WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic clusters

  1. Atomic clusters with addressable complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, David J.

    2017-02-01

    A general formulation for constructing addressable atomic clusters is introduced, based on one or more reference structures. By modifying the well depths in a given interatomic potential in favour of nearest-neighbour interactions that are defined in the reference(s), the potential energy landscape can be biased to make a particular permutational isomer the global minimum. The magnitude of the bias changes the resulting potential energy landscape systematically, providing a framework to produce clusters that should self-organise efficiently into the target structure. These features are illustrated for small systems, where all the relevant local minima and transition states can be identified, and for the low-energy regions of the landscape for larger clusters. For a 55-particle cluster, it is possible to design a target structure from a transition state of the original potential and to retain this structure in a doubly addressable landscape. Disconnectivity graphs based on local minima that have no direct connections to a lower minimum provide a helpful way to visualise the larger databases. These minima correspond to the termini of monotonic sequences, which always proceed downhill in terms of potential energy, and we identify them as a class of biminimum. Multiple copies of the target cluster are treated by adding a repulsive term between particles with the same address to maintain distinguishable targets upon aggregation. By tuning the magnitude of this term, it is possible to create assemblies of the target cluster corresponding to a variety of structures, including rings and chains.

  2. Determination of atomic cluster structure with cluster fusion algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2005-01-01

    We report an efficient scheme of global optimization, called cluster fusion algorithm, which has proved its reliability and high efficiency in determination of the structure of various atomic clusters.......We report an efficient scheme of global optimization, called cluster fusion algorithm, which has proved its reliability and high efficiency in determination of the structure of various atomic clusters....

  3. High intensity laser interactions with atomic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditmire, T

    2000-08-07

    The development of ultrashort pulse table top lasers with peak pulse powers in excess of 1 TW has permitted an access to studies of matter subject to unprecedented light intensities. Such interactions have accessed exotic regimes of multiphoton atomic and high energy-density plasma physics. Very recently, the nature of the interactions between these very high intensity laser pulses and atomic clusters of a few hundred to a few thousand atoms has come under study. Such studies have found some rather unexpected results, including the striking finding that these interactions appear to be more energetic than interactions with either single atoms or solid density plasmas. Recent experiments have shown that the explosion of such clusters upon intense irradiation can expel ions from the cluster with energies from a few keV to nearly 1 MeV. This phenomenon has recently been exploited to produce DD fusion neutrons in a gas of exploding deuterium clusters. Under this project, we have undertaken a general study of the intense femtosecond laser cluster interaction. Our goal is to understand the macroscopic and microscopic coupling between the laser and the clusters with the aim of optimizing high flux fusion neutron production from the exploding deuterium clusters or the x-ray yield in the hot plasmas that are produced in this interaction. In particular, we are studying the physics governing the cluster explosions. The interplay between a traditional Coulomb explosion description of the cluster disassembly and a plasma-like hydrodynamic explosion is not entirely understood, particularly for small to medium sized clusters (<1000 atoms) and clusters composed of low-Z atoms. We are focusing on experimental studies of the ion and electron energies resulting from such explosions through various experimental techniques. We are also examining how an intense laser pulse propagates through a dense medium containing these clusters.

  4. On clusters and clustering from atoms to fractals

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, PJ

    1993-01-01

    This book attempts to answer why there is so much interest in clusters. Clusters occur on all length scales, and as a result occur in a variety of fields. Clusters are interesting scientifically, but they also have important consequences technologically. The division of the book into three parts roughly separates the field into small, intermediate, and large-scale clusters. Small clusters are the regime of atomic and molecular physics and chemistry. The intermediate regime is the transitional regime, with its characteristics including the onset of bulk-like behavior, growth and aggregation, a

  5. Silica fractal atomic clusters saturated with OH

    CERN Document Server

    Olivi-Tran, N

    2003-01-01

    We constructed regular fractal SiOH atomic clusters which pending bonds are saturated with OH molecules. We calculated the binding energies of these clusters as well as for sp sup 2 hybridization as for sp sup 3 hybridizations. The result are the following: for the two hybridizations, the total binding energies have a linear dependence on the size of the fractal cluster, which comes directly from the scaling law of the fractal characteristic of the building of the cluster. We related by a scaling law, the number of electronic bonds and the total bonding energy.

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties. [Atomic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) (0.1981), 0.1895(9) (0.1874(4)), 0.1530(34) (0.1599(73)), 0.1664(37) (0.1724(110)), 0.1613(43) (0.1675(110)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) (0.0203(12)), 0.0188(10) (0.0220(21)), 0.0247(8) (0.0310(12)), 0.0253(8) (0.0351(8)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  7. Clusters of atoms and molecules theory, experiment, and clusters of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Clusters of Atoms and Molecules is devoted to theoretical concepts and experimental techniques important in the rapidly expanding field of cluster science. Cluster properties are dicussed for clusteres composed of alkali metals, semiconductors, transition metals, carbon, oxides and halides of alkali metals, rare gases, and neutral molecules. The book is composed of several well-integrated treatments all prepared by experts. Each contribution starts out as simple as possible and ends with the latest results so that the book can serve as a text for a course, an introduction into the field, or as a reference book for the expert.

  8. Ab initio calculations and modelling of atomic cluster structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2004-01-01

    framework for modelling the fusion process of noble gas clusters is presented. We report the striking correspondence of the peaks in the experimentally measured abundance mass spectra with the peaks in the size-dependence of the second derivative of the binding energy per atom calculated for the chain...... of the noble gas clusters up to 150 atoms....

  9. Quantum fluctuation effects on nuclear fragment and atomic cluster formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Akira [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Randrup, J.

    1997-05-01

    We investigate the nuclear fragmentation and atomic cluster formation by means of the recently proposed quantal Langevin treatment. It is shown that the effect of the quantal fluctuation is in the opposite direction in nuclear fragment and atomic cluster size distribution. This tendency is understood through the effective classical temperature for the observables. (author)

  10. Unraveling the atomic structure of ultrafine iron clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-12-18

    Unraveling the atomic structures of ultrafine iron clusters is critical to understanding their size-dependent catalytic effects and electronic properties. Here, we describe the stable close-packed structure of ultrafine Fe clusters for the first time, thanks to the superior properties of graphene, including the monolayer thickness, chemical inertness, mechanical strength, electrical and thermal conductivity. These clusters prefer to take regular planar shapes with morphology changes by local atomic shuffling, as suggested by the early hypothesis of solid-solid transformation. Our observations differ from observations from earlier experimental study and theoretical model, such as icosahedron, decahedron or cuboctahedron. No interaction was observed between Fe atoms or clusters and pristine graphene. However, preferential carving, as observed by other research groups, can be realized only when Fe clusters are embedded in graphene. The techniques introduced here will be of use in investigations of other clusters or even single atoms or molecules.

  11. Atomic structure of clusters through chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Techniques for the probing of isolated metal cluster structure through adsorbate binding patterns will be described. The saturation of clusters with reagents such as ammonia and nitrogen provides information on the number of preferred binding sites for these reagents. The dependence of this number on cluster size can suggest particular structural themes. The equilibrium reaction with water can be used to identify cluster sizes having especially enhanced binding for the water molecule. Again, the sequence of cluster sizes showing such enhancement can point to specific cluster structure. The reaction with oxygen can identify cluster sizes having particularly high ionization potentials, and these can be compared to simple models for the electronic structure of metal clusters. Representative applications of these probes to iron, cobalt, nickel, and copper clusters will be discussed. 5 figs.

  12. Thermodynamics of small clusters of atoms: A molecular dynamics simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard Kristensen, W.; Jensen, E. J.; Cotterill, Rodney M J

    1974-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of clusters containing 55, 135, and 429 atoms have been calculated using the molecular dynamics method. Structural and vibrational properties of the clusters were examined at different temperatures in both the solid and the liquid phase. The nature of the melting...... was found to be icosahedral in the 55-atom system and face centered cubic for the two larger systems. ©1974 American Institute of Physics...

  13. Enhanced Electromagnetic and Chemical/Biological Sensing. Properties of Atomic Cluster-Derived Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schatz, George

    2003-01-01

    The Center for Atomic Clusters-derived Materials performed a broad range of research concerned with synthesizing, characterizing and utilizing atomic and molecular clusters, nanoparticles and nanomaterial...

  14. Metallic behavior of Pd atomic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera-Granja, F [Instituto de Fisica ' Manuel Sandoval Vallarta' , Universidad Autonoma de San Luis PotosI, SLP 78000 (Mexico); Vega, A [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica, y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); Rogan, J [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago 1 (Chile); GarcIa, G [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Pontificia Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago, 7820436 (Chile)

    2007-09-12

    We report a study of the nonmetal-metal transition of free-standing Pd{sub N} clusters (2{<=}N{<=}21) carried out through two different theoretical approaches that are extensively employed in electronic structure calculations: a semi-empirical tight-binding (TB) model and an ab initio DFT pseudopotential model. The calculated critical size for the metallic transition decreases rapidly with the temperature and an oscillatory dependence with the cluster size is obtained, particularly in the DFT approach. The TB model describes the metallic behavior for cluster sizes beyond N{approx}12 well. Our obtained critical size at room temperature is of the order of the experimental estimation.

  15. Dynamics of atomic clusters in intense optical fields of ultrashort ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atomic clusters; Coulomb explosion; few-cycle laser pulses; strong fields; cluster dynamics. 1. Introduction. A number of scientific and technological developments are responsible for the resurgence of interest in studi- es of light-matter interactions, particularly of how very intense light interacts with matter. The interest stems.

  16. Fusion and fission of atomic clusters: recent advances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2005-01-01

    We review recent advances made by our group in finding optimized geometries of atomic clusters as well as in description of fission of charged small metal clusters. We base our approach to these problems on analysis of multidimensional potential energy surface. For the fusion process we have...

  17. Equilibrium structure and atomic vibrations of Nin clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Svetlana D.; Rusina, Galina G.

    2017-12-01

    The equilibrium bond lengths and binding energy, second differences in energy and vibrational frequencies of free clusters Nin (2 ≤ n ≤ 20) were calculated with the use of the interaction potential obtained in the tight-binding approximation (TBA). The results show that the minimum vibration frequency plays a significant role in the evaluation of the dynamic stability of the clusters. A nonmonotonic dependence of the minimum vibration frequency of clusters on their size and the extreme values for the number of atoms in a cluster n = 4, 6, 13, and 19 are demonstrated. This result agrees with the theoretical and experimental data on stable structures of small metallic clusters.

  18. Reactivity and Catalytic Activity of Hydrogen Atom Chemisorbed Silver Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Dar; Pal, Sourav

    2015-06-18

    Metal clusters of silver have attracted recent interest of researchers as a result of their potential in different catalytic applications and low cost. However, due to the completely filled d orbital and very high first ionization potential of the silver atom, the silver-based catalysts interact very weakly with the reacting molecules. In the current work, density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrogen atom chemisorption on the reactivity and catalytic properties of inert silver clusters. Our results affirm that the hydrogen atom chemisorption leads to enhancement in the binding energy of the adsorbed O2 molecule on the inert silver clusters. The increase in the binding energy is also characterized by the decrease in the Ag-O and increase in the O-O bond lengths in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Pertinent to the increase in the O-O bond length, a significant red shift in the O-O stretching frequency is also noted in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Moreover, the hydrogen atom chemisorbed silver clusters show low reaction barriers and high heat of formation of the final products for the environmentally important CO oxidation reaction as compared to the parent catalytically inactive clusters. The obtained results were compared with those of the corresponding gold and hydrogen atom chemisorbed gold clusters obtained at the same level of theory. It is expected the current computational study will provide key insights for future advances in the design of efficient nanosilver-based catalysts through the adsorption of a small atom or a ligand.

  19. The electronic structure of small nickel atom clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Harold; Newton, M. D.; Moskowitz, J. W.

    1980-11-01

    The ground state electronic structure of small nickel atom clusters (Nin, n=1-6) has been calculated using the ab initio effective core potential self-consistent field (SCF) method in a Gaussian expansion basis. The electronic configuration of the nickel atoms in the clusters is found to be very close to 3d94s1. The ground state electronic configurations for Nin generally have n unpaired 3d electrons in molecular orbitals (MO's) spanning the same irreducible representations as the 4s atomic orbitals while the n 4s electrons fill their MO's in accord with a simple three-dimensional Hückel model with overlap. Exceptions to this description are found in the cases of linear systems where the 3d holes prefer δ over σ symmetry and in octahedral Ni6 where a different preferred set of 3d holes is obtained. The SCF ground state wave functions correspond roughly to a model in which the 3d electrons can be viewed as weakly interacting localized 3d9 units. The clusters are bound together primarily by the 4s electrons with the 4p orbital contribution increasing in importance with cluster size and dimensionality. The binding energy per nickel atom generally increases as the size of the cluster increases, although at six atoms this quantity has not yet converged with cluster size. The density of states diagram for the occupied one electron energy levels in Ni6 is found to be very different from the corresponding types of diagrams obtained in the muffin tin (MT)-Xα method for small nickel atom clusters. This difference is examined in detail, with consideration given to the effects of relaxation energy and to the different orbital level filling criteria used in the two methods.

  20. Atom scattering off superfluid sub 4 He clusters and films

    CERN Document Server

    Zillich, R E

    2001-01-01

    statistics on identical particle scattering is studied by comparing helium-4 scattering to impurity (helium-3) scattering off helium-4 clusters; e.g. we show how the elastic conversion process from helium-4 atom to roton and back can be understood as a resonance phenomenon at the excitation energy of the roton in helium clusters. The connection between resonances in the elastic scattering channel to their counterpart in inelastic channels is highlighted in the example of our results for quantum reflection off films. Furthermore, our theory predicts a long range of interaction between slow atoms and low energy surface waves, which increases the low energy inelastic scattering probability. In this work, the HNC-Euler-Lagrange theory is applied to the many-body scattering problem. We use time-dependent variational correlated wave functions in excitation calculations in order to describe atom scattering off nanoclusters and microscopically thin films of superfluid helium-4. Apart from elastic processes, the level...

  1. Spin magnetic moments from single atoms to small Cr clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeglin, C.; Ohresser, P.; Decker, R.; Bulou, H.; Scheurer, F.; Chado, I.; Dhesi, S. S.; Gaudry, E.; Lazarovits, B.

    2005-07-01

    Morphology studies at the first stages of the growth of Cr/Au(111) are reported and compared to the magnetic properties of the nanostructures. We analyze by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction the Cr clusters growth between 200 K and 300 K. In the early stages of the growth the morphology of the clusters shows monoatomic high islands located at the kinks of the herringbone reconstructed Au(111) surface. By X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism performed on the Cr L2,3 edges it is shown that the temperature dependent morphology strongly influences the magnetic properties of the Cr clusters. We show that in the sub-monolayer regime Cr clusters are antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic when the size reaches the atomic limit.

  2. Spin magnetic moments from single atoms to small Cr clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeglin, C.; Decker, R.; Bulou, H.; Scheurer, F.; Chado, I. [IPCMS-GSI - UMR 7504, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Ohresser, P. [LURE, 91405 Orsay (France); Dhesi, S.S. [ESRF, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Present permanent address: Diamond Light Source, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gaudry, E. [LMCP, 4, place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France); Lazarovits, B. [CCMS, T.U. Vienna, Gumpendorfstr. 1a, 1060 Wien (Austria)

    2005-07-01

    Morphology studies at the first stages of the growth of Cr/Au(111) are reported and compared to the magnetic properties of the nanostructures. We analyze by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction the Cr clusters growth between 200 K and 300 K. In the early stages of the growth the morphology of the clusters shows monoatomic high islands located at the kinks of the herringbone reconstructed Au(111) surface. By X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism performed on the Cr L{sub 2,3} edges it is shown that the temperature dependent morphology strongly influences the magnetic properties of the Cr clusters. We show that in the sub-monolayer regime Cr clusters are antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic when the size reaches the atomic limit. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. High-accuracy coupled cluster calculations of atomic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borschevsky, A. [School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv, Israel and Centre for Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, The New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study, Massey University Auckland, Private Bag 102904, 0745 Auckland (New Zealand); Yakobi, H.; Eliav, E.; Kaldor, U. [School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2015-01-22

    The four-component Fock-space coupled cluster and intermediate Hamiltonian methods are implemented to evaluate atomic properties. The latter include the spectra of nobelium and lawrencium (elements 102 and 103) in the range 20000-30000 cm{sup −1}, the polarizabilities of elements 112-114 and 118, required for estimating their adsorption enthalpies on surfaces used to separate them in accelerators, and the nuclear quadrupole moments of some heavy atoms. The calculations on superheavy elements are supported by the very good agreement with experiment obtained for the lighter homologues.

  4. Chemically induced magnetism in atomically precise gold clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Tarakeshwar, Pilarisetty; Mujica, Vladimiro; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2014-03-12

    Comparative theoretical and experimental investigations are reported into chemically induced magnetism in atomically-precise, ligand-stabilized gold clusters Au25 , Au38 and Au55 . The results indicate that [Au25 (PPh3 )10 (SC12 H25 )5 Cl2 ](2+) and Au38 (SC12 H25 )24 are diamagnetic, Au25 (SC2 H4 Ph)18 is paramagnetic, and Au55 (PPh3 )12 Cl6 , is ferromagnetic at room temperature. Understanding the magnetic properties resulting from quantum size effects in such atomically precise gold clusters could lead to new fundamental discoveries and applications. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Efimov states in asymmetric three-body atomic clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolganova, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    The work is devoted to the investigation of the weakly bound three-body atomic clusters. The calculations on the van der Waals trimer 7Li4He2 are carried out using the differential Faddeev equations, which allows us to give accurate binding energies for both the ground and the exited state of the system. The results obtained indicate the Efimov nature of the excited state in this system.

  6. Structure and Thermodynamics of Metal Clusters on Atomically Smooth Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhoff, M; Schebarchov, D; Wales, D J

    2017-10-23

    We analyze the structure of model NiN and CuN clusters (N = 55, 147) supported on a variety of atomically smooth van der Waals surfaces. The global minima are mapped in the space of two parameters: (i) the laterally averaged surface stickiness, γ, which controls the macroscopic wetting angle, and (ii) the surface microstructure, which produces more subtle but important templating via epitaxial stresses. We find that adjusting the substrate lattice (even at constant γ) can favor different crystal plane orientations in the cluster, stabilize hexagonal close-packed order, or induce various defects, such as stacking faults, twin boundaries, and five-fold disclinations. Thermodynamic analysis reveals substrate-dependent solid-solid transitions in cluster morphology, with tunable transition temperature and sometimes exhibiting re-entrant behavior. These results shed new light on the extent to which a supporting surface can be used to influence the equilibrium behavior of nanoparticles.

  7. A nine-atom rhodium-aluminum oxide cluster oxidizes five carbon monoxide molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Hua-Min; Yuan, Zhen; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-01-01

    ... catalysis is elusive. Here we report that a single atom of rhodium, a powerful noble metal catalyst, can promote the transfer of five oxygen atoms to oxidize carbon monoxide from a nine-atom rhodium-aluminum oxide cluster...

  8. Impurity effects on solid-solid transitions in atomic clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husic, B E; Schebarchov, D; Wales, D J

    2016-11-03

    We use the harmonic superposition approach to examine how a single atom substitution affects low-temperature anomalies in the vibrational heat capacity (CV) of model nanoclusters. Each anomaly is linked to competing solidlike "phases", where crossover of the corresponding free energies defines a solid-solid transition temperature (Ts). For selected Lennard-Jones clusters we show that Ts and the corresponding CV peak can be tuned over a wide range by varying the relative atomic size and binding strength of the impurity, but excessive atom-size mismatch can destroy a transition and may produce another. In some tunable cases we find up to two additional CV peaks emerging below Ts, signalling one- or two-step delocalisation of the impurity within the ground-state geometry. Results for Ni74X and Au54X clusters (X = Au, Ag, Al, Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt, Pb), modelled by the many-body Gupta potential, further corroborate the possibility of tuning, engineering, and suppressing finite-system analogues of a solid-solid transition in nanoalloys.

  9. Plasmon excitations in two-dimensional atomic cluster systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yan-Qin; Yu, Ya-Bin, E-mail: apybyu@hnu.edu.cn; Xue, Hong-Jie; Wang, Ya-Xin; Chen, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Properties of plasmon excitations in two-dimensional (2D) atomic cluster systems are theoretically studied within an extended Hubbard model. The collective oscillation equations of charge, plasmon eigen-equations and the energy-absorption spectrum formula are presented. The calculated results show that different symmetries of plasmons exist in the cluster systems, and the symmetry of charge distribution in the plasmon resonance originate from the intrinsic symmetry of the corresponding eigen-plasmon modes, but not from the symmetry of applied external fields; however, the plasmon excitation with a certain polarization direction should be excited by the field in this direction, the dipole mode of plasmons can be excited by both uniform and non-uniform fields, but multipole ones cannot be excited by an uniform field. In addition, we show that for a given electron density, plasmon spectra are red-shifted with increasing size of the systems.

  10. Clustering of Ions at Atomic-Dimensions in Quantum Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, P K

    2012-01-01

    By means of particle simulations of the equations of motion for ions interacting with the newly discovered Shukla-Eliasson (SE) force in a dense quantum plasma, we demonstrate that the SE force is powerful to bring ions closer at atomic dimensions. Specifically, we present simulation results on the dynamics of an ensemble of ions in the presence of the SE force without and with confining external potentials and collisions between the ions and degenerate electrons. Our particle simulations reveal that under the SE force, ions attract each other, come closer and form ionic clusters in the bath of degenerate electrons that shield the ions. Furthermore, an external confining potential produces robust ion clusters that can have cigar-like and ball-like shapes. The binding between the ions on account of the SE force may provide possibility of non-Coulombic explosions of ionic clusters for inertial confined fusion (ICF) schemes when high-energy density plasmas (density exceeding $10^{23}$ per cubic centimeters) are ...

  11. Reactivity Control of Rhodium Cluster Ions by Alloying with Tantalum Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Tawaraya, Yuki; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-02-18

    Gas phase, bielement rhodium and tantalum clusters, RhnTam(+) (n + m = 6), were prepared by the double laser ablation of Rh and Ta rods in He carrier gas. The clusters were introduced into a reaction gas cell filled with nitric oxide (NO) diluted with He and were subjected to collisions with NO and He at room temperature. The product species were observed by mass spectrometry, demonstrating that the NO molecules were sequentially adsorbed on the RhnTam(+) clusters to form RhnTam(+)NxOx (x = 1, 2, 3, ...) species. In addition, oxide clusters, RhnTam(+)O2, were also observed, suggesting that the NO molecules were dissociatively adsorbed on the cluster, the N atoms migrated on the surface to form N2, and the N2 molecules were released from RhnTam(+)N2O2. The reactivity, leading to oxide formation, was composition dependent: oxide clusters were dominantly formed for the bielement clusters containing both Rh and Ta atoms, whereas such clusters were hardly formed for the single-element Rhn(+) and Tam(+) clusters. DFT calculations indicated that the Ta atoms induce dissociation of NO on the clusters by lowering the dissociation energy, whereas the Rh atoms enable release of N2 by lowering the binding energy of the N atoms on the clusters.

  12. Interaction of intense laser pulses with atomic clusters: Measurements of ion emission, simulations and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisch, J.W.G. E-mail: john.tisch@ic.ac.uk; Hay, N.; Mendham, K.J.; Springate, E.; Symes, D.R.; Comley, A.J.; Mason, M.B.; Gumbrell, E.T.; Ditmire, T.; Smith, R.A.; Marangos, J.P.; Hutchinson, M.H.R

    2003-05-01

    This review paper provides a general introduction to the interaction of intense (>10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}), femtosecond laser pulses with atomic clusters in the size range 500-10{sup 5} atoms. A nanoplasma model of the laser-cluster interaction is used to elucidate the underlying physics. Measurements of ion emission from the laser-cluster interaction are presented together with numerical simulations. Emerging applications are described.

  13. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Dahms, Sven O.; Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Str?ter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E

    2013-01-01

    Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated tha...

  14. Platinum clusters with precise numbers of atoms for preparative-scale catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, Takane; Akanuma, Yuki; Haruta, Naoki; Tsuchiya, Shogo; Ishihara, Kentaro; Okayasu, Takeshi; Chun, Wang-Jae; Takahashi, Masaki; Yamamoto, Kimihisa

    2017-09-25

    Subnanometer noble metal clusters have enormous potential, mainly for catalytic applications. Because a difference of only one atom may cause significant changes in their reactivity, a preparation method with atomic-level precision is essential. Although such a precision with enough scalability has been achieved by gas-phase synthesis, large-scale preparation is still at the frontier, hampering practical applications. We now show the atom-precise and fully scalable synthesis of platinum clusters on a milligram scale from tiara-like platinum complexes with various ring numbers (n = 5-13). Low-temperature calcination of the complexes on a carbon support under hydrogen stream affords monodispersed platinum clusters, whose atomicity is equivalent to that of the precursor complex. One of the clusters (Pt 10 ) exhibits high catalytic activity in the hydrogenation of styrene compared to that of the other clusters. This method opens an avenue for the application of these clusters to preparative-scale catalysis.The catalytic activity of a noble metal nanocluster is tied to its atomicity. Here, the authors report an atom-precise, fully scalable synthesis of platinum clusters from molecular ring precursors, and show that a variation of only one atom can dramatically change a cluster's reactivity.

  15. Energetics, ionization, and expansion dynamics of atomic clusters irradiated with short intense vacuum-ultraviolet pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaja, B; Wabnitz, H; Wang, F; Weckert, E; Möller, T

    2009-05-22

    Kinetic equations are used to model the dynamics of Xe clusters irradiated with short, intense vacuum-ultraviolet pulses. Various cluster size and pulse fluences are considered. It is found that the highly charged ions observed in the experiments are mainly due to Coulomb explosion of the outer cluster shell. Ions within the cluster core predominantly recombine with plasma electrons, forming a large fraction of neutral atoms. To our knowledge, our model is the first and only one that gives an accurate description of all of the experimental data collected from atomic clusters at 100 nm photon wavelength.

  16. Melting of size-selected gallium clusters with 60-183 atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyfer, Katheryne L; Kafader, Jared O; Yalamanchali, Anirudh; Jarrold, Martin F

    2014-07-10

    Heat capacities have been measured as a function of temperature for size-selected gallium cluster cations with between 60 and 183 atoms. Almost all clusters studied show a single peak in the heat capacity that is attributed to a melting transition. The peaks can be fit by a two-state model incorporating only fully solid-like and fully liquid-like species, and hence no partially melted intermediates. The exceptions are Ga90(+), which does not show a peak, and Ga80(+) and Ga81(+), which show two peaks. For the clusters with two peaks, the lower temperature peak is attributed to a structural transition. The melting temperatures for clusters with less than 50 atoms have previously been shown to be hundreds of degrees above the bulk melting point. For clusters with more than 60 atoms the melting temperatures decrease, approaching the bulk value (303 K) at around 95 atoms, and then show several small upward excursions with increasing cluster size. A plot of the latent heat against the entropy change for melting reveals two groups of clusters: the latent heats and entropy changes for clusters with less than 94 atoms are distinct from those for clusters with more than 93 atoms. This observation suggests that a significant change in the nature of the bonding or the structure of the clusters occurs at 93-94 atoms. Even though the melting temperatures are close to the bulk value for the larger clusters studied here, the latent heats and entropies of melting are still far from the bulk values.

  17. Interaction between an icosahedron Li(13) cluster and a graphene layer doped with a hydrogen atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Eduardo; Vázquez, Gerardo; Magaña, Fernando; Sansores, Enrique

    2012-12-01

    It is known that graphene reacts with atomic hydrogen to form a hydrogenated sheet of graphene. In order to understand the nature of the interaction between hydrogen and lithium in hydrogenated samples, we have carried out first principle calculations. Density functional theory and molecular dynamics were used to study the interaction between an icosahedron Li(13) cluster, and a graphene layer doped with a hydrogen atom. It was found that a hydrogen atom is levitated from the graphene layer and absorbed into the cluster of Li at 300 K and atmospheric pressure, with a binding energy far exceeding that of the adsorption energy of a hydrogen atom on the graphene layer.

  18. An adaptive immune optimization algorithm with dynamic lattice searching operation for fast optimization of atomic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xia, E-mail: xiawu@mail.nankai.edu.cn; Wu, Genhua

    2014-08-31

    Highlights: • A high efficient method for optimization of atomic clusters is developed. • Its performance is studied by optimizing Lennard-Jones clusters and Ag clusters. • The method is proved to be quite efficient. • A new Ag{sub 61} cluster with stacking-fault face-centered cubic motif is found. - Abstract: Geometrical optimization of atomic clusters is performed by a development of adaptive immune optimization algorithm (AIOA) with dynamic lattice searching (DLS) operation (AIOA-DLS method). By a cycle of construction and searching of the dynamic lattice (DL), DLS algorithm rapidly makes the clusters more regular and greatly reduces the potential energy. DLS can thus be used as an operation acting on the new individuals after mutation operation in AIOA to improve the performance of the AIOA. The AIOA-DLS method combines the merit of evolutionary algorithm and idea of dynamic lattice. The performance of the proposed method is investigated in the optimization of Lennard-Jones clusters within 250 atoms and silver clusters described by many-body Gupta potential within 150 atoms. Results reported in the literature are reproduced, and the motif of Ag{sub 61} cluster is found to be stacking-fault face-centered cubic, whose energy is lower than that of previously obtained icosahedron.

  19. Electrodeposition of Isolated Platinum Atoms and Clusters on Bismuth-Characterization and Electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Dick, Jeffrey E; Bard, Allen J

    2017-12-06

    We describe a method for the electrodeposition of an isolated single Pt atom or small cluster, up to 9 atoms, on a bismuth ultramicroelectrode (UME). This deposition was immediately followed by electrochemical characterization via the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) that occurs readily on the electrodeposited Pt but not on Bi. The observed voltammetric current plateau, even for a single atom, which behaves as an electrode, allows the estimation of deposit size. Pt was plated from solutions of femtomolar PtCl 6 2- , which allowed precise control of the arrival of ions and thus the plating rate on the Bi UME, to one ion every few seconds. This allowed the atom-by-atom fabrication of isolated platinum deposits, ranging from single atoms to 9-atom clusters. The limiting currents in voltammetry gave the size and number of atoms of the clusters. Given the stochasticity of the plating process, we show that the number of atoms plated over a given time (10 and 20 s) follows a Poisson distribution. Taking the potential at a certain current density as a measure of the relative rate of the HER, we found that the potential shifted positively as the size increased, with single atoms showing the largest overpotentials compared to bulk Pt.

  20. T-Path Formula and Atomic Bases for Cluster Algebras of Type D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Emily; Musiker, Gregg

    2015-07-01

    We extend a T-path expansion formula for arcs on an unpunctured surface to the case of arcs on a once-punctured polygon and use this formula to give a combinatorial proof that cluster monomials form the atomic basis of a cluster algebra of type D.

  1. Local surface cleaning and cluster assembly using contact mode atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, D.-Q.; Sacher, E

    2003-04-15

    Conventional contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used for local surface cleaning and cluster alignment. By using the AFM tip to sweep and push in contact mode, we have demonstrated that Cu clusters, prepared by vacuum evaporation onto Dow Cyclotene 3022 polymer and subsequent exposure to atmosphere, can easily be moved by the AFM tip, and assembled at the outer edge of the scanned region to form a line of clusters. We have found that the force applied by the tip plays an important role in the ease of cluster motion. Cyclotene surface treatment that enhances cluster adhesion hinders this ability, and may be used as a method of nanofabrication.

  2. Anisotropy modeling of terahertz metamaterials: polarization dependent resonance manipulation by meta-atom cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyunseung; In, Chihun; Choi, Hyunyong; Lee, Hojin

    2014-06-09

    Recently metamaterials have inspired worldwide researches due to their exotic properties in transmitting, reflecting, absorbing or refracting specific electromagnetic waves. Most metamaterials are known to have anisotropic properties, but existing anisotropy models are applicable only to a single meta-atom and its properties. Here we propose an anisotropy model for asymmetrical meta-atom clusters and their polarization dependency. The proposed anisotropic meta-atom clusters show a unique resonance property in which their frequencies can be altered for parallel polarization, but fixed to a single resonance frequency for perpendicular polarization. The proposed anisotropic metamaterials are expected to pave the way for novel optical systems.

  3. Electronic and atomic structure of the AlnHn+2 clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Alonso, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The electronic and atomic structure of the family of hydrogenated Al clusters AlnHn+2 with n=4-11 has been studied using the density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for exchange and correlation. All these clusters have substantial gaps between the highest...... a polyhedron of n vertices and n H atoms form strong H-Al terminal bonds; one pair of electrons is involved in each of those bonds. The remaining n+1 electron pairs form a delocalized cloud over the surface of the Al cage. The clusters fulfilling the Wade-Mingos rule have wider HOMO-LUMO gaps...

  4. Kr atoms and their clustering in zeolite A

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, W T; Jung, K J; Heo, N H

    2001-01-01

    The positions of Kr atoms encapsulated in the molecular-dimensioned cavities of fully dehydrated zeolite A of unit-cell composition Cs sub 3 Na sub 8 HSi sub 1 sub 2 Al sub 1 sub 2 O sub 4 sub 8 (Cs sub 3 -A) have been determined. Cs sub 3 -A was exposed to 1025 atm of krypton gas at 400 .deg. C for four days, followed by cooling at pressure to encapsulate Kr atoms. The resulting crystal structure of Cs sub 3 -A(6Kr) (a=12.247(2) A, R sub 1 =0.078, and R sub 2 =0.085) has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques in the cubic space group Pm3m at 21(1) .deg. C and 1 atm. In the crystal structure of Cs sub 3 -A(6Kr), six Kr atoms per unit cell are distributed over three crystallographically distinct positions: each unit cell contains one Kr atom at Kr(1) on a threefold axis in the sodalite unit, three at Kr(2) opposite four-rings in the large cavity , and two at Kr(3) on threefold axes in the large cavity . Relatively strong interactions of Kr atoms at Kr(1) and Kr(3) with Na sup + ions of ...

  5. Large scale structural optimization of trimetallic Cu-Au-Pt clusters up to 147 atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Genhua; Sun, Yan; Wu, Xia; Chen, Run; Wang, Yan

    2017-10-01

    The stable structures of Cu-Au-Pt clusters up to 147 atoms are optimized by using an improved adaptive immune optimization algorithm (AIOA-IC method), in which several motifs, such as decahedron, icosahedron, face centered cubic, sixfold pancake, and Leary tetrahedron, are randomly selected as the inner cores of the starting structures. The structures of Cu8AunPt30-n (n = 1-29), Cu8AunPt47-n (n = 1-46), and partial 75-, 79-, 100-, and 147-atom clusters are analyzed. Cu12Au93Pt42 cluster has onion-like Mackay icosahedral motif. The segregation phenomena of Cu, Au and Pt in clusters are explained by the atomic radius, surface energy, and cohesive energy.

  6. Self-diffusion dynamic behavior of atomic clusters on Re(0 0 0 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Fusheng [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Hu Wangyu, E-mail: wangyuhu2001cn@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Deng Huiqiu; Luo Wenhua; Xiao Shifang [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Yang Jianyu [Department of Maths and Physics, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411104 (China)

    2009-08-15

    Using molecular dynamics simulations and a modified analytic embedded atom potential, the self-diffusion dynamics of rhenium atomic clusters up to seven atoms on Re(0 0 0 1) surface have been studied in the temperature ranges from 600 K to 1900 K. The simulation time varies from 20 ns to 200 ns according to the cluster sizes and the temperature. The heptamer and trimer are more stable comparing to other neighboring non-compact clusters. The diffusion coefficients of clusters are derived from the mean square displacement of cluster's mass-center, and diffusion prefactors D{sub 0} and activation energies E{sub a} are derived from the Arrhenius relation. It is found that the Arrhenius relation of the adatom can be divided into two parts at different temperature range. The activation energy of clusters increases with the increasing of the atom number in clusters. The prefactor of the heptamer is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than a usual prefactor because of a large number of nonequivalent diffusion processes. The trimer and heptamer are the nuclei at different temperature range according to the nucleation theory.

  7. Quantum Cloning of an Unknown 2-Atom State via Entangled Cluster States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, L.-z.; Zhong, F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presented a scheme for cloning a 2-atom state in the QED cavity with the help of Victor who is the state's preparer. The cloning scheme has two steps. In the first step, the scheme requires probabilistic teleportation of a 2-atom state that is unknown in advance, and uses a 4-atom cluster state as quantum channel. In the second step, perfect copies of the 2-atom entangled state may be realized with the assistance of Victor. The finding is that our scheme has two outstanding advantages: it is not sensitive to the cavity decay, and Bell state is easy to identify.

  8. MD simulation of atomic displacement cascades near chromium-rich clusters in FeCr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhonchev, M., E-mail: tikhonchev@sv.ulsu.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Research Institute of Technology, 42 Leo Tolstoy St., 432970 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Svetukhin, V. [Ulyanovsk State University, Research Institute of Technology, 42 Leo Tolstoy St., 432970 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Gaganidze, E. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    The paper reports simulation of cascades in Fe–9 at.%Cr binary alloy containing chromium-rich clusters. The simulation is performed by the molecular dynamics method at the initial temperature of 300 K and primary knock-on atom energy of 15 and 20 keV. Spherical clusters containing 95 at.% of Cr with diameter of 1–5 nm have been considered. The properties of cascade evolution in the presence of chromium-rich cluster are studied. It is shown that these clusters tend to dissolve in collision cascades. However, clusters with diameter of ⩾3 nm exhibit only slight modifications and can be considered stable. Parameters of small (1–2 nm) clusters can change significantly and, in some cases, a 1 nm cluster can be totally dissolved.

  9. Light-induced processes on atoms and clusters confined in nanoporous silica and organic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moi, L.; Burchianti, A.; Bogi, A.; Marinelli, C.; Maibohm, C.; Mariotti, E.

    2007-03-01

    The study of light induced processes on atoms and nanoparticles confined in organic films or in dielectric structures is motivated both by fundamental interest and applications in optics and photonics. Depending on the light intensity and frequency and the kind of confinement, different processes can be activated. Among them photodesorption processes have a key role. Non thermal light induced atomic desorption has been observed from siloxane and paraffin films previously exposed to alkali vapors. This effect has been extensively investigated and used both to develop photo-atom sources and to load magneto-optical traps. Recently we observed huge photodesorption of alkali atoms embedded in nanoporous silica. In this case the atomic photodesorption causes, by properly tuning the light frequency, either formation or evaporation of clusters inside the silica matrix. Green-blue light desorbs isolated adatoms from the glass surface eventually producing clusters, whereas red-near infrared (NIR) light causes cluster evaporation due to direct excitation of surface plasmon oscillations. Green-blue light induces cluster formation taking advantage of the dense atomic vapor, which diffuses through the glass nano-cavities. Both processes are reversible and even visible to the naked eye. By alternatively illuminating the porous glass sample with blue-green and red-NIR light we demonstrate that the glass remembers the illumination sequences behaving as an effective rereadable and rewritable optical medium.

  10. Atomic Cluster Ionization and Attosecond Generation at Long Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-31

    very sensitive to the small ellipticity of the driving field due to the modification of the electron trajectory . Figure 3 shows the HHG yield with...of short trajectories for our geometry. Second, the group delay from the cluster and monomer show a striking similarity suggesting that the...this test. In order to further investigate this result, we performed an ellipticity study of the HHG yield. The idea is that if the returning

  11. High Intensity Femtosecond XUV Pulse Interactions with Atomic Clusters: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditmire, Todd [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Center for High Energy Density Science

    2016-10-12

    We propose to expand our recent studies on the interactions of intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) femtosecond pulses with atomic and molecular clusters. The work described follows directly from work performed under BES support for the past grant period. During this period we upgraded the THOR laser at UT Austin by replacing the regenerative amplifier with optical parametric amplification (OPA) using BBO crystals. This increased the contrast of the laser, the total laser energy to ~1.2 J , and decreased the pulse width to below 30 fs. We built a new all reflective XUV harmonic beam line into expanded lab space. This enabled an increase influence by a factor of 25 and an increase in the intensity by a factor of 50. The goal of the program proposed in this renewal is to extend this class of experiments to available higher XUV intensity and a greater range of wavelengths. In particular we plan to perform experiments to confirm our hypothesis about the origin of the high charge states in these exploding clusters, an effect which we ascribe to plasma continuum lowering (ionization potential depression) in a cluster nano-­plasma. To do this we will perform experiments in which XUV pulses of carefully chosen wavelength irradiate clusters composed of only low-Z atoms and clusters with a mixture of this low-­Z atom with higher Z atoms. The latter clusters will exhibit higher electron densities and will serve to lower the ionization potential further than in the clusters composed only of low Z atoms. This should have a significant effect on the charge states produced in the exploding cluster. We will also explore the transition of explosions in these XUV irradiated clusters from hydrodynamic expansion to Coulomb explosion. The work proposed here will explore clusters of a wider range of constituents, including clusters from solids. Experiments on clusters from solids will be enabled by development we performed during the past grant period in which we constructed and

  12. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  13. Coupled-cluster calculations of properties of Boron atom as a monovalent system

    CERN Document Server

    Gharibnejad, H

    2015-01-01

    We present relativistic coupled-cluster (CC) calculations of energies, magnetic-dipole hyperfine constants, and electric-dipole transition amplitudes for low-lying states of atomic boron. The trivalent boron atom is computationally treated as a monovalent system. We explore performance of the CC method at various approximations. Our most complete treatment involves singles, doubles and the leading valence triples. The calculations are done using several approximations in the coupled-cluster (CC) method. The results are within 0.2-0.4% of the energy benchmarks. The hyperfine constants are reproduced with 1-2% accuracy.

  14. Atomic shell structures observed in photoionization spectra of nickel and cobalt clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vialle, J.L. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire; Pellarin, M. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire; Baguenard, B. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire; Lerme, J. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire; Broyer, M. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire

    1995-12-31

    Nickel and cobalt clusters have been studied by near threshold laser-photoionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In the size domain from 50 up to 800 atoms, the mass distributions of the photoionized products look very similar for nickel and cobalt clusters. In both cases a regular structure is observed which is periodic on a N{sup 1/3} scale. It is found to be consistent with the filling of successive icosahedral shells of atoms. The recurring details of this structure agree with the so-called umbrellas model. (orig.)

  15. Mixed monolayer protected gold atom-oxide cluster synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Sindhu R.; Aneesh, Padamadathil K.; Sukumar, Chinthu; Rao, Talasila P.

    2012-06-01

    Small atomic gold clusters in solution, Aun, stabilized by cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cysteine, have been synthesized potentiodynamically in quiescent aqueous solutions. The electrodissolution of gold to gold ions during an anodic scan and subsequent cluster formation during a cathodic scan in underpotential (UPDD) and overpotential dissolution-deposition (OPDD) regions were studied. The experimental potentiodynamic I-E profiles and chronoamperometric i-t transients are fit into reported theoretical models of adsorption and electrocrystallization. The plausible application of clusters/cluster film to cysteine sensing based on fluorescence quenching and square wave stripping voltammetry is demonstrated.Small atomic gold clusters in solution, Aun, stabilized by cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cysteine, have been synthesized potentiodynamically in quiescent aqueous solutions. The electrodissolution of gold to gold ions during an anodic scan and subsequent cluster formation during a cathodic scan in underpotential (UPDD) and overpotential dissolution-deposition (OPDD) regions were studied. The experimental potentiodynamic I-E profiles and chronoamperometric i-t transients are fit into reported theoretical models of adsorption and electrocrystallization. The plausible application of clusters/cluster film to cysteine sensing based on fluorescence quenching and square wave stripping voltammetry is demonstrated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30446e

  16. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Sven O; Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E

    2013-02-01

    Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradecabromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome.

  17. Self-Assembly of Silver Metal Clusters of Small Atomicity on Cyclic Peptide Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerva, Miguel; García-Fandiño, Rebeca; Vázquez-Vázquez, Carlos; López-Quintela, M Arturo; Montenegro, Javier; Granja, Juan R

    2015-11-24

    Subnanometric noble metal clusters, composed by only a few atoms, behave like molecular entities and display magnetic, luminescent and catalytic activities. However, noncovalent interactions of molecular metal clusters, lacking of any ligand or surfactant, have not been seen at work. Theoretically attractive and experimentally discernible, van der Waals forces and noncovalent interactions at the metal/organic interfaces will be crucial to understand and develop the next generation of hybrid nanomaterials. Here, we present experimental and theoretical evidence of noncovalent interactions between subnanometric metal (0) silver clusters and aromatic rings and their application in the preparation of 1D self-assembled hybrid architectures with ditopic peptide nanotubes. Atomic force microscopy, fluorescence experiments, circular dichroism and computational simulations verified the occurrence of these interactions in the clean and mild formation of a novel peptide nanotube and metal cluster hybrid material. The findings reported here confirmed the sensitivity of silver metal clusters of small atomicity toward noncovalent interactions, a concept that could find multiple applications in nanotechnology. We conclude that induced supramolecular forces are optimal candidates for the precise spatial positioning and properties modulation of molecular metal clusters. The reported results herein outline and generalize the possibilities that noncovalent interactions will have in this emerging field.

  18. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahms, Sven O., E-mail: sdahms@fli-leibniz.de; Kuester, Miriam [Leibniz Institute for Age Research – Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI), Beutenbergstrasse 11, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Streb, Carsten [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Egerlandstrasse 1, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert [Universität Leipzig, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Than, Manuel E., E-mail: sdahms@fli-leibniz.de [Leibniz Institute for Age Research – Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI), Beutenbergstrasse 11, D-07745 Jena (Germany)

    2013-02-01

    A new approach is presented that allows the efficient localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds used in experimental phasing by a molecular replacement procedure. This permits the calculation of meaningful phases up to the highest resolution of the diffraction data. Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradecabromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome.

