force detected dynamic tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first atomic scale imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electron trap states in completely non-conducting surfaces by dynamic tunnelling force microscopy/spectroscopy. Single electrons are dynamically shuttled to/from individual states in thick films of hafnium silicate and silicon dioxide. The new method opens up surfaces that are inaccessible to the scanning tunnelling microscope for imaging and spectroscopy on an atomic scale.

  15. Spectroscopy of PTCDA attached to rare gas samples: clusters vs. bulk matrices. II. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Dvorak, M.; Müller, M; Knoblauch, T.; Bünermann, O.; Rydlo, A.; Minniberger, S.; Harbich, W.; Stienkemeier, F.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride) molecules and solid rare gas samples is studied by means of fluorescence emission spectroscopy. On the one hand, laser-excited PTCDA-doped large argon, neon and para-hydrogen clusters in comparison with PTCDA embedded in helium nanodroplets are spectroscopically characterized with respect to line broadening and shifting. A fast non-radiative relaxation is observed before a radiative decay in the electronic ground st...

  16. Fluorescence-excitation and Emission Spectroscopy on Single FMO Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhner, Alexander; Ashraf, Khuram; Cogdell, Richard J; Köhler, Jürgen

    2016-08-22

    In green-sulfur bacteria sunlight is absorbed by antenna structures termed chlorosomes, and transferred to the RC via the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex. FMO consists of three monomers arranged in C3 symmetry where each monomer accommodates eight Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules. It was the first pigment-protein complex for which the structure has been determined with high resolution and since then this complex has been the subject of numerous studies both experimentally and theoretically. Here we report about fluorescence-excitation spectroscopy as well as emission spectroscopy from individual FMO complexes at low temperatures. The individual FMO complexes are subjected to very fast spectral fluctuations smearing out any possible different information from the ensemble data that were recorded under the same experimental conditions. In other words, on the time scales that are experimentally accessible by single-molecule techniques, the FMO complex exhibits ergodic behaviour.

  17. The influence of magnetic fields on absorption and emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Heshou; Richter, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations play essential roles in astrophysics. They are crucial for determining important physical parameters, providing information about the composition of various objects in the universe, as well as depicting motions in the universe. However, spectroscopic studies often do not consider the influence of magnetic fields. In this paper, we explore the influence of magnetic fields on the spectroscopic observations arising from Ground State Alignment (GSA). Synthetic spectra are generated to show the measurable changes of the spectra due to GSA. The influences of atomic alignment on absorption from DLAs, emission from H\\,{\\sc ii} Regions, submillimeter fine-structure lines from star forming regions are presented as examples to illustrate the effect in diffuse gas. Furthermore, we demonstrate the influence of atomic alignment on physical parameters derived from spectral line ratios, such as the alpha-to-iron ratio([X/Fe]), interstellar temperature, and ionization rate. Results in our paper show...

  18. Optical Emission Spectroscopic Measurement of Hydroxyl Radicals in Air Discharge with Atomized Water%Optical Emission Spectroscopic Measurement of Hydroxyl Radicals in Air Discharge with Atomized Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙明; 陈维刚; 张颖

    2011-01-01

    Effects of discharge mode, voltage applied, size of the nozzle discharge electrode and flow rate of water on the generation of hydroxyl radical were investigated in air discharge with atomized water, by using optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Water was injected into the discharge region through the discharge nozzle electrode, and a large amount of fine water drops, formed and distributed in the discharge region, corona discharge was more effective to generate were observed. It was found that negative DC the hydroxyl radicals in comparison to positive DC corona discharge or negative pulsed discharge. A larger outer diameter of the nozzle electrode or a stronger electric field is beneficial for hydroxyl-radical generation. Moreover, there is a critical value in the flow rate of atomized water against the discharge voltage. Below this critical value, hydroxyl-radical generation increases with the increase in flow rate of the water, while above this value, it decreases. In addition, it is observed that OES from the discharge is mainly in the ultraviolet domain. The results are helpful in the study of the mechanism and application of plasma in pollution-control in either air or water.

  19. Emission Moessbauer spectroscopy of NiTi shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emission Moessbauer study on NiTi SMA (Shape Memory Alloy) is first reported. The 51.6 at% Ni-Ti alloy was provided by Shanghai Institute of steel and Iron Research. The emitter (also samples in this experiment) was produced by the nuclear reaction 58Ni(p,2p) 57Co in which a small amount of 58Ni was transformed to 57Co. The emitter Moessbauer spectra were measured after the sample was water quenched from 700 degree C for 30 min and aged at 500 degree C for 60 min and isochronal annealed in different temperature. Meantime the TEM observation and resistivity measure were also performed for the same material in the same heat treatment conditions. This work indicates that emission Moessbauer spectroscopy can be used to study the micro-mechanism of NiTi SMA

  20. Spectroscopy of PTCDA attached to rare gas samples: clusters vs. bulk matrices. II. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorak, M; Knoblauch, T; Bünermann, O; Rydlo, A; Minniberger, S; Harbich, W; Stienkemeier, F

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride) molecules and solid rare gas samples is studied by means of fluorescence emission spectroscopy. On the one hand, laser-excited PTCDA-doped large argon, neon and para-hydrogen clusters in comparison with PTCDA embedded in helium nanodroplets are spectroscopically characterized with respect to line broadening and shifting. A fast non-radiative relaxation is observed before a radiative decay in the electronic ground state takes place. On the other hand, fluorescence emission studies of PTCDA embedded in bulk neon and argon matrices results in much more complex spectral signatures characterized by a splitting of the different emission lines. These can be assigned to the appearance of site isomers of the surrounding matrix lattice structure.

  1. Isotopically selective counting of noble gas atoms, using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is being extended to develop a means for counting individual atoms of a selected isotope of a noble gas. In this method, lasers are used for RIS to obtain atomic species (Z) selectivity and a small quadrupole mass spectrometer provides isotopic (A) selectivity. A progress report on the objective of counting each atom of a particular isotope of a noble gas is given. (author)

  2. Isotopically selective counting of noble gas atoms, using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is being extended to develop a means for counting individual atoms of a selected isotope of a noble gas. In this method, lasers are used for RIS to obtain atomic species (Z) selectivity and a small quadrupole mass spectrometer provides isotopic (A) selectivity. A progress report on the objective of counting each atom of a particular isotope of a noble gas is given. 10 references, 4 figures

  3. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  4. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, Luis; O'Neil, Galen C.; Joe, Young I.; Alpert, Bradley K.; Damrauer, Niels H.; Doriese, William B.; Fatur, Steven M.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Jimenez, Ralph; Reintsema, Carl D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Silverman, Kevin L.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Tatsuno, Hideyuki; Ullom, Joel N.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond) time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3 keV ) spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe (2 ,2'-bipyridine)3]2 + and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  5. Precise atomic radiative lifetime via photoassociative spectroscopy of ultracold lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have obtained spectra of the high-lying vibrational levels of the 13Σ+g state of 6Li2 via photoassociation of ultracold 6Li atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap. The 13Σ+g state of the diatomic molecule correlates to a 2S1/2 state atom plus a 2P1/2 state atom. The long-range part of the molecular interaction potential for this state depends on the 2P atomic radiative lifetime. By calculating the energy eigenvalues of a model potential for the 13Σ+g state and fitting them to the experimentally measured vibrational levels, we have extracted a value for the 2P lifetime of 26.99±0.16 ns. The precision is currently limited by the accuracy of a region of the model potential provided by ab initio calculations

  6. Noise spectroscopy with large clouds of cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kashanian, Samir Vartabi; Guerin, William; Lintz, Michel; Fouché, Mathilde; Kaiser, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Noise measurement is a powerful tool to investigate many phenomena from laser characterization to quantum behavior of light. In this paper, we report on intensity noise measurements obtained when a laser beam is transmitted through a large cloud of cold atoms. While this measurement could possibly investigate complex processes such as the influence of atomic motion, one is first limited by the conversion of the intrinsic laser frequency noise to intensity noise via the atomic resonance. We show that a simple model, based on a mean-field approach, which corresponds to describing the atomic cloud by a dielectric susceptibility, is sufficient to understand the main features of this conversion observed in the experimental intensity noise spectrum.

  7. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Morrissey, Michael J; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining ground in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension on this work to molecules will be introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for particular applications.

  8. Ultrathin atomic vapor film transmission spectroscopy: analysis of Dicke narrowing structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Li; Yanpeng Zhang; Chenli Gan

    2005-01-01

    Transmission sub-Doppler spectroscopy with confined atomic vapor film between two dielectric walls is theoretically studied. Because of atoms flying from wall to wall, where they get de-excited, the atomfield interaction time is anisotropic so that the contribution of slow atoms is enhanced, a sub-Doppler transmission spectroscopy (Dicke narrowing effect) can be obtained when the thickness of the film is much small or comparable with the wavelength even at small angle oblique incidence. It is feasible to get a sub-Doppler structure in a new region (L <λ/4) in experiments.

  9. Modulation Transfer Spectroscopy of Ytterbium Atoms in a Hollow Cathode Lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the experimental study of modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp. The dependences of its linewidth, slope and magnitude on the various experimental parameters are measured and fitted by the well-known theoretical expressions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We have observed the Dicke narrowing effect by increasing the current of the hollow cathode lamp. It is also found that there are the optimal current and laser power to generate the better modulation transfer spectroscopy signal, which can be employed for locking the laser frequency to the atomic transition. (atomic and molecular physics)

  10. Single-atom electron energy loss spectroscopy of light elements

    OpenAIRE

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-01-01

    Light elements such as alkali metal (lithium, sodium) or halogen (fluorine, chlorine) are present in various substances and indeed play significant roles in our life. Although atomic behaviours of these elements are often a key to resolve chemical or biological activities, they are hardly visible in transmission electron microscope because of their smaller scattering power and higher knock-on probability. Here we propose a concept for detecting light atoms encaged in a nanospace by means of e...

  11. Noise spectroscopy with large clouds of cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Samir Vartabi; Eloy, Aurélien; Guerin, William; Lintz, Michel; Fouché, Mathilde; Kaiser, Robin

    2016-10-01

    Noise measurement is a powerful tool to investigate many phenomena from laser characterization to quantum behavior of light. In this paper, we report on intensity noise measurements obtained when a laser beam is transmitted through a large cloud of cold atoms. While this measurement could possibly be used to investigate complex processes such as the influence of atomic motion, one is first limited by the conversion of the intrinsic laser frequency noise to intensity noise via the atomic resonance. This conversion is studied here in detail. We show that, while experimental intensity noise spectra collapse onto the same curve at low Fourier frequencies, some differences appear at higher frequencies when the probe beam is detuned from the center of the resonance line. A simple model, based on a mean-field approach, which corresponds to describing the atomic cloud by a dielectric susceptibility, is sufficient to understand the main features. Using this model, the noise spectra allow extracting some quantitative information on the laser noise as well as on the atomic sample.

  12. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen and the Proton Size Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udem, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Precise determination of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference. A recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct. We hope to contribute to the resolution of this so called `proton size puzzle' by providing additional experimental input from the hydrogen side.

  13. Spectroscopy of cold rubidium Rydberg atoms for applications in quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Ryabtsev, I I; Tretyakov, D B; Entin, V M; Yakshina, E A

    2016-01-01

    Atoms in highly excited (Rydberg) states have a number of unique properties which make them attractive for applications in quantum information. These are large dipole moments, lifetimes and polarizabilities, as well as strong long-range interactions between Rydberg atoms. Experimental methods of laser cooling and precision spectroscopy enable the trapping and manipulation of single Rydberg atoms and applying them for practical implementation of quantum gates over qubits of a quantum computer based on single neutral atoms in optical traps. In this paper, we give a review of the experimental and theoretical work performed by the authors at the Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS and Novosibirsk State University on laser and microwave spectroscopy of cold Rb Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap and on their possible applications in quantum information. We also give a brief review of studies done by other groups in this area.

  14. Investigation of hydrogen atom addition to vinyl monomers by time resolved ESR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckert, D.; Mehler, K.

    1983-07-01

    By means of time resolved ESR spectroscopy in the microsecond time scale the H atom addition to different vinyl monomers was investigated. The H atoms produced by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions show a strong recombination CIDEP effect which also allows the recombination rate constant of H atoms to be determined. By analysis of ESR time profiles with the modified Bloch equations the relaxation times T/sub 1/, T/sub 2/, the polarization factors and the chemical rate constants with scavengers were obtained. Besides the H atom addition rate constants to different vinyl monomers the structure of the monomer radical was determined for acrylic acid.

  15. Study of NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} nanostructures in the Suzuki phase by optical spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejía-Uriarte, E.V., E-mail: elsi.mejia@ccadet.unam.mx [Laboratorio de Fotónica de Microondas, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-186, C.P. 04510, D.F. México (Mexico); Kolokoltsev, O. [Laboratorio de Fotónica de Microondas, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-186, C.P. 04510, D.F. México (Mexico); Navarrete Montesinos, M. [Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, D.F. México (Mexico); Camarillo, E.; Hernández A, J.; Murrieta S, H. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 20-364, C.P. 01000, D.F. México (Mexico)

    2015-04-15

    NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} nanostructures in the Suzuki phase have been studied by fluorescence (emission and excitation) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a function of temperature. The “as-grown” samples give rise to two broad emission bands that peak at 508 (green emission) and 610 nm (red emission). The excitation spectrum shows peaks at 227 nm and 232 nm for emission wavelengths at 508 nm and 610 nm, respectively. When the samples are heated continuously from room temperature up to 220 °C, the green emission (associated to the excitation peak at 227 nm) disappears at a temperature close to 120 °C, whilst only the red emission remains, which is characteristic of manganese ions. AFM images on the (0 0 1) surface (freshly cleaved) show several conformations of nanostructures, such as disks of 20–50 nm in diameter. Particularly, the images also reveal nanostructures with rectangular shape of ~280×160 nm{sup 2} and ~6 nm height; these are present only in samples with green emission associated to the Suzuki phase. Then, the evidence suggests that this topographic configuration might be related to the interaction with the first neighbors and the next neighbors, according to the configuration that has been suggested for the Suzuki phase. - Highlights: • NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} single crystals in the Suzuki phase contain rectangular nanostructures. • Double emission of manganese ions: green (508 nm) and red (610 nm) bands. • The excitation peak at 227 nm is attributed to rectangular nanostructures. • The green emission band associated to Suzuki phase is extinguished at 120 °C.

  16. X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms at SIDDHARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cargnelli M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The X-ray measurements of kaonic atoms play an important role for understanding the low-energy QCD in the strangeness sector. The SIDDHARTA experiment studied the X-ray transitions of 4 light kaonic atoms (H, D, 3He, and 4He using the DAFNE electron-positron collider at LNF (Italy. Most precise values of the shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s state were determined, which have been now used as fundamental information for the low-energy K−p interaction in theoretical studies. An upper limit of the X-ray yield of kaonic deuterium was derived, important for future K−d experiments. The shifts and widths of the kaonic 3He and 4He 2p states were obtained, confirming the end of the “kaonic helium puzzle”. In this contribution also the plans for new experiments of kaonic deuterium are being presented.

  17. Nuclear spectroscopy with Geant4: Proton and neutron emission & radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, L. G.; Rudolph, D.

    2016-07-01

    With the aid of a novel combination of existing equipment - JYFLTRAP and the TASISpec decay station - it is possible to perform very clean quantum-state selective, high-resolution particle-γ decay spectroscopy. We intend to study the determination of the branching ratio of the ℓ = 9 proton emission from the Iπ = 19/2-, 3174-keV isomer in the N = Z - 1 nucleus 53Co. The study aims to initiate a series of similar experiments along the proton dripline, thereby providing unique insights into "open quantum systems". The technique has been pioneered in case studies using SHIPTRAP and TASISpec at GSI. Newly available radioactive decay modes in Geant4 simulations are going to corroborate the anticipated experimental results.

  18. A Pragmatic Smoothing Method for Improving the Quality of the Results in Atomic Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bennun, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    A new smoothing method for the improvement on the identification and quantification of spectral functions based on the previous knowledge of the signals that are expected to be quantified, is presented. These signals are used as weighted coefficients in the smoothing algorithm. This smoothing method was conceived to be applied in atomic and nuclear spectroscopies preferably to these techniques where net counts are proportional to acquisition time, such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and other X-ray fluorescence spectroscopic methods, etc. This algorithm, when properly applied, does not distort the form nor the intensity of the signal, so it is well suited for all kind of spectroscopic techniques. This method is extremely effective at reducing high-frequency noise in the signal much more efficient than a single rectangular smooth of the same width. As all of smoothing techniques, the proposed method improves the precision of the results, but in this case we found also a systematic improvement on the...

  19. Consistency of atomic data for the interpretation of beam emission spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delabie, E; Von Hellermann, M G [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Brix, M; Giroud, C; Surrey, E; Zastrow, K D [EURATOM/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Jaspers, R J E [Eindhoven University of Technology, Postbus 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Marchuk, O [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, 52425, Juelich (Germany); O' Mullane, M G [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Ralchenko, Yu, E-mail: e.delabie@fz-juelich.d [Atomic Physics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8422 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Several collisional-radiative (CR) models (Anderson et al 2000 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 42 781-806, Hutchinson 2002 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44 71-82, Marchuk et al 2008 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79 10F532) have been developed to calculate the attenuation and the population of excited states of hydrogen or deuterium beams injected into tokamak plasmas. The datasets generated by these CR models are needed for the modelling of beam ion deposition and (excited) beam densities in current experiments, and the reliability of these data will be crucial to obtain helium ash densities on ITER combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy. Good agreement between the different CR models for the neutral beam (NB) is found, if corrections to the fundamental cross sections are taken into account. First the H{sub {alpha}} and H{sub {beta}} beam emission spectra from JET are compared with the expected intensities. Second, the line ratios within the Stark multiplet are compared with the predictions of a sublevel resolved model. The measured intensity of the full multiplet is {approx}30% lower than expected on the basis of beam attenuation codes and the updated beam emission rates, but apart from the atomic data this could also be due to the characterization of the NB path and line of sight integration and the absolute calibration of the optics. The modelled n = 3 to n = 4 population agrees very well with the ratio of the measured H{sub {alpha}} to H{sub {beta}} beam emission intensities. Good agreement is found as well between the NB power fractions measured with beam emission in plasma and on the JET Neutral Beam Test Bed. The Stark line ratios and {sigma}/{pi} intensity ratio deviate from a statistical distribution, in agreement with the CR model in parabolic states from Marchuk et al (2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 011002).

  20. Laser-induced atomic fragment fluorescence spectroscopy: a facile technique for molecular spectroscopy of spin-forbidden states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Chen, Yang; Keil, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Spectra of spin-forbidden and spin-allowed transitions in the mixed b (3)Pi(u) approximately A (1)Sigma(u)(+) state of Na(2) are measured separately by two-photon excitation using a single tunable dye laser. The two-photon excitation produces Na(*)(3p) by photodissociation, which is easily and sensitively detected by atomic fluorescence. At low laser power, only the A (1)Sigma(u)(+) state is excited, completely free of triplet excitation. At high laser power, photodissociation via the intermediate b (3)Pi(u) triplet state becomes much more likely, effectively "switching" the observations from singlet spectroscopy to triplet spectroscopy with only minor apparatus changes. This technique of perturbation-assisted laser-induced atomic fragment fluorescence may therefore be especially useful as a general vehicle for investigating perturbation-related physics pertinent to the spin-forbidden states, as well as for studying allowed and forbidden states of other molecules.

  1. Modulation Transfer Spectroscopy of Ytterbium Atoms in a Hollow Cathode Lamp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wen-Li; XU Xin-Ye

    2011-01-01

    We present the experimental study of modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp.The dependences of its linewidth, slope and magnitude on the various experimental parameters are measured and fitted by the well-known theoretical expressions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We have observed the Dicke narrowing effect by increasing the current of the hollow cathode lamp. It is also found that there are the optimal current and laser power to generate the better modulation transfer spectroscopy signal, which can be employed for locking the laser frequency to the atomic transition.

  2. Spontaneous Emission from a Driven Atom Embedded in a Photonic Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Shuang-Yuan; YANG Ya-Ping; CHENG Hong; ZHU Shi-Yao; WU Xiang

    2000-01-01

    The properties of the spontaneous emission from a three-level atom with an external driving field in a photonic crystal are studied. The population in the two upper levels displays complete decay or oscillatory behavior,depending on the initial atomic state and the relative position of the two upper levels from the forbidden gap.The intensity and the phase of the external field can also affect spontaneous emission from the atom.

  3. Emission Line Imaging and Spectroscopy of Distant Galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabl, Johannes Florian

    for the gas surrounding a galaxy. Around some objects the extended Ly αemission is so strong that it can be detected for individual objects. In this thesis extremely deep VLT/XSHOOTER rest-frame far-UV spectroscopy is presented for Himiko, a gigantic Ly α emitter at redshift z = 6.6 or a time when...... the universe was only 6 per cent of its present age. We constrained with our work, which of the possible Ly α producing mechanisms is responsible for the majority of Himiko’s Ly α emission. We conclude that normal Pop II star formation is the most likely explanation. Himiko is a rare object. Yet, recent...... applied a novel NB measurement method to a sample of UltraVISTA NB118 H α emitters, and demonstrate that this technique allows to recover more accurate fluxes. Additionally, the method allows to determine more accurate redshifts. Contemporary NB surveys have a strong focus on searches for Ly α emitters...

  4. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb

    OpenAIRE

    Fortier, T. M.; Coq, Y Le; Stalnaker, J. E.; Ortega, D.; Diddams, S. A.; Oates, C. W.; Hollberg, L.

    2006-01-01

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrat...

  5. Magnetic field modulation spectroscopy of rubidium atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Pradhan; R Behera; A K Das

    2012-04-01

    The magnetically modulated saturation absorption profile is studied for a wide range of external DC magnetic field. The salient features of Doppler-free signal generated by laser frequency modulation and atomic energy level modulation are compared. The DC offset of the signal profile is found to be unstable as the external DC magnetic field is changed. The technical difficulty of tuning laser frequency under locked condition over a large frequency span is discussed along with possible solutions.

  6. Determination of vanadium in food and traditional Chinese medicine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Various experimental conditions were described for the vanadium determination by graphite furnace atomic ab-sorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). The experiments showed that when atomization took place under the conditions where thecombination of a pyrolytic coating graphite tube and fast raising temperature were used and the temperature was stable, thesignal peak shapes could be improved, the sensitivity was enhanced, and the memory effect was removed. The vanadium infood and traditional Chinese medicinal herbs can be accurately determined using the standard curve method.

  7. Three-dimensional modeling of beam emission spectroscopy measurements in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Guszejnov, D; Pusztai, I; Refy, D; Zoletnik, S; Lampert, M; Nam, Y U; 10.1063/1.4764564

    2013-01-01

    One of the main diagnostic tools for measuring electron density profiles and the characteristics of long wavelength turbulent wave structures in fusion plasmas is Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES). The increasing number of BES systems necessitated an accurate and comprehensive simulation of BES diagnostics, which in turn motivated the development of the RENATE simulation code that is the topic of this paper. RENATE is a modular, fully three-dimensional code incorporating all key features of BES systems from the atomic physics to the observation, including an advanced modeling of the optics. Thus RENATE can be used both in the interpretation of measured signals and the development of new BES systems. The most important components of the code have been successfully benchmarked against other simulation codes. The primary results have been validated against experimental data from the KSTAR tokamak.

  8. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb

    CERN Document Server

    Fortier, T M; Stalnaker, J E; Ortega, D; Diddams, S A; Oates, C W; Hollberg, L

    2006-01-01

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrates the potential for high-resolution absolute-frequency spectroscopy over the entire spectrum of the frequency comb output using a single high-finesse optical reference cavity.

  9. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, T M; Coq, Y Le; Stalnaker, J E; Ortega, D; Diddams, S A; Oates, C W; Hollberg, L

    2006-10-20

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrates the potential for high-resolution absolute-frequency spectroscopy over the entire spectrum of the frequency comb output using a single high-finesse optical reference cavity. PMID:17155398

  10. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Havener, C. C.; Mattolat, C.; Vane, C. R.; Wendt, K.

    2013-12-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  11. Ionization potential of neutral atomic plutonium determined by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionization potential of the neutral plutonium atom, Pu i, has been determined by two- and three-step resonance photoionization observation of the threshold of ionization and of the Rydberg series. The Rydberg series were observed by field ionization as series that converge to the first ionization limit and as autoionizing series the converge to the second and to several higher convergence limits. The threshold and Rydberg series were obtained through a number of two- and three-step pathways. The photoionization threshold value for the 239Pu i ionization potential is 48 582(30) cm-1, and the more accurate value from the Rydberg series is 48 604(1) cm-1 or 6.0262(1) eV

  12. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm−1 for the ionization potential of iron. (paper)

  13. Resonant three-Photon Ionization Spectroscopy of Atomic Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuan [ORNL; Gottwald, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Havener, Charles C [ORNL; Mattolat, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

    2013-01-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti:Sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63737.686 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  14. An atomic hydrogen beam to test ASACUSA’s apparatus for antihydrogen spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diermaier, M., E-mail: martin.diermaier@oeaw.ac.at; Caradonna, P.; Kolbinger, B. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics (Austria); Malbrunot, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Massiczek, O.; Sauerzopf, C.; Simon, M. C.; Wolf, M.; Zmeskal, J.; Widmann, E. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    The ASACUSA collaboration aims to measure the ground state hyperfine splitting (GS-HFS) of antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart to atomic hydrogen. Comparisons of the corresponding transitions in those two systems will provide sensitive tests of the CPT symmetry, the combination of the three discrete symmetries charge conjugation, parity, and time reversal. For offline tests of the GS-HFS spectroscopy apparatus we constructed a source of cold polarised atomic hydrogen. In these proceedings we report the successful observation of the hyperfine structure transitions of atomic hydrogen with our apparatus in the earth’s magnetic field.

  15. Development of atomic spectroscopy methods in geological institutes of Faculty of Natural Sciences Comenius University and Slovak Academy of Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of atomic spectrochemistry methods in Geological Institute of Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University (GI FNS CU) is connected with its establishment in 1957. Its instrumental equipment and location resulted from the already existing Laboratory in the Chair for Mineralogy and Crystallography of FNS CU. In Geological Institute of Slovak Academy of Science (GI SAS) the development of atomic spectroscopy methods started later, only since 1963, when the Member of Academy, Prof. RNDr. B. Cambel, DrSc. became its director. In both institutes the methods of atomic emission spectrography were used as first. A new quality in the development started since 1969 when the Institutes moved to common buildings in Petrzalka (Bratislava), the first atomic absorption spectrometers were acquired and the Institutes were 'strengthened' by coming of Prof. Ing. E. Plsko, DrSc. In the following years the Institutes started to collaborate with some other organisations which were equipped with new facilities, e.g. in 1975 with X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, electron microprobe and in 1985 with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. This enabled to improve essentially the quality of research activities of both institutes in the chemical characterisation of geological materials, as well as in pedagogical work (students practice, diploma works and dissertations). In the present time characterized by new economic conditions a reduction of GI SAS laboratory activities has been realised. The laboratories of the GI FNS CU have, thanks to their director Ing. V. Stresko, PhD. shown also hence-forward a rich research, pedagogical and society activities what can be documented by numerous publications, citations, obtained awards, representations in professional societies and commissions, local and foreign advisory boards, accreditation boards etc. (author)

  16. Circuit Board Analysis for Lead by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in a Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhammer, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    A circuit board analysis of the atomic absorption spectroscopy, which is used to measure lead content in a course for nonscience majors, is being presented. The experiment can also be used to explain the potential environmental hazards of unsafe disposal of various used electronic equipments.

  17. Continuation of Atomic Spectroscopy on Alkali Isotopes at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Laser optical measurements on Rb, Cs and Fr have already been performed at ISOLDE in 1978-79. The hyperfine structure and isotope shift of |7|6|-|9|8Rb, |1|1|8|-|1|4|5Cs, |2|0|8|-|2|1|3Fr and 14 of their isomers have been studied. Among the wealth of information which has been obtained, the most important are the first observation of an optical transition of the element Fr, the evidence of the onset of nuclear deformation at N~=~60 for Rb isotopes and the shape isomerism isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ From both the atomic and nuclear physics point of view, new studies seem very promising: \\item - the search for new optical transitions in Fr; the shell effect in the rms charge radius at N~=~126 for Fr isotopes \\item - the study of a possible onset of deformation for Cs isotopes beyond |1|4|5Cs \\item - the study of a region of static deformation in neutron-deficient Rb isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ \\end{enumerate} A new apparatus has been built. The principle remains the same as used in our earlier experiments. The improvements concern ess...

  18. European Group for Atomic Spectroscopy. Summaries of contributions, eleventh annual conference, Paris-Orsay, July 10-13, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    Summaries are presented of talks given at the eleventh conference of the European group for atomic spectroscopy. Topics covered include: lifetimes; collisions; line shape; hyperfine structure; isotope shifts; saturation spectroscopy; Hanle effect; Rydberg levels; quantum beats; helium and helium-like atoms; metrology; and molecules. (GHT)

  19. Two-channel emission model for collective quantum jumps in Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayayan, Lyndon; Clemens, James

    2016-05-01

    We consider a system of driven, damped Rydberg atoms with dipole-dipole energy shifts which can give rise to a Rydberg blockade when the atoms are driven on resonance and collective quantum jumps when the atoms are driven off resonance. For the damping we consider a two-channel emission model with competition between fully independent and fully collective spontaneous emission. For independent emission a quasiclassical model predicts a bistable steady state and quantum fluctuations drive collective jumps between the two bistable branches. We show that the collective emission is enhanced, relative to the independent emission, which shifts the total effective spontaneous emission rate and impacts the presence or absence of bistability predicted by the quasiclassical model.

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy in the nanosecond range for matrix-isolated Cu atoms and dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggenhauser, H.; Kolb, D. M.; Rotermund, H. H.; Schrittenlacher, W.; Schroeder, W.

    1985-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation in the single-bunch mode was employed to study time-resolved emission from Cu atoms and dimers isolated in a Ne matrix. The decay time of the matrix-related emission at 3.5 eV for Cu in Ne after excitation of the 4s → 4p resonance transition was determined as 6.9±0.3 ns, while excitation into higher-lying 3d → 4p transitions resulted in a much slower decay of the 3.5 eV emission. From analysis of rise and decay times, a detailed diagram for energy dissipation in matrix-isolated Cu atoms has been derived. The B → X (Σ u → Σ g) emission of Cu 2 in Ne has a first-order decay time of about 10 ns.

  1. Optical emission spectroscopy of argon and hydrogen-containing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) on neutral argon is applied to investigate argon, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas. The spectra are analyzed using an extensive collisional-radiative model (CRM), from which the electron density and the electron temperature (or mean energy) can be calculated. The CRM also yields insight into the importance of different excited species and kinetic processes. The OES measurements are performed on pure argon plasmas at intermediate pressure. Besides, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas are investigated using argon as a trace gas. Especially for the gas mixture discharges, CRMs for low and high pressure differ substantially. The commonly used line-ratio technique is found to lose its sensitivity for gas mixture discharges at higher pressure. A solution using absolutely calibrated line intensities is proposed. The effect of radiation trapping and the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the results are discussed in detail, as they have been found to significantly influence the results. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  2. Optical emission spectroscopy study on deposition process of microcrystalline silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Zhi-Meng; Lei Qing-Song; Geng Xin-Hua; Zhao Ying; Sun Jian; Xi Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports that the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is used to monitor the plasma during the deposition process of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon films in a very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system. The OES intensities (SiH*, H*α and H*β) are investigated by varying the deposition parameters. The result shows that the discharge power, silane concentrations and substrate temperature affect the OES intensities. When the discharge power at silane concentration of 4% increases, the OES intensities increase first and then are constant, the intensities increase with the discharge power monotonously at silane concentration of 6%. The SiH* intensity increases with silane concentration, while the intensities of H*α and H*β increase first and then decrease. When the substrate temperature increases, the SiH* intensity decreases and the intensities of H*α and H*β are constant. The correlation between the intensity ratio of IH*α/ISiH* and the crystalline volume fraction (Xc) of films is confirmed.

  3. Development of atomic spectroscopy technologies - Hyperfine structure of 2 period atoms using optogalvanic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Nam Ic [Hankuk University of foreign studies, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The source of anomalous broad linewidth of 3{sup 3}P{sub 1},{sub 2},{sub 3}-3{sup 3}D{sub 2},{sub 3},4(3s') transition was explained. The broad optogalvanic spectrum was consisted of two gaussian peaks of different linewidths, and they are separated by 250 MHz. The Narrow peak, which has linewidth of room temperature, is from oxygen atoms already separated, and the shifted broad peak, which has linewidth corresponding to a temperature of 9000 K, is from weakly bound molecular ions. Obtained hyperfine spectrum of fluorine atom at the expected frequency, was too weak to analyze hyperfine structure constants. Microwave discharge might be necessary for higher density of excited state. 16 refs., 11 figs. (Author)

  4. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption pro

  5. An electron impact emission spectroscopy flux sensor for monitoring deposition rate at high background gas pressure with improved accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron impact emission spectroscopy (EIES) has been proven to be a critical tool for film composition control during codeposition processes for the fabrication of multicomponent thin film materials including the high-efficiency copper-indium-gallium-diselenide photovoltaic cells. This technique is highly specific to atomic species because the emission spectrum of each element is unique, and the typical width of atomic emission lines is very narrow. Noninterfering emission lines can generally be allocated to different atomic species. However, the electron impact emission spectra of many molecular species are often broadband in nature. When the optical emission from an EIES sensor is measured by using a wavelength selection device with a modest resolution, such as an optical filter or monochromator, the emissions from common residual gases may interfere with that from the vapor flux and cause erroneous flux measurement. The interference is most pronounced when measuring low flux density with the presence of gases such as in reactive deposition processes. This problem is solved by using a novel EIES sensor that has two electron impact excitation sources in separate compartments but with one common port for optical output. The vapor flux is allowed to pass through one compartment only. Using a tristate excitation scheme and appropriate signal processing technique, the interfering signals from residual gases can be completely eliminated from the output signal of the EIES monitor for process control. Data obtained from Cu and Ga evaporations with the presence of common residual gases such as CO2 and H2O are shown to demonstrate the improvement in sensor performance. The new EIES sensor is capable of eliminating the effect of interfering residual gases with pressure as high as in the upper 10-5 Torr range

  6. Ultrafast atomic process in X-ray emission by using inner-shell ionization method for sodium and carbon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-07-01

    An ultrafast inner-shell ionization process with X-ray emission stimulated by high-intensity short-pulse X-ray is studied. Carbon and sodium atoms are treated as target matter. It is shown that atomic processes of the target determine the necessary X-ray intensity for X-ray laser emission as well as the features of X-ray laser such as wavelength and duration time. The intensity also depends on the density of initial atoms. Furthermore, we show that as the intensity of X-ray source becomes high, the multi-inner-shell ionization predominates, leading to the formation of hollow atoms. As the density of hollow atoms is increased by the pumping X-ray power, the emission of X-rays is not only of significance for high brightness X-ray measurement but also is good for X-ray lasing. New classes of experiments of pump X-ray probe and X-ray laser are suggested. (author)

  7. Space-resolved characterization of high frequency atmospheric-pressure plasma in nitrogen applying optical emission spectroscopy and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekaran, Priyadarshini; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Averaged plasma parameters such as electron distribution function and electron density are determined by characterization of high frequency (2.4 GHz) nitrogen-plasma using both experimental methods, namely optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and microphotography, and numerical simulation. Both direct and stepwise electron-impact excitation of nitrogen emissions are considered. The determination of space-resolved electron distribution function, electron density, rate constant for electron-impact dissociation of nitrogen molecule and the production of nitrogen atoms, applying the same methods, is discussed. Spatial distribution of intensities of neutral nitrogen molecule and nitrogen molecular ion from the microplasma is imaged by a CCD camera. The CCD images are calibrated using the corresponding emissions measured by absolutely-calibrated OES, and are then subjected to inverse Abel transformation to determine space-resolved intensities and other parameters. The space-resolved parameters are compared, respecti...