  19. Cluster excitation and ionization in high velocity collisions:the atomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Mezdari, Férid; Wohrer-Béroff, Karine; Chabot, Marin

    2004-01-01

    NIM; The independent atom and electron model [1] is introduced in a quantum context and associated approximations tentatively estimated. Confrontation of the model to measured ionization and excitation cross sections of small ionic carbon clusters Cn+ in collisions with helium at an impact velocity of 2.6 a.u is presented.

  20. Atomically precise organomimetic cluster nanomolecules assembled via perfluoroaryl-thiol SNAr chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Elaine A.; Wixtrom, Alex I.; Axtell, Jonathan C.; Saebi, Azin; Jung, Dahee; Rehak, Pavel; Han, Yanxiao; Moully, Elamar Hakim; Mosallaei, Daniel; Chow, Sylvia; Messina, Marco S.; Wang, Jing Yang; Royappa, A. Timothy; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Maynard, Heather D.; Král, Petr; Spokoyny, Alexander M.

    2017-04-01

    The majority of biomolecules are intrinsically atomically precise, an important characteristic that enables rational engineering of their recognition and binding properties. However, imparting a similar precision to hybrid nanoparticles has been challenging because of the inherent limitations of existing chemical methods and building blocks. Here we report a new approach to form atomically precise and highly tunable hybrid nanomolecules with well-defined three-dimensionality. Perfunctionalization of atomically precise clusters with pentafluoroaryl-terminated linkers produces size-tunable rigid cluster nanomolecules. These species are amenable to facile modification with a variety of thiol-containing molecules and macromolecules. Assembly proceeds at room temperature within hours under mild conditions, and the resulting nanomolecules exhibit high stabilities because of their full covalency. We further demonstrate how these nanomolecules grafted with saccharides can exhibit dramatically improved binding affinity towards a protein. Ultimately, the developed strategy allows the rapid generation of precise molecular assemblies to investigate multivalent interactions.

  1. Trapping of hydrogen atoms inside small beryllium clusters and their ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumkin, F. Y.; Wales, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    Structure, stability and electronic properties are evaluated computationally for small Ben (n = 5-9) cluster cages accommodating atomic H inside and forming core-shell species. These parameters are predicted to vary significantly upon insertion of H, for ionic derivatives, and with the system size. In particular, the energy barrier for H-atom exit from the cage changes significantly for ions compared to the neutral counterparts. The corresponding effects predicted for cage assemblies suggest the possibility of efficient charge-control of hydrogen release. This, together with a high capacity for storing hydrogen in extended such assemblies might indicate a possible way towards feasible hydrogen-storage solutions.

  2. Investigation of energy thresholds of atomic and cluster sputtering of some elements under ion bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Atabaev, B G; Lifanova, L F

    2002-01-01

    Threshold energies of sputtering of negative cluster ions from the Si(111) surface were measured at bombardment by Cs sup + , Rb sup + , and Na sup + ions with energy of 0.1-3.0 keV. These results are compared with the calculations of the similar thresholds by Bohdansky etc. formulas (3) for clusters Si sub n sup - and Cu sub n sup - with n=(1-5) and also for B, C, Al, Si, Fe, Cu atoms. Threshold energies of sputtering for the above elements were also estimated using the data from (5). Satisfactory agreement between the experimental and theoretical results was obtained. (author)

  3. 2nd International Symposium "Atomic Cluster Collisions : Structure and Dynamics from the Nuclear to the Biological Scale"

    CERN Document Server

    Solov'yov, Andrey; ISACC 2007; Latest advances in atomic cluster collisions

    2008-01-01

    This book presents a 'snapshot' of the most recent and significant advances in the field of cluster physics. It is a comprehensive review based on contributions by the participants of the 2nd International Symposium on Atomic Cluster Collisions (ISACC 2007) held in July 19-23, 2007 at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. The purpose of the Symposium is to promote the growth and exchange of scientific information on the structure and properties of nuclear, atomic, molecular, biological and complex cluster systems studied by means of photonic, electronic, heavy particle and atomic collisions. Particular attention is devoted to dynamic phenomena, many-body effects taking place in cluster systems of a different nature - these include problems of fusion and fission, fragmentation, collective electron excitations, phase transitions, etc.Both the experimental and theoretical aspects of cluster physics, uniquely placed between nuclear physics on the one hand and atomic, molecular and solid state physics on the other, are discuss...

  4. Sequential Dihydrogen Desorption from Hydride-Protected Atomically Precise Silver Clusters and the Formation of Naked Clusters in the Gas Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Atanu; Bodiuzzaman, Mohammad; Nag, Abhijit; Jash, Madhuri; Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2017-11-28

    We report the formation of naked cluster ions of silver of specific nuclearities, uncontaminated by other cluster ions, derived from monolayer-protected clusters. The hydride and phosphine co-protected cluster, [Ag18(TPP)10H16]2+ (TPP, triphenylphosphine), upon activation produces the naked cluster ion, Ag17+, exclusively. The number of metal atoms present in the naked cluster is almost the same as that in the parent material. Two more naked cluster ions, Ag21+ and Ag19+, were also formed starting from two other protected clusters, [Ag25(DPPE)8H22]3+ and [Ag22(DPPE)8H19]3+, respectively (DPPE, 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane). By systematic fragmentation, naked clusters of varying nuclei are produced from Ag17+ to Ag1+ selectively, with systematic absence of Ag10+, Ag6+, and Ag4+. A seemingly odd number of cluster ions are preferred due to the stability of the closed electronic shells. Sequential desorption of dihydrogen occurs from the cluster ion, Ag17H14+, during the formation of Agn+. A comparison of the pathways in the formation of similar naked cluster ions starting from two differently ligated clusters has been presented. This approach developed bridges the usually distinct fields of gas-phase metal cluster chemistry and solution-phase metal cluster chemistry. We hope that our findings will enrich nanoscience and nanotechnology beyond the field of clusters.

  5. Exploring the atomic structure of 1.8 nm monolayer-protected gold clusters with aberration-corrected STEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian; Jian, Nan; Ornelas, Isabel; Pattison, Alexander J. [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lahtinen, Tanja; Salorinne, Kirsi [Department of Chemistry, Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Häkkinen, Hannu [Department of Chemistry, Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Department of Physics, Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Palmer, Richard E., E-mail: richardepalmerwork@yahoo.com [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Monolayer-protected (MP) Au clusters present attractive quantum systems with a range of potential applications e.g. in catalysis. Knowledge of the atomic structure is needed to obtain a full understanding of their intriguing physical and chemical properties. Here we employed aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (ac-STEM), combined with multislice simulations, to make a round-robin investigation of the atomic structure of chemically synthesised clusters with nominal composition Au{sub 144}(SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph){sub 60} provided by two different research groups. The MP Au clusters were “weighed” by the atom counting method, based on their integrated intensities in the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) regime and calibrated exponent of the Z dependence. For atomic structure analysis, we compared experimental images of hundreds of clusters, with atomic resolution, against a variety of structural models. Across the size range 123–151 atoms, only 3% of clusters matched the theoretically predicted Au{sub 144}(SR){sub 60} structure, while a large proportion of the clusters were amorphous (i.e. did not match any model structure). However, a distinct ring-dot feature, characteristic of local icosahedral symmetry, was observed in about 20% of the clusters. - Highlights: • Chemically synthesised gold clusters were “weighed” by atom counting to get true size. • Image simulations show a few percent of clusters have the predicted atomic structure. • But a specific ring-dot feature indicates local icosahedral order in many clusters.

  6. Atom-Precise Modification of Silver(I) Thiolate Cluster by Shell Ligand Substitution: A New Approach to Generation of Cluster Functionality and Chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si; Du, Xiang-Sha; Li, Bing; Wang, Jia-Yin; Li, Guo-Ping; Gao, Guang-Gang; Zang, Shuang-Quan

    2018-01-17

    To realize the molecular design of new functional silver(I) clusters, a new synthetic approach has been proposed, by which the weakly coordinating ligands NO3- in a Ag20 thiolate cluster precursor can be substituted by carboxylic ligands while keeping its inner core intact. By rational design, novel atom-precise carboxylic or amino acid protected 20-core Ag(I)-thiolate clusters have been demonstrated for the first time. The fluorescence and electrochemical activity of the postmodified Ag20 clusters can be modulated by alrestatin or ferrocenecarboxylic acid substitution. More strikingly, when chiral amino acids were used as postmodified ligands, CD-activity was observed for the Ag20 clusters, unveiling an efficient way to obtain atom-precise chiral silver(I) clusters.

  7. Exploring the atomic structure of 1.8nm monolayer-protected gold clusters with aberration-corrected STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Jian, Nan; Ornelas, Isabel; Pattison, Alexander J; Lahtinen, Tanja; Salorinne, Kirsi; Häkkinen, Hannu; Palmer, Richard E

    2017-05-01

    Monolayer-protected (MP) Au clusters present attractive quantum systems with a range of potential applications e.g. in catalysis. Knowledge of the atomic structure is needed to obtain a full understanding of their intriguing physical and chemical properties. Here we employed aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (ac-STEM), combined with multislice simulations, to make a round-robin investigation of the atomic structure of chemically synthesised clusters with nominal composition Au 144 (SCH 2 CH 2 Ph) 60 provided by two different research groups. The MP Au clusters were "weighed" by the atom counting method, based on their integrated intensities in the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) regime and calibrated exponent of the Z dependence. For atomic structure analysis, we compared experimental images of hundreds of clusters, with atomic resolution, against a variety of structural models. Across the size range 123-151 atoms, only 3% of clusters matched the theoretically predicted Au 144 (SR) 60 structure, while a large proportion of the clusters were amorphous (i.e. did not match any model structure). However, a distinct ring-dot feature, characteristic of local icosahedral symmetry, was observed in about 20% of the clusters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Theoretical realization of cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials based on terminated carbon atomic chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; An, Hui; Guo, Ling-Ju; Zeng, Zhi; Ju, Xin

    2011-01-14

    The capacity of carbon atomic chains with different terminations for hydrogen storage is studied using first-principles density functional theory calculations. Unlike the physisorption of H(2) on the H-terminated chain, we show that two Li (Na) atoms each capping one end of the odd- or even-numbered carbon chain can hold ten H(2) molecules with optimal binding energies for room temperature storage. The hybridization of the Li 2p states with the H(2)σ orbitals contributes to the H(2) adsorption. However, the binding mechanism of the H(2) molecules on Na arises only from the polarization interaction between the charged Na atom and the H(2). Interestingly, additional H(2) molecules can be bound to the carbon atoms at the chain ends due to the charge transfer between Li 2s2p (Na 3s) and C 2p states. More importantly, dimerization of these isolated metal-capped chains does not affect the hydrogen binding energy significantly. In addition, a single chain can be stabilized effectively by the C(60) fullerenes termination. With a hydrogen uptake of ∼10 wt.% on Li-coated C(60)-C(n)-C(60) (n = 5, 8), the Li(12)C(60)-C(n)-Li(12)C(60) complex, keeping the number of adsorbed H(2) molecules per Li and stabilizing the dispersion of individual Li atoms, can serve as better building blocks of polymers than the (Li(12)C(60))(2) dimer. These findings suggest a new route to design cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials based on terminated sp carbon chains.

  9. Energetics and self-diffusion behavior of Zr atomic clusters on a Zr(0 0 0 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Fusheng [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Hu Wangyu [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)], E-mail: wangyuhu2001cn@yahoo.com.cn; Deng Huiqiu; Luo Wenhua; Xiao Shifang [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Yang Jianyu [Department of Maths and Physics, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411104 (China)

    2009-09-15

    Using a molecular dynamics method and a modified analytic embedded atom potential, the energetic and the self-diffusion dynamics of Zr atomic clusters up to eight atoms on {alpha}-Zr(0 0 0 1) surface have been studied. The simulation temperature ranges from 300 to 1100 K and the simulation time varies from 20 to 40 ns. It's found that the heptamer and trimer are more stable comparing to other neighboring non-compact clusters. The diffusion coefficients of clusters are derived from the mean square displacement of cluster's mass-center and the present diffusion coefficients for clusters exhibit an Arrhenius behavior. The Arrhenius relation of the single adatom can be divided into two parts in different temperature range because of their different diffusion mechanisms. The migration energies of clusters increase with increasing the number of atoms in cluster. The differences of the prefactors also come from the diverse diffusion mechanisms. On the facet of 60 nm, the heptamer can be the nuclei in the crystal growth below 370 K.

  10. Relativistic multireference coupled-cluster theory based on a B -spline basis: Application to atomic francium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong-Bo; Lou, Bing-Qiong; Shi, Ting-Yun

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we report the relativistic Fock space multireference coupled-cluster method for atomic structure calculations. We use the no-pair Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian, together with a finite B -spline basis set to expand the large and small components of the Dirac wave function. Our method is applied to calculate ionization energies, reduced matrix elements, lifetimes, and polarizabilities for many states of atomic francium. To evaluate uncertainties of our results and investigate the role of electron correlation effects, we carry out calculations using approximated models at different levels. The quality of our calculations is assessed by comparing with available experimental results, showing a good agreement. In addition, the tune-out wavelengths of the ground state in the range of 340-800 nm, the magic wavelengths for the transition 7 s -8 s in the range of 800-1500 nm and the transition 7 s -7 p in the range of 600-1500 nm are determined by evaluating the dynamic polarizabilities of the 7 s , 8 s , and 7 p states for a linearly polarized light. These tune-out and magic wavelengths may be useful for laser cooling and trapping of the Fr atom, and for related high-precision trapping measurements.

  11. Properties of kinetic transition networks for atomic clusters and glassy solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John W R; Mehta, Dhagash; Wales, David J

    2017-09-27

    A database of minima and transition states corresponds to a network where the minima represent nodes and the transition states correspond to edges between the pairs of minima they connect via steepest-descent paths. Here we construct networks for small clusters bound by the Morse potential for a selection of physically relevant parameters, in two and three dimensions. The properties of these unweighted and undirected networks are analysed to examine two features: whether they are small-world, where the shortest path between nodes involves only a small number or edges; and whether they are scale-free, having a degree distribution that follows a power law. Small-world character is present, but statistical tests show that a power law is not a good fit, so the networks are not scale-free. These results for clusters are compared with the corresponding properties for the molecular and atomic structural glass formers ortho-terphenyl and binary Lennard-Jones. These glassy systems do not show small-world properties, suggesting that such behaviour is linked to the structure-seeking landscapes of the Morse clusters.

  12. Photoelectron imaging, probe of the dynamics: from atoms... to clusters; Imagerie de photoelectrons, sonde de la dynamique: des atomes... aux agregats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepine, F

    2003-06-15

    This thesis concerns the study of the deexcitation of clusters and atoms by photoelectron imaging. The first part is dedicated to thermionic emission of a finite size system. A 3-dimensional imaging setup allows us to measure the time evolution of the kinetic energy spectrum of electrons emitted from different clusters (W{sub n}{sup -}, C{sub n}{sup -}, C{sub 60}). Then we have a direct access to the fundamental quantities which characterize this statistical emission: the temperature of the finite heat bath and the decay rate. The second part concerns the ionization of atomic Rydberg states placed in a static electric field. We performed the first experiment of photoionization microscopy which allows us to obtain a picture which is the macroscopic projection of the electronic wave function. Then we have access to the detail of the photoionization and particularly to the quantum properties of the electron usually confined at the atomic scale. (author)

  13. Real-time study of the adiabatic energy loss in an atomic collision with a metal cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Roi; Siam, Nidal

    2004-10-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen atoms are accelerated towards metallic surfaces in their vicinity. As it approaches the surface, the velocity of an atom increases and this motion excites the metallic electrons, causing energy loss to the atom. This dissipative dynamics is frequently described as atomic motion under friction, where the friction coefficient is obtained from ab initio calculations assuming a weak interaction and slow atom. This paper tests the aforementioned approach by comparing to a real-time Ehrenfest molecular dynamics simulation of such a process. The electrons are treated realistically using standard approximations to time-dependent density functional theory. We find indeed that the electronic excitations produce a friction-like force on the atom. However, the friction coefficient strongly depends on the direction of the motion of the atom: it is large when the atom is moving towards the cluster and much smaller when the atom is moving away. It is concluded that a revision of the model for energy dissipation at metallic surfaces, at least for clusters, may be necessary. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

  14. Monitoring the dissolution process of metals in the gas phase: reactions of nanoscale Al and Ga metal atom clusters and their relationship to similar metalloid clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgert, Ralf; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg

    2008-05-14

    Formation and dissolution of metals are two of the oldest technical chemical processes. On the atomic scale, these processes are based on the formation and cleavage of metal-metal bonds. During the past 15 years we have studied intensively the intermediates during the formation process of metals, i.e. the formation of compounds containing many metal-metal bonds between naked metal atoms in the center and ligand-bearing metal atoms at the surface. We have called the clusters metalloid or, more generally, elementoid clusters. Via a retrosynthetic route, the many different Al and Ga metalloid clusters which have been structurally characterized allow us to understand also the dissolution process; i.e. the cleavage of metal-metal (M-M) bonds. However, this process can be detected much more directly by the reaction of single metal atom clusters in the gas phase under high vacuum conditions. A suitable tool to monitor the dissolution process of a metal cluster in the gas phase is FT-ICR (Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance) mass spectrometry. Snapshots during these cleavage processes are possible because only every 1-10 s is there a contact between a cluster molecule and an oxidizing molecule (e.g. Cl2). This period is long, i.e. the formation of the primary product (a smaller metal atom cluster) is finished before the next collision happens. We have studied three different types of reaction:(1) Step-by-step fragmentation of a structurally known metalloid cluster allows us to understand the bonding principle of these clusters because in every step only the weakest bond is broken.(2) There are three oxidation reactions of an Al13(-) cluster molecule with Cl2, HCl and O2 central to this review. These three reactions represent three different reaction types, (a) an exothermic reaction (Cl2), (b) an endothermic reaction (HCl), and (c) a kinetically limited reaction based on spin conservation rules (O2).(3) Finally, we present the reaction of a metalloid cluster with Cl2

  15. Neutron diffraction studies on a system with a 4-coordinate hydrogen atom in an yttrium cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousufuddin, Muhammed [Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Baldamus, Jens [RIKEN - Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tardif, Olivier [RIKEN - Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hou Zhaomin [RIKEN - Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Mason, Sax A. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); McIntyre, Garry J. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Bau, Robert [Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States)]. E-mail: bau@usc.edu

    2006-11-15

    A 4-coordinate H atom has been unambiguously located, by single-crystal neutron diffraction for the first time, in the center of the tetrahedral metal complex Y{sub 4}H{sub 8}(Cp''){sub 4}(THF) [Cp''=C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}(SiMe{sub 3})]. The core of the molecule consists of a tetranuclear cluster with one interstitial, one face-bridging and six edge-bridging hydride ligands. The four individual Y-H distances to the unique interstitial hydride ligand are 2.184(16), 2.189(16), 2.221(13) and 2.168(12) A. Neutron data were collected on a 4-mm{sup 3} crystal at the Quasi-Laue diffractometer VIVALDI at ILL (Grenoble), and the present agreement factor is R=12.2% for 3566 reflections.

  16. Thermally Stable and Regenerable Platinum-Tin Clusters for Propane Dehydrogenation Prepared by Atom Trapping on Ceria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Haifeng [Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering and Center for Microengineered Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87131 USA; Lin, Sen [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 China; Goetze, Joris [Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Universiteitsweg 99 3584 CG Utrecht The Netherlands; Pletcher, Paul [Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Universiteitsweg 99 3584 CG Utrecht The Netherlands; Guo, Hua [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87131 USA; Kovarik, Libor [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Artyushkova, Kateryna [Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering and Center for Microengineered Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87131 USA; Weckhuysen, Bert M. [Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Universiteitsweg 99 3584 CG Utrecht The Netherlands; Datye, Abhaya K. [Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering and Center for Microengineered Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87131 USA

    2017-06-28

    CeO2 supports are unique in their ability to trap ionic Pt, providing exceptional stability for isolated single atoms of Pt. Here, we explore the reactivity and stability of single atom Pt species for the industrially important reaction of light alkane dehydrogenation. The single atom Pt/CeO2 catalysts are stable during propane dehydrogenation, but we observe no selectivity towards propene. DFT calculations show strong adsorption of the olefin produced, leading to further unwanted reactions. In contrast, when Sn is added to ceria, the single atom Pt catalyst undergoes an activation phase where it transforms into Pt-Sn clusters under reaction conditions. Formation of small Pt-Sn clusters allows the catalyst to achieve high selectivity towards propene, due to facile desorption of the product. The CeO2-supported Pt-Sn clusters are very stable, even during extended reaction at 680 °C. By adding water vapor to the feed, coke formation can almost completely be suppressed. Furthermore, the Pt-Sn clusters can be readily transformed back to the atomically dispersed species on ceria via oxidation, making Pt-Sn/CeO2 a fully regenerable catalyst.

  17. Catalyst Architecture for Stable Single Atom Dispersion Enables Site-Specific Spectroscopic and Reactivity Measurements of CO Adsorbed to Pt Atoms, Oxidized Pt Clusters, and Metallic Pt Clusters on TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRita, Leo; Dai, Sheng; Lopez-Zepeda, Kimberly; Pham, Nicholas; Graham, George W; Pan, Xiaoqing; Christopher, Phillip

    2017-10-11

    Oxide-supported precious metal nanoparticles are widely used industrial catalysts. Due to expense and rarity, developing synthetic protocols that reduce precious metal nanoparticle size and stabilize dispersed species is essential. Supported atomically dispersed, single precious metal atoms represent the most efficient metal utilization geometry, although debate regarding the catalytic activity of supported single precious atom species has arisen from difficulty in synthesizing homogeneous and stable single atom dispersions, and a lack of site-specific characterization approaches. We propose a catalyst architecture and characterization approach to overcome these limitations, by depositing ∼1 precious metal atom per support particle and characterizing structures by correlating scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and CO probe molecule infrared spectroscopy. This is demonstrated for Pt supported on anatase TiO 2 . In these structures, isolated Pt atoms, Pt iso , remain stable through various conditions, and spectroscopic evidence suggests Pt iso species exist in homogeneous local environments. Comparing Pt iso to ∼1 nm preoxidized (Pt ox ) and prereduced (Pt metal ) Pt clusters on TiO 2 , we identify unique spectroscopic signatures of CO bound to each site and find CO adsorption energy is ordered: Pt iso ≪ Pt metal atoms bonded to TiO 2 and that Pt iso exhibits optimal reactivity because every atom is exposed for catalysis and forms an interfacial site with TiO 2 . This approach should be generally useful for studying the behavior of supported precious metal atoms.

  18. Evolution of the Rayleigh scattering from mixed Ar/Kr clusters during their saturation with krypton atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhvaniya, I. A.; Dzhidzhoev, M. S.; Balakin, A. V.; Kuzechkin, N. A.; Shkurinov, A. P.; Gordienko, V. M.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of the Rayleigh scattering signal from mixed Ar/Kr clusters with variation in the partial Kr concentration in the initial gas mixture is investigated. An addition of krypton in small amounts to argon is found to cause an anomalously rapid increase in the Rayleigh scattering signal amplitude, which is due to a sharp increase in the size of clusters as a result of their saturation with krypton atoms. At a partial krypton concentration above 25% in the initial mixture, the scattering signal amplitude is stabilised because of the condensation saturation during the cluster formation.

  19. Clusters of interstitial carbon atoms near the graphite surface as a possible origin of dome-like features observed by STM

    OpenAIRE

    Elesin, V. F.; Openov, L. A.

    1999-01-01

    Formation of clusters of interstitial carbon atoms between the surface and second atomic layers of graphite is demonstrated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that interstitial clusters result in the dome-like surface features that may be associated with some of the hillocks observed by STM on the irradiated graphite surface.

  20. Atomic Cluster Aggregates in Nucleation of Solid Alumina Inclusion in the Aluminum Deoxidation for Liquid Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guocheng; Xiao, Yuanyou; Zhao, Changming; Li, Jing; Shang, Deli

    2018-02-01

    Nucleation plays a decisive role in determining the structure and size distribution of a solid inclusion particle in liquid iron. The literature does not yet provide a clear picture about the pathway leading to solid alumina inclusion from liquid iron. The main confusion surrounds the little-known structures and thermodynamic properties of metastable alumina phase (MAP) that appear in the nucleation of alumina inclusion. In this work, it is suggested that MAP could appear in the Al-deoxidation reaction, based on the summaries and analysis in terms of various equilibrium experimental results and thermodynamic modeling of the Al deoxidation in liquid iron since the 1950s. The structures and thermodynamic properties of a species of MAP, alumina atomic cluster aggregates (AACAs), are calculated by density functional theory (DFT) methods. The thermodynamics on formation and transformation of AACAs shows that AACAs are in equilibrium with Al and O with various contents measured in the Al-deoxidation equilibrium experiments for liquid iron. It is suggested that the residual Al and O, which cannot nucleate, appear in the form of AACAs in Al-deoxidized liquid iron. It can be concluded that AACAs are the metastable intermediates and structural units for alumina inclusion nucleating from liquid iron. Thus, the behaviors of AACAs are important to the control of the nucleation rate of alumina inclusions in the Al deoxidation for liquid iron.

  1. PREFACE: International Conference on Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowek, Danielle; Bennani, Azzedine; Lablanquie, Pascal; Maquet, Alfred

    2008-12-01

    The 2008 edition of the International Conference on Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces was held in Paris from 30 June to 2 July 2008. This biennial conference alternates with the International Symposium on (e,2e), Double Photoionization and Related Topics which is a satellite of the International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC) conference. Over 110 participants from 20 countries gathered to examine the latest developments in the field of radiation interactions with matter. These include electron-electron correlation effects in excitation and in single and multiple ionization of atoms, molecules, clusters and surfaces with various projectiles: electrons, photons and ions. The present proceedings gathers the contributions of invited speakers and is intended to provide a detailed state-of-the-art account of the various facets of the field. Special thanks are due to Université Paris Sud XI, CNRS, and the laboratories LCAM, LIXAM and LCPMR which provided financial support for the organization of the conference. We are also grateful to the contribution of the companies Varian and RoentDek Handels GmbH. Guest Editors: Danielle Dowek and Azzedine Bennani LCAM, Université Paris Sud XI, France Pascal Lablanquie and Alfred Maquet LCPMR, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE Lorenzo Avaldi, (Italy) Alexei Grum Grzhimailo, (Russia) Klaus Bartschat, (USA) Nikolai Kabachnik, (Russia) Jamal Berakdar, (Germany) Birgit Lohmann, (Australia) Nora Berrah, (USA) Don H Madison, (USA) Michael Brunger, (Australia) Francis Penent, (France) Albert Crowe, (UK) Bernard Piraux, (Belgium) Claude Dal Cappello, (France) Roberto Rivarola, (Argentina) JingKang Deng, (China) Emma Sokkel, (Ireland) Alexander Dorn, (Germany) Giovanni Stefani, (Italy) Reinhardt Dorner, (Germany) Noboru Watanabe, (Japan) François Frémont, (France) LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE Azzedine BENNANI (Chair

  2. The fifth international symposium ''atomic cluster collisions''. ISACC 2011. Book of Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The Fifth International Symposium ''Atomic Cluster Collisions'' (ISACC 2011) will take place in July 21-25, 2011 in Berlin, Germany. The venue of the meeting will be the St.-Michaels-Heim a lovely place located within a garden area of Berlin-Grunewald. The ISACC 2011 is organized by the Fritz-Haber-Institute of the Max- Planck Society along with the King Saud University, Rhiyadh and by the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Frankfurt am Main, Germany. ISACC started as the international symposium on atomic cluster collisions in St. Petersburg, Russia in 2003. The second ISACC was held at the GSI, Darmstadt, Germany in 2007. Both first and second symposia were satellites of the International Conferences on Photonic Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC). The third ISACC has returned to St. Petersburg, Russia in 2008. The last ISACC took place in Ann Arbor, again as a satellite meeting of the ICPEAC. Initially the symposium was mainly focused on dynamics of atomic clusters, especially in atomic cluster collisions, but since then its scope has been widened significantly to include dynamics of nanosystems, biomolecules, and macromolecules with the emphasis on the similarity of numerous essential clustering phenomena arising in different branches of physics, chemistry, and biology. After the four ISACC meetings it has become clear that there is a need for an interdisciplinary conference covering a broad range of topics related to the Dynamics of Systems on a Nanoscale. Therefore in 2010 it was decided to expand upon this series of meetings with a new conference organized under the new title ''Dynamics of Systems on the Nanoscale'', the DySoN Conference, since this title better reflects the interdisciplinary character of the earlier ISACC meetings embracing all the topics of interest under a common theme. The first DySoN Conference took place in Rome, Italy in 2010. The fifth ISACC symposium will be again a

  3. A Flexible Method for Production of Stable Atomic Clusters with Variable Size for Chemical and Catalytic Activity Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    mobility and mass standards from electrosprays of tetra- alkyl ammonium halides , J. Aerosol Science 36 (2005) 1224–1237. [10] M. F. Jarrold, J.E. Bower...that the chosen size range contains the size targeted for the superconductivity measurements based on the theoretical paper by Kresin, et al. [1...and superconductivity, and ii) a paper by Kresin, et al. [1-2] predicting high superconducting transition temperatures for atomic clusters of

  4. Carbon nanotubes randomly decorated with gold clusters: from nano{sup 2}hybrid atomic structures to gas sensing prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlier, J-C; Zanolli, Z [Unite de Physico-Chimie et de Physique des Materiaux (PCPM), European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF), Universite Catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud 1, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Arnaud, L; Avilov, I V; Felten, A; Pireaux, J-J [Centre de Recherche en Physique de la Matiere et du Rayonnement (PMR-LISE), Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, 61 Rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Delgado, M [Sensotran, s.l., Avenida Remolar 31, E-08820 El Prat de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Demoisson, F; Reniers, F [Service de Chimie Analytique et Chimie des Interfaces (CHANI), Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Faculte des Sciences, CP255, Boulevard du Triomphe 2, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Espinosa, E H; Ionescu, R; Leghrib, R; Llobet, E [Department of Electronic Engineering, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Avenida Paisos Catalans 26, E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); Ewels, C P; Suarez-Martinez, I [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Universite de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssiniere-BP 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Guillot, J; Mansour, A; Migeon, H-N [Departement Science et Analyse des Materiaux, Centre de Recherche Public-Gabriel Lippmann, rue du Brill 41, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Watson, G E, E-mail: jean-jacques.pireaux@fundp.ac.b [Vega Science Trust, Unit 118, Science Park SQ, Brighton, BN1 9SB (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-16

    Carbon nanotube surfaces, activated and randomly decorated with metal nanoclusters, have been studied in uniquely combined theoretical and experimental approaches as prototypes for molecular recognition. The key concept is to shape metallic clusters that donate or accept a fractional charge upon adsorption of a target molecule, and modify the electron transport in the nanotube. The present work focuses on a simple system, carbon nanotubes with gold clusters. The nature of the gold-nanotube interaction is studied using first-principles techniques. The numerical simulations predict the binding and diffusion energies of gold atoms at the tube surface, including realistic atomic models for defects potentially present at the nanotube surface. The atomic structure of the gold nanoclusters and their effect on the intrinsic electronic quantum transport properties of the nanotube are also predicted. Experimentally, multi-wall CNTs are decorated with gold clusters using (1) vacuum evaporation, after activation with an RF oxygen plasma and (2) colloid solution injected into an RF atmospheric plasma; the hybrid systems are accurately characterized using XPS and TEM techniques. The response of gas sensors based on these nano{sup 2}hybrids is quantified for the detection of toxic species like NO{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}.

  5. Carbon nanotubes randomly decorated with gold clusters: from nano2hybrid atomic structures to gas sensing prototypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, J-C; Arnaud, L; Avilov, I V; Delgado, M; Demoisson, F; Espinosa, E H; Ewels, C P; Felten, A; Guillot, J; Ionescu, R; Leghrib, R; Llobet, E; Mansour, A; Migeon, H-N; Pireaux, J-J; Reniers, F; Suarez-Martinez, I; Watson, G E; Zanolli, Z

    2009-09-16

    Carbon nanotube surfaces, activated and randomly decorated with metal nanoclusters, have been studied in uniquely combined theoretical and experimental approaches as prototypes for molecular recognition. The key concept is to shape metallic clusters that donate or accept a fractional charge upon adsorption of a target molecule, and modify the electron transport in the nanotube. The present work focuses on a simple system, carbon nanotubes with gold clusters. The nature of the gold-nanotube interaction is studied using first-principles techniques. The numerical simulations predict the binding and diffusion energies of gold atoms at the tube surface, including realistic atomic models for defects potentially present at the nanotube surface. The atomic structure of the gold nanoclusters and their effect on the intrinsic electronic quantum transport properties of the nanotube are also predicted. Experimentally, multi-wall CNTs are decorated with gold clusters using (1) vacuum evaporation, after activation with an RF oxygen plasma and (2) colloid solution injected into an RF atmospheric plasma; the hybrid systems are accurately characterized using XPS and TEM techniques. The response of gas sensors based on these nano(2)hybrids is quantified for the detection of toxic species like NO(2), CO, C(2)H(5)OH and C(2)H(4).

  6. On the performance of two-component energy-consistent pseudopotentials in atomic Fock-space coupled cluster calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figgen, Detlev; Wedig, Anja; Stoll, Hermann; Dolg, Michael; Eliav, Ephraim; Kaldor, Uzi

    2008-01-14

    The four-component atomic intermediate-Hamiltonian Fock-space coupled cluster (IHFSCC) code of Landau et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6862 (2001)] has been adapted to two-component calculations with relativistic pseudopotentials of the energy-consistent variety. Recently adjusted energy-consistent pseudopotentials for group 11 and 12 transition elements as well as group 13 and 14 post-d main group elements, which were fitted to atomic valence spectra from four-component multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations, are tested in IHFSCC calculations for ionization potentials, electron affinities, and excitation energies of a variety of atoms and ions. Where comparison is possible, the deviations from experimental data are in good agreement with those found in previously published IHFSCC all-electron calculations: experimental data are usually reproduced within a few hundred wavenumbers.

  7. Ab initio calculations on structural and electronic transport properties of six-atom GaN clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jinfeng; Long, Xiaojiang; Hao, Yanjun; Zhu, Jun; Guo, Yundong

    2017-11-01

    The structural and electronic transport properties of GaxNy (x + y = 6) clusters are investigated in the framework of density functional theory (DFT). To get their most stable structures, a strategy of particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is adopted. It is found that the most stable cluster’s binding energy and HOMO-LUMO gap energy decrease with Ga atom’s number in cluster increasing. The electronic transport properties of the clusters connected with two Al(100) electrodes are obtained by a method of combining nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) with DFT. Equilibrium conductance of all six-atom GaN cluster is low (less than 0.65 G0), and Ga2N4 has the highest one (0.635 G0). Significant negative differential resistance (NDR) phenomenon is observed in configurations with cluster Ga2N4, Ga3N3 and Ga5N1, and these three clusters have almost the same current value in voltage region from 0.8 V to 1.3 V.

  8. Formation of Exotic Networks of Water Clusters in Helium Droplets Facilitated by the Presence of Neon Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douberly, Gary E.; Miller, Roger E.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2017-03-08

    Water clusters are formed in helium droplets via the sequential capture of monomers. One or two neon atoms are added to each droplet prior to the addition of water. The infrared spectrum of the droplet ensemble reveals several signatures of polar, water tetramer clusters having dipole moments between 2D and 3D. Comparison with ab initio computations supports the assignment of the cluster networks to noncyclic “3+1” clusters, which are ~5.3 kcal/mol less stable than the global minimum nonpolar cyclic tetramer. The (H2O)3Ne + H2O ring insertion barrier is sufficiently large, such that evaporative helium cooling is capable of kinetically quenching the nonequilibrium tetramer system prior to its rearrangement to the lower energy cyclic species. To this end, the reported process results in the formation of exotic water cluster networks that are either higher in energy than the most stable gas-phase analogs or not even stable in the gas phase.

  9. Formation of Exotic Networks of Water Clusters in Helium Droplets Facilitated by the Presence of Neon Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douberly, Gary E; Miller, Roger E; Xantheas, Sotiris S

    2017-03-22

    Water clusters are formed in helium droplets via the sequential capture of monomers. One or two neon atoms are added to each droplet prior to the addition of water. The infrared spectrum of the droplet ensemble reveals several signatures of polar, water tetramer clusters having dipole moments between 2D and 3D. Comparison with ab initio computations supports the assignment of the cluster networks to noncyclic "3 + 1" clusters, which are ∼5.3 kcal/mol less stable than the global minimum nonpolar cyclic tetramer. The (H2O)3Ne + H2O ring insertion barrier is sufficiently large, such that evaporative helium cooling is capable of kinetically quenching the nonequilibrium tetramer system prior to its rearrangement to the lower energy cyclic species. To this end, the reported process results in the formation of exotic water cluster networks that are either higher in energy than the most stable gas-phase analogs or not even stable in the gas phase.

  10. Mechanistic elucidation of the stepwise formation of a tetranuclear manganese pinned butterfly cluster via N-N bond cleavage, hydrogen atom transfer, and cluster rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Clifton R; Gau, Michael R; Baglia, Regina A; McWilliams, Sean F; Zdilla, Michael J

    2014-12-31

    A mechanistic pathway for the formation of the structurally characterized manganese-amide-hydrazide pinned butterfly complex, Mn4(μ3-PhN-NPh-κ(3)N,N')2(μ-PhN-NPh-κ(2)-N,N')(μ-NHPh)2L4 (L = THF, py), is proposed and supported by the use of labeling studies, kinetic measurements, kinetic competition experiments, kinetic isotope effects, and hydrogen atom transfer reagent substitution, and via the isolation and characterization of intermediates using X-ray diffraction and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The data support a formation mechanism whereby bis[bis(trimethylsilyl)amido]manganese(II) (Mn(NR2)2, where R = SiMe3) reacts with N,N'-diphenylhydrazine (PhNHNHPh) via initial proton transfer, followed by reductive N-N bond cleavage to form a long-lived Mn(IV) imido multinuclear complex. Coordinating solvents activate this cluster for abstraction of hydrogen atoms from an additional equivalent of PhNHNHPh resulting in a Mn(II)phenylamido dimer, Mn2(μ-NHPh)2(NR2)2L2. This dimeric complex further assembles in fast steps with two additional equivalents of PhNHNHPh replacing the terminal silylamido ligands with η(1)-hydrazine ligands to give a dimeric Mn2(μ-NHPh)2(PhN-NHPh)2L4 intermediate, and finally, the addition of two additional equivalents of Mn(NR2)2 and PhNHNHPh gives the pinned butterfly cluster.

  11. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multicomponent metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamical aspects of a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulations with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (self diffusion coefficient, self relaxation time, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx˜1300 K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs well above the melting point of the system (Tm˜900 K) in the equilibrium liquid state; and the crossover temperature Tx is roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature of the system (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a nonparametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter α2 and the four-point correlation function χ4.

  12. Intense deuterium nuclear fusion of pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally within highly deuterated atom clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshiaki, A; Zhang, Y C

    2002-01-01

    Embedded nano-Pd particles of 5 nm in size instantly abundant D-atoms more than 250% in the atomic ratio against Pd-atoms at room temperature when they are kept in D sub 2 gas pressurized to less than 10 atm. In such ultrahigh densities, 2-4 D-atoms can be coagulated inside each octahedral space of Pd lattice (pycnodeuterium-lump). When a stimulation energy such as latticequake causing by ultrasonic wave was supplied to those highly deuterated Pd particles, intense deuterium nuclear fusion (''solid fusion'') was generated there and both excess heat and sup 4 He gas were abundantly produced. Naturally, these facts can not be realized at all in bulk Pd. The results show that the nuclear fusion occurs without any hazardous rays in pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally inside the each cell of the host metal lattice. These unit cells correspond to minimum unit of the solid fusion reactor as a ''Lattice Reactor''. (author)

  13. Fragmentation of neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision; Fragmentation d'agregats de carbone neutres formes par collision atomique a haute vitesse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinet, G

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the fragmentation of small neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision on atomic gas. In this experiment, the main way of deexcitation of neutral clusters formed by electron capture with ionic species is the fragmentation. To measure the channels of fragmentation, a new detection tool based on shape analysis of current pulse delivered by semiconductor detectors has been developed. For the first time, all branching ratios of neutral carbon clusters are measured in an unambiguous way for clusters size up to 10 atoms. The measurements have been compared to a statistical model in microcanonical ensemble (Microcanonical Metropolis Monte Carlo). In this model, various structural properties of carbon clusters are required. These data have been calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT-B3LYP) to find the geometries of the clusters and then with Coupled Clusters (CCSD(T)) formalism to obtain dissociation energies and other quantities needed to compute fragmentation calculations. The experimental branching ratios have been compared to the fragmentation model which has allowed to find an energy distribution deposited in the collision. Finally, specific cluster effect has been found namely a large population of excited states. This behaviour is completely different of the atomic carbon case for which the electron capture in the ground states predominates. (author)

  14. Atomic scale modelling of Al and Ni(1 1 1) surface erosion under cluster impact

    CERN Document Server

    Zhurkin, E E

    2003-01-01

    We have studied sputtering of Al and Ni(1 1 1) surfaces under impact of Al sub N and Ni sub N clusters (1=13. The pronounced microcraters are formed in the impact region above a threshold cluster size of around N=13. As a sensitivity study, we show that interaction with electronic subsystem of the target has a strong influence on secondary emission, but almost does not affect the features of surface microstructure of irradiated target.

  15. Photoionization and Velocity Map Imaging spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters with Synchrotron and Free Electron Laser radiation at Elettra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fraia, M.; Sergo, R.; Stebel, L.; Giuressi, D.; Cautero, G.; Tudor, M.; Callegari, C.; O'Keeffe, P.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Lyamayev, V.; Feyer, V.; Moise, A.; Devetta, M.; Piseri, P.; Grazioli, C.; Coreno, M.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in laser and Synchrotron Radiation instrumentation are continuously boosting fundamental research on the electronic structure of matter. At Elettra the collaboration between several groups active in the field of atomic, molecular and cluster physics and the Instrumentation and Detector Laboratory has resulted in an experimental set-up that successfully tackles the challenges posed by the investigation of the electronic structure of isolated species in the gas phase. The use of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) and Free Electron Laser (FEL) light, allows to cover a wide spectrum of targets from energetic to dynamics. We developed a Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) spectrometer that allows to perform as well SR as FEL experiments, just by changing part of the detection system. In SR experiments, at the Gasphase beamline of Elettra, a cross delay line detector is used, coupled to a 4-channel time-to-digital converter that reconstructs the position of the electrons. Simultaneously, a Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometer is used to acquire photoion spectra. Such a system allows PhotoElectron-PhotoIon-Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters. In FEL experiments (notably differing from SR experiments in the much higher rate of events produced and detected, which forces one to forfeit coincidence detection), at the Low Density Matter (LDM) beamline of FERMI, a Micro Channel Plate (MCP) a phosphor screen and a CCD camera are used instead, capable of shot-by-shot collection of practically all events, albeit without time resolution.

  16. Indium clustering in a-plane InGaN quantum wells as evidenced by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Fengzai; Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Fu, Wai Yuen; Griffiths, James T.; Massabuau, Fabien C.-P.; Kappers, Menno J.; Oliver, Rachel A., E-mail: rao28@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Martin, Tomas L.; Bagot, Paul A. J.; Moody, Michael P., E-mail: michael.moody@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-16

    Atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to characterize the distribution of In atoms within non-polar a-plane InGaN quantum wells (QWs) grown on a GaN pseudo-substrate produced using epitaxial lateral overgrowth. Application of the focused ion beam microscope enabled APT needles to be prepared from the low defect density regions of the grown sample. A complementary analysis was also undertaken on QWs having comparable In contents grown on polar c-plane sample pseudo-substrates. Both frequency distribution and modified nearest neighbor analyses indicate a statistically non-randomized In distribution in the a-plane QWs, but a random distribution in the c-plane QWs. This work not only provides insights into the structure of non-polar a-plane QWs but also shows that APT is capable of detecting as-grown nanoscale clustering in InGaN and thus validates the reliability of earlier APT analyses of the In distribution in c-plane InGaN QWs which show no such clustering.

  17. Atomic layer deposition of platinum clusters on titania nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goulas, A.; Van Ommen, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    We report the fabrication of platinum nanoclusters with a narrow size distribution on TiO2 nanoparticles using atomic layer deposition. With MeCpPtMe3 and ozone as reactants, the deposition can be carried out at a relatively low temperature of 250 degrees C. Our approach of working with suspended

  18. Co-deposition of Atomic Clusters of Different Size and Composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Vece, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/248753355; Young, N.P.; Li, Z.; Chen, Y.; Palmer, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated the potential applications of nanoclusters in catalysis,[1,2] biology,[3, 4] and medicine,[ 5] in addition to areas such as electronics[6] and optics.[7] These applications all require the creation of stable arrays of clusters that can withstand the relevant

  19. Effect of Alkali Metal Atoms Doping on Structural and Nonlinear Optical Properties of the Gold-Germanium Bimetallic Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A new series of alkali-based complexes, AM@GenAu (AM = Li, Na, and K, have been theoretically designed and investigated by means of the density functional theory calculations. The geometric structures and electronic properties of the species are systematically analyzed. The adsorption of alkali metals maintains the structural framework of the gold-germanium bimetallic clusters, and the alkali metals prefer energetically to be attached on clusters’ surfaces or edges. The high chemical stability of Li@Ge12Au is revealed by the spherical aromaticity, the hybridization between the Ge atoms and Au-4d states, and delocalized multi-center bonds, as well as large binding energies. The static first hyperpolarizability (βtot is related to the cluster size and geometric structure, and the AM@GenAu (AM = Na and K clusters exhibit the much larger βtot values up to 13050 a.u., which are considerable to establish their strong nonlinear optical (NLO behaviors. We hope that this study will promote further application of alkali metals-adsorbed germanium-based semiconductor materials, serving for the design of remarkable and tunable NLO materials.

  20. Barrierless growth of precursor-free, ultrafast laser-fragmented noble metal nanoparticles by colloidal atom clusters - A kinetic in situ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendrzej, Sandra; Gökce, Bilal; Amendola, Vincenzo; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    Unintended post-synthesis growth of noble metal colloids caused by excess amounts of reactants or highly reactive atom clusters represents a fundamental problem in colloidal chemistry, affecting product stability or purity. Hence, quantified kinetics could allow defining nanoparticle size determination in dependence of the time. Here, we investigate in situ the growth kinetics of ps pulsed laser-fragmented platinum nanoparticles in presence of naked atom clusters in water without any influence of reducing agents or surfactants. The nanoparticle growth is investigated for platinum covering a time scale of minutes to 50days after nanoparticle generation, it is also supplemented by results obtained from gold and palladium. Since a minimum atom cluster concentration is exceeded, a significant growth is determined by time resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy, analytical disc centrifugation, zeta potential measurement and transmission electron microscopy. We suggest a decrease of atom cluster concentration over time, since nanoparticles grow at the expense of atom clusters. The growth mechanism during early phase (<1day) of laser-synthesized colloid is kinetically modeled by rapid barrierless coalescence. The prolonged slow nanoparticle growth is kinetically modeled by a combination of coalescence and Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner kinetic for Ostwald ripening, validated experimentally by the temperature dependence of Pt nanoparticle size and growth quenching by Iodide anions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Shape analysis of current pulses delivered by semiconductor detectors: A new tool for fragmentation studies of high velocity atomic clusters and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabot, M. E-mail: chabot@ipno.in2p3.fr; Della Negra, S.; Lavergne, L.; Martinet, G.; Wohrer-Beroff, K. E-mail: wohrer@gps.jussieu.fr; Sellem, R.; Daniel, R.; Le Bris, J.; Lalu, G.; Gardes, D.; Scarpaci, J.A.; Desesquelle, P.; Lima, V

    2002-11-01

    Shape analyses of current pulses delivered by semiconductor detectors under impact of high velocity atomic clusters have been performed for the first time. We show in this paper that the shape of the current pulse depends sensitively on the cluster size. When the cluster is fragmented, the obtained signal is found to result from the sum of signals associated with individual fragment impacts so that recognition of the fragmentation pathway is made possible in an unambiguous way. Application to the extraction of the 29 fragmentation channels of neutral C{sub 9} clusters is presented.

  2. Shape analysis of current pulses delivered by semiconductor detectors: A new tool for fragmentation studies of high velocity atomic clusters and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Chabot, M; Lavergne, L; Martinet, G; Wohrer-Beroff, K; Sellem, R; Daniel, R; Le Bris, J; Lalu, G; Gardes, D; Scarpaci, J A; Désesquelles, P; Lima, V

    2002-01-01

    Shape analyses of current pulses delivered by semiconductor detectors under impact of high velocity atomic clusters have been performed for the first time. We show in this paper that the shape of the current pulse depends sensitively on the cluster size. When the cluster is fragmented, the obtained signal is found to result from the sum of signals associated with individual fragment impacts so that recognition of the fragmentation pathway is made possible in an unambiguous way. Application to the extraction of the 29 fragmentation channels of neutral C sub 9 clusters is presented.

  3. One-atom-thick 2D copper oxide clusters on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Emi; Kvashnin, Dmitry G; Sakai, Seiji; Chernozatonskii, Leonid A; Sorokin, Pavel B; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2017-03-17

    The successful isolation and remarkable properties of graphene have recently triggered investigation of two-dimensional (2D) materials from layered compounds; however, one-atom-thick 2D materials without bulk layered counterparts are scarcely reported. Here we report the structure and properties of novel 2D copper oxide studied by experimental and theoretical methods. Electron microscopy observations reveal that copper oxide can form monoatomic layers with an unusual square lattice on graphene. Density functional theory calculations suggest that oxygen atoms at the centre of the square lattice stabilizes the 2D Cu structure, and that the 2D copper oxide sheets have unusual electronic and magnetic properties different from 3D bulk copper oxide.

  4. From atoms to layers: in situ gold cluster growth kinetics during sputter deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Buffet, Adeline; Körstgens, Volker; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Schlage, Kai; Benecke, Gunthard; Perlich, Jan; Rawolle, Monika; Rothkirch, André; Heidmann, Berit; Herzog, Gerd; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Röhlsberger, Ralf; Gehrke, Rainer; Stribeck, Norbert; Roth, Stephan V.

    2013-05-01

    The adjustment of size-dependent catalytic, electrical and optical properties of gold cluster assemblies is a very significant issue in modern applied nanotechnology. We present a real-time investigation of the growth kinetics of gold nanostructures from small nuclei to a complete gold layer during magnetron sputter deposition with high time resolution by means of in situ microbeam grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (μGISAXS). We specify the four-stage growth including their thresholds with sub-monolayer resolution and identify phase transitions monitored in Yoneda intensity as a material-specific characteristic. An innovative and flexible geometrical model enables the extraction of morphological real space parameters, such as cluster size and shape, correlation distance, layer porosity and surface coverage, directly from reciprocal space scattering data. This approach enables a large variety of future investigations of the influence of different process parameters on the thin metal film morphology. Furthermore, our study allows for deducing the wetting behavior of gold cluster films on solid substrates and provides a better understanding of the growth kinetics in general, which is essential for optimization of manufacturing parameters, saving energy and resources.The adjustment of size-dependent catalytic, electrical and optical properties of gold cluster assemblies is a very significant issue in modern applied nanotechnology. We present a real-time investigation of the growth kinetics of gold nanostructures from small nuclei to a complete gold layer during magnetron sputter deposition with high time resolution by means of in situ microbeam grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (μGISAXS). We specify the four-stage growth including their thresholds with sub-monolayer resolution and identify phase transitions monitored in Yoneda intensity as a material-specific characteristic. An innovative and flexible geometrical model enables the extraction

  5. Robustness of ‘cut and splice’ genetic algorithms in the structural optimization of atomic clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froltsov, Vladimir A.; Reuter, Karsten

    2009-05-01

    We return to the geometry optimization problem of Lennard-Jones clusters to analyze the performance dependence of 'cut and splice' genetic algorithms (GAs) on the employed population size. We generally find that admixing twinning mutation moves leads to an improved robustness of the algorithm efficiency with respect to this a priori unknown technical parameter. The resulting very stable performance of the corresponding mutation + mating GA implementation over a wide range of population sizes is an important feature when addressing unknown systems with computationally involved first-principles based GA sampling.

  6. Application of cluster-plus-glue-atom model to barrierless Cu–Ni–Ti and Cu–Ni–Ta films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaona, E-mail: lixiaona@dlut.edu.cn; Ding, Jianxin; Wang, Miao; Dong, Chuang [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Chu, Jinn P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-01

    To improve the thermal stability of copper and avoid its diffusion into surrounding dielectrics or interfacial reactions with them, the authors applied the cluster-plus-glue-atom model to investigate barrierless Cu–Ni–M (M = Ti or Ta) seed layers. The dissolution of the third element (Ti or Ta) in the Cu lattice with the aid of Ni significantly improved the thermal stability of the Cu seed layer. The appropriate M/Ni (M = Ti or Ta) ratio was selected to obtain a low resistivity: the resistivity was as low as 2.5 μΩ cm for the (Ti{sub 1.5/13.5}Ni{sub 12/13.5}){sub 0.3}Cu{sub 99.7} film and 2.8 μΩ cm for the (Ta{sub 1.1/13.1}Ni{sub 12/13.1}){sub 0.4}Cu{sub 99.6} film after annealing at 500 °C for 1 h. After annealing at 500 °C for 40 h, the two films remained stable without forming a Cu{sub 3}Si compound. The authors confirmed that the range of applications of the cluster-plus-glue-atom model could be extended. Therefore, a third element M with negative enthalpies of mixing with both Cu and Ni could be selected, under the premise that the mixing enthalpy of M–Ni is more negative than that of M–Cu.

  7. Inner-shell spectroscopy and exchange interaction of Rydberg electrons bound by singly and doubly charged Kr and Xe atoms in small clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Masanari; Hatsui, Takaki; Setoyama, Hiroyuki; Ruehl, Eckart [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Kosugi, Nobuhiro, E-mail: kosugi@ims.ac.j [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Surface-site resolved Kr 3d{sub 5/2}{sup -1}5p and 3d{sub 5/2}{sup -1}6p and Xe 4d{sub 5/2}{sup -1}6p and 4d{sub 5/2}{sup -1}7p Rydberg excited states in small van der Waals Kr and Xe clusters with a mean size of = 15 are investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, surface-site resolved Kr 4s{sup -2}5p, 4s{sup -2}6p, and 4s{sup -1}4p{sup -1}5p shakeup-like Rydberg states in small Kr clusters are investigated by resonant Auger electron spectroscopy. The exchange interaction of the Rydberg electron with the surrounding atoms and the induced polarization of the surrounding atoms in the singly and doubly ionized atoms are deduced from the experimental spectra to analyze different surface-site contributions in small clusters, assuming that the corner, edge, face, and bulk sites have 3, 5-6, 8, and 12 nearest neighbor atoms. These energies are almost proportional to the number of the nearest neighbor atoms. The present analysis indicates that small Kr and Xe clusters with = 15 have an average or mixture structure between the fcc-like cubic and icosahedron-like spherical structures.

  8. Metals on graphene and carbon nanotube surfaces: From mobile atoms to atomtronics to bulk metals to clusters and catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Santanu C.

    2014-01-14

    In this Perspective, we present an overview of recent fundamental studies on the nature of the interaction between individual metal atoms and metal clusters and the conjugated surfaces of graphene and carbon nanotube with a particular focus on the electronic structure and chemical bonding at the metal-graphene interface. We discuss the relevance of organometallic complexes of graphitic materials to the development of a fundamental understanding of these interactions and their application in atomtronics as atomic interconnects, high mobility organometallic transistor devices, high-frequency electronic devices, organometallic catalysis (hydrogen fuel generation by photocatalytic water splitting, fuel cells, hydrogenation), spintronics, memory devices, and the next generation energy devices. We touch on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grown on metals, the reactivity of its surface, and its use as a template for asymmetric graphene functionalization chemistry (ultrathin Janus discs). We highlight some of the latest advances in understanding the nature of interactions between metals and graphene surfaces from the standpoint of metal overlayers deposited on graphene and SWNT thin films. Finally, we comment on the major challenges facing the field and the opportunities for technological applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. Photoelectron angular distributions for states of any mixed character: An experiment-friendly model for atomic, molecular, and cluster anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khuseynov, Dmitry; Blackstone, Christopher C.; Culberson, Lori M.; Sanov, Andrei, E-mail: sanov@u.arizona.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2014-09-28

    We present a model for laboratory-frame photoelectron angular distributions in direct photodetachment from (in principle) any molecular orbital using linearly polarized light. A transparent mathematical approach is used to generalize the Cooper-Zare central-potential model to anionic states of any mixed character. In the limit of atomic-anion photodetachment, the model reproduces the Cooper-Zare formula. In the case of an initial orbital described as a superposition of s and p-type functions, the model yields the previously obtained s-p mixing formula. The formalism is further advanced using the Hanstorp approximation, whereas the relative scaling of the partial-wave cross-sections is assumed to follow the Wigner threshold law. The resulting model describes the energy dependence of photoelectron anisotropy for any atomic, molecular, or cluster anions, usually without requiring a direct calculation of the transition dipole matrix elements. As a benchmark case, we apply the p-d variant of the model to the experimental results for NO{sup −} photodetachment and show that the observed anisotropy trend is described well using physically meaningful values of the model parameters. Overall, the presented formalism delivers insight into the photodetachment process and affords a new quantitative strategy for analyzing the photoelectron angular distributions and characterizing mixed-character molecular orbitals using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of negative ions.

  10. Study of Pair and many-body interactions in rare-gas halide atom clusters using negative ion zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) and threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yourshaw, Ivan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-07-09

    The diatomic halogen atom-rare gas diatomic complexes KrBr-, XeBr-, and KrCl- are studied in this work by zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy in order to characterize the weak intermolecular diatomic potentials of these species. Also, the ZEKE and threshold photodetachment spectra of the polyatomic clusters ArnBr- (n = 2-9) and ArnI- (n = 2-19) are studied to obtain information about the non-additive effects on the interactions among the atoms. This work is part of an ongoing effort to characterize the pair and many-body potentials of the complete series of rare gas halide clusters. In these studies we obtain information about both the anionic and neutral clusters.

  11. Prediction of the transition energies of atomic No and Lr by the intermediate Hamiltonian coupled cluster method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borschevsky, A.; Eliav, E.; Kaldor, U. [School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv, (Israel); Vilkas, M.J.; Ishikawa, Y. [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 23346, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931-3346 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Measurements of the spectroscopic properties of the superheavy elements present a serious challenge to the experimentalist. Their short lifetimes and the low quantities of their production necessitate reliable prediction of transition energies to avoid the need for broad wavelength scans and to assist in identifying the lines. Thus, reliable high-accuracy calculations are necessary prior and parallel to experimental research. Nobelium and Lawrencium are at present the two most likely candidates for spectroscopic measurements, with the first experiments planned at GSI, Darmstadt. The intermediate Hamiltonian (IH) coupled cluster method is applied to the ionization potentials, electron affinities, and excitation energies of atomic nobelium and lawrencium. Large basis sets are used (37s31p26d21f16g11h6i). All levels of a particular atom are obtained simultaneously by diagonalizing the IH matrix. The matrix elements correspond to all excitations from correlated occupied orbitals to virtual orbitals in a large P space, and are 'dressed' by folding in excitations to higher virtual orbitals (Q space) at the coupled cluster singles-and-doubles level. Lamb-shift corrections are included. The same approach was applied to the lighter homologues of Lr and No, lutetium and ytterbium, for which many transition energies are experimentally known, in order to assess the accuracy of the calculation. The average absolute error of 20 excitation energies of Lu is 423 cm{sup -1}, and the error limits for Lr are therefore put at 700 cm{sup -1}. Predicted Lr excitations with large transition moments in the prime range for the planned experiment, 20,000-30,000 cm{sup -1}, are 7p {yields} 8s at 20,100 cm{sup -1} and 7p {yields}p 7d at 28,100 cm{sup -1}. In case of Yb, the calculated ionization potential was within 20 cm{sup -1} of the experiment, and the average error of the 20 lowest calculated excitations was about 300 cm{sup -1}. Hence, the

  12. Experimental and theoretical study of hydrogen atom abstraction from n-butane by lanthanum oxide cluster anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bo; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Li, Xiao-Na; Ding, Xun-Lei; He, Sheng-Gui

    2011-09-22

    Lanthanum oxide cluster anions are prepared by laser ablation and reacted with n-C(4)H(10) in a fast flow reactor. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is used to detect the cluster distribution before and after the reactions. (La(2)O(3))(m=1-3)OH(-) and La(3)O(7)H(-) are observed as products, which suggests the occurrence of hydrogen atom abstraction reactions: (La(2)O(3))(m=1-3)O(-) + n-C(4)H(10) → (La(2)O(3))(m=1-3)OH(-) + C(4)H(9) and La(3)O(7)(-) + n-C(4)H(10) → La(3)O(7)H(-) + C(4)H(9). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to study the structures and bonding properties of La(2)O(4)(-), La(3)O(7)(-), and La(4)O(7)(-) clusters. The calculated results show that each of La(2)O(4)(-) and La(4)O(7)(-) contains one oxygen-centered radical (O(-•)) which is responsible for the high reactivity toward n-C(4)H(10). La(3)O(7)(-) contains one oxygen-centered radical (O(-•)) and one superoxide unit (O(2)(-•)), and the O(-•) is responsible for its high reactivity toward n-C(4)H(10). The O(-•) and O(2)(-•) can be considered to be generated by the adsorption of an O(2) molecule onto the singlet La(3)O(5)(-) with electron transfer from a terminally bonded oxygen ion (O(2-)) to the O(2). This may help us understand the mechanism of the formation of O(-•) and O(2)(-•) radicals in lanthanum oxide systems. The reaction mechanisms of La(2)O(4)(-) + n-C(4)H(10) and La(3)O(7)(-) + n-C(4)H(10) are also studied by the DFT calculations, and the calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental observations. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. cluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electron transfer chains involved in a number of biologi- cal systems including respiration and photosynthesis.1. The most common iron–sulphur clusters found as active centres in iron–sulphur proteins are [Fe2S2], [Fe3S4] and [Fe4S4], in which Fe(III) ions are coordinated to cysteines from the peptide and are linked to each ...

  14. Investigation of modulus hardening of various co-clusters in aged Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Song [Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu, Zhiyi, E-mail: liuzhiyi@csu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Ying, Puyou; Wang, Jian; Li, Junlin [Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2016-06-21

    The modulus hardening capability of various co-clusters in a low Cu/Mg ratio Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy aged at 165 °C is investigated by quantitative atom probe tomography analysis. Prolonged aging from 5 min to 2 h leads to the simultaneous increase in the critical shear stress of both Mg-Ag and Cu-Mg co-clusters. Regardless of the higher shear modulus of Cu-Mg co-clusters, calculation results show that Mg-Ag co-clusters possess a greater modulus hardening capability than Cu-Mg co-clusters, suggesting its primary contribution to the rapid hardening at the early aging stage. As aging extends from 30 min to 2 h, the increment in the critical shear stress of Mg-Ag co-clusters is lower than that of Cu-Mg co-clusters due to the precipitation of high density Ω phase. In addition, the shear modulus of Mg-Ag co-clusters is generally independent on its size at each investigated condition.

  15. Defining and quantifying frustration in the energy landscape: Applications to atomic and molecular clusters, biomolecules, jammed and glassy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, V. K.; Stevenson, J. D.; Niblett, S. P.; Farrell, J. D.; Wales, D. J.

    2017-03-01

    The emergence of observable properties from the organisation of the underlying potential energy landscape is analysed, spanning a full range of complexity from self-organising to glassy and jammed systems. The examples include atomic and molecular clusters, a β-barrel protein, the GNNQQNY peptide dimer, and models of condensed matter that exhibit structural glass formation and jamming. We have considered measures based on several different properties, namely, the Shannon entropy, an equilibrium thermodynamic measure that uses a sample of local minima, and indices that require additional information about the connections between local minima in the form of transition states. A frustration index is defined that correlates directly with key properties that distinguish relaxation behaviour within this diverse set. The index uses the ratio of the energy barrier to the energy difference with reference to the global minimum. The contributions for each local minimum are weighted by the equilibrium occupation probabilities. Hence we obtain fundamental insight into the connections and distinctions between systems that cover the continuum from efficient structure-seekers to landscapes that exhibit broken ergodicity and rare event dynamics.

  16. Atomic force microscopy of photosystem II and its unit cell clustering quantitatively delineate the mesoscale variability in Arabidopsis thylakoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoa, Bibiana; Schneider, Anna R; Brooks, Matthew D; Grob, Patricia; Nogales, Eva; Geissler, Phillip L; Niyogi, Krishna K; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Photoautotrophic organisms efficiently regulate absorption of light energy to sustain photochemistry while promoting photoprotection. Photoprotection is achieved in part by triggering a series of dissipative processes termed non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), which depend on the re-organization of photosystem (PS) II supercomplexes in thylakoid membranes. Using atomic force microscopy, we characterized the structural attributes of grana thylakoids from Arabidopsis thaliana to correlate differences in PSII organization with the role of SOQ1, a recently discovered thylakoid protein that prevents formation of a slowly reversible NPQ state. We developed a statistical image analysis suite to discriminate disordered from crystalline particles and classify crystalline arrays according to their unit cell properties. Through detailed analysis of the local organization of PSII supercomplexes in ordered and disordered phases, we found evidence that interactions among light-harvesting antenna complexes are weakened in the absence of SOQ1, inducing protein rearrangements that favor larger separations between PSII complexes in the majority (disordered) phase and reshaping the PSII crystallization landscape. The features we observe are distinct from known protein rearrangements associated with NPQ, providing further support for a role of SOQ1 in a novel NPQ pathway. The particle clustering and unit cell methodology developed here is generalizable to multiple types of microscopy and will enable unbiased analysis and comparison of large data sets.

  17. Atomic force microscopy of photosystem II and its unit cell clustering quantitatively delineate the mesoscale variability in Arabidopsis thylakoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibiana Onoa

    Full Text Available Photoautotrophic organisms efficiently regulate absorption of light energy to sustain photochemistry while promoting photoprotection. Photoprotection is achieved in part by triggering a series of dissipative processes termed non-photochemical quenching (NPQ, which depend on the re-organization of photosystem (PS II supercomplexes in thylakoid membranes. Using atomic force microscopy, we characterized the structural attributes of grana thylakoids from Arabidopsis thaliana to correlate differences in PSII organization with the role of SOQ1, a recently discovered thylakoid protein that prevents formation of a slowly reversible NPQ state. We developed a statistical image analysis suite to discriminate disordered from crystalline particles and classify crystalline arrays according to their unit cell properties. Through detailed analysis of the local organization of PSII supercomplexes in ordered and disordered phases, we found evidence that interactions among light-harvesting antenna complexes are weakened in the absence of SOQ1, inducing protein rearrangements that favor larger separations between PSII complexes in the majority (disordered phase and reshaping the PSII crystallization landscape. The features we observe are distinct from known protein rearrangements associated with NPQ, providing further support for a role of SOQ1 in a novel NPQ pathway. The particle clustering and unit cell methodology developed here is generalizable to multiple types of microscopy and will enable unbiased analysis and comparison of large data sets.

  18. A particle swarm optimization algorithm with random learning mechanism and Levy flight for optimization of atomic clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bailu; Zhao, Zheng; Zhou, Yingcheng; Yuan, Wenyan; Li, Jian; Wu, Jun; Cheng, Daojian

    2017-10-01

    Swarm intelligence optimization algorithms are mainstream algorithms for solving complex optimization problems. Among these algorithms, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm has the advantages of fast computation speed and few parameters. However, PSO is prone to premature convergence. To solve this problem, we develop a new PSO algorithm (RPSOLF) by combining the characteristics of random learning mechanism and Levy flight. The RPSOLF algorithm increases the diversity of the population by learning from random particles and random walks in Levy flight. On the one hand, we carry out a large number of numerical experiments on benchmark test functions, and compare these results with the PSO algorithm with Levy flight (PSOLF) algorithm and other PSO variants in previous reports. The results show that the optimal solution can be found faster and more efficiently by the RPSOLF algorithm. On the other hand, the RPSOLF algorithm can also be applied to optimize the Lennard-Jones clusters, and the results indicate that the algorithm obtains the optimal structure (2-60 atoms) with an extraordinary high efficiency. In summary, RPSOLF algorithm proposed in our paper is proved to be an extremely effective tool for global optimization.

  19. On the use of big-bang method to generate low-energy structures of atomic clusters modeled with pair potentials of different ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, J M C; Pais, A A C C; Abreu, P E

    2012-02-05

    The efficiency of the so-called big-bang method for the optimization of atomic clusters is analysed in detail for Morse pair potentials with different ranges; here, we have used Morse potentials with four different ranges, from long- ρ = 3) to short-ranged ρ = 14) interactions. Specifically, we study the efficacy of the method in discovering low-energy structures, including the putative global minimum, as a function of the potential range and the cluster size. A new global minimum structure for long-ranged ρ = 3) Morse potential at the cluster size of n= 240 is reported. The present results are useful to assess the maximum cluster size for each type of interaction where the global minimum can be discovered with a limited number of big-bang trials. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Migration of Single Iridium Atoms and Tri-iridium Clusters on MgO Surfaces. Aberration-Corrected STEM Imaging and ab-initio Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chang W. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Iddir, Hakim [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Uzun, Alper [Koc Univ., Instanbul (Turkey); Curtiss, Larry A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Browning, Nigel D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gates, Bruce C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Ortalan, Volkan [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-11-06

    To address the challenge of fast, direct atomic-scale visualization of the diffusion of atoms and clusters on surfaces, we used aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with high scan speeds (as little as ~0.1 s per frame) to visualize the diffusion of (1) a heavy atom (Ir) on the surface of a support consisting of light atoms, MgO(100), and (2) an Ir3 cluster on MgO(110). Sequential Z-contrast images elucidate the diffusion mechanisms, including the hopping of Ir1 and the rotational migration of Ir3 as two Ir atoms remain anchored to the surface. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provided estimates of the diffusion energy barriers and binding energies of the iridium species to the surfaces. The results show how the combination of fast-scan STEM and DFT calculations allow real-time visualization and fundamental understanding of surface diffusion phenomena pertaining to supported catalysts and other materials.

  1. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  2. From average to local structure: a Rietveld and an atomic pair distribution function (PDF) study of selenium clusters in zeolite-NdY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeykoon, A M Milinda; Donner, Wolfgang; Brunelli, Michela; Castro-Colin, Miguel; Jacobson, Allan J; Moss, Simon C

    2009-09-23

    The structure of Se particles in the approximately 13 A diameter alpha-cages of zeolite NdY has been determined by Rietveld refinement and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of X-ray data. With the diffuse scattering subtracted an average structure comprised of an undistorted framework containing nanoclusters of 20 Se atoms is observed. The intracluster correlations and the cluster-framework correlations which give rise to diffuse scattering were modeled by using PDF analysis.

  3. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-08-26

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in irradiated materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1.0a0 to 3.3a0 have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomic level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a0 by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.

  4. The Effect of Indium Content on the Atomic Environment and Cluster Stability of GeSe4Inx=10,15 Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios S. E. Antipas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The atomic environments of two chalcogenide glasses, with compositions GeSe4In10 and GeSe4In15, were studied via Reverse Monte Carlo and Density Functional Theory. Indium content demoted Ge–Se bonding in favor of Se-In while the contribution of Se–Se in the first coordination shell order was faint. Upon transition to the richer In glass, there was formation of rich Ge-centered clusters at radial distances further than 4 Å from the RMC box center, which was taken to signify a reduction of Ge–Se interactions. Cluster coordination by Se promoted stability while, very conclusively, In coordination lowered cluster stability by intervening in the Ge–Se and Se–Se networks.

  5. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on small aluminum oxide clusters: Role of the local atomic environment and charge state on the oxidation of the CO molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ornelas-Lizcano, J. C.; Guirado-López, R. A., E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Física “Manuel Sandoval Vallarta,” Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Alvaro Obregón 64, 78000 San Luis Potosí, México (Mexico)

    2015-03-28

    We present extensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations dedicated to analyze the adsorption behavior of CO molecules on small Al{sub x}O{sub y}{sup ±} clusters. Following the experimental results of Johnson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 112, 4732 (2008)], we consider structures having the bulk composition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as smaller Al{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O units. Our electron affinity and total energy calculations are consistent with aluminum oxide clusters having two-dimensional rhombus-like structures. In addition, interconversion energy barriers between two- and one-dimensional atomic arrays are of the order of 1 eV, thus clearly defining the preferred isomers. Single CO adsorption on our charged Al{sub x}O{sub y}{sup ±} clusters exhibits, in general, spontaneous oxygen transfer events leading to the production of CO{sub 2} in line with the experimental data. However, CO can also bind to both Al and O atoms of the clusters forming aluminum oxide complexes with a CO{sub 2} subunit. The vibrational spectra of Al{sub x}O{sub y} + CO{sub 2} provides well defined finger prints that may allow the identification of specific isomers. The Al{sub x}O{sub y}{sup +} clusters are more reactive than the anionic species and the final Al{sub 2}O{sup +} + CO reaction can result in the production of atomic Al and carbon dioxide as observed from experiments. We underline the crucial role played by the local atomic environment, charge density distribution, and spin-multiplicity on the oxidation behavior of CO molecules. Finally, we analyze the importance of coadsorption and finite temperature effects by performing DFT Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Our calculations show that CO oxidation on Al{sub x}O{sub y}{sup +} clusters can be also promoted by the binding of additional CO species at 300 K, revealing the existence of fragmentation processes in line with the ones experimentally inferred.

  6. Computational evaluation of sub-nanometer cluster activity of singly exposed copper atom with various coordinative environment in catalytic CO2 transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Ramasamy; Thamaraichelvan, Arunachalam; Ganesan, Tharumeya Kuppusamy; Viswanathan, Balasubramanian

    2017-02-01

    Metal cluster, at sub-nanometer level has a unique property in the activation of small molecules, in contrast to that of bulk surface. In the present work, singly exposed active site of copper metal cluster at sub-nanometer level was designed to arrive at the energy minimised configurations, binding energy, electrostatic potential map, frontier molecular orbitals and partial density of states. The ab initio molecular dynamics was carried out to probe the catalytic nature of the cluster. Further, the stability of the metal cluster and its catalytic activity in the electrochemical reduction of CO2 to CO were evaluated by means of computational hydrogen electrode via calculation of the free energy profile using DFT/B3LYP level of theory in vacuum. The activity of the cluster is ascertained from the fact that the copper atom, present in a two coordinative environment, performs a more selective conversion of CO2 to CO at an applied potential of -0.35 V which is comparatively lower than that of higher coordinative sites. The present study helps to design any sub-nano level metal catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 to various value added chemicals.

  7. Chemical inhomogeneity in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and ZnO. A HRTEM study on atomic scale clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, T.P.

    2008-10-08

    Nanostructuration as well as the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles pervades the development of modern materials and devices. Quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is currently being developed for a structural and chemical analysis at an atomic scale. It is used in this thesis to study the chemical inhomogeneity and clustering in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N, InN and ZnO. A methodology for reliable quantitative HRTEM is rst de ned: it necessitates a damage free sample, the avoidance of electron beam damage and the control of microscope instabilities. With these conditions satis ed, the reliability of quantitative HRTEM is demonstrated by an accurate measurement of lattice relaxation in a thin TEM sample. Clustering in an alloy can then be distinguished from a random distribution of atoms. In In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N for instance, clustering is detected for concentrations x>0.1. The sensitivity is insufficient to determine whether clustering is present for lower concentrations. HRTEM allows to identify the amplitude and the spatial distribution of the decomposition which is attributed to a spinodal decomposition. In InN, nanometer scale metallic indium inclusions are detected. With decreasing size of the metallic clusters, the photoluminescence of the sample shifts towards the infrared. This indicates that the inclusions may be responsible for the infrared activity of InN. Finally, ZnO grown homoepitaxially on zinc-face and oxygen-face substrates is studied. The O-face epilayer is strained whereas the Zn-face epilayer is almost strain free and has a higher crystalline quality. Quantitative analysis of exit wave phases is in good agreement with simulations, but the signal to noise ratio needs to be improved for the detection of single point defects. (orig.)

  8. Study of atomic clusters in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel surveillance samples by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammelli, S. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gauss-Str. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)], E-mail: Sebastiano.cammelli@psi.ch; Degueldre, C.; Kuri, G.; Bertsch, J. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R. [Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gauss-Str. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2009-03-31

    Copper and nickel impurities in nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel can form nano-clusters, which have a strong impact on the ductile-brittle transition temperature of the material. Thus, for control purposes and simulation of long irradiation times, surveillance samples are submitted to enhanced neutron irradiation. In this work, surveillance samples from a Swiss nuclear power plant were investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). The density of Cu and Ni atoms determined in the first and second shells around the absorber is affected by the irradiation and temperature. The comparison of the EXAFS data at Cu and Ni K-edges shows that these elements reside in arrangements similar to bcc Fe. However, the EXAFS analysis reveals local irradiation damage in the form of vacancy fractions, which can be determined with a precision of {approx}5%. There are indications that the formation of Cu and Ni clusters differs significantly.

  9. On the size and structure of helium snowballs formed around charged atoms and clusters of noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2014-09-18

    Helium nanodroplets doped with argon, krypton, or xenon are ionized by electrons and analyzed in a mass spectrometer. HenNgx(+) ions containing up to seven noble gas (Ng) atoms and dozens of helium atoms are identified; the high resolution of the mass spectrometer combined with advanced data analysis make it possible to unscramble contributions from isotopologues that have the same nominal mass but different numbers of helium or Ng atoms, such as the magic He20(84)Kr2(+) and the isobaric, nonmagic He41(84)Kr(+). Anomalies in these ion abundances reveal particularly stable ions; several intriguing patterns emerge. Perhaps most astounding are the results for HenAr(+), which show evidence for three distinct, solid-like solvation shells containing 12, 20, and 12 helium atoms. This observation runs counter to the common notion that only the first solvation shell is solid-like but agrees with calculations by Galli et al. for HenNa(+) [J. Phys. Chem. A 2011, 115, 7300] that reveal three shells of icosahedral symmetry. HenArx(+) (2 ≤ x ≤ 7) ions appear to be especially stable if they contain a total of n + x = 19 atoms. A sequence of anomalies in the abundance distribution of HenKrx(+) suggests that rings of six helium atoms are inserted into the solvation shell each time a krypton atom is added to the ionic core, from Kr(+) to Kr3(+). Previously reported strong anomalies at He12Kr2(+) and He12Kr3(+) [Kim , J. H.; et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124, 214301] are attributed to a contamination. Only minor local anomalies appear in the distributions of HenXex(+) (x ≤ 3). The distributions of HenKr(+) and HenXe(+) show strikingly similar, broad features that are absent from the distribution of HenAr(+); differences are tentatively ascribed to the very different fragmentation dynamics of these ions.

  10. Computational evaluation of sub-nanometer cluster activity of singly exposed copper atom with various coordinative environment in catalytic CO{sub 2} transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, Ramasamy [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College, Madurai, Tamilnadu 625 009 (India); National Center for Catalysis Research, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, Tamilnadu 600 036 (India); Thamaraichelvan, Arunachalam [Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chettinad Hospital & Research Institute, Kelambakkam, Tamilnadu 603 103 (India); Ganesan, Tharumeya Kuppusamy [Department of Chemistry, The American College, Madurai, Tamilnadu 625 002 (India); Viswanathan, Balasubramanian, E-mail: bvnathan@iitm.ac.in [National Center for Catalysis Research, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, Tamilnadu 600 036 (India)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • On interaction with adsorbate CO{sub 2,} the adsorbent changes its configuration around the metal. • Electron transfer is faster in low coordinative environment of Cu. • CO formation is more favorable on Cu sites with even coordination number. • Cu at coordination number two has a over potential of −0.35 V. - Abstract: Metal cluster, at sub-nanometer level has a unique property in the activation of small molecules, in contrast to that of bulk surface. In the present work, singly exposed active site of copper metal cluster at sub-nanometer level was designed to arrive at the energy minimised configurations, binding energy, electrostatic potential map, frontier molecular orbitals and partial density of states. The ab initio molecular dynamics was carried out to probe the catalytic nature of the cluster. Further, the stability of the metal cluster and its catalytic activity in the electrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} to CO were evaluated by means of computational hydrogen electrode via calculation of the free energy profile using DFT/B3LYP level of theory in vacuum. The activity of the cluster is ascertained from the fact that the copper atom, present in a two coordinative environment, performs a more selective conversion of CO{sub 2} to CO at an applied potential of −0.35 V which is comparatively lower than that of higher coordinative sites. The present study helps to design any sub-nano level metal catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} to various value added chemicals.

  11. Structures of Mn clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The geometries of several Mn clusters in the size range Mn13–Mn23 are studied via the generalized gradient approximation to density functional theory. For the 13- and 19-atom clusters, the icosahedral structures are found to be most stable, while for the 15-atom cluster, the bcc structure is more favoured.

  12. Structures of Mn clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The geometries of several Mn clusters in the size range Mn13–Mn23 are studied via the generalized gradient approximation to density functional theory. For the 13- and 19-atom clusters, the icosahedral struc- tures are found to be most stable, while for the 15-atom cluster, the bcc structure is more favoured.

  13. CMOS-compatible dense arrays of Ge quantum dots on the Si(001 surface: hut cluster nucleation, atomic structure and array life cycle during UHV MBE growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arapkina Larisa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a direct observation of Ge hut nucleation on Si(001 during UHV molecular beam epitaxy at 360°C. Nuclei of pyramids and wedges were observed on the wetting layer (WL (M × N patches starting from the coverage of 5.1 Å and found to have different structures. Atomic models of nuclei of both hut species have been built as well as models of the growing clusters. The growth of huts of each species has been demonstrated to follow generic scenarios. The formation of the second atomic layer of a wedge results in rearrangement of its first layer. Its ridge structure does not repeat the nucleus. A pyramid grows without phase transitions. A structure of its vertex copies the nucleus. Transitions between hut species turned out to be impossible. The wedges contain point defects in the upper corners of the triangular faces and have preferential growth directions along the ridges. The derived structure of the {105} facet follows the paired dimer model. Further growth of hut arrays results in domination of wedges, and the density of pyramids exponentially drops. The second generation of huts arises at coverages >10 Å; new huts occupy the whole WL at coverages ~14 Å. Nanocrystalline Ge 2D layer begins forming at coverages >14 Å.

  14. Structure stability and spectroscopy of metal clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    Theory based on self-consistent field-linear combinations of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital theory was applied to clusters. Four areas were covered: electronic structure, equilibrium geometries, and stability of charged clusters, interaction of metal clusters with H and halogen atoms, thermal stability of isolated clusters, and stability and optical properties of hetero-atomic clusters. (DLC)

  15. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame, E-mail: Aroumougame.Asaithamy@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Chen, David J., E-mail: David.Chen@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., {gamma}- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure.

  16. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J

    2011-06-03

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., γ- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cluster fusion algorithm: application to Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2006-01-01

    We present a new general theoretical framework for modelling the cluster structure and apply it to description of the Lennard-Jones clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing...... paths up to the cluster size of 150 atoms. We demonstrate that in this way all known global minima structures of the Lennard-Jones clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence...... for the clusters of noble gas atoms and compare it with experimental observations. We report the striking correspondence of the peaks in the dependence of the second derivative of the binding energy per atom on cluster size calculated for the chain of the Lennard-Jones clusters based on the icosahedral symmetry...

  18. Modelling the Energetics of Encapsulation of Atoms and Atomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    2015-07-04

    Jul 4, 2015 ... Modelling the Energetics of Encapsulation of. Atoms and Atomic Clusters into Carbon. Nanotubes: Insights from Analytical Approaches. R. S. Swathi. School of Chemistry. Indian Institute of Science Education and Research. Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India ...

  19. Structure and properties of atomic nanoclusters

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, Julio A

    2005-01-01

    Atomic clusters are the bridge between molecules and the bulk matter. Following two key experiments - the observation of electronic shells in metallic clusters and the discovery of the C60 fullerence - the field of atomic clusters has experienced a rapid growth, and is now considered a mature field. The electrons of the cluster are confined to a small volume, hence, quantum effects are manifested on many properties of the clusters. Another interesting feature is that the properties often change in a non-smooth way as the number of atoms in the cluster increases. This book provides an updated overview of the field, and presents a detailed description of the structure and electronic properties of different types of clusters: Van der Waals clusters, metallic clusters, clusters of ionic materials and network clusters. The assembling of clusters is also considered, since specially stable clusters are expected to play a role in the future design and synthesis of new materials.

  20. Structure stability and spectroscopy of metal clusters. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    Theory based on self-consistent field-linear combinations of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital theory was applied to clusters. Four areas were covered: electronic structure, equilibrium geometries, and stability of charged clusters, interaction of metal clusters with H and halogen atoms, thermal stability of isolated clusters, and stability and optical properties of hetero-atomic clusters. (DLC)

  1. Extending DFT-based genetic algorithms by atom-to-place re-assignment via perturbation theory: A systematic and unbiased approach to structures of mixed-metallic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigend, Florian, E-mail: florian.weigend@kit.edu [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Abteilung für Theoretische Chemie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Fritz-Haber-Weg 2, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany and Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-10-07

    Energy surfaces of metal clusters usually show a large variety of local minima. For homo-metallic species the energetically lowest can be found reliably with genetic algorithms, in combination with density functional theory without system-specific parameters. For mixed-metallic clusters this is much more difficult, as for a given arrangement of nuclei one has to find additionally the best of many possibilities of assigning different metal types to the individual positions. In the framework of electronic structure methods this second issue is treatable at comparably low cost at least for elements with similar atomic number by means of first-order perturbation theory, as shown previously [F. Weigend, C. Schrodt, and R. Ahlrichs, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 10380 (2004)]. In the present contribution the extension of a genetic algorithm with the re-assignment of atom types to atom sites is proposed and tested for the search of the global minima of PtHf{sub 12} and [LaPb{sub 7}Bi{sub 7}]{sup 4−}. For both cases the (putative) global minimum is reliably found with the extended technique, which is not the case for the “pure” genetic algorithm.

  2. Cool Cluster Correctly Correlated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varganov, Sergey Aleksandrovich [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Atomic clusters are unique objects, which occupy an intermediate position between atoms and condensed matter systems. For a long time it was thought that physical and chemical properties of atomic dusters monotonically change with increasing size of the cluster from a single atom to a condensed matter system. However, recently it has become clear that many properties of atomic clusters can change drastically with the size of the clusters. Because physical and chemical properties of clusters can be adjusted simply by changing the cluster's size, different applications of atomic clusters were proposed. One example is the catalytic activity of clusters of specific sizes in different chemical reactions. Another example is a potential application of atomic clusters in microelectronics, where their band gaps can be adjusted by simply changing cluster sizes. In recent years significant advances in experimental techniques allow one to synthesize and study atomic clusters of specified sizes. However, the interpretation of the results is often difficult. The theoretical methods are frequently used to help in interpretation of complex experimental data. Most of the theoretical approaches have been based on empirical or semiempirical methods. These methods allow one to study large and small dusters using the same approximations. However, since empirical and semiempirical methods rely on simple models with many parameters, it is often difficult to estimate the quantitative and even qualitative accuracy of the results. On the other hand, because of significant advances in quantum chemical methods and computer capabilities, it is now possible to do high quality ab-initio calculations not only on systems of few atoms but on clusters of practical interest as well. In addition to accurate results for specific clusters, such methods can be used for benchmarking of different empirical and semiempirical approaches. The atomic clusters studied in this work contain from a few atoms

  3. Enhancement of soft X-ray emission from fs laser plasma by using mixture of molecule and atomic gases as cluster jet targets and its application for nanostructure imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikuz, T A; Faenov, A Ya; Fukuda, Y; Kando, M; Kotaki, H; Daito, I; Homma, T; Kawase, K; Kameshima, T; Kawachi, T; Bolton, P; Daido, H; Kimura, T; Tajima, T; Kato, Y; Bulanov, S V [Kansai Photon Science Institute (KPSI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Kizugawa-city, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Skobelev, I Yu; Gasilov, S V [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Boldarev, A S; Gasilov, V A, E-mail: faenov.anatoly@jaea.go.j [Institute for Mathematical Modelling, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-04-01

    Submicron scale clusters, produced by mixture of molecular (CO{sub 2}) and atomic (He) gases expanding from the specifically designed super-sonic nozzle, have been irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses in order to build up a bright debris-free soft X-ray source. Spectroscopy measurements showed that X-ray flux in the strongest oxygen spectral lines (He{sub b}eta at 665.7 eV and L{sub ya}lpha at 653.7 eV) produced by the plasma from gas mixture clusters is 2-8 times larger than in the case of using pure CO{sub 2} or N{sub 2}O clusters as targets and reaches values about 2.8x10{sup 10} ph/(sr centre dot pulse). Lines intensity and spatial dimension were measured from two observation point - along and perpendicular to the laser beam propagation directions. Images of 100 nm thick Mo foils in a wide field of view (cm{sup 2} scale) with high spatial resolution (700 nm) were obtained using LiF crystals as soft X-ray imaging detectors. Agreement between calculated and measured intensity of the image fragment which illustrates overlapping of Mo foil layers confirms accuracy of the plasma parameters measurements.