  8. Characterization of RF He-N2/Ar mixture plasma via Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younus, Maria; Rehman, N. U.; Shafiq, M.; Hussain, S. S.; Zakaullah, M.; Zaka-ul-Islam, M.

    2016-08-01

    A Magnetic Pole Enhanced inductively coupled RF H e - N 2 / A r plasma is characterized using a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. The effect of helium mixing on electron density ( n e ) and temperature ( T e ) , electron energy probability functions (EEPFs), [ N ] atomic density, and N 2 dissociation is investigated. A Langmuir probe and a zero slope method based on trace rare gas-optical emission spectroscopy (TRG-OES) are employed to measure the electron temperature. It is noted that the electron temperature shows an increasing trend for both methods. However, the temperature measured by a zero slope method T e ( Z . S ) approaches the temperature measured by a Langmuir probe; T e ( L . P ) at 56% and above helium concentration in the discharge. "Advance actinometry" is employed to monitor the variation in [ N ] atomic density with helium concentration and gas pressure. It is noted that [ N ] atomic density increases at 56% and above helium in the discharge, which is consistent with the trend of electron temperature and EEPFs. A drastic enhancement in N 2 dissociation fraction D 1 determined by "advance actinometry" is noted at 56% and above helium concentration in the mixture due to modifications in different population and depopulation mechanisms. However, it is also noted that the dissociation fraction D 2 determined by intensity ratio method increases linearly with helium addition.

  9. Contribution of nitrogen atoms and ions to the luminescence emission during femotosecond filamentation in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Yu; Li, Shu-Chang; Sui, Lai-Zhi; Jiang, Yuan-Fei; Chen, An-Min; Jin, Ming-Xing

    2016-01-01

    During femtosecond filamentation in air, nitrogen molecules and corresponding molecular ions undergo dissociation due to the high intensity of laser pulses, generating nitrogen atoms and atomic ions. The generated atoms and atomic ions emit luminescence in the UV range, which superposes on those emissions for the neutral and ionic nitrogen molecules. Here we report on a significant difference between the emission behavior of the 391-nm line and the other spectral lines under different pump laser polarizations. We attribute this difference to the contribution of the atomic ions to the luminescence emission around 391 nm. The difference becomes more evident in tightly focusing cases, providing an indirect but effective evidence for the dissociation of nitrogen molecular ions.

  10. Asphaltene Erosion Process in Air Plasma: Emission Spectroscopy and Surface Analysis for Air-Plasma Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. MARTINEZ; O. FLORES; J. C. POVEDA; B. CAMPILLO

    2012-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was applied for plasma characterization during the erosion of asphaltene substrates. An amount of 100 mg of asphaltene was carefully applied to an electrode and exposed to air-plasma glow discharge at a pressure of 1.0 Torr. The plasma was generated in a stainless steel discharge chamber by an ac generator at a frequency of 60 Hz, output power of 50 W and a gas flow rate of 1.8 L/min. The electron temperature and ion density were estimated to be 2.15±0.11 eV and (1.24±0.05)× 10^16 m^-3, respectively, using a double Langmuir probe. OES was employed to observe the emission from the asphaltene exposed to air plasma. Both molecular band emission from N2, N2+, OH, CH, NH, O2 as well as CN, and atomic light emission from V and Hγ were observed and used to monitor the evolution of asphaltene erosion. The asphaltene erosion was analyzed with the aid of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) detector. The EDX analysis showed that the time evolution of elements C, O, S and V were similar and the chemical composition of the exposed asphaltenes remained constant. Particle size evolution was measured, showing a maximum size of 2307 μm after 60 min. This behavior is most likely related to particle agglomeration as a function of time.

  11. Nitrogen line spectroscopy of O-stars -- I. Nitrogen III emission line formation revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Jorge G Rivero; Najarro, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    This is the first paper in a series dealing with optical Nitrogen spectroscopy of O-type stars, aiming at the analysis of Nitrogen abundances. We implemented a new Nitrogen model atom into the NLTE atmosphere/spectrum synthesis code FASTWIND, and compare the resulting optical NIII lines at 4634/40/42 A with other predictions, mostly from Mihalas & Hummer (1973, ApJ 179, 827,`MH'), and from the alternative code CMFGEN. Using similar model atmospheres as MH (not blanketed and wind-free), we are able to reproduce their results, in particular the triplet emission lines. According to MH, these should be strongly related to dielectronic recombination (DR) and the drain by certain two-electron transitions. However, using realistic, fully line-blanketed atmospheres at solar abundances, the key role of DR controlling these emission features is superseded -- for O-star conditions -- by the strength of the stellar wind and metallicity. In the case of wind-free models, the resulting lower ionizing EUV-fluxes severely...

  12. Methane Oxidation to Methanol without CO2 Emission: Catalysis by Atomic Negative Ions

    OpenAIRE

    Tesfamichael, Aron; Suggs, Kelvin; Felfli, Zineb; Msezane, Alfred Z

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic activities of the atomic Y-, Ru-, At-, In-, Pd-, Ag-, Pt-, and Os- ions have been investigated theoretically using the atomic Au- ion as the benchmark for the selective partial oxidation of methane to methanol without CO2 emission. Dispersion-corrected density-functional theory has been used for the investigation. From the energy barrier calculations and the thermodynamics of the reactions, we conclude that the catalytic effect of the atomic Ag-, At-, Ru-, and Os- ions is higher...

  13. Photoassociation spectroscopy of cold alkaline earth atoms near the intercombination line

    OpenAIRE

    Ciurylo, R.; Tiesinga, E.; Kotochigova, S.; P.S. Julienne

    2004-01-01

    The properties of photoassociation (PA) spectra near the intercombination line (the weak transition between $^{1}S_{0}$ and $^{3}P_{1}$ states) of group II atoms are theoretically investigated. As an example we have carried out a calculation for Calcium atoms colliding at ultra low temperatures of 1 mK, 1 $\\mu$K, and 1 nK. Unlike in most current photoassociation spectroscopy the Doppler effect can significantly affect the shape of the investigated lines. Spectra are obtained using Ca--Ca and ...

  14. [Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-ming; Zhu, Feng-rong; Zhang, Zi-bin; Ren, Xiang-jun; Deng, Hu; Zhai, Li-hua; Zhang, Li-xing

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the investigation of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atoms by three-step three-color resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS). Twenty-seven odd-parity highly excited levels, whose transition probability is high, were used in this research. One hundred and forty-one autoionization states were found by these channels with the third-step laser scanning in the wavelength range of 634-670 nm. The ionization probabilities of different channels, which had higher cross sections, were compared. On the basis of this, eight optimal photoionization schemes of cerium atom have been given. PMID:15828309

  15. Atomic and molecular photoelectron and Auger-electron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron spectroscopy, combined with synchrotron radiation, was used to measure the angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons from atoms and molecules as functions of photon energy. The branching ratios and partial cross sections were also measured in certain cases. By comparison with theoretical calculations, the experimental results are interpreted in terms of the characteristic electronic structure and ionization dynamics of the atomic or molecular sample. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of the ejected electrons. The double-angle-TOF method for the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions is discussed. This technique offers the advantages of increased electron collection efficiency and the elimination of certain systematic errors. An electron spectroscopy study of inner-shell photoexcitation and ionization of Xe, photoelectron angular distributions from H2 and D2, and photoionization cross sections and photoelectron asymmetries of the valence orbitals of NO are reported

  16. Visible Light Emission from Atomic Scale Patterns Fabricated by the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Stokbro, Kurt;

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) induced light emission from artificial atomic scale structures comprising silicon dangling bonds on hydrogen-terminated Si(001) surfaces has been mapped spatially and analyzed spectroscopically in the visible spectral range. The light emission is based on a novel...

  17. Electron and X-ray emission in collisions of multiply charged ions and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents experimental results of electron and X-ray emission following slow collisions of multiply charged ions and atoms. The aim of the investigation was to study the mechanisms which are responsible for the emission. (G.T.H.)

  18. Bayesian modelling of the emission spectrum of the Joint European Torus Lithium Beam Emission Spectroscopy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J; Brix, M; Ghim, Y-C

    2016-02-01

    A Bayesian model of the emission spectrum of the JET lithium beam has been developed to infer the intensity of the Li I (2p-2s) line radiation and associated uncertainties. The detected spectrum for each channel of the lithium beam emission spectroscopy system is here modelled by a single Li line modified by an instrumental function, Bremsstrahlung background, instrumental offset, and interference filter curve. Both the instrumental function and the interference filter curve are modelled with non-parametric Gaussian processes. All free parameters of the model, the intensities of the Li line, Bremsstrahlung background, and instrumental offset, are inferred using Bayesian probability theory with a Gaussian likelihood for photon statistics and electronic background noise. The prior distributions of the free parameters are chosen as Gaussians. Given these assumptions, the intensity of the Li line and corresponding uncertainties are analytically available using a Bayesian linear inversion technique. The proposed approach makes it possible to extract the intensity of Li line without doing a separate background subtraction through modulation of the Li beam. PMID:26931843

  19. Atomic spatial coherence with spontaneous emission in a strong coupling cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Zhen; Zhou, Xiaoji; Chen, Xuzong

    2010-01-01

    The role of spontaneous emission in the interaction between a two-level atom and a pumped micro-cavity in the strong coupling regime is discussed in this paper. Especially, using a quantum Monte-Carlo simulation, we investigate atomic spatial coherence. It is found that atomic spontaneous emission destroys the coherence between neighboring lattice sites, while the cavity decay does not. Furthermore, our computation of the spatial coherence function shows that the in-site locality is little affected by the cavity decay, but greatly depends on the cavity pump amplitude.

  20. Transmittance, Reflectance, and Emission Spectroscopy of Meteorites from the UV to the IR Spectral Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Koulen, J. M.; Ferrari, S.; Martellato, E.

    2016-08-01

    Transmittance, reflectance, and emissivity Spectra of six meteorites have been collected at the Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory (PSL) of DLR in Berlin in the whole spectral range from the UV to the IR.

  1. Workshop on Thermal Emission Spectroscopy and Analysis of Dust, Disk, and Regoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Ann L. (Editor); Lynch, David K. (Editor); Sitko, Michael (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the workshop on Thermal Emission Spectroscopy and analysis of Dust, Disks and Regoliths, held April 28-30, 1999, in Houston Texas.

  2. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM MECHANICALLY VENTILATED POULTRY HOUSES USING MULTIPATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia emissions from mechanically ventilated poultry operations are an important environmental concern. Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy has emerged as a robust real-time method for gas phase measurement of ammonia concentrations in agricultural settings. ...

  3. Athermalization in atomic force microscope based force spectroscopy using matched microstructure coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Torun, H.; Finkler, O.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a method for athermalization in atomic force microscope (AFM) based force spectroscopy applications using microstructures that thermomechanically match the AFM probes. The method uses a setup where the AFM probe is coupled with the matched structure and the displacements of both structures are read out simultaneously. The matched structure displaces with the AFM probe as temperature changes, thus the force applied to the sample can be kept constant without the need for a ...

  4. Mass scaling and non-adiabatic effects in photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold strontium atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Borkowski, Mateusz; Morzyński, Piotr; Ciuryło, Roman; Julienne, Paul S.; Yan, Mi; DeSalvo, Brian J.; Killian, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    We report photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold $^{86}$Sr atoms near the intercombination line and provide theoretical models to describe the obtained bound state energies. We show that using only the molecular states correlating with the $^1S_0$$+$$^3P_1$ asymptote is insufficient to provide a mass scaled theoretical model that would reproduce the bound state energies for all isotopes investigated to date: $^{84}$Sr, $^{86}$Sr and $^{88}$Sr. We attribute that to the recently discovered ...

  5. Transient Emission of Three-Level Atoms in a Photonic Crystal with a Pseudogap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xing-Sheng; CHEN Hong-Da

    2006-01-01

    @@ We study the transient behaviour of an external field induced transient emission of three-level atomic systems embedded in a photonic crystal with a pseudogap. The expressions for fluorescence spectra and emission dynamics for luminescent materials in the pseudogap are obtained. The properties of the transient gain in the pseudogap are discussed. It shows that the transient emission in the pseudogap can be effectively controlled.

  6. Frequency lock of a dye laser emission on iron atomic line top

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis is to realize a frequency lock of a dye laser emission on iron atomic line top. To reach that goal, the author first presents the calculation of atomic vapour density by means of laser absorption ratio measure and studies the dye laser working. It is then necessary to find a device giving the required precision on the frequency of the absorption line choosen. It is obtained thanks to the atomic line reconstitution by optogalvanic effect which gives the reference. Besides, the author presents the necessity of a laser emission power regulation which is obtained thanks to a device including an acoustic and optic modulator. A reliable and accurate captor is choosen and adjusted testing various hollow cathode lamps. The method to obtain the frequency lock of laser emission on iron atomic line top is described. (TEC). 18 refs., 64 figs

  7. Kennard-Stepanov relation connecting absorption and emission spectra in an atomic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Moroshkin, Peter; Sass, Anne; Klaers, Jan; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The Kennard-Stepanov relation describes a thermodynamic, Boltzmann-type scaling between the absorption and emission spectral profiles of an absorber, which applies in many liquid state dye solutions as well as in semiconductor systems. Here we examine absorption and emission spectra of rubidium atoms in dense argon buffer gas environment. We demonstrate that the Kennard-Stepanov relation between absorption and emission spectra is well fulfilled in the collisionally broadened atomic gas system. Our experimental findings are supported by a simple theoretical model.

  8. Master equation for collective spontaneous emission with quantized atomic motion

    OpenAIRE

    Damanet, François; Braun, Daniel; Martin, John

    2015-01-01

    We derive a markovian master equation for the internal dynamics of an ensemble of two-level atoms including the quantization of their motion. Our equation provides a unifying picture of the effects of recoil and indistinguishability of atoms beyond the Lamb-Dicke regime on both their dissipative and conservative dynamics. We give general expressions for the decay rates and the dipole-dipole shifts for any motional states, generalizing those in Ref. [1]. We find closed-form formulas for a numb...

  9. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2015-12-21

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4pz atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices.

  10. Theoretical analysis of the spectroscopy of atomic Bose-Hubbard systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Kensuke; Yamashita, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    We provide a numerical method to calculate comprehensively the microwave and the laser spectra of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices at finite temperatures. Our formulation is built up with the sum rules, up to the second order, derived from the general principle of spectroscopy. The sum rule approach allows us to discuss the physical origins of a spectral peak shift and also a peak broadening. We find that a spectral broadening of superfluid atoms can be determined from number fluctuations of atoms, while that of normal-state atoms is mainly attributed to quantum fluctuations resulting from hopping of atoms. To calculate spectra at finite temperatures, based on the sum rule approach, we provide a two-mode approximation assuming that spectra of the superfluid and normal state atoms can be calculated separately. Our method can properly deal with multipeak structures of spectra resulting from thermal fluctuations and also coexisting of the superfluid and the normal states. By combining the two-mode approximation with a finite temperature Gutzwiller approximation, we calculate spectra at finite temperatures by considering realistic systems, and the calculated spectra show nice agreements with those in experiments.

  11. Some problems connected with boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy and the sensitivity improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA J. SAVOVIC

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Two atomizers were compared: an N2O–C2H2 flame and a stabilized U-shaped DC arc with aerosol supply. Both the high plasma temperature and the reducing atmosphere obtained by acetylene addition to the argon stream substantially increase the sensitivity of boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS when the arc atomizer is used. The results were compared with those for silicon as a control element. The experimental characteristic concentrations for both elements were compared with the computed values. The experimentally obtained characteristic concentration for boron when using the arc atomizer was in better agreement with the calculated value. It was estimated that the influence of stable monoxide formation on the sensitivity for both elements was about the same, but reduction of analyte and formation of non-volatile carbide particles was more important for boron, which is the main reason for the low sensitivity of boron determination using a flame atomizer. The use of an arc atomizer suppresses this interference and significantly improves the sensitivity of the determination.

  12. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao [Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sanvito, Stefano [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Hou, Shimin, E-mail: smhou@pku.edu.cn [Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Beida Information Research (BIR), Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2015-12-21

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4p{sub z} atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices.

  13. Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy: Experimental study of lead emission intensity dependence on the wavelengths and sample matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piscitelli S, V.; Martinez L, M.A.; Fernandez C, A.J. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia Laser, Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas, DC 1020 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Gonzalez, J.J.; Mao, X.L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Russo, R.E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: RERusso@lbl.gov

    2009-02-15

    Lead (Pb) emission intensity (atomic line 405.78 nm) dependence on the sample matrix (metal alloy) was studied by means of collinear double pulse (DP)-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The measurement of the emission intensity produced by three different wavelength combinations (i.e. I:532 nm-II:1064 nm, I:532 nm-II:532 nm, and I:532 nm-II:355 nm) from three series of standard reference materials showed that the lead atomic line 405.78 nm emission intensity was dependent on the sample matrix for all the combination of wavelengths, however reduced dependency was found for the wavelength combination I:532 nm-II:355 nm. Two series of standard reference materials from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and one series from the British Chemical Standards (BCS) were used for these experiments. Calibration curves for lead ablated from NIST 626-630 ('Zn{sub 95}Al{sub 4}Cu{sub 1}') provided higher sensitivity (slope) than those calibration curves produced from NIST 1737-1741 ('Zn{sub 99.5}Al{sub 0.5}') and with the series BCS 551-556 ('Cu{sub 87}Sn{sub 11}'). Similar trends between lead emission intensity (calibration curve sensitivities) and reported variations in plasma temperatures caused by the differing ionization potentials of the major and minor elements in these samples were established.

  14. Delaminated graphene at silicon carbide facets: atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotra, Giuseppe; Ramasse, Quentin M; Deretzis, Ioannis; La Magna, Antonino; Spinella, Corrado; Giannazzo, Filippo

    2013-04-23

    Atomic-resolution structural and spectroscopic characterization techniques (scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy) are combined with nanoscale electrical measurements (conductive atomic force microscopy) to study at the atomic scale the properties of graphene grown epitaxially through the controlled graphitization of a hexagonal SiC(0001) substrate by high temperature annealing. This growth technique is known to result in a pronounced electron-doping (∼10(13) cm(-2)) of graphene, which is thought to originate from an interface carbon buffer layer strongly bound to the substrate. The scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis, carried out at an energy below the knock-on threshold for carbon to ensure no damage is imparted to the film by the electron beam, demonstrates that the buffer layer present on the planar SiC(0001) face delaminates from it on the (112n) facets of SiC surface steps. In addition, electron energy loss spectroscopy reveals that the delaminated layer has a similar electronic configuration to purely sp2-hybridized graphene. These observations are used to explain the local increase of the graphene sheet resistance measured around the surface steps by conductive atomic force microscopy, which we suggest is due to significantly lower substrate-induced doping and a resonant scattering mechanism at the step regions. A first-principles-calibrated theoretical model is proposed to explain the structural instability of the buffer layer on the SiC facets and the resulting delamination.

  15. Emission Channeling Studies of the Lattice Site of Oversized Alkali Atoms Implanted in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    % IS340 \\\\ \\\\ As alkali atoms have the largest atomic radius of all elements, the determination of their lattice configuration following implantation into metals forms a critical test for the various models predicting the lattice site of implanted impurity atoms. The site determination of these large atoms will especially be a crucial check for the most recent model that relates the substitutional fraction of oversized elements to their solution enthalpy. Recent exploratory $^{213}$Fr and $^{221}$Fr $\\alpha$-emission channeling experiments at ISOLDE-CERN and hyperfine interaction measurements on Fr implanted in Fe gave an indication for anomalously large substitutional fractions. To investigate further the behaviour of Fr and other alkali atoms like Cs and Rb thoroughly, more on-line emission channeling experiments are needed. We propose a number of shifts for each element, where the temperature of the implanted metals will be varied between 50$^\\circ$ and 700$^\\circ$~K. Temperature dependent measurements wi...

  16. Precision spectroscopy of Mg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, A N; Brazhnikov, D V; Shilov, A M; Bagayev, S N [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bonert, A E [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-30

    We report the results of experimental investigations aimed at creation of the optical frequency standard based on magnesium atoms cooled and localised in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). An experimentally realised MOT for magnesium made it possible to obtain a cloud comprising ∼10{sup 6} – 10{sup 7} atoms at a temperature of 3 – 5 mK. The results of ultra-high resolution spectroscopy of intercombination {sup 1}S{sub 0} – {sup 3}P{sub 1} transition for Mg atom are presented, the resonances in time-domain separated optical fields with the half-width of Γ = 500 Hz are recorded, which corresponds to the Q-factor of the reference line Q = ν/Δν ∼ 1.3 × 10{sup 12}. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  17. X-ray absorption spectroscopy in electrical fields: An element-selective probe of atomic polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, V.; Wilhelm, F.; Ollefs, K.; Rogalev, A.; Ney, A.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied a range of polar and nonpolar materials using x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) in external electric fields. An energy shift of the XANES by a few meV/kV is found which scales linearly with the applied voltage, thus being reminiscent of the linear Stark effect. This is corroborated by the consistent presence of this energy shift in polar thin films and bulk crystals and its absence in nonpolar materials as well as in conducting films. The observed energy shift of the XANES is different between two atomic species in one specimen and appears to scale linearly with the atomic number of the studied element. Therefore, XANES in electrical fields opens the perspective to study atomic polarization with element specificity in a range of functional materials.

  18. Composite pulses in Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy for the next generation of atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Zanon-Willette, T; Yudin, V I; Taichenachev, A V

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of atomic frequency standards based on an ensemble of neutral atoms or a single-ion will provide very stringent tests in metrology, applied and fundamental physics requiring a new step in very precise control of external systematic corrections. In the proceedings of the 8th Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology, we present a generalization of the recent Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy with separated oscillating fields using composites pulses in order to suppress field frequency shifts induced by the interrogation laser itself. Sequences of laser pulses including specific selection of phases, frequency detunings and durations are elaborated to generate spectroscopic signals with a strong reduction of the light-shift perturbation by off resonant states. New optical clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden transitions in atoms, ions, molecules and nuclei will benefit from these generalized Ramsey schemes to reach relative accuracies well below the 10$^{-18}$ level.

  19. Composite pulses in Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy for the next generation of atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon-Willette, T.; Minissale, M.; Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The next generation of atomic frequency standards based on an ensemble of neutral atoms or a single-ion will provide very stringent tests in metrology, applied and fundamental physics requiring a new step in very precise control of external systematic corrections. In the proceedings of the 8th Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology, we present a generalization of the recent Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy with separated oscillating fields using composites pulses in order to suppress field frequency shifts induced by the interrogation laser itself. Sequences of laser pulses including specific selection of phases, frequency detunings and durations are elaborated to generate spectroscopic signals with a strong reduction of the light-shift perturbation by off resonant states. New optical clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden transitions in atoms, ions, molecules and nuclei will benefit from these generalized Ramsey schemes to reach relative accuracies well below the 10-18 level.

  20. A Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Mercury Continuous Emission Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-12-15

    The Sensor Research & Development Corporation (SRD) has undertaken the development of a Continuous Emissions Monitor (CEM) for mercury based on the technique of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRD). The project involved building an instrument for the detection of trace levels of mercury in the flue gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. The project has occurred over two phases. The first phase concentrated on the development of the ringdown cavity and the actual detection of mercury. The second phase dealt with the construction and integration of the sampling system, used to carry the sample from the flue stack to the CRD cavity, into the overall CRD instrument. The project incorporated a Pulsed Alexandrite Laser (PAL) system from Light Age Incorporated as the source to produce the desired narrow band 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) radiation. This laser system was seeded with a diode laser to bring the linewidth of the output beam from about 150 GHz to less than 60 MHz for the fundamental beam. Through a variety of non-linear optics the 761 nm fundamental beam is converted into the 254 nm beam needed for mercury detection. Detection of the mercury transition was verified by the identification of the characteristic natural isotopic structure observed at lower cavity pressures. The five characteristic peaks, due to both natural isotopic abundance and hyperfine splitting, provided a unique identifier for mercury. SRD scientists were able to detect mercury in air down below 10 parts-per-trillion by volume (pptr). This value is dependent on the pressure and temperature within the CRD cavity at the time of detection. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) absorbs UV radiation in the same spectral region as mercury, which is a significant problem for most mercury detection equipment. However, SRD has not only been able to determine accurate mercury concentrations in the presence of SO{sub 2}, but the CRD instrument can in fact determine the SO{sub 2} concentration as well. Detection of

  1. PETOS-BASIC programs for treating data and reporting results in atomic spectroscopy; Programacion en lenguaje BASIC-PETOS para el tratamiento de datos e informacion de resultados en espectroscopia atomica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca, M.

    1985-07-01

    A PETOS-BASIC program was written which provides the off-line treatment of data in optical emission spectroscopy, flame photometry and, atomic absorption spectroscopy. Polynomial calibration functions are fitted in overlapped steps by the least squares method. The calculated concentrations in unknown samples are stored in sequential files (one per element, up to four), from which they can be read to be reported in a second program. (Author) 7 refs.

  2. Teleporting the one-qubit state via two-level atoms with spontaneous emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Mingliang, E-mail: mingliang0301@xupt.edu.cn, E-mail: mingliang0301@163.com [School of Science, Xi' an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi' an 710061 (China)

    2011-05-14

    We study quantum teleportation via two two-level atoms coupled collectively to a multimode vacuum field and prepared initially in different atomic states. We concentrated on the influence of the spontaneous emission, collective damping and dipole-dipole interaction of the atoms on fidelity dynamics of quantum teleportation and obtained the region of spatial distance between the two atoms over which the state can be teleported nonclassically. Moreover, we showed through concrete examples that entanglement of the channel state is the prerequisite but not the only essential quantity for predicting the teleportation fidelity.

  3. δ-electron spectroscopy and the atomic clock effect in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of strongly bound electrons in superheavy quasimolecular systems with combined nuclear charge numbers Z = ZP + ZT ≥ 110 are investigated. The emission of δ-electrons may serve as an atomic clock for nuclear reactions which is associated with the large overlap of the electron probability density with the nuclear interior. Excitation and emission rates of inner-shell electrons in collisions of very heavy ions with beam energies at or above the nuclear Coulomb barrier depend explicitly on details of the nuclear dynamics. Theoretical and experimental results are reviewed. (orig.)

  4. PREFACE: Heavy-Ion Spectroscopy and QED Effects in Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Martinson, Indrek; Schuch, Reinhold

    1993-01-01

    now essentially solved. The experimental accuracy is already so high that also higher-order QED effects become observable, and several groups are now active in trying to evaluate such effects from first principles. Another related field where substantial progress has recently been made involves precision measurements of X-ray transitions. This has created an interest in the study of deep inner holes in heavy atoms, where large relativistic and QED effects appear. These effects are as large as in corresponding highly charged ions, but the interpretation requires that the many-body effects from the surrounding electrons are accurately extracted. This is a big challenge at present. Atomic collision physics with highly charged ions has been dominated in recent years by the search for a possibility to describe electron-electron interaction within the dynamics of collisions. The experiments on multielectron transfer reactions with highly charged ions posed in this respect quite a challenge to the theory. The models developed to meet this were often based on methods and terminologies developed for describing the inter-electronic interactions in atomic structure. This caused many controversial discussions, also during this symposium. A new and fast rising field is the interaction of highly charged ions with solid surfaces. This may become an important link between atomic physics and condensed-matter physics, stimulated by the opportunity to study effects in coupled many-body systems present in the case when a large amount of electrons is transferred from the solid to each single ion. Furtheron, collision experiments with cooled ion beams in ion storage rings open new dimensions also for atomic spectroscopy. It appears possible that transition and binding energies can be measured in recombination of very heavy ions with a better quality than by conventional Auger electron or X-ray spectroscopy. Obviously, it is not possible to cover all the fields mentioned here in a single

  5. Atomic parity violation in heavy alkalis: detection by stimulated emission for cesium and traps for cold francium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work deals with the recent advances of atomic spectroscopy experiments on cesium and francium, which aim at precise parity violation (PV) measurements in these atoms. Within the framework of a 'double-badged thesis', the candidate devoted himself on the one hand to the preliminary PV measurement (8% accuracy) of the present Cs experiment at the Kastler-Brossel laboratory in Paris and on the other hand to the preparation of a Fr radioactive atomic sample (production and trapping) at the LNL (INFN) in Italy. The two experiments are at very different stages. The measurements reported for cesium were actually made possible thanks to the work initiated in 1991, for the PV detection by stimulated emission. The Italian experiment is instead in a beginning stage: in order to probe the properties of francium, which is unstable, a number of atoms large enough has to be first produced and collected. The PV schemes which proved to be well suited for cesium are a solid starting point for the case of francium. (author)

  6. Atomic parity violation in heavy alkalis: detection by stimulated emission for cesium and traps for cold francium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanguinetti, St

    2004-07-01

    The present work deals with the recent advances of atomic spectroscopy experiments on cesium and francium, which aim at precise parity violation (PV) measurements in these atoms. Within the framework of a 'double-badged thesis', the candidate devoted himself on the one hand to the preliminary PV measurement (8% accuracy) of the present Cs experiment at the Kastler-Brossel laboratory in Paris and on the other hand to the preparation of a Fr radioactive atomic sample (production and trapping) at the LNL (INFN) in Italy. The two experiments are at very different stages. The measurements reported for cesium were actually made possible thanks to the work initiated in 1991, for the PV detection by stimulated emission. The Italian experiment is instead in a beginning stage: in order to probe the properties of francium, which is unstable, a number of atoms large enough has to be first produced and collected. The PV schemes which proved to be well suited for cesium are a solid starting point for the case of francium. (author)

  7. Isotope ratio determination of uranium by optical emission spectroscopy on a laser-produced plasma - basic investigations and analytical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, W.; Petit, A.; Briand, A.

    1998-05-01

    We report in this paper, the first determination of the isotope ratio (238/235) in an uranium sample by optical emission spectroscopy on a laser-produced plasma at reduced pressure (2.67 Pa). Investigations aimed at developing a new application of laser ablation for analytical isotope control of uranium are presented. Optimized experimental conditions allow one to obtain atomic emission spectra characterized by the narrowest possible line widths of the order of 0.01 nm for the investigated transition UII 424.437 nm. We show the possibility to achieve a relative precision in the range of 5% for an enrichment of 3.5% 235U. The influence of different relevant plasma parameters on the measured line width is discussed.

  8. Effect of discharge parameters on emission yields in a radio-frequency glow-discharge atomic-emission source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Mark; Hartenstein, Matthew L.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    1997-05-01

    A study is performed on a radio-frequency glow-discharge atomic-emission (rf-GD-AES) source to determine the factors effecting the emission yields for both metallic and nonconductive sample types. Specifically, these studies focus on determining how the operating parameters (power and pressure) influence emission yields. The results follow predicted patterns as determined by Langmuir probe diagnostic studies of a similar source. In particular, discharge gas pressure is the key operating parameter as slight changes in pressure may significantly affect the emission yield of the analyte species. RF power is less important and is shown to produce only relatively small changes in the emission yield over the ranges typically used in rf-GD analyses. These studies indicate that the quantitative analysis of layered materials, depth-profiling, may be adversely affected if the data collection scheme, i.e. the quantitative algorithm, requires changing the pressure during an analysis to keep the operating current and voltage constant. A direct relationship is shown to exist between the Ar (discharge gas) emission intensity and that of sputtered species for nonconductors. This observance is used to compensate for differences in emission intensities observed in the analysis of various thickness nonconductive samples. The sputtered element emission signals are corrected based on the emission intensity of an Ar (1) transition, implying that quantitative analysis of nonconductive samples is not severely limited by the availability of matrix matched standards.

  9. PLASMA SPECTROSCOPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2010-01-01

    A brief introduction into the spectroscopy of fusion plasmas is presented. Basic principles of the emission of ionic, atomic and molecular radiation is explained and a survey of the effects, which lead to the population of the respective excited levels, is given. Line radiation, continuum radiation,

  10. Velocity selective bi-polarization spectroscopy for laser cooling of metastable Krypton atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, Y B; Singh, S; Mishra, S R; Rawat, H S

    2014-01-01

    We report a velocity selective bi-polarization spectroscopy (VS-BPS) technique to generate a background-free, dispersion-like reference signal which is tunable over a wide range of frequency. In this technique, a pair of linearly polarized weak probe beams passing through a gas cell of metastable Krypton (Kr*) atoms, overlaps with a pair of counter-propagating circularly polarized strong pump beams derived from an independently tunable control laser. The polarization spectroscopy signals from the two probe beams, after subtraction, result in VS-BPS signal. The spectral shifting in VS-BPS signal can be achieved by tuning the frequency of the control laser. The dependence of the amplitude and slope of the VS-BPS signal on the RF power used for excitation of Kr atoms in the gas cell and on the power of pump beams has been studied. The frequency stability of a diode laser locked with VS-BPS signal has been found to be better than the frequency stability of the laser locked with a saturated absorption spectroscopy...

  11. Non-linear Spectroscopy of Sr Atoms in an Optical Cavity for Laser Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Bjarke T R; Schäffer, Stefan A; Westergaard, Philip G; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-01-01

    We study the non-linear interaction of a cold sample of strontium-88 atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit and investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak inter-combination line $\\lvert 5s^{2} \\, ^1 \\textrm{S}_0 \\rangle \\,-\\, \\lvert 5s5p \\, ^3 \\textrm{P}_1 \\rangle$ at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the light field transmitted through the cavity represented by the complex cavity transmission coefficient. We demonstrate high signal-to-noise-ratio measurements of both quadratures - the cavity transmitted phase and absorption - by employing FM spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). We also show that when FM spectroscopy is employed in connection with a cavity locked to the probe light, observables are substantially modified compared to the free space situation where no cavity is present. Furthermore, the non-linear dynami...

  12. Taking nanomedicine teaching into practice with atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C

    2015-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic force microscope by performing AFM scanning images of human blood cells and force spectroscopy measurements of the fibrinogen-platelet interaction. Since the beginning of this course, in 2008, the overall rating by the students was 4.7 (out of 5), meaning a good to excellent evaluation. Students were very enthusiastic and produced high-quality AFM images and force spectroscopy data. The implementation of the hands-on AFM course was a success, giving to the students the opportunity of contact with a technique that has a wide variety of applications on the nanomedicine field. In the near future, nanomedicine will have remarkable implications in medicine regarding the definition, diagnosis, and treatment of different diseases. AFM enables students to observe single molecule interactions, enabling the understanding of molecular mechanisms of different physiological and pathological processes at the nanoscale level. Therefore, the introduction of nanomedicine courses in bioscience and medical school curricula is essential.

  13. Determination of atomic hydrogen density in non-thermal hydrogen plasmas via emission actinometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Weiguo [Laboratory of Plasmas Physical Chemistry, PO Box 288, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Xu Yong [Laboratory of Plasmas Physical Chemistry, PO Box 288, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Geng Zicai [Laboratory of Plasmas Physical Chemistry, PO Box 288, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu Zhongwei [Laboratory of Plasmas Physical Chemistry, PO Box 288, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhu Aimin [Laboratory of Plasmas Physical Chemistry, PO Box 288, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2007-07-21

    Atomic hydrogen plays an important role in the chemical vapour deposition of diamond and other functional materials. This paper reports the experimental determinations of atomic hydrogen density in dielectric barrier discharge hydrogen plasmas via optical emission spectrometry using Ar as an actinometer. At certain discharge conditions (ac 24 kHz, 28 kV of peak-to-peak voltage), the approximate hydrogen dissociation fractions calculated from the emission intensities with respect to electron temperatures obtained with the Langmuir probe, are decreased from 0.099 to 0.01 as the gas pressure increases from 2 to 4 Torr. The relative H atom mole fractions as a function of discharge parameters (spatial position and gas flow rate) have been investigated. It is shown that the discharge characteristics strongly depend on the spatial position but not on the gas flow rate. The influences of the above operating parameters on the emission intensities have been discussed.

  14. Determination of atomic hydrogen density in non-thermal hydrogen plasmas via emission actinometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic hydrogen plays an important role in the chemical vapour deposition of diamond and other functional materials. This paper reports the experimental determinations of atomic hydrogen density in dielectric barrier discharge hydrogen plasmas via optical emission spectrometry using Ar as an actinometer. At certain discharge conditions (ac 24 kHz, 28 kV of peak-to-peak voltage), the approximate hydrogen dissociation fractions calculated from the emission intensities with respect to electron temperatures obtained with the Langmuir probe, are decreased from 0.099 to 0.01 as the gas pressure increases from 2 to 4 Torr. The relative H atom mole fractions as a function of discharge parameters (spatial position and gas flow rate) have been investigated. It is shown that the discharge characteristics strongly depend on the spatial position but not on the gas flow rate. The influences of the above operating parameters on the emission intensities have been discussed

  15. Methane Oxidation to Methanol without CO2 Emission: Catalysis by Atomic Negative Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Tesfamichael, Aron; Felfli, Zineb; Msezane, Alfred Z

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic activities of the atomic Y-, Ru-, At-, In-, Pd-, Ag-, Pt-, and Os- ions have been investigated theoretically using the atomic Au- ion as the benchmark for the selective partial oxidation of methane to methanol without CO2 emission. Dispersion-corrected density-functional theory has been used for the investigation. From the energy barrier calculations and the thermodynamics of the reactions, we conclude that the catalytic effect of the atomic Ag-, At-, Ru-, and Os- ions is higher than that of the atomic Au- ion catalysis of CH4 conversion to methanol. By controlling the temperature around 290K (Os-), 300K (Ag-), 310K (At-), 320K (Ru-) and 325K (Au-) methane can be completely oxidized to methanol without the emission of CO2. We conclude by recommending the investigation of the catalytic activities of combinations of the above negative ions for significant enhancement of the selective partial oxidation of methane to methanol.

  16. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizunov, A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Khilchenko, A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 630073 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D{sub α} or H{sub α} lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10{sup 6} s{sup −1} per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D{sub α} light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  17. Diagnostics of helium plasma by collisional-radiative modeling and optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonwook; Kwon, Duck-Hee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Optical diagnostics for the electron temperature (T{sub e}) and the electron density (n{sub e}) of fusion plasma is important for understanding and controlling the edge and the divertor plasmas in tokamak. Since the line intensity ratio method using the collisional-radiative modeling and OES (optical emission spectroscopy) is simple and does not disturb the plasma, many fusion devices with TEXTOR, JET, JT-60U, LHD, and so on, have employed the line intensity ratio method as a basic diagnostic tool for neutral helium (He I). The accuracy of the line intensity ratio method depends on the reliability of the cross sections and rate coefficients. We performed state-of-the-art R-matrix calculations including couplings up to n=7 states and the distorted wave (DW) calculations for the electron-impact excitation (EIE) cross sections of He I using the flexible atomic code (FAC). The collisional-radiative model for He I was constructed using the calculated the cross sections. The helium collisional-radiative model for He I was constructed to diagnose the electron temperature and the electron density of the plasma. The electron temperature and density were determined by using the line intensity ratio method.

  18. Dynamics of double-pulse laser produced titanium plasma inferred from thin film morphology and optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krstulović, N., E-mail: niksak@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Salamon, K., E-mail: ksalamon@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Modic, M., E-mail: martina.modic@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Bišćan, M., E-mail: mbiscan@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Milat, O., E-mail: milat@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Milošević, S., E-mail: slobodan@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, dynamics of double-pulse laser produced titanium plasma was studied both directly using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and indirectly from morphological properties of deposited thin films. Both approaches yield consistent results. Ablated material was deposited in a form of thin film on the Si substrate. During deposition, plasma dynamics was monitored using optical emission spectroscopy with spatial and temporal resolutions. The influence of ablation mode (single and double) and delay time τ (delay between first and second pulses in double-pulse mode) on plasma dynamics and consequently on morphology of deposited Ti-films was studied using X-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy. Delay time τ was varied from 170 ns to 4 μs. The results show strong dependence of both emission signal and Ti-film properties, such as thickness, density and roughness, on τ. In addition, correlation of average density and thickness of film is observed. These results are discussed in terms of dependency of angular distribution and kinetic energy of plasma plume particles on τ. Advantages of using double-pulse laser deposition for possible application in thin film production are shown. - Highlights: • Ti-thin films produced by single and double pulse laser ablation mode. • Ablation mode and delay time influenced plasma plume and film characteristics. • Films are most compact for optimized delay time (thinnest, smoothest and most dense). • Plasma dynamics can be inferred from film characteristics.

  19. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaoming; Gao, Fei; Qiu, Yishen; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  20. Thermal Emissivity-Based Chemical Spectroscopy through Evanescent Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Zsolt L; Ohodnicki, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    A new spectroscopic technique is presented, with which environmentalchemistry-induced thermal emissivity changes of thin films are extracted with high isolation through evanescent tunneling. With this method the hydrogen-induced emissivity changes of films of TiO2 , Pd-TiO2 , and Au-TiO2 , with properties of high conductivity, hydrogen chemisorption, and plasmonic activity, are characterized in the UV-vis and NIR wavelength ranges, at 1073 K.

  1. Thermal Emissivity-Based Chemical Spectroscopy through Evanescent Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Zsolt L; Ohodnicki, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    A new spectroscopic technique is presented, with which environmentalchemistry-induced thermal emissivity changes of thin films are extracted with high isolation through evanescent tunneling. With this method the hydrogen-induced emissivity changes of films of TiO2 , Pd-TiO2 , and Au-TiO2 , with properties of high conductivity, hydrogen chemisorption, and plasmonic activity, are characterized in the UV-vis and NIR wavelength ranges, at 1073 K. PMID:26901747

  2. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field ϕ =ϕ0cos(mϕt ) , can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the standard model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive limits on the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  3. Atomic-scale chemical quantification of oxide interfaces using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ping; Van Benthem, Mark [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, MS 1411, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1411 (United States); Xiong, Jie; Jia, Quanxi [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-04-29

    Atomic-scale quantification of chemical composition across oxide interfaces is important for understanding physical properties of epitaxial oxide nanostructures. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope was used to quantify chemical composition across the interface of ferromagnetic La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and antiferromagnetic BiFeO{sub 3} quantum structure. This research demonstrates that chemical composition at atomic columns can be quantified by Gaussian peak-fitting of EDS compositional profiles across the interface. Cation diffusion was observed at both A- and B-sublattice sites; and asymmetric chemical profiles exist across the interface, consistent with the previous studies.

  4. In-situ measurement of vacuum window birefringence by atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Andreas; Genske, Maximilian; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Alberti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    We present an in-situ method to measure the birefringence of a single vacuum window by means of microwave spectroscopy on an ensemble of cold atoms. Stress-induced birefringence can cause an ellipticity in the polarization of an initially linearly-polarized laser beam. The amount of ellipticity can be reconstructed by measuring the differential vector light shift of an atomic hyperfine transition. Measuring the ellipticity as a function of the linear polarization angle allows us to infer the amount of birefringence $\\Delta n$ at the level of $10^{-8}$ and identify the orientation of the optical axes. The key benefit of this method is the ability to separately characterize each vacuum window, allowing the birefringence to be precisely compensated in existing vacuum apparatuses.

  5. Atomic physics studies of highly charged ions on tokamaks using x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is given of atomic physics issues which have been studied on tokamaks with the help resolution x-ray spectroscopy. The issues include the testing of model calculations predicting the excitation of line radiation, the determination of rate coefficients, and accurate atomic structure measurements. Recent research has focussed primarily on highly charged heliumlike (22 ≤ Z ≤ 28) and neonlike (34 ≤ Z ≤ 63) ions, and results are presented from measurements on the PLT and TFTR tokamaks. Many of the measurements have been aided by improved instrumental design and new measuring techniques. Remarkable agreement has been found between measurements and theory in most cases. However, in this review those areas are stressed where agreement is worst and where further investigations are needed. 19 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of Al atoms and dimers solvated in helium nanodroplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Solid State Physics, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2015-02-28

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the solvation of Al atoms in helium droplets. The R2PI spectra reveal vibrational progressions that can be attributed to Al–He{sub n} vibrations. It is found that small helium droplets have very little chance to pick up an aluminum atom after collision. However, the pick-up probability increases with the size of the helium droplets. The absorption band that is measured by monitoring the ions on the mass of the Al dimer is found to be very little shifted with respect to the Al monomer band (∼400 cm{sup −1}). However, using the same laser wavelength, we were unable to detect any Al{sub n} photoion with n larger than two.

  7. Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy of extremely neutron-deficient barium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy (FACS) has been used to measure the nuclear mean square radii and moments of the extremely neutron-deficient isotopes 120-124Ba. At N=65 an abrupt change in nuclear mean square charge radii is observed which can be understood in terms of the occupation of the spin-orbit partner g7/2 5/2[413] neutron and g9/2 9/2[404] proton orbitals and the consequent enhancement of the n-p interaction. (orig.)

  8. Development of atomic spectroscopy technology -Development of ultrasensitive spectroscopic analysis technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Hyung Kee; Song Kyoo Suk; Kim, Duk Hyun; Hong, Suk Kyung; Lee, Yong Joo; Lee, Jong Hoon; Yang, Kee Hoh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    For the resonance ionization spectroscopy experiment, erbium and samarium were chosen as test elements and their optimum photoionization schemes for trace analysis have been investigated by using multiphoton spectroscopic techniques. With the optimum scheme, the detection limit of various atoms were measured. For the test of laser induced fluorescence system, calibration curves obtained from lead and cadmium standard solutions were made and Pb concentrations of various unknown solutions were determined. By using the developed differential absorption lidar system, backscattering signals from aerosol and ozone have been measured. Error source, error calibration and data interpretation techniques have been also studied. 60 figs, 8 pix, 28 tabs, 30 refs. (Author).

  9. Spectroscopy of cesium Rydberg atoms in strong radio-frequency fields

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Yuechun; Li, Jingkui; Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    We study Rydberg atoms modulated by strong radio-frequency (RF) fields with a frequency of 70 MHz. The Rydberg atoms are prepared in a room temperature cesium cell, and their level structure is probed using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). As the RF field increases from the weak- into the strong-field regime, the range of observed RF-induced phenomena progresses from AC level shifts through increasingly pronounced and numerous RF-modulation sidebands to complex state-mixing and level-crossings with high-l hydrogen-like states. Weak anharmonic admixtures in the RF field generate clearly visible modifications in the Rydberg-EIT spectra. A Floquet analysis is employed to model the Rydberg spectra, and good agreement with the experimental observations is found. Our results show that all-optical spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms in vapor cells can serve as an antenna-free, atom-based and calibration-free technique to measure and map RF electric fields and to analyze their higher-harmonic contents.

  10. Light-induced atom desorption from glass surfaces characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Ryo; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed the surfaces of vitreous silica (quartz) and borosilicate glass (Pyrex) substrates exposed to rubidium (Rb) vapor by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to understand the surface conditions of alkali metal vapor cells. XPS spectra indicated that Rb atoms adopted different bonding states in quartz and Pyrex. Furthermore, Rb atoms in quartz remained in the near-surface region, while they diffused into the bulk in Pyrex. For these characterized surfaces, we measured light-induced atom desorption (LIAD) of Rb atoms. Clear differences in time evolution, photon energy dependence, and substrate temperature dependence were found; the decay of LIAD by continuous ultraviolet irradiation for quartz was faster than that for Pyrex, a monotonic increase in LIAD with increasing photon energy from 1.8 to 4.3 eV was more prominent for quartz, and LIAD from quartz was more efficient at higher temperatures in the range from 300 to 580 K, while that from Pyrex was almost independent of temperature.

  11. Quantitative Determination of Arsenic in Bottled Drinking Water Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Guţu Claudia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many studies have been performed in the past few years, to determine arsenic speciation in drinking water, food chain and environment, arsenic being a well-recognized carcinogenic and toxic agent mainly in its inorganic species. The instrumental techniques used for arsenic determination, such as hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, can provide a great sensitivity only on the total amount. Objective: The aim of this study was to develop a simple and rapid method and to analyze the concentration of total inorganic arsenic in bottled drinking water. Methods: Total arsenic was determined in samples from six different types of commercially available bottled drinking water using atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal or hydride generation vaporisation. All drinking water samples were acidified with 0.1M nitric acid to match the acidity of the standards. Results: The method was linear within the studied range (1-5 μg/L, R = 0.9943. The quantification limits for arsenic determination were 0.48 μg/L (HGAAS and 0.03 μg/L (GFAAS. The evaluated arsenic content in drinking water was within the accepted limits provided by law. Conclusions: A simple and sensitive method for the quantification of arsenic in drinking water using atomic absorbtion spectroscopy was described, which can be further used in toxicological studies. As an additional advantage, the system is very fast, efficient and environmental friendly

  12. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Using a squeezed field to protect two-atom entanglement against spontaneous emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunable interaction between two atoms in a cavity is realized by interacting the two atoms with an extra controllable single-mode squeezed field. Such a controllable interaction can be further used to control entanglement between the two atoms against amplitude damping decoherence caused by spontaneous emissions. For the independent amplitude damping decoherence channel, entanglement will be lost completely without controls, while it can be partially preserved by the proposed strategy. For the collective amplitude damping decoherence channel, our strategy can enhance the entanglement compared with the uncontrolled case when the entanglement of the uncontrolled stationary state is not too large

  14. [Study of emission spectra of N atom generated in multi-needle-to-plate corona discharge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hui; Yu, Ran; Zhang, Lu; Mi, Dong; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-06-01

    The emission spectra of nitrogen (N) atom produced by multi-needle-to-plate negative corona discharge in air were detected successfully at one atmosphere, and the excited transition spectral line at 674.5 nm with maximum value of relative intensity was selected to investigate the influences of air and electrical parameters on N atom relative density. The results indicate that N atom relative density in ionization region increases with the increase in power; decreases with increasing discharge gap and relative humidity; and with the increase in N2 content, the relative density of N active atom firstly increases and then decreases. Under present experimental conditions, the maximum value of N atom relative density appears at the axial distance from needle point r = 1 mm. PMID:22870624

  15. Three-body entanglement induced by spontaneous emission in a three two-level atoms system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao Xiang-Ping; Fang Mao-Fa; Zheng Xiao-Juan; Cai Jian-Wu

    2006-01-01

    We study three-body entanglement induced by spontaneous emission in a three two-level atoms system by using the entanglement tensor approach. The results show that the amount of entanglement is strongly dependent on the initial state of the system and the species of atoms. The three-body entanglement is the result of the coherent superposition of the two-body entanglements. The larger the two-body entanglement is, the stronger the three-body entanglement is. On the other hand, if there exists a great difference in three two-body entanglement measures, the three-body entanglement is very weak. We also find that the maximum of the two-body entanglement obtained with nonidentical atoms is greater than that obtained with identical atoms via adjusting the difference in atomic frequency.

  16. Optical emission spectroscopy observations of fast pulsed capillary discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avaria, G.; Ruiz, M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E. S.; Chuaqui, H.; Bhuyan, H.

    2014-05-01

    We present time resolved optical emission spectroscopic (OES) observations of a low energy, pulsed capillary discharage (PCD). The optical emission from the capillary plasma and plasma jets emitted from the capillary volume was recorded with with a SpectraPro 275 spectrograph, fitted with a MCP gated OMA system, with 15 ns time resolution. The discharge was operated with different gases, including argon, nitrogen, hydrogen and methane, in a repetitive pulsed discharge mode at 10-50 Hz, with, 10-12 kV pulses applied at the cathode side. The time evolution of the electron density was measured using Stark broadening of the Hβ line. Several features of the capillary plasma dynamics, such as ionization growth, wall effects and plasma jet evolution, are inferred from the time evolution of the optical emission.

  17. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, F. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption process. Section II discusses 1s X-ray absorption, i.e., the K edges, and section III deals with 2p X-ray absorption, the L edges. X-ray emission is discussed in, respectively, the L edges. X-ray emis...

  18. Hybrid interferometric/dispersive atomic spectroscopy of laser-induced uranium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Phyllis K.; Scott, Jill R.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-02-01

    An established optical emission spectroscopy technique, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), holds promise for detection and rapid analysis of elements relevant for nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation, and nuclear power, including the measurement of isotope ratios. One such important application of LIBS is the measurement of uranium enrichment (235U/238U), which requires high spectral resolution (e.g., 25 pm for the 424.4 nm U II line). High-resolution dispersive spectrometers necessary for such measurements are typically bulky and expensive. We demonstrate the use of an alternative measurement approach, which is based on an inexpensive and compact Fabry-Perot etalon integrated with a low to moderate resolution Czerny-Turner spectrometer, to achieve the resolution needed for isotope selectivity of LIBS of uranium in ambient air. Spectral line widths of ~ 10 pm have been measured at a center wavelength 424.437 nm, clearly discriminating the natural from the highly enriched uranium.

  19. Characterization of helium/argon working gas systems in a radiofrequency glow discharge atomic emission source. Part I: Optical emission, sputtering and electrical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Steven J.; Hartenstein, Matthew L.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Belkin, Mikhail; Caruso, Joseph A.

    1998-08-01

    Studies are performed to determine the influence of discharge gas composition (helium/argon working gas mixtures) on the analyte emission signal intensities, sputtering rates, and DC-bias characteristics of an analytical radiofrequency glow discharge atomic emission spectroscopy (RF-GD-AES) source. As the partial pressure of He is increased from 0 to 15 torr, increased emission intensity is observed for a range of bulk and trace elements in NIST 1250 SRM (low alloy steel), regardless of the base pressure of Ar in the source (5 and 9 torr). In contrast to increases in analyte emission intensity of up to 300%, counterindicative decreases in the sputtering rates on the order of about 30-50% are observed. The magnitude of these effects depends on both the partial pressure of helium introduced to the source and the total pressure of the He and Ar gases. Use of relative emission yield (REY) to normalize changes in emission intensity to sputtering rates indicates that excitation efficiencies increase under these conditions. Increases in average electron energy and temperature appear to control this response. Decreases in both analyte emission intensities and sputter rates occur with increasing He partial pressure when the total pressure in the cell remains fixed (11 torr in these studies). Emission yields for the fixed pressure, mixed gas plasmas decrease as the partial pressure of He (He/Ar ratio) in the RF-GD source increases. In this case, decreases in electron number densities appear to dictate the lower REYs. Measurement of DC-bias values at the sample surface provide understanding with respect to the observed changes in sputtering rates as well as suggest the origins of changes in plasma electron energetics. Use of a diamond stylus profilometer provides both the quantitative sputter rate information as well as qualitative insights into the use of mixed gas plasmas for enhanced depth profiling capabilities. The analyte emission characteristics of these mixed gas

  20. Atomic force spectroscopy and density-functional study of graphene corrugation on Ru(0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshina, Elena; Dedkov, Yuriy

    2016-06-01

    Graphene, the thinnest material in the world, can form moiré structures on different substrates, including graphite, h -BN, or metal surfaces. In such systems, the structure of graphene, i.e., its corrugation, as well as its electronic and elastic properties, are defined by the combination of the system geometry and local interaction strength at the interface. The corrugation in such structures on metals is heavily extracted from diffraction or local probe microscopy experiments, and it can be obtained only via comparison with theoretical data, which usually simulate the experimental findings. Here we show that graphene corrugation on metals can be measured directly employing atomic force spectroscopy, and the obtained value coincides with state-of-the-art theoretical results. The presented results demonstrate an unexpected space selectivity for the Δ f (z ) signal in the atomic force spectroscopy in the moiré graphene lattice on Ru(0001), which is explained by the different response of the graphene layer on the indentation process. We also address the elastic reaction of the formed graphene nanodoms on the indentation process by the scanning tip that is important for the modeling and fabrication of graphene-based nanoresonators on the nanoscale.

  1. Atom-atom entanglement generated at early times by two-photon emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Juan; Sabin, Carlos [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: leon@imaff.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: csl@imaff.cfmac.csic.es

    2009-07-15

    We analyze entanglement generation between a pair of neutral two-level atoms that are initially excited in a common electromagnetic vacuum. The nonlocal correlations that appear due to the interaction with the field can become entanglement when the field state is known. We distinguish two different situations: in the first, the field remains in the vacuum state and in the second, two photons are present in the final state. In both cases, we study the dependence of the entanglement on time and interatomic distance, at ranges related with locality issues.

  2. Determination of serum lithium: comparison between atomic emission and absorption spectrometry methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Elielton do Espírito Santo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The therapeutic monitoring of lithium, through concentration measurements, is important for individual dose adjustment, as a marker of treatment adherence and to prevent poisoning and side effects. Objectives: Validate and compare two methods - atomic emission and atomic absorption - for the determination of lithium in serum samples. Methodology: Parameters such as specificity, precision, accuracy, limit of detection (LOD and linearity were considered. The atomic absorption spectrometer was used, operating in either emission or absorption mode. For the quantitative comparison of 30 serum samples from patients with mood disorder treated with lithium, the results were submitted to Student's t-test, F-test and Pearson's correlation. Results: The limit of quantification (LOQ was established as 0.05 mEq/l of lithium, and calibration curves were constructed in the range of 0.05-2 mEq/l of lithium, using aqueous standards. Sample preparation time was reduced, what is important in medical laboratory. Conclusion: Both methods were considered satisfactory, precise and accurate and can be adopted for lithium quantification. In the comparison of quantitative results in lithium-treated patients through statistical tests, no significant differences were observed. Therefore the methods for lithium quantification by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS and flame atomic emission spectrometry (FAES may be considered similar.

  3. Kinetic theory and atomic physics corrections for determination of ion velocities from charge-exchange spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Burgos, J. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Solomon, W. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.; Chrystal, C.

    2013-09-01

    Charge-exchange spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for determining ion temperatures, densities and rotational velocities in tokamak plasmas. This technique depends on detailed understanding of the atomic physics processes that affect the measured apparent velocities with respect to the true ion rotational velocities. These atomic effects are mainly due to energy dependence of the charge-exchange cross-sections, and in the case of poloidal velocities, due to gyro-motion of the ion during the finite lifetime of the excited states. Accurate lifetimes are necessary for correct interpretation of measured poloidal velocities, specially for high density plasma regimes on machines such as ITER, where l-mixing effects must be taken into account. In this work, a full nl-resolved atomic collisional radiative model coupled with a full kinetic calculation that includes the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the ion gyro-motion is presented for the first time. The model directly calculates from atomic physics first principles the excited state lifetimes that are necessary to evaluate the gyro-orbit effects. It is shown that even for low density plasmas where l-mixing effects are unimportant and coronal conditions can be assumed, the nl-resolved model is necessary for an accurate description of the gyro-motion effects to determine poloidal velocities. This solution shows good agreement when compared to three QH-mode shots on DIII-D, which contain a wide range of toroidal velocities and high ion temperatures where greater atomic corrections are needed. The velocities obtained from the model are compared to experimental velocities determined from co- and counter-injection of neutral beams on DIII-D.

  4. Atom location using scanning transmission electron microscopy based on electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The technique of atom location by channelling enhanced microanalysis (ALCHEMI) using cross section data, measured as a function of electron beam orientation, has been widely implemented by many researchers. The accurate application of ALCHEMI, usually based on energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), requires knowledge, from first principles, of the relative delocalization of the inner-shell ionization interaction (see for example Oxley and Allen, 1998; Oxley et al., 1999). Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) also provides information about the location of atoms of different types within the crystal lattice. Unlike high angle annular dark field (HAADF), EELS provides a unique signal for each atom type. In conjunction with highly focused probes, allowing near atomic resolution, this makes possible, in principle, the application of ALCHEMI like techniques to STEM images to determine the distribution of impurities within the unit cell. The accurate interpretation of STEM results requires that both the inner-shell ionization interaction and resulting ionization cross section or image be correctly modelled. We present model calculations demonstrating the in principle application of ALCHEMI type techniques to STEM images pertinent to EELS. The inner-shell ionisation interaction is modelled using Hartree-Fock wave functions to describe the atomic bound states and Hartree-Slater wave functions to describe the continuum states. The wave function within the crystal is calculated using boundary conditions appropriate for a highly focussed probe (Rossouw and Allen, 2001) and STEM images or ionisation cross sections are simulated using an inelastic cross section formulation that correctly accounts for the contribution from both dynamical electrons and those dechannelled by absorptive scattering processes such as thermal diffuse scattering (TDS). Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy

  5. Parity violating radiative emission of neutrino pair in heavy alkaline earth atoms of even isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshimura, M; Uetake, S

    2014-01-01

    Metastable excited states ${}^3P_2, {}^3P_0$ of heavy alkaline earth atoms of even isotopes are studied for parity violating (PV) effects in radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP). PV terms arise from interference between two diagrams containing neutrino pair emission of valence spin current and nuclear electroweak charge density proportional to the number of neutrons in nucleus. This mechanism gives large PV effects, since it does not suffer from the suppression of 1/(electron mass) usually present for non-relativistic atomic electrons. A controllable magnetic field is crucial to identify RENP process by measuring PV observables. Results of PV asymmetries under the magnetic field reversal and the photon circular polarization reversal are presented for an example of Yb atom.

  6. Model for Atomic Oxygen Visible Line Emissions in Comet C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp

    CERN Document Server

    Raghuram, Susarla

    2012-01-01

    We have recently developed a coupled chemistry-emission model for the green and red-doublet emissions of atomic oxygen on comet Hyakutake. In the present work we applied our model to comet Hale-Bopp, which had an order of magnitude higher H2O production rate than comet Hyakutake, to evaluate the photochemistry associated with the production and loss of O(1S) and O(1D) atoms and emission processes of green and red-doublet lines. We present the wavelength-dependent photo-attenuation rates for different photodissociation processes forming O(1S) and O(1D). The calculated radiative efficiency profiles of O(1S) and O(1D) atoms show that in comet Hale-Bopp the green and red-doublet emissions are emitted mostly above radial distances of 10^3 and 10^4 km, respectively. The model calculated [OI] 6300 A emission surface brightness and average intensity over the Fabry-P{\\'e}rot spectrometer field of view are consistent with the observation of Morgenthaler et al. (2001), while the intensity ratio of green to red-doublet e...

  7. Study of the Neutron Deficient Pb and Bi Isotopes by Simultaneous Atomic- and Nuclear-Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Kessler, T

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study systematically nuclear properties of the neutron deficient lead $^{183-189}$Pb, $^{191g}$Pb, $^{193g}$Pb and bismuth isotopes $^{188-200}$Bi by atomic spectroscopy with the ISOLDE resonance ionisation laser ion source (RILIS) combined with simultaneous nuclear spectroscopy at the detection set-up. The main focus is the determination of the mean square charge radii of $^{183-190}$Pb and $^{188-193}$Bi from which the influence of low-lying intruder states should become obvious. Also the nuclear spin and magnetic moments of ground-states and long-lived isomers will be determined unambiguously through evaluation of the hyperfine structure, and new isomers could be discovered. The decay properties of these nuclei can be measured by $\\alpha$-$\\gamma$ and $\\beta$-$\\gamma$ spectroscopy. With this data at hand, possible shape transitions around mid-shell at N$\\sim$104 will be studied. This data is crucial for the direct test of nuclear theory in the context of intruder state influence (e.g. energy ...

  8. Precision X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms as a probe of low-energy kaon-nucleus interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, H; Beer, G; Bellotti, G; Berucci, C; Bragadireanu, A M; Bosnar, D; Cargnelli, M; Curceanu, C; Butt, A D; d'Uffizi, A; Fiorini, C; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Hayano, R S; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Iwasaki, M; Sandri, P Levi; Marton, J; Okada, S; Pietreanu, D; Piscicchia, K; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Tatsuno, H; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    In the exotic atoms where one atomic $1s$ electron is replaced by a $K^{-}$, the strong interaction between the $K^{-}$ and the nucleus introduces an energy shift and broadening of the low-lying kaonic atomic levels which are determined by only the electromagnetic interaction. By performing X-ray spectroscopy for Z=1,2 kaonic atoms, the SIDDHARTA experiment determined with high precision the shift and width for the $1s$ state of $K^{-}p$ and the $2p$ state of kaonic helium-3 and kaonic helium-4. These results provided unique information of the kaon-nucleus interaction in the low energy limit.

  9. Determination of Elemental Ratio in an Atomic Column by Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Mitsutaka; Hosaka, Yoshiteru; Ichikawa, Noriya; Saito, Takashi; Shimakawa, Yuichi; Kurata, Hiroki

    2016-07-26

    Atomic-resolution quantification of the elemental ratio of Fe to Mn at the octahedral and tetrahedral sites in brownmillerite Ca2Fe1.07Mn0.93O5 was determined using electron energy-loss spectroscopy combined with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The combined techniques revealed that oversampling of the spectral imaging data yielded a spatially resolved area that very nearly reflects atomic resolution (∼1.2 Å radius). The average experimental ratios of Fe to Mn within this region were 17.5:82.5 for the octahedral sites and 81.6:18.4 for the tetrahedral sites. The elemental ratio in an octahedral atomic column was successfully extracted by estimating the mixing of signals from nearest neighbor columns. The results indicated that the ratio of Fe to Mn was 13:87 at the octahedral site, which is in good agreement with the results of neutron diffraction analysis. In addition, the uncertainty of experimental results obtained by using an average 1.2 Å radius was less than 10% at octahedral sites, depending on the sample thickness. In contrast, the experimental error due to dechanneling of incident electrons was larger at the tetrahedral sites. This experimental procedure has wide application for determining the spatially resolved composition ratio of elements in perovskite-like compounds. PMID:27341006

  10. Evaluation on corrosively dissolved gold induced by alkanethiol monolayer with atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have monitored a gold corrosive dissolution behavior accompanied in n-alkanethiol like n-dodecanethiol assembled process with in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and then observed it with atomic force microscopy (AFM) which showed an evident image of corrosive defects or holes produced on gold substrate, corresponding to gold dissolution induced by the alkanethiol molecules in the presence of oxygen. For detection of the dissolved gold defects during alkanethiol assembled process, an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) has been carried out in this paper, and the detection limit for the dissolved gold could be evaluated to be 15.4 ng/mL. The amount of dissolved gold from the substrates of gold plates as functions of immersion time, acid media, solvents and thiol concentration has been examined in the oxygen saturated solutions. In comparison with in situ QCM method, the kinetics behavior of the long-term gold corrosion on the gold plates in 1.0 mmol/L of n-dodecanethiol solution determined with AAS method was a slow process, and its corrosion rate on gold dissolution could be evaluated to be about 4.4 x 10-5 ng.cm-2.s-1, corresponding to 1.3 x 108 Au atoms.cm-2.s-1, that was much smaller than that of initial rate monitored with in situ QCM. Both kinetics equations obtained with QCM and AAS showed a consistent corrosion behavior on gold surfaces.

  11. Atomic physics for fusion plasma spectroscopy; a soft x-ray study of molybdenum ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the radiative patterns of the ions of heavy atoms (Z approx-gt 18) is crucial to fusion experiments. The present thesis applies ab initio, relativistic calculations of atomic data to modeling the emission of molybdenum (Z = 42) ions in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The models are compared to observations made in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak (Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade. Experimental confirmation of these models allows confidence in calculations of the total molybdenum concentration and quantitative estimates of the total power lost from the plasmas due to molybdenum line radiation. Charge states in the plasma core (Mo33+ to Mo29+) emit strong x-ray and XUV spectra which allow benchmarking of models for the spatial distribution of highly stripped molybdenum ions; the models only achieve agreement with observations when the rates of indirect ionization and recombination processes are included in the calculation of the charge state distribution of the central molybdenum ions. The total concentration of molybdenum in the core of the plasma is found, and the total power radiated from the plasma core is computed. Observations of line emission from more highly charged molybdenum ions (Mo36+ to Mo34+) are presented. open-quotes Bulkclose quotes molybdenum charge states (Mo25+ to Mo23+) emit complicated XUV spectra from a position in the plasma near C-Mod's half radius; spatial profiles of these ions' emission are analyzed. Models for the line-emission spectra of adjacent ions (Mo28+ to Mo26+) are offered, and the accuracy and limits of ab initio energy level calculations are discussed. open-quotes Edgeclose quotes charge states (Mo22+ to Mo15) extend to the last closed magnetic flux surface of the C-Mod plasma. The strongest features from these charge states are emitted in a narrow band from ∼70 Angstrom

  12. Infrared emissivity spectroscopy of a soda-lime silicate glass up to the melt

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiane N. Santos; Meneses, Domingos de S.; Montouillout, Valérie; Echegut, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The short-range structure of an iron doped soda-lime glass was investigated by infrared emissivity spectroscopy from room temperature up to the melt. Quantitative information on the distribution of the Q^n tetrahedral units was obtained by fitting the emissivity spectra using a dielectric function model (DFM). The DFM is based on causal Gaussian bands, associated with the stretching motions of the silicate tetrahedra. The changes in the absorption modes are related to the activation of a dyna...

  13. Ultrafast soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of surface adsorbates using an X-ray free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Development of the soft X-ray spectroscopy setup to probe surfaces using free electron laser. •Probing surface chemical reactions using free electron laser. •Optical laser pump and soft X-ray probe study on a sub-picosecond timescale. -- Abstract: We report on an experimental system designed to probe chemical reactions on solid surfaces on a sub-picosecond timescale using soft X-ray emission spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron laser (FEL) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We analyzed the O 1s X-ray emission spectra recorded from atomic oxygen adsorbed on a Ru(0 0 0 1) surface at a synchrotron beamline (SSRL, BL13-2) and an FEL beamline (LCLS, SXR). We have demonstrated conditions that provide negligible amount of FEL induced damage of the sample. In addition we show that the setup is capable of tracking the temporal evolution of electronic structure during a surface reaction of submonolayer quantities of CO molecules desorbing from the surface

  14. Glow discharge lamp: A light source for optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanathan, K. S.; Srinivasan, V.; Nalini, S.; Mahalingam, T. R.

    A glow discharge lamp based on a modified version of the Grimm design has been fabricated. Its utility as a radiation source for optical emission spectrography by standardizing a method for the analysis of low alloy steels using a set of certified standards from DMRL, Hyderabad, has been demonstrated. A model has been proposed where the sputtering rates of different metals have been correlated with their heats of sublimation, metallic radii, and densities. Sputtering rates of ten different metals obtained from literature have been used to test this model, and the correlation appears to be excellent.