  4. Cross section measurements of the processes occurring in the fragmentation of H{sub n}{sup +} (3 {<=} n {<=} 35) hydrogen clusters induced by high speed (60 keV/u) collisions on helium atoms; Mesure des sections efficaces des differents processus intervenant dans la fragmentation d`agregats d`hydrogene H{sub n}{sup +} (3 {<=} n {<=} 35) induite par collision a haute vitesse (60 keV/u) sur un atome d`helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louc, Sandrine [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-09-15

    Different processes involved in the fragmentation of ionised hydrogen clusters H{sub 3} + (H{sub 2}){sub (n-3)/2} (n = 5-35) have been studied in the same experiment: the fragmentation of the cluster is induced by the collision with an helium atom at high velocity ({approx_equal} c/100). The collision is realised in reversed kinematic - clusters are accelerated - which allows the detection of neutral and charged fragments. The different channels of fragmentation are identified by using coincidence techniques. For all the cluster sizes studied the capture cross sections of one electron of the target by the cluster is equal to the capture cross section of the H{sub 3}{sup +} ion. In the same way, the dissociation cross section of the H{sub 3}{sup +} core of the cluster does not depend on cluster size. These fragmentation processes are due to the interaction of H{sub 3}{sup +} core of the cluster and the helium atom without ionization of another component of the cluster. On the contrary, the cross sections of loss of one, two and three molecules by the cluster and the dissociation cross section of the cluster in all its molecular components depends strongly on the cluster size. This dependence is different from the one measured for the metastable decay of the cluster. Thus, the process of loss of molecules induced by a collision should correspond to a different dissociation mechanism. In regard of the singularities observed for the size dependence, the H{sub 9}{sup +}, H{sub 15}{sup +}, H{sub 19}{sup +} and H{sub 29}{sup +} clusters could be the `core` of the biggest clusters. These observation are in agreement with the size effects of smaller magnitude observed for the dissociation cross section (all the processes). The values of the cross section for the process of at least one ionization of the cluster indicate that about 80% of the fragmentation events result from this process. (author) 114 refs., 74 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Oxidative atom-transfer to a trimanganese complex to form Mn6(μ6-E) (E = O, N) clusters featuring interstitial oxide and nitride functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fout, Alison R; Zhao, Qinliang; Xiao, Dianne J; Betley, Theodore A

    2011-10-26

    Utilizing a hexadentate ligand platform, a trinuclear manganese complex of the type ((H)L)Mn(3)(thf)(3) was synthesized and characterized ([(H)L](6-) = [MeC(CH(2)N(C(6)H(4)-o-NH))(3)](6-)). The pale-orange, formally divalent trimanganese complex rapidly reacts with O-atom transfer reagents to afford the μ(6)-oxo complex ((H)L)(2)Mn(6)(μ(6)-O)(NCMe)(4), where two trinuclear subunits bind the central O-atom and the ((H)L) ligands cooperatively bind both trinuclear subunits. The trimanganese complex ((H)L)Mn(3)(thf)(3) rapidly consumes inorganic azide ([N(3)]NBu(4)) to afford a dianionic hexanuclear nitride complex [((H)L)(2)Mn(6)(μ(6)-N)](NBu(4))(2), which subsequently can be oxidized with elemental iodine to ((H)L)(2)Mn(6)(μ(6)-N)(NCMe)(4). EPR and alkylation of the interstitial light atom substituent were used to distinguish the nitride from the oxo complex. The oxo and oxidized nitride complexes give rise to well-defined Mn(II) and Mn(III) sites, determined by bond valence summation, while the dianionic nitride shows a more symmetric complex, giving rise to indistinguishable ion oxidation states based on crystal structure bond metrics.

  6. Introduction to cluster dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhard, Paul-Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Clusters as mesoscopic particles represent an intermediate state of matter between single atoms and solid material. The tendency to miniaturise technical objects requires knowledge about systems which contain a ""small"" number of atoms or molecules only. This is all the more true for dynamical aspects, particularly in relation to the qick development of laser technology and femtosecond spectroscopy. Here, for the first time is a highly qualitative introduction to cluster physics. With its emphasis on cluster dynamics, this will be vital to everyone involved in this interdisciplinary subje

  7. Coupled cluster calculations of mean excitation energies of the noble gas atoms He, Ne and Ar and of the H2 molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Haq, Inam Ul; Sabin, John R.; Oddershede, Jens; Christiansen, Ove; Coriani, Sonia

    2014-03-01

    Using an asymmetric Lanczos chain algorithm for the calculation of the coupled cluster linear response functions at the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) and coupled cluster singles and approximate iterative doubles (CC2) levels of approximation, we have calculated the mean excitation energies of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar, and of the hydrogen molecule (H2). Convergence with respect to the one-electron basis set was investigated in detail for families of correlation-consistent basis sets including both augmentation and core-valence functions. We find that the electron correlation effects at the CCSD level change the mean excitation energies obtained at the uncorrelated Hartree-Fock level by about 1%. For the two-electron systems He and H2, our CCSD results (for a Lanczos chain length equal to the full excitation space), I0 = 42.28 eV (helium) and I0 = 19.62 eV (H2), correspond to full configuration interaction results and are therefore the exact, non-relativistic theoretical values for the mean excitation energy of these two systems within the Bethe theory for the chosen basis set and, in the case of H2, at the experimental equilibrium geometry.

  8. Interaction of carbon with vacancy and self-interstitial atom clusters in {alpha}-iron studied using metallic-covalent interatomic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terentyev, Dmitry, E-mail: dterenty@sckcen.b [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna [Department Matematica Aplicada III, E.T.S. Enginyeria de Camins, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Jansson, Ville [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014, Helsinki 00014 (Finland); Khater, Hassan [Department Matematica Aplicada III, E.T.S. Enginyeria de Camins, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Bonny, Giovanni [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2011-01-31

    The presence of even small amount of carbon interstitial impurity affects properties of Fe and Fe-based ferritic alloys. From earlier experiments it follows that carbon exhibits considerably strong interaction with lattice defects and therefore influences their mobility, hence affecting the evolution of the microstructure under irradiation. This work is dedicated to understanding the interaction of carbon-vacancy complexes with glissile dislocation loops, which form in Fe, Fe-based alloys and ferritic steels under irradiation. We apply large scale atomistic simulations coupled with the so-called 'metallic-covalent bonding' interatomic model for the Fe-C system, known to be the most consistent interatomic model available today. With these techniques we have studied (i) the stability of vacancy-carbon clusters; (ii) the interaction of octahedral carbon with 1/2<1 1 1> loops; (iii) possibility of the dynamic drag of carbon by 1/2<1 1 1> loops and (iv) the interaction of 1/2<1 1 1> loops with the most stable vacancy-carbon clusters expected to occur under irradiation. Finally, we have shown that carbon-vacancy complexes act as strong traps for 1/2<1 1 1> loops.

  9. Imaging with Mass Spectrometry: A SIMS and VUV-Photoionization Study of Ion-Sputtered Atoms and Clusters from GaAs and Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Lynelle; Zhou, Jia; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-12-05

    A new mass spectrometry surface imaging method is presented in which ion-sputtered neutrals are postionized by wavelength-tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light from a synchrotron source. Mass spectra and signal counts of the photoionized neutrals from GaAs (100) and Au are compared to those of the secondary ions. While clusters larger than dimers are more efficiently detected as secondary ions, certain species, such as As2, Au and Au2, are more efficiently detected through the neutral channel. Continuously tuning the photon wavelength allows photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves to be obtained for sputtered Asm (m=1,2) and Aun (n=1-4). From the observed ionization thresholds, sputtered neutral As and Au show no clear evidence of electronic excitation, while neutral clusters have photoionization onsets shifted to lower energies by ~;;0.3 eV. These shifts are attributed to unresolved vibrational and rotational excitations. High-spatial resolution chemical imaging with synchrotron VUV postionization is demonstrated at two different photon energies using a copper TEM grid embedded in indium. The resulting images are used to illustrate the use of tunable VUV light for verifying mass peak assignments by exploiting the unique wavelength-dependent PIE of each sputtered neutral species. This capability is valuable for identifying compounds when imaging chemically complex systems with mass spectrometry-based techniques.

  10. Harmonic generation in laser-produced plasmas containing atoms, ions and clusters: a review. JMO Series: Attosecond and Strong Field Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    A review of studies of the high-order harmonic generation of laser radiation in laser-produced plasma revealed recent developments in this field. These include new approaches in application of two-colour pumps, generation of extremely broadened harmonics, further developments in harmonic generation in clusters (fullerenes, carbon nanotubes), destructive interference of harmonics from different emitters, new approaches in resonance-induced enhancement of harmonics, applications of high pulse repetition rate lasers for the enhancement of average power of generating harmonics and observation of quantum path signatures, etc. We show that this method of frequency conversion of laser radiation towards the extreme ultraviolet range became mature during multiple sets of studies carried out in many laboratories worldwide and demonstrated new approaches in the generation of strong coherent short-wavelength radiation for various applications.

  11. Coupled cluster calculations of mean excitation energies of the noble gas atoms He, Ne and Ar and of the H2 molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Ul Haq, Inam; Sabin, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Using an asymmetric-Lanczos-chain algorithm for the calculation of the coupled cluster linear response functions at the CCSD and CC2 levels of approximation, we have calculated the mean excitation energies of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar, and of the hydrogen molecule H2. Convergence with respect...... by about 1%. For the two-electron systems He and H2, our CCSD results (for a Lanczos chain length equal to the full excitation space), I0 = 42:28 eV (Helium) and I0 = 19:62 eV (H2), correspond to full conguration interaction results and are therefore the exact, non-relativistic theoretical values...

  12. Gain narrowing in few-atom systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savels, T.; Savels, Tom; Mosk, Allard; Lagendijk, Aart

    2007-01-01

    Using a density matrix approach, we study the simplest systems that display both gain and feedback: clusters of 2 to 5 atoms, one of which is pumped. The other atoms supply feedback through multiple scattering of light. We show that, if the atoms are in each other's near field, the system exhibits

  13. From Atoms to Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-31

    Honea. M.L. Homer, J.L. Persson, R.L. Whetten , Chem. atoms Phys. Lett. 171 (1990) 147. [17] M.R. Hoare, Adv. Chem. Phys. 40 (1979) 49. Two types of...Persson, M.E. LaVilla, R.L. tal conditions, the clusters become rigid. Thereafter, Whetten , J. Phys. Chem. 93 (1989) 2869. each newly added atom condenses...106 (1981) 265. M. Broyer, Phys. Rev. A 39 (1989) 6056. [9] W. Ekardt, Ber. Bunsenges. Phys. Chem. 88 (1984) 289. [38] R.L. Whetten , private

  14. Structure of Silicon Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Jun; Bahel, Atul; Ramakrishna, Mushti V.

    1995-01-01

    We determined the structures of silicon clusters in the 11-14 atom size range using the tight-binding molecular dynamics method. These calculations reveal that \\Si{11} is an icosahedron with one missing cap, \\Si{12} is a complete icosahedron, \\Si{13} is a surface capped icosahedron, and \\Si{14} is a 4-4-4 layer structure with two caps. The characteristic feature of these clusters is that they are all surface.

  15. Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  16. Cancer Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Clusters On This Page What is a cancer cluster? ... the number of cancer cases in the suspected cluster Many reported clusters include too few cancer cases ...

  17. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  18. Metal Cluster Topology. 1. Osmium Carbonyl Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-29

    AD-A164 372 NETAL CLUSTER TOPOLOGY I OSNIUM CARDONYI. CLUSTERS(U) i ’ GEORGIA IiNIY ATHENS DEPT OF CHENISTRY R 8 KING UCr S 29 JAN 86 TR-15 NSSSI4-S5...to distinguish between globally delocalized (D) and edge-localized (L) polyhedra. Treatment of globally delocalized polyhedra leads clearly to the same...of five internal orbitals for two of the six vertex atoms will make the pair of edge-fused tetrahedra unfavorable except for some of the heavy

  19. Atomic bonding between metal and graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2013-03-07

    To understand structural and chemical properties of metal-graphene composites, it is crucial to unveil the chemical bonding along the interface. We provide direct experimental evidence of atomic bonding between typical metal nano structures and graphene, agreeing well with density functional theory studies. Single Cr atoms are located in the valleys of a zigzag edge, and few-atom ensembles preferentially form atomic chains by self-assembly. Low migration barriers lead to rich dynamics of metal atoms and clusters under electron irradiation. We demonstrate no electron-instigated interaction between Cr clusters and pristine graphene, though Cr has been reported to be highly reactive to graphene. The metal-mediated etching is a dynamic effect between metal clusters and pre-existing defects. The resolved atomic configurations of typical nano metal structures on graphene offer insight into modeling and simulations on properties of metal-decorated graphene for both catalysis and future carbon-based electronics. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  20. Alkali clusters: beyond the jellium sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, L. (Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza (Italy)); Bachelet, G.B. (Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza (Italy)); Giai, N.V. (Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza (Italy)); Lipparini, E. (Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    Ionic pseudohamiltonians, which replace core electrons in atomic calculations, are used to build a new jellium-like model which describes electronic ground state and excitation properties of atomic clusters. As an application, we successfully describe the plasmon resonance in Lithium, Sodium, and Potassium clusters with little additional effort and considerable improvement over the conventional jellium model. (orig.).

  1. Cu cluster shell structure at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole Bøssing; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1991-01-01

    Equilibrium structures of small (3–29)-atom Cu clusters are determined by simulated annealing, and finite-temperature ensembles are simulated by Monte Carlo techniques using the effective-medium theory for the energy calculation. Clusters with 8, 18, and 20 atoms are found to be particularly stab...

  2. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  3. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  4. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B. (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  5. Exotic objects of atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletskii, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    There has been presented a short survey of physical properties, methods of production and exploration as well as directions of practical usage of the objects of atomic physics which are not yet described in detail in modern textbooks and manuals intended for students of technical universities. The family of these objects includes negative and multicharged ions, Rydberg atoms, excimer molecules, clusters. Besides of that, in recent decades this family was supplemented with new nanocarbon structures such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The textbook “Exotic objects of atomic physics” [1] edited recently contains some information on the above-listed objects of the atomic physics. This textbook can be considered as a supplement to classic courses of atomic physics teaching in technical universities.

  6. Cluster growing process and a sequence of magic numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2003-01-01

    demonstrate that in this way all known global minimum structures of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence for the clusters of noble gas atoms...

  7. Photoabsorption of small sodium and magnesium clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2004-01-01

    We predict the strong enhancement in the photoabsorption of small Mg clusters in the region of 4-5 eV due to the resonant excitation of the plasmon oscillations of cluster electrons. The photoabsorption spectra for neutral Mg clusters consisting of up to N=11 atoms have been calculated using it a...

  8. Optical response of small magnesium clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2004-01-01

    We predict strong enhancement in the photoabsorption of small Mg clusters in the region of 4–5 eV due to the resonant excitation of the plasmon oscillations of cluster electrons. Photoabsorption spectra for neutral Mg clusters consisting of up to N = 11 atoms have been calculated using an ab init...

  9. Star clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieles, M.

    2006-01-01

    Star clusters are observed in almost every galaxy. In this thesis we address several fundamental problems concerning the formation, evolution and disruption of star clusters. From observations of (young) star clusters in the interacting galaxy M51, we found that clusters are formed in complexes of

  10. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clustering problem, considering clustering tasks in which different instances may have different weights.We conduct the first extensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in both...... the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  11. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  12. Cluster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, R

    1992-11-01

    Cluster management is a management model that fosters decentralization of management, develops leadership potential of staff, and creates ownership of unit-based goals. Unlike shared governance models, there is no formal structure created by committees and it is less threatening for managers. There are two parts to the cluster management model. One is the formation of cluster groups, consisting of all staff and facilitated by a cluster leader. The cluster groups function for communication and problem-solving. The second part of the cluster management model is the creation of task forces. These task forces are designed to work on short-term goals, usually in response to solving one of the unit's goals. Sometimes the task forces are used for quality improvement or system problems. Clusters are groups of not more than five or six staff members, facilitated by a cluster leader. A cluster is made up of individuals who work the same shift. For example, people with job titles who work days would be in a cluster. There would be registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, nursing assistants, and unit clerks in the cluster. The cluster leader is chosen by the manager based on certain criteria and is trained for this specialized role. The concept of cluster management, criteria for choosing leaders, training for leaders, using cluster groups to solve quality improvement issues, and the learning process necessary for manager support are described.

  13. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdobintsev, P Yu; Rakcheeva, L P; Murashov, S V; Melnikov, A S; Lyubchik, S; Timofeev, N A; Pastor, A A; Khodorkovskii, M A

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  14. Atomic Power

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atomic Power. By Denis Taylor: Dr. Taylor was formerly Chief UNESCO Advisor at the University. College, Nairobi, Kenya and is now Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Uni- versity of ... method of producing radioactive isotopes, which are materials .... the sealing and the pressure balancing, all can be carried out ...

  15. Cluster Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re at risk of cluster headache. A family history. Having a parent or sibling who has had cluster headache might increase your risk. By Mayo Clinic Staff . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  16. Cluster Headache

    OpenAIRE

    Bergseng, Marta Næss

    1985-01-01

    Cluster headache is the most severe primary headache with recurrent pain attacks described as worse than giving birth. The aim of this paper was to make an overview of current knowledge on cluster headache with a focus on pathophysiology and treatment. This paper presents hypotheses of cluster headache pathophysiology, current treatment options and possible future therapy approaches. For years, the hypothalamus was regarded as the key structure in cluster headache, but is now thought to be pa...

  17. Fusion process of Lennard-Jones clusters: global minima and magic numbers formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2004-01-01

    We present a new theoretical framework for modeling the fusion process of Lennard–Jones (LJ) clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing paths up to the cluster size of 150 atoms...

  18. Enhanced high-order harmonic generation from Argon-clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, Yin; Hagmeijer, Rob; Bastiaens, Hubertus M.J.; Goh, S.J.; van der Slot, P.J.M.; Biedron, S.; Milton, S.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2017-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) in clusters is of high promise because clusters appear to offer an increased optical nonlinearity. We experimentally investigate HHG from Argon clusters in a supersonic gas jet that can generate monomer-cluster mixtures with varying atomic number density and

  19. Meaningful Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  20. Clusters distributions on charges and dimensions at ion metal sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Matveev, V I

    2001-01-01

    The theory on the metal sputtering in form of large (with the atoms number N >= 5) neutral and charged clusters under the impact of the ion bombardment is considered. The probability of the cluster emission, consisting of the N atoms, is calculated on the basis of the Einstein model. The charge state of the cluster, consisting of the N atoms, is determined. The obtained formulae agree well with the experimental results. It is noted, that the mass-spectra of the neutral clusters slightly depend on the target temperature, whereas the mass-spectra of the single charge clusters essentially depend on the target temperature

  1. Atomic arias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  2. Atomic rivals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  3. About the Clusters Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Innovation Clusters Program advises cluster organizations, encourages collaboration between clusters, tracks U.S. environmental technology clusters, and connects EPA programs to cluster needs.

  4. Formation of global energy minimim structures in the growth process of Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Koshelev, Andrey; Shutovich, Andrey

    2003-01-01

    We present a new theoretical framework for modelling the cluster growing process. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing paths up to the cluster sizes of 150 atoms. We demonstrate t...... for the clusters of noble gases atoms. Our method serves an efficient alternative to the global optimization techniques based on the Monte-Carlo simulations and it can be applied for the solution of a broad variety of problems in which atomic cluster structure is important....

  5. Data Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  6. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Klimov; Guzatov, D. V.

    2007-01-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for a construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  7. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  8. Structure and properties of small sodium clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2002-01-01

    and the results of other theoretical work. We have systematically calculated the optimized geometries of neutral and singly charged sodium clusters having up to 20 atoms, their multipole moments (dipole and quadrupole), static polarizabilities, binding energies per atom, ionization potentials, and frequencies...

  9. clusters: density functional theory (DFT)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    contain contributions from the central atom by symmetry at the anion ground state geometry. The resulting RuF. −. 3 anion, thus, has a closed-shell structure and should be thermo- dynamically and electronically very stable. Table 1 shows energy difference for different multiplicities of neutral and anionic RuFn clusters.

  10. Re4As6S3, a thio-spinel-related cluster system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besnard, Celine; Svensson, Christer; Ståhl, Kenny

    2003-01-01

    . The rhenium atoms form tetrahedral clusters linked via tetrahedral arsenic clusters to produce an NaCl-type arrangement. The oxidation state of rhenium is IV and the number of electrons shared by the rhenium atoms in the cluster is 12. The structure is based on an ordered defect thio-spinel A((1-x))B(2)X(4......) where the B-type atoms form tetrahedral clusters....

  11. Theoretical Study of Ripening Mechanisms of Pd Clusters on Ceria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ya-Qiong; Liu, Jin-Xun; Filot, Ivo A W; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2017-11-14

    We carried out density functional theory calculations to investigate the ripening of Pd clusters on CeO2(111). Starting from stable Pd n clusters (n = 1-21), we compared how these clusters can grow through Ostwald ripening and coalescence. As Pd atoms have mobility higher than that of Pd n clusters on the CeO2(111) surface, Ostwald ripening is predicted to be the dominant sintering mechanism. Particle coalescence is possible only for clusters with less than 5 Pd atoms. These ripening mechanisms are facilitated by adsorbed CO through lowering barriers for the cluster diffusion, detachment of a Pd atom from clusters, and transformation of initial planar clusters.

  12. Pseudojellium model with an application to lithium clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Ll.; Bachelet, G. B.; van Giai, Nguyen; Lipparini, E.

    1993-11-01

    Ionic pseudo-Hamiltonians, which replace core electrons in atomic calculations, are used to build a jelliumlike model, which describes electronic ground state and excitation properties of atomic clusters. As an application, we successfully describe the plasmon resonance in lithium clusters for which recent rexperimental data have shown the failure of the conventional jellium model.

  13. Novel caged clusters of silicon: Fullerenes, Frank–Kasper ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. We review recent findings of metal (M) encapsulated caged clusters of Si and Ge obtained from computer experiments based on an ab initio pseudopotential method. It is shown that one M atom changes drastically the properties of Si and Ge clusters and that depending upon the size of the M atom, cages of 14,.

  14. Approximation Clustering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Approximation Clustering. Clustering within (1+ ε) of the optimum cost. ε is user defined tolerance. For metric spaces even approximating is. hard (below, say 30%). Euclidean k-median in fixed dimension can. be approximated in polynomial time.

  15. Comparative study of Ti and Ni clusters from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B; Lee, G W

    2007-08-20

    Icosahedral clusters in Ti and Ni are studied with first-principles density functional calculations. We find significant distortion on the Ti icosahedron caused by the strong interaction between surface atoms on the icosahedron but not between the center atom and surface atoms, whereas no such distortion is observed on Ni clusters. In addition, distortion becomes more severe when atoms are added to the Ti13 cluster resulting in short bonds. Such distorted icosahedra having short bonds are essentially to explain the structure factor of Ti liquid obtained in experiment.

  16. Cluster Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulati, Mukesh; Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Suresh, Sangeetha

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we investigate corporate social responsibility (CSR) in industrial clusters in the Indian context. We use the definition of CSR as given in the Indian Ministry of Corporate Affairs’ National Voluntary Guidelines (NVGs) for Business Responsibility: ‘the commitment of an enterprise...... sell their products successfully in international markets, but there is also an increasingly large consumer base within India. Indeed, Indian industrial clusters have contributed to a substantial part of this growth process, and there are several hundred registered clusters within the country....... At the same time, several attempts have been made at promoting the adoption of CSR in MSMEs in Indian industrial clusters. In fact, India has proved to be a kind of laboratory for experimenting with different types of cluster-based CSR and is thus an interesting location in relation to the broader aim...

  17. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  18. Electron motion enhanced high harmonic generation in xenon clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Na; Bai, Ya; Peng, Peng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-01-01

    Atomic clusters presents an isolated system that models the bulk materials whose mechanism of HHG remains uncertain, and a promising medium to produce HHG beyond the limited conversion efficiency for gaseous atoms. Here we reveal that the oscillation of collective electron motion within clusters develops after the interaction of intense laser fields, and it significantly enhances the harmonic dipole and increases the quantum phase of the harmonics. Experimentally, the phase matching conditions of HHG from nanometer xenon clusters and atoms are distinguished, which confirms the enhanced internal field that was proposed theoretically a decade ago. The separation of HHG from atoms and clusters allows the determination of the amplitude of the HHG for clusters to be 5 orders higher, corresponding to 4 times higher conversion efficiency for atomic response. The finding provides an insight on the HHG mechanism of bulk materials and a means by which an efficient coherent X-ray source can be developed.

  19. Quasi-planar elemental clusters in pair interactions approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chkhartishvili Levan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pair-interactions approximation, when applied to describe elemental clusters, only takes into account bonding between neighboring atoms. According to this approach, isomers of wrapped forms of 2D clusters – nanotubular and fullerene-like structures – and truly 3D clusters, are generally expected to be more stable than their quasi-planar counterparts. This is because quasi-planar clusters contain more peripheral atoms with dangling bonds and, correspondingly, fewer atoms with saturated bonds. However, the differences in coordination numbers between central and peripheral atoms lead to the polarization of bonds. The related corrections to the molar binding energy can make small, quasi-planar clusters more stable than their 2D wrapped allotropes and 3D isomers. The present work provides a general theoretical frame for studying the relative stability of small elemental clusters within the pair interactions approximation.

  20. Clustering Dycom

    KAUST Repository

    Minku, Leandro L.

    2017-10-06

    Background: Software Effort Estimation (SEE) can be formulated as an online learning problem, where new projects are completed over time and may become available for training. In this scenario, a Cross-Company (CC) SEE approach called Dycom can drastically reduce the number of Within-Company (WC) projects needed for training, saving the high cost of collecting such training projects. However, Dycom relies on splitting CC projects into different subsets in order to create its CC models. Such splitting can have a significant impact on Dycom\\'s predictive performance. Aims: This paper investigates whether clustering methods can be used to help finding good CC splits for Dycom. Method: Dycom is extended to use clustering methods for creating the CC subsets. Three different clustering methods are investigated, namely Hierarchical Clustering, K-Means, and Expectation-Maximisation. Clustering Dycom is compared against the original Dycom with CC subsets of different sizes, based on four SEE databases. A baseline WC model is also included in the analysis. Results: Clustering Dycom with K-Means can potentially help to split the CC projects, managing to achieve similar or better predictive performance than Dycom. However, K-Means still requires the number of CC subsets to be pre-defined, and a poor choice can negatively affect predictive performance. EM enables Dycom to automatically set the number of CC subsets while still maintaining or improving predictive performance with respect to the baseline WC model. Clustering Dycom with Hierarchical Clustering did not offer significant advantage in terms of predictive performance. Conclusion: Clustering methods can be an effective way to automatically generate Dycom\\'s CC subsets.

  1. Cluster analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Everitt, Brian S; Leese, Morven; Stahl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Cluster analysis comprises a range of methods for classifying multivariate data into subgroups. By organizing multivariate data into such subgroups, clustering can help reveal the characteristics of any structure or patterns present. These techniques have proven useful in a wide range of areas such as medicine, psychology, market research and bioinformatics.This fifth edition of the highly successful Cluster Analysis includes coverage of the latest developments in the field and a new chapter dealing with finite mixture models for structured data.Real life examples are used throughout to demons

  2. Sputtered Clusters from Niobium-Vanadium Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Hofer, W. O.

    1982-01-01

    A series of Nb&z.sbnd;V alloys have been irradiated by 6 keV argon ions. Homonuclear and heteronuclear clusters emitted from these alloys have been studied by means of post-ionization and/or secondary ion mass spectrometry. The intensity of clusters of atomic masses up to approximately 300 amu...... was related to the concentrations of Nb and V in the alloys. In addition, the behaviour of polyatomic cluster yields as a function of partial oxygen pressure was studied. At partial pressures larger than approximately 10 6Torr, the yields decreased with increasing partial pressures. By inclusion of the post......-ionized neutrals, the total secondary particle intensity was increased by a factor of 1.5 for clusters up to atomic masses of around 200 amu. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a varied surface topography with large differences from grain to grain for irradiated samples exposed for doses larger than 1018 atoms...

  3. Structure and stability of small H clusters on graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sljivancanin, Zeljko; Andersen, Mie; Hammer, Bjørk

    2011-01-01

    The structure and stability of small hydrogen clusters adsorbed on graphene is studied by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Clusters containing up to six H atoms are investigated systematically, with the clusters having either all H atoms on one side of the graphene sheet (cis......-clusters) or having the H atoms on both sides in an alternating manner (trans-clusters). The most stable cis-clusters found have H atoms in ortho- and para-positions with respect to each other (two H’s on neighboring or diagonally opposite carbon positions within one carbon hexagon), while the most stable trans......-clusters found have H atoms in ortho-trans-positions with respect to each other (two H’s on neighboring carbon positions, but on opposite sides of the graphene). Very stable trans-clusters with 13–22 H atoms were identified by optimizing the number of H atoms in ortho-trans-positions and thereby the number...

  4. Cluster editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böcker, S.; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The Cluster Editing problem asks to transform a graph into a disjoint union of cliques using a minimum number of edge modifications. Although the problem has been proven NP-complete several times, it has nevertheless attracted much research both from the theoretical and the applied side. The prob......The Cluster Editing problem asks to transform a graph into a disjoint union of cliques using a minimum number of edge modifications. Although the problem has been proven NP-complete several times, it has nevertheless attracted much research both from the theoretical and the applied side....... The problem has been the inspiration for numerous algorithms in bioinformatics, aiming at clustering entities such as genes, proteins, phenotypes, or patients. In this paper, we review exact and heuristic methods that have been proposed for the Cluster Editing problem, and also applications...

  5. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  6. Novel caged clusters of silicon: Fullerenes, Frank–Kasper ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These clusters show high stability and large highest occupied–lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO–LUMO) gaps which are likely to make these species strongly abundant. A regular icosahedral M@X12 cluster has also been obtained for X = Ge and Sn by doping a divalent M atom. Interactions between clusters are ...

  7. Engineering quantum hyperentangled states in atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Mehwish; -Islam, Rameez-ul; Abbas, Tasawar; Ikram, Manzoor

    2017-11-01

    Hyperentangled states have boosted many quantum informatics tasks tremendously due to their high information content per quantum entity. Until now, however, the engineering and manipulation of such states were limited to photonic systems only. In present article, we propose generating atomic hyperentanglement involving atomic internal states as well as atomic external momenta states. Hypersuperposition, hyperentangled cluster, Bell and Greenberger–Horne–Zeilinger states are engineered deterministically through resonant and off-resonant Bragg diffraction of neutral two-level atoms. Based on the characteristic parameters of the atomic Bragg diffraction, such as comparatively large interaction times and spatially well-separated outputs, such decoherence resistant states are expected to exhibit good overall fidelities and offer the evident benefits of full controllability, along with extremely high detection efficiency, over the counterpart photonic states comprised entirely of flying qubits.

  8. Teach us atom structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Suh Yeon

    2006-08-15

    This book is written to teach atom structure in very easy way. It is divided into nine chapters, which indicates what is the components of matter? when we divide matter continuously, it becomes atom, what did atom look like? particles comprised of matter is not only atom, discover of particles comprised of atom, symbol of element, various radiation, form alchemy to nuclear transmutation, shape of atom is evolving. It also has various pictures in each chapters to explain easily.

  9. Playing pinball with atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedi, Amirmehdi; van Houselt, Arie; van Gastel, Raoul; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Harold J W

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of controlling an atomic scale mechanical device by an external electrical signal. On a germanium substrate, a switching motion of pairs of atoms is induced by electrons that are directly injected into the atoms with a scanning tunneling microscope tip. By precisely controlling the tip current and distance we make two atom pairs behave like the flippers of an atomic-sized pinball machine. This atomic scale mechanical device exhibits six different configurations.

  10. Bussines Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmiza Pencea

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Clusters are complex economic structures in which similar companies, their up-stream and down-stream business partners, universities, research institutes, educational units, various service providers, diverse private and public institutions concentrate geografically, striving to get economies of agglomeration and scale, to capitalize on the resulting spill over effects, to cut costs, to better harness resources, to exchange information and experience, to improve quality, innovation, skills and productivity. By somehow unexpectedly combining competition and cooperation, they form a new, sophisticated stage in the evolution of production structures in quest of higher efficiency. This paper forays into the world of clusters and clusterization, which seem to increasingly capture the interest of businesses, scholars and policy makers. It looks at what clusters are, how they arise, what are their specific features, what benefits and challenges they can generate for companies and for the regions in which they locate and if and how they should be fostered by industrial policy interventions. The conclusion is that clusters can be very important development triggers and therefore they should be encouraged and nurtured by adequate policy measures. They should not only be used as a regular policy tool, but be placed at the very center of the development strategies of emerging economies.

  11. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    The cluster theory attributed to Michael Porter has significantly influenced industrial policies in countries across Europe and North America since the beginning of the 1990s. Institutions such as the EU, OECD and the World Bank and governments in countries such as the UK, France, The Netherlands......, Portugal and New Zealand have adopted the concept. Public sector interventions that aim to support cluster development in industries most often focus upon economic policy goals such as enhanced employment and improved productivity, but rarely emphasise broader societal policy goals relating to e.......g. sustainability or quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to explore how and to what extent public sector interventions that aim at forcing cluster development in industries can support sustainable development as defined in the Brundtland tradition and more recently elaborated in such concepts as eco-industrialism...

  12. Evolution of the electronic and ionic structure of Mg clusters with increase in cluster size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2003-01-01

    . We have systematically calculated the optimized geometries of neutral and singly charged magnesium clusters consisting of up to 21 atoms, electronic shell closures, binding energies per atom, ionization potentials, and the gap between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals....... We have investigated the appearance of the elements of the hcp structure and metallic evolution of the magnesium clusters, as well as the stability of linear chains and rings of magnesium atoms. The results obtained are compared with the available experimental data and the results of other...

  13. Toward the Development of Cluster-Based Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, Kit H. [Johns Hopkins University

    1995-06-01

    Our research program provided experimental results that made fundamental, underpinning contributions to the development of cluster-based materials. Specific topics we have studied include the non-metal-to-metallic transition in divalent metal clusters, the search for (and discovery of) theoretically-predicted, ionically-bonded cluster-assembled “molecules” and other Magic Clusters, the interaction of transition metal atoms and clusters with organic molecular templates, the synthesis and characterization of Zintl phase clusters, the magnetic properties of semiconductor clusters, the molecular properties of electronic materials, the magnetic properties of silicon-encapsulated rare earth metal atom cages, and the magnetic and electronic properties of gold/silica and gold/iron clusters.

  14. Magnetism of electrons in atoms and superatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medel, Victor; Reveles, J. Ulises; Khanna, Shiv N.

    2012-09-01

    The quantum states of electrons in small symmetric metallic clusters are grouped into shells similar to the electronic shells in free atoms, leading to the conceptual basis for defining superatoms. The filling of the electronic shells in clusters, however, do not follow Hund's rule and usually result in non-magnetic species. It is shown that by embedding a transition metal in group II atoms, one can stabilize superatoms with unpaired electronic supershells. We demonstrate this intriguing effect through electronic structure studies of MnSrn (n = 6-12) clusters within first principles generalized gradient calculations. The studies identify an unusually stable magnetic MnSr9 species with a large exchange splitting of 1.82 eV of the superatomic D-states. It is shown that the exchange split d-states in the Mn atom induce exchange splitting in S and D superatomic shells because of the hybridization between orbitals of selected parity. The magnetic MnSr9 cluster with 25 valence electrons has filled 1S2, 1P6, 1D10, 2S2 shells, making it highly stable, and an open shell of 5 unpaired D electrons breeding the magnetic moment. The stable cluster is resistant to collapse as two motifs are united to form a supermolecule.

  15. CO dissociation on magnetic Fen clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Jedidi, Abdesslem

    2014-01-01

    This work theoretically investigates the CO dissociation on Fen nanoparticles, for n in the range of 1-65, focusing on size dependence in the context of the initial step of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. CO adsorbs molecularly through its C-end on a triangular facet of the nanoparticle. Dissociation becomes easier when the cluster size increases. Then, the C atom is bonded to a square facet that is generated as a result of the adsorption if it does not yet exist in the bare cluster, while the O atom is adsorbed on a triangular facet. In the most stable situation, the two adsorbed atoms remain close together, both having in common one shared first-neighbor iron atom. There is a partial spin quenching of the neighboring Fe atoms, which become more positively charged than the other Fe atoms. The shared surface iron atom resembles a metal-cation from a complex. Despite the small size of the iron cluster considered, fluctuations due to specific configurations do not influence properties for n > 25 and global trends seem significant.

  16. Nanothermodynamics of iron clusters: Small clusters, icosahedral and fcc-cuboctahedral structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelié, C.; Soudan, J.-M.

    2017-05-01

    The study of the thermodynamics and structures of iron clusters has been carried on, focusing on small clusters and initial icosahedral and fcc-cuboctahedral structures. Two combined tools are used. First, energy intervals are explored by the Monte Carlo algorithm, called σ-mapping, detailed in the work of Soudan et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 144109 (2011), Paper I]. In its flat histogram version, it provides the classical density of states, gp(Ep), in terms of the potential energy of the system. Second, the iron system is described by a potential which is called "corrected EAM" (cEAM), explained in the work of Basire et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 104304 (2014), Paper II]. Small clusters from 3 to 12 atoms in their ground state have been compared first with published Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, giving a complete agreement of geometries. The series of 13, 55, 147, and 309 atom icosahedrons is shown to be the most stable form for the cEAM potential. However, the 147 atom cluster has a special behaviour, since decreasing the energy from the liquid zone leads to the irreversible trapping of the cluster in a reproducible amorphous state, 7.38 eV higher in energy than the icosahedron. This behaviour is not observed at the higher size of 309 atoms. The heat capacity of the 55, 147, and 309 atom clusters revealed a pronounced peak in the solid zone, related to a solid-solid transition, prior to the melting peak. The corresponding series of 13, 55, and 147 atom cuboctahedrons has been compared, underscoring the unstability towards the icosahedral structure. This unstability occurs clearly in several steps for the 147 atom cluster, with a sudden transformation at a transition state. This illustrates the concerted icosahedron-cuboctahedron transformation of Buckminster Fuller-Mackay, which is calculated for the cEAM potential. Two other clusters of initial fcc structures with 24 and 38 atoms have been studied, as well as a 302 atom cluster. Each one relaxes

  17. Insights into the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of V-doped copper clusters: comparison with pure copper clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Die, Dong; Zheng, Ben-Xia; Zhao, Lan-Qiong; Zhu, Qi-Wen; Zhao, Zheng-Quan

    2016-01-01

    The structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Cun+1 and CunV (n = 1–12) clusters have been investigated by using density functional theory. The growth behaviors reveal that V atom in low-energy CunV isomer favors the most highly coordinated position and changes the geometry of the three-dimensional host clusters. The vibrational spectra are predicted and can be used to identify the ground state. The relative stability and chemical activity of the ground states are analyzed through the binding energy per atom, energy second-order difference and energy gap. It is found that that the stability of CunV (n ≥ 8) is higher than that of Cun+1. The substitution of a V atom for a Cu atom in copper clusters alters the odd-even oscillations of stability and activity of the host clusters. The vertical ionization potential, electron affinity and photoelectron spectrum are calculated and simulated for all of the most stable clusters. Compare with the experimental data, we determine the ground states of pure copper clusters. The magnetism analyses show that the magnetic moments of CunV clusters are mainly localized on the V atom and decease with the increase of cluster size. The magnetic change is closely related to the charge transfer between V and Cu atoms. PMID:27534599

  18. Fuzzy Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berks, G.; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf von; Jantzen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    and clustering are the basic concerns in medicine. Classification depends on definitions of the classes and their required degree of participant of the elements in the cases' symptoms. In medicine imprecise conditions are the rule and therefore fuzzy methods are much more suitable than crisp ones. Fuzzy c...

  19. Fully Cationized Gold Clusters: Synthesis of Au25(SR+)18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yohei; Narita, Kunihiro; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Whetten, Robert L

    2016-10-06

    Although many thiolate-protected Au clusters with different numbers of Au atoms and a variety of thiolate ligands have been synthesized, to date there has been no report of a fully cationized Au cluster protected with cationic thiolates. Herein, we report the synthesis of the first member of a new series of thiolate-protected Au cluster molecules: a fully cationized Au 25 (SR + ) 18 cluster.

  20. Linear-time subspace clustering via bipartite graph modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Amir; Elad, Michael; Hel-Or, Yacov

    2015-10-01

    We present a linear-time subspace clustering approach that combines sparse representations and bipartite graph modeling. The signals are modeled as drawn from a union of low-dimensional subspaces, and each signal is represented by a sparse combination of basis elements, termed atoms, which form the columns of a dictionary matrix. The sparse representation coefficients are arranged in a sparse affinity matrix, which defines a bipartite graph of two disjoint sets: 1) atoms and 2) signals. Subspace clustering is obtained by applying low-complexity spectral bipartite graph clustering that exploits the small number of atoms for complexity reduction. The complexity of the proposed approach is linear in the number of signals, thus it can rapidly cluster very large data collections. Performance evaluation of face clustering and temporal video segmentation demonstrates comparable clustering accuracies to state-of-the-art at a significantly lower computational load.

  1. Control the fear atomic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Gwan [I and Book, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-04-15

    This book has a lot of explanation of nuclear energy with articles. Their titles are the bad man likes atomic, the secret of atom, nuclear explosion, NPT?, the secret of uranium fuel rod, nuclear power plant vs nuclear bomb, I hate atomic, keep plutonium in control, atomic in peace and find out alternative energy.

  2. Potential of Transition Metal Atoms Embedded in Buckled Monolayer g-C3N4 as Single-Atom Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Shu-Long

    2017-10-27

    We use first-principles calculations to systematically explore the potential of transition metal atoms (Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, and Au) embedded in buckled monolayer g-C3N4 as single-atom catalysts. We show that clustering of Sc and Ti on g-C3N4 is thermodynamically impeded and that V, Cr, Mn, and Cu are much less susceptible to clustering than the other TM atoms under investigation. Strong bonding of the transition metal atoms in the cavities of g-C3N4 and high diffusion barriers together are responsible for single-atom fixation. Analysis of the CO oxidation process indicates that embedding of Cr and Mn in g-C3N4 gives rise to promising single-atom catalysts at low temperature.

  3. Change of Energy of the Cubic Subnanocluster of Iron Under Influence of Interstitial and Substitutional Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedolya, Anatoliy V; Bondarenko, Natalya V

    2016-12-01

    Energy change of an iron face-centred cubic subnanocluster was evaluated using molecular mechanics method depending on the position of a carbon interstitial atom and substitutional atoms of nickel. Calculations of all possible positions of impurity atoms show that the energy change of the system are discrete and at certain positions of the atoms are close to continuous.In terms of energy, when all impurity atoms are on the same edge of an atomic cluster, their positions are more advantageous. The presence of nickel atoms on the edge of a cubic cluster resulted in decrease of potential barrier for a carbon atom and decrease in energy in the whole cluster. A similar drift of a carbon atom from central octahedral interstitial site to the surface in the direction occurred under the influence of surface factors.Such configuration corresponds to decreasing symmetry and increasing the number of possible energy states of a subnanocluster, and it corresponds to the condition of spontaneous crystallization process in an isolated system.Taking into account accidental positions of the nickel atom in the iron cluster, such behaviour of the carbon atom can explain the mechanism of growth of a new phase and formation of new clusters in the presence of other kind of atoms because of surface influence.

  4. Cluster Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvesen

    1999-11-01

    The care of patients with cluster headache has at least two goals: 1) immediately abolishing an ongoing attack and 2) stopping or shortening a bout (a cluster period). The fierceness and the relative brevity of the attacks dictate the use of a fast-acting agent. There are probably three agents fulfilling these criteria: sumatriptan (by subcutaneous injection), oxygen (inhaled through a face mask), and ergotamines (by injection or, perhaps, sublingual tablets). An abundance of data from controlled studies as well as recent clinical experience probably favors sumatriptan as the most effective alternative, the most significant drawback being its high cost. Oxygen inhalation is free of side effects and may be effective but is inconvenient to use. Ergotamines in tablet form act less rapidly, and there are more contraindications to their use. In short-term prophylaxis, however, ergotamine may still be a drug of choice if the timing of the attacks allows planned use of the drug shortly before the attack. If the timing is more irregular, steroids may at least temporarily break a cycle (eg, prednisolone, 60 or 80 mg/d, gradually tapered to zero in 3 to 4 weeks). If more long-lasting prophylaxis is needed or expected, lithium carbonate, 900 mg/d, or verapamil, 360 mg/d, both have reasonable response rates. As for chronic cluster headache, lithium probably will still be the drug of choice. For a very limited group of patients with chronic cluster headache, surgery may be a last resort. The best surgical options are probably radiofrequency rhizotomy or microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve.

  5. Regional Innovation Clusters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — The Regional Innovation Clusters serve a diverse group of sectors and geographies. Three of the initial pilot clusters, termed Advanced Defense Technology clusters,...

  6. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  7. Atomic and molecular manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Work with individual atoms and molecules aims to demonstrate that miniaturized electronic, optical, magnetic, and mechanical devices can operate ultimately even at the level of a single atom or molecule. As such, atomic and molecular manipulation has played an emblematic role in the development of the field of nanoscience. New methods based on the use of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) have been developed to characterize and manipulate all the degrees of freedom of individual atoms and molecules with an unprecedented precision. In the meantime, new concepts have emerged to design molecules and substrates having specific optical, mechanical and electronic functions, thus opening the way to the fabrication of real nano-machines. Manipulation of individual atoms and molecules has also opened up completely new areas of research and knowledge, raising fundamental questions of "Optics at the atomic scale", "Mechanics at the atomic scale", Electronics at the atomic scale", "Quantum physics at the atomic sca...

  8. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  9. C60 as an Atom Trap to Capture Co Adatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Peng; Li, Dongzhe; Repain, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    C60 molecules were used to trap Co adatoms and clusters on a Au(111) surface using atomic/molecular manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope. Two manipulation pathways (successive integration of single Co atoms in one molecule or direct integration of a Co cluster) were found...... to efficiently allow the formation of complexes mixing a C60 molecule with Co atoms. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals the robustness of the pi states of C60 that are preserved after Co trapping. Scanning tunneling microscopy images and density functional theory calculations reveal that dissociated Co...... clusters of up to nine atoms can be formed at the molecule-substrate interface. These results open new perspectives in the interactions between metal adatoms and molecules, for applications in metal-organic devices...

  10. Atomic switch: atom/ion movement controlled devices for beyond von-neumann computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Terabe, Kazuya; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Aono, Masakazu

    2012-01-10

    An atomic switch is a nanoionic device that controls the diffusion of metal ions/atoms and their reduction/oxidation processes in the switching operation to form/annihilate a conductive path. Since metal atoms can provide a highly conductive channel even if their cluster size is in the nanometer scale, atomic switches may enable downscaling to smaller than the 11 nm technology node, which is a great challenge for semiconductor devices. Atomic switches also possess novel characteristics, such as high on/off ratios, very low power consumption and non-volatility. The unique operating mechanisms of these devices have enabled the development of various types of atomic switch, such as gap-type and gapless-type two-terminal atomic switches and three-terminal atomic switches. Novel functions, such as selective volatile/nonvolatile, synaptic, memristive, and photo-assisted operations have been demonstrated. Such atomic switch characteristics can not only improve the performance of present-day electronic systems, but also enable development of new types of electronic systems, such as beyond von- Neumann computers. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Measurement of cluster-cluster interaction in liquids by deposition and AFM of silicon clusters onto HOPG surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galinis, Gediminas; Torricelli, Gauthier; Akraiam, Atea; Haeften, Klaus von, E-mail: kvh6@le.ac.uk [University of Leicester, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    We have investigated the interaction and aggregation of novel fluorescent silicon nanoclusters in liquids by measuring the size distribution of dried clusters on graphite. The clusters were produced by gas aggregation and co-deposition with a beam of water vapour. Drops of the solutions were placed on freshly cleaved highly oriented pyrolitic graphite, subsequently vacuum dried and investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in ultra high vacuum. The AFM images show single clusters and agglomerates. The height distributions are Gaussian-shaped with average heights of 1 nm and widths of 1 nm. The heights never exceed 3 nm. In some regions a second cluster layer is observed. In all samples the separation between first and second layers is larger than the separation between the first layer and the graphite substrate, which we attribute to a stronger interaction between clusters and surface than the cluster self-interaction. We conclude that the separation between first and second layer represents a much better fingerprint of the original size distribution of the clusters in solution than the height of the first layer. The observation of a second cluster layer is important for using silicon clusters as building blocks for cluster-assembled materials.

  12. Cluster size dependence of high-order harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y.; Hagmeijer, R.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Goh, S. J.; van der Slot, P. J. M.; Biedron, S. G.; Milton, S. V.; Boller, K.-J.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from noble gas clusters in a supersonic gas jet. To identify the contribution of harmonic generation from clusters versus that from gas monomers, we measure the high-order harmonic output over a broad range of the total atomic number density in the jet (from 3×1016 to 3 × 1018 {{cm}}-3) at two different reservoir temperatures (303 and 363 K). For the first time in the evaluation of the harmonic yield in such measurements, the variation of the liquid mass fraction, g, versus pressure and temperature is taken into consideration, which we determine, reliably and consistently, to be below 20% within our range of experimental parameters. By comparing the measured harmonic yield from a thin jet with the calculated corresponding yield from monomers alone, we find an increased emission of the harmonics when the average cluster size is less than 3000. Using g, under the assumption that the emission from monomers and clusters add up coherently, we calculate the ratio of the average single-atom response of an atom within a cluster to that of a monomer and find an enhancement of around 100 for very small average cluster size (∼200). We do not find any dependence of the cut-off frequency on the composition of the cluster jet. This implies that HHG in clusters is based on electrons that return to their parent ions and not to neighboring ions in the cluster. To fully employ the enhanced average single-atom response found for small average cluster sizes (∼200), the nozzle producing the cluster jet must provide a large liquid mass fraction at these small cluster sizes for increasing the harmonic yield. Moreover, cluster jets may allow for quasi-phase matching, as the higher mass of clusters allows for a higher density contrast in spatially structuring the nonlinear medium.

  13. Atomic vapor density monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewall, N.; Harris, W.; Beeler, R.; Wooldridge, J.; Chen, H.L.

    1986-09-01

    This report presents information on the Atomic Vapor Density Monitor (AVDM) system that measures the density of a vapor by measuring the absorption of light from a swept-wavelength laser that passes through an atomic vapor stream.

  14. Research briefing on selected opportunities in atomic, molecular, and optical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses research on the following topics: The Laser-Atom Revolution; Controlling Dynamical Pathways; Nonclassical States of Light; Transient States of Atomic Systems; New Light Generation and Handling; Clusters; Atomic Physics at User Facilities; and Impacts of AMO Sciences on Modern Technologies.

  15. Research briefing on selected opportunities in atomic, molecular, and optical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research on the following topics: The Laser-Atom Revolution; Controlling Dynamical Pathways; Nonclassical States of Light; Transient States of Atomic Systems; New Light Generation and Handling; Clusters; Atomic Physics at User Facilities; and Impacts of AMO Sciences on Modern Technologies.

  16. Atomic Physics 15: Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Atomic Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Linden van den Heuvell, H. B.; Walraven, J. T. M.; Reynolds, M. W.

    1997-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Generation of a "Schrödinger cat" of radiation and observation of its decoherence * Synthesis of entangled states and quantum computing * Entangled states of atomic ions for quantum metrology and computation * Entanglement and indistinguishability: Coherence experiments with photon pairs and triplets * Atom optics as a testing ground for quantum chaos * Coherent ultra-bright XUV lasers and harmonics * Hollow atoms * Interdisciplinary experiments with polarized noble gases * The creation and study of Bose-Einstein condensation in a cold alkali vapor * oscopic quantum phenomena in trapped Bose-condensed gases * Doppler-free spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen * QED and the ground state of helium * Towards coherent atomic samples using laser cooling * Bose-Einstein condensation of a weakly-interacting gas * Zeeman and his contemporaries: Dutch physics around 1900 * Zeeman's great discovery * The Zeeman effect: A tool for atom manipulation * The Zeeman effect a century later: New insights into classical physics * QED effects in few-electron high-Z systems * Lamb shift experiments on high-Z one- and two-electron systems * Fundamental constants of nature * Response of atoms in photonic lattices * Hydrogen-like systems and quantum electrodynamics * New experiments with atomic lattices bound by light * Bloch oscillations of atoms in an optical potential * Quantum decoherence and inertial sensing with atom interferometers * Quantum effects in He clusters * Atoms in super-intense radiation fields * Wave packet dynamics of excited atomic electrons in intense laser fields * Nonlinear laser-electron scattering * Comparing the antiproton and proton and progress toward cold antihydrogen * Author Index

  17. Adsorption and growth of palladium clusters on graphdiyne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, A; López, M J; Granja-DelRío, A; Azizi, K; Alonso, J A

    2017-07-26

    The density functional formalism has been used to investigate the stability and the properties of small palladium clusters supported on graphdiyne layers. The large triangular holes existing on the graphdiyne structure provide efficient sites to hold the clusters at small distances from the plane of the graphdiyne layer. The cluster adsorption energies, between 3 and 4 eV, are large enough to maintain the clusters tightly bound to the triangular holes. The competition between dispersion of Pd atoms on graphdiyne and growth of Pd clusters in the triangular holes of the layer is also discussed. In addition, the triangular holes can be simultaneously decorated with clusters on both sides. This indicates that palladium clusters could be used to build nanostructures formed by stacked graphdiyne layers with tailored interlayer distances controlled by the size of the clusters. The size of the clusters also controls the electronic HOMO-LUMO gap of the material.

  18. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  19. Playing Pinball with Atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saedi, A.; van Houselt, Arie; van Gastel, Raoul; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of controlling an atomic scale mechanical device by an external electrical signal. On a germanium substrate, a switching motion of pairs of atoms is induced by electrons that are directly injected into the atoms with a scanning tunneling microscope tip. By precisely

  20. Atomic structure of a decagonal Al-Pd-Mn phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalkovič, Marek; Roth, Johannes; Trebin, Hans-Rainer

    2017-12-01

    We present a detailed structure solution for the 16 -Å decagonal quasicrystal in the Al-Pd-Mn system by means of cluster decoration and ab initio energy minimization. It is based on structure models of the ɛ and other approximant phases. The ɛ phases can be represented as subsets of a hexagon-boat-star (HBS) tiling. The decagonal phase comprises further HBS tiles. We have constructed several fictitious HBS approximants and optimized their structures individually. All tiles are decorated by two types of atomic clusters: the pseudo-Mackay icosahedron (PMI) and the large bicapped pentagonal prism (LBPP). It turns out that, whereas the PMI clusters can be kept essentially unchanged, the LBPP clusters must be adjusted in occupancy with Al atoms depending on their positions in the various tiles. In this way we obtain cluster decorations for all tiles of the decagonal quasicrystal. The calculations were confirmed by evaluation of an effective tile Hamiltonian.

  1. Spectroscopy at metal cluster surfaces. Final report, September 15, 1993--September 14, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, M.A.

    1998-06-01

    The focus of this research program is the study of gas phase metal clusters to evaluate their potential as models for the fundamental interactions present in catalysis. To do this, the authors characterize the chemical bonding present between the component atoms in metal clusters as well as the bonding exhibited by {open_quotes}physisorption{close_quotes} on metal atom or metal cluster surfaces. Electronic spectra, vibrational frequencies and bond dissociation energies are measured for both neutral and ionized clusters with a variety of laser/mass spectrometry techniques. The authors are particularly interested in bimetallic cluster systems, and how their properties compare to those of corresponding pure metal clusters.

  2. Atomization characteristics of a prefilming airblast atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shigeru; Koito, Atsushi; Hishiki, Manabu

    1992-01-01

    The size distribution of water test sprays generated by a prefilming airblast atomizer used for aeroengines was measured in swirling and non-swirling flows with the well established laser scattering particle sizing technique. Atomizing air velocity (or pressure difference) was varied in a range wider than the conditions of actual engines. The Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) decreased at approximately a 1.5 power of the atomizing air velocity, being a higher velocity index than the previously reported values of 1 to 1.2. It was unexpectedly found that the effect of the liquid/air flow ratio was small. Since swirling flow increased the SMD at lower air velocities yet decreased it at higher ones, it is suggested that the reverse flow near the nozzle pintle adversely affects atomization.

  3. Cluster Ion Implantation in Graphite and Diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite a...... implantation. Implantation of cobalt and argon clusters into two different allotropic forms of carbon, namely, graphite and diamond is analysed and compared in order to approach universal theory of cluster stopping in matter.......Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite...... and diamond samples implanted by keV-energy size-selected cobalt and argon clusters. One of the emphases is put on pinning of metal clusters on graphite with a possibility of following selective etching of graphene layers. The other topic of concern is related to the development of scaling law for cluster...

  4. Single atom electrochemical and atomic analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rama

    In the past decade, advances in electron and scanning-probe based microscopies have led to a wealth of imaging and spectroscopic data with atomic resolution, yielding substantial insight into local physics and chemistry in a diverse range of systems such as oxide catalysts, multiferroics, manganites, and 2D materials. However, typical analysis of atomically resolved images is limited, despite the fact that image intensities and distortions of the atoms from their idealized positions contain unique information on the physical and chemical properties inherent to the system. Here, we present approaches to data mine atomically resolved images in oxides, specifically in the hole-doped manganite La5/8Ca3/8MnO3, on epitaxial films studied by in-situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Through application of bias to the STM tip, atomic-scale electrochemistry is demonstrated on the manganite surface. STM images are then further analyzed through a suite of algorithms including 2D autocorrelations, sliding window Fourier transforms, and others, and can be combined with basic thermodynamic modelling to reveal relevant physical and chemical descriptors including segregation energies, existence and strength of atomic-scale diffusion barriers, surface energies and sub-surface chemical species identification. These approaches promise to provide tremendous insights from atomically resolved functional imaging, can provide relevant thermodynamic parameters, and auger well for use with first-principles calculations to yield quantitative atomic-level chemical identification and structure-property relations. This research was sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, BES, DOE. Research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which also provided support and is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  5. Multilevel Atomic Coherent States and Atomic Holomorphic Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang-Qi; Haake, Fritz

    1996-01-01

    The notion of atomic coherent states is extended to the case of multilevel atom collective. Based on atomic coherent states, a holomorphic representation for atom collective states and operators is defined. An example is given to illustrate its application.

  6. Atomic Covalent Functionalization of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, James E.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    -dimensional materials with fundamentally different electronic and physical properties. Specifically, we focus on recent studies of the addition of atomic hydrogen, fluorine, and oxygen to the basal plane of graphene. In each of these reactions a high energy, activating step initiates the process, breaking the local π structure and distorting the surrounding lattice. Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments reveal that substrate mediated interactions often dominate when the initial binding event occurs. We then compare these substrate effects with the results of theoretical studies that typically assume a vacuum environment. As the surface coverage increases, clusters often form around the initial distortion, and the stoichiometric composition of the saturated end product depends strongly on both the substrate and reactant species. In addition to these chemical and structural observations, we review how covalent modification can extend the range of physical properties that are achievable in two-dimensional materials. PMID:23030800

  7. Thermal stability of helium-vacancy clusters in iron

    CERN Document Server

    Morishita, K; Wirth, B D; Díaz de la Rubia, T

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations were performed to evaluate the thermal stability of helium-vacancy clusters (He sub n V sub m) in Fe using the Ackland Finnis-Sinclair potential, the Wilson-Johnson potential and the Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark-Beck potential for describing the interactions of Fe-Fe, Fe-He and He-He, respectively. Both the calculated numbers of helium atoms, n, and vacancies, m, in clusters ranged from 0 to 20. The binding energies of an interstitial helium atom, an isolated vacancy and a self-interstitial iron atom to a helium-vacancy cluster were obtained from the calculated formation energies of clusters. All the binding energies do not depend much on cluster size, but they primarily depend on the helium-to-vacancy ratio (n/m) of clusters. The binding energy of a vacancy to a helium-vacancy cluster increases with the ratio, showing that helium increases cluster lifetime by dramatically reducing thermal vacancy emission. On the other hand, both the binding energies of a helium atom and an iron ...

  8. Magnetic behavior of clusters of ferromagnetic transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khanna, S. N.; Linderoth, Søren

    1991-01-01

    The effective magnetic moments of small iron and cobalt clusters have been calculated by assuming that the clusters undergo superparamagnetic relaxation. The effective moments per atom are found to be much below the bulk values, even at low temperatures (100 K). They increase with particle size a...

  9. Noble Gas Clusters and Nanoplasmas in High Harmonic Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Aladi, M; Rácz, P; Földes, I B

    2015-01-01

    We report a study of high harmonic generation from noble gas clusters of xenon atoms in a gas jet. Harmonic spectra were investigated as a function of backing pressure, showing spectral shifts due to the nanoplasma electrons in the clusters. At certain value of laser intensity this process may oppose the effect of the well-known ionization-induced blueshift. In addition, these cluster-induced harmonic redshifts may give the possibility to estimate cluster density and cluster size in the laser-gas jet interaction range.

  10. Detonation of Meta-stable Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, Allen; Kuhl, Allen L.; Fried, Laurence E.; Howard, W. Michael; Seizew, Michael R.; Bell, John B.; Beckner, Vincent; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2008-05-31

    We consider the energy accumulation in meta-stable clusters. This energy can be much larger than the typical chemical bond energy (~;;1 ev/atom). For example, polymeric nitrogen can accumulate 4 ev/atom in the N8 (fcc) structure, while helium can accumulate 9 ev/atom in the excited triplet state He2* . They release their energy by cluster fission: N8 -> 4N2 and He2* -> 2He. We study the locus of states in thermodynamic state space for the detonation of such meta-stable clusters. In particular, the equilibrium isentrope, starting at the Chapman-Jouguet state, and expanding down to 1 atmosphere was calculated with the Cheetah code. Large detonation pressures (3 and 16 Mbar), temperatures (12 and 34 kilo-K) and velocities (20 and 43 km/s) are a consequence of the large heats of detonation (6.6 and 50 kilo-cal/g) for nitrogen and helium clusters respectively. If such meta-stable clusters could be synthesized, they offer the potential for large increases in the energy density of materials.

  11. Electronic Structure and Geometries of Small Compound Metal Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-14

    During the tenure of the DOE grant DE-FG05-87EI145316 we have concentrated on equilibrium geometries, stability, and the electronic structure of transition metal-carbon clusters (met-cars), clusters designed to mimic the chemistry of atoms, and reactivity of homo-nuclear metal clusters and ions with various reactant molecules. It is difficult to describe all the research the authors have accomplished as they have published 38 papers. In this report, they outline briefly the salient features of their work on the following topics: (1) Designer Clusters: Building Blocks for a New Class of Solids; (2) Atomic Structure, Stability, and Electronic Properties of Metallo-Carbohedrenes; (3) Reactivity of Metal Clusters with H{sub 2} and NO; and (4) Anomalous Spectroscopy of Li{sub 4} Clusters.

  12. Heavy hitters via cluster-preserving clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Nelson, Jelani; Nguyen, Huy L.

    2016-01-01

    , providing correctness whp. In fact, a simpler version of our algorithm for p = 1 in the strict turnstile model answers queries even faster than the "dyadic trick" by roughly a log n factor, dominating it in all regards. Our main innovation is an efficient reduction from the heavy hitters to a clustering...... problem in which each heavy hitter is encoded as some form of noisy spectral cluster in a much bigger graph, and the goal is to identify every cluster. Since every heavy hitter must be found, correctness requires that every cluster be found. We thus need a "cluster-preserving clustering" algorithm......, that partitions the graph into clusters with the promise of not destroying any original cluster. To do this we first apply standard spectral graph partitioning, and then we use some novel combinatorial techniques to modify the cuts obtained so as to make sure that the original clusters are sufficiently preserved...

  13. Melting and Freezing of Metal Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Andrés; Jarrold, Martin F.

    2011-05-01

    Recent developments allow heat capacities to be measured for size-selected clusters isolated in the gas phase. For clusters with tens to hundreds of atoms, the heat capacities determined as a function of temperature usually have a single peak attributed to a melting transition. The melting temperatures and latent heats show large size-dependent fluctuations. In some cases, the melting temperatures change by hundreds of degrees with the addition of a single atom. Theory has played a critical role in understanding the origin of the size-dependent fluctuations, and in understanding the properties of the liquid-like and solid-like states. In some cases, the heat capacities have extra features (an additional peak or a dip) that reveal a more complex behavior than simple melting. In this article we provide a description of the methods used to measure the heat capacities and provide an overview of the experimental and theoretical results obtained for sodium and aluminum clusters.

  14. Toward the Atomic-Level Mass Analysis of Biomolecules by the Scanning Atom Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masahiro

    2017-04-01

    In 1994, a new type of atom probe instrument, named the scanning atom probe (SAP), was proposed. The unique feature of the SAP is the introduction of a small extraction electrode, which scans over a specimen surface and confines the high field, required for field evaporation of surface atoms in a small space, between the specimen and the electrode. Thus, the SAP does not require a sharp specimen tip. This indicates that the SAP can mass analyze the specimens which are difficult to form in a sharp tip, such as organic materials and biomolecules. Clean single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT), made by high-pressure carbon monoxide process are found to be the best substrates for biomolecules. Various amino acids and dipeptide biomolecules were successfully mass analyzed, revealing characteristic clusters formed by strongly bound atoms in the specimens. The mass analysis indicates that SAP analysis of biomolecules is not only qualitative, but also quantitative.

  15. Stability of two-dimensional clusters on crystal surfaces: from Ostwald ripening to single-cluster decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenfeld, G.; Morgenstern, Karina; Beckmann, Ingo; Wulfhekel, Wulf; Wulfhekel, W.C.U.; Laegsgaard, Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming; Comsa, George

    1998-01-01

    An overview is given of recent work on the decay of two-dimensional clusters on a Ag(111) surface. Experimental studies using scanning tunnelling microscopy are presented, and various approaches to extract quantitative information on the relevant atomic processes from cluster decay experiments are

  16. Atomic Inference from Weak Gravitational Lensing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Phil; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-14

    We present a novel approach to reconstructing the projected mass distribution from the sparse and noisy weak gravitational lensing shear data. The reconstructions are regularized via the knowledge gained from numerical simulations of clusters, with trial mass distributions constructed from n NFW profile ellipsoidal components. The parameters of these ''atoms'' are distributed a priori as in the simulated clusters. Sampling the mass distributions from the atom parameter probability density function allows estimates of the properties of the mass distribution to be generated, with error bars. The appropriate number of atoms is inferred from the data itself via the Bayesian evidence, and is typically found to be small, reecting the quality of the data. Ensemble average mass maps are found to be robust to the details of the noise realization, and succeed in recovering the demonstration input mass distribution (from a realistic simulated cluster) over a wide range of scales. As an application of such a reliable mapping algorithm, we comment on the residuals of the reconstruction and the implications for predicting convergence and shear at specific points on the sky.

  17. Long range intermolecular forces in triatomic systems: connecting the atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations

    OpenAIRE

    Cvitas, Marko T.; Soldan, Pavel; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2005-01-01

    The long-range forces that act between three atoms are analysed in both atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations. Expressions for atom-diatom dispersion coefficients are obtained in terms of 3-body nonadditive coefficients. The anisotropy of atom-diatom C_6 dispersion coefficients arises primarily from nonadditive triple-dipole and quadruple-dipole forces, while pairwise-additive forces and nonadditive triple-dipole and dipole-dipole-quadrupole forces contribute significantly to atom-di...

  18. Cluster headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducros Anne

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cluster headache (CH is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye. It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain unknown. Involvement of the hypothalamus (a structure regulating endocrine function and sleep-wake rhythms has been confirmed, explaining, at least in part, the cyclic aspects of CH. The disease is familial in about 10% of cases. Genetic factors play a role in CH susceptibility, and a causative role has been suggested for the hypocretin receptor gene. Diagnosis is clinical. Differential diagnoses include other primary headache diseases such as migraine, paroxysmal hemicrania and SUNCT syndrome. At present, there is no curative treatment. There are efficient treatments to shorten the painful attacks (acute treatments and to reduce the number of daily attacks (prophylactic treatments. Acute treatment is based on subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan and high-flow oxygen. Verapamil, lithium, methysergide, prednisone, greater occipital nerve blocks and topiramate may be used for prophylaxis. In refractory cases, deep-brain stimulation of the

  19. Theory and applications of atomic and ionic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitroy, J [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Safronova, M S [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Clark, Charles W, E-mail: jxm107@rsphysse.anu.edu.a, E-mail: msafrono@udel.ed, E-mail: charles.clark@nist.go [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8410 (United States)

    2010-10-28

    Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics. The dielectric constant and refractive index of any gas are examples of macroscopic properties that are largely determined by the dipole polarizability. When it comes to microscopic phenomena, the existence of alkaline-earth anions and the recently discovered ability of positrons to bind to many atoms are predominantly due to the polarization interaction. An imperfect knowledge of atomic polarizabilities is presently looming as the largest source of uncertainty in the new generation of optical frequency standards. Accurate polarizabilities for the group I and II atoms and ions of the periodic table have recently become available by a variety of techniques. These include refined many-body perturbation theory and coupled-cluster calculations sometimes combined with precise experimental data for selected transitions, microwave spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms and ions, refractive index measurements in microwave cavities, ab initio calculations of atomic structures using explicitly correlated wavefunctions, interferometry with atom beams and velocity changes of laser cooled atoms induced by an electric field. This review examines existing theoretical methods of determining atomic and ionic polarizabilities, and discusses their relevance to various applications with particular emphasis on cold-atom physics and the metrology of atomic frequency standards. (topical review)

  20. The energetics of prenucleation clusters in lattice solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legg, Benjamin A.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2016-12-07

    According to classical nucleation theory, nucleation from solution involves the formation of small atomic clusters. Most formulations of classical nucleation use continuum “droplet” approximations to describe the properties of these clusters. However, the discrete atomic nature of very small clusters may cause deviations from these approximations. Here, we present a self-consistent framework for describing the nature of these deviations. We use our framework to investigate the formation of “polycube” atomic clusters on a cubic lattice, for which we have used combinatoric data to calculate the thermodynamic properties of clusters with 17 atoms or less. We show that that the classical continuum droplet model emerges as a natural approach to describe the free energy of small clusters; but with a size-dependent surface tension. However, this formulation only arises if an appropriate “site-normalized” definition is adopted for the free energy of formation. These results are independently confirmed through the use of Monte Carlo calculations. Our results show that clusters formed from sparingly soluble materials (μM solubility range) tend to adopt compact configurations that minimize the solvent-solute interaction energy. As a consequence, there are distinct minima in the cluster-size-energy landscape that correspond to especially compact configurations. Conversely, highly soluble materials (1 M) form clusters with expanded configurations that maximize configurational entropy. The effective surface tension of these clusters tends to smoothly and systematically decrease as cluster size increases. However, materials with intermediate solubility (1 mM) are found to have a balanced behavior, with cluster energies that follow the classical ‘droplet’ scaling laws remarkably well.

  1. Multiply-negatively charged aluminium clusters and fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Noelle

    2008-07-15

    Multiply negatively charged aluminium clusters and fullerenes were generated in a Penning trap using the 'electron-bath' technique. Aluminium monoanions were generated using a laser vaporisation source. After this, two-, three- and four-times negatively charged aluminium clusters were generated for the first time. This research marks the first observation of tetra-anionic metal clusters in the gas phase. Additionally, doubly-negatively charged fullerenes were generated. The smallest fullerene dianion observed contained 70 atoms. (orig.)

  2. The energetics of prenucleation clusters in lattice solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Benjamin A; De Yoreo, James J

    2016-12-07

    According to classical nucleation theory, nucleation from solution involves the formation of small atomic clusters. Most formulations of classical nucleation use continuum "droplet" approximations to describe the properties of these clusters. However, the discrete atomic nature of very small clusters may cause deviations from these approximations. Here, we present a self-consistent framework for describing the nature of these deviations. We use our framework to investigate the formation of "polycube" atomic clusters on a cubic lattice, for which we have used combinatoric data to calculate the thermodynamic properties of clusters with 17 atoms or less. We show that the classical continuum droplet model emerges as a natural approach to describe the free energy of small clusters, but with a size-dependent surface tension. However, this formulation only arises if an appropriate "site-normalized" definition is adopted for the free energy of formation. These results are independently confirmed through the use of Monte Carlo calculations. Our results show that clusters formed from sparingly soluble materials (μM solubility range) tend to adopt compact configurations that minimize the solvent-solute interaction energy. As a consequence, there are distinct minima in the cluster-size-energy landscape that correspond to especially compact configurations. Conversely, highly soluble materials (1M) form clusters with expanded configurations that maximize configurational entropy. The effective surface tension of these clusters tends to smoothly and systematically decrease as the cluster size increases. However, materials with intermediate solubility (1 mM) are found to have a balanced behavior, with cluster energies that follow the classical "droplet" scaling laws remarkably well.

  3. Geometry, chemical reactivity and Raman spectra of gold clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngangbam Bedamani Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Structures, stability, and chemical reactivity of Aun (n = 2-10 clusters are investigated using density functional theory (DFT. We have studied the reactivity parameters of the clusters in terms of relevant electronic structure principles. It is observed that stability and properties are strongly dependent on the cluster size. Clusters with an even number of atoms are found to be energetically and chemically more stable than odd-numbered clusters. Electronic structure of clusters has been investigated using partial density of states (PDOS. PDOS analysis clearly shows that energy states of highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital are predominantly contributed by s orbital. From time-dependent DFT calculations, it is shown that absorption spectra of even-numbered clusters are more intense and are observed at lower wavelength region than the odd-sized gold clusters.

  4. Modern atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of physics in the last 30-plus years has come from research on atoms, photons, and their interactions. Collecting information previously scattered throughout the literature, Modern Atomic Physics provides students with one unified guide to contemporary developments in the field. After reviewing metrology and preliminary material, the text explains core areas of atomic physics. Important topics discussed include the spontaneous emission of radiation, stimulated transitions and the properties of gas, the physics and applications of resonance fluorescence, coherence, cooling and trapping of charged and neutral particles, and atomic beam magnetic resonance experiments. Covering standards, a different way of looking at a photon, stimulated radiation, and frequency combs, the appendices avoid jargon and use historical notes and personal anecdotes to make the topics accessible to non-atomic physics students. Written by a leader in atomic and optical physics, this text gives a state-of-the...

  5. Single atom microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2012-12-01

    We show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy operating at low accelerating voltages is able to analyze, simultaneously and with single atom resolution and sensitivity, the local atomic configuration, chemical identities, and optical response at point defect sites in monolayer graphene. Sequential fast-scan annular dark-field (ADF) imaging provides direct visualization of point defect diffusion within the graphene lattice, with all atoms clearly resolved and identified via quantitative image analysis. Summing multiple ADF frames of stationary defects produce images with minimized statistical noise and reduced distortions of atomic positions. Electron energy-loss spectrum imaging of single atoms allows the delocalization of inelastic scattering to be quantified, and full quantum mechanical calculations are able to describe the delocalization effect with good accuracy. These capabilities open new opportunities to probe the defect structure, defect dynamics, and local optical properties in 2D materials with single atom sensitivity.

  6. Fluorescent Thiol-Derivatized Gold Clusters Embedded in Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Carotenuto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to aurophilic interactions, linear and/or planar Au(I-thiolate molecules spontaneously aggregate, leading to molecular gold clusters passivated by a thiolate monolayer coating. Differently from the thiolate precursors, such cluster compounds show very intensive visible fluorescence characteristics that can be tuned by alloying the gold clusters with silver atoms or by conjugating the electronic structure of the metallic core with unsaturated electronic structures in the organic ligand through the sulphur atom. Here, the photoluminescence features of some examples of these systems are shortly described.

  7. Solar Spectroscopy: Atomic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, H.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A Greek philosopher called DEMOCRITUS (c. 460-370 BC) first introduced the concept of atoms (which means indivisible). His atoms do not precisely correspond to our atoms of today, which are not indivisible, but made up of a nucleus (protons with positive charge and neutrons which have no charge) and orbiting electrons (with negative charge). Indeed, in the solar atmosphere, the temperature is suc...

  8. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  9. Interplay between experiments and calculations for organometallic clusters and caged clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Atsushi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Nakajima Designer Nanocluster Assembly Project, ERATO, JST, KSP, 3-2-1 Sakado, Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); Keio Institute of Pure and Applied Sciences (KiPAS), Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    Clusters consisting of 10-1000 atoms exhibit size-dependent electronic and geometric properties. In particular, composite clusters consisting of several elements and/or components provide a promising way for a bottom-up approach for designing functional advanced materials, because the functionality of the composite clusters can be optimized not only by the cluster size but also by their compositions. In the formation of composite clusters, their geometric symmetry and dimensionality are emphasized to control the physical and chemical properties, because selective and anisotropic enhancements for optical, chemical, and magnetic properties can be expected. Organometallic clusters and caged clusters are demonstrated as a representative example of designing the functionality of the composite clusters. Organometallic vanadium-benzene forms a one dimensional sandwich structure showing ferromagnetic behaviors and anomalously large HOMO-LUMO gap differences of two spin orbitals, which can be regarded as spin-filter components for cluster-based spintronic devices. Caged clusters of aluminum (Al) are well stabilized both geometrically and electronically at Al{sub 12}X, behaving as a “superatom”.

  10. Photodesorption of Na atoms from rough Na surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Gerlach, R.; Manson, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the desorption of Na atoms from large Na clusters deposited on dielectric surfaces. High-resolution translational energy distributions of the desorbing atoms are determined by three independent methods, two-photon laser-induced fluorescence, as well as single-photon and resonance......-enhanced two-photon ionization techniques. Upon variation of surface temperature and for different substrates (mica vs lithium fluoride) clear non-Maxwellian time-of-flight distributions are observed with a cos θ angular dependence and most probable kinetic energies below that expected of atoms desorbing from...... atoms are scattered by surface vibrations. Recent experiments providing time constants for the decay of the optical excitations in the clusters support this model. The excellent agreement between experiment and theory indicates the importance of both absorption of the laser photons via direct excitation...

  11. Partitional clustering algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book summarizes the state-of-the-art in partitional clustering. Clustering, the unsupervised classification of patterns into groups, is one of the most important tasks in exploratory data analysis. Primary goals of clustering include gaining insight into, classifying, and compressing data. Clustering has a long and rich history that spans a variety of scientific disciplines including anthropology, biology, medicine, psychology, statistics, mathematics, engineering, and computer science. As a result, numerous clustering algorithms have been proposed since the early 1950s. Among these algorithms, partitional (nonhierarchical) ones have found many applications, especially in engineering and computer science. This book provides coverage of consensus clustering, constrained clustering, large scale and/or high dimensional clustering, cluster validity, cluster visualization, and applications of clustering. Examines clustering as it applies to large and/or high-dimensional data sets commonly encountered in reali...

  12. Atomic structure of graphene supported heterogeneous model catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, Dirk

    2017-04-15

    Graphene on Ir(111) forms a moire structure with well defined nucleation centres. Therefore it can be utilized to create hexagonal metal cluster lattices with outstanding structural quality. At diffraction experiments these 2D surface lattices cause a coherent superposition of the moire cell structure factor, so that the measured signal intensity scales with the square of coherently scattering unit cells. This artificial signal enhancement enables the opportunity for X-ray diffraction to determine the atomic structure of small nano-objects, which are hardly accessible with any experimental technique. The uniform environment of every metal cluster makes the described metal cluster lattices on graphene/Ir(111) an attractive model system for the investigation of catalytic, magnetic and quantum size properties of ultra-small nano-objects. In this context the use of x-rays provides a maximum of flexibility concerning the possible sample environments (vacuum, selected gases, liquids, sample temperature) and allows in-situ/operando measurements. In the framework of the present thesis the structure of different metal clusters grown by physical vapor deposition in an UHV environment and after gas exposure have been investigated. On the one hand the obtained results will explore many aspects of the atomic structure of these small metal clusters and on the other hand the presented results will proof the capabilities of the described technique (SXRD on cluster lattices). For iridium, platinum, iridium/palladium and platinum/rhodium the growth on graphene/Ir(111) of epitaxial, crystalline clusters with an ordered hexagonal lattice arrangement has been confirmed using SXRD. The clusters nucleate at the hcp sites of the moire cell and bind via rehybridization of the carbon atoms (sp{sup 2} → sp{sup 3}) to the Ir(111) substrate. This causes small displacements of the substrate atoms, which is revealed by the diffraction experiments. All metal clusters exhibit a fcc structure

  13. Probing cluster surface morphology by cryo spectroscopy of N2 on cationic nickel clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillinger, Sebastian; Mohrbach, Jennifer; Niedner-Schatteburg, Gereon

    2017-11-01

    We present the cryogenic (26 K) IR spectra of selected [Nin(N2)m]+ (n = 5-20, m = 1 - mmax), which strongly reveal n- and m-dependent features in the N2 stretching region, in conjunction with density functional theory modeling of some of these findings. The observed spectral features allow us to refine the kinetic classification [cf. J. Mohrbach, S. Dillinger, and G. Niedner-Schatteburg, J. Chem. Phys. 147, 184304 (2017)] and to define four classes of structure related surface adsorption behavior: Class (1) of Ni6+, Ni13+, and Ni19+ are highly symmetrical clusters with all smooth surfaces of equally coordinated Ni atoms that entertain stepwise N2 adsorption up to stoichiometric N2:Nisurface saturation. Class (2) of Ni12+ and Ni18+ are highly symmetrical clusters minus one. Their relaxed smooth surfaces reorganize by enhanced N2 uptake toward some low coordinated Ni surface atoms with double N2 occupation. Class (3) of Ni5+ and Ni7+ through Ni11+ are small clusters of rough surfaces with low coordinated Ni surface atoms, and some reveal semi-internal Ni atoms of high next-neighbor coordination. Surface reorganization upon N2 uptake turns rough into rough surface by Ni atom migration and turns octahedral based structures into pentagonal bipyramidal structures. Class (4) of Ni14+ through Ni17+ and Ni20+ are large clusters with rough and smooth surface areas. They possess smooth icosahedral surfaces with some proximate capping atom(s) on one hemisphere of the icosahedron with the other one largely unaffected.

  14. Mixture model modal clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Chacón, José E.

    2016-01-01

    The two most extended density-based approaches to clustering are surely mixture model clustering and modal clustering. In the mixture model approach, the density is represented as a mixture and clusters are associated to the different mixture components. In modal clustering, clusters are understood as regions of high density separated from each other by zones of lower density, so that they are closely related to certain regions around the density modes. If the true density is indeed in the as...

  15. Unsupervised ensemble minority clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzàlez Pellicer, Edgar; Turmo Borras, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Cluster analysis lies at the core of most unsupervised learning tasks. However, the majority of clustering algorithms depend on the all-in assumption, in which all objects belong to some cluster, and perform poorly on minority clustering tasks, in which a small fraction of signal data stands against a majority of noise. The approaches proposed so far for minority clustering are supervised: they require the number and distribution of the foreground and background clusters. In supervised learni...

  16. Quantum Monte Carlo programming for atoms, molecules, clusters, and solids

    CERN Document Server

    Schattke, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    In one source, this textbook provides quick and comprehensive access to quantitative calculations in materials science. The authors address both newcomers as well as researchers who would like to become familiar with QMC in order to apply to their research. As such, they cover the basic theory required for applying the method, and describe how to transfer this knowledge into calculation. The book includes a series of problems of increasing difficulty with associated stand-alone programs which will be available for free download.

  17. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  18. Atoms, Molecules and Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in Applications of Quantum Mechanics to 'Atoms, Molecules and Radiation' will be held at the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore from December 8 to 20. 2014. The Course is primarily aimed at teachers teaching quantum mechanics and/ or atomic and molecular physics at the UG / PG level.

  19. When Atoms Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  20. Atomicity in Electronic Commerce,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Atomicity in Electronic Commerce J. D. Tygar January 1996 CMU-CS-96-112 School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213...other research sponsor. Keywords: electronic commerce , atomicity, NetBill, IBIP, cryptography, transaction pro- cessing, ACID, franking, electronic ...goods over networks. Electronic commerce has inspired a large variety of work. Unfortunately, much of that work ignores traditional transaction

  1. Atomic properties of elements 114 and 118 and their adsorption on inert surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaldor U.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present fully relativistic coupled cluster calculations of ionization potentials, electron affinities, and polarizabilities of superheavy elements 114 and 118, along with their lighter homologues, lead and radon. The combination of the 4-component Dirac Hamiltonian with the state of the art coupled cluster approach allows us to achieve very good agreement with experimental values for the lighter elements; similar precision can be expected for our predictions for the superheavy atoms. The trends in the atomic properties are discussed, demonstrating the strong relativistic effects. Using the calculated atomic properties, adsorption enthalpies of the superheavy atoms on inert surfaces are estimated and shown to be rather low for both elements.

  2. Theoretical atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This expanded and updated well-established textbook contains an advanced presentation of quantum mechanics adapted to the requirements of modern atomic physics. It includes topics of current interest such as semiclassical theory, chaos, atom optics and Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic gases. In order to facilitate the consolidation of the material covered, various problems are included, together with complete solutions. The emphasis on theory enables the reader to appreciate the fundamental assumptions underlying standard theoretical constructs and to embark on independent research projects. The fourth edition of Theoretical Atomic Physics contains an updated treatment of the sections involving scattering theory and near-threshold phenomena manifest in the behaviour of cold atoms (and molecules). Special attention is given to the quantization of weakly bound states just below the continuum threshold and to low-energy scattering and quantum reflection just above. Particular emphasis is laid on the fundamen...

  3. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  4. Maximally Atomic Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Brzozowski

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The atoms of a regular language are non-empty intersections of complemented and uncomplemented quotients of the language. Tight upper bounds on the number of atoms of a language and on the quotient complexities of atoms are known. We introduce a new class of regular languages, called the maximally atomic languages, consisting of all languages meeting these bounds. We prove the following result: If L is a regular language of quotient complexity n and G is the subgroup of permutations in the transition semigroup T of the minimal DFA of L, then L is maximally atomic if and only if G is transitive on k-subsets of 1,...,n for 0 <= k <= n and T contains a transformation of rank n-1.

  5. Seniority-based coupled cluster theory

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Thomas M; Stein, Tamar; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2014-01-01

    Doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI) with optimized orbitals often accurately describes strong correlations while working in a Hilbert space much smaller than that needed for full configuration interaction. However, the scaling of such calculations remains combinatorial with system size. Pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) is very successful in reproducing DOCI energetically, but can do so with low polynomial scaling ($N^3$, disregarding the two-electron integral transformation from atomic to molecular orbitals). We show here several examples illustrating the success of pCCD in reproducing both the DOCI energy and wave function, and show how this success frequently comes about. What DOCI and pCCD lack are an effective treatment of dynamic correlations, which we here add by including higher-seniority cluster amplitudes which are excluded from pCCD. This frozen pair coupled cluster approach is comparable in cost to traditional closed-shell coupled cluster methods with results that are competitive fo...

  6. Size-dependent mobility of gold nano-clusters during growth on chemically modified graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin R. Bell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nano-clusters were grown on chemically modified graphene by direct sputter deposition. Transmission electron microscopy of the nano-clusters on these electron-transparent substrates reveals an unusual bimodal island size distribution (ISD. A kinetic Monte Carlo model of growth incorporating a size-dependent cluster mobility rule uniquely reproduces the bimodal ISD, providing strong evidence for the mobility of large clusters during surface growth. The cluster mobility exponent of −5/3 is consistent with cluster motion via one-dimensional diffusion of gold atoms around the edges of the nano-clusters.

  7. Structural, electronic, vibrational and optical properties of Bin clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dan; Shen, Wanting; Zhang, Chunfang; Lu, Pengfei; Wang, Shumin

    2017-10-01

    The neutral, anionic and cationic bismuth clusters with the size n up to 14 are investigated by using B3LYP functional within the regime of density functional theory and the LAN2DZ basis set. By analysis of the geometries of the Bin (n = 2-14) clusters, where cationic and anionic bismuth clusters are largely similar to those of neutral ones, a periodic effect by adding units with one to four atoms into smaller cluster to form larger cluster is drawn for the stable structures of bismuth clusters. An even-odd alteration is shown for the properties of the clusters, such as the calculated binding energies and dissociation energies, as well as frontier orbital energies, electron affinities, ionization energies. All the properties indicate that the Bi4 cluster is the most possible existence in bismuth-containing materials, which supports the most recent experiment. The orbital compositions, infrared and Raman activities and the ultraviolet absorption of the most possible tetramer bismuth cluster are given in detail to reveal the periodic tendency of adding bismuth atoms and the stability of tetramer bismuth cluster.

  8. Comparison of Se and Te clusters produced by ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzyna, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructures based on tellurium and selenium are materials used as components for the manufacturing topological insulators. Therefore it is crucial to precisely characterize these materials. In this work the emission of selenium and tellurium cluster ions, sputtered by Bi+ primary ion guns, was investigated by using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF SIMS). It has been found that BixTex and BixSex clusters appear in addition to Sex and Tex clusters in the mass range up to 1300 m/z. Local maxima or minima (magic numbers) are observed in the ion intensity versus a number of atoms per cluster for both positive and negative ions spectra for all types of clusters and primary ions used. These extrema can be attributed to different yield and stability of certain clusters but also to fragmentation of high-mass clusters.

  9. Comparison of Se and Te clusters produced by ion bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trzyna Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructures based on tellurium and selenium are materials used as components for the manufacturing topological insulators. Therefore it is crucial to precisely characterize these materials. In this work the emission of selenium and tellurium cluster ions, sputtered by Bi+ primary ion guns, was investigated by using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF SIMS. It has been found that BixTex and BixSex clusters appear in addition to Sex and Tex clusters in the mass range up to ~ 1300 m/z. Local maxima or minima (magic numbers are observed in the ion intensity versus a number of atoms per cluster for both positive and negative ions spectra for all types of clusters and primary ions used. These extrema can be attributed to different yield and stability of certain clusters but also to fragmentation of high-mass clusters.

  10. Polarization Bremsstrahlung on Atoms, Plasmas, Nanostructures and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Astapenko, Valeriy

    2013-01-01

    The book is devoted to the modern theory and experimental manifestation of Polarization Bremsstrahlung (PB) which arises due to scattering of charged particles from various targets: atoms, nanostructures (including atomic clusters, nanoparticle in dielectric matrix, fullerens, graphene-like two-dimensional atomic structure) and in condensed matter (monocrystals, polycrystals, partially ordered crystals and amorphous matter) The present book addresses mainly researchers interested in the radiative processes during the interaction between fast particles and matter. It also will be useful for post-graduate students specializing in radiation physics and related fields.

  11. Management of cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2012-01-01

    and agitation. Patients may have up to eight attacks per day. Episodic cluster headache (ECH) occurs in clusters of weeks to months duration, whereas chronic cluster headache (CCH) attacks occur for more than 1 year without remissions. Management of cluster headache is divided into acute attack treatment...

  12. Clustering of correlated networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dorogovtsev, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    We obtain the clustering coefficient, the degree-dependent local clustering, and the mean clustering of networks with arbitrary correlations between the degrees of the nearest-neighbor vertices. The resulting formulas allow one to determine the nature of the clustering of a network.

  13. Cluster knockout reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-07

    Apr 7, 2014 ... 2 fm) N–N interaction enhances clustering in the low density surface region of the nuclei. Therefore, to study the clustering aspect of the nuclei, one has to have high projectile energies but has to choose kinematics which probes the low momentum component of the bound clusters. While the cluster pickup ...

  14. Cluster knockout reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-07

    Apr 7, 2014 ... Cluster knockout reactions are expected to reveal the amount of clustering (such as that of , d and even of heavier clusters such as 12C, 16O etc.) in the target nucleus. In simple terms, incident medium high-energy nuclear projectile interacts strongly with the cluster (present in the target nucleus) as if it ...

  15. Doping and cluster formation in diamond

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2011-09-09

    Introducing a cluster formation model, we provide a rational fundamental viewpoint for the difficulty to achieve n-type dopeddiamond. We argue that codoping is the way forward to form appropriately doped shallow regions in diamond and other forms of carbon such as graphene. The electronegativities of the codopants are an important design criterion for the donor atom to efficiently donate its electron. We propose that the nearest neighbour codopants should be of a considerably higher electronegativity compared to the donor atom. Codoping strategies should focus on phosphorous for which there are a number of appropriate codopants.