  15. Time-resolved characterization of a filamentary argon discharge at atmospheric pressure in a capillary using emission and absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Sandra; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Niermann, Benedikt; Winter, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    An argon/nitrogen (0.999/0.001) filamentary pulsed discharge operated at atmospheric pressure in a quartz tube is characterized using voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and absorption spectroscopy. Nitrogen is applied as a sensor gas for the purpose of OES diagnostic. The density of argon metastable atoms Ar(3P2) is determined using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Using a plasma chemical model the measured OES data are applied for the characterization of the plasma conditions. Between intense positive pulses the discharge current oscillates with a damped amplitude. It is established that an electric current flows in this discharge not only through a thin plasma filament that is observed in the discharge image but also through the whole cross section of the quartz tube. A diffuse plasma fills the quartz tube during a time between intense current pulses. Ionization waves are propagating in this plasma between the spike and the grounded area of the tube producing thin plasma channels. The diameter of these channels increases during the pause between the propagation of ionization waves probably because of thermal expansion and diffusion. Inside the channels electron densities of ˜2 × 1013 cm-3, argon metastable densities ˜1014 cm-3 and a reduced electric field about 10 Td are determined.

  16. Ground-based NIR emission spectroscopy of HD189733b

    CERN Document Server

    Waldmann, I P; Tinetti, G; Griffith, C A; Swain, M R; Deroo, P

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of transiting exoplanets are providing an unprecedented view of the atmospheres of planets around nearby stars. As we learn more about the atmospheres of these remote bodies, we begin to build up a clearer picture of their composition and thermal structure. Here we investigate the case of K and L band emissions of the hot-Jupiter HD 189733b. Using the SpeX instrument on the NASA IRTF, we obtained three nights of secondary eclipse data using equivalent settings for all nights. Our sample includes one night previously presented by Swain et al. (2010) which allows for comparability of results. In this publication we present and discuss in detail a greatly improved data-reduction and analysis routine. This, in conjunction with more data, allows us to increase the spectral resolution of our planetary spectrum (R ~ 170-180), leading to a better identifiability of the features present. We confirm the existence of a strong emission at ~3.3 microns which is inconsistent with LTE simulations ...

  17. Nuclear structure of light thallium isotopes as deduced from laser spectroscopy on a fast atom beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After optimizing the system by experiments on /sup 201,203,205/Tl, the neutron-deficient isotopes 189-193Tl have been studied using the collinear fast atom beam laser spectroscopy system at UNISOR on-line to the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. A sensitive system for the measurements was developed since the light isotopes were available in mass-separated beams of only 7 x 104 to 4 x 105 atoms per second. By laser excitation of the 535 nm atomic transitions of atoms in the beam, the 6s27s 2S/sub 1/2/ and 6s26s 2P/sub 3/2/ hyperfine structures were measured, as were the isotope shifts of the 535 nm transitions. From these, the magnetic dipole moments, spectroscopic quadrupole moments and isotopic changes in mean-square charge radius were deduced. The magnetic dipole moments are consistent with previous data. The /sup 190,192/Tl isotopes show a considerable difference in quadrupole deformations as well as an anomalous isotope shift with respect to 194Tl. A large isomer shift in 193Tl is observed implying a larger deformation in the 9/2- isomer than in the 1/2+ ground state. The /sup 189,191,193/Tl isomers show increasing deformation away from stability. A deformed shell model calculation indicates that this increase in deformation can account for the dropping of the 9/2- band in these isotopes while an increase in neutron pairing correlations, having opposite and compensating effects on the rotational moment of inertia, maintains the 9/2- strong-coupled band structure. 105 refs., 27 figs

  18. Review of atomic data needs for active charge-exchange spectroscopy on ITERa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, O.; Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.; Delabie, E.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Jaspers, R.; Reiter, D.

    2008-10-01

    The quantitative exploitation of active beam spectra is largely based on an advanced atomic modeling. Under the ITER operating conditions the penetration depth of a diagnostic beam into the plasma core crucially affects the intensities of spectral lines and hence the uncertainties of derived plasma parameters. A critical review of atomic data and an assessment of its error margins are, therefore, urgently needed. The aim of the present work is to verify the existing beam-stopping and beam-emission data for hydrogen beam in fusion plasmas. The agreement between the ADAS database and the present calculations is found to be within 5% for the beam-stopping data in a H-plasma. The calculation of beam attenuation in the presence of He-ash (4%) and Be ions (2%) demonstrates the agreement between the present data and the ADAS database within 10%. Finally, the maximum deviation of 15% is found only for beam-emission data at the electron density of 1×1012-2×1012cm-3, which is significantly below the ITER density of 1014cm-3.

  19. Angle-resolved 2D imaging of electron emission processes in atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of electron emission processes have been studied in detail for both atomic and molecular systems, using a highly efficient experimental system comprising two time-of-flight (TOF) rotatable electron energy analyzers and a 3rd generation synchrotron light source. Two examples are used here to illustrate the obtained results. Firstly, electron emissions in the HCL molecule have been mapped over a 14 eV wide photon energy range over the Cl 2p ionization threshold. Particular attention is paid to the dissociative core-excited states, for which the Auger electron emission shows photon energy dependent features. Also, the evolution of resonant Auger to the normal Auger decay distorted by post-collision interaction has been observed and the resonating behavior of the valence photoelectron lines studied. Secondly, an atomic system, neon, in which excitation of doubly excited states and their subsequent decay to various accessible ionic states has been studied. Since these processes only occurs via inter-electron correlations, the many body dynamics of an atom can be probed, revealing relativistic effects, surprising in such a light atom. Angular distribution of the decay of the resonances to the parity unfavored continuum exhibits significant deviation from the LS coupling predictions

  20. Diagnosis of methane plasma generated in an atmospheric pressure DBD micro-jet by optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis of methane plasma, generated in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) micro-plasma jet with a quartz tube as dielectric material by a 25 kHz sinusoidal ac power source, is conducted by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The reactive radicals in methane plasma such as CH, C2, and Hα are detected in-situ by OES. The possible dissociation mechanism of methane in diluted Ar plasma is deduced from spectra. In addition, the density of CH radical, which is considered as one of the precursors in diamond-like (DLC) film formation, affected by the parameters of input voltage and the feed gas flow rate, is emphasized. With the Boltzmann plots, four Ar atomic spectral lines (located at 675.28 mm, 687.13 nm, 738.40 nm and 794.82 nm, respectively) are chosen to calculate the electron temperature, and the dependence of electron temperature on discharge parameters is also investigated. (authors)

  1. Quantitative compositional analysis of sedimentary materials using thermal emission spectroscopy: 1. Application to sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Michael T.; Rogers, A. Deanne; Bristow, Thomas F.; Pan, Cong

    2015-11-01

    Thermal emission spectroscopy is used to determine the mineralogy of sandstone and mudstone rocks as part of an investigation of linear spectral mixing between sedimentary constituent phases. With widespread occurrences of sedimentary rocks on the surface of Mars, critical examination of the accuracy associated with quantitative models of mineral abundances derived from thermal emission spectra of sedimentary materials is necessary. Although thermal emission spectroscopy has been previously proven to be a viable technique to obtain quantitative mineralogy from igneous and metamorphic materials, sedimentary rocks, with natural variation of composition, compaction, and grain size, have yet to be examined. In this work, we present an analysis of the thermal emission spectral (~270-1650 cm-1) characteristics of a suite of 13 sandstones and 14 mudstones. X-ray diffraction and traditional point counting procedures were all evaluated in comparison with thermal emission spectroscopy. Results from this work are consistent with previous thermal emission spectroscopy studies and indicate that bulk rock mineral abundances can be estimated within 11.2% for detrital grains (i.e., quartz and feldspars) and 14.8% for all other mineral phases present in both sandstones and mudstones, in comparison to common in situ techniques used for determining bulk rock composition. Clay-sized to fine silt-sized grained phase identification is less accurate, with differences from the known ranging from ~5 to 24% on average. Nevertheless, linear least squares modeling of thermal emission spectra is an advantageous technique for determining abundances of detrital grains and sedimentary matrix and for providing a rapid classification of clastic rocks.

  2. Experimental detection of iron overload in liver through neutron stimulated emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapadia, A J; Tourassi, G D; Sharma, A C [Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC 27705 (United States); Crowell, A S; Kiser, M R; Howell, C R [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27706 (United States)], E-mail: anuj.kapadia@duke.edu

    2008-05-21

    Iron overload disorders have been the focus of several quantification studies involving non-invasive imaging modalities. Neutron spectroscopic techniques have demonstrated great potential in detecting iron concentrations within biological tissue. We are developing a neutron spectroscopic technique called neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT), which has the potential to diagnose iron overload in the liver at clinically acceptable patient dose levels through a non-invasive scan. The technique uses inelastic scatter interactions between atomic nuclei in the sample and incoming fast neutrons to non-invasively determine the concentration of elements in the sample. This paper discusses a non-tomographic application of NSECT investigating the feasibility of detecting elevated iron concentrations in the liver. A model of iron overload in the human body was created using bovine liver tissue housed inside a human torso phantom and was scanned with a 5 MeV pulsed beam using single-position spectroscopy. Spectra were reconstructed and analyzed with algorithms designed specifically for NSECT. Results from spectroscopic quantification indicate that NSECT can currently detect liver iron concentrations of 6 mg g{sup -1} or higher and has the potential to detect lower concentrations by optimizing the acquisition geometry to scan a larger volume of tissue. The experiment described in this paper has two important outcomes: (i) it demonstrates that NSECT has the potential to detect clinically relevant concentrations of iron in the human body through a non-invasive scan and (ii) it provides a comparative standard to guide the design of iron overload phantoms for future NSECT liver iron quantification studies.

  3. Optical Emission Spectroscopy Investigation of a Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Aerodynamic Actuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying-Hong; WU Yun; JIA Min; ZHOU Zhang-Wen; GUO Zhi-Gang; PU Yi-Kang

    2008-01-01

    The optical emission spectroscopy of a surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma aerodynamic actuator is investigated with different electrode configurations, applied voltages and driving frequencies. The rotational temperature of N2 (C3IIu) molecule is calculated according to its rotational emission band near 380.5 nm. The average electron energy of the discharge is evaluated by emission intensity ratio of first negative system to second positive system of N2. The rotational temperature is sensitive to the inner space of an electrode pair. The average electron energy shows insensitivity to the applied voltage, the driving frequency and the electrode configuration.

  4. Superradiant cascade emissions in an atomic ensemble via four-wave mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jen, H.H., E-mail: sappyjen@gmail.com

    2015-09-15

    We investigate superradiant cascade emissions from an atomic ensemble driven by two-color classical fields. The correlated pair of photons (signal and idler) is generated by adiabatically driving the system with large-detuned light fields via four-wave mixing. The signal photon from the upper transition of the diamond-type atomic levels is followed by the idler one which can be superradiant due to light-induced dipole–dipole interactions. We then calculate the cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) of the idler photon, which is a cumulative effect of interaction energy. We study its dependence on a cylindrical geometry, a conventional setup in cold atom experiments, and estimate the maximum CLS which can be significant and observable. Manipulating the CLS of cascade emissions enables frequency qubits that provide alternative robust elements in quantum network. - Highlights: • Superradiance from a cascade atomic transition. • Correlated photon pair generation via four-wave mixing. • Dynamical light–matter couplings in a phased symmetrical state. • Cooperative Lamb shift in a cylindrical atomic ensemble.

  5. Spontaneous emission spectrum of a three-level atom embedded in photonic crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国强; 王健; 张汉壮

    2005-01-01

    The two models of three-level (one upper level and two lower levels, or two upper levels and one lower level) atom embedded in a double-band photonic crystal are adopted. The atomic transitions from the upper levels to the lower levels are assumed to be coupled by the same reservoir which are respectively the isotropic photonic band gap (PBG)modes, the anisotropic PBG modes and the free vacuum modes. The effects of the fine structure of the atomic ground state levels in the model with one upper level and two lower levels, and the quantum interferences in the model with two upper levels and one lower level on the spontaneous emission spectrum of an atom are investigated in detail. Most interestingly, it is shown that new spontaneous emission lines are produced from the fine splitting of atomic ground state levels in the isotropic PBG case. The quantum interferences induce additional narrow spontaneous lines near the transition from the empty upper level to the lower level.

  6. Spectroscopy of bright quasars: emission lines and internal extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Bachev, R; Semkov, E; Mihov, B

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to improve the existing knowledge about the most powerful engines in the Universe - quasars. Although a lot is already known, we still have only a vague idea how these engines work exactly, why they behave as they do, and what the relation is between their evolution and the evolution of their harboring galaxy. Methods we used are based on optical spectroscopy of visually bright quasars, many of which have recently been discovered as X-ray sources, but eventually missed in color-selected surveys. The spectra typically cover the 4200-7000 AA region, allowing measurements of the characteristics of the hydrogen lines, the FeII contribution, and other lines of interest. We present accurate redshift estimates and Seyfert type classification of the objects. We also show that the contribution of the host galaxy to the optical continuum is non-negligible in many cases, as is the intrinsic AGN absorption. Consequences of not correcting for those factors when estimating different quasar ...

  7. Extracting Oscillation Frequencies in Spontaneous Emission Rate of an Atom Between Two Mirrors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hai-Jun; DU Meng-Li

    2007-01-01

    For an atom in a medium with refractive index n sandwiched between two parallel mirrors, we derive an analytical formula for the spontaneous emission rate based on Fermi's golden rule. The oscillations are not transparent in this formula. By performing Fourier transform on scaling variable measuring system size while holding system configuration fixed, we extracted the frequencies of many oscillations in this system. We show that these oscillations correspond to emitted photon closed-orbits going away from and returning to the emitting atom.

  8. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montaser, A.

    1992-01-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  9. Charging Induced Emission of Neutral Atoms from NaCl Nanocube Corners

    OpenAIRE

    Ceresoli, Davide; Zykova-Timan, Tatyana; Tosatti, Erio

    2008-01-01

    Detachment of neutral cations/anions from solid alkali halides can in principle be provoked by donating/subtracting electrons to the surface of alkali halide crystals, but generally constitutes a very endothermic process. However, the amount of energy required for emission is smaller for atoms located in less favorable positions, such as surface steps and kinks. For a corner ion in an alkali halide cube the binding is the weakest, so it should be easier to remove that atom, once it is neutral...

  10. Ultra fast atomic process in X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Tajima, T.

    1998-03-01

    An ultra-fast atomic process together with X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization using high intensity (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse (20fs) X-ray is studied. A new class of experiment is proposed and a useful pumping source is suggested. In this method, it is found that the gain value of X-ray laser amounts to larger than 1000(1/cm) with use of the density of 10{sup 22}/cm{sup 3} of carbon atom. Electron impact ionization effect and initial density effect as well as intensity of pumping source effect are also discussed. (author)

  11. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Carter

    2002-12-31

    SRD tested a number of different length cavities during this past quarter. Continuous transmission was observed with cavity lengths from 65 to 12 cm. The 65 cm cavity was replaced with a 39 cm cavity for work performed during this quarter. Flue gas components were tested for background absorptions and any interference with the determination of accurate mercury concentrations. Sulfur dioxide was found to absorb fairly strongly in the region of the mercury transition, but the Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) instrument was still able to detect mercury at subparts-per-billion by volume (ppb) levels. Additional flue gases tested included H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}. None of these flue gas constituents showed any observable absorption in the ultraviolet region near the atomic mercury transition. Work was also initiated in speciation studies. In particular mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) was tested. A mercury signal was detected from a gas stream containing HgCl{sub 2}. SRD was not able to determine definitively if there exists a spectral shift great enough to separate HgCl{sub 2} from elemental mercury in these initial tests.

  12. Laser absorption spectroscopy diagnostics of helium metastable atoms generated in dielectric barrier discharge cryoplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Stauss, Sven; Sakai, Osamu; Terashima, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    Cryoplasmas, which are plasmas whose gas temperatures are below room temperature (RT), have shown dynamic changes in their physical and chemical characteristics when the gas temperature in the plasmas (Tgp) was decreased from RT. In this study, we measured the temporal behavior of helium metastable (Hem) atoms generated in a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge at ambient gas temperatures (Tga) of 300, 100, and 14 K and with a gas density similar to atmospheric conditions by laser absorption spectroscopy. The increments of Tgp to Tga were less than 20 K. We found from the results that the Hem lifetime and maximum density become longer and larger over one order of magnitude for lower Tga. The reasons for the long Hem lifetime at low Tga are decreases in the rate coefficients of three-body Hem quenching reactions and in the amounts of molecular impurities with boiling points higher than that of He.

  13. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons - Spectroscopy and collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    This is the second volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 2 introduces lasers and quantum optics, while the main focus is on the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy, as well as on collision physics as the continuum counterpart to bound molecular states. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  14. The in-gas-jet laser ion source: resonance ionization spectroscopy of radioactive atoms in supersonic gas jets

    OpenAIRE

    Kudryavtsev, Yu; Ferrer, R; Huyse, M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.(KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Leuven, 3001, Belgium)

    2012-01-01

    New approaches to perform efficient and selective step-wise Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) of radioactive atoms in different types of supersonic gas jets are proposed. This novel application results in a major expansion of the In-Gas Laser Ionization and Spectroscopy (IGLIS) method developed at KU Leuven. Implementation of resonance ionization in the supersonic gas jet allows to increase the spectral resolution by one order of magnitude in comparison with the currently performed in-g...

  15. Time-resolved spectroscopy of spin-current emission from a magnetic insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateno, Yuma; Fukami, Masaya; Tashiro, Takaharu; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate time-resolved spectroscopy of spin-current emission from a magnetic insulator using the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE). We measured magnetic field dependence of the spin-current emission in the time domain and found that the spectral shape of the ISHE voltage changes with time. The change in the spectral shape is due to field and power dependent temporal oscillation of the spin pumping driven by parametric magnons. The observed oscillating spin-current emission driven by dipole-exchange magnons is well reproduced by a model calculation based on the S theory. In contrast, the spin-current emission driven by short-wavelength exchange magnons cannot be reproduced with this model, illustrating an important role of higher-order nonlinear effects in the spin-current emission.

  16. Surface and waveguide collection of Raman emission in waveguide-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zilong; Zervas, Michalis N; Bartlett, Philip N; Wilkinson, James S

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate Raman spectroscopy on a high index thin film tantalum pentoxide waveguide and compare collection of Raman emission from the waveguide end with that from the waveguide surface. Toluene was used as a convenient model analyte, and a 40-fold greater signal was collected from the waveguide end. Simulations of angular and spatial Raman emission distributions showed good agreement with experiments, with the enhancement resulting from efficient collection of power from dipoles near the surface into the high-index waveguide film and substrate, combined with long interaction length. The waveguide employed was optimized at the excitation wavelength but not at emission wavelengths, and full optimization is expected to lead to enhancements comparable to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in robust low-cost metal-free and nanostructure-free chips. PMID:27607994

  17. New method for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from livestock buildings using open-path FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briz, Susana; Barrancos, José; Nolasco, Dácil; Melián, Gladys; Padrón, Eleazar; Pérez, Nemesio

    2009-09-01

    It is widely known that methane, together with carbon dioxide, is one of the most effective greenhouse gases contributing to climate global change. According to EMEP/CORINAIR Emission Inventory Guidebook1, around 25% of global CH4 emissions originate from animal husbandry, especially from enteric fermentation. However, uncertainties in the CH4 emission factors provided by EMEP/CORINAIR are around 30%. For this reason, works addressed to calculate emissions experimentally are so important to improve the estimations of emissions due to livestock and to calculate emission factors not included in this inventory. FTIR spectroscopy has been frequently used in different methodologies to measure emission rates in many environmental problems. Some of these methods are based on dispersion modelling techniques, wind data, micrometeorological measurements or the release of a tracer gas. In this work, a new method for calculating emission rates from livestock buildings applying Open-Path FTIR spectroscopy is proposed. This method is inspired by the accumulation chamber method used for CO2 flux measurements in volcanic areas or CH4 flux in wetlands and aquatic ecosystems. The process is the following: livestock is outside the building, which is ventilated in order to reduce concentrations to ambient level. Once the livestock has been put inside, the building is completely closed and the concentrations of gases emitted by livestock begin to increase. The Open-Path system measures the concentration evolution of gases such as CO2, CH4, NH3 and H2O. The slope of the concentration evolution function, dC/dt, at initial time is directly proportional to the flux of the corresponding gas. This method has been applied in a cow shed in the surroundings of La Laguna, Tenerife Island, Spain). As expected, evolutions of gas concentrations reveal that the livestock building behaves like an accumulation chamber. Preliminary results show that the CH4 emission factor is lower than the proposed by

  18. Photochemistry of atomic oxygen green and red-doublet emissions in comets at larger heliocentric distances

    CERN Document Server

    Raghuram, Susarla

    2014-01-01

    In comets the atomic oxygen green to red-doublet emission intensity ratio (G/R ratio) of 0.1 has been used to confirm H$_2$O as the parent species producing oxygen emission lines. The larger ($>$0.1) value of G/R ratio observed in a few comets is ascribed to the presence of higher CO$_2$ and CO relative abundances in the cometary coma. We aim to study the effect of CO$_2$ and CO relative abundances on the observed G/R ratio in comets observed at large ($>$2 au) heliocentric distances by accounting for important production and loss processes of O($^1$S) and O($^1$D) in the cometary coma. Recently we have developed a coupled chemistry-emission model to study photochemistry of O($^1$S) and O($^1$D) atoms and the production of green and red-doublet emissions in comets Hyakutake and Hale-Bopp. In the present work we applied the model to six comets where green and red-doublet emissions are observed when they are beyond 2 au from the Sun. In a water-dominated cometary coma and with significant ($>$10%) CO$_2$ relati...

  19. Iodine Determination by Microwave Plasma Torch Atomic Emission Spectrometer Coupled with Online Preconcentration Vapor Generation Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FEI Yan-qun; LUO Gui-min; FENG Guo-dong; CHEN Huan-wen; FEI Qiang; HUAN Yan-fu; JIN Qin-han

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on iodine determination by microwave plasma torch atomic emission spectrometry (MPT-AES) coupled with online preconcentration vapor generation method.A new desolvation device,multistrand Nation dryer,was used as the substitute for condenser desolvation system.Some experimental conditions,such as preconcentration time,acidity of sample solution,rinsing solution acidity and dynamic linear range were investigated and optimized.The new desolvation system eliminates the problem of decreasing emission intensity of I(I) 206.238 nm line with the increase of working time on a conventional condenser desolvation system,thus greatly improving the reproducibility.

  20. Correlation between Soft X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectra of the Nitrogen Atoms within Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Yuka; Tokushima, Takashi; Takahashi, Osamu; Hoke, Hiroshi; Takamuku, Toshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been performed on the N K-edge of two imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([C2mim][TFSA]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C2mim][Br]), to clarify the electronic structures of the ILs. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has also been applied to the ILs by excitation at various X-ray energies according to the XAS spectra. It was possible to fully associate the XAS peaks with the XES peaks. Additionally, both XAS and XES spectra of the ILs were well reproduced by the theoretical spectra for a single-molecule model on [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) using density functional theory. The assignments for the XAS and XES peaks of the ILs were accomplished from both experimental and theoretical approaches. The theoretical XAS and XES spectra of [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) did not significantly depend on the conformations of the ions. The reproducibility of the theoretical spectra for the single-molecule model suggested that the interactions between the cations and anions are very weak in the ILs, thus scarcely influencing the electronic structures of the nitrogen atoms. PMID:27388151

  1. Atomic and Molecular Photoelectron and Auger Electron SpectroscopyStudies Using Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, Stephen H.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spectroscopy, combined with synchrotron radiation, was used to measure the angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons from atoms and molecules as functions of photon energy. The branching ratios and partial cross sections were a 130 measured in certain cases. By comparison with theoretical calculations, the experimental results are interpreted in terms of the characteristic electronic structure and ionization dynamics of the atomic or molecular sample. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) spectra o f the ejected electrons. The ''a double-angle-TOF'' method for the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions is discussed. This technique offers the advantages of increased electron collect ion efficiency and the elimination of certain systematic errors. Several results were obtained for Xe using photon energies in the range hv {approx_equal} 60-190 eV, where excitation and ionization of the inner-subshell 4d electrons dominates. The 4d asymmetry parameter {beta} exhibits strong oscillations with energy, in agreement with several theoretical calculations. As predicted, the 5p asymmetry parameter was observed to deviate strongly from that calculated using the independent-electron model, due to intershell correlation with the 4d electrons.

  2. Photoassociation spectroscopy of cold alkaline earth atoms near the intercombination line

    CERN Document Server

    Ciurylo, R; Kotochigova, S; Julienne, P S

    2004-01-01

    The properties of photoassociation (PA) spectra near the intercombination line (the weak transition between $^{1}S_{0}$ and $^{3}P_{1}$ states) of group II atoms are theoretically investigated. As an example we have carried out a calculation for Calcium atoms colliding at ultra low temperatures of 1 mK, 1 $\\mu$K, and 1 nK. Unlike in most current photoassociation spectroscopy the Doppler effect can significantly affect the shape of the investigated lines. Spectra are obtained using Ca--Ca and Ca--Ca$^*$ short-range {\\it ab initio} potentials and long-range van der Waals and resonance dipole potentials. The similar van der Waals coefficients of ground $^{1}S_{0} + ^{1}S_{0}$ and excited $^{1}S_{0} + ^{3}P_{1}$ states cause the PA to differ greatly from those of strong, allowed transitions with resonant dipole interactions. The density of spectral lines is lower, the Condon points are at relatively short range, and the reflection approximation for the Franck-Condon factors is not applicable, and the spontaneous ...

  3. New niobium and rhenium halides synthesis routes by atomic vaporization. X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New synthetic route as the so called 'chimie douce' or MVS (Metal Vapor Synthesis) has been an increasing field lately to synthesize new kind of solid state structures. Our interest is the assembly of small molecular building blocks of early transition metal halides. We illustrate the use of vaporized rare earth metals to condense NbCls units. We probed the local order around the Nb atom with X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy, far Infra-Red and XPS in order to better understand the mechanisms involved. A first EXAFS, IR and XPS study on solid state products has shown the evolution of the NbCl5 dimer towards a chain like structure. However, the condensation patterns depends on the rare earth atoms vaporized. These results have been confirmed by X-ray Absorption ab initio calculations. Because our compounds are extremely air sensitive we have developed in situ MVS reactor to take 'snapshots' of the structural intermediates by EXAFS. This study showed the condensation of the initial NbCl5 building blocks by reduction of the Nb oxidation state by rare earth vaporization. This method is a new way of looking at condensation mechanisms via structural evolution observed by EXAFS. (author)

  4. Effect of target composition on the emission enhancement observed in Double-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristo Foretti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.; Salvetti, A.; Tognoni, E.

    2008-02-01

    The effect of the matrix composition on the emission enhancement observed in Double-Pulse (DP) Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was studied for several pure metal targets (Al, Au, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Pt, Si and W). The measurements were performed in air by using a dual-pulse Nd:YAG ns laser emitting 60mJ pulses at 1064nm wavelength. The measurement of the emission enhancement for neutral and ionic lines of all the samples showed a wide range of results. Very low enhancement was observed in Pb, Ni and Mn while the highest values of enhancement were obtained in Cu, Al and Au. The space-averaged thermodynamic parameters of the induced plasmas in DP and in SP LIBS were calculated and the enhancement of ablated atomized mass in DP case was spectroscopically estimated in all the targets. A correlation seems to exist between the ablated atomized mass enhancement and the plasma temperature increase in the DP configuration. An attempt was made to correlate the increase of these two quantities with the melting point and heat, boiling point and heat, reflectivity and ionization energy of the metal. No evident correlation was found. At the opposite, a correlation was observed between the ablated atomized mass enhancement and the thermal diffusivity of the metal. A simple picture is proposed to explain the experimental findings. It is hypothesized that different mass ablation mechanisms prevail depending on the experimental configuration. It may be expected that in the SP case mass ablation is dominated by vaporization, while in the DP case it is dominated by phase explosion and/or melt expulsion.

  5. Expressing self-absorption in the analytical function of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kántor, Tibor; Bartha, András

    2015-11-01

    The self-absorption of spectral lines was studied with up to date multi-element inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) instrumentation using radial and axial viewing of the plasma, as well, performing line peak height and line peak area measurements. Two resonance atomic and ionic lines of Cd and Mg were studied, the concentration range was extended up to 2000 mg/L. At the varying analyte concentration, constant matrix concentration of 10,000 mg/L Ca was ensured in the pneumatically nebulized solutions. The physical and the phenomenological formulation of the emission analytical function is overviewed and as the continuity of the earlier results the following equation is offered:

  6. X-ray emission simulation from hollow atoms produced by high intensity laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Zhidkov, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan); Suto, Keiko [Nara Women' s Univ., Graduate School of Human Culture, Nara (Japan); Kagawa, Takashi [Nara Women' s Univ., Department of Physics, Nara (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    We theoretically study the x-ray emission from hollow atoms produced by collisions of multiply charged ions accelerated by a short pulse laser with a solid or foil. By using the multistep-capture-and-loss (MSCL) model a high conversion efficiency to x-rays in an ultrafast atomic process is obtained. It is also proposed to apply this x-ray emission process to the x-ray source. For a few keV x-rays this x-ray source has a clear advantage. The number of x-ray photons increases as the laser energy becomes larger. For a laser energy of 10 J, the number of x-ray photons of 3x10{sup 11} is estimated. (author)

  7. Laser sampling system for an inductively-coupled atomic emission spectrometer. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-15

    A laser sampling system was attached to a Perkin Elmer Optima 3000 inductively-coupled plasma, atomic emission spectrometer that was already installed and operating in the Chemistry and Geochemistry Department at the Colorado School of Mines. The use of the spectrometer has been highly successful. Graduate students and faculty from at least four different departments across the CSM campus have used the instrument. The final report to NSF is appended to this final report. Appendices are included which summarize several projects utilizing this instrument: acquisition of an inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer for the geochemistry program; hydrogen damage susceptibility assessment for high strength steel weldments through advanced hydrogen content analysis, 1996 and 1997 annual reports; and methods for determination of hydrogen distribution in high strength steel welds.

  8. Secondary electron emission from Au by medium energy atomic and molecular ions

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, A; Obata, F; Hamamoto, Y; Yogo, A

    2002-01-01

    Number distributions of secondary electrons emitted from a Au metal surface have been measured for atomic and molecular ions of H sup + , He sup + , C sup + , N sup + , O sup + , H sup + sub 2 , H sup + sub 3 , HeH sup + , CO sup + and O sup + sub 2 in the energy range 0.3-2.0 MeV. The emission statistics obtained are described fairly well by a Polya function. The Polya parameter b, determining the distribution shape, is found to decrease monotonously with increasing emission yield gamma, revealing a surprising relationship of b gamma approx 1 over the different projectile species and impact energies. This finding supports certainly the electron cascading model. Also we find a strong negative molecular effect for heavier molecular ions, showing a significant reduction of gamma compared to the estimated values using constituent atomic projectile data.

  9. Identification of microcrystalline rocks using thermal emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardgrove, C. J.; Rogers, D.; Glotch, T. D.; Arnold, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    High-silica deposits on Mars have been discovered from orbit (Holden Crater, Mawrth Vallis) and from landed surface missions to both Gusev Crater (Spirit) and Gale Crater (Curiosity). The character of these silica deposits can be used to understand both the depositional environment (i.e. fumarole vs. sinter) and/or diagenetic process. Initial work has shown that, in the case of opaline silica, there are differences in spectral shape that may be related to surface textural features imparted during formation or post-depositional alteration. Due to the increasing importance of understanding microcrystalline deposits on Mars, here, we study the effects of crystal size and surface roughness on thermal infrared emission spectra of micro- and macro-crystalline quartz. The spectra of chert and macro-crystalline quartz have significant differences in both spectral contrast, and in the rounded doublet between ~1000-1250 cm-1, which can shift and appear less rounded in microcrystalline samples. We find that microcrystalline minerals exhibit naturally rough surfaces compared to their macrocrystalline counterparts at the 10 micron scale; and that this roughness causes distinct spectral differences within the Reststrahlen bands. We find that surface roughness, if rough on the scale of the wavelengths where the wavelength-dependent absorption coefficient (k) is large, can cause not only decreased spectral contrast, but also substantial changes in spectral shape. The spectral shape differences are small enough that the composition of the material is still recognizable, but large enough such that a roughness effect could be detected. We find that my studying the thermal infrared spectral character of the sample, it may be possible to make general inferences about microcrystallinity, and thus aid in the potential reconstruction of sedimentary rock diagenesis.

  10. The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, in the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre, VAMDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Christian P.; Schlemmer, Stephan; Schilke, Peter; Stutzki, Jürgen; Müller, Holger S. P.

    2016-09-01

    The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, was founded 1998 to provide in its catalog section line lists of mostly molecular species which are or may be observed in various astronomical sources (usually) by radio astronomical means. The line lists contain transition frequencies with qualified accuracies, intensities, quantum numbers, as well as further auxiliary information. They have been generated from critically evaluated experimental line lists, mostly from laboratory experiments, employing established Hamiltonian models. Separate entries exist for different isotopic species and usually also for different vibrational states. As of December 2015, the number of entries is 792. They are available online as ascii tables with additional files documenting information on the entries. The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre, VAMDC, was founded more than 5 years ago as a common platform for atomic and molecular data. This platform facilitates exchange not only between spectroscopic databases related to astrophysics or astrochemistry, but also with collisional and kinetic databases. A dedicated infrastructure was developed to provide a common data format in the various databases enabling queries to a large variety of databases on atomic and molecular data at once. For CDMS, the incorporation in VAMDC was combined with several modifications on the generation of CDMS catalog entries. Here we introduce related changes to the data structure and the data content in the CDMS. The new data scheme allows us to incorporate all previous data entries but in addition allows us also to include entries based on new theoretical descriptions. Moreover, the CDMS entries have been transferred into a mySQL database format. These developments within the VAMDC framework have in part been driven by the needs of the astronomical community to be able to deal efficiently with large data sets obtained with the Herschel Space Telescope or, more recently, with the Atacama Large

  11. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy of advanced materials for opto- and nano-electronics

    CERN Multimedia

    Olafsson, S; Weyer, G O P; Masenda, H; Dlamini, W B

    Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS) is a versatile solid state method giving information about probe atom interactions with its nearest neighbours. Simultaneously, information on the probe valence state, site symmetry, and electric and magnetic hyperfine interactions is obtained. MS can be applied in many different contexts in material science and solid state physics. MS using radioactive isotopes, applied for decades at the ISOLDE facilities, has the particular merit of very high sensitivity. This opens up many new possibilities compared to traditional (absorption) Mössbauer spectroscopy. Among them is the possibility of working with very low concentrations (10$^{-4}$ at. ~\\%), where the probe atoms are true dilute impurities. Here we propose four main themes in our Mössbauer investigations for the coming years: \\\\(1) Para-magnetic relaxations in compound semiconductors. \\\\(2) Vacancy diffusion in group IV semiconductors. \\\\(3) Doping of Si-nano-particles. \\\\(4) Investigation of phase change mechanisms in chalcog...

  12. Liquid sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry — Critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can be considered as the most important tools in inorganic analytical chemistry. Huge progress has been made since the first analytical applications of the ICP. More stable RF generators, improved spectrometers and detection systems were designed along with the achievements gained from advanced microelectronics, leading to overall greatly improved analytical performance of such instruments. In contrast, for the vast majority of cases liquid sample introduction is still based on the pneumatic principle as described in the late 19th century. High flow pneumatic nebulizers typically demand the use of spray chambers as “aerosol filters” in order to match the prerequisites of an ICP. By this, only a small fraction of the nebulized sample actually contributes to the measured signal. Hence, the development of micronebulizers was brought forward. Those systems produce fine aerosols at low sample uptake rates, but they are even more prone for blocking or clogging than conventional systems in the case of solutions containing a significant amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). Despite the high number of publications devoted to liquid sample introduction, it is still considered the Achilles' heel of atomic spectrometry and it is well accepted, that the technology used for liquid sample introduction is still far from ideal, even when applying state-of-the-art systems. Therefore, this review is devoted to offer an update on developments in the field liquid sample introduction that had been reported until the year 2013. The most recent and noteworthy contributions to this field are discussed, trends are highlighted and future directions are outlined. The first part of this review provides a brief overview on theoretical considerations regarding conventional pneumatic nebulization, the fundamentals on aerosol generation and discusses characteristics of aerosols ideally

  13. Laser spectroscopy with nanometric gas cells distance dependence of atom-surface interaction and collisions under confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Hamdi, I; Yarovitski, A; Dutier, G; Maurin, I; Saltiel, S; Li, Y; Lezama, A; Vartapetyan, T; Sarkisyan, D; Gorza, M P; Fichet, M; Bloch, D; Ducloy, M; Hamdi, Ismah\\`{e}ne; Todorov, Petko; Yarovitski, Alexander; Dutier, Gabriel; Maurin, Isabelle; Saltiel, Solomon; Li, Yuanyuan; Lezama, Arturo; Varzhapetyan, Tigran; Sarkisyan, David; Gorza, Marie-Pascale; Fichet, Mich\\`{e}le; Bloch, Daniel; Ducloy, Martial

    2005-01-01

    The high sensitivity of Laser Spectroscopy has made possible the exploration of atomic resonances in newly designed "nanometric" gas cells, whose local thickness varies from 20nm to more than 1000 nm. Following the initial observation of the optical analogous of the coherent Dicke microwave narrowing, the newest prospects include the exploration of long-range atom surface van der Waals interaction with spatial resolution in an unprecedented range of distances, modification of atom dielectric resonant coupling under the influence of the coupling between the two neighbouring dielectric media, and even the possible modification of interatomic collisions processes under the effect of confinement.

  14. Angle and Spin Resolved Auger Emission Theory and Applications to Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lohmann, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    The Auger effect must be interpreted as the radiationless counterpart of photoionization and is usually described within a two-step model. Angle and spin resolved Auger emission physics deals with the theoretical and numerical description, analysis and interpretation of such types of experiments on free atoms and molecules. This monograph derives the general theory applying the density matrix formalism and, in terms of irreducible tensorial sets, so called state multipoles and order parameters, for parameterizing the atomic and molecular systems, respectively. Propensity rules and non-linear dependencies between the angular distribution and spin polarization parameters are included in the discussion. The numerical approaches utilizing relativistic distorted wave (RDWA), multiconfigurational Dirac-Fock (MCDF), and Greens operator methods are described. These methods are discussed and applied to theoretical predictions, numerical results and experimental data for a variety of atomic systems, especially the rare...

  15. Photon Emission Dynamics of a Two-Level Atom in a Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chang Jae

    2015-01-01

    The collapse and revival of quantum states appear in diverse areas of physics. In quantum optics the occurrence of such a phenomena in the evolution of an atomic state, interacting with a light field initially in a coherent state, was predicted by using the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM), and subsequently demonstrated experimentally. In this paper we revisit the JCM with the Monte-Carlo wave function approach and investigate the time evolution of the photon emission rate of the atom in a cavity. Analytical and numerical quantum trajectory calculations show that the cavity and the initial field statistics strongly influence the photon emission dynamics. A coherent field indeed gives rise to a collapse and revival behavior that mirrors atomic state evolution. However, there are differences between the two. The emission rate for a field in a Fock number state exhibits a sinusoidal oscillation, and there exists a quiescent period for a thermal field. These properties are quite different from those in free space. It ...

  16. Emission spectroscopy of a plasma created by corona discharge in helium

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thi Hai Van

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful tool to obtain information on microscopicprocesses in non-equilibrium discharge plasma (corona) in dense media such as high pressuresupercritical gas and even liquids. Spectroscopic observations of the light emitted from anionization zone near a tip electrode can be used to determine structural information of thelocal environment of the emitting atoms or molecules. The spectral features observable aresensitive to the immediate surroundings of the emitti...

  17. Excitation emission and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of selected varnishes used in historical musical instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Austin; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Thoury, Mathieu; Comelli, Daniela; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2009-11-15

    The analysis of various varnishes from different origins, which are commonly found on historical musical instruments was carried out for the first time with both fluorescence excitation emission spectroscopy and laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Samples studied include varnishes prepared using shellac, and selected diterpenoid and triterpenoid resins from plants, and mixtures of these materials. Fluorescence excitation emission spectra have been collected from films of naturally aged varnishes. In parallel, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of varnishes provides means for discriminating between short- (less than 2.0 ns) and long-lived (greater than 7.5 ns) fluorescence emissions in each of these complex materials. Results suggest that complementary use of the two non destructive techniques allows a better understanding of the main fluorophores responsible for the emission in shellac, and further provides means for distinguishing the main classes of other varnishes based on differences in fluorescence lifetime behaviour. Spectrofluorimetric data and time resolved spectra presented here may form the basis for the interpretation of results from future in situ fluorescence examination and time resolved fluorescence imaging of varnished musical instruments.

  18. Negative ions, energy loss, and electron emission during grazing scattering of fast H and He atoms from a clean and oxidized NiAl(1 1 0) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blauth, D. [Institut fuer Physik der Humboldt, Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin-Adlershof (Germany); Winter, H., E-mail: winter@physik.hu-berlin.de [Institut fuer Physik der Humboldt, Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin-Adlershof (Germany)

    2011-06-01

    Negative ion fractions, projectile energy loss, and the emission of electrons is studied for grazing scattering of hydrogen and helium atoms/ions from a clean and oxidized NiAl(1 1 0) surface. Making use of translation energy spectroscopy and the coincident detection of the number of emitted electrons we have studied the electronic interaction mechanisms for the change from a clean metal target to an insulator surface via the preparation of a well defined ultrathin alumina film on top of the metal substrate. We find that already for a monolayer thick oxide film the characteristic different features of electronic processes for the surface of an insulator crystal are present.

  19. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  20. Soil humic-like organic compounds in prescribed fire emissions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we present the chemical characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon fraction of atmospheric aerosol collected during a prescribed fire burn in relation to soil organic matter and biomass combustion. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we observed that humic-like substances in fire emissions have been associated with soil organic matter rather than biomass. Using a chemical mass balance model, we estimated that soil organic matter may contribute up to 41% of organic hydrogen and up to 27% of water-soluble organic carbon in fire emissions. Dust particles, when mixed with fresh combustion emissions, substantially enhances the atmospheric oxidative capacity, particle formation and microphysical properties of clouds influencing the climatic responses of atmospheric aeroso. Owing to the large emissions of combustion aerosol during fires, the release of dust particles from soil surfaces that are subjected to intense heating and shear stress has, so far, been lacking. -- Highlights: •We characterized the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) of fire emissions by NMR. •Distinct patterns were observed for soil dust and vegetation combustion emissions. •Soil organic matter accounted for most of WSOC in early prescribed burn emissions. -- Humic-like soil organic matter may be an important component of particulate emissions in the early stages of wildfires

  1. Symmetry-resolved spectroscopy by detection of a metastable hydrogen atom for investigating the doubly excited states of molecular hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odagiri, Takeshi; Kumagai, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Takehiko; Nakano, Motoyoshi; Kouchi, Noriyuki [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Suzuki, Isao H, E-mail: joe@chem.titech.ac.j [Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2009-11-01

    Symmetry-resolved spectroscopy for investigating the doubly excited states of molecular hydrogen has been newly developed, where a metastable hydrogen atom dissociating in a direction parallel and perpendicular to the electric vector of the linearly polarized incident light is detected.

  2. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  3. Controlling spontaneous emission of a two-level atom by hyperbolic metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Zheng; Jiang, Xunya

    2012-01-01

    Within the frame of quantum optics we analyze the properties of spontaneous emission of two-level atom in media with indefinite permittivity tensor where the geometry of the dispersion relation is characterized by an ellipsoid or a hyperboloid(hyperbolic medium). The decay rate is explicitly given with the orientation of the dipole transition matrix element taken into account. It indicates that for the ellipsoid case the intensity of the photons coupled into different modes can be tuned by changing the direction of the matrix element and for the hyperboloid case it is found that spontaneous emission in hyperbolic medium can be dramatically enhanced compared to the dielectric background. Moreover, spontaneous emission exhibit the strong directivity and get the maximum in the asymptote direction.

  4. Relativistic theory for radiative forward electron emission in heavy ion-atom encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubaßa-Amundsen, Doris; Müller, Robert; Surzhykov, Andrey; Yerokhin, Vladimir

    2014-12-01

    The forward electron emission with simultaneous photon production during the scattering of relativistic, highly stripped projectiles from light target atoms is calculated within the Dirac theory. The method of calculation is a simplification of the impulse approximation and is based on the relation of the cross section for radiative capture to continuum of loosely bound electrons to the frame-transformed electron bremsstrahlung cross section. It is demonstrated that such an approximation is well justified in a large region of energies and photon emission angles, with the exception of the extreme forward and backward emission and the soft-photon energy limit. The cusp spectrum and the corresponding angular distribution are compared to recent experimental data for the collision system 90.38 MeV/amu U88+ + N2.

  5. Characterization of coal oil using three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Xiao; Yujun Zhang; Zhigang Wang; Dan Jin; Gaofang Yin; Wenqing Liu

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensioned (3D) excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy is applied to charac terize the coal oil. The results show that the 3D fluorescence spectra of coal oil in aqueous solution mainly have one broad peak. This peak is identified at the excitation/emission wavelengths of 270/290 nm. The relation between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of coal oil is also studied. When the concentration lies between 2 鈥? 2000 ppm, the relation between the fluorescence intensity and the concen tration of coal oil is well linear. The nature of solvents significantly affects the EEM fluorescence of coal oil.

  6. Monitoring the deposition process of metal-doped polymer films using optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, L.; Biederman, H.

    1985-03-01

    Simultaneous plasma polymerization of halocarbons (CF/sub 4/ and C/sub 2/F/sub 3/Cl) and sputtering of metals (Au and Al) or cosputtering (Au + polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon)) have been performed by means of an RF (20 MHz) glow discharge excited by a planar magnetron. The optical emission spectroscopy (OES) has been used for monitoring the deposition process of metal-doped polymer films. The light emission intensity ratios of the relevant species in the plasma volume are given in connection with the characteristics of the films prepared.

  7. Hole emission from Ge/Si quantum dots studied by time-resolved capacitance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapteyn, C.M.A.; Lion, M.; Heitz, R.; Bimberg, D. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik; Miesner, C.; Asperger, T.; Brunner, K.; Abstreiter, G. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Walter-Schottky-Inst. fuer Physikalische Grundlagen der Halbleiterelektronik

    2001-03-01

    Emission of holes from self-organized Ge quantum dots (QDs) embedded in Si Schottky diodes is studied by time-resolved capacitance spectroscopy (DLTS). The DLTS signal is rather broad and depends strongly on the filling and detection bias conditions. The observed dependence is interpreted in terms of carrier emission from many-hole states of the QDs. The activation energies obtained from the DLTS measurements are a function of the amount of stored charge and the position of the Fermi level in the QDs. (orig.)

  8. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Michael; Schlaf, Rudy

    2015-08-01

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru0) and its oxide (RuO2) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru0 and RuO2 films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO2 and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.0 An interface dipole of up to -0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO2/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  9. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Michael, E-mail: mvschaefer@mail.usf.edu, E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Schlaf, Rudy, E-mail: mvschaefer@mail.usf.edu, E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru{sup 0}) and its oxide (RuO{sub 2}) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru{sup 0} and RuO{sub 2} films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO{sub 2} and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.{sup 0} An interface dipole of up to −0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO{sub 2}/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  10. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  11. Magneto optical trap recoil ion momentum spectroscopy: application to ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    87Rb atoms have been cooled, trapped and prepared as targets for collision studies with 2 and 5 keV Na+ projectiles. The physics studied deals with charge exchange processes. The active electron, which is generally the most peripheral electron of the atomic target, is transferred from the target onto the ionic projectile. The ionized target is called recoil ion. The technique used to study this physics is the MOTRIMS (Magneto Optical Trap Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy) technique, which combines a magneto optical trap and a recoil ion momentum spectrometer. The spectrometer is used for the measurement of the recoil ions momentum, which gives access to all the information of the collision: the Q-value (which is the potential energy difference of the active electron on each particle) and the scattering angle of the projectile. The trap provides extremely cold targets to optimize the measurement of the momentum, and to release the latter from thermal motion. Through cinematically complete experiments, the MOTRIMS technique gives access to better resolutions on momentum measurements. Measurements of differential cross sections in initial and final capture states and in scattering angle have been done. Results obtained for differential cross sections in initial and final states show globally a good agreement with theory and an other experiment. Nevertheless, discrepancies with theory and this other experiment are shown for the measurements of doubly differential cross sections. These discrepancies are not understood yet. The particularity of the experimental setup designed and tested in this work, namely a low background noise, allows a great sensitivity to weak capture channels, and brings a technical and scientific gain compared with previous works. (author)

  12. Potential application of flame infrared emission spectroscopy (FIRE) in on-line analyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses an investigation into the infrared emission from organic compounds undergoing combustion in hydrogen/air flames. Flame infrared emission (FIRE) spectroscopy has been applied to measurement such as: total purgeable organic carbon, total inorganic carbon, chloride, and available chlorine in water samples. Additionally, FIRE technology has been applied as a detector for gas chromatography. Infrared emission bands form vibrationally excited hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, and carbon dioxide are identified. Detection of one or more of these emission bands allowed the selective determination of organic compounds containing carbon, chlorine, or fluorine as they elute from a gas chromatography column. In addition to infrared emission from carbon dioxide, wavelengths characteristic of hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride, and sulfur dioxide have been identified. Combustion of chlorine containing compounds in a hydrogen rich (reducing) flame will produce vibrationally excited hydrogen chloride. Relaxation of hydrogen chloride from excited state to the ground state results in emission of infrared radiation at 3.8 micron. This emission is conveniently located between the mission bands for water (2.6 - 3.6 micron) and carbon dioxide (4.4 microns)

  13. Copper Determination in Gunshot Residue by Cyclic Voltammetric and Inductive Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Hashim Nurul’Afiqah Hashimah; Mohd Zain Zainiharyati; Jaafar Mohd Zuli

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of gunshot residue (GSR) is a crucial evidences for a forensic analyst in the fastest way. GSR analysis insists a suitable method provides a relatively simple, rapid and precise information on the spot at the crime scene. Therefore, the analysis of Cu(II) in GSR using cyclic voltammetry (CV) on screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) is a better choice compared to previous alternative methods such as Inductive Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) those required a lon...

  14. Characterization by acoustic emission and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the cathodic disbonding of Zn coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amami, Souhail [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6066 du CNRS, B.P. 20529, 60206 Compiegne Cedex (France)], E-mail: souhail.amami@utc.fr; Lemaitre, Christian; Laksimi, Abdelouahed; Benmedakhene, Salim [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6066 du CNRS, B.P. 20529, 60206 Compiegne Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    Galvanized steel has been tested in a synthetic sea water solution under different cathodic overprotection conditions. The generated hydrogen flux caused the damage of the metal-zinc interface and led to a progressive coating detachment. Scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and acoustic emission technique were used to characterize the damage chronology under different cathodic potentials. A damage mechanism was proposed and the acoustic signature related to the coating degradation was statistically identified using clustering techniques.

  15. Halogenated salicylaldehyde azines: The heavy atom effect on aggregation-induced emission enhancement properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiao-tong, E-mail: chenxiaotong@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tong, Ai-jun [Key Laboratory of Bioorganic Phosphorus Chemistry and Chemical Biology (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-01-15

    This study investigates the heavy-atom effect (HAE) on aggregation-induced emission enhancement (AIEE) properties of salicylaldehyde azines. For this purpose, a series of halogenated salicylaldehyde azine derivatives, namely, chloro-salicylaldehyde azine (1), bromo-salicylaldehyde azine (2) and iodo-salicylaldehyde azine (3) are synthesized. 1 and 2 display typical AIEE characteristics of salicylaldehyde azine compounds; whereas for the iodo-substituent in 3, is found to be effective “external” heavy atom quenchers to salicylaldehyde azine fluorescence in aggregated state. Based on its weak fluorescence in aggregated state and relative strong fluorescence in dispersed state, 3 can also be applied as a turn-on fluorescence probe for egg albumin detection attributed to hydrophobic interaction. -- Highlights: • This study investigates the heavy-atom effect (HAE) on aggregation-induced emission enhancement (AIEE) properties of salicylaldehyde azines. • Chloro- and bromo-salicylaldehyde display typical AIEE properties of salicylaldehyde azine, whereas the iodo-substitute quenches AIEE in aggregated state. • Iodo-salicylaldehyde can be applied as a turn-on fluorescence probe for egg albumin detection attributed to hydrophobic interaction.

  16. First hydrogen operation of NIO1: Characterization of the source plasma by means of an optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbisan, M., E-mail: marco.barbisan@igi.cnr.it; Baltador, C.; Zaniol, B.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Univ. of Padua, Acciaierie Venete SpA), C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN-LNL, v.le dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Fantz, U.; Wünderlich, D. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Vialetto, L. [Università degli Studi di Padova, Via 8 Febbraio, 2, 35122 Padova (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a compact and flexible radio frequency H{sup −} ion source, developed by Consorzio RFX and INFN-LNL. The aim of the experimentation on NIO1 is the optimization of both the production of negative ions and their extraction and beam optics. In the initial phase of its commissioning, NIO1 was operated with nitrogen, but now the source is regularly operated also with hydrogen. To evaluate the source performances, an optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic was installed. The system includes a low resolution spectrometer in the spectral range of 300-850 nm and a high resolution (50 pm) one, to study, respectively, the atomic and the molecular emissions in the visible range. The spectroscopic data have been interpreted also by means of a collisional-radiative model developed at IPP Garching. Besides the diagnostic hardware and the data analysis methods, the paper presents the first plasma measurements across a transition to the full H mode, in a hydrogen discharge. The characteristic signatures of this transition in the plasma parameters are described, in particular, the sudden increase of the light emitted from the plasma above a certain power threshold.

  17. Influence of atomic tip structure on the intensity of inelastic tunneling spectroscopy data analyzed by combined scanning tunneling spectroscopy, force microscopy, and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Norio; Gustafsson, Alexander; Peronio, Angelo; Paulsson, Magnus; Arai, Toyoko; Giessibl, Franz J.

    2016-04-01

    Achieving a high intensity in inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) is important for precise measurements. The intensity of the IETS signal can vary by up to a factor of 3 for various tips without an apparent reason accessible by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) alone. Here, we show that combining STM and IETS with atomic force microscopy enables carbon monoxide front-atom identification, revealing that high IETS intensities for CO/Cu(111) are obtained for single-atom tips, while the intensity drops sharply for multiatom tips. Adsorption of the CO molecule on a Cu adatom [CO/Cu/Cu(111)] such that the molecule is elevated over the substrate strongly diminishes the tip dependence of IETS intensity, showing that an elevated position channels most of the tunneling current through the CO molecule even for multiatom tips, while a large fraction of the tunneling current bypasses the CO molecule in the case of CO/Cu(111).

  18. The Kalman filter approach to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Veen, E. H.; Bosch, S.; De Loos-Vollebregt, M. T. C.

    1994-07-01

    This article is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta Part B (SAB). The hardcopy text, comprising the main article and two appendices, is accompanied by a disk containing the compiled program, a reference manual and data files. The work deals with data handling in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). With this technique, the analyte signal is superimposed on a background signal. When separating the signals by manual or automated three-point background correction, there are many instances in which the data reduction fails. Based on scans recorded in a fast-scanning mode and on a library of pure-component scans, the Kaiman filter approach models the emission in the spectral window (about 100 pm) of the analyte and mathematically solves the problem of background correction. By using a criterion-based algorithm to correct for optical instability, the uncertainty in the determination of the interferent line signal is eliminated. Therefore, the present filter implementation yields more accurate and precise results, especially in the case of line overlap. The Kalman filter Approach to Atomic Spectrometry (KAAS) software automatically processes Perkin-Elmer Plasma 1000/2000 text files, but can also handle ASCII data files. Practical and comprehensive examples are given to evoke the "Kalman filter feeling" in the crucial step of creating the emission model.

  19. Mass scaling and non-adiabatic effects in photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold strontium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, Mateusz; Ciuryło, Roman; Julienne, Paul S; Yan, Mi; DeSalvo, Brian J; Killian, T C

    2014-01-01

    We report photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold $^{86}$Sr atoms near the intercombination line and provide theoretical models to describe the obtained bound state energies. We show that using only the molecular states correlating with the $^1S_0$$+$$^3P_1$ asymptote is insufficient to provide a mass scaled theoretical model that would reproduce the bound state energies for all isotopes investigated to date: $^{84}$Sr, $^{86}$Sr and $^{88}$Sr. We attribute that to the recently discovered avoided crossing between the $^1S_0$$+$$^3P_1$ $0_u$ ($^3\\Pi^+_u$) and $^1S_0$$+$$^1D_2$ $0_u$ ($^1\\Sigma^+_u$) potential curves at short range and we build a mass scaled interaction model that quantitatively reproduces the available $0_u$ bound state energies for the three stable bosonic isotopes. We also provide a two-channel model that incorporates the rotational (Coriolis) mixing between the $0_u$ and $1_u$ curves which, while not mass scaled, is capable of quantitatively describing the vibrational splittings observed...

  20. MDM2-MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2-MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ) in the micromolar range for the MDM2-MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2-MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation. PMID:27621617

  1. Atomic spectroscopy on fusion relevant ions and studies of light impurities in the JET tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunklev, M

    1999-03-01

    The spectrum and energy levels of C IV and the 3l-4l system of the Mg-like ions in the iron group elements have been investigated. This has led to several hundred identified transitions, many of them previously unknown. Using the Charge Exchange Diagnostic system at JET, ion temperatures, rotation velocities and densities have been derived from visible spectroscopic measurements on fully ionised light impurities, such as He, C, N and Ne. The existence of plume contribution from beam produced hydrogen-like ions has been proven beyond any doubt to affect the deduction of the active charge exchange signal of He II. In the case of C VI the plume signal was estimated to be at least a factor of five lower than the active charge exchange signal. Line integrated passive charge exchange emission between neutral background atoms and fully stripped impurity ions has been investigated and modelled. When the synthetic spectrum is fitted into the experimentally detected spectra the neutral background density can be deduced. The importance of including background atoms (H, D and T) as charge exchange donors, not only in state 2s, but also in state 1s, has shown to be crucial in high temperature shots. Transport of light impurities has been studied with gas puff injections into steady state H-mode plasmas. The results suggest that light impurities are transported as described by the neo-classical Pfirsch-Schlueter regime at the edge, whilst in the centre, sawtoothing, preferably to Banana transport, is mixing the plasma and increases the measured values on the diffusion. For the peaking of impurities in a steady state plasma an anomalous treatment was more in agreement with the experimental data. Certain confinement information, previously predicted theoretically as a part of the peaking equation, has been experimentally verified

  2. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombaba, Jackson M.

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The device exhibits a stable signal because the plasma is self-seeding and reignites itself every half cycle. A tesla coil is not required to commence generation of the plasma if the ac voltage applied is greater than the breakdown voltage of the plasma-supporting gas. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (Mvutilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienyl manganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer (common room humidifier) was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were also considered. Figures of merits of selected elements both in absorption and emission modes are reported. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using

  3. [Study on Ammonia Emission Rules in a Dairy Feedlot Based on Laser Spectroscopy Detection Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Zhang, Yu-jun; You, Kun; Wang, Li-ming; Gao, Yan-wei; Xu, Jin-feng; Gao, Zhi-ling; Ma, Wen-qi

    2016-03-01

    It needs on-line monitoring of ammonia concentration on dairy feedlot to disclose ammonia emissions characteristics accurately for reducing ammonia emissions and improving the ecological environment. The on-line monitoring system for ammonia concentration has been designed based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology combining with long open-path technology, then the study has been carried out with inverse dispersion technique and the system. The ammonia concentration in-situ has been detected and ammonia emission rules have been analyzed on a dairy feedlot in Baoding in autumn and winter of 2013. The monitoring indicated that the peak of ammonia concentration was 6.11 x 10(-6) in autumn, and that was 6.56 x 10(-6) in winter. The concentration results show that the variation of ammonia concentration had an obvious diurnal periodicity, and the general characteristic of diurnal variation was that the concentration was low in the daytime and was high at night. The ammonia emissions characteristic was obtained with inverse dispersion model that the peak of ammonia emissions velocity appeared at noon. The emission velocity was from 1.48 kg/head/hr to 130.6 kg/head/hr in autumn, and it was from 0.004 5 kg/head/hr to 43.32 kg/head/hr in winter which was lower than that in autumn. The results demonstrated ammonia emissions had certain seasonal differences in dairy feedlot scale. In conclusion, the ammonia concentration was detected with optical technology, and the ammonia emissions results were acquired by inverse dispersion model analysis with large range, high sensitivity, quick response without gas sampling. Thus, it's an effective method for ammonia emissions monitoring in dairy feedlot that provides technical support for scientific breeding.

  4. Nonthermal Optical Emission Spectrometry: Direct Atomization and Excitation of Cadmium for Highly Sensitive Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Wu, De-Fu; Yu, Yong-Liang; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-04-19

    The low atomization and excitation capability of nonthermal microplasma, e.g., dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), has greatly hampered its potential applications for the determination of metals in solution. In the present work, an inspiring development is reported for direct atomization and excitation of cadmium in aqueous solution by DBD and facilitates highly sensitive determination. A DBD microplasma is generated on the nozzle of a pneumatic micronebulizer to focus the DBD energy on a confined space and atomize/excite metals in the spray. Meanwhile, an appropriate sample matrix and nebulization in helium further improves the atomization and excitation capability of DBD. With cadmium as a model, its emission is recorded by a CCD spectrometer at 228.8 nm. By using an 80 μL sample solution nebulized at 3 μL s(-1), a linear range of 5-1000 μg L(-1) along with a detection limit of 1.5 μg L(-1) is achieved, which is comparable to those obtained by commercial bulky inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-based instrumentations. PMID:27030025

  5. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm−3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm−3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm−3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm−3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges. - Highlights: • We determine He metastable number densities for four plasma types • The highest number densities were observed in a dielectric barrier discharge • No helium metastable atoms were observed downstream from the exits of glow discharges

  6. Plasma optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic during amorphous silicon thin films deposition by Rf sputtering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the study of the glow discharge, used for amorphous silicon thin films deposition by Rf sputtering technique. The produced plasma is investigated by mean of the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) analysis. Different plasmas obtained with changing the gas pressure and Rf powers were analysed at different positions in the inter-electrode space. Emission lines from Ar, Si, Si+ and Ar+ were observed in the visible region. It was found that emission intensities of all the observed lines have a spatial Gaussian shape. The maximum intensity is located in the core of the plasma and decrease in the electrodes region. The ratio between the Si and Ar+ intensities (ISi/IAr+), in the target region, is proposed as a new tool to estimate the Ar sputtering yield. This ratio was compared to the theoretical calculated sputtering yield. The difference between these two quantities is exploited to determine the contribution of fast Ar neutrals in the sputtering process.

  7. Interactions of protons with furan molecules studied by collision-induced emission spectroscopy at the incident energy range of 50-1000 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasowicz, Tomasz J.; Pranszke, Boguslaw

    2016-08-01

    Investigations of the ion-molecule reactions provide insight into many fields ranging from the stellar wind interaction with interstellar media, up to medicine and industrial applications. Besides the applications, the understanding of these processes is itself a problem of fundamental importance. Thus, interactions of protons with the gas-phase furan molecules have been investigated for the first time in the energy range of 50-1000 eV exploiting collision-induced emission spectroscopy. Recorded spectra reveal emission of the atomic H β to H θ lines of the hydrogen Balmer series and the molecular bands of vibrationally and rotationally excited diatomic CH fragments created in the A2 Δ and B2Σ- electronic states. The measurements of the emission yields of the excited fragments by recording their intensities at different projectile energies have been performed. The highest yields have been observed for production of hydrogen atoms which intensities rapidly decreased with increasing principal quantum number n . From the H ( n = 4-7) intensity ratios depopulation factors of hydrogen excited states have been determined at each impact energy and possible collisional mechanisms leading to enhanced production of the hydrogen atoms have been suggested. We compare and discuss our results with improved data set of proton collisions with tetrahydrofuran (THF) molecules, the hydrogenated derivatives of furan.

  8. Corona discharge radical emission spectroscopy: a multi-channel detector with nose-type function for discrimination analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yunfei; Wu, Peng; Wu, Xi; Jiang, Xiaoming; Xu, Kailai; Hou, Xiandeng

    2013-04-21

    A simple and economical multi-channel optical sensor using corona discharge radical emission spectroscopy is developed and explored as an optical nose for discrimination analysis of volatile organic compounds, wines, and even isomers. PMID:23471437

  9. Projectile X-ray emission in relativistic ion-atom collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Salem, Shadi

    2010-01-01

    This work reports on the study of the projectile x-ray emission in relativistic ion-atom collisions. Excitation of K-shell in He-like uranium ions, electron capture into H-like uranium ions and Simultaneous ionization and excitation of initially He-like uranium ions have been studied using the experimental storage ring at GSI. Information about the population of the excited states for the H- and He-like uranium ions, can be obtained by measuring the angular distribution of the decay radiation...

  10. Analysis of atmospheric aerosols by atomic emission spectrometry with electrical discharge sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure is developed for the determination of the concentration of heavy metals (Pb, Mn, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Cd) in atmospheric air by atomic emission spectrometry with gas-discharge sampling onto the end of a standard carbon electrode. A design of a two-section sampler is proposed; the sampler provides the rapid determination of deposition factors for the deposition of heavy metals contained in aerosol particles onto the end of a carbon electrode. Examples of determining metal concentrations in a model sample of air and in atmospheric air and determination limits of metals deposited onto the end of a carbon electrode are given

  11. A Complete Model Helium Atom: Theoretical Emissivities, the Case B Approximation, and the Primordial Helium Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, R. L.; Bauman, R. P.; MacAdam, K. B.; Ferland, G. J.

    2004-12-01

    We have completed the development of a new model helium atom for the spectra simulation code Cloudy. All relevant astrophysically significant processes are included, and the spectrum is solved self-consistently with the thermal and ionization structure of the simulated system. We present here an overview of the differences that distinguish our model from those by previous authors. We also compare predicted case B emissivities with those from previous works. The differences will have significant consequences for the interpretation of spectra of a wide variety of systems. We also explore deviations from the case B approximation and present an estimate of the primordial helium abundance.

  12. Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions From Venus: VEX Observations and Theoretical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, M.-C.; Galli, A.; Tanaka, T.; Moore, T. E.; Wurz, P.; Holmstrom, M.

    2007-01-01

    Venus has almost no intrinsic magnetic field to shield itself from its surrounding environment. The solar wind thus directly interacts with the planetary ionosphere and atmosphere. One of the by-products of this close encounter is the production of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. Theoretical studies have shown that significant amount of ENAs are emanated from the planet. The launch of the Venus Express (VEX) in 2005 provided the first light ever of the Venus ENA emissions. The observed ENA flux level and structure are in pretty good agreement with the theoretical studies. In this paper, we present VEX ENA data and the comparison with numerical simulations. We seek to understand the solar wind interaction with the planet and the impacts on its atmospheres.

  13. Correspondence Between Oscillations and Emitted Photon Closed-Orbits in Spontaneous Emission Rate of an Atom Near a Dielectric Slab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUN Su-Jun; WANG Fu-He; ZHOU Yun-Song; DU Meng-Li

    2007-01-01

    We study the oscillations in the spontaneous emission rate of an atom near a dielectric slab. The emission rate is calculated as a function of system size using quantum electrodynamics. It exhibits multi-periodic oscillations.Four frequencies of the oscillations are extracted by Fourier transforms. They agree with actions of photon closed-orbits going away and returning to the atom. These oscillations are explained as manifestations of quantum interference effects between the emitted photon wave near the atom and the returning photon waves travelling along various closed-orbits.

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of matrix-isolated silver atoms after pulsed excitation of inner-shell transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, T.; Wiggenhauser, H.; Schriever, U.; Kolb, D. M.

    1990-02-01

    The energy dissipation in matrix-isolated silver atoms after pulsed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) excitation of 4d-5p transitions has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The decay behavior of the various fluorescence bands has been analyzed and a model for the relaxation process proposed within the framework of a two-dimensional configuration-coordinate diagram. If minute quantities of Ag2 are present in the matrix, the analysis requires consideration of energy transfer between silver atoms and dimers.

  15. Influence on electron energy loss spectroscopy of the niobium-substituted uranium atom: A density functional theory study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We present the electronic structure and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for uranium, niobium and U3Nb in which uranium is substituted by niobium. Comparing the electronic structures and optical properties for uranium, niobium and U3Nb, we found that when niobium atom replaces uranium atom in the center lattice, density of state (DOS) of U3Nb shifts downward to low energy. Niobium affects DOS forfand d electrons more than that for p and s electrons. U3Nb is similar to uranium for the electronic energy loss spectra.

  16. Characterisation of a micro-plasma device sensor using electrical measurements and emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, D

    2002-04-01

    This thesis reports on research undertaken on the characterisation of a micro-plasma device to be used for gas analysis by mean of plasma emission spectroscopy. The work covers aspects related to the micro-plasma electrical and optical emission parameters, and their importance for the utilisation of the micro-plasma device in gas analysis. Experimental results have been used to analyse the fundamental micro-plasma processes and to develop a model, which could provide additional information. This dissertation contains a general literature review of topics related to plasma physics, plasma emission spectroscopy, gas analysis (chemical analysis and artificial olfaction) and other micro-plasma applications. Experimental work focuses on two main areas: electrical measurements and emission measurements. Firstly, electrical measurements are taken and interpretations are given. Where necessary, new theoretical treatments are suggested in order to describe better the physical phenomena. Plasma emission has been considered under different working conditions. This allowed the characterisation of the micro-plasma emission and also a better understanding of the micro-plasma processes. On the basis of the experimental data obtained and other assumptions a model has been developed. A computer simulation based on this model provided additional useful information on the micro- plasma behaviour. The first fundamental implication of this new research is the peculiar behaviour of the micro-plasma. This micro-plasma exhibited deviations from Paschen law and strong dependency on cathode material, which contributed to the formation of a low current stable regime. These results have been followed by physical interpretations and theoretical descriptions. The second implication is the establishment of the boundaries and of the influencing parameters for plasma emission spectroscopy as an analytical tool in this particular micro-plasma. From the applied perspective this study has shown that

  17. Experimental study of conversion from atomic high—order harmonics to x—ray emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangQi; ChenJian-Xin; XiaYuan-Qin; ChenDe-Ying

    2003-01-01

    There are two physical phenomena in a strong laser intensity. One is the high-order harmonic emission; the other is x-ray emission from optical-field ionized plasmas. The experiment of conversion from high-order harmonics to x-ray emissions was given with a 105fs Ti:sapphire laser by adjusting laser intensities. The ingredient in plasma was investigated by the numerical simulations.Our experimental results suggested that the free electrons have detrimental effects on harmonic generation but are favourable for x-ray emission from optical-field ionized plasmas. If we want to obtain more intense harmonic signals as a coherent light source in the soft x-ray region, we must avoid the production of free electrons in plasmas. At the same time, if we want to observe x-rays for the development of high-repetition-rate table-top soft x-ray lasers, we should strip all atoms in the plasmas to a necessary ionized stage by the optical-field-ionization in the field of a high-intensity laser pulse.