  16. Cluster processes in gases and plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Boris M

    2009-01-01

    Boris M. Smirnov received his Ph.D. in physics from Leningrad State University in 1968. After working in different research positions, he finally accepted a post as head of one of the divisions of the Institute for High Temperatures at the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow in 1986. Professor Smirnov is the author and co-author of approximately 50 books as well as 400 research articles in plasma physics, atomic physics, and atomic clusters. He is Vice Chairman of the National Council for Low Temperature Plasma and Chairman ofa Section on Elementary Processes in Plasma. Professor Smirnov`s r

  17. Single-atom nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Prati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Single-Atom Nanoelectronics covers the fabrication of single-atom devices and related technology, as well as the relevant electronic equipment and the intriguing new phenomena related to single-atom and single-electron effects in quantum devices. It also covers the alternative approaches related to both silicon- and carbon-based technologies, also from the point of view of large-scale industrial production. The publication provides a comprehensive picture of the state of the art at the cutting edge and constitutes a milestone in the emerging field of beyond-CMOS technology. Although there are

  18. Physics of the atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wehr, Russell M; Adair, Thomas W

    1984-01-01

    The fourth edition of Physics of the Atom is designed to meet the modern need for a better understanding of the atomic age. It is an introduction suitable for students with a background in university physics and mathematical competence at the level of calculus. This book is designed to be an extension of the introductory university physics course into the realm of atomic physics. It should give students a proficiency in this field comparable to their proficiency in mechanics, heat, sound, light, and electricity.

  19. Reactivity of Clusters and Bulk Surfaces - A Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, Arne

    1996-03-01

    Single-crystal surfaces are characterized by a large number of equivalent binding sites, while the surfaces of clusters are neither flat nor regular in shape. The cluster surface has convex shape and,thus, its atoms have a lower coordination number than atoms on a single-crystal surface. This difference in coordination number influences the chemical reactivity and, in that respect, cluster surfaces are similar to surfaces rich in 'defects' such as steps, kinks etc. A cluster consiting of a few atoms has a limited possibility to accomodate the energy released in an exothermic reaction compared with a bulk surface, for which the bulk acts as a heat reservoir. This means that a product formed in a chemical reaction on a free cluster in vaccum is metastable, and can decay by desorption of the adsorbed molecule or by evaporation of cluster atoms. Our work covers both experimental investigations and first-principle electronic-structure calculations. In the experiments, the reactivity of neutral clusters is studied at single-collision-like conditions, which enables the determination of absolute numbers of the reaction probability (S) in a collision. A beam of clusters is produced in a laser vaporization source at ambient or liquid-nitrogen temperature. After skimming, the cluster beam passes through a cell with reactive gas, and the clusters experience one or a few collisions with gas molecules. The reactivity of some transition metals and the coinage metal Cu will be discussed. In some cases, the reactivities of transition-metal clusters have attained bulk-like characteristics, with high values of S for O2 and CO almost independent of size already at small clusters, but the finite size of the cluster is also manifested by product decomposition. The chemical reactivity of Cu clusters is controlled by the delocalized 4s-orbitals, as described by the jellium model. The measured size dependent reactivity is also analyzed using molecular cluster calculations within the

  20. Nuclear clustering in the energy density functional approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebran, J.-P., E-mail: jean-paul.ebran@cea.fr [CEA,DAM,DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Khan, E. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Université Paris-Sud CEA, IN2P3 CNRS, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Nikšić, T.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-10-15

    Nuclear Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) are a microscopic tool of choice extensively used over the whole chart to successfully describe the properties of atomic nuclei ensuing from their quantum liquid nature. In the last decade, they also have proved their ability to deal with the cluster phenomenon, shedding a new light on its fundamental understanding by treating on an equal footing both quantum liquid and cluster aspects of nuclei. Such a unified microscopic description based on nucleonic degrees of freedom enables to tackle the question pertaining to the origin of the cluster phenomenon and emphasizes intrinsic mechanisms leading to the emergence of clusters in nuclei.

  1. Geometry-dependent atomic multipole models for the water molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loboda, O; Millot, C

    2017-10-28

    Models of atomic electric multipoles for the water molecule have been optimized in order to reproduce the electric potential around the molecule computed by ab initio calculations at the coupled cluster level of theory with up to noniterative triple excitations in an augmented triple-zeta quality basis set. Different models of increasing complexity, from atomic charges up to models containing atomic charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles, have been obtained. The geometry dependence of these atomic multipole models has been investigated by changing bond lengths and HOH angle to generate 125 molecular structures (reduced to 75 symmetry-unique ones). For several models, the atomic multipole components have been fitted as a function of the geometry by a Taylor series of fourth order in monomer coordinate displacements.

  2. Clustering in analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drab, Klaudia; Daszykowski, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Data clustering plays an important role in the exploratory analysis of analytical data, and the use of clustering methods has been acknowledged in different fields of science. In this paper, principles of data clustering are presented with a direct focus on clustering of analytical data. The role of the clustering process in the analytical workflow is underlined, and its potential impact on the analytical workflow is emphasized.

  3. Physicochemical properties of technetium acido clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryutchkov, Sergei V.

    1998-10-01

    The review is concerned with the electronic and molecular structure and physicochemical properties of all types of technetium clusters with acido ligands described to date. As a typical cluster-forming metal, technetium possesses a number of specific, anomalous cluster-forming properties that can be interpreted in terms of greater capability of outer diffuse 5s(5p) AOs to participate in the formation of additional M-M bonds in technetium acido clusters as compared to analogous clusters of other transition d-elements. Theoretical interpretation of the electronic and molecular structure and properties of technetium clusters has been confirmed by experimental data (X-ray analysis, magnetochemistry, and EPR, optical, X-ray photoelectron and X-ray emission spectroscopy). The experimentally observed increased stability of technetium clusters with odd numbers of 'metallic' electrons and a decrease in the effective charge on Tc atoms upon formation of the M-M bonds are discussed. Recently found 'anomalous' properties of technetium and rhenium compounds with ferrocenium cations (in particular, unusual low-temperature electron emission on X-ray irradiation) are also considered. The bibliography includes 101 references.

  4. Physicochemical properties of technetium acido clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryutchkov, Sergei V [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-10-31

    The review is concerned with the electronic and molecular structure and physicochemical properties of all types of technetium clusters with acido ligands described to date. As a typical cluster-forming metal, technetium possesses a number of specific, anomalous cluster-forming properties that can be interpreted in terms of greater capability of outer diffuse 5s(5p) AOs to participate in the formation of additional M-M bonds in technetium acido clusters as compared to analogous clusters of other transition d-elements. Theoretical interpretation of the electronic and molecular structure and properties of technetium clusters has been confirmed by experimental data (X-ray analysis, magnetochemistry, and EPR, optical, X-ray photoelectron and X-ray emission spectroscopy). The experimentally observed increased stability of technetium clusters with odd numbers of 'metallic' electrons and a decrease in the effective charge on Tc atoms upon formation of the M-M bonds are discussed. Recently found 'anomalous' properties of technetium and rhenium compounds with ferrocenium cations (in particular, unusual low-temperature electron emission on X-ray irradiation) are also considered. The bibliography includes 101 references.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 6 giants atomic data and equivalent widths (Mucciarelli+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucciarelli, A.; Monaco, L.; Bonifacio, P.; Saviane, I.

    2017-07-01

    Atomic data (wavelength, oscillator strength, excitation potential and measured equivalent width) for all the measured spectral lines in six giant stars of the stellar cluster Gaia1 are provided. (2 data files).

  6. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Physics and Chemistry of Finite Systems : from Clusters to Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Khanna, S; Rao, B

    1992-01-01

    Recent innovations in experimental techniques such as molecular and cluster beam epitaxy, supersonic jet expansion, matrix isolation and chemical synthesis are increasingly enabling researchers to produce materials by design and with atomic dimension. These materials constrained by sire, shape, and symmetry range from clusters containing as few as two atoms to nanoscale materials consisting of thousands of atoms. They possess unique structuraI, electronic, magnetic and optical properties that depend strongly on their size and geometry. The availability of these materials raises many fundamental questions as weIl as technological possibilities. From the academic viewpoint, the most pertinent question concerns the evolution of the atomic and electronic structure of the system as it grows from micro clusters to crystals. At what stage, for example, does the cluster look as if it is a fragment of the corresponding crystal. How do electrons forming bonds in micro-clusters transform to bands in solids? How do the s...

  7. Energetic Study of Helium Cluster Nucleation and Growth in 14YWT through First Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingye Gan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available First principles calculations have been performed to energetically investigate the helium cluster nucleation, formation and growth behavior in the nano-structured ferritic alloy 14YWT. The helium displays strong affinity to the oxygen:vacancy (O:Vac pair. By investigating various local environments of the vacancy, we find that the energy cost for He cluster growth increases with the appearance of solutes in the reference unit. He atom tends to join the He cluster in the directions away from the solute atoms. Meanwhile, the He cluster tends to expand in the directions away from the solute atoms. A growth criterion is proposed based on the elastic instability strain of the perfect iron lattice in order to determine the maximum number of He atoms at the vacancy site. We find that up to seven He atoms can be trapped at a single vacancy. However, it is reduced to five if the vacancy is pre-occupied by an oxygen atom. Furthermore, the solute atoms within nanoclusters, such as Ti and Y, will greatly limit the growth of the He cluster. A migration energy barrier study is performed to discuss the reduced mobility of the He atom/He cluster in 14YWT.

  8. Atomic & Molecular Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic & Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  9. The Casimir atomic pendulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razmi, H. [Department of Physics, University of Qom, Qom 37185-359 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: razmi@qom.ac.ir; Abdollahi, M. [Department of Physics, University of Qom, Qom 37185-359 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mah.abdollahi@gmail.com

    2008-11-10

    We want to introduce an atomic pendulum whose driving force (torque) is due to the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Applying the well-known Casimir-Polder effect to a special configuration (a combined structure of an atomic nanostring and a conducting plate), an atomic pendulum (Casimir atomic pendulum) is designed. Using practically acceptable data corresponding to the already known world of nanotechnology and based on reasonable/reliable numerical estimates, the period of oscillation for the pendulum is computed. This pendulum can be considered as both a new micro(nano)-electromechanical system and a new simple vacuum machine. Its design may be considered as a first step towards realizing the visualized vacuum (Casimir) clock{exclamation_point}.

  10. The Casimir atomic pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmi, H.; Abdollahi, M.

    2008-11-01

    We want to introduce an atomic pendulum whose driving force (torque) is due to the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Applying the well-known Casimir-Polder effect to a special configuration (a combined structure of an atomic nanostring and a conducting plate), an atomic pendulum (Casimir atomic pendulum) is designed. Using practically acceptable data corresponding to the already known world of nanotechnology and based on reasonable/reliable numerical estimates, the period of oscillation for the pendulum is computed. This pendulum can be considered as both a new micro(nano)-electromechanical system and a new simple vacuum machine. Its design may be considered as a first step towards realizing the visualized vacuum (Casimir) clock!

  11. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  12. Dalton's Atomic Theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DOBBIN, LEONARD

    1896-01-01

    WITH reference to the communications from the authors and from the reviewer of the "New View of the Origin of Dalton's Atomic Theory," published in NATURE for May 14, I beg leave to offer the following remarks...

  13. Atomic Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) is a new technology which can be used for developing high performance laser components for atom-based sensors...

  14. Topics in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Charles E

    2006-01-01

    The study of atomic physics propelled us into the quantum age in the early twentieth century and carried us into the twenty-first century with a wealth of new and, in some cases, unexplained phenomena. Topics in Atomic Physics provides a foundation for students to begin research in modern atomic physics. It can also serve as a reference because it contains material that is not easily located in other sources. A distinguishing feature is the thorough exposition of the quantum mechanical hydrogen atom using both the traditional formulation and an alternative treatment not usually found in textbooks. The alternative treatment exploits the preeminent nature of the pure Coulomb potential and places the Lenz vector operator on an equal footing with other operators corresponding to classically conserved quantities. A number of difficult to find proofs and derivations are included as is development of operator formalism that permits facile solution of the Stark effect in hydrogen. Discussion of the classical hydrogen...

  15. Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadeishi, T.; McLaughlin, R.

    1978-08-01

    The design and development of a Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer for trace element analysis are described. An instruction manual is included which details the operation, adjustment, and maintenance. Specifications and circuit diagrams are given. (WHK)

  16. Atomic Clocks Research - An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-15

    magnet. Since atomic deflection in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is inversely proportional to the square of the atomic speed, the atomic velocity...purifier and controlled leak; an atomic source (i.e., the dissociator under 39 study); a dipole electromagnetic with pole pieces shaped to produce an...34Relaxation Magnetique d’Atomes de Rubidium sur des Parois Paraffines," J. Phys. (Paris) 24, 379 (1963). 21. S. Wexler, "Deposition of Atomic Beams

  17. Wave Atom Based Watermarking

    OpenAIRE

    Bukhari, Ijaz; Nuhman-ul-Haq; Hyat, Khizar

    2013-01-01

    Watermarking helps in ensuring originality, ownership and copyrights of a digital image. This paper aims at embedding a Watermark in an image using Wave Atom Transform. Preference of Wave Atoms on other transformations has been due to its sparser expansion, adaptability to the direction of local pattern, and sharp frequency localization. In this scheme, we had tried to spread the watermark in an image so that the information at one place is very small and undetectable. In order to extract the...

  18. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  19. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  20. Atomic Bomb Health Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Luckey, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    Media reports of deaths and devastation produced by atomic bombs convinced people around the world that all ionizing radiation is harmful. This concentrated attention on fear of miniscule doses of radiation. Soon the linear no threshold (LNT) paradigm was converted into laws. Scientifically valid information about the health benefits from low dose irradiation was ignored. Here are studies which show increased health in Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. Parameters include decreased mutation,...

  1. Atomic interferometry; Interferometrie atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudon, J.; Robert, J. [Paris-13 Univ., 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2004-07-01

    Since the theoretical works of L. De Broglie (1924) and the famous experiment of Davisson and Germer (1927), we know that a wave is linked with any particle of mass m by the relation {lambda} = h/(mv), where {lambda} is the wavelength, v the particle velocity and h is the Planck constant. The basic principle of the interferometry of any material particle, atom, molecule or aggregate is simple: using a simple incident wave, several mutually consistent waves (with well-defined relative phases) are generated and controllable phase-shifts are introduced between them in order to generate a wave which is the sum of the previous waves. An interference figure is obtained which consists in a succession of dark and bright fringes. The atomic interferometry is based on the same principle but involves different techniques, different wave equations, but also different beams, sources and correlations which are described in this book. Because of the small possible wavelengths and the wide range of possible atomic interactions, atomic interferometers can be used in many domains from the sub-micron lithography to the construction of sensors like: inertial sensors, gravity-meters, accelerometers, gyro-meters etc. The first chapter is a preliminary study of the space and time diffraction of atoms. The next chapters is devoted to the description of slit, light separation and polarization interferometers, and the last chapter treats of the properties of Bose-Einstein condensates which are interesting in atomic interferometry. (J.S.)

  2. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, M.; Tomonaga, M.; Amenomori, T.; Matsuo, T. (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-12-01

    Characteristic features of the leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. Dose estimates of atomic bomb radiation were based on T65D, but the new dosimetry system DS86 was used for some analyses. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic to atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. The threshold of CML occurrence in Hiroshima is likely to be between 0.5{approx}0.09 Gy. However, the threshold of acute leukemia appears to be nearly 1 Gy. In the distribution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes by French-American-British classification, there was no M3 case in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Although aplastic anemia has not increased as a late effect of the atomic bomb radiation exposure, many atypical leukemia or other myeloproliferative diseases who had been diagnosed as aplastic anemia or its related diseases have been experienced among atomic bomb survivors. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral T-cells in several atomic bomb survivors. (author).

  3. Structure of the thiolated Au130 cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlahuice-Flores, Alfredo; Santiago, Ulises; Bahena, Daniel; Vinogradova, Ekaterina; Conroy, Cecil V; Ahuja, Tarushee; Bach, Stephan B H; Ponce, Arturo; Wang, Gangli; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Whetten, Robert L

    2013-10-10

    The structure of the recently discovered Au130-thiolate and -dithiolate clusters is explored in a combined experiment-theory approach. Rapid electron diffraction in scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) enables atomic-resolution imaging of the gold core and the comparison with density functional theory (DFT)-optimized realistic structure models. The results are consistent with a 105-atom truncated-decahedral core protected by 25 short staple motifs, incorporating disulfide bridges linking the dithiolate ligands. The optimized structure also accounts, via time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) simulation, for the distinctive optical absorption spectrum, and rationalizes the special stability underlying the selective formation of the Au130 cluster in high yield. The structure is distinct from, yet shares some features with, each of the known Au102 and Au144/Au146 systems.

  4. Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy Of Metal Cluster-Adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D. M.; Kaldor, A.; Zakin, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    Recent development of the laser vaporization technique combined with mass-selective detection has made possible new studies of the fundamental chemical and physical properties of unsupported transition metal clusters as a function of the number of constituent atoms. A variety of experimental techniques have been developed in our laboratory to measure ionization threshold energies, magnetic moments, and gas phase reactivity of clusters. However, studies have so far been unable to determine the cluster structure or the chemical state of chemisorbed species on gas phase clusters. The application of infrared multiple photon dissociation IRMPD to obtain the IR absorption properties of metal cluster-adsorbate species in a molecular beam is described here. Specifically using a high power, pulsed CO2 laser as the infrared source, the IRMPD spectrum for methanol chemisorbed on small iron clusters is measured as a function of the number of both iron atoms and methanols in the complex for different methanol isotopes. Both the feasibility and potential utility of IRMPD for characterizing metal cluster-adsorbate interactions are demonstrated. The method is generally applicable to any cluster or cluster-adsorbate system dependent only upon the availability of appropriate high power infrared sources.

  5. Structure of transition metal clusters: A force-biased Monte Carlo approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbu, Dil K.; Biswas, Parthapratim

    2017-11-01

    We present a force-biased Monte Carlo (FMC) method for structural modeling of transition metal clusters of Fe, Ni, and Cu with 5 to 60 atoms. By employing the Finnis-Sinclair potential for Fe and the Sutton-Chen potential for Ni and Cu, the total energy of the clusters is minimized using a method that utilizes atomic forces in Monte Carlo simulations. The structural configurations of the clusters obtained from this biased Monte Carlo approach are analyzed and compared with the same from the Cambridge Cluster Database (CCD). The results show that the total-energy of the FMC clusters is very close to the corresponding value of the CCD clusters as listed in the Cambridge Cluster Database. A comparison of the FMC and CCD clusters is presented by computing the pair-correlation function, the bond-angle distribution, and the distribution of atomic-coordination numbers in the first-coordination shell, which provide information about the two-body and three-body correlation functions, the local atomic structure, and the bonding environment of the atoms in the clusters.

  6. What Makes Clusters Decline?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark....... The longitudinal study on the high-tech cluster reveals that technological lock-in and exit of key firms have contributed to decline. Entrepreneurship has a positive effect on the cluster’s adaptive capabilities, while multinational companies have contradicting effects by bringing in new resources to the cluster...

  7. Comprehensive cluster analysis with Transitivity Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkop, Tobias; Emig, Dorothea; Truss, Anke; Albrecht, Mario; Böcker, Sebastian; Baumbach, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Transitivity Clustering is a method for the partitioning of biological data into groups of similar objects, such as genes, for instance. It provides integrated access to various functions addressing each step of a typical cluster analysis. To facilitate this, Transitivity Clustering is accessible online and offers three user-friendly interfaces: a powerful stand-alone version, a web interface, and a collection of Cytoscape plug-ins. In this paper, we describe three major workflows: (i) protein (super)family detection with Cytoscape, (ii) protein homology detection with incomplete gold standards and (iii) clustering of gene expression data. This protocol guides the user through the most important features of Transitivity Clustering and takes ∼1 h to complete.

  8. Anomalous diamagnetic susceptibility in 13-atom platinum nanocluster superatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roduner, Emil; Jensen, Christopher; van Slageren, Joris; Rakoczy, Rainer A; Larlus, Oliver; Hunger, Michael

    2014-04-22

    We are used to being able to predict diamagnetic susceptibilities χD to a good approximation in atomic increments since there is normally little dependence on the chemical environment. Surprisingly, we find from SQUID magnetization measurements that the χD per Pt atom of zeolite-supported Pt13 nanoclusters exceeds that of Pt(2+) ions by a factor of 37-50. The observation verifies an earlier theoretical prediction. The phenomenon can be understood nearly quantitatively on the basis of a simple expression for diamagnetic susceptibility and the superatom nature of the 13-atom near-spherical cluster. The two main contributions come from ring currents in the delocalized hydride shell and from cluster molecular orbitals hosting the Pt 5d and Pt 6s electrons. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Mobile atomic gold as oxidation catalyst?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikaljevic, Djuro; Memmel, Norbert; Bertel, Erminald

    2018-01-01

    In a recent study we reported on the catalytic action of gold on the oxidative removal of carbon from carburized W(110) surfaces at high temperatures, shifting the desorption peak of the formed carbon monoxide by roughly 200 K from 1100 to 1150 K down to 900 K. Motivated by this observation we examined the structure/morphology of gold on these surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy after annealing to various temperatures, both with and without the presence of adsorbed oxygen. With increasing temperature structural rearrangements of the gold clusters/islands are observed which become most pronounced in the temperature range where the catalytic reaction sets in. In the same temperature range gold-induced segregation of carbon to the surface occurs. As the strong structural changes of the gold clusters require the existence of mobile gold species, we suggest that mobile atomic gold is related to both the enhanced carbon segregation and the observed catalytic effect.

  10. Universal bosonic tetramers of dimer-atom-atom structure

    OpenAIRE

    Deltuva, A.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable four-boson states having an approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are studied using momentum-space integral equations for the four-particle transition operators. For a given Efimov trimer the universal properties of the lowest associated tetramer are determined. The impact of this tetramer on the atom-trimer and dimer-dimer collisions is analyzed. The reliability of the three-body dimer-atom-atom model is studied.

  11. FY 1997 research and development of fusion domains. Part 1. Studies on cluster science; 1997 nendo seika hokokusho (yugo ryoiki kenkyu kaihatsu). 1. Cluster Science no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Studies were made on clusters which are thought to play important roles in status changes in substances (coagulation, crystallization and phase segregation) and chemical reactions (combustion, aqueous solution reaction and catalytic reaction). In the study of clusters by using infrared spectra, a method was developed to detect by using mass analyzer the cluster ion amount produced by dual resonance between resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and infrared lights. Fabrication of a Terahertz spectrometer was planned to enable high-resolution and high-accuracy observation on molecular clusters. Clusters consisting of silver atoms and ammonia molecules were successfully observed. A method was developed to investigate size dependence of cluster reactivity by using a Fourier converted ion cyclotron resonant mass analyzer. In addition, studies were conducted on clusters in liquids and aqueous solutions, clusters frozen in surface and matrix, and clusters stabilized in micro-space. 96 refs., 34 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Fast Constrained Spectral Clustering and Cluster Ensemble with Random Projection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wenfen Liu; Mao Ye; Jianghong Wei; Xuexian Hu

    2017-01-01

    Constrained spectral clustering (CSC) method can greatly improve the clustering accuracy with the incorporation of constraint information into spectral clustering and thus has been paid academic attention widely...

  13. Clustering high dimensional data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assent, Ira

    2012-01-01

    High-dimensional data, i.e., data described by a large number of attributes, pose specific challenges to clustering. The so-called ‘curse of dimensionality’, coined originally to describe the general increase in complexity of various computational problems as dimensionality increases, is known...... for clustering are required. Consequently, recent research has focused on developing techniques and clustering algorithms specifically for high-dimensional data. Still, open research issues remain. Clustering is a data mining task devoted to the automatic grouping of data based on mutual similarity. Each cluster...... groups objects that are similar to one another, whereas dissimilar objects are assigned to different clusters, possibly separating out noise. In this manner, clusters describe the data structure in an unsupervised manner, i.e., without the need for class labels. A number of clustering paradigms exist...

  14. Perspective: Exchange reactions in thiolate-protected metal clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Niihori

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Thiolate-protected metal clusters can exchange ligands or metal atoms with other substances such as coexisting ligands, complexes, and metal clusters in solution. Using these reactions, it is possible to synthesize metal clusters with new physical and chemical properties. Although the occurrence of such reactions was recognized nearly 20 years ago, their details were not well understood. In recent years, techniques for the precise synthesis of metal clusters and their characterization have progressed considerably and, as a result, details of these reactions have been clarified. In this perspective, we focus on the most-studied thiolate-protected gold clusters and provide a summary of recent findings as well as future expectations concerning the exchange reactions of these clusters.

  15. Sputtering of neutral and ionic indium clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Z.; Coon, S.R.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.; Von Nagy-Felsobuki, E.I.

    1993-10-01

    Secondary neutral and secondary ion cluster yields were measured during the sputtering of a polycrystalline indium surface by normally incident {approximately}4 keV Ar{sup +} ions. In the secondary neutral mass spectra, indium clusters as large as In{sub 32} were observed. In the secondary ion mass spectra, indium clusters up to In{sub 18}{sup +} were recorded. Cluster yields obtained from both the neutral and ion channel exhibited a power law dependence on the number of constituent atoms, n, in the cluster, with the exponents measured to be {minus}5.6 and {minus}4. 1, respectively. An abundance drop was observed at n=8, 15, and 16 in both the neutral and ion yield distributions suggesting that the stability of the ion (either secondary ion or photoion) plays a significant role in the observed distributions. In addition, our experiments suggest that unimolecular decomposition of the neutral cluster may also plays an important role in the measured yield distributions.

  16. Sampling the Hydrogen Atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graves N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A model is proposed for the hydrogen atom in which the electron is an objectively real particle orbiting at very near to light speed. The model is based on the postulate that certain velocity terms associated with orbiting bodies can be considered as being af- fected by relativity. This leads to a model for the atom in which the stable electron orbits are associated with orbital velocities where Gamma is n /α , leading to the idea that it is Gamma that is quantized and not angular momentum as in the Bohr and other models. The model provides a mechanism which leads to quantization of energy levels within the atom and also provides a simple mechanical explanation for the Fine Struc- ture Constant. The mechanism is closely associated with the Sampling theorem and the related phenomenon of aliasing developed in the mid-20th century by engineers at Bell labs.

  17. Pulsars in Globular Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Camilo, Fernando; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2005-01-01

    More than 100 radio pulsars have been detected in 24 globular clusters. The largest observed samples are in Terzan 5 and 47 Tucanae, which together contain 45 pulsars. Accurate timing solutions, including positions in the cluster, are known for many of these pulsars. Here we provide an observational overview of some properties of pulsars in globular clusters, as well as properties of the globular clusters with detected pulsars. The many recent detections also provide a new opportunity to re-e...

  18. Cluster Physics with Merging Galaxy Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandor M. Molnar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a unique opportunity to study matter in a parameter space which cannot be explored in our laboratories on Earth. In the standard LCDM model, where the total density is dominated by the cosmological constant ($Lambda$ and the matter density by cold dark matter (CDM, structure formation is hierarchical, and clusters grow mostly by merging.Mergers of two massive clusters are the most energetic events in the universe after the Big Bang,hence they provide a unique laboratory to study cluster physics.The two main mass components in clusters behave differently during collisions:the dark matter is nearly collisionless, responding only to gravity, while the gas is subject to pressure forces and dissipation, and shocks and turbulenceare developed during collisions. In the present contribution we review the different methods used to derive the physical properties of merging clusters. Different physical processes leave their signatures on different wavelengths, thusour review is based on a multifrequency analysis. In principle, the best way to analyze multifrequency observations of merging clustersis to model them using N-body/HYDRO numerical simulations. We discuss the results of such detailed analyses.New high spatial and spectral resolution ground and space based telescopeswill come online in the near future. Motivated by these new opportunities,we briefly discuss methods which will be feasible in the near future in studying merging clusters.

  19. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuexing [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs-. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy.

  20. Interatomic scattering in energy dependent photoelectron spectra of Ar clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patanen, M.; Benkoula, S.; Nicolas, C.; Goel, A. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Antonsson, E. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie Institut für Chemie und Biochemie, Fachbereich Biologie, Chemie, Pharmazie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Neville, J. J. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Department of Chemistry, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 6E2 (Canada); Miron, C., E-mail: Catalin.Miron@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP), ‘Horia Hulubei’ National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 30 Reactorului Street, RO-077125 Măgurele, Jud. Ilfov (Romania)

    2015-09-28

    Soft X-ray photoelectron spectra of Ar 2p levels of atomic argon and argon clusters are recorded over an extended range of photon energies. The Ar 2p intensity ratios between atomic argon and clusters’ surface and bulk components reveal oscillations similar to photoelectron extended X-ray absorption fine structure signal (PEXAFS). We demonstrate here that this technique allows us to analyze separately the PEXAFS signals from surface and bulk sites of free-standing, neutral clusters, revealing a bond contraction at the surface.

  1. Structural evolution of small ruthenium cluster anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldt, Eugen [Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hehn, Anna-Sophia; Ahlrichs, Reinhart [Institute für Physikalische Chemie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Kaiserstrasse 12, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kappes, Manfred M.; Schooss, Detlef, E-mail: detlef.schooss@kit.edu [Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute für Physikalische Chemie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Kaiserstrasse 12, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-01-14

    The structures of ruthenium cluster anions have been investigated using a combination of trapped ion electron diffraction and density functional theory computations in the size range from eight to twenty atoms. In this size range, three different structural motifs are found: Ru{sub 8}{sup −}–Ru{sub 12}{sup −} have simple cubic structures, Ru{sub 13}{sup −}–Ru{sub 16}{sup −} form double layered hexagonal structures, and larger clusters form close packed motifs. For Ru{sub 17}{sup −}, we find hexagonal close packed stacking, whereas octahedral structures occur for Ru{sub 18}{sup −}–Ru{sub 20}{sup −}. Our calculations also predict simple cubic structures for the smaller clusters Ru{sub 4}{sup −}–Ru{sub 7}{sup −}, which were not accessible to electron diffraction measurements.

  2. CO adsorption on neutral iridium clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kerpal, Christian; Meijer, Gerard; Fielicke, André

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of carbon monoxide on neutral iridium clusters in the size range of n = 3 to 21 atoms is investigated with infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy. For each cluster size only a single v(CO) band is present with frequencies in the range between 1962 cm-1 (n = 8) and 1985 cm-1 (n = 18) which can be attributed to an atop binding geometry. This behaviour is compared to the CO binding geometries on clusters of other group 9 and 10 transition metals as well as to that on extended surfaces. The preference of Ir for atop binding is rationalized by relativistic effects on the electronic structure of the later 5d metals.

  3. Clustering of Galaxy Clusters at Intermediate Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postman, Marc; Lauer, Tod R.; Oegerle, William

    2001-02-01

    We propose to continue a redshift survey of 141 objectively selected galaxy clusters to measure their clustering properties and constrain models of the formation of structure in the universe. This is the first redshift survey to probe cluster correlations on comoving scales of ~ 50h_75^-1 Mpc at z ~ 0.5 and will thus provide an original and important constraint on the evolution of large-scale structure. The cluster sample comes from our deep (I_AB ≤ 24), contiguous 16 deg^2 I-band KPNO 4-m survey. The proposed observations distinguish themselves from other ongoing distant cluster redshift work in that this survey will be able to provide meaningful constraints on the large-scale spatial distribution of moderate redshift clusters owing to the large angular area and contiguous geometry of the parent survey. The availability of the HET/LRS provides a highly efficient solution to the acquisition of redshifts for the 80 cluster candidates with 0.6 ≤ z_est ≤ 0.7. The systems with z_est > 0.6 are needed to assure complete sampling of the cluster population at z_obs ~ 0.5. The survey declination (52+/-2°) and observational strategy are extremely well-suited to the initial capabilities and queue observing mode of the HET. The 4m/RCSP is well suited to completing the survey of the z_est data. This survey began using the KPNO 4m to obtain redshifts for the 0.3 ≤ z_est < 0.6 sample. So far, we have observed 31 clusters and we're presently ~25% complete with the z_est < 0.6 observations (75% complete for z_est < 0.4). We have discovered at least 2 superclusters at z=0.23 and z=0.50.

  4. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  5. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia C. Capelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's, all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules, the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  6. Optically pumped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Happer, William; Walker, Thad

    2010-01-01

    Covering the most important knowledge on optical pumping of atoms, this ready reference is backed by numerous examples of modelling computation for optical pumped systems. The authors show for the first time that modern scientific computing software makes it practical to analyze the full, multilevel system of optically pumped atoms. To make the discussion less abstract, the authors have illustrated key points with sections of MATLAB codes. To make most effective use of contemporary mathematical software, it is especially useful to analyze optical pumping situations in the Liouville spa

  7. Atoms in Agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, Thomas S. [University of Tennessee

    1965-01-01

    Agriculture benefits from the applications of research. Radioactive techniques have been used to study soils, plants, microbes, insects, farm animals, and new ways to use and preserve foodstuffs. Radioactive atoms are not used directly by farmers but are used in research directed by the U. S. Department of Agriculture and Atomic Energy Commission, by the agricultural experiment stations of the various states, and by numerous public and private research institutions. From such research come improved materials and methods which are used on the farm.

  8. Korean atomic bomb victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Yukuo

    2009-01-01

    After colonizing Korea, Japan invaded China, and subsequently initiated the Pacific War against the United States, Britain, and their allies. Towards the end of the war, U.S. warplanes dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which resulted in a large number of Koreans who lived in Hiroshima and Nagasaki suffering from the effects of the bombs. The objective of this paper is to examine the history of Korea atomic bomb victims who were caught in between the U.S., Japan, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea).

  9. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, Michito; Tomonaga, Masao; Amenomori, Tatsuhiko; Matsuo, Tatsuki (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-03-01

    Characteristic features of leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for CML in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic for atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. In the distribution of AML subtypes of FAB classification, there was no M3 cases in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral blood of proximal survivors. (author).

  10. Marketing research cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Nebojša

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available One area of applications of cluster analysis in marketing is identification of groups of cities and towns with similar demographic profiles. This paper considers main aspects of cluster analysis by an example of clustering 12 cities with the use of Minitab software.

  11. The Durban Auto Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jochen; Robbins, Glen; Barnes, Justin

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the formation of the Durban Auto Cluster in the context of trade liberalization. It argues that the improvement of operational competitiveness of firms in the cluster is prominently due to joint action. It tests this proposition by comparing the gains from cluster activities...

  12. Cosmology with cluster surveys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surveys of clusters of galaxies provide us with a powerful probe of the density and nature of the dark energy. The red-shift distribution of detected clusters is highly sensitive to the dark energy equation of state parameter . Upcoming Sunyaev–Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys would provide us large yields of clusters to very high ...

  13. Cosmology with cluster surveys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cosmology with cluster surveys. SUBHABRATA MAJUMDAR. CITA, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H8, Canada. E-mail: subha@cita.utoronto.ca. Abstract. Surveys of clusters of galaxies provide us with a powerful probe of the den- sity and nature of the dark energy. The red-shift distribution of detected clusters is.

  14. Formation of stellar clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation and the formation of stellar clusters in molecular clouds which form as the interstellar medium passes through spiral shocks. The spiral shock compresses gas into an ∼100 pc long main star formation ridge, where clusters form every 5-10 pc along the merger ridge. We use a gravitational potential-based cluster finding algorithm, which extracts individual clusters, calculates their physical properties and traces cluster evolution over multiple time-steps. Final cluster masses at the end of simulation range between 1000 and 30 000 M⊙ with their characteristic half-mass radii between 0.1 and 2 pc. These clusters form by gathering material from 10-20 pc size scales. Clusters also show a mass-specific angular momentum relation, where more massive clusters have larger specific angular momentum due to the larger size scales, and hence angular momentum from which they gather their mass. The evolution shows that more massive clusters experience hierarchical merging process, which increases stellar age spreads up to 2-3 Myr. Less massive clusters appear to grow by gathering nearby recently formed sinks, while more massive clusters with their large global gravitational potentials are increasing their mass growth from gas accretion.

  15. Relational aspects of clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerding, Allan Næs

    The present paper is the first preliminary account of a project being planned for 2013, focussing on the development of the biomedico cluster in North Denmark. The project focusses on the relational capabilities of the cluster in terms of a number of organizational roles which are argued...... to be necessary for the development and growth of the upcoming cluster in question....

  16. Scalar-pseudoscalar interaction in the francium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripnikov, L. V.; Maison, D. E.; Mosyagin, N. S.

    2017-02-01

    Fr atom can be successively used to search for the atomic permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) [Hyperfine Interact. 236, 53 (2015), 10.1007/s10751-015-1193-1; J. Phys.: Conference Series 691, 012017 (2016), 10.1088/1742-6596/691/1/012017]. It can be induced by the permanent electron EDM predicted by modern extensions of the standard model to be nonzero at the level accessible by the new generation of EDM experiments. We consider another mechanism of the atomic EDM generation in Fr. This is caused by the scalar-pseudoscalar nucleus-electron neutral current interaction with the dimensionless strength constant kT ,P. Similar to the electron EDM this interaction violates both spatial parity and time-reversal symmetries and can also induce permanent atomic EDM. It was shown in [Phys. Rev. D 89, 056006 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.056006] that the scalar-pseudoscalar contribution to the atomic EDM can dominate over the direct contribution from the electron EDM within the standard model. We report high-accuracy combined all-electron and two-step relativistic coupled cluster treatment of the effect from the scalar-pseudoscalar interaction in the Fr atom. Up to the quadruple cluster amplitudes within the coupled cluster method with single, double, triple, and noniterative quadruple amplitudes, CCSDT(Q), were included in correlation treatment. This calculation is required for the interpretation of the experimental data in terms of kT ,P. The resulted EDM of the Fr atom expressed in terms of kT ,P is dFr=kT ,P4.50 ×10-18e cm , where e is the (negative) charge of the electron. The value of the ionization potential of the 2S1 /2 ground state of Fr calculated within the same methods is in very good agreement with the experimental datum.

  17. Fundamental characteristics of liquid cluster ion source for surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaoka, G.H. [Ion Beam Engineering Experimental Laboratory, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)]. E-mail: gtakaoka@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Noguchi, H. [Ion Beam Engineering Experimental Laboratory, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Nakayama, K. [Ion Beam Engineering Experimental Laboratory, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Hironaka, Y. [Ion Beam Engineering Experimental Laboratory, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Kawashita, M. [Ion Beam Engineering Experimental Laboratory, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a cluster ion source using liquid organic materials, which has several advantages for surface modification based on the different properties of liquid cluster ions. When vapors of liquid materials such as ethanol were ejected through a nozzle into a high-vacuum region, clusters were produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon. The clusters produced were ionized by an electron bombardment method, and the cluster ion current increased with increase of an electron current for ionization. In order to achieve the effective transport of cluster ion beams, a unipotential or einzel lens was used. The current density was much larger than that without using the lens. Furthermore, the beam diameter could be controlled by adjusting the lens voltage, and it was changed between 5 mm and 20 mm. In addition, several kinds of substrates such as Si, SiO{sub 2}, PC substrates were irradiated at different acceleration voltages with ethanol cluster ion beams, and chemical and physical sputtering with a high sputtering yield was achieved. The sputtered surfaces were very smooth at an atomic level. The liquid cluster ion beams have a high potential for surface etching with the atomic level flatness, which is not obtained by a conventional wet process.

  18. Cluster analysis for applications

    CERN Document Server

    Anderberg, Michael R

    1973-01-01

    Cluster Analysis for Applications deals with methods and various applications of cluster analysis. Topics covered range from variables and scales to measures of association among variables and among data units. Conceptual problems in cluster analysis are discussed, along with hierarchical and non-hierarchical clustering methods. The necessary elements of data analysis, statistics, cluster analysis, and computer implementation are integrated vertically to cover the complete path from raw data to a finished analysis.Comprised of 10 chapters, this book begins with an introduction to the subject o

  19. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  20. FAC: Flexible Atomic Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ming Feng

    2018-02-01

    FAC calculates various atomic radiative and collisional processes, including radiative transition rates, collisional excitation and ionization by electron impact, energy levels, photoionization, and autoionization, and their inverse processes radiative recombination and dielectronic capture. The package also includes a collisional radiative model to construct synthetic spectra for plasmas under different physical conditions.

  1. Atomic physics and reality

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    An account of the long standing debate between Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein regarding the validity of the quantum mechanical description of atomic phenomena.With physicts, John Wheeler (Texas), John Bell (CERN), David Rohm (London), Abner Shimony (Boston), Alain Aspect (Paris)

  2. Ludwig Boltzmann: Atomic genius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cercignani, C. [Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)]. E-mail: carcer@mate.polimi.it

    2006-09-15

    On the centenary of the death of Ludwig Boltzmann, Carlo Cercignani examines the immense contributions of the man who pioneered our understanding of the atomic nature of matter. The man who first gave a convincing explanation of the irreversibility of the macroscopic world and the symmetry of the laws of physics was the Austrian physicist Ludwig Boltzmann, who tragically committed suicide 100 years ago this month. One of the key figures in the development of the atomic theory of matter, Boltzmann's fame will be forever linked to two fundamental contributions to science. The first was his interpretation of 'entropy' as a mathematically well-defined measure of the disorder of atoms. The second was his derivation of what is now known as the Boltzmann equation, which describes the statistical properties of a gas as made up of molecules. The equation, which described for the first time how a probability can evolve with time, allowed Boltzmann to explain why macroscopic phenomena are irreversible. The key point is that while microscopic objects like atoms can behave reversibly, we never see broken coffee cups reforming because it would involve a long series of highly improbable interactions - and not because it is forbidden by the laws of physics. (U.K.)

  3. Atomic Force Microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Atomic Force Microscopy - A Tool to Unveil the Mystery of Biological Systems ... Transcription and Disease Laboratory, Molecular Biology and Genetics Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 ...

  4. Observational Evidence for Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edwin R., Jr.; Childers, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the development of the concept of atomicity and some of the many which can be used to establish its validity. Chemical evidence, evidence from crystals, Faraday's law of electrolysis, and Avogadro's number are among the areas which show how the concept originally developed from a purely philosophical idea. (JN)

  5. Spatial cluster modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, Andrew B

    2002-01-01

    Research has generated a number of advances in methods for spatial cluster modelling in recent years, particularly in the area of Bayesian cluster modelling. Along with these advances has come an explosion of interest in the potential applications of this work, especially in epidemiology and genome research. In one integrated volume, this book reviews the state-of-the-art in spatial clustering and spatial cluster modelling, bringing together research and applications previously scattered throughout the literature. It begins with an overview of the field, then presents a series of chapters that illuminate the nature and purpose of cluster modelling within different application areas, including astrophysics, epidemiology, ecology, and imaging. The focus then shifts to methods, with discussions on point and object process modelling, perfect sampling of cluster processes, partitioning in space and space-time, spatial and spatio-temporal process modelling, nonparametric methods for clustering, and spatio-temporal ...

  6. Modeling Clustered Data with Very Few Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeish, Daniel; Stapleton, Laura M

    2016-01-01

    Small-sample inference with clustered data has received increased attention recently in the methodological literature, with several simulation studies being presented on the small-sample behavior of many methods. However, nearly all previous studies focus on a single class of methods (e.g., only multilevel models, only corrections to sandwich estimators), and the differential performance of various methods that can be implemented to accommodate clustered data with very few clusters is largely unknown, potentially due to the rigid disciplinary preferences. Furthermore, a majority of these studies focus on scenarios with 15 or more clusters and feature unrealistically simple data-generation models with very few predictors. This article, motivated by an applied educational psychology cluster randomized trial, presents a simulation study that simultaneously addresses the extreme small sample and differential performance (estimation bias, Type I error rates, and relative power) of 12 methods to account for clustered data with a model that features a more realistic number of predictors. The motivating data are then modeled with each method, and results are compared. Results show that generalized estimating equations perform poorly; the choice of Bayesian prior distributions affects performance; and fixed effect models perform quite well. Limitations and implications for applications are also discussed.

  7. Clusters and how to make it work : Cluster strategy toolkit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anu Manickam; Karel van Berkel

    2014-01-01

    Clusters are the magic answer to regional economic development. Firms in clusters are more innovative; cluster policy dominates EU policy; ‘top-sectors’ and excellence are the choice of national policy makers; clusters are ‘in’. But, clusters are complex, clusters are ‘messy’; there is no clear

  8. Designing a tunable magnet using cluster-assembled iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Keisuke

    2018-01-01

    The design of a cluster-assembled three dimensional crystal is performed through first principle calculations. In particular, Fe6 and Fe5A (A = B, C, N, F, or Cl) clusters are treated as a single atom and periodically placed in a body center cubic (BCC) unit cell. Calculations reveal that van der Waals forces play a major role between the clusters where exothermic binding energy is observed in Fe6 and Fe5A (A = B, C, N, or Cl) cluster-assembled BCC crystal. The magnetic moment of the designed cluster-assembled crystal is much higher than that of bulk iron where the magnetic moment is tunable upon the introduction of the dopants. In addition, the bandgap of cluster-assembled crystal is different from bulk Fe where Fe6, Fe5B, and Fe5C cluster-assembled BCC crystal have a large bandgap. One can thereby consider that the ability to tune the magnetic moment and bandgap is achievable in principle through the design of the cluster-assembled material as well as through the introduction of dopants. Thus, cluster-assembled crystal expands upon how a material can be designed and properties that are tailorable through controlling the structure and through the composition of the clusters.