  18. Experimental study of conversion from atomic high-order harmonics to x-ray emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骐; 陈建新; 夏元钦; 陈德应

    2003-01-01

    There are two physical phenomena in a strong laser intensity. One is the high-order harmonic emission; the other is x-ray emission from optical-field ionized plasmas. The experiment of conversion from high-order harmonics to x-ray emissions was given with a 105fs Ti:sapphire laser by adjusting laser intensities. The ingredient in plasma was investigated by the numerical simulations. Our experimental results suggested that the free electrons have detrimental effects on harmonic generation but are favourable for x-ray emission from optical-field ionized plasmas. If we want to obtain more intense harmonic signals as a coherent light source in the soft x-ray region, we must avoid the production of free electrons in plasmas. At the same time, if we want to observe x-rays for the development of high-repetition-rate table-top soft x-ray lasers, we should strip all atoms in the plasmas to a necessary ionized stage by the optical-fieldionization in the field of a high-intensity laser pulse.

  19. Quantification of fluorine traces in solid samples using CaF molecular emission bands in atmospheric air Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Llamas, C.; Pisonero, J.; Bordel, N.

    2016-09-01

    Direct solid determination of trace amounts of fluorine using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a challenging task due to the low excitation efficiency of this element. Several strategies have been developed to improve the detection capabilities, including the use of LIBS in a He atmosphere to enhance the signal to background ratios of F atomic emission lines. An alternative method is based on the detection of the molecular compounds that are formed with fluorine in the LIBS plasma. In this work, the detection of CaF molecular emission bands is investigated to improve the analytical capabilities of atmospheric air LIBS for the determination of fluorine traces in solid samples. In particular, Cu matrix samples containing different fluorine concentration (between 50 and 600 μg/g), and variable amounts of Ca, are used to demonstrate the linear relationships between CaF emission signal and F concentration. Limits of detection for fluorine are improved by more than 1 order of magnitude using CaF emission bands versus F atomic lines, in atmospheric-air LIBS. Furthermore, a toothpaste powder sample is used to validate this analytical method. Good agreement is observed between the nominal and the predicted fluorine mass-content.

  20. Raman spectroscopy as a tool to investigate the structure and electronic properties of carbon-atom wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Milani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, nanotubes and other carbon nanostructures have shown potential as candidates for advanced technological applications due to the different coordination of carbon atoms and to the possibility of π-conjugation. In this context, atomic-scale wires comprised of sp-hybridized carbon atoms represent ideal 1D systems to potentially downscale devices to the atomic level. Carbon-atom wires (CAWs can be arranged in two possible structures: a sequence of double bonds (cumulenes, resulting in a 1D metal, or an alternating sequence of single–triple bonds (polyynes, expected to show semiconducting properties. The electronic and optical properties of CAWs can be finely tuned by controlling the wire length (i.e., the number of carbon atoms and the type of termination (e.g., atom, molecular group or nanostructure. Although linear, sp-hybridized carbon systems are still considered elusive and unstable materials, a number of nanostructures consisting of sp-carbon wires have been produced and characterized to date. In this short review, we present the main CAW synthesis techniques and stabilization strategies and we discuss the current status of the understanding of their structural, electronic and vibrational properties with particular attention to how these properties are related to one another. We focus on the use of vibrational spectroscopy to provide information on the structural and electronic properties of the system (e.g., determination of wire length. Moreover, by employing Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman scattering in combination with the support of first principles calculations, we show that a detailed understanding of the charge transfer between CAWs and metal nanoparticles may open the possibility to tune the electronic structure from alternating to equalized bonds.

  1. Dielectric spectroscopy at the nanoscale by atomic force microscopy: A simple model linking materials properties and experimental response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of an atomic force microscope for studying molecular dynamics through dielectric spectroscopy with spatial resolution in the nanometer scale is a recently developed approach. However, difficulties in the quantitative connection of the obtained data and the material dielectric properties, namely, frequency dependent dielectric permittivity, have limited its application. In this work, we develop a simple electrical model based on physically meaningful parameters to connect the atomic force microscopy (AFM) based dielectric spectroscopy experimental results with the material dielectric properties. We have tested the accuracy of the model and analyzed the relevance of the forces arising from the electrical interaction with the AFM probe cantilever. In this way, by using this model, it is now possible to obtain quantitative information of the local dielectric material properties in a broad frequency range. Furthermore, it is also possible to determine the experimental setup providing the best sensitivity in the detected signal

  2. Standard practice for analysis of aqueous leachates from nuclear waste materials using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice is applicable to the determination of low concentration and trace elements in aqueous leachate solutions produced by the leaching of nuclear waste materials, using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). 1.2 The nuclear waste material may be a simulated (non-radioactive) solid waste form or an actual solid radioactive waste material. 1.3 The leachate may be deionized water or any natural or simulated leachate solution containing less than 1 % total dissolved solids. 1.4 This practice should be used by analysts experienced in the use of ICP-AES, the interpretation of spectral and non-spectral interferences, and procedures for their correction. 1.5 No detailed operating instructions are provided because of differences among various makes and models of suitable ICP-AES instruments. Instead, the analyst shall follow the instructions provided by the manufacturer of the particular instrument. This test method does not address comparative accuracy of different devices...

  3. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Manfred Lange; Dennis van Vörden; Rolf Möller

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements). When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip–sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between...

  4. Boosting persistence time of laser-induced plasma by electric arc discharge for optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S., E-mail: simon.eschlboeck-fuchs@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Kolmhofer, P.J.; Bodea, M.A.; Hechenberger, J.G.; Huber, N. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rössler, R. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, A-4031 Linz (Austria); Pedarnig, J.D., E-mail: johannes.pedarnig@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2015-07-01

    Plasma induced by nanosecond laser ablation is re-excited by a pulsed electric discharge and the parameters and optical emission of the plasma are measured. The discharge is a low-voltage and high-current electric arc that is triggered by the laser-induced plasma and slowly decaying with time. The optical emission of such combined plasma lasts up to several milliseconds which is much longer than without re-excitation (μs range). The emission spectra of re-excited plasma measured on different sample materials show higher line intensities than spectra measured by conventional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Moreover, emission lines of fluorine (spectral range 683–691 nm) and sulfur (range 520–550 nm) not detected by conventional LIBS become easily detectable with the combined plasma. The concentration of major components in metallurgical slags, as determined by calibration-free LIBS, agrees very well to the reference data evaluating the spectra taken from re-excited plasma. - Highlights: • Persistence time of laser-induced plasma in air is increased from ~ 10 μs to ~ 1 ms. • Laser-induced plasma triggers an electric arc discharge that boosts the plasma. • The combined laser-arc plasma is in LTE state over very long time (ms range). • CF-LIBS method delivers accurate results evaluating spectra of combined plasma. • Emission from S and F, not detected by LIBS, is detected with combined plasma.

  5. Probing the interaction of individual amino acids with inorganic surfaces using atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razvag, Yair; Gutkin, Vitaly; Reches, Meital

    2013-08-13

    This article describes single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements of the interaction between individual amino acid residues and inorganic surfaces in an aqueous solution. In each measurement, there is an amino acid residue, lysine, glutamate, phenylalanine, leucine, or glutamine, and each represents a class of amino acids (positively or negatively charged, aromatic, nonpolar, and polar). Force-distance curves measured the interaction of the individual amino acid bound to a silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip with a silcon substrate, cut from a single-crystal wafer, or mica. Using this method, we were able to measure low adhesion forces (below 300 pN) and could clearly determine the strength of interactions between the individual amino acid residues and the inorganic substrate. In addition, we observed how changes in the pH and ionic strength of the solution affected the adsorption of the residues to the substrates. Our results pinpoint the important role of hydrophobic interactions among the amino acids and the substrate, where hydrophobic phenylalanine exhibited the strongest adhesion to a silicon substrate. Additionally, electrostatic interactions also contributed to the adsorption of amino acid residues to inorganic substrates. A change in the pH or ionic strength values of the buffer altered the strength of interactions among the amino acids and the substrate. We concluded that the interplay between the hydrophobic forces and electrostatic interactions will determine the strength of adsorption among the amino acids and the surface. Overall, these results contribute to our understanding of the interaction at the organic-inorganic interface. These results may have implications for our perception of the specificity of peptide binding to inorganic surfaces. Consequently, it would possibly lead to a better design of composite materials and devices.

  6. Laser-induced Fluorescence and Optical Emission Spectroscopy for the Determination of Reactive Species in the Effluent of Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xuekai; Razavi, Hamid; Lu, Xinpei; Laroussi, Mounir

    2014-10-01

    OH radicals and O atoms are important active species in various applications of room temperature atmospheric pressure plasma jet (RT-APPJ). So the determination of absolute density of OH radicals and O atoms in RT-APPJs is necessary. In this work, the time and spatially resolved OH radicals density of a RT-APPJ are measured using the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technology. In addition, the spatial distribution of the emitting species along the axial direction of the jet is of interest and is measured using optical emission spectroscopy. The absolute OH density of the RT-APPJ is about 2.0 × 1013 cm-3 at 5 mm away from the plasma jet nozzle and 1 μs after the discharge. The OH density reaches a maximum when H2O concentration in helium gas flow is about 130ppm. In order to control the OH density, the effect of voltage polarity, applied voltage magnitude, pulse frequency, pulse width on the OH density are also investigated and discussed. O atoms are investigated by TA-LIF. It is demonstrated that the O atoms density reaches a maximum when O2 percent is about 0.3% in pure He and the lifetime of O atoms in RT-APPJ is much longer (up to dozens of ms) than OH radicals.

  7. Spatially-resolved HST Grism Spectroscopy of a Lensed Emission Line Galaxy at z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Frye, Brenda L; Bowen, David V; Meurer, Gerhardt; Sharon, Keren; Straughn, Amber; Coe, Dan; Broadhurst, Tom; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-01-01

    We take advantage of gravitational lensing amplification by Abell 1689 (z=0.187) to undertake the first space-based census of emission line galaxies (ELGs) in the field of a massive lensing cluster. Forty-three ELGs are identified to a flux of i_775=27.3 via slitless grism spectroscopy. One ELG (at z=0.7895) is very bright owing to lensing magnification by a factor of ~4.5. Several Balmer emission lines detected from ground-based follow-up spectroscopy signal the onset of a major starburst for this low-mass galaxy (M_* = 2 x 10^9 solar masses) with a high specific star formation rate (~20 /Gyr). From the blue emission lines we measure a gas-phase oxygen abundance consistent with solar (12+log(O/H)=8.8 +/- 0.2). We break the continuous line-emitting region of this giant arc into seven ~1kpc bins (intrinsic size) and measure a variety of metallicity dependent line ratios. A weak trend of increasing metal fraction is seen toward the dynamical center of the galaxy. Interestingly, the metal line ratios in a region...

  8. Dicke-Narrowing Spectroscopy of Doubly Dressed Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Singly Dressed Four-Wave-Mixing in a Confined Atomic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuan-Yuan; BAI Jin-Wao; LI-Li; ZHANG Wei-Feng; LI Chang-Biao; NIE Zhi-Qiang; GAN Chen-Li; ZHANG Yan-Peng

    2008-01-01

    Dicke-narrowing effect appears both in doubly dressed electromagnetically induced transparency and singly dressed four-wave-mixing lines due to the contribution of slow atoms resulting from de-excited effects of atom-wall collision and transient behaviour of atoms in a confined system. A robust recipe for high resolution spectroscopy of electromagnetically induced transparency dressed by two fields and four-wave-mixing lines comparable with the cold atoms is achievable in a thin vapour cell in experiments.

  9. A Radiative Cycle with Stimulated Emission from Atoms (Ions) in an astrophysical Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, S

    2003-01-01

    We propose that a radiative cycle operates in atoms (ions) located in a rarefied gas in the vicinity of a hot star. Besides spontaneous transitions the cycle includes a stimulated transition in one very weak intermediate channel. This radiative "bottle neck" creates a population inversion, which for an appropriate column density results in amplification and stimulated radiation in the weak transition. The stimulated emission opens a fast decay channel leading to a fast radiative cycle in the atom (or ion). We apply this model by explaining two unusually bright Fe II lines at 250.7 and 250.9 nm in the UV spectrum of gas blobs close to h Carinae, one of the most massive and luminous stars in the Galaxy. The gas blobs are spatially resolved from the central star by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We also suggest that in the frame of a radiative cycle stimulated emission is a key phenomenon behind many spectral lines showing anomalous intensities in spectra of gas blobs outside eruptive stars.

  10. First application of superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeters to hadronic-atom x-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, S; Curceanu, C; Doriese, W B; Fowler, J W; Gard, J; Gustafsson, F P; Hashimoto, T; Hayano, R S; Hirenzaki, S; Hays-Wehle, J P; Hilton, G C; Ikeno, N; Iliescu, M; Ishimoto, S; Itahashi, K; Iwasaki, M; Koike, T; Kuwabara, K; Ma, Y; Marton, J; Noda, H; O'Neil, G C; Outa, H; Reintsema, C D; Sato, M; Schmidt, D R; Shi, H; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, T; Swetz, D S; Tatsuno, H; Uhlig, J; Ullom, J N; Widmann, E; Yamada, S; Yamagata-Sekihara, J; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution pionic-atom x-ray spectroscopy was performed with an x-ray spectrometer based on a 240-pixel array of superconducting transition-edge-sensor (TES) microcalorimeters at the piM1 beam line of the Paul Scherrer Institute. X-rays emitted by pionic carbon via the 4f->3d transition and the parallel 4d->3p transition were observed with a full-width-at-half-maximum energy resolution of 6.8 eV at 6.4 keV. Measured x-ray energies are consistent with calculated electromagnetic values which considered the strong-interaction effect assessed via the Seki-Masutani potential for the 3p energy level, and favor the electronic population of two filled 1s electrons in the K-shell. Absolute energy calibration with an uncertainty of 0.1 eV was demonstrated under a high-rate hadron beam condition of 1.45 MHz. This is the first application of a TES spectrometer to hadronic-atom x-ray spectroscopy and is an important milestone towards next-generation high-resolution kaonic-atom x-ray spectroscopy.

  11. Stimulated emission and multi-peaked absorption in a four level N-type atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Kai; Gu Ying; Gong Qi-Huang

    2007-01-01

    Absorption and refrtion of the inner transition F2 (→) F3 of the closed four level N-type atom have been investigated under a weak field. The outer transitions F1 (→) F3 and F2 (→) F4 are resonantly interacted with drive field with frequency ωc and Rabi frequency Ωc, and saturation field with ωs and Ωs, respectively. For the suitable Rabi frequencies Ωc and Ωs, we obtain the Mollow absorption spectrum of probe field. The reason is that the drive field excites the atom to the upper level F3 and simultaneously the saturation field takes the atom out of the lower level F2, leading to the stimulated emission. Meanwhile, due to the dynamic energy splitting induced by the drive and saturation fields, the two- and four-peaked absorption spectra are observed. At the zero off-resonance detuning of probe field, we also find the transfer of dispersion from negative to positive with an increment of Ωs. Finally, the refractive index enhancement is predicted for a wide spectral region.

  12. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, A.

    In this project, new high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are developed for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using atomic emission spectrometry (AES) and mass spectrometry (MS). These devices offer promise of solving singularly difficult analytical problems that either exist now or are likely to arise in the future in the various fields of energy generation, environmental pollution, nutrition, and biomedicine. Emphasis is being placed on: (1) generation of annular, helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPs) that are suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements possessing high excitation and ionization energies, with the intent of enhancing the detecting powers of a number of elements; (2) computer modelings of ICP discharges to predict the behavior of new and existing plasmas; (3) diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems to quantify their fundamental properties, with the ultimate aim to improve analytical performance of atomic spectrometry; (4) development and characterization of new, low cost sample introduction systems that consume microliter or microgram quantities of samples; and (5) investigation of new membrane separators for stripping solvent from sample aerosol to reduce various interferences and to enhance sensitivity and selectivity in plasma spectrometry.

  13. Excitation-emission matrices and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Ts; Borisova, E.; Penkov, N.; Vladimirov, B.; Zhelyazkova, A.; Avramov, L.

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an improved fluorescence technique for cancer diagnostics in the gastrointestinal tract. We investigate the fluorescence of ex vivo colorectal (cancerous and healthy) tissue samples using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) steady-state approaches. The obtained results are processed for revealing characteristic fluorescence spectral features with a valuable diagnostic meaning. The main tissue fluorophores, contributing to the observed fluorescence, are tyrosine, tryptophan, NADH, FAD, collagen and elastin. Based on the results of the Mann-Whitney test as useful parameters for differentiation of gastrointestinal cancer from normal mucosa, we suggest using excitation wavelengths in the range 300 - 360 nm for fluorescence spectroscopy and wavelengths intervals of 60 nm and 90 nm for SFS.

  14. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  15. Magnetic field-induced spectroscopy of forbidden optical transitions with application to lattice-based optical atomic clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Oates, C W; Hoyt, C W; Barber, Z W; Hollberg, L

    2006-03-01

    We develop a method of spectroscopy that uses a weak static magnetic field to enable direct optical excitation of forbidden electric-dipole transitions that are otherwise prohibitively weak. The power of this scheme is demonstrated using the important application of optical atomic clocks based on neutral atoms confined to an optical lattice. The simple experimental implementation of this method--a single clock laser combined with a dc magnetic field--relaxes stringent requirements in current lattice-based clocks (e.g., magnetic field shielding and light polarization), and could therefore expedite the realization of the extraordinary performance level predicted for these clocks. We estimate that a clock using alkaline-earth-like atoms such as Yb could achieve a fractional frequency uncertainty of well below 10(-17) for the metrologically preferred even isotopes.

  16. Assessing topographic cutaneous autofluorescence variation using fluorescence UV and visible excitation emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Zandi, Soodabeh; Feng, Florina; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lui, Harvey

    2011-03-01

    Cutaneous autofluorescence properties were systematically studied using fluorescence excitation emission matrix spectroscopy. Twenty-six healthy subjects with a mean age of 34 (range 21-74) participated in this study. The fluorescence of major skin fluorophores such as tryptophan, collagen, elastin and NADH could be readily identified. On average, facial skin shows strong tryptophan and measurable porphyrin fluorescence; the palm and nail show strong tryptophan and keratin fluorescence. These results demonstrate that regional topographic variations exist not only in the amount of fluorescence but also in the relative distribution of fluorophores in normal skin. Moreover this provides a basis for future interpretation of autofluorescence in diseased skin.

  17. Remote gas analysis of aircraft exhausts using FTIR-emission-spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heland, J.; Schaefer, K. [Fraunhofer Inst. for Atmospheric Environmental Research, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    FITR emission spectroscopy as a remote sensing multi-component analyzing technique was investigated to determine the composition of aircraft exhausts at ground level. A multi-layer radiative transfer interpretation software based on a line-by-line computer algorithm using the HITRAN data base was developed. Measurements were carried out with different engine types to determine the traceable gas species and their detection limits. Finally validation measurements were made to compare the results of the system to those of conventional equipment. (author) 8 refs.

  18. Observing Solvation Dynamics with Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Emission Spectroscopy and X-ray Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Kristoffer; Gawelda, Wojciech; Abela, Rafael;

    2016-01-01

    rearrangement of the solute with X-ray emission spectroscopy, thus establishing time zero for the ensuing X-ray diffuse scattering analysis. The simultaneously recorded X-ray diffuse scattering atterns reveal slower subpicosecond dynamics triggered by the intramolecular structural dynamics of the photoexcited......, confirming previous ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Structural changes in the aqueous solvent associated with density and temperature changes occur with similar to 1 ps time constants, characteristic for structural dynamics in water. This slower time scale of the solvent response allows us...

  19. Applying light-emitting diodes with narrowband emission features in differential spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihler, Holger; Kern, Christoph; Pöhler, Denis; Platt, Ulrich

    2009-12-01

    LEDs are a promising new type of light source for differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Varying differential structures in the emission spectrum of LEDs, however, display a potentially severe problem. We show that the structures, which originate from a Fabry-Pérot etalon, may be removed by tilting the emitter, which at the same time increases the radiant flux coupled into the subsequent optical system. The results of long-path DOAS measurements, where we apply our method on a blue LED for the suppression of periodic structures, are also presented. PMID:19953172

  20. Application of {sup 57}Co emission Moessbauer spectroscopy to studying biocomplexes in frozen solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamnev, A. A., E-mail: aakamnev@ibppm.sgu.ru [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Kulikov, L. A.; Perfiliev, Yu. D. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry Techniques, Department of Radiochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Antonyuk, L. P. [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Kuzmann, E.; Vertes, A. [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Research Group for Nuclear Techniques in Structural Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Department of Nuclear Chemistry (Hungary)

    2005-09-15

    Emission Moessbauer spectroscopy with the {sup 57}Co isotope was used to study very dilute rapidly frozen aqueous solutions of cobalt(II) complexes with low-molecular-weight biomolecules (aromatic amino acids - anthranilic acid and L-tryptophan) and within a sophisticated biopolymer, bacterial glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme of nitrogen metabolism. The appearance of after-effects of the {sup 57}Co{sup {yields}57}Fe nuclear transformation as well as the coordination properties of the cation and the ligands in the complexes are discussed on the basis of their Moessbauer parameters.

  1. Application of 57Co emission Mössbauer spectroscopy to studying biocomplexes in frozen solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Kulikov, L. A.; Perfiliev, Yu. D.; Antonyuk, L. P.; Kuzmann, E.; Vértes, A.

    2005-09-01

    Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy with the 57Co isotope was used to study very dilute rapidly frozen aqueous solutions of cobalt(II) complexes with low-molecular-weight biomolecules (aromatic amino acids anthranilic acid and L-tryptophan) and within a sophisticated biopolymer, bacterial glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme of nitrogen metabolism. The appearance of after-effects of the 57Co→57Fe nuclear transformation as well as the coordination properties of the cation and the ligands in the complexes are discussed on the basis of their Mössbauer parameters.

  2. Atoms, molecules, and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons, spectroscopy and scattering physics; Atome, Molekuele und optische Physik 2. Molekuele und Photonen, Spektroskopie und Streuphysik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, C.P. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    These textbooks apply first of all to graduate students of physics and physical chemistry until the promotion. They want to a certain degree mediate the canonical knowledge of atomic and molecular physics and introduce to foundations of modern optica and quantum optics. In many selected partial fields they lead (together with a planned third volume) up to the actual status of research. So also the active scientist is addressed. By clearly structurated chapters the reader is - starting from the foundations of quantum physics, stepwise made familiar with the most important phenomena, models, and measuring methods. Thereby the focus lies on the experiment and its interpretation - the necessary theory is introduced from this point of view compactly and occasionally also something laxly. The first part is concentrated to the structure of the atoms and an introduction in modern methods of spectroscopy. In the present second part it deals with the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy as well as with scattering physics, which treats - complementarly to the bound molecular states - the continuum. Finally selected chapters of laser physics, modern optics, and quantum optics are treated. Thereby atomic, molecular, and optical physics is proved as a undiminishedly alive, highly productive branch of modern physics. It provides simultaneously for many further partial fields of physics and other natural-scientific disciplines indispensable foundations. [German] Diese Lehrbuecher wenden sich in erster Linie an fortgeschrittene Studierende der Physik und der Physikalischen Chemie bis hin zur Promotion. Sie wollen gewissermassen das kanonische Wissen der Atom- und Molekuelphysik vermitteln und in Grundlagen der modernen Optik und Quantenoptik einfuehren. In vielen ausgewaehlten Teilgebieten fuehren sie (zusammen mit einem geplanten dritten Band) bis hin zum aktuellen Stand der Forschung. So wird auch der aktive Wissenschaftler angesprochen. Durch klar strukturierte Kapitel

  3. X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    During the last two decades, remarkable and often spectacular progress has been made in the methodological and instrumental aspects of x–ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. This progress includes considerable technological improvements in the design and production of detectors especially with the development and expansion of large-scale synchrotron reactors All this has resulted in improved analytical performance and new applications, as well as in the perspective of a dramatic enhancement in the potential of x–ray based analysis techniques for the near future. This comprehensive two-volume treatise features articles that explain the phenomena and describe examples of X–ray absorption and emission applications in several fields, including chemistry, biochemistry, catalysis, amorphous and liquid systems, synchrotron radiation, and surface phenomena. Contributors explain the underlying theory, how to set up X–ray absorption experiments, and how to analyze the details of the resulting spectra. X-R...

  4. Characterization of dielectric barrier discharge in air applying current measurement, numerical simulation and emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekaran, Priyadarshini; Awakowicz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air is characterized applying current measurement, numerical simulation and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). For OES, a non-calibrated spectrometer is used. This diagnostic method is applicable when cross-sectional area of the active plasma volume and current density can be determined. The nitrogen emission in the spectral range of 380 nm- 406 nm is used for OES diagnostics. Electric field in the active plasma volume is determined applying the measured spectrum, well-known Frank-Condon factors for nitrogen transitions and numerically- simulated electron distribution functions. The measured electric current density is used for determination of electron density in plasma. Using the determined plasma parameters, the dissociation rate of nitrogen and oxygen in active plasma volume are calculated, which can be used by simulation of the chemical kinetics.

  5. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster).

  6. [Studies on the remote measurement of the emission of formaldehyde by mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng-Cheng; Xie, Pin-Hua; Li, Ang; Si, Fu-Qi; Dou, Ke; Liu, Yu; Xu, Jin; Wang, Jie

    2011-11-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant carbonyl compounds that play an important role in atmospheric chemistry and photochemical reactions. Formaldehyde is an important indicator of atmospheric reactivity and urban atmospheric aerosol precursors. In the present paper, the emission of formaldehyde from chemical area was measured using the mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). This instrument uses the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source with successful sampling in the area loop. Vertical column density was retrieved by this system, combined with the meteorological wind field and car speed information, the emission of formaldehyde in the area was estimated. The authors carried out the measuring experiment in one chemical plant in Beijing using this technology. The result showed that the average value of the flux of formaldehyde in this area was 605 kg x h(-1) during the measuring period. PMID:22242505

  7. LZIFU: an emission-line fitting toolkit for integral field spectroscopy data

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, I-Ting; Groves, Brent; Rich, Jeffrey A; Rupke, David S N; Hampton, Elise; Kewley, Lisa J; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Croom, Scott M; Richards, Samuel; Schaefer, Adam L; Sharp, Rob; Sweet, Sarah M

    2016-01-01

    We present LZIFU (LaZy-IFU), an IDL toolkit for fitting multiple emission lines simultaneously in integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. LZIFU is useful for the investigation of the dynamical, physical and chemical properties of gas in galaxies. LZIFU has already been applied to many world-class IFS instruments and large IFS surveys, including the Wide Field Spectrograph, the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE), the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey, the Sydney-Australian-astronomical-observatory Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. Here we describe in detail the structure of the toolkit, and how the line fluxes and flux uncertainties are determined, including the possibility of having multiple distinct kinematic components. We quantify the performance of LZIFU, demonstrating its accuracy and robustness. We also show examples of applying LZIFU to CALIFA and SAMI data to construct emission line and kinematic maps, and investigate complex, skewed line prof...

  8. Determination of manganese in thermoluminescent materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content of manganese in the mixed fluorides CaF2: MnF2 and CaF2: Mn thermoluminophors was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and spectrophotometry. The various Mn emission lines were compared and the manganese emission line at 257.610 nm was used for ICP-AES analysis. For the spectrophotometric determination the manganese(II) ions were oxidized to intensively coloured permanganate ions using potassium periodate. No statistically significant differences were found between the results of ICP-AES and spectrophotometric methods of analysis. The thermoluminophors were synthesized by coprecipitation of manganese with CaF2, varying the concentration of manganese in the initial solutions in the range of 0.01 - 2.0 % (m/m). The coprecipitated mixed fluorides CaF2: MnF2 were heated at 1423 K. The glow curves of synthesized CaF2: Mn thermoluminophors were measured. (author)

  9. Emission of hydrogen energetic neutral atoms from the Martian subsolar magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.-D.; Alho, M.; Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have simulated the hydrogen energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions from the subsolar magnetosheath of Mars using a hybrid model of the proton plasma charge exchanging with the Martian exosphere to study statistical features revealed from the observations of the Neutral Particle Detectors on Mars Express. The simulations reproduce well the observed enhancement of the hydrogen ENA emissions from the dayside magnetosheath in directions perpendicular to the Sun-Mars line. Our results show that the neutralized protons from the shocked solar wind are the dominant ENA population rather than those originating from the pickup planetary ions. The simulation also suggests that the observed stronger ENA emissions in the direction opposite to the solar wind convective electric field result from a stronger proton flux in the same direction at the lower magnetosheath; i.e., the proton fluxes in the magnetosheath are not cylindrically symmetric. We also confirm the observed increasing of the ENA fluxes with the solar wind dynamical pressure in the simulations. This feature is associated with a low altitude of the induced magnetic boundary when the dynamic pressure is high and the magnetosheath protons can reach to a denser exosphere, and thus, the charge exchange rate becomes higher. Overall, the analysis suggests that kinetic effects play an important and pronounced role in the morphology of the hydrogen ENA distribution and the plasma environment at Mars, in general.

  10. Comparison Between X-rays Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Measurements on a Ceramic Envelop Lamp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bruno LAFITTE; Michel AUBES; Georges ZISSIS

    2007-01-01

    Burners of metal halide lamps used for illumination are generally made of polycrystalline alumina ceramic (PCA) which is translucent to visible light.We show that the difficulty of selecting a line of sight through the lamp prevents the use of optical emission diagnostic.X-rays photons are mainly absorbed and not scattered by PCA.Absorption by mercury atoms contributing to the discharge allowed us to determine the density of mercury in the lamp.By comparing diagnostic methods,we put in evidence the difficulty of taking into account the scattering of light mathematically.

  11. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices—CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Barry M.; McCaffrey, John G., E-mail: john.mccaffrey@nuim.ie [Department of Chemistry, Maynooth University, National University of Ireland—Maynooth, County Kildare (Ireland)

    2016-01-28

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ⋅ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y{sup 1}P←a{sup 1}S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ⋅ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (<130 cm{sup −1}). All of the M ⋅ RG diatomics have bond lengths considerably longer than those of the rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr{sub 2} while this transition is quenched in Ba{sub 2}. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba{sub 2} indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications.

  12. Optical emission spectroscopy of point-plane corona and back-corona discharges in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, T.; Sobczyk, A. T.; Jaworek, A.

    2011-12-01

    Results of spectroscopic investigations and current-voltage characteristics of corona discharge and back discharge on fly-ash layer, generated in point-plane electrode geometry in air at atmospheric pressure are presented in the paper. The characteristics of both discharges are similar but differ in the current and voltage ranges of all the discharge forms distinguished during the experiments. Three forms of back discharge, for positive and negative polarity, were investigated: glow, streamer and low-current back-arc. In order to characterize ionisation and excitation processes in back discharge, the emission spectra were measured and compared with those obtained for normal corona discharge generated in the same electrode configuration but with fly ash layer removed. The emission spectra were measured in two discharge zones: near the tip of needle electrode and near the plate. Visual forms of the discharge were recorded with digital camera and referred to current-voltage characteristics and emission spectra. The measurements have shown that spectral lines emitted by back discharge depend on the form of discharge and the discharge current. From the comparison of the spectral lines of back and normal discharges an effect of fly ash layer on the discharge morphology can be determined. The recorded emission spectra formed by ionised gas and plasma near the needle electrode and fly ash layer are different. It should be noted that in back arc emission, spectral lines of fly ash layer components can be distinguished. On the other hand, in needle zone, the emission of high intensity N2 second positive system and NO γ lines can be noticed. Regardless of these gaseous lines, also atomic lines of dust layer were present in the spectrum. The differences in spectra of back discharge for positive and negative polarities of the needle electrode have been explained by considering the kind of ions generated in the crater in fly ash layer. The aim of these studies is to better

  13. Estimation of lead, cadmium and nickel content by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in dry fruit bodies of some macromycetes growing in Poland. II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Grzybek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The content of lead, cadmium, and nickel in dry fruit bodies of 34 species of macromyoetes collected in Poland from 72 natural babitats by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS was estimated.

  14. Diagnosis of Methane Plasma Generated in an Atmospheric Pressure DBD Micro-Jet by Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-Feng; BIAN Xin-Chao; CHEN Qiang; LIU Fu-Ping; LIU Zhong-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosis of methane plasma,generated in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) microplasma jet with a quartz tube as dielectric material by a 25 kHz sinusoidal ac power source,is conducted by optical emission spectroscopy (OES).The reactive radicals in methane plasma such as CH,C2,and Ha are detected insitu by OES.The possible dissociation mechanism of methane in diluted Ar plasma is deduced from spectra.In addition,the density of CH radical,which is considered as one of the precursors in diamond-like (DLC) film formation,affected by the parameters of input voltage and the feed gas flow rate,is emphasized. With the Boltzmann plots,four Ar atomic spectral lines (located at 675.28nm,687.13nm,738.40nm and 794.82nm,respectively) are chosen to calculate the electron temperature,and the dependence of electron temperature on discharge parameters is also investigated.

  15. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J. (UCB)

    2012-03-13

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution

  16. One-atom detection and statistical studies with resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To learn how to take matter apart atom-by-atom and to count each atom according to its type, regardless of its initial chemical or physical state, is presumably a worthy goal in scientific research. The advent of the laser created real hope that these aspirations will be realized. The counting of atoms is not merely an intellectual exercise set apart from real-world applications. On the contrary, even though the capability is scarcely more than five years old, practical applications have been made in many fields of chemistry, physics, the environment, and industry. In this lecture we wish to review how the laser made possible the counting of atoms and how this capability has been put to use in situations where atoms are free to react chemically as they diffuse through a medium. Fluctuation phenomena and statistical mechanics can also be examined in these situations

  17. Pump-probe spectroscopy in degenerate two-level atoms with arbitrarily strong fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigdon, T.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.; Goren, C.; Rosenbluh, M.; Friedmann, H.

    2007-03-01

    We review our previous work on pump-probe spectroscopy in realistic degenerate two-level systems and model systems. In particular, we discuss the role of transfer of coherence (TOC) between the ground and excited hyperfine states in producing electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIA) peaks in the probe spectrum, when an F g goes to F e = F g +1 transition in an alkali-metal atom interacts with a strong pump and weak probe that have perpendicular polarizations. When the pump is rho + polarized and the probe pi polarized, this system can be modelled by an N system. We also discuss the role of transfer of population (TOP) between the Zeeman levels of the ground hyperfine state in producing EIA peaks when the pump and probe have the same polarization. This system can be modelled using a double two-level system. The role of Doppler broadening and phase-changing collisions in modifying the EIA-TOC and EIA-TOP absorption and refraction spectra is also discussed. All these spectra were calculated using MATLAB programs that both construct and solve the relevant Bloch equations. In our recent work, we consider the effect of a strong probe on the pump absorption and refraction spectra when the pump and probe polarizations are linear and perpendicular. It is difficult to solve this problem numerically due to the large number frequencies involved. In order to simplify the problem, we considered two cases: (i) rho + polarized pump and pi polarized probe, and (ii) rho + polarized pump and rho - polarized probe, and investigated a series of transitions in both Rb and Cs, using modified versions of the MATLAB programs devised for the weakprobe case. A number of interesting differences from the weak-probe case were found. For example, when the probe is sufficiently strong, we found the pump and probe spectra to show complementary behavior. In addition, as the number of Zeeman levels increase, the EIA peaks become progressively sharper, and are accompanied by steeper dispersion.

  18. Two-step resonance ionization spectroscopy of Na atomic beam using cw and pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-step photoionization of sodium atomic beam has been carried out using a cw and a pulsed dye lasers. Sodium ions have been detected by a time of flight method in order to reduce background noise. With a proper power of the pulsed dye laser the sodium atomic beam has been irradiated by a resonant cw dye laser. The density of the sodium atomic beam is estimated to be 103 cm-3 at the ionization area. (author)

  19. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy oflaser-ablated copper atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Andrejeva, Anna; Harris, Joe P.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2014-01-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of laser-ablated copper atoms entrainedin a supersonic free jet expansion are reported. Depending on the ionization scheme employed, andthe conditions under which the copper atoms are produced, very different spectra are produced, whichare discussed. In some circumstances, high proportions of metastable atoms survive the ablation andexpansion process and are clearly seen in the spectra. The spectroscopic transitions for the observedlin...

  20. Freshness estimation of intact frozen fish using fluorescence spectroscopy and chemometrics of excitation-emission matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElMasry, Gamal; Nagai, Hiroto; Moria, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Naho; Tsuta, Mizuki; Sugiyama, Junichi; Okazaki, Emiko; Nakauchi, Shigeki

    2015-10-01

    The current study attempted to provide a convenient, non-invasive and time-saving method to estimate the freshness of intact horse mackerel (Trachurus japonicus) fish in a frozen state using autofluorescence spectroscopy in tandem with multivariate analysis of fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEM). The extracted fluorescence data from different freshness conditions were pretreated, masked and reorganized to resolve fish fluorescence spectra from overlapping signals and scattering profiles for detecting and characterizing freshness changes. The real freshness values of the examined fish samples were then traditionally determined by the hard chemical analysis using the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and expressed as K-values. The fluorescence EEM data and the real freshness values were modeled using partial least square (PLS) regression and a novel algorithm was proposed to identify the ideal combinations of excitation and emission wavelengths being used as perfect predictors. The results revealed that freshness of frozen fish could be accurately predicted with R(2) of 0.89 and root mean square error estimated by cross validation (RMSECV) of 9.66%. This work substantially demonstrated that the autofluorescence spectroscopy associated with the proposed technical approaches has a high potential in non-destructive sensing of fish freshness in the frozen state. PMID:26078142

  1. Emission Fourier transform spectroscopy for the remote sensing of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Giovanni; Cortesi, Ugo; Palchetti, Luca

    2002-02-01

    Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS), thanks to their intrinsic advantages of high throughput, high spectral resolution and multiplex acquisition of spectral channels, offer a powerful tool for the characterisation of the Earth's atmosphere. The use of photon noise limited detectors in FTS instruments operating in the middle/far infrared spectral region permits high sensitivity emission spectroscopy measurements, without the limitations arising from the use of an external radiation source. The wide operating spectral range of FTS instruments makes possible simultaneous detection of different atmospheric chemical species that show rotational and vibrational spectral bands in the middle/far infrared region. Spatially resolved measurements of the concentration of the interesting species are of fundamental interest in the study of local phenomena in atmospheric chemistry and physics, and can be obtained through the use of various observation and data inversion techniques. Among these, the best results in terms of vertical resolution are achieved through the limb sounding observation technique from airborne platform. As an example of possibilities offered by the above considered technique, results obtained from the SAFIRE-A (Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere using Far InfraRed Emission-Airborne) during the Antarctic campaign APE-GAIA (Airborne Polar Experiment-Geophysica Aircraft In Antarctica, Ushuaia, Argentina, September-October, 1999) are presented.

  2. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy as a tool for determining quality of sparkling wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elcoroaristizabal, Saioa; Callejón, Raquel M; Amigo, Jose M; Ocaña-González, Juan A; Morales, M Lourdes; Ubeda, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Browning in sparkling wines was assessed by the use of excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy combined with PARAllel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC). Four different cava sparkling wines were monitored during an accelerated browning process and subsequently storage. Fluorescence changes observed during the accelerated browning process were monitored and compared with other conventional parameters: absorbance at 420nm (A420) and the content of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF). A high similarity of the spectral profiles for all sparkling wines analyzed was observed, being explained by a four component PARAFAC model. A high correlation between the third PARAFAC factor (465/530nm) and the commonly used non-enzymatic browning indicators was observed. The fourth PARAFAC factor (280/380nm) gives us also information about the browning process following a first order kinetic reaction. Hence, excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy, together with PARAFAC, provides a faster alternative for browning monitoring to conventional methods, as well as useful key indicators for quality control. PMID:27041327

  3. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  4. Some metals determination in beers by atomic emission spectrometry of induced argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was made the identification and determination of metals in brazilian bottled and canned beer, using atomic emission spectrometry with d.c. are and argon coupled plasma excitation sources. The elements Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were determined in beer samples, after treatment with HNO sub(3) conc. /H sub(2) O sub(2) (30%). In the determination of Co, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn and alternative method using HNO sub(3) conc. /O sub(3) was proved be useful. The results obtained for Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were below the limits established by brazilian legislation, showing the good quality of the beer concerning the metals. The results of this work were requested by the previous Ministerio do Meio Ambiente e Urbanismo in order to contribute to review the brazilian legislation in foods and beverages about metals contents. (author)

  5. Extraction concentration and atomic emission determination of controlled elements in acid mine waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, B.I.; Oshchepkova, A.P. (Permskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1984-09-01

    Exchange reactions between metal (Cd, Zn, Co, Hg, etc.) dithizonates and diantipyrylmethane (DAM) salts in non-aqueous solutions have been examined. Metal ions forming stable thiocyanate or iodide complexes (Cd(SCN)/sub 4//sup 2 -/, CdI/sub 4//sup 2 -/) pass from the dithizonates to form anionic complexes and then ion pairs with protonated DAM. Addition of DAM salts to organic extracts is an effective method of decomposition of dithizonates and preconcentration of elements in a microphase formed due to extract separation into two phases. A combination of preconcentration of microelements in a three-phase system with atomic emission analysis makes it possible to determine a group of controlled micro elements in complex acid mine waters.

  6. Radiative emission of neutrino pairs in atoms and light sterile neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Dinh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The process of Radiative Emission of Neutrino Pair (RENP in atoms is sensitive to the absolute neutrino mass scale, the type of spectrum neutrino masses obey and the nature – Dirac or Majorana – of massive neutrinos. We analyse the possibility to test the hypothesis of existence of neutrinos with masses at the eV scale coupled to the electron in the weak charged lepton current in an RENP experiment. The presence of eV scale neutrinos in the neutrino mixing is associated with the existence of sterile neutrinos which mix with the active flavour neutrinos. At present there are a number of hints for active–sterile neutrino oscillations driven by Δm2∼1 eV2. We perform a detailed analysis of the RENP phenomenology within the “3+1” scheme with one sterile neutrino.

  7. Intra- and intercycle interference of electron emission in laser assisted XUV atomic ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Gramajo, Ana Alicia; Garibotti, Carlos Roberto; Arbó, Diego

    2016-01-01

    We study the ionization of atomic hydrogen in the direction of polarization due to a linearly polarized XUV pulse in the presence a strong field IR. We describe the photoelectron spectra as an interference problem in the time domain. Electron trajectories steming from different optical laser cycles give rise to intercycle interference energy peaks known as sidebands. These sidebands are modulated by a grosser structure coming from the intracycle interference of the two electron trajectories born during the same optical cycle. We make use of a simple semiclassical model which offers the possibility to establish a connection between emission times and the photoelectron kinetic energy. We compare the semiclassical predictions with the continuum-distorted wave strong field approximation and the ab initio solution of the time dependent Schr\\"odinger equation. We analyze such interference pattern as a function of the time delay between the IR and XUV pulse and also as a function of the laser intensity.

  8. Taking Nanomedicine Teaching into Practice with Atomic Force Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A.; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic…

  9. Dissipation and oscillatory solvation forces in confined liquids studied by small-amplitude atomic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, de Sissi; Ende, van den Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2010-01-01

    We determine conservative and dissipative tip–sample interaction forces from the amplitude and phase response of acoustically driven atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers using a non-polar model fluid (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, which displays strong molecular layering) and atomically flat su

  10. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  11. Optical emission enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using micro-torches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Huang, X.; Li, S.; Lu, Yao; Chen, K.; Lu, Y. F.

    2016-03-01

    A cost effective method for optical emission enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been proposed in this research. The pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 532 nm was used for sample ablation and plasma generation. A cost effective commercial butane micro-torch was put parallel to the sample surface to generate a small flame above the surface. The laser-induced plasma expanded in the flame environment. The time-resolved optical emission intensity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) have been observed with and without micro torch. For laser with pulse energy of 20 mJ, the relationship between optical emission intensity and delay time indicates that signal intensities have been greatly enhanced in the initial several microseconds when using micro torch. The time-resolved study of signal-to-noise ratio shows that the maximum SNR occurs at the delay time of 2 μs. The laser energy effects on the enhancements of optical emission intensity and SNR have also been analyzed, which indicates that the enhancement factors are both delay time and laser energy dependent. The maximum enhancement factors for both optical emission intensity and SNR gradually decreases with the laser energy increase. The limits of detection (LODs) for aluminum (Al) and molybdenum (Mo) in steel have been estimated, which shows that the detection sensitivity has been improved by around 4 times. The LODs of Al and Mo have been reduced from 18 to 6 ppm and from 110 to 36 ppm in LIBS, respectively. The method of LIBS by a micro torch has been demonstrated to be a cost effective method for detection sensitivity improvement, especially in the situation of low laser pulse energy.

  12. Atomic spectroscopy and highly accurate measurement: determination of fundamental constants; Spectroscopie atomique et mesures de grande precision: determination de constantes fonfamentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwob, C

    2006-12-15

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author concerning highly accurate atomic spectroscopy applied for the determination of fundamental constants. A pure optical frequency measurement of the 2S-12D 2-photon transitions in atomic hydrogen and deuterium has been performed. The experimental setting-up is described as well as the data analysis. Optimized values for the Rydberg constant and Lamb shifts have been deduced (R = 109737.31568516 (84) cm{sup -1}). An experiment devoted to the determination of the fine structure constant with an aimed relative uncertainty of 10{sup -9} began in 1999. This experiment is based on the fact that Bloch oscillations in a frequency chirped optical lattice are a powerful tool to transfer coherently many photon momenta to the atoms. We have used this method to measure accurately the ratio h/m(Rb). The measured value of the fine structure constant is {alpha}{sub -1} = 137.03599884 (91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.7*10{sup -9}. The future and perspectives of this experiment are presented. This document presented before an academic board will allow his author to manage research work and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  13. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of vitiligo skin in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Richer, Vincent; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Zandi, Soodabeh; Kollias, Nikiforos; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence signals depend on the intensity of the exciting light, the absorption properties of the constituent molecules, and the efficiency with which the absorbed photons are converted to fluorescence emission. The optical features and appearance of vitiligo have been explained primarily on the basis of reduced epidermal pigmentation, which results in abnormal white patches on the skin. The objective of this study is to explore the fluorescence properties of vitiligo and its adjacent normal skin using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. Thirty five (35) volunteers with vitiligo were acquired using a double-grating spectrofluorometer with excitation and emission wavelengths of 260-450 nm and 300-700 nm respectively. As expected, the most pronounced difference between the spectra obtained from vitiligo lesions compared to normally pigmented skin was that the overall fluorescence was much higher in vitiligo; these differences increased at shorter wavelengths, thus matching the characteristic spectral absorption of epidermal melanin. When comparing the fluorescence spectra from vitiligo to normal skin we detected three distinct spectral bands centered at 280nm, 310nm, and 335nm. The 280nm band may possibly be related to inflammation, whereas the 335 nm band may arise from collagen or keratin cross links. The source of the 310 nm band is uncertain; it is interesting to note its proximity to the 311 nm UV lamps used for vitiligo phototherapy. These differences are accounted for not only by changes in epidermal pigment content, but also by other optically active cutaneous biomolecules.

  14. Optical emission spectroscopy for quantification of ultraviolet radiations and biocide active species in microwave argon plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattieaux, G., E-mail: gaetan.wattieaux@laplace.univ-tlse.fr; Yousfi, M.; Merbahi, N.

    2013-11-01

    This work deals with absorption and mainly emission spectrometry of a microwave induced surfatron plasma jet launched in ambient air and using an Argon flow carrier gas. The Ar flow rate varies between 1 and 3 L/min and the microwave power between 40 and 60 W. The analysis of the various spectra has led to the determination of the ozone and atomic oxygen concentrations, ultraviolet (UV) irradiance separating UVA, UVB and UVC, gas temperature, plasma electron density and excitation temperature. Most of these diagnostics are spatially resolved along the plasma jet axis. It is shown more particularly that rotational temperature obtained from OH(A-X) spectra ranges between 800 K to 1000 K while the apparent temperature of the plasma jet remains lower than about 325 K which is compatible with biocide treatment without significant thermal effect. The electron density reaches 1.2 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}, the excitation temperature is about 4000 K, the UVC radiation represents only 5% of the UV radiations emitted by the device, the ozone concentration is found to reach 88 ± 27 ppm in the downstream part of the plasma jet at a distance of 30 mm away from the quartz tube outlet of the surfatron and the atomic oxygen concentration lies between 10 and 80 ppm up to a distance of 20 mm away from the quartz tube outlet. Ozone is identified as the main germicidal active species produced by the device since its concentration is in accordance with bacteria inactivation durations usually reported using such plasma devices. Human health hazard assessment is carried out all along this study since simple solutions are reminded to respect safety standards for exposures to ozone and microwave leakage. In this study, an air extraction unit is used and a Faraday cage is set around the quartz tube of the surfatron and the plasma jet. These solutions should be adopted by users of microwave induced plasma in open air conditions because according to the literature, this is not often the

  15. Theory of electron emission from atomically sharp metallic emitters in high electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jun.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic theoretical investigation of the effect of tip geometry on the field emission current voltage characteristics from atomically sharp metallic field emitters is presented. A free electron model is used for the metal emitters with non-planar geometries in studying the dependence of the current density on tip geometry, local field, and temperature. The classical image interaction is derived exactly for the metal emitters modeled as cones, paraboloids, hyperboloids and sphere on cones. The classical image interaction for these non-planar emitter geometries is diminished in magnitude relative to the planar image interaction. The bias potential for the model emitter modifies the shape of the tunneling barriers, and the resulting form predicts a dramatically enhanced current relative to the classical Fowler-Nordheim result. The transmission coefficients for the surface potential barriers are evaluated within the WKB approximation. The current-voltage characteristics are calculated for these models using the kinetic formulation of the current density integral. The calculated results do not exhibit the straight line behavior predicted by the Fowler-Nordheim model for field emission from a planar surface. The effects of emitter curvature on electron emission in combined high fields and elevated temperature are examined. An analytic expression for the J(V) characteristics of a prototype sharp emitter is derived which exhibits explicitly the dependence of the current density on geometric and material parameters. The adequacy of a [beta]-factor in the conventional planar model F-N equation to account for emitter curvature is examined. The use of such an F-N equation is incorrect when applied to sharp emitters (r[sub t] [le] 10nm) and will lead to spurious results when used to extract information such as field values or emitting area from experimental F-N curves. The effect of tip geometry on the Nottingham energy exchange and temperature stability is studied.

  16. Raman spectroscopy of atomically thin two-dimensional magnetic iron phosphorus trisulfide (FePS3) crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingzhi; Du, Kezhao; Liu, Yu Yang Fredrik; Hu, Peng; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Qing; Owen, Man Hon Samuel; Lu, Xin; Gan, Chee Kwan; Sengupta, Pinaki; Kloc, Christian; Xiong, Qihua

    2016-09-01

    Metal phosphorous trichalcogenide is an important group of layered two-dimensional (2D) materials with potentially diverse applications in low-dimensional magnetic and spintronic devices. Herein we present a comprehensive investigation on the lattice dynamics and spin-phonon interactions of mechanically exfoliated atomically thin 2D magnetic material—iron phosphorus trisulfide (FePS3) by Raman spectroscopy and first principle calculations. Layer-number and temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy suggests a magnetic persistence in FePS3 even down to monolayer regime through the spin-phonon coupling, while the Néel temperature decreases from 117 K in bulk to 104 K in monolayer sample. Our studies advocate the intriguing magnetic properties in 2D crystals and suggest that FePS3 is a promising candidate material for future magnetic applications.

  17. Non-linear Spectroscopy of Sr Atoms in an Optical Cavity for Laser Stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Bjarke T. R.; Henriksen, Martin R.; Schäffer, Stefan A.; Westergaard, Philip G.; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray; Thomsen, Jan W.

    2015-01-01

    We study the non-linear interaction of a cold sample of strontium-88 atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit and investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak inter-combination line $\\lvert 5s^{2} \\, ^1 \\textrm{S}_0 \\rangle \\,-\\, \\lvert 5s5p \\, ^3 \\textrm{P}_1 \\rangle$ at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and abs...

  18. Visualization of subsurface nanoparticles in a polymer matrix using resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yao, Atsushi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-01

    A visualization technique of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale spatial resolution is strongly demanded. Some research groups have demonstrated the visualization of subsurface features using various techniques based on atomic force microscopy. However, the imaging mechanisms have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated the visualization of subsurface Au nanoparticles buried in a polymer matrix 900 nm from the surface using two techniques; i.e., resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy. It was clarified that the subsurface features were visualized by the two techniques as the area with a higher contact resonance frequency and a higher Q-factor than those in the surrounding area, which suggests that the visualization is realized by the variation of the contact stiffness and damping of the polymer matrix due to the existence of the buried nanoparticles.

  19. Authentication of organically grown plants - advantages and limitations of atomic spectroscopy for multi-element and stable isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Kristian Holst; Schjørring, Jan Kofod; Kelly, S.D.;

    2014-01-01

    Organic food products are believed to be healthier, safer and more environment-friendly than their conventional counterparts and are sold at premium prices. Consequently, adulteration of organic plants and fraudulent activities for economic profit are increasing. This has spurred the development...... of sophisticated analytical procedures for testing authenticity. We review the use of multi-element and stable-isotope analysis based on atomic spectroscopy for discriminating between organic and conventional plants. We conclude that inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, stable-isotope analysis of bulk...

  20. Evaluation of emery dust on the manufacture of abrasives by neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work it is presented an evaluation on the degree of contamination by emery dust in a working area where abrasives are manufactured, in a factory located in the industrial area of Toluca City by neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The samples were collected on Whatman filters and attacked with hot concentrated HCl. The elements founded were: Al, Si, V, Mg, Br, Mn, Ni, Zn, Fe, Cr, Ca and Pb. They are a risk for the health of the workers. (Author)

  1. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy of even-parity autoionizing Rydberg states of atomic sulphur

    OpenAIRE

    Woutersen, S.; Milan,, M; Lange; Buma, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Several previously unobserved Rydberg states of the sulphur atom above the lowest ionization threshold are identified and assigned using (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. All states were accessed by two-photon transitions from either the 3P ground or the 1D excited state, prepared by in situ photodissociation of H2S. The observed states derive from the (2Do)5p and (2Po)4p configurations. For the (2Do)5p 3F and (2Po)4p 3D triplets, extensive photoele...

  2. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  3. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy study of bias-enhanced nucleation of diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M.M.; Jimenez, I.; Vazquez, L.; Gomez-Aleixandre, C.; Albella, J.M.; Sanchez, O. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco28049, Madrid (Spain); Terminello, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California94551 (United States); Himpsel, F.J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin--Madison, Madison, Wisconsin53706 (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The bias-enhanced nucleation of diamond on Si(100) has been studied by x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and atomic force microscopy, two techniques well suited to characterize nanometric crystallites. Diamond nuclei of {approximately}15nm are formed after 5 min of bias-enhanced treatment. The number of nuclei and its size increases with the time of application of the bias voltage. A nanocrystalline diamond film is attained after 20 min of bias-enhanced nucleation. At the initial nucleation stages, the Si substrate appears covered with diamond crystallites and graphite, without SiC being detected by XANES. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Measurement of the magnetic field profile in the atomic fountain clock FoCS-2 using Zeeman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Devenoges; André, Stefanov; Antoine, Jallageas; Jacques, Morel; Thomas, Südmeyer; Pierre, Thomann

    2016-01-01

    We report the evaluation of the second order Zeeman shift in the continuous atomic fountain clock FoCS-2. Because of the continuous operation and its geometrical constraints, the methods used in pulsed fountain are not applicable. We use here time-resolved Zeeman spectroscopy to probe the magnetic field profile in the clock. The pulses of ac magnetic excitation allow us to measure the Zeeman frequency with spatial resolution and to evaluate the Zeeman shift with an uncertainty smaller than 10E-16 in relative units.

  5. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm-1 were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  6. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, Sebastian; Fies, Silke; Gottwald, Tina; Mattolat, Christoph; Rothe, Sebastian; Wendt, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm - 1 were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  7. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, Sebastian, E-mail: raeder@uni-mainz.de; Fies, Silke; Gottwald, Tina; Mattolat, Christoph [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Rothe, Sebastian [CERN, Engineering Department (Switzerland); Wendt, Klaus [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm{sup -1} were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  8. Emission Spectroscopy as a Probe into Photoinduced Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Polyazine Bridged Ru(II,Rh(III Supramolecular Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J. Brewer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy are valuable tools to probe photochemical processes of metal-ligand, coordination complexes. Ru(II polyazine light absorbers are efficient light harvesters absorbing in the UV and visible with emissive 3MLCT excited states known to undergo excited state energy and electron transfer. Changes in emission intensity, energy or band-shape, as well as excited state lifetime, provide insight into excited state dynamics. Photophysical processes such as intramolecular electron transfer between electron donor and electron acceptor sub-units may be investigated using these methods. This review investigates the use of steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy to measure excited state intramolecular electron transfer in polyazine bridged Ru(II,Rh(III supramolecular complexes. Intramolecular electron transfer in these systems provides for conversion of the emissive 3MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state to a non-emissive, but potentially photoreactive, 3MMCT (metal-to-metal charge transfer excited state. The details of the photophysics of Ru(II,Rh(III and Ru(II,Rh(III,Ru(II systems as probed by steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy will be highlighted.

  9. Atomic-scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M. J.; Smith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at BΙ-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at BΙΙ-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  10. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ping [Sandia National Laboratories; Zhou, Lin [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J. [Ames Laboratory; Smith, David J. [Arizona State University

    2014-02-04

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at BΙ-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at BΙΙ-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems.

  11. VUV absorption spectroscopy measurements of the role of fast neutral atoms in high-power gap breakdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FILUK,A.B.; BAILEY,JAMES E.; CUNEO,MICHAEL E.; LAKE,PATRICK WAYNE; NASH,THOMAS J.; NOACK,DONALD D.; MARON,Y.

    2000-03-20

    The maximum power achieved in a wide variety of high-power devices, including electron and ion diodes, z pinches, and microwave generators, is presently limited by anode-cathode gap breakdown. A frequently-discussed hypothesis for this effect is ionization of fast neutral atoms injected throughout the anode-cathode gap during the power pulse. The authors describe a newly-developed diagnostic tool that provides the first direct test of this hypothesis. Time-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy is used to directly probe fast neutral atoms with 1 mm spatial resolution in the 10 mm anode-cathode gap of the SABRE 5 MV, 1 TW applied-B ion diode. Absorption spectra collected during Ar RF glow discharges and with CO{sub 2} gas fills confirm the reliability of the diagnostic technique. Throughout the 50--100 ns ion diode pulses no measurable neutral absorption is seen, setting upper limits of 0.12--1.5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} for ground state fast neutral atom densities of H, C, N, O, F. The absence of molecular absorption bands also sets upper limits of 0.16--1.2 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} for common simple molecules. These limits are low enough to rule out ionization throughout the gap as a breakdown mechanism. This technique can now be applied to quantify the role of neutral atoms in other high-power devices.

  12. Atomic-scale chemical imaging and quantification of metallic alloy structures by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M J; Smith, David J

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L2(1) phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B(Ι)-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B(ΙΙ)-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  13. Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy of liquid water: novel instrumentation, high resolution, and the "map" approach

    OpenAIRE

    Weinhardt, L.

    2010-01-01

    Techniques to study the electronic structure of liquids are rare. Most recently, resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has been shown to be an extremely versatile spectroscopy to study both occupied and unoccupied electronic states for liquids in thermodynamic equilibrium. However, XES requires high-brilliance soft x-ray synchrotron radiation and poses significant technical challenges to maintain a liquid sample in an ultra-high vacuum environment. Our group has therefore developed and c...

  14. Scaled-energy spectroscopy of a |M|=1 Rydberg barium atom in an electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lei; Quan Wei; Shen Li; Yang Hai-Feng; Shi Ting-Yun; Liu Xiao-Jun; Liu Hong-Ping; Zhan Ming-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    We observe strong energy-dependent quantum defects in the scaled-energy Stark spectra for |M|=1 Rydberg states of barium atoms at three scaled energies: ε= -2.000, ε= -2.500 and ε=-3.000. In an attempt to explain the observations, theoretical calculations of closed orbit theory based on a model potential including core effect are performed for non-hydrogenic atoms. While such a potential has been uniformly successful for alkali atoms with a single valence electron, it fails to match experimental results for barium atoms in the 6snp Rydberg states with two valence electrons. Our study points out that this discrepancy is due to the strong perturbation from the 5d8p state, which voids the simple approximation for constant quantum defects of principle quantum number n.

  15. Atomic oxygen fine-structure splittings with tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Lyndon R.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Nelis, Thomas; Robinson, Ruth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fine-structure splittings of atomic oxygen (O-16) in the ground state have been accurately measured using a tunable far-infrared spectrometer. The 3P0-3pl splitting is 2,060,069.09 (10) MHz, and the 3Pl-3P2 splitting is 4,744,777.49 (16) MHz. These frequencies are important for measuring atomic oxygen concentration in earth's atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

  16. Continuous measurements of volcanic gases from Popocatepetl volcano by thermal emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taquet, Noemie; Stremme, Wolfgang; Meza, Israel; Grutter, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Passive volcanic gas emissions have been poorly studied despite their impact on the atmospheric chemistry with important consequences on its geochemical cycles and climate change on regional and global scale. Therefore, long-term monitoring of volcanic gas plumes and their composition are of prime importance for climatic models and the estimation of the volcanic contribution to climate change. We present a new measurement and analysis strategy based on remote thermal emission spectroscopy which can provide continuous (day and night) information of the composition of the volcanic plume. In this study we show results from the Popocatepetl volcano in Mexico with measurements performed during the year 2015 from the Altzomoni Atmospheric Observatory (19.12N, -98.65W, 3,985 masl). This site, which forms part of the RUOA (www.ruoa.unam.mx) and NDACC (https://www2.acom.ucar.edu/irwg) networks, is located north of the crater of this active volcano at 12 km distance. Emission spectra were recorded with an FTIR spectrometer (OPAG22, Bruker) at 0.5 cm-1 spectral resolution and processed using the SFIT4 radiative transfer and profile retrieval code, based on the Optimal Estimation method (Rodgers, 1976; 1990; 2000). This newly improved methodology is intercompared to a former retrieval strategy using measurements from 2008 and recent results of the variability of the SiF4/SO2 composition ratio during 2015 is presented. A discussion of how the new measurements improve the understating of the impact of volcanic gas emissions on the atmosphere on global and regional scale is included.

  17. Simulations of beam-emission spectroscopy on Alcator C-Mod (abstract)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampsell, M. B.; Bravenec, R. V.; Rowan, W. L.; Eisner, E. C.; Patterson, D. M.; Bretz, N. L.; Boivin, R. L.; Hubbard, A. E.; Irby, J. H.; Marmar, E. S. (and others)

    2001-01-01

    An eight-channel beam-emission-spectroscopy (BES)1 system has been installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, intended for use with a diagnostic neutral hydrogen beam (DNB). Capable of localized measurements from the plasma edge to the plasma core, the BES diagnostic collects light from the first Balmer transition (H{sub {alpha}}) resultant from beam/plasma collisions. The H{sub {alpha}} line splits into several components whose central wavelengths depend on the viewing geometry, the magnetic field, and the beam energy. This is due to the Doppler shifts from viewing the beam off perpendicular, the different velocities of the three mass components of the beam (H, H{sub 2}, H{sub 3}), and the large motional Stark effect. Optimal signal-to-noise requires collecting these components while attenuating all other emission: primarily bremsstrahlung and D{sub {alpha}} radiation (from plasma D{sup 0}/e{sup -} collisions). Tunable bandpass filters are thus required. A BES simulation code has been developed that calculates the brightnesses (bremsstrahlung, D{sub {alpha}}, H{sub {alpha}}) versus wavelength using plasma profile data from the C-Mod MDSplus database,2 a computation of the beam penetration, the viewing and DNB geometries, and bandpass filter characteristics. The model was first used to estimate signal levels and choose the optimal BES bandpass filters; its ultimate purpose is to determine the shot-to-shot tuning requirements of the filters for different discharge conditions. Comparisons of measured and predicted background bremsstrahlung and D{sub {alpha}} brightnesses are presented, as are first measurements and calculations of the beam emission. The code is written in the IDL programming language3 utilizing the ''widget'' graphical user interface. Designed for geometrical and spectral flexibility, it can be modified to simulate other beam diagnostics such as motional-Stark-effect plasma current measurements and charge-exchange recombination

  18. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  19. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy determination of trace element composition of argan oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzálvez, A; Ghanjaoui, M E; El Rhazi, M; de la Guardia, M

    2010-02-01

    A methodology based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) after microwave assisted acid digestion has been developed to determine the trace element content of Moroccan argan oil. Limit of detection values equal or lower than few mg/kg were obtained for all elements under study. To assure the accuracy of the whole procedure, recovery studies were carried out on argan oil samples spiked at different concentration levels from 10 to 200 µg/L. Quantitative average recovery values were obtained for all elements evaluated, demonstrating the suitability of this methodology for the determination of trace elements in argan oil samples. Aluminum, calcium, chromium, iron, potassium, lithium, magnesium, sodium, vanadium and zinc were quantitatively determined in Moroccan argan oils being found that their concentration is different of that found in other edible oils thus offering a way for authentication and for the evaluation of possible adulterations.

  20. Development of beam emission spectroscopy for turbulence transport study in Heliotron J

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S.; Ohshima, S.; Matsuda, H.; Lu, X. X.; Kokubu, D.; Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Kado, S.; Oishi, T.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Ishizawa, A.; Kenmochi, N.; Otani, Y.; Konoshima, S.; Mizuuchi, T.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the development study of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) for the turbulent transport study in Heliotron J. Modification of the sightlines (10 × 4 for edge and 10 × 2 for edge) enables us to obtain 2-dimensional BES imaging. The cooling effect on the reduction in the electrical noise of avalanche photodiode (APD) assembly has been investigated using a refrigerant cooling system. When the temperature of the APD element has set to be -20 °C, the electrical noise can be reduced more than 50%. The measurement error of the phase difference in the case of low signal level has been tested by two light-emitting diode lamps. The APD cooling has an effect to improve the measurement error at the low signal level of APD.

  1. Sample preparation techniques in trace element analysis by X-ray emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report, written under a research contract with the IAEA, contains a detailed presentation of the most difficult problem encountered in the trace element analysis by methods of the X-ray emission spectroscopy, namely the sample preparation techniques. The following items are covered. Sampling - with specific consideration of aerosols, water, soil, biological materials, petroleum and its products, storage of samples and their handling. Pretreatment of samples - preconcentration, ashing, solvent extraction, ion exchange and electrodeposition. Sample preparations for PIXE - analysis - backings, target uniformity and homogeneity, effects of irradiation, internal standards and specific examples of preparation (aqueous, biological, blood serum and solid samples). Sample preparations for radioactive sources or tube excitation - with specific examples (water, liquid and solid samples, soil, geological, plants and tissue samples). Finally, the problem of standards and reference materials, as well as that of interlaboratory comparisons, is discussed

  2. Temperature Effect on the Optical Emission Intensity in Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Super Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbani, S. M. R.; Ghezelbash, M.; Majd, A. E.; Soltanolkotabi, M.; Saghafifar, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the influence of heating and cooling samples on the optical emission spectra and plasma parameters of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for Titanium 64, Inconel 718 super alloys, and Aluminum 6061 alloy is investigated. Samples are uniformly heated up to approximately 200°C and cooled down to -78°C by an external heater and liquid nitrogen, respectively. Variations of plasma parameters like electron temperature and electron density with sample temperature are determined by using Boltzmann plot and Stark broadening methods, respectively. Heating the samples improves LIBS signal strength and broadens the width of the spectrum. On the other hand, cooling alloys causes fluctuations in the LIBS signal and decrease it to some extent, and some of the spectral peaks diminish. In addition, our results show that electron temperature and electron density depend on the sample temperature variations.

  3. Tunneling spectroscopy of a phosphorus impurity atom on the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savinov, S. V.; Oreshkin, A. I., E-mail: oreshkin@spmlab.phys.msu.su, E-mail: oreshkin@spmlab.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Oreshkin, S. I. [Moscow State University, Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Russian Federation); Haesendonck, C. van [Laboratorium voor Stoffysica en Magnetisme (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    We numerically model the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface electronic properties in the vicinity of a P donor impurity atom located near the surface. We find a notable increase in the surface local density of states (LDOS) around the surface dopant near the bottom of the empty surface state band π*, which we call a split state due to its limited spatial extent and energetic position inside the band gap. We show that despite the well-established bulk donor impurity energy level position at the very bottom of the conduction band, a surface donor impurity on the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface might produce an energy level below the Fermi energy, depending on the impurity atom local environment. It is demonstrated that the impurity located in subsurface atomic layers is visible in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) experiment on the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface. The quasi-1D character of the impurity image, observed in STM experiments, is confirmed by our computer simulations with a note that a few π-bonded dimer rows may be affected by the presence of the impurity atom. We elaborate a model that allows classifying atoms on the experimental low-temperature STM image. We show the presence of spatial oscillations of the LDOS by the density-functional theory method.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of TiO2 and Al2O3 on nanographite films: structure and field emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleshch, Victor I.; Ismagilov, Rinat R.; Smolnikova, Elena A.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Tuyakova, Feruza; Obraztsov, Alexander N.