  9. Atomically Precise Metal Nanoclusters for Catalytic Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Rongchao [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-11-18

    The central goal of this project is to explore the catalytic application of atomically precise gold nanoclusters. By solving the total structures of ligand-protected nanoclusters, we aim to correlate the catalytic properties of metal nanoclusters with their atomic/electronic structures. Such correlation unravel some fundamental aspects of nanocatalysis, such as the nature of particle size effect, origin of catalytic selectivity, particle-support interactions, the identification of catalytically active centers, etc. The well-defined nanocluster catalysts mediate the knowledge gap between single crystal model catalysts and real-world conventional nanocatalysts. These nanoclusters also hold great promise in catalyzing certain types of reactions with extraordinarily high selectivity. These aims are in line with the overall goals of the catalytic science and technology of DOE and advance the BES mission “to support fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the level of electrons, atoms, and molecules”. Our group has successfully prepared different sized, robust gold nanoclusters protected by thiolates, such as Au25(SR)18, Au28(SR)20, Au38(SR)24, Au99(SR)42, Au144(SR)60, etc. Some of these nanoclusters have been crystallographically characterized through X-ray crystallography. These ultrasmall nanoclusters (< 2 nm diameter) exhibit discrete electronic structures due to quantum size effect, as opposed to quasicontinuous band structure of conventional metal nanoparticles or bulk metals. The available atomic structures (metal core plus surface ligands) of nanoclusters serve as the basis for structure-property correlations. We have investigated the unique catalytic properties of nanoclusters (i.e. not observed in conventional nanogold catalysts) and revealed the structure-selectivity relationships. Highlights of our

  10. Role of atoms in atomic gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcia, Matthew A.; Cline, Julia R. K.; Thompson, James K.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that space-based atomic sensors may be used to detect gravitational waves. These proposals describe the sensors either as clocks or as atom interferometers. Here, we seek to explore the fundamental similarities and differences between the two types of proposals. We present a framework in which the fundamental mechanism for sensitivity is identical for clock and atom interferometer proposals, with the key difference being whether or not the atoms are tightly confined by an external potential. With this interpretation in mind, we propose two major enhancements to detectors using confined atoms, which allow for an enhanced sensitivity analogous to large momentum transfer used in atom interferometry (though with no transfer of momentum to the atoms), and a way to extend the useful coherence time of the sensor beyond the atom's excited-state lifetime.

  11. Interface magnetic anisotropy in cobalt clusters embedded in a platinum or niobium matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, M.; Negrier, M.; Dupuis, V.; Tuaillon-Combes, J.; Melinon, P.; Perez, A.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Barbara, B.; Vogel, J.; Baguenard, B.

    2000-01-01

    A low concentration of cobalt clusters with a fcc structure and containing almost one thousand atoms are embedded in two different metallic matrices: platinum and niobium. Samples have been prepared using a co-deposition technique. Cobalt clusters preformed in the gas phase and matrix atoms are simultaneously deposited on a silicon substrate under Ultra High Vacuum conditions. This original technique allows to prepare nanostructured systems from miscible elements such as Co/Pt and Co/Nb in wh...

  12. Investigation of Catalytic Finite-Size-Effects of Platinum Metal Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lin; Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Romero, Nichols A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations on highly parallel computing resources to study size-dependent changes in the chemical and electronic properties of platinum (Pt) for a number of fixed freestanding clusters ranging from 13 to 1415 atoms, or 0.7–3.5 nm in diameter....... We find that the surface catalytic properties of the clusters converge to the single crystal limit for clusters with as few as 147 atoms (1.6 nm). Recently published results for gold (Au) clusters showed analogous convergence with size. However, this convergence happened at larger sizes, because...... the Au d-states do not contribute to the density of states around the Fermi-level, and the observed level fluctuations were not significantly damped until the cluster reached ca. 560 atoms (2.7 nm) in size....

  13. The structural transition of the Na_{309} clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Nava, Juan A.; Moreira, Joel; Pantoja, Joel; Ibáñez, Guillermo R.; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2016-09-01

    Theoretical insights are provided for understanding why the structural changes detected by photoelectronic measurements on the canonical ensemble of clusters Na_{309} do not induce any signal on their experimental specific heat. The cooling down of a collection of these clusters, whose atomic interactions are modeled with the Gupta potential, reveals that Na_{309} has indeed two configurations of enhanced stability. The most stable one is a perfect icosahedral structure (ico configuration), just as was determined by experiments. The candidate derived from the interaction model for the unknown configuration is a kind of hcp variation of the first (ico-hcp configuration). It has more atoms with low coordination, but also more atoms with high coordination. But the difference between the quantities of the first ones is greater than the difference between the amounts of the second ones, causing a slight loss of the cluster cohesion. Additionally, the properties of an ensemble of Na_{309} clusters in thermodynamic equilibrium were determined. The comparison between theoretical and experimental results shows that the model only reproduces the properties of the solid-solid transition. However, its predictions for the melting and premelting are wrong. We suggest that both failures could be consequences of only one elementary fault: the underestimation of the cohesion of the atoms with low coordination. This source of error of the model would not affect the description of the structural transition, since this transformation is essentially caused by clusters made up of atoms with high coordination. In spite of its mistakes, the model allowed to determine for the first time a candidate for the unknown solid phase of these clusters. This structure, as well as the elementary fault suggested for the model, must be confirmed by ab-initio calculations.

  14. Open source clustering software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoon, M J L; Imoto, S; Nolan, J; Miyano, S

    2004-06-12

    We have implemented k-means clustering, hierarchical clustering and self-organizing maps in a single multipurpose open-source library of C routines, callable from other C and C++ programs. Using this library, we have created an improved version of Michael Eisen's well-known Cluster program for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux/Unix. In addition, we generated a Python and a Perl interface to the C Clustering Library, thereby combining the flexibility of a scripting language with the speed of C. The C Clustering Library and the corresponding Python C extension module Pycluster were released under the Python License, while the Perl module Algorithm::Cluster was released under the Artistic License. The GUI code Cluster 3.0 for Windows, Macintosh and Linux/Unix, as well as the corresponding command-line program, were released under the same license as the original Cluster code. The complete source code is available at http://bonsai.ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp/mdehoon/software/cluster. Alternatively, Algorithm::Cluster can be downloaded from CPAN, while Pycluster is also available as part of the Biopython distribution.

  15. Agricultural Clusters in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, M.A.; Heijman, W.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Michael Porter was the first to use the term cluster in an economic context. He introduced the term in The Competitive Advantage of Nations (1990). The term cluster is also known as business cluster, industry cluster, competitive cluster or Porterian cluster. This article aims at determining and

  16. Absorption imaging of ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David A.; Aigner, Simon; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Imaging ultracold atomic gases close to surfaces is an important tool for the detailed analysis of experiments carried out using atom chips. We describe the critical factors that need be considered, especially when the imaging beam is purposely reflected from the surface. In particular we present...... methods to measure the atom-surface distance, which is a prerequisite for magnetic field imaging and studies of atom surface-interactions....

  17. Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of small metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of metal clusters, in particular clusters of Group IIA and IIB atoms were conducted. Early in the project it became clear that electron correlation involving d orbitals plays a more important role in the binding of these clusters than had been previously anticipated. This necessitated that computer codes for calculating two electron integrals and for constructing the resulting CI Hamiltonions be replaced with newer, more efficient procedures. Program modification, interfacing and testing were performed. Results of both plans are reported.

  18. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  19. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  20. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  1. Atomes et rayonnement

    OpenAIRE

    Dalibard, Jean; Haroche, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Matière et lumière sont intimement liées dans notre modélisation du monde physique. De l’élaboration de la théorie quantique à l’invention du laser, l’interaction entre atomes et rayonnement a joué un rôle central dans le développement de la science et de la technologie d’aujourd’hui. La maîtrise de cette interaction permet désormais d’atteindre les plus basses températures jamais mesurées. Le refroidissement de gaz d’atomes par la lumière d’un laser conduit à une « matière quantique » aux pr...

  2. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  3. Navigation with Atom Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-20

    stability of the design and will be measured at a future time. Angle random walk can be calculated from first principles from the shot-noise limited...interferometer cannot distinguish between the two sources of phase shifts. We describe a design for a dual atom interferometer to simultaneously...stability. This paper is organized as follows: we first describe the basic building blocks of the interferometer: beam splitters and mirrors. We then

  4. Disentangling Porterian Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagtfelt, Tue

    This dissertation investigates the contemporary phenomenon of industrial clusters based on the work of Michael E. Porter, the central progenitor and promoter of the cluster notion. The dissertation pursues two central questions: 1) What is a cluster? and 2) How could Porter’s seemingly fuzzy...... to his membership on the Commission on Industrial Competitiveness, and that the cluster notion found in his influential book, Nations, represents a significant shift in his conception of cluster compared with his early conceptions. This shift, it is argued, is a deliberate attempt by Porter to create......, contested theory become so widely disseminated and applied as a normative and prescriptive strategy for economic development? The dissertation traces the introduction of the cluster notion into the EU’s Lisbon Strategy and demonstrates how its inclusion originates from Porter’s colleagues: Professor Örjan...

  5. From collisions to clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loukonen, Ville; Bork, Nicolai; Vehkamaki, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    The clustering of sulphuric acid with base molecules is one of the main pathways of new-particle formation in the Earth's atmosphere. First step in the clustering process is likely the formation of a (sulphuric acid)1(base)1(water)n cluster. Here, we present results from direct first......-principles molecular dynamics collision simulations of (sulphuric acid)1(water)0, 1 + (dimethylamine) → (sulphuric acid)1(dimethylamine)1(water)0, 1 cluster formation processes. The simulations indicate that the sticking factor in the collisions is unity: the interaction between the molecules is strong enough...... to overcome the possible initial non-optimal collision orientations. No post-collisional cluster break up is observed. The reasons for the efficient clustering are (i) the proton transfer reaction which takes place in each of the collision simulations and (ii) the subsequent competition over the proton...

  6. Clustering by Local Gravitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Yu, Zhiwen; Chen, C L Philip; You, Jane; Gu, Tianlong; Wong, Hau-San; Zhang, Jun

    2017-05-02

    The objective of cluster analysis is to partition a set of data points into several groups based on a suitable distance measure. We first propose a model called local gravitation among data points. In this model, each data point is viewed as an object with mass, and associated with a local resultant force (LRF) generated by its neighbors. The motivation of this paper is that there exist distinct differences between the LRFs (including magnitudes and directions) of the data points close to the cluster centers and at the boundary of the clusters. To capture these differences efficiently, two new local measures named centrality and coordination are further investigated. Based on empirical observations, two new clustering methods called local gravitation clustering and communication with local agents are designed, and several test cases are conducted to verify their effectiveness. The experiments on synthetic data sets and real-world data sets indicate that both clustering approaches achieve good performance on most of the data sets.

  7. Convex Discriminative Multitask Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Multitask clustering tries to improve the clustering performance of multiple tasks simultaneously by taking their relationship into account. Most existing multitask clustering algorithms fall into the type of generative clustering, and none are formulated as convex optimization problems. In this paper, we propose two convex Discriminative Multitask Clustering (DMTC) objectives to address the problems. The first one aims to learn a shared feature representation, which can be seen as a technical combination of the convex multitask feature learning and the convex Multiclass Maximum Margin Clustering (M3C). The second one aims to learn the task relationship, which can be seen as a combination of the convex multitask relationship learning and M3C. The objectives of the two algorithms are solved in a uniform procedure by the efficient cutting-plane algorithm and further unified in the Bayesian framework. Experimental results on a toy problem and two benchmark data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  8. Cluster Management Institutionalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Normann, Leo; Agger Nielsen, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    This article explores a new management form – cluster management – in Danish public sector day care. Although cluster management has been widely adopted in Danish day care at the municipality level, it has attracted only sparse research attention. We use theoretical insights from Scandinavian...... institutionalism together with a longitudinal case-based inquiry into how cluster management has entered and penetrated the management practices of day care in Denmark. We demonstrate how cluster management became widely adopted in the day care field not only because of its intrinsic properties but also because...... of how it was legitimized as a “ready-to-use” management model. Further, our account reveals how cluster management translated into considerably different local variants as it travelled into specific organizations. However, these processes have not occurred sequentially with cluster management first...

  9. Into the atom and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    Magnifying an atom to football pitch size. The dense nucleus, carrying almost all the atomic mass, is much smaller than the ball. The players (the electrons) would see something about the size of a marble!

  10. Nuclear effects in atomic transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Pálffy, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    Atomic electrons are sensitive to the properties of the nucleus they are bound to, such as nuclear mass, charge distribution, spin, magnetization distribution, or even excited level scheme. These nuclear parameters are reflected in the atomic transition energies. A very precise determination of atomic spectra may thus reveal information about the nucleus, otherwise hardly accessible via nuclear physics experiments. This work reviews theoretical and experimental aspects of the nuclear effects that can be identified in atomic structure data. An introduction to the theory of isotope shifts and hyperfine splitting of atomic spectra is given, together with an overview of the typical experimental techniques used in high-precision atomic spectroscopy. More exotic effects at the borderline between atomic and nuclear physics, such as parity violation in atomic transitions due to the weak interaction, or nuclear polarization and nuclear excitation by electron capture, are also addressed.

  11. Active cluster crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfau, Jean-Baptiste; López, Cristóbal; Hernández-García, Emilio

    2017-09-01

    We study the appearance and properties of cluster crystals (solids in which the unit cell is occupied by a cluster of particles) in a two-dimensional system of self-propelled active Brownian particles with repulsive interactions. Self-propulsion deforms the clusters by depleting particle density inside, and for large speeds it melts the crystal. Continuous field descriptions at several levels of approximation allow us to identify the relevant physical mechanisms.

  12. Percolation in clustered networks

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Joel C

    2009-01-01

    The social networks that infectious diseases spread along are typically clustered. Because of the close relation between percolation and epidemic spread, the behavior of percolation in such networks gives insight into infectious disease dynamics. A number of authors have studied clustered networks, but the networks often contain preferential mixing between high degree nodes. We introduce a class of random clustered networks and another class of random unclustered networks with the same prefer...

  13. Cluster Symmetries and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freer Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many light nuclei display behaviour that indicates that rather than behaving as an A-body systems, the protons and neutrons condense into clusters. The α-particle is the most obvious example of such clustering. This contribution examines the role of such α-clustering on the structure, symmetries and dynamics of the nuclei 8Be, 12C and 16O, recent experimental measurements and future perspectives.

  14. Data Mining with Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Klímek, Petr

    2008-01-01

    One of the oppotunities in data mining is a use of clustering analysis. Clustering analysis belongs to unsupervised methods of data mining. We put here a focus on this method. Some basic principles are described in the second part of this paper. This method is examined on two examples from the marketing field. In the first example is used software Statgraphics 5.0Plus to solve clustering problem (nearest neighbour algorithm and Eucleidian distance); and in the second example is used Statistic...

  15. Atomic and Molecular Physics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    Atomic Quantum Memories in Nano-Scale Optical Circuits: Jeff Kimble, Oskar Painter (CalTech) • Demonstration of a nanofiber atom trap: A. Goban...et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 033603 (2012) • Cavity QED with atomic mirrors: D. Chang, et al, N. J. Phys. 14, 063003 (2012) • Fiber -coupled chip... PMMA -diamond hybrid cavities, coupling stable NV centers • Cavity Optomechanics with Cold Atoms: Dan Stamper-Kurn (UC Berkeley) • Squeezed light

  16. Spatial Scan Statistic: Selecting clusters and generating elliptic clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Andersen, Jens Strodl

    2004-01-01

    The spatial scan statistic is widely used to search for clusters. This paper shows that the usually applied elimination of overlapping clusters to find secondary clusters is sensitive to smooth changes in the shape of the clusters. We present an algorithm for generation of set of confocal elliptic clusters. In addition, we propose a new way to present the information in a given set of clusters based on the significance of the clusters.

  17. Spatial Scan Statistic: Selecting clusters and generating elliptic clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Andersen, Jens Strodl

    2004-01-01

    The spatial scan statistic is widely used to search for clusters. This paper shows that the usually applied elimination of overlapping clusters to find secondary clusters is sensitive to smooth changes in the shape of the clusters. We present an algorithm for generation of set of confocal elliptic...... clusters. In addition, we propose a new way to present the information in a given set of clusters based on the significance of the clusters....

  18. Structural properties of transition-metal clusters via force-biased Monte Carlo and ab initio calculations: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbu, Dil K.; Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Drabold, David A.; Elliott, Stephen R.; Biswas, Parthapratim

    2017-11-01

    We present a force-biased Monte Carlo (FMC) method for structural modeling of the transition-metal clusters of Fe, Ni, and Cu with sizes of 13, 30, and 55 atoms. By employing the Finnis-Sinclair potential for Fe and the Sutton-Chen potential for Ni and Cu, the total energy of the clusters is minimized using the local gradient of the potentials in Monte Carlo simulations. The structural configurations of the clusters, obtained from the biased Monte Carlo approach, are analyzed and compared with the same configurations from the Cambridge Cluster Database (CCD) upon relaxation of the clusters using the first-principles density-functional code nwchem. The results show that the total-energy value and the structure of the FMC clusters are essentially identical to the corresponding value and the structure of the CCD clusters. A comparison of the nwchem-relax FMC and CCD structures is presented by computing the pair-correlation function, the bond-angle distribution, the coordination number of the first-coordination shell, and the Steinhardt bond-orientational order parameter, which provide information about the two- and three-body correlation functions, the local bonding environment of the atoms, and the geometry of the clusters. An atom-by-atom comparison of the FMC and CCD clusters is also provided by superposing one set of clusters onto another, and the electronic properties of the clusters are addressed by computing the density of electronic states.

  19. 15th Cluster workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Laakso, Harri; Escoubet, C. Philippe; The Cluster Active Archive : Studying the Earth’s Space Plasma Environment

    2010-01-01

    Since the year 2000 the ESA Cluster mission has been investigating the small-scale structures and processes of the Earth's plasma environment, such as those involved in the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetospheric plasma, in global magnetotail dynamics, in cross-tail currents, and in the formation and dynamics of the neutral line and of plasmoids. This book contains presentations made at the 15th Cluster workshop held in March 2008. It also presents several articles about the Cluster Active Archive and its datasets, a few overview papers on the Cluster mission, and articles reporting on scientific findings on the solar wind, the magnetosheath, the magnetopause and the magnetotail.

  20. Molecular Polarizability of Sc and C (Fullerene and Graphite Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Torrens

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available A method (POLAR for the calculation of the molecular polarizability is presented. It uses the interacting induced dipoles polarization model. As an example, the method is applied to Scn and Cn (fullerene and one-shell graphite model clusters. On varying the number of atoms, the clusters show numbers indicative of particularly polarizable structures. The are compared with reference calculations (PAPID. In general, the Scn calculated (POLAR and Cn computed (POLAR and PAPID are less polarizable than what is inferred from the bulk. However, the Scn calculated (PAPID are more polarizable than what is inferred. Moreover, previous theoretical work yielded the same trend for Sin, Gen and GanAsm small clusters. The high polarizability of the Scn clusters (PAPID is attributed to arise from dangling bonds at the surface of the cluster.

  1. Advances in molecular vibrations and collision dynamics molecular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bacic, Zatko

    1998-01-01

    This volume focuses on molecular clusters, bound by van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds. Twelve chapters review a wide range of recent theoretical and experimental advances in the areas of cluster vibrations, spectroscopy, and reaction dynamics. The authors are leading experts, who have made significant contributions to these topics.The first chapter describes exciting results and new insights in the solvent effects on the short-time photo fragmentation dynamics of small molecules, obtained by combining heteroclusters with femtosecond laser excitation. The second is on theoretical work on effects of single solvent (argon) atom on the photodissociation dynamics of the solute H2O molecule. The next two chapters cover experimental and theoretical aspects of the energetics and vibrations of small clusters. Chapter 5 describes diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations and non additive three-body potential terms in molecular clusters. The next six chapters deal with hydrogen-bonded clusters, refle...

  2. Nanospectroscopy of thiacyanine dye molecules adsorbed on silver nanoparticle clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralević, Uroš; Isić, Goran; Anicijević, Dragana Vasić; Laban, Bojana; Bogdanović, Una; Lazović, Vladimir M.; Vodnik, Vesna; Gajić, Radoš

    2018-03-01

    The adsorption of thiacyanine dye molecules on citrate-stabilized silver nanoparticle clusters drop-cast onto freshly cleaved mica or highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surfaces is examined using colocalized surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The incidence of dye Raman signatures in photoluminescence hotspots identified around nanoparticle clusters is considered for both citrate- and borate-capped silver nanoparticles and found to be substantially lower in the former case, suggesting that the citrate anions impede the efficient dye adsorption. Rigorous numerical simulations of light scattering on random nanoparticle clusters are used for estimating the electromagnetic enhancement and elucidating the hotspot formation mechanism. The majority of the enhanced Raman signal, estimated to be more than 90%, is found to originate from the nanogaps between adjacent nanoparticles in the cluster, regardless of the cluster size and geometry.

  3. Electrophobic interaction induced impurity clustering in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guang-Hong; Zhou, Hong-Bo; Aguiar, J.; Liu, Feng

    Helium is a typical impurity in metals, which is produced from transmutation reactions in both fission and fusion. It is well known that He atoms are energetically favorable clustering with each other, resulting in mechanical property degradation of metals, which is originated from the self-trapping of He. Here, we introduce the concept of electrophobic interaction, analogous to hydrophobic interaction, for describing the behavior of impurity atoms in a metal, a solvent of electrons\\x9D. We demonstrate that there exists a form of electrophobic interaction between impurities with closed electron shell structure, which governs their dissolution behavior in a metal. Using He, Be and Ar as examples, we predict by first-principles calculations that a clustering energy due to the electrophobic interaction follows a universal power-law scaling with the number of atoms (N) dissolved in a free electron gas, as well as W or Al lattice, as Ec (N^2/3 - N). This new concept significantly advances our fundamental understanding and capacity to predict the solute behavior of impurities in metals, a useful contribution to be considered in future material design of metals for nuclear, metallurgical, and energy applications.

  4. Lasers, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. Basic information for understanding the laser is provided including discussion of the electromagnetic spectrum, radio waves, light and the atom, coherent light, controlled…

  5. Breaking the atom with Samson

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Väänänen, J.; Coecke, B.; Ong, L.; Panangaden, P.

    2013-01-01

    The dependence atom =(x,y) was introduced in [11]. Here x and y are finite sets of attributes (or variables) and the intuitive meaning of =(x,y) is that the attributes x completely (functionally) determine the attributes y. One may wonder, whether the dependence atom is truly an atom or whether it

  6. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  7. Bohmian picture of Rydberg atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    lished the nearly elliptical shapes for the centre-of-mass motion in Rydberg atoms using numerical simulations, we show analytically that the Bohmian trajectories in Rydberg atoms are nearly ellipti- cal. Keywords. Rydberg atom; quantum trajectory. PACS No. 03.65.Ge. 1. Introduction. Ever since the advent of quantum ...

  8. Influence of indium clustering on the band structure of semiconducting ternary and quaternarynitride alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca,, I.; Łepkowski, S. P.; Suski, T.

    2009-01-01

    and atomic arrangements are examined. Particular attention is paid to the magnitude of and trends in bowing of the band gaps. Indium composition fluctuation (clustering) is simulated by different distributions of In atoms and it is shown that it strongly influences the band gaps. The gaps are considerably...

  9. Electronic Structure of Au25 Clusters: Between Discrete and Continuous

    KAUST Repository

    Katsiev, Khabiboulakh

    2016-07-15

    Here, an approach based on synchrotron resonant photoemission is emplyed to explore the transition between quantization and hybridization of the electronic structure in atomically precise ligand-stabilized nanoparticles. While the presence of ligands maintains quantization in Au25 clusters, their removal renders increased hybridization of the electronic states at the vicinity of the Fermi level. These observations are supported by DFT studies.

  10. Activation of Molecular Oxygen by Anionic Gold Clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woodham, A. P.; Meijer, G.; Fielicke, A.

    2012-01-01

    A golden opportunity: Molecular oxygen is found to be converted into a superoxo (O2−) species upon complexation to gold-cluster anions containing an even number of Au atoms. Vibrational spectra (see scheme) reveal small variations in the extent of O[BOND]O bond activation dependent upon the electron

  11. Cluster size dependence of high-order harmonic generation

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Y; Bastiaens, H M J; van der Slot, P J M; Biedron, S G; Milton, S V; Boller, K -J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from noble gas clusters in a supersonic gas jet. To identify the contribution of harmonic generation from clusters versus that from gas monomers, we measure the high-order harmonic output over a broad range of the total atomic number density in the jet (from 3x10^{16} cm^{-3} to 3x10^{18} cm^{-3}) at two different reservoir temperatures (303 K and 363 K). For the first time in the evaluation of the harmonic yield in such measurements, the variation of the liquid mass fraction, g, versus pressure and temperature is taken into consideration, which we determine, reliably and consistently, to be below 20% within our range of experimental parameters. Based on measurements with a thin jet where significant variations in reabsorption and the phase matching conditions can be neglected, we conclude that atoms in the form of small clusters (average cluster size < 1000 atoms) provide the same higher-order nonlinear response as single-atoms. This implies that HHG in ...

  12. Structural properties of small rhodium clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soon, Yee Yeen; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    We report a systematic study of the structural properties of rhodium clusters at the atomistic level. A novel global-minimum search algorithm, known as parallel tempering multicanonical basin hopping plus genetic algorithm (PTMBHGA), is used to obtain the geometrical structures with lowest minima at the semi-empirical level where Gupta potential is used to describe the atomic interaction among the rhodium atoms. These structures are then re-optimized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with exchange-correlation energy approximated by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The structures are optimized for different spin multiplicities. The ones with lowest energies will be taken as ground-state structures. In most cases, we observe only minor changes in the geometry and bond length of the clusters as a result of DFT-level re-optimization. Only in some limited cases, the initial geometries obtained from the PTMBHGA are modified by the re-optimization. The variation of structural properties, such as ground-state geometry, symmetry and binding energy, with respect to the cluster size is studied and agreed well with other results available in the literature.

  13. A free energy study of carbon clusters on Ir(111): Precursors to graphene growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetlow, H.; Ford, I. J.; Kantorovich, L.

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the nucleation of graphene on transition metals is related to the formation of carbon clusters of various sizes and shapes on the surface. Assuming a low concentration of carbon atoms on a crystal surface, we derive a thermodynamic expression for the grand potential of the cluster of N carbon atoms, relative to a single carbon atom on the surface (the cluster work of formation). This is derived taking into account both the energetic and entropic contributions, including structural and rotational components, and is explicitly dependent on the temperature. Then, using ab initio density functional theory, we calculate the work of formation of carbon clusters CN on the Ir(111) surface as a function of temperature considering clusters with up to N = 16 C atoms. We consider five types of clusters (chains, rings, arches, top-hollow, and domes), and find, in agreement with previous zero temperature studies, that at elevated temperatures the structure most favoured depends on N, with chains and arches being the most likely at N 10 . Our calculations reveal the work of formation to have a much more complex character as a function of the cluster size than one would expect from classical nucleation theory: for typical conditions, the work of formation displays not one but two nucleation barriers, at around N = 4-5 and N = 9-11. This suggests, in agreement with existing LEEM data, that five atom carbon clusters, along with C monomers, must play a pivotal role in the nucleation and growth of graphene sheets, whereby the formation of large clusters is achieved from the coalescence of smaller clusters (Smoluchowski ripening). Although the main emphasis of our study is on thermodynamic aspects of nucleation, the pivotal role of kinetics of transitions between different cluster types during the nucleation process is also discussed for a few cases as illustrative examples.

  14. Structural, magnetic and electronic properties of FexCoyIrz (x + y + z = 5, 6) clusters: an ab initio study

    KAUST Repository

    Devi, Assa Aravindh Sasikala

    2014-05-01

    Investigations on freestanding binary and ternary clusters of Fe (x) Co (y) Ir (z) (x + y + z = 5, 6) are carried out using ab initio density functional theory techniques. The geometry, chemical order, binding energy, magnetic moment and electronic structure of the clusters are analyzed for the entire range of composition. Composition dependent structural transition is observed in the five atom clusters, while octahedral geometry prevailed in clusters with six atoms. Both the clusters show increment in binding energy with the increase in number of heterogeneous bonds. Analysis based on the chemical order parameter indicates that clusters favor mixing rather than segregation. The clusters exhibit ferromagnetic ordering and the inter-dependence of optimal cluster geometry to the magnetic moments and electronic structure is observed.

  15. Metal clusters on supported argon layers; Metallcluster auf dielektrischen Substraten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, Bernhard

    2011-10-21

    The deposition of small sodium clusters on supported Ar(001)-surfaces is simulated. Theoretical description is achieved by a hierarchical model consisting of time-dependent DFT and molecular dynamics. The valence electrons of the sodium atoms are considered by Kohn-Sham-Scheme with self interaction correction. The interaction of argon atoms and sodium ions is described by atom-atom potentials whereas the coupling to the QM electrons is done by local pseudo-potentials. A decisive part of the model is the dynamical polarizability of the rare-gas atoms. The optional metal support is considered by the method of image charges. The influence of the forces caused by image charges and the influence of the number of argon monolayers on structure, optical response and deposition dynamics of Na{sub 6} and Na{sub 8} is investigated. There is very little influence on cluster structure and only a small shift of the cluster perpendicular to the surface. Concerning optical response the position of the Mie plasmon peak stays robust whereas the details of spectral fragmentation react very sensitively to changes. The forces caused by image charges of the metal support play only a little role with the dynamics of deposition while the thickness of the argon surface strongly influences the dissipation. (orig.)

  16. Super Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R. W.

    1994-05-01

    Super star clusters represent an extreme in the star formation process. They are very luminous, compact objects with L_V > 10(6) L_{V,sun} and diameters = 100 times higher than normal OB associations and clusters in ``giant H II regions''. Prior to HST about a dozen such objects had been identified in nearby galaxies, but at ground-based resolution they are nearly point sources. We review recent HST observations of individual super star clusters in NGC 1140, 1569, and 1705. They have half-light radii of only 2--3.5 pc, and some show evidence of substructure which should be resolvable with the repaired HST. After allowing for age differences, the surface brightness of NGC 1569-A is over 65 times higher than the core of 30 Doradus in the LMC and 1200 times higher than the mean rich LMC star cluster. In some cases, the energy released by the clusters into their surroundings is sufficient to drive galaxy-wide winds. Their properties make super star clusters good analogues of young globular clusters. In some, though not all, cases super star clusters appear to form in the aftermath of a merger or accretion event. The most impressive examples are the clusters detected by HST in NGC 1275 and 7252, one of which has the extraordinary luminosity ~ 6 times 10(8) L_{V,sun}. M82 affords a nearby view of a post-interaction system. HST imaging has identified over 80 super star clusters in its central regions with mean luminosities of ~ 3 times 10(6) L_{V,sun}. Their close packing and signs of interaction with the well-known supernova-driven wind suggest that they do not evolve independently. Super cluster evolution in starbursts is probably a collective phenomenon.

  17. Comparison of Hydrogen Elimination from Molecular Zinc and Magnesium Hydride Clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Intemann, J.; Sirsch, Peter; Harder, Sjoerd

    2014-01-01

    In analogy to the previously reported tetranuclear magnesium hydride cluster with a bridged dianionic bis-beta-diketiminate ligand, a related zinc hydride cluster has been prepared. The crystal structures of these magnesium and zinc hydride complexes are similar: the metal atoms are situated at the

  18. Van der Waals coefficients for alkali metal clusters and their size ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . 1000 atoms) easily, thereby allowing us to study the evolution of van der Waals coefficients with the size of the clusters. For details of the ETF method and its application to study alkali–metal cluster, we refer the reader to [9,10,27–29]. In the.

  19. Impact of keV-energy argon clusters on diamond and graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir; Samela, Juha; Nordlund, Kai

    2012-01-01

    the graphene planes, significant radiation damage is already introduced by impact of clusters with low kinetic energies (a few tens of eV/atom). However, collisions of the argon clusters cause very elastic response of the graphene planes that leads to efficient closure of the craters which could be formed...

  20. Long-Range Excitation of Collective Modes in Mesoscopic Metal Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein, M. S.; Kharchenko, V; Canto, L. F.; Donangelo, R.

    1999-01-01

    We develop a semiclassical theory for the long range excitation of plasmon resonances in atomic clusters, based on the doorway hypothesis. The effect of the width of the plasmon resonance is fully taken into account. As an application we study plasmon excitation in small Sodium clusters, in collisions with electrons and protons.

  1. Structure determination of isolated metal clusters via far-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielicke, André; Kirilyuk, Andrei; Ratsch, Christian; Behler, Jörg; Scheffler, Matthias; von Helden, Gert; Meijer, Gerard

    2004-07-09

    We present a new method for the size selective structure determination of small isolated metal clusters in the gas phase. The technique is applied to cationic vanadium clusters containing 6 to 23 atoms, whose far infrared absorption spectra are measured in the 140-450 cm(-1) spectral range. The spectra are unique for each cluster size and are true fingerprints of the cluster's structure. By comparing the experimental spectra to spectra obtained from density-functional theory, the geometric cluster structure can be identified.

  2. Statistical properties of convex clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Kean Ming; Witten, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we study the statistical properties of convex clustering. We establish that convex clustering is closely related to single linkage hierarchical clustering and $k$-means clustering. In addition, we derive the range of the tuning parameter for convex clustering that yields a non-trivial solution. We also provide an unbiased estimator of the degrees of freedom, and provide a finite sample bound for the prediction error for convex clustering. We compare convex clustering to so...

  3. Nonlocalized clustering and evolution of cluster structure in nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, H.

    2017-06-01

    It is shown that the THSR (Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-Roepke) wave function describe well not only cluster-gas like structures but also ordinary cluster structures with spatial localization of clusters. Based on this fact, the container model has been proposed as a new model of cluster dynamics. For better description of cluster dynamics, extended version of container model has been introduced. The container model of cluster dynamics teaches us how is the evolution of cluster structure which starts from the ground state having shell-model structure to many kinds of cluster states up to the cluster-gas states.

  4. Magnetic properties of iron cluster/chromium matrix nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Fischer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A custom-designed apparatus was used for the fine-tuned co-deposition of preformed Fe clusters into antiferromagnetic Cr matrices. Three series of samples with precisely defined cluster sizes, with accuracy to a few atoms, and controlled concentrations were fabricated, followed by a complete characterization of structure and magnetic performance. Relevant magnetic characteristics, reflecting the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic coupling between Fe clusters and the Cr matrix, i.e., blocking temperature, coercivity field, and exchange bias were measured and their dependence on cluster size and cluster concentration in the matrix was analyzed. It is evident that the blocking temperatures are clearly affected by both the cluster size and their concentration in the Cr matrix. In contrast the coercivity shows hardly any dependence on size or inter-cluster distance. The exchange bias was found to be strongly sensitive to the cluster size but not to the inter-cluster distances. Therefore, it was concluded to be an effect that is purely localized at the interfaces.

  5. Magnetic properties of icosahedral MRu sub 1 sub 2 clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Deng Kai Ming; Xiao Chuan Yun; Wang Ke Lin

    1997-01-01

    The magnetic properties of icosahedral MRu sub 1 sub 2 clusters are studied using the discrete-variational local-spin-density-functional method, where M = V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni. The results show that all of the I sub h MRu sub 1 sub 2 clusters, just like the case for the I sub h Ru sub 1 sub 3 cluster, have double magnetic solutions. In contrast to the moment of 4 mu sub B for the I sub h Ru sub 1 sub 3 cluster, the total magnetic moments of the I sub h MRu sub 1 sub 2 clusters, ranging from 1 mu sub B to 20 mu sub B , have been changed greatly by the substitution of the central Ru atom with M. Among them, the NiRu sub 1 sub 2 cluster has a giant moment of 20 mu sub B. Furthermore, the NiRu sub 1 sub 2 cluster has nondegenerate ground state and could be expected to be remarkably stable. Therefore, for the purpose of enhancing the magnetic moment of the I sub h Ru sub 1 sub 3 cluster, Ni is a promising candidate as a dopant. Finally, we predict that all the I sub h MRu sub 1 sub 2 clusters except NiRu sub ...

  6. Cold atoms close to surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Wildermuth, Stephan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    Microscopic atom optical devices integrated on atom chips allow to precisely control and manipulate ultra-cold (T atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) close to surfaces. The relevant energy scale of a BEC is extremely small (down to ... be utilized as a sensor for variations of the potential energy of the atoms close to the surface. Here we describe how to use trapped atoms as a measurement device and analyze the performance and flexibility of the field sensor. We demonstrate microscopic magnetic imaging with simultaneous high spatial...

  7. Topics in atomic collision theory

    CERN Document Server

    Geltman, Sydney; Brueckner, Keith A

    1969-01-01

    Topics in Atomic Collision Theory originated in a course of graduate lectures given at the University of Colorado and at University College in London. It is recommended for students in physics and related fields who are interested in the application of quantum scattering theory to low-energy atomic collision phenomena. No attention is given to the electromagnetic, nuclear, or elementary particle domains. The book is organized into three parts: static field scattering, electron-atom collisions, and atom-atom collisions. These are in the order of increasing physical complexity and hence necessar

  8. Construction of the energy matrix for complex atoms. Part VIII: Hyperfine structure HPC calculations for terbium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elantkowska, Magdalena; Ruczkowski, Jarosław; Sikorski, Andrzej; Dembczyński, Jerzy

    2017-11-01

    A parametric analysis of the hyperfine structure (hfs) for the even parity configurations of atomic terbium (Tb I) is presented in this work. We introduce the complete set of 4fN-core states in our high-performance computing (HPC) calculations. For calculations of the huge hyperfine structure matrix, requiring approximately 5000 hours when run on a single CPU, we propose the methods utilizing a personal computer cluster or, alternatively a cluster of Microsoft Azure virtual machines (VM). These methods give a factor 12 performance boost, enabling the calculations to complete in an acceptable time.

  9. Securing Personal Network Clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jehangir, A.; Heemstra de Groot, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    A Personal Network is a self-organizing, secure and private network of a user’s devices notwithstanding their geographic location. It aims to utilize pervasive computing to provide users with new and improved services. In this paper we propose a model for securing Personal Network clusters. Clusters

  10. Neurostimulation in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jeppe L; Barloese, Mads; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Neurostimulation has emerged as a viable treatment for intractable chronic cluster headache. Several therapeutic strategies are being investigated including stimulation of the hypothalamus, occipital nerves and sphenopalatine ganglion. The aim of this review is to provide...... effective strategy must be preferred as first-line therapy for intractable chronic cluster headache....

  11. Cauchy cluster process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghorbani, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we introduce an instance of the well-know Neyman–Scott cluster process model with clusters having a long tail behaviour. In our model the offspring points are distributed around the parent points according to a circular Cauchy distribution. Using a modified Cramér-von Misses test...

  12. Cluster Synchronization Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, Weiguo; Cao, Ming

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents two approaches to achieving cluster synchronization in dynamical multi-agent systems. In contrast to the widely studied synchronization behavior, where all the coupled agents converge to the same value asymptotically, in the cluster synchronization problem studied in this paper,

  13. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  14. Reflections on cluster policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakman, Steven; van Marrewijk, Charles

    Economic activity tends to cluster. This results in productivity gains. For policy makers this offers an opportunity to formulate and promote policies that foster clustering of economic activity. Paradoxically, although agglomeration rents are often found in empirical research, a rationale for

  15. Calixarene-supported clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Stephanie M.; McIntosh, Ruaraidh D.; Piligkos, Stergios

    2012-01-01

    A combination of complementary cluster ligands results in the formation of a new calixarene-supported ferromagnetic [Mn(5)] cage that displays the characteristic bonding modes of each support.......A combination of complementary cluster ligands results in the formation of a new calixarene-supported ferromagnetic [Mn(5)] cage that displays the characteristic bonding modes of each support....

  16. Detecting clusters of mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhou

    Full Text Available Positive selection for protein function can lead to multiple mutations within a small stretch of DNA, i.e., to a cluster of mutations. Recently, Wagner proposed a method to detect such mutation clusters. His method, however, did not take into account that residues with high solvent accessibility are inherently more variable than residues with low solvent accessibility. Here, we propose a new algorithm to detect clustered evolution. Our algorithm controls for different substitution probabilities at buried and exposed sites in the tertiary protein structure, and uses random permutations to calculate accurate P values for inferred clusters. We apply the algorithm to genomes of bacteria, fly, and mammals, and find several clusters of mutations in functionally important regions of proteins. Surprisingly, clustered evolution is a relatively rare phenomenon. Only between 2% and 10% of the genes we analyze contain a statistically significant mutation cluster. We also find that not controlling for solvent accessibility leads to an excess of clusters in terminal and solvent-exposed regions of proteins. Our algorithm provides a novel method to identify functionally relevant divergence between groups of species. Moreover, it could also be useful to detect artifacts in automatically assembled genomes.

  17. Structure determination of small vanadium clusters by density-functional theory in comparison with experimental far-infrared spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratsch, C; Fielicke, A; Kirilyuk, A; Behler, J; von Helden, G; Meijer, G; Scheffler, M

    2005-03-22

    The far-infrared vibrational spectra for charged vanadium clusters with sizes of 3-15 atoms have been measured using infrared multiple photon dissociation of Vn+Ar-->Vn(+)+Ar. Using density-functional theory calculations, we calculated the ground state energy and vibrational spectra for a large number of stable and metastable geometries of such clusters. Comparison of the calculated vibrational spectra with those obtained in the experiment allows us to deduce the cluster size specific atomic structures. In several cases, a unique atomic structure can be identified, while in other cases our calculations suggest the presence of multiple isomers.

  18. Cavity QED with atomic mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D. E.; Jiang, L.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Kimble, H. J.

    2012-06-01

    A promising approach to merge atomic systems with scalable photonics has emerged recently, which consists of trapping cold atoms near tapered nanofibers. Here, we describe a novel technique to achieve strong, coherent coupling between a single atom and photon in such a system. Our approach makes use of collective enhancement effects, which allow a lattice of atoms to form a high-finesse cavity within the fiber. We show that a specially designated ‘impurity’ atom within the cavity can experience strongly enhanced interactions with single photons in the fiber. Under realistic conditions, a ‘strong coupling’ regime can be reached, wherein it becomes feasible to observe vacuum Rabi oscillations between the excited impurity atom and a single cavity quantum. This technique can form the basis for a scalable quantum information network using atom-nanofiber systems.

  19. Chameleon Induced Atomic Afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The chameleon is a scalar field whose mass depends on the density of its environment. Chameleons are necessarily coupled to matter particles and will excite transitions between atomic energy levels in an analogous manner to photons. When created inside an optical cavity by passing a laser beam through a constant magnetic field, chameleons are trapped between the cavity walls and form a standing wave. This effect will lead to an afterglow phenomenon even when the laser beam and the magnetic field have been turned off, and could be used to probe the interactions of the chameleon field with matter.

  20. Atomic mechanics of solids

    CERN Document Server

    MacPherson, A K

    1990-01-01

    This volume brings together some of the presently available theoretical techniques which will be useful in the design of solid-state materials. At present, it is impossible to specify the atomic composition of a material and its macroscopic physical properties. However, the future possibilities for such a science are being laid today. This is coming about due to the development of fast, cheap computers which will be able to undertake the calculations which are necessary.Since this field of science is fairly new, it is not yet quite clear which direction of analysis will eventually prov

  1. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  2. Atomic data for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.); Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  3. Studies of Atomic Free Radicals Stored in a Cryogenic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David M.; Hubbard, Dorthy (Technical Monitor); Alexander, Glen (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Impurity-Helium Solids are porous gel-like solids consisting of impurity atoms and molecules surrounded by thin layers of solid helium. They provide an ideal medium for matrix isolation of free radicals to prevent recombination and store chemical energy. In this work electron spin resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, and ultrasound techniques have all been employed to study the properties of these substances. Detailed studies via electron spin resonance of exchange tunneling chemical reactions involving hydrogen and deuterium molecular and atomic impurities in these solids have been performed and compared with theory. Concentrations of hydrogen approaching the quantum solid criterion have been produced. Structured studies involving X ray diffraction, ultrasound, and electron spin resonance have shown that the impurities in impurity helium solids are predominantly contained in impurity clusters, with each cluster being surrounded by thin layers of solid helium.

  4. Concerted hydrogen-atom abstraction in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, K L; Tommos, C; Cukier, R I; Babcock, G T

    2000-06-01

    Photosystem II evolves oxygen by using water in the unlikely role of a reductant. The absorption of sunlight by chlorophyll produces highly oxidizing equivalents that are filled with electrons stripped from water. This proton-coupled redox chemistry occurs at the oxygen-evolving complex, which contains a tetramanganese cluster, a redox-active tyrosine amino acid hydrogen-bonded to a histidine amino acid, a calcium ion and chloride. Hydrogen-atom abstraction by the tyrosyl radical from water bound to the manganese cluster is now widely held to occur in this process, at least for some of the steps in the catalytic cycle. We discuss kinetic and energetic constraints on the hydrogen-atom abstraction process.

  5. Structures, stability, magnetic moments and growth strategies of the Fe{sub n}N (n = 1–7) clusters: All-electron density functional theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhi, E-mail: lizhi81723700@163.com [School of Materials and Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan, 114051 (China); Zhao, Zhen [School of Chemistry and Life Science, Anshan Normal University, Anshan, 114007 (China)

    2017-02-01

    The geometries, electronic properties, magnetic moments and growth strategies of the Fe{sub n}N (n = 1–7) clusters are investigated using all-electron density functional theory. The results show that N doping significantly distorts the Fe{sub n} clusters. Fe{sub 4}N and Fe{sub 6}N clusters are more stable structures than other considered Fe{sub n}N clusters. Local peaks of HOMO-LUMO gap curve are found at n = 3, 7, implying that the chemical stability of the Fe{sub 3}N and Fe{sub 7}N clusters is higher. Fe{sub 2}N, Fe{sub 4}N and Fe{sub 6}N clusters have larger magnetic moments compared to other considered Fe{sub n}N (n = 1–7) clusters. It can be seen that the Fe{sub 5} clusters are easier to adsorb a Fe atom while the Fe{sub 4} clusters are easier to adsorb a N atom. The considered Fe{sub m}N clusters prefer to adsorb a Fe atom and larger Fe{sub m}N clusters are easier to grow. - Highlights: • The structural stability of the Fe{sub 4}N and Fe{sub 6}N clusters is higher. • The chemical stability of the Fe{sub 3}N and Fe{sub 7}N clusters is higher. • Fe{sub 5} clusters are easier to adsorb a Fe atom while Fe{sub 4} clusters are easier to adsorb a N atom. • Fe{sub n}N clusters prefer to adsorb a Fe atom.

  6. Negotiating Cluster Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacomin, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Palm oil was introduced to Malay(si)a as an alternative to natural rubber, inheriting its cluster organizational structure. In the late 1960s, Malaysia became the world’s largest palm oil exporter. Based on archival material from British colonial institutions and agency houses, this paper focuses...... on the governance dynamics that drove institutional change within this cluster during decolonization. The analysis presents three main findings: (i) cluster boundaries are defined by continuous tug-of-war style negotiations between public and private actors; (ii) this interaction produces institutional change...... within the cluster, in the form of cumulative ‘institutional rounds’ – the correction or disruption of existing institutions or the creation of new ones; and (iii) this process leads to a broader inclusion of local actors in the original cluster configuration. The paper challenges the prevalent argument...

  7. Mathematical classification and clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Mirkin, Boris

    1996-01-01

    I am very happy to have this opportunity to present the work of Boris Mirkin, a distinguished Russian scholar in the areas of data analysis and decision making methodologies. The monograph is devoted entirely to clustering, a discipline dispersed through many theoretical and application areas, from mathematical statistics and combina­ torial optimization to biology, sociology and organizational structures. It compiles an immense amount of research done to date, including many original Russian de­ velopments never presented to the international community before (for instance, cluster-by-cluster versions of the K-Means method in Chapter 4 or uniform par­ titioning in Chapter 5). The author's approach, approximation clustering, allows him both to systematize a great part of the discipline and to develop many in­ novative methods in the framework of optimization problems. The optimization methods considered are proved to be meaningful in the contexts of data analysis and clustering. The material presented in ...

  8. Evidence for cluster shape effects on the kinetic energy spectrum in thermionic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, F; Lépine, F; Baguenard, B; Pagliarulo, F; Concina, B; Bordas, C; Parneix, P

    2007-11-28

    Experimental kinetic energy release distributions obtained for the thermionic emission from C(n) (-) clusters, 10< or =n< or =20, exhibit significant non-Boltzmann variations. Using phase space theory, these different features are analyzed and interpreted as the consequence of contrasting shapes in the daughter clusters; linear and nonlinear isomers have clearly distinct signatures. These results provide a novel indirect structural probe for atomic clusters associated with their thermionic emission spectra.

  9. Galaxy cluster's rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolopoulou, M.; Plionis, M.

    2017-03-01

    We study the possible rotation of cluster galaxies, developing, testing, and applying a novel algorithm which identifies rotation, if such does exist, as well as its rotational centre, its axis orientation, rotational velocity amplitude, and, finally, the clockwise or counterclockwise direction of rotation on the plane of the sky. To validate our algorithms we construct realistic Monte Carlo mock rotating clusters and confirm that our method provides robust indications of rotation. We then apply our methodology on a sample of Abell clusters with z ≲ 0.1 with member galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR10 spectroscopic data base. After excluding a number of substructured clusters, which could provide erroneous indications of rotation, and taking into account the expected fraction of misidentified coherent substructure velocities for rotation, provided by our Monte Carlo simulation analysis, we find that ∼23 per cent of our clusters are rotating under a set of strict criteria. Loosening the strictness of the criteria, on the expense of introducing spurious rotation indications, we find this fraction increasing to ∼28 per cent. We correlate our rotation indicators with the cluster dynamical state, provided either by their Bautz-Morgan type or by their X-ray isophotal shape and find for those clusters showing rotation within 1.5 h^{-1}_{70} Mpc that the significance of their rotation is related to the dynamically younger phases of cluster formation but after the initial anisotropic accretion and merging has been completed. Finally, finding rotational modes in galaxy clusters could lead to the necessity of correcting the dynamical cluster mass calculations.

  10. The electron screening puzzle and nuclear clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitaleri, C., E-mail: spitaleri@lns.infn.it [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Bertulani, C.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University-Commerce, Commerce, TX 75429 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei”, Università di Padova, via Marzolo, 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo, 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2016-04-10

    Accurate measurements of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest within, or close to, the Gamow peak show evidence of an unexpected effect attributed to the presence of atomic electrons in the target. The experiments need to include an effective “screening” potential to explain the enhancement of the cross sections at the lowest measurable energies. Despite various theoretical studies conducted over the past 20 years and numerous experimental measurements, a theory has not yet been found that can explain the cause of the exceedingly high values of the screening potential needed to explain the data. In this letter we show that instead of an atomic physics solution of the “electron screening puzzle”, the reason for the large screening potential values is in fact due to clusterization effects in nuclear reactions, in particular for reaction involving light nuclei.

  11. The electron screening puzzle and nuclear clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Spitaleri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest within, or close to, the Gamow peak show evidence of an unexpected effect attributed to the presence of atomic electrons in the target. The experiments need to include an effective “screening” potential to explain the enhancement of the cross sections at the lowest measurable energies. Despite various theoretical studies conducted over the past 20 years and numerous experimental measurements, a theory has not yet been found that can explain the cause of the exceedingly high values of the screening potential needed to explain the data. In this letter we show that instead of an atomic physics solution of the “electron screening puzzle”, the reason for the large screening potential values is in fact due to clusterization effects in nuclear reactions, in particular for reaction involving light nuclei.

  12. INTERACTION OF INTERSTITIAL CLUSTERS WITH RHENIUM, OSMIUM, AND TANTALUM IN TUNGSTEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2016-09-01

    In the previous semi annual report, we explored the stability of interstitial clusters in W up to size seven. In this report, we study the binding of those clusters to Re, Os, and Ta atoms. For each cluster size, the three most stable configurations are considered to average the binding property. The average binding energy to a Re decreases from 0.79 eV for a size-1 cluster (a [111] dumbbell) to 0.65 eV for a size-7 cluster. For Os, the binding decreases from 1.61 eV for a [111] dumbbell to 1.34 eV for a size-7 cluster. Tantalum is repulsive to interstitial clusters with binding energy ranges from -0.61 eV for a [111] dumbbell to -0.5 eV for a size-7 cluster.

  13. Neuromorphic atomic switch networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius V Avizienis

    Full Text Available Efforts to emulate the formidable information processing capabilities of the brain through neuromorphic engineering have been bolstered by recent progress in the fabrication of nonlinear, nanoscale circuit elements that exhibit synapse-like operational characteristics. However, conventional fabrication techniques are unable to efficiently generate structures with the highly complex interconnectivity found in biological neuronal networks. Here we demonstrate the physical realization of a self-assembled neuromorphic device which implements basic concepts of systems neuroscience through a hardware-based platform comprised of over a billion interconnected atomic-switch inorganic synapses embedded in a complex network of silver nanowires. Observations of network activation and passive harmonic generation demonstrate a collective response to input stimulus in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Further, emergent behaviors unique to the complex network of atomic switches and akin to brain function are observed, namely spatially distributed memory, recurrent dynamics and the activation of feedforward subnetworks. These devices display the functional characteristics required for implementing unconventional, biologically and neurally inspired computational methodologies in a synthetic experimental system.

  14. Delay in atomic photoionization

    CERN Document Server

    Kheifets, A S

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the time delay between emission of photoelectrons from the outer valence $ns$ and $np$ sub-shells in noble gas atoms following absorption of an attosecond XUV pulse. By solving the time dependent Schr\\"odinger equation and carefully examining the time evolution of the photoelectron wave packet, we establish the apparent "time zero" when the photoelectron leaves the atom. Various processes such as elastic scattering of the photoelectron on the parent ion and many-electron correlation affect the quantum phase of the dipole transition matrix element, the energy dependence of which defines the emission timing. This qualitatively explains the time delay between photoemission from the $2s$ and $2p$ sub-shells of Ne as determined experimentally by attosecond streaking [{\\em Science} {\\bf 328}, 1658 (2010)]. However, with our extensive numerical modeling, we were only able to account for less than a half of the measured time delay of $21\\pm5$~as. We argue that the XUV pulse alone cannot produce such a larg...

  15. Point-Defect Mediated Bonding of Pt Clusters on (5,5) Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, J. G.; Lv, Y. A.; Li, X. N.

    2009-01-01

    The adhesion of various sizes of Pt clusters on the metallic (5,5) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with and without the point defect has been investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT). The calculations show that the binding energies of Pt-n (n = 1-6) clusters on the defect free CNTs are more......). The stronger orbital hybridization between the Pt atom and the carbon atom shows larger charge transfers on the defective CNTs than on the defect free CNTs, which allows the strong interaction between Pt clusters and CNTs. On the basis of DFT calculations, CNTs with point defect can be used as the catalyst...

  16. Interplay of electronic and geometry shell effects in properties of neutral and charged Sr clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2007-01-01

    charged strontium clusters consisting of up to 14 atoms, average bonding distances, electronic shell closures, binding energies per atom, the gap between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, and spectra of the density of electronic states (DOS). It is demonstrated....... It is shown that the excessive charge essentially affects the optimized geometry of strontium clusters. Ionization of small strontium clusters results in the alteration of the magic numbers. The strong dependence of the DOS spectra on details of ionic structure allows one to perform a reliable geometry...

  17. Structural diversity of polyoxomolybdate clusters along the three-fold axis of the molybdenum storage protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Juliane; Warkentin, Eberhard; Demmer, Ulrike; Kowalewski, Björn; Dierks, Thomas; Schneider, Klaus; Ermler, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    The molybdenum storage protein (MoSto) can store more than 100 Mo or W atoms as discrete polyoxometalate (POM) clusters. Here, we describe the three POM cluster sites along the threefold axis of the protein complex based on four X-ray structures with slightly different polyoxomolybdate compositions between 1.35 and 2 Å resolution. In contrast to the Moα-out binding site occupied by an Mo3 cluster, the Moα-in and Moβ binding sites contain rather weak and non-uniform electron density for the Mo atoms (but clearly identifiable by anomalous data), suggesting the presence of POM cluster ensembles and/or degradation products of larger aggregates. The "Moα-in cluster ensemble" was interpreted as an antiprism-like Mo6 species superimposed with an Mo7 pyramide and the "Moβ cluster ensemble" as an Mo13 cluster (present mostly in a degraded form) composed of a pyramidal Mo7 and a Mo3 building block linked by three spatially separated MoOx units. Inside the ball-shaped Mo13 cluster sits an occluded central atom, perhaps a metal ion. POM cluster formation at the Moα-in and Moβ sites appears to be driven by filtering out and binding/protecting self-assembled transient species complementary to the protein template. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nuclear clustering and the electron screening puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Spitaleri, C.

    2018-01-01

    Electron screening changes appreciably the magnitude of astrophysical nuclear reactions within stars. This effect is also observed in laboratory experiments on Earth, where atomic electrons are present in the nuclear targets. Theoretical models were developed over the past 30 years and experimental measurements have been carried out to study electron screening in thermonuclear reactions. None of the theoretical models were able to explain the high values of the experimentally determined screening potentials. We explore the possibility that the "electron screening puzzle" is due to nuclear clusterization and polarization e_ects in the fusion reactions. We will discuss the supporting arguments for this scenario.

  19. Electric dipole moments, cluster metallicity, and the magnetism of rare earth clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlan, John

    One of the fundamental properties of bulk metals is the cancellation of electric fields. The free charges inside of a metal will move until they find an arrangement where the internal electric field is zero. This implies that the electric dipole moment of a metal particle should be exactly zero, because an electric dipole moment requires a net separation of charge and thus a nonzero internal electric field. This thesis is an experimental study to see if this property continues to hold for tiny subnanometer metal particles called clusters (2--200 atom, R beam electric deflection technique. We find that the observed dipole moments vary a great deal across the periodic table. Alkali metals have zero dipole moments, while transition metals and lanthanides all have dipole moments which are highly size dependent. In most cases, the measured dipole moments are independent of temperature (T = 20--50 K), and when there is a strong temperature dependence this suggests that there is a new state of matter present. Our interpretation of these results are that those clusters which have a nonzero dipole moment are non-metallic, in the sense that their electrons must be localized and prevented from moving to screen the internal field associated with a permanent dipole moment. This interpretation gives insight to several related phenomena and applications. We briefly discuss an example cluster system RhN where the measured electric dipole moments appear to be correlated with a the N2O reactivity. Finally, we discuss a series of magnetic deflection experiments on lanthanide clusters (Pr, Ho, Tb, and Tm). The magnetic response of these clusters is very complex and highly sensitive to size and temperature. We find that PrN (which is non-magnetic in the bulk) becomes magnetic in clusters and Tm N clusters have magnetic moments lower than the atomic value as well as the bulk saturation value implying that the magnetic order in the cluster involves non-collinear or antiferromagnetic

  20. Studies in clustering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stell, George

    In recent years the properties of percolation models have been studied intensively. The purpose of our project was to develop a general theory of percolation and clustering between particles of arbitrary size and shape, with arbitrary correlations between them. The goal of such a theory includes the treatment of continuum percolation as well as a novel treatment of lattice percolation. We made substantial progress toward this goal. The quantities basic to a description of clustering, the mean cluster size, mean number of clusters, etc., were developed. Concise formulas were given for the terms in such series, and proved, at least for sufficiently low densities, that the series are absolutely convergent. These series can now be used to construct Pade approximants that will allow one to probe the percolation transition. A scaled-particle theory of percolation was developed which gives analytic approximants for the mean number of clusters in a large class of two and three dimensional percolation models. Although this quantity is essential in many applications, e.g., explaining colligative properties, and interpreting low-angle light-scattering data, no systematic studies of it have been done before this work. Recently carried out detailed computer simulations show that the mean number of clusters is given to high accuracy by several of there approximations. Extensions of this work will allow calculation of the complete cluster size distribution.

  1. Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio [Richland, WA; Calapristi, Augustin J [West Richland, WA; Crow, Vernon L [Richland, WA; Hetzler, Elizabeth G [Kennewick, WA; Turner, Alan E [Kennewick, WA

    2009-12-22

    Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a document clustering method includes providing a document set comprising a plurality of documents, providing a cluster comprising a subset of the documents of the document set, using a plurality of terms of the documents, providing a cluster label indicative of subject matter content of the documents of the cluster, wherein the cluster label comprises a plurality of word senses, and selecting one of the word senses of the cluster label.

  2. Recognizing nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J.; Smith, Daniel; Calogero, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Doping graphene by heteroatoms such as nitrogen presents an attractive route to control the position of the Fermi level in the material. We prepared N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111) surfaces via chemical vapor deposition of two different molecules. Using scanning tunneling microscopy images...... as a benchmark, we show that the position of the dopant atoms can be determined using atomic force microscopy. Specifically, the frequency shift-distance curves Delta f(z) acquired above a N atom are significantly different from the curves measured over a C atom. Similar behavior was found for N-doped graphene...

  3. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  4. Seniority-based coupled cluster theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E. [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005-1892 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005-1892 (United States); Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Stein, Tamar [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005-1892 (United States)

    2014-12-28

    Doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI) with optimized orbitals often accurately describes strong correlations while working in a Hilbert space much smaller than that needed for full configuration interaction. However, the scaling of such calculations remains combinatorial with system size. Pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) is very successful in reproducing DOCI energetically, but can do so with low polynomial scaling (N{sup 3}, disregarding the two-electron integral transformation from atomic to molecular orbitals). We show here several examples illustrating the success of pCCD in reproducing both the DOCI energy and wave function and show how this success frequently comes about. What DOCI and pCCD lack are an effective treatment of dynamic correlations, which we here add by including higher-seniority cluster amplitudes which are excluded from pCCD. This frozen pair coupled cluster approach is comparable in cost to traditional closed-shell coupled cluster methods with results that are competitive for weakly correlated systems and often superior for the description of strongly correlated systems.

  5. Understanding ligand effects in gold clusters using mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes recent research on the influence of phosphine ligands on the size, stability, and reactivity of gold clusters synthesized in solution. Sub-nanometer clusters exhibit size- and composition-dependent properties that are unique from those of larger nanoparticles. The highly tunable properties of clusters and their high surface-to-volume ratio make them promising candidates for a variety of technological applications. However, because “each-atom-counts” toward defining cluster properties it is critically important to develop robust synthesis methods to efficiently prepare clusters of predetermined size. For decades phosphines have been known to direct the size-selected synthesis of gold clusters. Despite the preparation of numerous species it is still not understood how different functional groups at phosphine centers affect the size and properties of gold clusters. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) it is possible to characterize the effect of ligand substitution on the distribution of clusters formed in solution at defined reaction conditions. In addition, ligand exchange reactions on preformed clusters may be monitored using ESI-MS. Collision induced dissociation (CID) may also be employed to obtain qualitative insight into the fragmentation of mixed ligand clusters and the relative binding energies of differently substituted phosphines. Quantitative ligand binding energies and cluster stability may be determined employing surface induced dissociation (SID) in a custom-built Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS). Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) based modeling of the SID data allows dissociation energies and entropy values to be extracted that may be compared with the results of high-level theoretical calculations. The charge reduction and reactivity of atomically precise gold clusters, including partially ligated species generated in the gas-phase by in source CID, on well

  6. Understanding ligand effects in gold clusters using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Grant E; Laskin, Julia

    2016-06-21

    This review summarizes recent research on the influence of phosphine ligands on the size, stability, and reactivity of gold clusters synthesized in solution. Sub-nanometer clusters exhibit size- and composition-dependent properties that are unique from those of larger nanoparticles. The highly tunable properties of clusters and their high surface-to-volume ratio make them promising candidates for a variety of technological applications. However, because "each-atom-counts" toward defining cluster properties it is critically important to develop robust synthesis methods to efficiently prepare clusters of predetermined size. For decades phosphines have been known to direct the size-selected synthesis of gold clusters. Despite the preparation of numerous species it is still not understood how different functional groups at phosphine centers affect the size and properties of gold clusters. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) it is possible to characterize the effect of ligand substitution on the distribution of clusters formed in solution at defined reaction conditions. In addition, ligand exchange reactions on preformed clusters may be monitored using ESI-MS. Collision induced dissociation (CID) may also be employed to obtain qualitative insight into the fragmentation of mixed ligand clusters and the relative binding energies of differently substituted phosphines. Quantitative ligand binding energies and cluster stability may be determined employing surface induced dissociation (SID) in a custom-built Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS). Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) based modeling of the SID data allows dissociation energies and entropy values to be extracted. The charge reduction and reactivity of atomically precise gold clusters, including partially ligated species generated in the gas-phase by in source CID, on well-defined surfaces may be explored using ion soft landing (SL) in a custom

  7. The concept of cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lea Louise Holst; Møller, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    villages in order to secure their future. This paper will address the concept of cluster-villages as a possible approach to strengthen the conditions of contemporary Danish villages. Cluster-villages is a concept that gather a number of villages in a network-structure where the villages both work together...... to forskellige positioner ser vi en ny mulighed for landsbyudvikling, som vi kalder Clustervillages. In order to investigate the potentials and possibilities of the cluster-village concept the paper will seek to unfold the concept strategically; looking into the benefits of such concept. Further, the paper seeks...

  8. Partially supervised speaker clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao; Chu, Stephen Mingyu; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-05-01

    Content-based multimedia indexing, retrieval, and processing as well as multimedia databases demand the structuring of the media content (image, audio, video, text, etc.), one significant goal being to associate the identity of the content to the individual segments of the signals. In this paper, we specifically address the problem of speaker clustering, the task of assigning every speech utterance in an audio stream to its speaker. We offer a complete treatment to the idea of partially supervised speaker clustering, which refers to the use of our prior knowledge of speakers in general to assist the unsupervised speaker clustering process. By means of an independent training data set, we encode the prior knowledge at the various stages of the speaker clustering pipeline via 1) learning a speaker-discriminative acoustic feature transformation, 2) learning a universal speaker prior model, and 3) learning a discriminative speaker subspace, or equivalently, a speaker-discriminative distance metric. We study the directional scattering property of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) mean supervector representation of utterances in the high-dimensional space, and advocate exploiting this property by using the cosine distance metric instead of the euclidean distance metric for speaker clustering in the GMM mean supervector space. We propose to perform discriminant analysis based on the cosine distance metric, which leads to a novel distance metric learning algorithm—linear spherical discriminant analysis (LSDA). We show that the proposed LSDA formulation can be systematically solved within the elegant graph embedding general dimensionality reduction framework. Our speaker clustering experiments on the GALE database clearly indicate that 1) our speaker clustering methods based on the GMM mean supervector representation and vector-based distance metrics outperform traditional speaker clustering methods based on the “bag of acoustic features” representation and statistical

  9. Raspberry Pi super cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, Andrew K

    2013-01-01

    This book follows a step-by-step, tutorial-based approach which will teach you how to develop your own super cluster using Raspberry Pi computers quickly and efficiently.Raspberry Pi Super Cluster is an introductory guide for those interested in experimenting with parallel computing at home. Aimed at Raspberry Pi enthusiasts, this book is a primer for getting your first cluster up and running.Basic knowledge of C or Java would be helpful but no prior knowledge of parallel computing is necessary.

  10. Spanning Tree Based Attribute Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yifeng; Jorge, Cordero Hernandez

    2009-01-01

    inconsistent edges from a maximum spanning tree by starting appropriate initial modes, therefore generating stable clusters. It discovers sound clusters through simple graph operations and achieves significant computational savings. We compare the Star Discovery algorithm against earlier attribute clustering...

  11. Tune Your Brown Clustering, Please

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derczynski, Leon; Chester, Sean; Bøgh, Kenneth Sejdenfaden

    2015-01-01

    Brown clustering, an unsupervised hierarchical clustering technique based on ngram mutual information, has proven useful in many NLP applications. However, most uses of Brown clustering employ the same default configuration; the appropriateness of this configuration has gone predominantly...

  12. First-principles study of ZnO cluster-decorated carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Guo-Liang; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Cheng, Wen-Dan

    2011-11-04

    We have investigated the structural, electronic and carbon monoxide (CO) detection properties of the ZnO cluster-decorated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by using density functional theory (DFT). The stable structures of hybrid ZnO/SWCNT materials are that the ZnO cluster plane is perpendicular to the surface of SWCNTs with the Zn atoms towards the SWCNTs (Zn atom above axial C-C bond or above the C atom). For the ZnO cluster-decorated semiconducting SWCNTs, the SWCNTs present p-type characteristics which may lead to the decrease of conductance upon illumination with ultraviolet (UV) light. The CO can be adsorbed on the hybrid ZnO/SWCNT materials due to the charge transfer between them. Compared with isolated ZnO clusters or bare SWCNTs, the ZnO/SWCNT network would have excellent CO detection ability due to their suitable adsorption energy and conductivity.

  13. Structure and dynamics in liquid bismuth and Bi(n) clusters: a density functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akola, J; Atodiresei, N; Kalikka, J; Larrucea, J; Jones, R O

    2014-11-21

    Density functional/molecular dynamics simulations with more than 500 atoms have been performed on liquid bismuth at 573, 773, 923, and 1023 K and on neutral Bi clusters with up to 14 atoms. There are similar structural patterns (coordination numbers, bond angles, and ring patterns) in the liquid and the clusters, with significant differences from the rhombohedral crystalline form. We study the details of the structure (structure factor, pair, and cavity distribution functions) and dynamical properties (vibration frequencies, diffusion constants, power spectra), and compare with experimental results where available. While the three short covalent bonds typical to pnictogens are characteristic in both liquid and clusters, the number of large voids and the total cavity volume is much larger in the liquid at 1023 K, with larger local concentration variations. The inclusion of spin-orbit coupling results in a lowering of the cohesive energies in Bin clusters of 0.3-0.5 eV/atom.

  14. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Optical nanofibres and neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Nieddu, Thomas; Chormaic, Sile Nic

    2015-01-01

    Optical nanofibres are increasingly being used in cold atom experiments due to their versatility and the clear advantages they have when developing all-fibred systems for quantum technologies. They provide researchers with a method of overcoming the Rayleigh range for achieving high intensities in a focussed beam over a relatively long distance, and can act as a noninvasive tool for probing cold atoms. In this review article, we will briefly introduce the theory of mode propagation in an ultrathin optical fibre and highlight some of the more significant theoretical and experimental progresses to date, including the early work on atom probing, manipulation and trapping, the study of atom-dielectric surface interactions, and the more recent observation of nanofibre-mediated nonlinear optics phenomena in atomic media. The functionality of optical nanofibres in relation to the realisation of atom-photon hybrid quantum systems is also becoming more evident as some of the earlier technical challenges are surpassed ...

  16. Atomic iodine laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, G.A.; Gusinow, M.A.; Hays, A.K.; Padrick, T.D.; Palmer, R.E.; Rice, J.K.; Truby, F.K.; Riley, M.E.

    1978-05-01

    The atomic iodine photodissociation laser has been under intensive study for a number of years. The physics associated with this system is now well understood and it is possible to produce a 0.1 nsec (or longer) near-diffraction-limited laser pulse which can be amplified with negligible temporal distortion and little spatial deformation. The output of either a saturated or unsaturated amplifier consists of a high-fidelity near-diffraction-limited, energetic laser pulse. The report is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 is a survey of the important areas affecting efficient laser operation and summarizes the findings of Chap. 2. Chapter 2 presents detailed discussions and evaluations pertinent to pumps, chemical regeneration, and other elements in the overall laser system. Chapter 3 briefly discusses those areas that require further work and the nature of the work required to complete the full-scale evaluation of the applicability of the iodine photodissociation laser to the inertial confinement program.

  17. Coalescence of silver clusters by immersion in diluted HF solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, R. G.; Mio, A. M.; D'Arrigo, G.; Grimaldi, M. G.; Spinella, C.; Rimini, E.

    2015-07-01

    The galvanic displacement deposition of silver on H-terminated Si (100) in the time scale of seconds is instantaneous and characterized by a cluster density of 1011-1012 cm-2. The amount of deposited Ag follows a t1/2 dependence in agreement with a Cottrell diffusion limited mechanism. At the same time, during the deposition, the cluster density reduces by a factor 5. This behavior is in contrast with the assumption of immobile clusters. We show in the present work that coalescence and aggregation occur also in the samples immersed in the diluted hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution without the presence of Ag+. Clusters agglomerate according to a process of dynamic coalescence, typical of colloids, followed by atomic redistribution at the contact regions with the generation of multiple internal twins and stacking-faults. The normalized size distributions in terms of r/rmean follow also the prediction of the Smoluchowski ripening mechanism. No variation of the cluster density occurs for samples immersed in pure H2O solution. The different behavior might be associated to the strong attraction of clusters to oxide-terminated Si surface in presence of water. The silver clusters are instead weakly bound to hydrophobic H-terminated Si in presence of HF. HF causes then the detachment of clusters and a random movement on the silicon surface with mobility of about 10-13 cm2/s. Attractive interaction (probably van der Waals) among particles promotes coarsening.

  18. Galaxy clusters and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    White, S

    1994-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest coherent objects in Universe. It has been known since 1933 that their dynamical properties require either a modification of the theory of gravity, or the presence of a dominant component of unseen material of unknown nature. Clusters still provide the best laboratories for studying the amount and distribution of this dark matter relative to the material which can be observed directly -- the galaxies themselves and the hot,X-ray-emitting gas which lies between them.Imaging and spectroscopy of clusters by satellite-borne X -ray telescopes has greatly improved our knowledge of the structure and composition of this intergalactic medium. The results permit a number of new approaches to some fundamental cosmological questions,but current indications from the data are contradictory. The observed irregularity of real clusters seems to imply recent formation epochs which would require a universe with approximately the critical density. On the other hand, the large baryon fraction observ...

  19. CSR in Industrial Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Pillay, Renginee G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The paper seeks to review the literature on CSR in industrial clusters in developing countries, identifying the main strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in this literature, pointing to future research directions and policy implications in the area of CSR and industrial cluster development....... Design/methodology/approach – A literature review is conducted of both academic and policy-oriented writings that contain the keywords “industrial clusters” and “developing countries” in combination with one or more of the following terms: corporate social responsibility, environmental management, labor...... in this field and their comments incorporated in the final version submitted to Corporate Governance. Findings – The article traces the origins of the debate on industrial clusters and CSR in developing countries back to the early 1990s when clusters began to be seen as an important vehicle for local economic...

  20. Evolution of clustered storage

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Van de Vyvre, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The session actually featured two presentations: * Evolution of clustered storage by Lance Hukill, Quantum Corporation * ALICE DAQ - Usage of a Cluster-File System: Quantum StorNext by Pierre Vande Vyvre, CERN-PH the second one prepared at short notice by Pierre (thanks!) to present how the Quantum technologies are being used in the ALICE experiment. The abstract to Mr Hukill's follows. Clustered Storage is a technology that is driven by business and mission applications. The evolution of Clustered Storage solutions starts first at the alignment between End-users needs and Industry trends: * Push-and-Pull between managing for today versus planning for tomorrow * Breaking down the real business problems to the core applications * Commoditization of clients, servers, and target devices * Interchangeability, Interoperability, Remote Access, Centralized control * Oh, and yes, there is a budget and the "real world" to deal with This presentation will talk through these needs and trends, and then ask the question, ...

  1. How Clusters Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology innovation clusters are geographic concentrations of interconnected companies, universities, and other organizations with a focus on environmental technology. They play a key role in addressing the nation’s pressing environmental problems.

  2. Air void clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Air void clustering around coarse aggregate in concrete has been identified as a potential source of : low strengths in concrete mixes by several Departments of Transportation around the country. Research was : carried out to (1) develop a quantitati...

  3. Clustering of Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that newly emerging flux tends to appear on the Solar surface at sites where there is flux already. This results in clustering of solar activity. Standard dynamo theories do not predict this effect.

  4. Quantum information with Rydberg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, Mark; Walker, T.G.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Rydberg atoms with principal quantum number n»1 have exaggerated atomic properties including dipole-dipole interactions that scale as n4 and radiative lifetimes that scale as n3. It was proposed a decade ago to take advantage of these properties to implement quantum gates between neutral atom...... of multiqubit registers, implementation of robust light-atom quantum interfaces, and the potential for simulating quantum many-body physics. The advances of the last decade are reviewed, covering both theoretical and experimental aspects of Rydberg-mediated quantum information processing....

  5. Low-energy collisions of helium clusters with size-selected cobalt cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaka, Hideho; Ichihashi, Masahiko

    2017-04-01

    Collisions of helium clusters with size-selected cobalt cluster ions, Com+ (m ≤ 5), were studied experimentally by using a merging beam technique. The product ions, Com+Hen (cluster complexes), were mass-analyzed, and this result indicates that more than 20 helium atoms can be attached onto Com+ at the relative velocities of 103 m/s. The measured size distributions of the cluster complexes indicate that there are relatively stable complexes: Co2+Hen (n = 2, 4, 6, and 12), Co3+Hen (n = 3, 6), Co4+He4, and Co5+Hen (n = 3, 6, 8, and 10). These stabilities are explained in terms of their geometric structures. The yields of the cluster complexes were also measured as a function of the relative velocity (1 × 102-4 × 103 m/s), and this result demonstrates that the main interaction in the collision process changes with the increase of the collision energy from the electrostatic interaction, which includes the induced deformation of HeN, to the hard-sphere interaction. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2017-80015-0

  6. Using ICD for structural analysis of clusters: a case study on NeAr clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasshauer, E.; Förstel, M.; Pallmann, S.; Pernpointner, M.; Hergenhahn, U.

    2014-10-01

    We present a method to utilize interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) to retrieve information about the mean geometric structures of heteronuclear clusters. It is based on observation and modelling of competing ICD channels, which involve the same initial vacancy, but energetically different final states with vacancies in different components of the cluster. Using binary rare gas clusters of Ne and Ar as an example, we measure the relative intensity of ICD into (Ne+)2 and Ne+Ar+ final states with spectroscopically well separated ICD peaks. We compare in detail the experimental ratios of the Ne-Ne and Ne-Ar ICD contributions and their positions and widths to values calculated for a diverse set of possible structures. We conclude that NeAr clusters exhibit a core-shell structure with an argon core surrounded by complete neon shells and, possibly, further an incomplete shell of neon atoms for the experimental conditions investigated. Our analysis allows one to differentiate between clusters of similar size and stochiometric Ar content, but different internal structure. We find evidence for ICD of Ne 2s-1, producing Ar+ vacancies in the second coordination shell of the initial site.

  7. HPAM: Hirshfeld partitioned atomic multipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elking, Dennis M.; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2012-02-01

    An implementation of the Hirshfeld (HD) and Hirshfeld-Iterated (HD-I) atomic charge density partitioning schemes is described. Atomic charges and atomic multipoles are calculated from the HD and HD-I atomic charge densities for arbitrary atomic multipole rank l on molecules of arbitrary shape and size. The HD and HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are tested by comparing molecular multipole moments and the electrostatic potential (ESP) surrounding a molecule with their reference ab initio values. In general, the HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are found to better reproduce ab initio electrostatic properties over HD atomic charges/multipoles. A systematic increase in precision for reproducing ab initio electrostatic properties is demonstrated by increasing the atomic multipole rank from l=0 (atomic charges) to l=4 (atomic hexadecapoles). Both HD and HD-I atomic multipoles up to rank l are shown to exactly reproduce ab initio molecular multipole moments of rank L for L⩽l. In addition, molecular dipole moments calculated by HD, HD-I, and ChelpG atomic charges only ( l=0) are compared with reference ab initio values. Significant errors in reproducing ab initio molecular dipole moments are found if only HD or HD-I atomic charges used. Program summaryProgram title: HPAM Catalogue identifier: AEKP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 500 809 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 424 494 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: Any Operating system: Linux RAM: Typically, a few hundred megabytes Classification: 16.13 External routines: The program requires 'formatted checkpoint' files obtained from the Gaussian 03 or Gaussian 09 quantum chemistry program. Nature of problem: An ab initio

  8. Globular clusters with Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancino, E.; Bellazzini, M.; Giuffrida, G.; Marinoni, S.

    2017-05-01

    The treatment of crowded fields in Gaia data will only be a reality in a few years from now. In particular, for globular clusters, only the end-of-mission data (public in 2022-2023) will have the necessary full crowding treatment and will reach sufficient quality for the faintest stars. As a consequence, the work on the deblending and decontamination pipelines is still ongoing. We describe the present status of the pipelines for different Gaia instruments, and we model the end-of-mission crowding errors on the basis of available information. We then apply the nominal post-launch Gaia performances, appropriately worsened by the estimated crowding errors, to a set of 18 simulated globular clusters with different concentration, distance and field contamination. We conclude that there will be 103-104 stars with astrometric performances virtually untouched by crowding (contaminated by <1 mmag) in the majority of clusters. The most limiting factor will be field crowding, not cluster crowding: the most contaminated clusters will only contain 10-100 clean stars. We also conclude that (i) the systemic proper motions and parallaxes will be determined to 1 per cent or better up to ≃15 kpc, and the nearby clusters will have radial velocities to a few km s-1; (ii) internal kinematics will be of unprecedented quality, cluster masses will be determined to ≃10 per cent up to 15 kpc and beyond, and it will be possible to identify differences of a few km s-1 or less in the kinematics (if any) of cluster sub-populations up to 10 kpc and beyond; (iii) the brightest stars (V ≃ 17 mag) will have space-quality, wide-field photometry (mmag errors), and all Gaia photometry will have 1-3 per cent errors on the absolute photometric calibration.

  9. Conformation and catalytic activity of nickel-carbon cluster for ethanol dissociation in carbon nanotube synthesis: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Satoru; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Shibuta, Yasushi

    2017-07-01

    Conformation and catalytic activity of nickel-carbon binary clusters are investigated to shed light on important questions on the carbon nanotube growth. Carbon atoms tend to stay at the surface of the binary cluster and form carbon chains with increasing carbon concentration. The binary clusters have lower catalytic activity for ethanol dehydrogenation compared to pure nickel clusters due to the strong electron negativity of carbon atoms. Moreover, the Csbnd C bond dissociation in typical fragment molecules, which is a key reaction of carbon nanotube growth via alcohol CVD, is inhibited on the binary cluster due to the increase of the backward reaction.

  10. Linear Atom Guides: Guiding Rydberg Atoms and Progress Toward an Atom Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traxler, Mallory A.

    In this thesis, I explore a variety of experiments within linear, two-wire, magnetic atom guides. Experiments include guiding of Rydberg atoms; transferring between states while keeping the atoms contained within the guide; and designing, constructing, and testing a new experimental apparatus. The ultimate goal of the atom guiding experiments is to develop a continuous atom laser. The guiding of 87Rb 59D5/2 Rydberg atoms is demonstrated. The evolution of the atoms is driven by the combined effects of dipole forces acting on the center-of-mass degree of freedom as well as internal-state transitions. Time delayed microwave and state-selective field ionization, along with ion detection, are used to investigate the evolution of the internal-state distribution as well as the Rydberg atom motion while traversing the guide. The observed decay time of the guided-atom signal is about five times that of the initial state. A population transfer between Rydberg states contributes to this lengthened lifetime, and also broadens the observed field ionization spectrum. The population transfer is attributed to thermal transitions and, to a lesser extent, initial state-mixing due to Rydberg-Rydberg collisions. Characteristic signatures in ion time-of-flight signals and spatially resolved images of ion distributions, which result from the coupled internal-state and center-of-mass dynamics, are discussed. Some groups have used a scheme to make BECs where atoms are optically pumped from one reservoir trap to a final state trap, irreversibly transferring those atoms from one trap to the other. In this context, transfer from one guided ground state to another is studied. In our setup, before the atoms enter the guide, they are pumped into the | F = 1, mF = --1> state. Using two repumpers, one tuned to the F = 1 → F' = 0 transition (R10) and the other tuned to the F = 1 → F' = 2 transition (R12), the atoms are pumped between these guided states. Magnetic reflections within the guide

  11. Introduction to light forces, atom cooling, and atom trapping

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, Craig

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces and reviews light forces, atom cooling and atom trapping. The emphasis is on the physics of the basic processes. In discussing conservative forces the semi-classical dressed states are used rather than the usual quantized field dressed states.

  12. Atomic Force Microscopy and Real Atomic Resolution. Simple Computer Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsos, V.; Manias, E.; Brinke, G. ten; Hadziioannou, G.

    1994-01-01

    Using a simple computer simulation for AFM imaging in the contact mode, pictures with true and false atomic resolution are demonstrated. The surface probed consists of two f.c.c. (111) planes and an atomic vacancy is introduced in the upper layer. Changing the size of the effective tip and its

  13. Intermolecular atom-atom bonds in crystals - a chemical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Tejender S; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-03-01

    Short atom-atom distances between molecules are almost always indicative of specific intermolecular bonding. These distances may be used to assess the significance of all hydrogen bonds, including the C-H⋯O and even weaker C-H⋯F varieties.

  14. Structural and electronic properties of Sn substituted Cun (n=10, 13) clusters: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Koushik; Majumder, Chiranjib

    2017-05-01

    Here we present the structural and electronic properties of free and tin substituted copper Cun-mSnm (n=10, 13; m=0, 1, 2) clusters. The ground state properties have been calculated using plane wave based pseudopotential approach under the spin-polarized density functional theory. The results show that Cu13 cluster favors a stacked layer structure over the spherically symmetric icosahedron structure. The substitution of Cu atoms by Sn changes the relative stability pattern of the Cu13 isomers. Moreover, Sn atoms favor to substitute the surface Cu atoms than Cu atom at the center. Thus it is predicted that for bimetallic Cu-Sn nanoclusters, segregation of Sn atoms to the outer surface will lead to significant change in the chemical reactivity.

  15. Direct Observation of Luminescent Silver Clusters Confined in Faujasite Zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altantzis, Thomas; Coutino-Gonzalez, Eduardo; Baekelant, Wouter; Martinez, Gerardo T; Abakumov, Artem M; Tendeloo, Gustaaf Van; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Bals, Sara; Hofkens, Johan

    2016-08-23

    One of the ultimate goals in the study of metal clusters is the correlation between the atomic-scale organization and their physicochemical properties. However, direct observation of the atomic organization of such minuscule metal clusters is heavily hindered by radiation damage imposed by the different characterization techniques. We present direct evidence of the structural arrangement, at an atomic level, of luminescent silver species stabilized in faujasite (FAU) zeolites using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Two different silver clusters were identified in Ag-FAU zeolites, a trinuclear silver species associated with green emission and a tetranuclear silver species related to yellow emission. By combining direct imaging with complementary information obtained from X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld analysis, we were able to elucidate the main differences at an atomic scale between luminescent (heat-treated) and nonluminescent (cation-exchanged) Ag-FAU zeolites. It is expected that such insights will trigger the directed synthesis of functional metal nanocluster-zeolite composites with tailored luminescent properties.

  16. Metal-graphene interaction studied via atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Ramasse, Quentin; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2011-03-09

    Distributions and atomic sites of transition metals and gold on suspended graphene were investigated via high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, especially using atomic resolution high angle dark field imaging. All metals, albeit as singular atoms or atom aggregates, reside in the omni-present hydrocarbon surface contamination; they do not form continuous films, but clusters or nanocrystals. No interaction was found between Au atoms and clean single-layer graphene surfaces, i.e., no Au atoms are retained on such surfaces. Au and also Fe atoms do, however, bond to clean few-layer graphene surfaces, where they assume T and B sites, respectively. Cr atoms were found to interact more strongly with clean monolayer graphene, they are possibly incorporated at graphene lattice imperfections and have been observed to catalyze dissociation of C-C bonds. This behavior might explain the observed high frequency of Cr-cluster nucleation, and the usefulness as wetting layer, for depositing electrical contacts on graphene.

  17. Structures and energetics of small lead cluster ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelting, Rebecca; Otterstätter, Robin; Weis, Patrick; Drebov, Nedko; Ahlrichs, Reinhart; Kappes, Manfred M

    2011-01-14

    By a combination of gas phase ion mobility measurements and relativistic density functional theory calculations with inclusion of spin-orbit coupling, we assign structures of lead cluster cations and anions in the range between 4 and 15 atoms. We find a planar rhombus for the tetramer, a trigonal bipyramid for the pentamer, and a pentagonal bipyramid for the heptamer, independent of charge state. For the hexamer, the cation and anion structures differ: we find an octahedron for the anion while the cation consists of fused tetrahedra. For the octamer, we find in both cases structures based on the pentagonal bipyramid motif plus adatom. For the larger clusters investigated we always find different structures for cations and anions. For example, Pb(12)(-) is confirmed to be a hollow icosahedron while Pb(12)(+) is a truncated filled icosahedron. Pb(13)(+) is a filled icosahedron but Pb(13)(-) is a hollow icosahedron with the additional atom capping a face. In order to get experimental information on the relative stabilities, we investigated the collision induced dissociation mass spectra for the different cluster sizes and charge states, and observe a strong correlation with the calculated fragmentation energies. Up to n = 13 the main fragmentation channel is atom loss; for the larger cluster sizes we observe fission into two large fragments. This channel is dominant for larger anions, less pronounced but clearly present for the cations.

  18. Stability of V2O5 Supported on Titania in the Presence of Water, Bulk Oxygen Vacancies, and Adsorbed Oxygen Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Henrik Høgh; Neilson, Hunter L.; Buratto, Steven K.

    2017-01-01

    ). In the case of oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes and methanol, the reaction produces water, oxygen vacancies, and hydrogen atoms bound to the surface. For this article we use density functional theory to examine how the presence of these species on the surface affects a V2O5 cluster, which we assume......A catalyst consisting of vanadium oxide submonolayers supported on rutile titanium dioxide is used for a variety of reactions. One important question is the difference between the activity of monomeric clusters (having one vanadium atom) and polymeric clusters (having more than one vanadium atom...

  19. Atom-surface studies with Rb Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yuanxi; Sheng, Jiteng; Sedlacek, Jonathon; Shaffer, James

    2015-05-01

    We report on experimental and theoretical progress studying atom-surface interactions using rubidium Rydberg atoms. Rydberg atoms can be strongly coupled to surface phonon polariton (SPhP) modes of a dielectric material. The coherent interaction between Rydberg atoms and SPhPs has potential applications for quantum hybrid devices. Calculations of TM-mode SPhPs on engineered surfaces of periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) and lithium tantalate (PPLT) for different periodic domains and surface orientations, as well as natural materials such as quartz, are presented. Our SPhP calculations account for the semi-infinite anisotropic nature of the materials. In addition to theoretical calculations, we show experimental results of measurements of adsorbate fields and coupling of Rydberg atoms to SPhPs on quartz.

  20. Coherent Atom Optics with fast metastable rare gas atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grucker, J.; Baudon, J.; Karam, J.-C.; Perales, F.; Bocvarski, V.; Vassilev, G.; Ducloy, M.

    2006-12-01

    Coherent atom optics experiments making use of an ultra-narrow beam of fast metastable atoms generated by metastability exchange are reported. The transverse coherence of the beam (coherence radius of 1.7 μm for He*, 1.2 μm for Ne*, 0.87 μm for Ar*) is demonstrated via the atomic diffraction by a non-magnetic 2μm-period reflection grating. The combination of the non-scalar van der Waals (vdW) interaction with the Zeeman interaction generated by a static magnetic field gives rise to "vdW-Zeeman" transitions among Zeeman sub-levels. Exo-energetic transitions of this type are observed with Ne*(3P2) atoms traversing a copper micro-slit grating. They can be used as a tunable beam splitter in an inelastic Fresnel bi-prism atom interferometer.