    2016-03-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metal oxides (MO) was used to modify the properties of nanographite (NG) films produced by direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. NG films consist of a few layers of graphene flakes (nanowalls) and nanoscrolls homogeneously distributed over a silicon substrate with a predominantly vertical orientation of graphene sheets to the substrate surface. TiO2 and Al2O3 layers, with thicknesses in the range of 50 to 250 nm, were deposited on NG films by ALD. The obtained NG-MO composite materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that ALD forms a uniform coating on graphene flakes, while on the surface of needle-like nanoscrolls it forms spherical nanoparticles. Field emission properties of the films were measured in a flat vacuum diode configuration. Analysis based on obtained current-voltage characteristics and electrostatic calculations show that emission from NG-TiO2 films is determined by the nanoscrolls protruding from the TiO2 coverage. The TiO2 layers with thicknesses of <200 nm almost do not affect the overall field emission characteristics of the films. At the same time, these layers are able to stabilize the NG films' surface and can lead to an improvement of the NG cold cathode performance in vacuum electronics.

  5. Elemental determination of microsamples by liquid film dielectric barrier discharge atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qian; Zhu, Zhenli; Hu, Shenghong; Zheng, Hongtao; Jin, Lanlan

    2012-05-01

    In this study, a new liquid-film dielectric barrier discharge (LFDBD) atomic emission source was developed for microsample elemental determination. It consists of a copper electrode, a tungsten wire electrode, and a piece of glass slide between them, which serves as the dielectric barrier as well as the sample plate. The sample solution with 1 mol L(-1) nitric acid, when deposited onto the surface of the glass slide, forms a thin liquid film. The plasma is generated between the tip of the tungsten wire electrode and the liquid film surface when alternating-current (ac) high voltage (peak voltage ~3.7 kV, frequency ~30 kHz) is applied on the electrodes. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions in the sample solution were achieved by atomic emission measurements in the plasma and were demonstrated in this study with elements Na, K, Cu, Zn, and Cd. Detection limits were in the range from 0.6 ng (7 μg L(-1)) for Na to 6 ng (79 μg L(-1)) for Zn. Repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation from seven repetitive analyses of samples with analyte concentrations at 1 mg L(-1), varied from 2.1% to 4.4%. Compared with other liquid discharge systems that operate at atmospheric pressure, the current system offers several advantages: First, it eliminates the use of a sample flow system (e.g., syringe or peristaltic pump); instead, a small aliquot of sample is directly pipetted onto the glass slide for analysis. Second, it is a microanalysis system and requires sample volume ≤80 μL, a benefit when a limited amount of sample is available. Third, because the sample is applied in aliquot, there is no washout time, and the analysis can be easily extended to sample array for high-throughput analysis. The proposed LFDBD is promising for in-field elemental determination because of its simplicity, cost effectiveness, low power supply, and no inert gas requirement. PMID:22486234

  6. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in the particulate phase from burning incenses with various atomic hydrogen/carbon ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Tzu-Ting, E-mail: d89844001@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering and Health, Yuanpei University, No. 306, Yuanpei St., Hsin Chu, 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shaw-Tao [Department of Applied Chemistry, Providence University, 200 Chung-Chi Rd., Salu Dist., Taichung City 43301, Taiwan (China); Lin, Tser-Sheng [Department of Safety, Health, and Environmental Engineering, National United University, 2 Lien Da, Maioli, 360, Taiwan (China); Hong, Wei-Lun [Department of Environmental Engineering and Health, Yuanpei University, No. 306, Yuanpei St., Hsin Chu, 300, Taiwan (China)

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the particulate phase generated from burning various incense was investigated by a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Among the used incenses, the atomic H/C ratio ranged from 0.51 to 1.69, yielding the emission factor ranges for total particulate mass and PAHs of 4.19-82.16 mg/g and 1.20-9.50 {mu}g/g, respectively. The atomic H/C ratio of the incense was the key factor affecting particulate mass and the PAHs emission factors. Both the maximum emission factor and the slowest burning rate appear at the H/C ratio of 1.57. The concentrations of the four-ring PAHs predominated and the major species among the 16 PAHs were fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and chrysene for most incense types. The benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[a]anthracene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene accounted for 87.08-93.47% of the total toxic equivalency emission factor. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The atomic H/C ratio of incense was the key factor affecting PAHs emission factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Burning incense with lower atomic H/C ratio minimized the production of total PAHs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The BaP, BaA, BbF, and DBA accounted for 87.08-93.47% of the TEQ emission factor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Special PAH ratios were regarded as characteristic ratios for burning incense.

  7. Luminescence spectroscopy of matrix-isolated atomic manganese: Excitation of the 'forbidden' a6DJ↔a6S transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced excitation spectra recorded for the electric-quadrupole 3d64s a6DJ54s2a6S5/2 transitions of atomic Mn, allow assignment of the red emission features, previously observed in Mn/RG (RG=Ar, Kr and Xe) matrices with resonance 3d54s4pz6P5/254s2 a6S5/2 excitation, to the metastable a6D9/2 state. Narrow excitation bands recorded for the red site in the Mn/Kr system allow identification of all five spin-orbit levels (J=1/2, 3/2, 5/2, 7/2 and 9/2) in the a6D state. The coincidence of the lowest energy excitation band and the observed 585.75 nm (17 072 cm-1) emission band of atomic Mn in Kr matrices, yielded a definitive assignment of this emission to a transition from the J=9/2 spin-orbit level. Temperature dependent emission scans lead to the identification of the zero phonon line for the a6D9/2→a6S5/2 transition at 585.75 nm. The identified matrix-shift of +20 cm-1 allows an assessment of the extent of the ground state stabilization in the red (2 deg.) site of atomic Mn isolation in solid Kr. Emission produced with direct a6D state excitation yielded both the 585.75 and 626 nm features. The former band arises for Mn atoms occupying the red site--the latter from blue site occupancy in solid Kr. The excitation linewidths recorded for these two sites differ greatly, with the blue site yielding a broad featureless profile, in contrast to the narrow, structured features of the red site. The corresponding red site a6DJ↔a6S5/2 transitions in Ar and Xe matrices are broader than in Kr--a difference considered to originate from the site sizes available in these hosts and the interatomic Mn·RG potentials. The millisecond decay times recorded for the red emission bands in the Mn/RG systems are all much shorter than the 3 s value predicted for the gas phase a6D9/2→a6S5/2 transition. This enhancement allows optical pumping of the forbidden a6DJ↔a6S transitions with low laser powers when atomic manganese is isolated in the solid state. However all the emission

  8. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampert, M. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Czopf, A.; Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, BME IOP, Budapest (Hungary); Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I. [BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Nam, Y. U. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  9. LZIFU: an emission-line fitting toolkit for integral field spectroscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, I.-Ting; Medling, Anne M.; Groves, Brent; Rich, Jeffrey A.; Rupke, David S. N.; Hampton, Elise; Kewley, Lisa J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Croom, Scott M.; Richards, Samuel; Schaefer, Adam L.; Sharp, Rob; Sweet, Sarah M.

    2016-09-01

    We present lzifu (LaZy-IFU), an idl toolkit for fitting multiple emission lines simultaneously in integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. lzifu is useful for the investigation of the dynamical, physical and chemical properties of gas in galaxies. lzifu has already been applied to many world-class IFS instruments and large IFS surveys, including the Wide Field Spectrograph, the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE), the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey, the Sydney-Australian-astronomical-observatory Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. Here we describe in detail the structure of the toolkit, and how the line fluxes and flux uncertainties are determined, including the possibility of having multiple distinct kinematic components. We quantify the performance of lzifu, demonstrating its accuracy and robustness. We also show examples of applying lzifu to CALIFA and SAMI data to construct emission line and kinematic maps, and investigate complex, skewed line profiles presented in IFS data. The code is made available to the astronomy community through github. lzifu will be further developed over time to other IFS instruments, and to provide even more accurate line and uncertainty estimates.

  10. Updated Spitzer emission spectroscopy of bright transiting hot Jupiter HD 189733b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorov, Kamen O. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Grillmair, Carl J., E-mail: todorovk@phys.ethz.ch [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Mail Stop 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We analyze all existing secondary eclipse time series spectroscopy of hot Jupiter HD 189733b acquired with the now defunct Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument. We describe the novel approaches we develop to remove the systematic effects and extract accurate secondary eclipse depths as a function of wavelength in order to construct the emission spectrum of the exoplanet. We compare our results with a previous study by Grillmair et al. that did not examine all data sets available to us. We are able to confirm the detection of a water feature near 6 μm claimed by Grillmair et al. We compare the planetary emission spectrum to three model families—based on isothermal atmosphere, gray atmosphere, and two realizations of the complex radiative transfer model by Burrows et al., adopted in Grillmair et al.'s study. While we are able to reject the simple isothermal and gray models based on the data at the 97% level just from the IRS data, these rejections hinge on eclipses measured within a relatively narrow wavelength range, between 5.5 and 7 μm. This underscores the need for observational studies with broad wavelength coverage and high spectral resolution, in order to obtain robust information on exoplanet atmospheres.

  11. Interactions between osmium atoms dissolved in iron observed by the 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konieczny Robert

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The room temperature 57Fe Mössbauer spectra for binary iron-based solid solutions Fe1−xOsx, with x in the range 0.01 ≤ x ≤ 0.05, were analyzed in terms of binding energy Eb between two Os atoms in the Fe-Os system. The extrapolated values of Eb for x = 0 were used for computation of enthalpy of solution of osmium in iron. The result was compared with that resulting from the cellular atomic model of alloys by Miedema. The comparison shows that our findings are in qualitative agreement with the Miedema's model predictions.

  12. Spectroscopy of 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) attached to rare gas samples: Clusters vs. bulk matrices. II. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Dvorak, Matthieu; Mueller, Markus; Knoblauch, Tobias; Buenermann, Oliver; Rydlo, Alexandre; Minniberger, Stefan; Harbich, Wolfgang; Stienkemeier, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecules and solid rare gas samples is studied by means of fluorescence emission spectroscopy. Laser-excited PTCDA-doped large argon, neon, and para-hydrogen clusters along with PTCDA embedded in helium nanodroplets are spectroscopically characterized with respect to line broadening and shifting. A fast non-radiative relaxation is observed before a radiative decay in the electronic ground state takes place. In co...

  13. Field emission spectroscopy evidence for dual-barrier electron tunnelling in nanographite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandurin, D. A.; Kleshch, V. I. [Department of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Mingels, S.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G. [FB C Physics Department, University of Wuppertal, 42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Obraztsov, A. N., E-mail: obraz@polly.phys.msu.ru [Department of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu 80101 (Finland)

    2015-06-08

    Nanocarbon films with upstanding flake-like graphite crystallites of nanometre thickness were fabricated by carbon condensation from a methane–hydrogen gas mixture activated by a direct-current discharge. The nanographite (NG) crystallites are composed of a few graphene layers. The adjacent atomic layers are connected partially at the edges of the crystallites to form strongly curved graphene structures. The extraordinary field emission (FE) properties were revealed for the NG films with an average current density of a few mA/cm{sup 2}, reproducibly obtained at a macroscopic applied field of about 1 V/μm. The integral FE current–voltage curves and electron spectra (FEES) of NG cathodes with multiple emitters were measured in a triode configuration. Most remarkably, above a threshold field, two peaks were revealed in FEES with different field-dependent shifts to lower energies. This behaviour evidences electron emission through a dual potential barrier, corresponding to carbon–carbon heterostructure formed as a result of the graphene bending.

  14. In-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes: From atomic physics to nuclear structure

    CERN Multimedia

    Rothe, S

    2014-01-01

    The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source RILIS [1] at the CERN-ISOLDE on-line radioactive ion beam facility is essential for ion beam production for the majority of experiments, but it is also powerful tool for laser spectroscopy of rare isotopes. A series of experiments on in-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes [2, 3] revealed the nuclear ground state properties of 191;211;216;218Po. However, limitations caused by the isobaric background of surface-ionized francium isotopes hindered the study of several neutron rich polonium isotopes. The development of the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) [4] and finally its integration at ISOLDE has led to a dramatic suppression of surface ions. Meanwhile, the RILIS laser spectroscopy capabilities have advanced tremendously. Widely tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) lasers were installed to complement the established dye laser system. Along with a new data acquisition system [5], this more versatile laser setup enabled rst ever laser spectroscopy of the radioact...

  15. Spectroscopy of ^1S0 -- ^3P1^88Sr Atomic Transition in a 1.06 μm Optical Dipole Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Mickelson, P. G.; Traverso, A. J.; Killian, T. C.

    2008-05-01

    We studied the effects of laser light near-resonant with the ^1S0-- ^3P1^88Sr transition in an optical dipole trap (ODT). We observe laser cooling of our ODT atomic sample as the atoms collide in the presence of red-detuned 689 nm light. Heating of the atoms was also observed at a different range of frequency detunings while performing spectroscopy. Both processes were accompanied with atom loss, but the increase of phase space density observed during 689 nm laser cooling could aid pursuits of quantum degeneracy with Sr.

  16. Development of Two-Photon Pump Polarization Spectroscopy Probe Technique Tpp-Psp for Measurements of Atomic Hydrogen .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Aman; Lucht, Robert P.

    2015-06-01

    Atomic hydrogen (H) is a key radical in combustion and plasmas. Accurate knowledge of its concentration can be used to better understand transient phenomenon such as ignition and extinction in combustion environments. Laser induced polarization spectroscopy is a spatially resolved absorption technique which we have adapted for quantitative measurements of H atom. This adaptation is called two-photon pump, polarization spectroscopy probe technique (TPP-PSP) and it has been implemented using two different laser excitation schemes. The first scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-3P levels using a circularly polarized 656-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 656 nm. As a result, the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. The laser beams were created by optical parametric generation followed by multiple pulse dye amplification stages. This resulted in narrow linewidth beams which could be scanned in frequency domain and varied in energy. This allowed us to systematically investigate saturation and Stark effect in 2S-3P transitions with the goal of developing a quantitative H atom measurement technique. The second scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-4P transitions using a circularly polarized 486-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 486 nm. As a result the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. A dye laser was pumped by third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser to create a laser beam

  17. Characterization of novel sufraces by FTIR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy for food pathogen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single molecular detection of pathogens and toxins of interest to food safety is within grasp using technology such as Atomic Force Microscopy. Using antibodies or specific aptamers connected to the AFM tip make it possible to detect a pathogen molecule on a surface. However, it also becomes necess...

  18. Atomic signatures of local environment from core-level spectroscopy in β -Ga2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchi, Caterina; Zschiesche, Hannes; Nabok, Dmitrii; Mogilatenko, Anna; Albrecht, Martin; Galazka, Zbigniew; Kirmse, Holm; Draxl, Claudia; Koch, Christoph T.

    2016-08-01

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental study on core-level excitations from the oxygen K edge of β -Ga2O3 . A detailed analysis of the electronic structure reveals the importance of O-Ga hybridization effects in the conduction region. The spectrum from O 1 s core electrons is dominated by excitonic effects, which overall redshift the absorption onset by 0.5 eV, and significantly redistribute the intensity to lower energies. Analysis of the spectra obtained within many-body perturbation theory reveals atomic fingerprints of the inequivalent O atoms. From the comparison of energy-loss near-edge fine-structure (ELNES) spectra computed with respect to different crystal planes, with measurements recorded under the corresponding diffraction conditions, we show how the spectral contributions of specific O atoms can be enhanced while quenching others. These results suggest ELNES, combined with ab initio many-body theory, as a very powerful technique to characterize complex systems, with sensitivity to individual atomic species and to their local environment.

  19. Atomic force microscope with combined FTIR-Raman spectroscopy having a micro thermal analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Samuel D.; Fondeur, Fernando F.

    2011-10-18

    An atomic force microscope is provided that includes a micro thermal analyzer with a tip. The micro thermal analyzer is configured for obtaining topographical data from a sample. A raman spectrometer is included and is configured for use in obtaining chemical data from the sample.

  20. Probing Co/Si interface behaviour by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the Co-Si reaction, the Co growth mode at room temperature, diffusion behaviour as well as morphology evolution during annealing on both H-terminated and clean Si(001) and Si(111) surfaces. From in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation, "Co-Si" reaction appears to occur on both H-terminated and clean surfaces at room temperature (RT) and the silicide crystallinity is improved upon annealing.Co growth mode on H-terminated Si surfaces occurs in a pseudo layer-by-layer manner while small close-packed island growth mode is observed on the clean Si surface. Upon annealing at different temperatures, Co atom concentration decreases versus annealing time, which in part is attributed to Co atoms inward diffusion. The diffusion behaviour on both types of surfaces demonstrates a similar trend. Morphology study using ex-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that the islands formed on Si(001) surface after annealing at 700 ℃ are elongated with growth directions alternate between the two perpendicular [(-1)10] and [110] directions. Triangular islands are observed on Si(111) surface.

  1. Nuclear moments and isotopic variation of the mean square charge radii of strontium nuclei by atomic beam laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperfine structure and optical isotope shift measurements have been performed on a series of stable and radioactive strontium isotopes (A = 80 to 90), including two isomers 85m and 87m. The spectroscopy applied continuous wave dye laser induced fluorescence of free atoms at λ=293.2 nm in a well collimated atomic beam. The 293.2 nm ultraviolet light was generated by frequency doubling the output of a dye laser in either a temperature tuned Ammonium Dihydrogen Arsenate (ADA) crystal or an angle tuned Lithium Iodate crystal. A special radio frequency (rf) technique was used to tune the dye laser frequency with long term stability. Radioactive Sr isotopes were produced either by neutron capture of stable strontium or by (α,xn) reactions from krypton gas. The samples were purified by an electromagnetic mass separator and their sizes were of order 100 pg, which corresponds to 1011 atoms. The observed results of the hyperfine structure components are evaluated in terms of nuclear magnetic dipole moments and electric quadrupole moments. Changes in mean square charge radii of strontium nuclei which were extracted from the isotope shift measurements, exhibit a distinct shell effect at the neutron magic number N=50. The experimental data are analysed and compared with some theoretical nuclear model predictions. The strong increase of the nuclear charge radii with decreasing neutron number of isotopes below N=50 is in agreement with the variation of the mean square deformation extracted from measured B(E2) values. (orig.)

  2. Determination of trace elements in refined gold samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steharnik Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for determination the trace contents of silver, copper, iron, palladium, zinc and platinum in refined gold samples. Simultaneous inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer with radial torch position and cross flow nebulizer was used for determination. In order to compare the different calibration strategies, two sets of calibration standards were prepared. The first set was based on matrix matched calibration standards and the second was prepared without the addition of matrix material. Detection limits for matrix matching calibrations were higher for some elements than those without matrix matching. In addition, the internal standardization method was applied and experiments indicated that indium was the best option as internal standard. The obtained results for gold sample by matrix matching and matrix free calibrations were compared with the obtained results by standard addition method. The accuracy of the methods was tested performing recovery test. Recoveries for spiked sample were in the range of 90-115 %. The accuracy of the methods was also tested by analysis of certified reference material of high pure goldAuGHP1. The best results were achieved by matrix free calibration and standard addition method using indium as internal standard at wavelength of 230 nm. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 34024: Development of Technologies for Recycling of Precious, Rare and Associated Metals from Solid Waste in Serbia to High Purity Products

  3. Capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection for determining chlorophenols in water and soil samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campillo, Natalia [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Aguinaga, Nerea [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Vinas, Pilar [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain)]. E-mail: hcordoba@um.es

    2005-11-03

    A purge-and-trap preconcentration system coupled to a GC equipped with a microwave-induced atomic emission detector was used to determine 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) in water and soil samples. The analytes were previously leached from the solid matrices into a 5% (w/v) sodium carbonate solution using an ultrasonic probe. It was necessary to acetylate the compounds before purging them from the aqueous medium, which, at the same time, improved their chromatographic separation. After selecting the optimal experimental conditions, the performance of the system was evaluated. Each chromatographic run took 26 min, including the purge time. Detection limits for 5 ml water samples ranged from 23 to 150 ng l{sup -1}, which is lower than the limits reached using the methods proposed by the US Environmental Pollution Agency (EPA) for chlorophenols in water. For soil samples, detection limits were calculated for 7 g samples, the resulting values ranging between 80 and 540 pg g{sup -1} for 2,4,6-TCP and 2-CP, respectively. The accuracy of the method was checked by analysing a certified reference soil, as well as fortified water and soil samples.

  4. Methods for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, George C. Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2010-08-03

    A method for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). ICP-AES analysis is performed across a plurality of selected locations in the plasma on an unknown sample, collecting the light intensity at one or more selected wavelengths of one or more sought-for analytes, creating a first dataset. The first dataset is then calibrated with a calibration dataset creating a calibrated first dataset curve. If the calibrated first dataset curve has a variability along the location within the plasma for a selected wavelength, errors are present. Plasma-related errors are then corrected by diluting the unknown sample and performing the same ICP-AES analysis on the diluted unknown sample creating a calibrated second dataset curve (accounting for the dilution) for the one or more sought-for analytes. The cross-over point of the calibrated dataset curves yields the corrected value (free from plasma related errors) for each sought-for analyte.

  5. Microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometric determination of Ca, K and Mg in various cheese varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) was used to determine calcium, magnesium and potassium in various Turkish cheese samples. Cheese samples were dried at 100 °C for 2 days and then digested in a mixture of nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide (3:1). Good linearities (R(2) > 0.999) were obtained up to 10 μg mL(-1) of Ca, Mg and K at 445.478 nm, 285.213 nm and 766.491 nm, respectively. The analytes in a certified reference milk powder sample were determined within the uncertainty limits. Moreover, the analytes added to the cheese samples were recovered quantitatively (>90%). All determinations were performed using aqueous standards for calibration. The LOD values for Ca, Mg and K were 0.036 μg mL(-1), 0.012 μg mL(-1) and 0.190 μg mL(-1), respectively. Concentrations of Ca, K and Mg in various types of cheese samples produced in different regions of Turkey were found between 1.03-3.70, 0.242-0.784 and 0.081-0.303 g kg(-1), respectively. PMID:26304350

  6. Determination of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) in urine by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grases, F.; Perello, J.; Isern, B.; Prieto, R.M

    2004-05-10

    Myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) is a substance present in urine with an important role in preventing calcium renal calculi development. In spite of this, the use of urinary phytate levels on stone-formers' evaluation and treatment is still notably restricted as a consequence of the enormous difficulty to analyze this substance in urine. In this paper, a simple procedure for routinary urinary phytate determination based on phosphorus determination through inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry is described. The method only requires a previous separation of phytate from other components by column anion exchange chromatography. The working linear range used was 0-2 mg l{sup -1} phosphorus (0-7 mg l{sup -1} phytate). The limit of detection was 64 {mu}g l{sup -1} of phytate and the limit of quantification was 213 {mu}g l{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for 1.35 mg l{sup -1} phytate was 2.4%. Different urine samples were analyzed using an alternative analytical methodology based on gas chromatography (GC)/mass detection used for inositol determination (phytate was previously hydrolyzed), resulting both methods comparable using as criterion to assess statistical significance P<0.05.

  7. Inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectrometry: trace elements in oil matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, C. A.

    1977-12-01

    The simultaneous determination of up to 20 trace elements in various oil matrices by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry is reported. The oil matrices investigated were lubricating oils (for wear metals), fuel oil, centrifuged coal liquefaction product, crude soybean oil, and commercial edible oils. The samples were diluted with appropriate organic solvents and injected into the plasma as an aerosol generated by a pneumatic nebulization technique. Detection limits of the 28 elements studied ranged from 0.0006 to 9 ..mu..g/g with the majority falling in the 0.01 to 0.1 ..mu..g/g range. Analytical calibration curves were linear over at least two orders of magnitude and for some elements this linearity extended over 4.5 orders of magnitude. Relevant data on precision and accuracy are included. Because metals often occur as particles in lubricating oil and coal liquefaction products, the effect of particles on the analytical results was examined. Wear metal particles in used oil did not appear to affect the analytical results. However, incomplete recovery relative to organometallic reference solutions was obtained for iron particles with a nominal mean diameter of 3.0 ..mu..m suspended in oil. It was shown that the following factors contributed to incomplete recovery for the particles: settling of the suspended particles in the flask, a difference in nebulization efficiency between particle suspensions and organometallic solutions, and indications of incomplete vaporization of the larger particles in the plasma.

  8. Determination of eight trace elements in doped crystal ALN by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. In this paper, an accurate and simple method has been developed for the determination of trace Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn ,Ni and Zn in doped AlN crystal using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). AlN crystal becomes ideal substrate for the epitaxial growth of GaN, AlGaN with high Al ingredient and AlN which are used to fabricate ultraviolet LEDs, blue- ultraviolet solid state LDs, lasers, ultraviolet detectors. At present, It is a very important aspect for scientific workers to promote in the transition metals elements doped AlN showing ferromagne. Owing its low detection limits and multi-element capability, ICP-AES has been used in many fields.The optimum instrument working conditions are selected .AlN crystal was fused with KOH and the fusion product was dissolved in dilute aqua regia. Matrix effect from KOH and interference to the spectral lines of the elements to be determined were investigated and corrected by matrix matching and background correction method. Detection limits of elements were 0.01% to 0.0002% The recoveries for elements were 98% to 104%. The relative standard deviation was 0.5% to 4.0%.

  9. Direct solid soil analysis by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of heavy metals in soils by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) usually involves the time-consuming step of preparing a solution of the solid that is then nebulized into the plasma. According to regulations, digestion by aqua regia(hydrochloric acid + nitric acid, 3 + 1) should be carried out although it is known that this method is incomplete for silicate soils. The problem can be eliminated by introducing the solid directly into the plasma using the laser ablation technique for sampling. Results are described for a study of laser ablation using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser coupled with a new échelle spectrometer which has a multichannel solid-state detector. The laser pulses were focused onto the solid surface of pressed soil samples to generate an aerosol which is entrained in a flowing Ar stream, transported through a tube and then introduced directly into the inductively coupled plasma. Some characteristics of the preparation technique, the selection of an internal standard and homogeneity tests of the elemental distribution are reported along with a comparison and evaluation of three methods of calibration. The criteria used to measure the performance of laser ablation ICP-AES are the relative standard deviations obtained of 4.9–12.7% and the accuracy, 0.3–12.4% for Fe, Mn, Cu, Pb, Cr, Zn and Ni

  10. Activities 2009-2011 at the Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center team at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, MD USA centered in the last two years on two main subjects: First, the data center completed and issued a new, significantly improved version of its principal product, the Atomic Spectra Database (ASD Version 4.0 in September 2010, with an update 4.1.0 in May 2011). These versions contain new data for a good number of additional spectra as well as new, better quality and more extensive data replacing the earlier material. They are also for the first time completely integrated with the two NIST bibliographies on atomic energy levels and spectra, and on atomic transition probabilities. The sources of the material selected in ASD for the various spectra and transitions are identified there by their numbers in the respective bibliographies, so that the original papers can be directly accessed by users if they desire more background material. Secondly, new tabulations of atomic energy levels and wavelengths were completed for hydrogen and its isotopes (H, D, T), for argon (Ar II through Ar XVIII), cesium (Cs I through Cs LV), barium (Ba III through Ba LVI) and tungsten (W III through W LXXIV). Compilations of energy levels and spectral lines are in progress on neon (Ne IV), chlorine (Cl I through Cl XVII), and nickel (Ni I through Ni VIII). Data assessments and compilations of atomic transition probabilities were completed for hydrogen and its isotopes (H,D,T), for helium(He I and He II), for lithium (Li I through Li III), beryllium (Be I through Be IV), boron (B I through B V), sulfur (S I through S XVI), cesium (Cs I through Cs LV), and barium (Ba III through Ba LVI). Additional compilations for the higher fluorine and neon ions (F V through F IX, Ne VI through Ne X), chlorine (Cl I through Cl XVII) and nickel (Ni I through Ni VIII) are in progress. As in all our earlier work, the NIST data tables are limited to reference data, i.e. data

  11. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  12. Near-infrared nano-spectroscopy and emission energy control of semiconductor quantum dots using a phase-change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have proposed a method to achieve near-field imaging spectroscopy of single semiconductor quantum dots with high sensitivity by using an optical mask layer of a phase-change material. Sequential formation and elimination of an amorphous aperture allows imaging spectroscopy with high spatial resolution and high collection efficiency. We present numerical simulation and experimental result that show the effectiveness of this technique. Inspired by this optical mask effect, a new approach which can precisely control the emission energy of semiconductor quantum dots has been proposed. This method uses the volume expansion of a phase change material upon amorphization, which allows reversible emission energy tuning of quantum dots. A photoluminescence spectroscopy of single quantum dots and simulation were conducted to demonstrate and further explore the feasibility of this method

  13. Effect of early injection strategy on spray atomization and emission reduction characteristics in bioethanol blended diesel fueled engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is to investigate the emission reduction characteristics of bioethanol blended diesel fuel at early injection condition including spray, atomization and evaporation characteristics. The spray atomization and evaporation characteristics were investigated using spray visualization system and KIVA-3V code, respectively. In this work, the effect of ethanol blending on the spray behavior is more evident at early injection condition. In the calculation results, the droplet size of bioethanol blended fuel was smaller than that of diesel, and bioethanol blended diesel droplets firstly evaporated by its volatility and superior atomization characteristics. In early injection condition, the bioethanol blending caused an increase in indicated mean effective pressure with an extension of the ignition delay. The cooling effect of the bioethanol fuel reduced NOx. The HC emission increased and the CO emission decreased because of the ethanol blending. The geometry mean diameter and total number density increased as a result of ethanol blending, the particle number in the nuclei mode decreased, and the particle number in the accumulation mode increased in early injection condition. -- Highlights: ► The overall spray, combustion and emission characteristics of bioethanol-blended diesel fuel are measured. ► Experimental results are compared in the early injection- and the conventional injection cases. ► Atomization and evaporation characteristics of diesel-bioethanol blended fuel were numerically analyzed using KIVA-3V. ► In the early injection cases, the cooling effect of bioethanol fuel is clearer compared to the conventional injection. ► By the early injection strategy with bioethanol blended diesel fuel, the exhaust emissions can be significantly reduced.

  14. Study of polonium isotopes ground state properties by simultaneous atomic- and nuclear-spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Koester, U H; Kalaninova, Z; Imai, N

    2007-01-01

    We propose to systematically study the ground state properties of neutron deficient $^{192-200}$Po isotopes by means of in-source laser spectroscopy using the ISOLDE laser ion source coupled with nuclear spectroscopy at the detection setup as successfully done before by this collaboration with neutron deficient lead isotopes. The study of the change in mean square charge radii along the polonium isotope chain will give an insight into shape coexistence above the mid-shell N = 104 and above the closed shell Z = 82. The hyperfine structure of the odd isotopes will also allow determination of the nuclear spin and the magnetic moment of the ground state and of any identifiable isomer state. For this study, a standard UC$_{x}$ target with the ISOLDE RILIS is required for 38 shifts.

  15. Uma introdução à espectroscopia atômica: II - o espectro do sódio An introduction to atomic spectroscopy: II - the sodium spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Sala

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article is devoted to Chemistry or Physics undergraduate students, given their difficulty to understand fundamental concepts and technical language used in atomic spectroscopy and quantum mechanics. An easy approach is shown in the treatment of the emission spectrum of the sodium atom without any involved calculations. In a previous article, the hydrogen spectrum was considered and the energy degeneracy of the angular momentum quantum number was observed. For the sodium spectrum, due to the valence electron penetration into internal shells, a breakdown of this degeneracy occurs and a dependence of this penetration on the angular momentum quantum number is observed. The eigenvalues are determined introducing the quantum defect correction (Rydberg correction in the denominator of the Balmer equation, and the energy diagram is obtained. The intensity ratio for the observed doublets is explained by introducing new wave functions, containing the magnetic quantum number of the total angular momentum.

  16. X-ray emission spectroscopy study of the Verwey transition in Fe sub 3 O sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Moewes, A; Finkelstein, L D; Galakhov, A V; Gota, S; Gautier-Soyer, M; Rueff, J P; Hague, C F

    2003-01-01

    The temperature-dependent Verwey transition in a 500 A (111) thin film of Fe sub 3 O sub 4 (magnetite) has been studied using soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy at room temperature and below the transition temperature T sub V. The Fe L sub 2 sub , sub 3 x-ray emission spectra show an increase in the intensity of the L sub 2 emission relative to the L sub 3 emission below T sub V. This is independent of the excitation energy and is attributed to a metal-insulator transition across T sub V. Comparison of the Fe L sub 3 emission and O K alpha spectra with LDA band structure calculations supports the suggestion of charge ordering in Fe sub 3 O sub 4 at low temperature.

  17. Determination of trace elements in Egyptian cane sugar (Deshna Factories) by neutron activation, atomic absorption spectrophotometric and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multielement instrumental neutron activation (INAA), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) and atomic absorption spectrophotometric (AAS) analyses were utilized for the determination of Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cu, Eu, Fe, Ga, Hf, K, La, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Ta, Th, Ti, U, V, W and Zn in sugar cane plant, raw juice, juice in different stages, syrup, deposits, molasses, A, B and C sugar, refinery 1 and 2 sugar, and in soil samples picked up from the immediate vicinity of the cane plant roots at surface, 30 and 60 cm depth, respectively. (author)

  18. Spectroscopy of 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) attached to rare gas samples: Clusters vs. bulk matrices. II. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Matthieu; Müller, Markus; Knoblauch, Tobias; Bünermann, Oliver; Rydlo, Alexandre; Minniberger, Stefan; Harbich, Wolfgang; Stienkemeier, Frank

    2012-10-01

    The interaction between 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecules and solid rare gas samples is studied by means of fluorescence emission spectroscopy. Laser-excited PTCDA-doped large argon, neon, and para-hydrogen clusters along with PTCDA embedded in helium nanodroplets are spectroscopically characterized with respect to line broadening and shifting. A fast non-radiative relaxation is observed before a radiative decay in the electronic ground state takes place. In comparison, fluorescence emission studies of PTCDA embedded in bulk neon and argon matrices result in much more complex spectral signatures characterized by a splitting of the different emission lines. These can be assigned to the appearance of site isomers of the surrounding matrix lattice structure.

  19. Fine-structure constant variability surprises for laboratory atomic spectroscopy and cosmological evolution of quasar spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bekenstein, J D

    2003-01-01

    Calculation of the Dirac hydrogen atom spectrum in the framework of dynamical fine structure constant (alpha) variability discloses a small departure in the laboratory from Sommerfeld's formula for the fine structure shifts, possibly measurable today. And for a distant object in the universe, the wavelength shift of a spectral line specifically ascribable to cosmological alpha variation is found to depend differently on the quantum numbers than in the conventional view. This last result clashes with the conventional wisdom that an atom's spectrum can change with cosmological time only through evolution of the alpha parameter in the energy eigenvalue formula, and thus impacts on the Webb group's analysis of fine structure intervals in quasar absorption lines (which has been claimed to disclose cosmological alpha evolution). In particular, analyzing together a mix of quasar absorption lines from different fine structure multiplets can bias estimates of cosmological alpha variability.

  20. Probing an Excited-State Atomic Transition Using Hyperfine Quantum Beat Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, Christopher G; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to observe the dynamics of an excited-state transition in a room temperature atomic vapor using hyperfine quantum beats. Our experiment using cesium atoms consists of a pulsed excitation of the D2 transition, and continuous-wave driving of an excited-state transition from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state to the 7S$_{1/2}$ state. We observe quantum beats in the fluorescence from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state which are modified by the driving of the excited-state transition. The Fourier spectrum of the beat signal yields evidence of Autler-Townes splitting of the 6P$_{3/2}$, F = 5 hyperfine level and Rabi oscillations on the excited-state transition. A detailed model provides qualitative agreement with the data, giving insight to the physical processes involved.